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Sample records for temperature gamma-ray detectors

  1. CDZNTE ROOM-TEMPERATURE SEMICONDUCTOR GAMMA-RAY DETECTOR FOR NATIONAL-SECURITY APPLICATIONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMARDA,G.S.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CUI, Y.; HOSSAIN, A.; KOHMAN, K.T.; JAMES, R.B.

    2007-05-04

    One important mission of the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration is to develop reliable gamma-ray detectors to meet the widespread needs of users for effective techniques to detect and identify special nuclear- and radioactive-materials. Accordingly, the Nonproliferation and National Security Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory was tasked to evaluate existing technology and to develop improved room-temperature detectors based on semiconductors, such as CdZnTe (CZT). Our research covers two important areas: Improving the quality of CZT material, and exploring new CZT-based gamma-ray detectors. In this paper, we report on our recent findings from the material characterization and tests of actual CZT devices fabricated in our laboratory and from materials/detectors supplied by different commercial vendors. In particular, we emphasize the critical role of secondary phases in the current CZT material and issues in fabricating the CZT detectors, both of which affect their performance.

  2. Directional detector of gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Samson A.; Levert, Francis E.

    1979-01-01

    A directional detector of gamma rays comprises a strip of an electrical cuctor of high atomic number backed with a strip of a second electrical conductor of low atomic number. These elements are enclosed within an electrical conductor that establishes an electrical ground, maintains a vacuum enclosure and screens out low-energy gamma rays. The detector exhibits a directional sensitivity marked by an increased output in the favored direction by a factor of ten over the output in the unfavored direction.

  3. Gamma ray detector modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capote, M. Albert (Inventor); Lenos, Howard A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A radiation detector assembly has a semiconductor detector array substrate of CdZnTe or CdTe, having a plurality of detector cell pads on a first surface thereof, the pads having a contact metallization and a solder barrier metallization. An interposer card has planar dimensions no larger than planar dimensions of the semiconductor detector array substrate, a plurality of interconnect pads on a first surface thereof, at least one readout semiconductor chip and at least one connector on a second surface thereof, each having planar dimensions no larger than the planar dimensions of the interposer card. Solder columns extend from contacts on the interposer first surface to the plurality of pads on the semiconductor detector array substrate first surface, the solder columns having at least one solder having a melting point or liquidus less than 120 degrees C. An encapsulant is disposed between the interposer circuit card first surface and the semiconductor detector array substrate first surface, encapsulating the solder columns, the encapsulant curing at a temperature no greater than 120 degrees C.

  4. Mercuric iodide room-temperature array detectors for gamma-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B. [Xsirius, Inc, Camarillo, CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Significant progress has been made recently in the development of mercuric iodide detector arrays for gamma-ray imaging, making real the possibility of constructing high-performance small, light-weight, portable gamma-ray imaging systems. New techniques have been applied in detector fabrication and then low noise electronics which have produced pixel arrays with high-energy resolution, high spatial resolution, high gamma stopping efficiency. Measurements of the energy resolution capability have been made on a 19-element protypical array. Pixel energy resolutions of 2.98% fwhm and 3.88% fwhm were obtained at 59 keV (241-Am) and 140-keV (99m-Tc), respectively. The pixel spectra for a 14-element section of the data is shown together with the composition of the overlapped individual pixel spectra. These techniques are now being applied to fabricate much larger arrays with thousands of pixels. Extension of these principles to imaging scenarios involving gamma-ray energies up to several hundred keV is also possible. This would enable imaging of the 208 keV and 375-414 keV 239-Pu and 240-Pu structures, as well as the 186 keV line of 235-U.

  5. New room temperature high resolution solid-state detector (CdZnTe) for hard x rays and gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Amyelizabeth C.; Desai, Upendra D.

    1993-01-01

    The new CdZnTe high 'Z' material represents a significant improvement in detectors for high energy photons. With the thicknesses available, photons up to 100 keV can be efficiently detected. This material has a wide band gap of 1.5 - 2.2 eV which allows it to operate at room temperature while providing high spectral resolution. Results of resolution evaluations are presented. This detector can be used for high resolution spectral measurements of photons in x-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, offering a significant reduction in the weight, power, and volume of the detector system compared to more conventional detector types such as scintillation counters. In addition, the detector will have the simplicity and reliability of solid-state construction. The CdZnTe detector, as a new development, has not yet been evaluated in space. The Get Away Special program can provide this opportunity.

  6. Programming Arduino to Control Bias Voltages to Temperature-Depedndent Gamma-ray Detectors aboard TRYAD Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevons, C. E.; Jenke, P.; Briggs, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are sub-millisecond gamma-ray flashes that are correlated with lightning have been observed with numerous satellites since their discovery in the early 1990s. Although substantial research has been conducted on TGFs, puzzling questions regarding their origin are still left unanswered. Consequently, the Terrestrial RaYs Analysis and Detection (TRYAD) mission is designed to solve many issues about TGFs by measuring the beam profile and orientation of TGFs in low Earth orbit. This project consists of sending two CubeSats into low-Earth orbit where they will independently sample TGF beams. Both of the TRYAD CubeSats will contain a gamma-ray detector composed of lead doped plastic scintillator coupled to silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays. The gain readings of the SiPMs vary with temperature and the bias voltage must be corrected to compensate. Using an Arduino micro-controller, circuitry and software was developed to control the gain in response to the resistance of a thermistor. I will present the difficulties involved with this project along with our solutions.

  7. Development and performance of a gamma-ray imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, J. L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, J. M.; La Torre, M.; Álvarez, L.; Karelin, D.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Ullán, M.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2012-09-01

    In the last few years we have been working on feasibility studies of future instruments in the gamma-ray range, from several keV up to a few MeV. The innovative concept of focusing gamma-ray telescopes in this energy range, should allow reaching unprecedented sensitivities and angular resolution, thanks to the decoupling of collecting area and detector volume. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), Pulsars, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). In order to achieve the needed performance, a gamma-ray imaging detector with mm spatial resolution and large enough efficiency is required. In order to fulfill the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution, an initial prototype of a gamma-ray imaging detector based on CdTe pixel detectors is being developed. It consists of a stack of several layers of CdTe detectors with increasing thickness, in order to enhance the gamma-ray absorption in the Compton regime. A CdTe module detector lies in a 11 x 11 pixel detector with a pixel pitch of 1mm attached to the readout chip. Each pixel is bump bonded to a fan-out board made of alumina (Al2O3) substrate and routed to the corresponding input channel of the readout ASIC to measure pixel position and pulse height for each incident gamma-ray photon. We will report the main features of the gamma-ray imaging detector performance such as the energy resolution for a set of radiation sources at different operating temperatures.

  8. Development of Gamma-Ray Compton Imager Using Room-Temperature 3-D Position Sensitive Semiconductor Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong He; Whe, D

    2003-01-01

    During the three years of this project, two 3-dimensional position sensitive CdZnTe spectrometers were upgraded in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. A prototype Compton-scattering gamma-ray imager was assembled using the two upgraded CdZnTe detectors. The performance of both gamma-ray spectrometers were individually tested. The angular resolution and detection sensitivity of the imaging system were measured using both a point and a line-shaped 137 Cs radiation source. The measurement results are consistent with that obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations performed during the early phase of the project.

  9. CdTe and CdZnTe crystals for room temperature gamma-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Franc, J; Belas, E; Grill, R; Hlidek, P; Moravec, P; Bok, J B

    1999-01-01

    CdTe(Cl) detectors from CdTe single crystals, grown by the Bridgman method from Te-rich melt, were fabricated. The quality of the detectors was tested with sup 5 sup 7 Co and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am sources. In the sup 5 sup 7 Co spectrum low noise is demonstrated by the presence of a 14 keV peak and good resolution approx 7 keV (FWHM) evident from the separation of 122 and 136 keV peaks. A review is given of the state-of-the-art properties of (CdZn)Te single crystals prepared for substrates in the Institute of Physics of Charles University. The quality of samples is tested by measurements of the diffusion length of minority carriers, from which the mobility-lifetime product is evaluated. (author)

  10. X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Radiation Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed is a semiconductor radiation detector for detecting X-ray and / or gamma-ray radiation. The detector comprises a converter element for converting incident X-ray and gamma-ray photons into electron-hole pairs, at least one cathode, a plurality of detector electrodes arranged with a pitch...

  11. Gamma-ray imaging with position-sensitive HPGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, K. E-mail: kvetter@lbl.gov; Burks, M.; Mihailescu, L

    2004-06-01

    Due to advances in manufacturing large and highly segmented HPGe detectors along with the availability of fast and high-precision digital electronics, it is now possible to build efficient and high-resolution Compton cameras. Two-dimensionally segmented semi-conductor detectors along with pulse-shape analysis allow to obtain three-dimensional positions and energies of individual gamma-ray interactions. By employing gamma-ray tracking procedures it is possible to determine the scattering sequence in the detector and ultimately to deduce the incident direction of gamma rays without the use of a attenuating collimator. These advanced gamma-ray tracking-based Compton cameras are able not only to image gamma-ray sources with higher sensitivity than collimator-based systems but can increase the sensitivity in finding gamma-ray sources over non-imaging detectors, particularly in complex radiation fields. We have implemented a Compton camera built of a single double-sided strip HPGe detector with a strip pitch size of 2 mm. A three-dimensional position resolution of 0.5 mm at 122 keV by using simple pulse-shape analysis is achieved. We have implemented image reconstruction procedures for search scenarios, which are of interest for national security applications. In addition, we have developed reconstruction procedures to optimize image quality which potentially finds applications in other areas as well.

  12. Handheld dual thermal neutron detector and gamma-ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Ashley C.; Burger, Arnold; Bhattacharya, Pijush; Tupitsyn, Yevgeniy

    2017-05-02

    A combined thermal neutron detector and gamma-ray spectrometer system, including: a first detection medium including a lithium chalcopyrite crystal operable for detecting neutrons; a gamma ray shielding material disposed adjacent to the first detection medium; a second detection medium including one of a doped metal halide, an elpasolite, and a high Z semiconductor scintillator crystal operable for detecting gamma rays; a neutron shielding material disposed adjacent to the second detection medium; and a photodetector coupled to the second detection medium also operable for detecting the gamma rays; wherein the first detection medium and the second detection medium do not overlap in an orthogonal plane to a radiation flux. Optionally, the first detection medium includes a .sup.6LiInSe.sub.2 crystal. Optionally, the second detection medium includes a SrI.sub.2(Eu) scintillation crystal.

  13. Gamma ray polarimetry using a position sensitive germanium detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kroeger, R A; Kurfess, J D; Phlips, B F

    1999-01-01

    Imaging gamma-ray detectors make sensitive polarimeters in the Compton energy regime by measuring the scatter direction of gamma rays. The principle is to capitalize on the angular dependence of the Compton scattering cross section to polarized gamma rays and measure the distribution of scatter directions within the detector. This technique is effective in a double-sided germanium detector between roughly 50 keV and 1 MeV. This paper reviews device characteristics important to the optimization of a Compton polarimeter, and summarizes measurements we have made using a device with a 5x5 cm active area, 1 cm thickness, and strip-electrodes on a 2 mm pitch.

  14. Air shower detectors in gamma-ray astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinnis, Gus [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Extensive air shower (EAS) arrays directly detect the particles in an EAS that reach the observation altitude. This detection technique effectively makes air shower arrays synoptic telescopes -- they are capable of simultaneously and continuously viewing the entire overhead sky. Typical air shower detectors have an effective field-of-view of 2 sr and operate nearly 100% of the time. These two characteristics make them ideal instruments for studying the highest energy gamma rays, extended sources and transient phenomena. Until recently air shower arrays have had insufficient sensitivity to detect gamma-ray sources. Over the past decade, the situation has changed markedly. Milagro, in the US, and the Tibet AS{gamma} array in Tibet, have detected very-high-energy gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula and the active galaxy Markarian 421 (both previously known sources). Milagro has discovered TeV diffuse emission from the Milky Way, three unidentified sources of TeV gamma rays, and several candidate sources of TeV gamma rays. Given these successes and the suite of existing and planned instruments in the GeV and TeV regime (AGILE, GLAST, HESS, VERITAS, CTA, AGIS and IceCube) there are strong reasons for pursuing a next generation of EAS detectors. In conjunction with these other instruments the next generation of EAS instruments could answer long-standing problems in astrophysics.

  15. Detector calibration for in-situ gamma ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Balea, G

    2002-01-01

    The power in the technique of in-situ spectrometry lies in the fact that a detector placed on ground measures gamma radiation from sources situated over an area of several hundred square meters. The 'field of view' for the detector would be larger for high energy radiation sources and for sources closer to the soil surface. In contrast, a soil sample would represent an area of a few tens of hundreds of square centimeters. In practice, an effective characterization of a site would involve in-situ gamma ray spectrometry in conjunction with soil sampling. As part of an overall program, in-situ gamma ray spectrometry provides a means to assess the degree of contamination in areas during the course of operations in the field, thus guiding the investigator on where to collect samples. It can also substantially reduce the number of samples need to be collected and subsequently analyzed. (author)

  16. Arrays of Encapsulated CdZnTe Gamma-Ray Detectors for Planetary Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, C. E.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Prettyman, T. H.; Reedy, R. C.; Smith, M. K.; Sweet, M. R.

    2000-01-01

    Recent results from encapsulated multi-element CdZnTe room-temperature semiconductor gamma-ray detectors are presented. Our multi-element-array design is a good low-mass and low-power candidate for elemental mapping on future planetary missions.

  17. Conference on physics from large {gamma}-ray detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The conference on {open_quotes}Physics from Large {gamma}-ray Detector Arrays{close_quotes} is a continuation of the series of conferences that have been organized every two years by the North American Heavy-ion Laboratories. The aim of the conference this year was to encourage discussion of the physics that can be studied with such large arrays. This volume is the collected proceedings from this conference. It discusses properties of nuclear states which can be created in heavy-ion reactions, and which can be observed via such detector systems.

  18. Employing Thin HPGe Detectors for Gamma-Ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Ziock, K; Burks, M; Hull, E; Madden, N; Pehl, R

    2002-05-02

    We have evaluated a collimator-less gamma-ray imaging system, which is based on thin layers of double-sided strip HPGe detectors. The positions of individual gamma-ray interactions will be deduced by the strip addresses and the Ge layers which fired. Therefore, high bandwidth pulse processing is not required as in thick Ge detectors. While the drawback of such a device is the increased number of electronics channels to be read out and processed, there are several advantages, which are particularly important for remote applications: the operational voltage can be greatly reduced to fully deplete the detector and no high bandwidth signal processing electronics is required to determine positions. Only a charge sensitive preamplifier, a slow pulse shaping amplifier, and a fast discriminator are required on a per channel basis in order to determine photon energy and interaction position in three dimensions. Therefore, the power consumption and circuit board real estate can be minimized. More importantly, since the high bandwidth signal shapes are not used to determine the depth position, lower energy signals can be processed. The processing of these lower energy signals increases the efficiency for the recovery of small angle scattering. Currently, we are studying systems consisting of up to ten 2mm thick Ge layers with 2mm pitch size. The required electronics of the few hundred channels can be integrated to reduce space and power. We envision applications in nuclear non-proliferation and gamma-ray astronomy where ease of operation and low power consumption, and reliability, are crucial.

  19. Employing Thin HPGe Detectors for Gamma-Ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Ziock, K; Burks, M; Hull, E; Madden, N; Pehl, R

    2002-04-15

    We have evaluated a collimator-less gamma-ray imaging system, which is based on thin layers of double-sided strip HPGe detectors. The position of individual gamma-ray interactions will be deduced by the strip addresses and the Ge layers which fired. Therefore, high bandwidth pulse processing is not required as in thick Ge detectors. While the drawback of such a device is the increased number of electronics channels to be read out and processed, there are several advantages, which are particularly important for remote applications: the operational voltage can be greatly reduced to fully deplete the detector and no high bandwidth signal processing electronics is required to determine positions. Only a charge sensitive preamplifier, a slow pulse shaping amplifier, and a fast discriminator are required on a per channel basis in order to determine photon energy and interaction position in three dimensions. Therefore, the power consumption and circuit board real estate can be minimized. More importantly, since the high bandwidth signal shapes are not used to determine the depth position, lower energy signals can be processed. The processing of these lower energy signals increases the efficiency for the recovery of small angle scattering. Currently, we are studying systems consisting of up to ten 2mm thick Ge layers with 2mm pitch size. The required electronics of the few hundred channels can be integrated to reduce space and power. We envision applications in nuclear non-proliferation and gamma-ray astronomy where ease of operation and low power consumption, and reliability, are crucial.

  20. Accelerated Aging Test for Plastic Scintillator Gamma Ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-05-12

    Polyvinyl toluene (PVT) and polystyrene (PS), collectively referred to as “plastic scintillator,” are synthetic polymer materials used to detect gamma radiation, and are commonly used in instrumentation. Recent studies have revealed that plastic scintillator undergoes an environmentally related material degradation that adversely affects performance under certain conditions and histories. A significant decrease in gamma ray sensitivity has been seen in some detectors in systems as they age. The degradation of sensitivity of plastic scintillator over time is due to a variety of factors, and the term “aging” is used to encompass all factors. Some plastic scintillator samples show no aging effects (no significant change in sensitivity over more than 10 years), while others show severe aging (significant change in sensitivity in less than 5 years). Aging effects arise from weather (variations in heat and humidity), chemical exposure, mechanical stress, light exposure, and loss of volatile components. The damage produced by these various causes can be cumulative, causing observable damage to increase over time. Damage may be reversible up to some point, but becomes permanent under some conditions. It has been demonstrated that exposure of plastic scintillator in an environmental chamber to 30 days of high temperature and humidity (90% relative humidity and 55°C) followed by a single cycle to cold temperature (-30°C) will produce severe fogging in all PVT samples. This thermal cycle will be referred to as the “Accelerated Aging Test.” This document describes the procedure for performing this Accelerated Aging Test.

  1. Zinc oxide nanowire gamma ray detector with high spatiotemporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Daniel C.; Nolen, J. Ryan; Cook, Andrew; Mu, Richard R.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional scintillation detectors are typically single crystals of heavy-metal oxides or halides doped with rare-earth ions that record the recombination of electron-hole pairs by photon emission in the visible to ultraviolet. However, the light yields are typically low enough to require photomultiplier detection with the attendant instrumental complications. Here we report initial studies of gamma ray detection by zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires, grown by vapor-solid deposition. The nanowires grow along the c-axis in a wurtzite structure; they are typically 80 nm in diameter and have lengths of 1- 2 μm. The nanowires are single crystals of high quality, with a photoluminescence (PL) yield from band-edge exciton emission in the ultraviolet that is typically one hundred times larger than the PL yield from defect centers in the visible. Nanowire ensembles were irradiated by 662 keV gamma rays from a Cs-137 source for periods of up to ten hours; gamma rays in this energy range interact by Compton scattering, which in ZnO creates F+ centers that relax to form singly-charged positive oxygen vacancies. Following irradiation, we fit the PL spectra of the visible emission with a sum of Gaussians at the energies of the known defects. We find highly efficient PL from the irradiated area, with a figure of merit approaching 106 photons/s/MeV of deposited energy. Over a period of days, the singly charged O+ vacancies relax to the more stable doubly charged O++ vacancies. However, the overall defect PL returns to pre-irradiation values after about a week, as the vacancies diffuse to the surface of these very thin nanowires, indicating that a self-healing process restores the nanowires to their original state.

  2. LEC SI-GaAs detectors for gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogru, M.; Beaumont, S.P.; Bertin, R.; Booth, C.N.; Buttar, C.; Capiluppi, C.; Carraresi, L.; Cindolo, F.; Colocci, M.; Combley, F.H.; D' Auria, S.; Del Papa, C.; Edwards, M.; Fiori, F.; Foster, F.; Francescato, A.; Gray, R.; Hill, G.; Hou, Y.; Houston, P.; Hughes, G.; Jones, B.K.; Lynch, J.G.; Lisowsky, B.; Matheson, J.; Nava, F.; Nuti, M.; O' Shea, V.; Pelfer, P.G.; Raine, C.; Ratoff, P.; Santana, J.; Sounders, I.J.; Seller, P.H.; Shankar, K.; Sharp, P.H.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Sloan, T.; Smith, K.M.; Tartoni, I.; Hafe, I. ten; Turnbull, R.M.; Vanni, U.; Vinattieri, A.; Zichichi, A. (Dipartimento di Fisica, Bologna Univ. (Italy) INFN, Bologna (Italy) CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) Dipartimento di Fisica, Florence Univ. (Italy) INFN, Florence (Italy) Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom) Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom) Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom) Dipartimento di Fisica, Bologna Univ. (Italy) INFN, Bologna (Italy) Ruth; RD8 Collaboration

    1994-09-01

    Detectors with a p-i-n structure based on Liquid Encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) grown Semi-Insulating (SI) GaAs have been fabricated. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and their response to [gamma]-rays have been studied. Measurements of the peak charge collection efficiency (cce) have been compared with a model assuming a uniform electric field. The comparison indicates that this field is not uniform. The peak cce at 500 V is found to be 52% and 82% in 400 [mu]m and 200 [mu]m thick detectors respectively. The resolution of the [sup 57]Co full energy peak is between 10% and 13% at 400 V. ((orig.))

  3. Spatial Pileup Considerations for Pixellated Gamma -ray Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furenlid, L.R.; Clarkson, E.; Marks, D.G.; Barrett, H.H.

    2015-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution solid-state detectors being developed for gamma-ray applications benefit from having pixel dimensions substantially smaller than detector slab thickness. This leads to an enhanced possibility of charge partially spreading to neighboring pixels as a result of diffusion (and secondary photon emission) transverse to the drift direction. An undesirable consequence is the effective magnification of the event “size“ and the spatial overlap issues which result when two photons are absorbed in close proximity within the integration time of the detector/readout system. In this work, we develop the general statistics of spatial pileup in imaging systems and apply the results to detectors we are developing based on pixellated cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) and a multiplexing application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) readout. We consider the limitations imposed on total count rate capacity and explore in detail the consequences for the LISTMODE data-acquisition strategy. Algorithms are proposed for identifying and, where possible, resolving overlapping events by maximum-likelihood estimation. The efficacy and noise tolerance of these algorithms will be tested with a combination of simulated and experimental data in future work. PMID:26568675

  4. A segmented detector for airbone gamma ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgada, G.; Iovene, A.; Petrucci, S.; Tintori, C., E-mail: g.burgada@caen.it [Costruzioni Apparecchiature Elettroniche Nucleari S.p.A. (CAEN), Viareggio (Italy); Alvarez, M.A.G., E-mail: malvarez@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Baldoncini, M.; Xhixha, G.; Strati, V., E-mail: gerti.xhixha@unife.it [University of Ferrara, Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Ferrara (Italy); Mantovani, F., E-mail: mantovani@fe.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Ferrara (Italy); Garosi, P.; Mou, L., E-mail: li.mou@libero.it [University of Siena (Italy); Alvarez, C. Rossi, E-mail: rossialvarez@pd.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Legnaro (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    The airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (AGRS) is widely acknowledged as a very efficient technique for large areas monitoring. The detector system mounted on a helicopter allows for an extensive survey in a single flight time, thus reducing the exposure risk for the operator. Results from AGRS techniques are exploited in many fields, from the geological research to the homeland security for the search of orphan radioactive sources, from the mining and hydrocarbon exploration to the construction industry. The new generation of compact digital data acquisition and online processing equipment allows for faster airborne survey campaigns, and enhances the flexibility of operations. In addition, the algorithm for the extrapolation of the nuclide concentrations from the acquired gamma spectra is a challenging step of the entire technique. We are going to present a new device for advanced AGRS measurements, with an innovative detector configuration and data processing algorithms for optimizing the source localization and the on-line response capabilities. The new compact structure makes the system easily portable by a single operator, and rapidly mountable on most common helicopters. Preliminary feasibility studies have been performed to test the mechanics and the hardware of the whole system, which is intended to work without any human attendance. The first flights are planned by the end of 2014, with the aim of detecting artificial point sources having intensities on the order of 10^8 Bq and natural enriched fields already monitored. (author)

  5. Experimental determination of gamma-ray discrimination in pillar-structured thermal neutron detectors under high gamma-ray flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Qinghui; Conway, Adam M.; Voss, Lars F.; Radev, Radoslav P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Nikolić, Rebecca J., E-mail: nikolic1@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Dar, Mushtaq A. [King Saud University, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Cheung, Chin L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a detector that has a high neutron-to-gamma discrimination of 8.5×10{sup 5} with a high thermal neutron detection efficiency of 39% when exposed to a high gamma-ray field of 10{sup 9} photons/cm{sup 2}s. The detector is based on a silicon pillar structure filled with a neutron converter material ({sup 10}B) designed to have high thermal neutron detection efficiency. The pillar dimensions are 50 µm pillar height, 2 µm pillar diameter and 2 µm spacing between adjacent pillars.

  6. New scintillators for focal plane detectors in gamma-ray missions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buis, Ernst-Jan; Beijersbergen, Marco; Kraft, Stefan; Owens, Alan; Quarati, Francesco; Brandenburg, Sytze; Ostendorf, Reint

    2005-01-01

    Recent developments of cerium-doped lanthanum-halide scintillators like LaBr3:Ce show a remarkable performance in gamma-ray spectroscopy. When high energy resolution in combination with stopping power is required they provide excellent gamma-ray detector candidates for the use in space missions.

  7. Experimental determination of gamma-ray discrimination in pillar-structured thermal neutron detectors under high gamma-ray flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Qinghui [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Conway, Adam M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Voss, Lars F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Radev, Radoslav P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nikolić, Rebecca J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dar, Mushtaq A. [King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Cheung, Chin L. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-08-04

    Silicon pillar structures filled with a neutron converter material (10B) are designed to have high thermal neutron detection efficiency with specific dimensions of 50 μm pillar height, 2 μm pillar diameter and 2 μm spacing between adjacent pillars. In this paper, we have demonstrated such a detector has a high neutron-to-gamma discrimination of 106 with a high thermal neutron detection efficiency of 39% when exposed to a high gamma-ray field of 109 photons/cm2s.

  8. A transportable source of gamma rays with discrete energies and wide range for calibration and on-site testing of gamma-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granja, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.granja@utef.cvut.cz [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Slavicek, Tomas; Kroupa, Martin [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Owens, Alan [European Space Technology Centre ESTEC, European Space Agency ESA, Keplerlaan 1, 2200AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Pospisil, Stanislav; Janout, Zdenek [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Kralik, Miloslav; Solc, Jaroslav [Czech Metrology Institute, Radiova 3, 102 00 Prague 10 (Czech Republic); Valach, Ondrej [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-21

    We describe a compact and transportable wide energy range, gamma-ray station for the calibration of gamma-ray sensitive devices. The station was specifically designed for the on-site testing and calibration of gamma-ray sensitive spacecraft payloads, intended for space flight on the BepiColombo and SoIar Orbiter missions of the European Space Agency. The source is intended to serve as a calibrated reference for post test center qualification of integrated payload instruments and for preflight evaluation of scientific radiation sensors. Discrete gamma rays in the energy range 100 keV–9 MeV are produced in the station with reasonable intensity using a radionuclide neutron source and 100 l of distilled water with 22 kg salt dissolved. The gamma-rays generated contain many discrete lines conveniently evenly distributed over the entire energy range. The neutron and gamma-ray fields have been simulated by Monte Carlo calculations. Results of the numerical calculations are given in the form of neutron and gamma-ray spectra as well as dose equivalent rate. The dose rate was also determined directly by dedicated dosemetric measurements. The gamma-ray field produced in the station was characterized using a conventional HPGe detector. The application of the station is demonstrated by measurements taken with a flight-qualified LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillation detector. Gamma-ray spectra acquired by both detectors are presented. The minimum measuring times for calibration of the flight-version detector, was between 2 and 10 min (up to 6.2 MeV) and 20–30 min (up to 8 MeV), when the detector was placed at a distance 2–5 m from the station. - Highlights: • Transportable station of mono-energetic gamma rays has been built. • Produced neutron and gamma ray field simulated by Monte Carlo calculations. • Discrete gamma rays produced in wide energy range up to 9 MeV. • Produced gamma ray spectra measured by HPGe and scintillating LaBr{sub 3}Ce detectors. • Demonstration of

  9. CsI(Tl)-photodiode detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Fioretto, E; Viesti, G; Cinausero, M; Zuin, L; Fabris, D; Lunardon, M; Nebbia, G; Prete, G

    2000-01-01

    We report on the performances of CsI(Tl)-photodiode detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications. Light output yield and energy resolution have been measured for different crystals and read-out configurations.

  10. Development of a gamma ray monitor using a CdZnTe semiconductor detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasolonjatovo, A H D; Shiomi, T; Nakamura, T; Nishizawa, H; Tsudaka, Y; Fujiwara, H; Araki, H; Matsuo, K

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new X ray and gamma ray monitor using the CdZnTe semiconductor detector, which has high sensitivity at room temperature. The pulse height spectra and the detection efficiencies of a 10 mm x 10 mm by 2 mm thick CdZnTe detector were measured in the energy range of 10 keV to 1.8 MeV by using monoenergetic X ray and gamma ray sources. The measured results showed very good agreement with the results calculated using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code taking into account the charge collection efficiency in the detector. By using two CZT detectors of 10 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm and 3 mm x 3 mm x 2 mm coupled with a filter, the weighted sum of a few energy channels with different cut-off energies was finally found to achieve a flat energy response with an equivalent dose (counts per microSv) within +/-30% or +/- 10% deviation.

  11. A transportable source of gamma rays with discrete energies and wide range for calibration and on-site testing of gamma-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Carlos; Slavicek, Tomas; Kroupa, Martin; Owens, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Janout, Zdenek; Kralik, Miloslav; Solc, Jaroslav; Valach, Ondrej

    2015-01-01

    We describe a compact and transportable wide energy range, gamma-ray station for the calibration of gamma-ray sensitive devices. The station was specifically designed for the on-site testing and calibration of gamma-ray sensitive spacecraft payloads, intended for space flight on the BepiColombo and SoIar Orbiter missions of the European Space Agency. The source is intended to serve as a calibrated reference for post test center qualification of integrated payload instruments and for preflight evaluation of scientific radiation sensors. Discrete gamma rays in the energy range 100 keV-9 MeV are produced in the station with reasonable intensity using a radionuclide neutron source and 100 l of distilled water with 22 kg salt dissolved. The gamma-rays generated contain many discrete lines conveniently evenly distributed over the entire energy range. The neutron and gamma-ray fields have been simulated by Monte Carlo calculations. Results of the numerical calculations are given in the form of neutron and gamma-ray spectra as well as dose equivalent rate. The dose rate was also determined directly by dedicated dosemetric measurements. The gamma-ray field produced in the station was characterized using a conventional HPGe detector. The application of the station is demonstrated by measurements taken with a flight-qualified LaBr3:Ce scintillation detector. Gamma-ray spectra acquired by both detectors are presented. The minimum measuring times for calibration of the flight-version detector, was between 2 and 10 min (up to 6.2 MeV) and 20-30 min (up to 8 MeV), when the detector was placed at a distance 2-5 m from the station.

  12. Response of CZT drift-strip detector to X- and gamma rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Gerward, Leif

    2001-01-01

    The drift-strip method for improving the energy response of a CdZnTe (CZT) detector to hard X- and gamma rays is discussed. Results for a 10 x 10 x 3 mm(3) detector crystal demonstrate a remarkable improvement of the energy resolution. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) is 2.18 keV (3.6%), 2...

  13. Charge sharing on monolithic CdZnTe gamma-ray detectors: A simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gros d' Aillon, Eric [LETI - CEA Recherche technologique, CEA Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, F 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Tabary, Joachim [LETI - CEA Recherche technologique, CEA Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, F 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Gliere, Alain [LETI - CEA Recherche technologique, CEA Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, F 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Verger, Loick [LETI - CEA Recherche technologique, CEA Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, F 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France)]. E-mail: loick.verger@cea.fr

    2006-07-01

    Monolithic CdZnTe gamma-ray detectors are used to build gamma cameras for nuclear medicine imaging but their energy resolution is currently limited by charge sharing between adjacent anodes. For this work, charge sharing is simulated using Ulysse, a numerical model that takes into account the physical processes of charge creation by ionizing radiation and charge transport within the semiconductor detector. The charge carrier cloud size, following the gamma-ray photon interaction, is computed by the Monte Carlo method. Electron cloud diffusion and charge induction on the electrodes are computed by the finite element method. This study shows that the electron diffusion strongly influences the final electron cloud diameter.

  14. Space Detectors for Gamma Rays (100 MeV-100 GeV): from Egret to Fermi LAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The design of spaceborne high-energy (E is greater than 100 MeV) gamma-ray detectors depends on two principal factors: (1) the basic physics of detecting and measuring the properties of the gamma rays; and (2) the constraints of operating such a detector in space for an extended period. Improvements in technology have enabled major advances in detector performance, as illustrated by two successful instruments, EGRET on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and LAT on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

  15. Gamma ray generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  16. On the Angular Resolution of the AGILE Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, S.; Donnarumma, I.; Tavani, M.; Trois, A.; Bulgarelli, A.; Argan, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Chen, A.; Del Monte, E.; Fioretti, V.; Gianotti, F.; Giuliani, A.; Longo, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Morselli, A.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Caraveo, P.

    2015-08-01

    We present a study of the angular resolution of the AGILE gamma-ray imaging detector (GRID) that has been operational in space since 2007 April. The AGILE instrument is made of an array of 12 planes that are each equipped with a tungsten converter and silicon microstrip detectors, and is sensitive in the energy range 50 MeV-10 GeV. Among the space instruments devoted to gamma-ray astrophysics, AGILE uniquely exploit an analog readout system with dedicated electronics coupled with silicon detectors. We show the results of Monte Carlo simulations carried out to reproduce the gamma-ray detection by the GRID and we compare them to in-flight data. We use the Crab (pulsar + Nebula) system for discussion of real data performance, since its {E}-2 energy spectrum is representative of the majority of gamma-ray sources. For Crab-like spectrum sources, the GRID angular resolution (FWHM of ˜ 4^\\circ at 100 MeV; ˜ 0\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 8 at 1 GeV; ˜ 0\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 9 integrating the full energy band from 100 MeV to tens of GeV) is stable across a large field of view, characterized by a flat response up to 30^\\circ off-axis. A comparison of the angular resolution obtained by the two operational gamma-ray instruments, AGILE/GRID and Fermi/LAT (Large Area Telescope), is interesting in view of future gamma-ray missions, which are currently under study. The two instruments exploit different detector configurations that affect the angular resolution: the former is optimized in the readout and track reconstruction, especially in the low-energy band, the latter is optimized in terms of converter thickness and power consumption. We show that despite these differences, the angular resolution of both instruments is very similar, between 100 MeV and a few GeV.

  17. Design and performance of soft gamma-ray detector for NeXT mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, H.; Kamae, T.; Madejski, G.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Takahashi, T.; Nakazawa, K.; Watanabe, S.; Mitani, T.; Tanaka, T.; /JAXA, Sagamihara; Fukazawa, Y.; /Hiroshima U.; Kataoka, J.; Ikagawa, T.; /Tokyo Inst. Tech.; Kokubun, M.; Makishima, K.; /Tokyo U.; Terada, Y.; /Wako, RIKEN; Nomachi, M.; /Osaka U.; Tashiro, M.; /Saitama U.

    2005-05-04

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) on board NeXT (Japanese future high energy astrophysics mission) is a Compton telescope with narrow field of view, which utilizes Compton kinematics to enhance its background rejection capabilities. It is realized as a hybrid semiconductor gamma-ray detector which consists of silicon and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors. It can detect photons in an energy band 0.05-1 MeV at a background level of 5 x 10{sup -7} counts/s/cm{sup 2}/keV; the silicon layers are required to improve the performance at a lower energy band (<0.3 MeV). Excellent energy resolution is the key feature of the SGD to achieve both high angular resolution and good background rejection capability. Its ability to measure gamma-ray polarization opens up a new window to study gamma-ray emission in the universe. We will present the development of key technologies to realize the SGD; high quality CdTe, low noise front-end VLSI and bump bonding technology. Energy resolutions of 1.7 keV (FWHM) for CdTe pixel detectors and 1.1 keV for silicon strip detectors have been measured. We also present the validation of Monte Carlo simulation used to evaluate the performance of the SGD.

  18. A Current Mode Detector Array for Gamma-Ray Asymmetry Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Gericke, M T; Bowman, J D; Gillis, R C; Hartfield, J; Ino, T; Leuschner, M; Masuda, Y; Mitchell, G S; Muto, S; Nann, H; Page, S A; Penttil"a, S I; Ramsay, W D; Seo, P N; Snow, W M; Tasson, J; Wilburn, W S

    2004-01-01

    We have built a CsI(Tl) gamma-ray detector array for the NPDGamma experiment to search for a small parity-violating directional asymmetry in the angular distribution of 2.2 MeV gamma-rays from the capture of polarized cold neutrons by protons with a sensitivity of several ppb. The weak pion-nucleon coupling constant can be determined from this asymmetry. The small size of the asymmetry requires a high cold neutron flux, control of systematic errors at the ppb level, and the use of current mode gamma-ray detection with vacuum photo diodes and low-noise solid-state preamplifiers. The average detector photoelectron yield was determined to be 1300 photoelectrons per MeV. The RMS width seen in the measurement is therefore dominated by the fluctuations in the number of gamma rays absorbed in the detector (counting statistics) rather than the intrinsic detector noise. The detectors were tested for noise performance, sensitivity to magnetic fields, pedestal stability and cosmic background. False asymmetries due to ga...

  19. Contribution of a germanium detector in mobile gamma-ray spectrometry. Spectral analysis and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Gutierrez, S; Bourgeois, C

    2002-01-01

    The sensitivity of the germanium semi-conductor detector is 30 times lower than that of the sodium iodide (NaI) detectors frequently used in airborne spectrometry. Its energy resolution however, is 20 times better, giving more accurate identification of radionuclides, especially when complex spectra are involved. The use of the germanium detector in mobile gamma-ray spectrometry provides a large amount of qualitative and quantitative information. In post-accident situations a germanium detector will be sufficient, and should therefore be used in preference to a NaI detector. An algorithm for detecting the total absorption peaks by studying the variations in the spectral profile of germanium gamma-ray spectra has been developed at the CEA. The use of digital filters that take into account the characteristics of the absorption peaks reduces the statistical fluctuations, making possible detection based on the analysis of the first and second derivatives. The absorption peak is then estimated by subtracting the b...

  20. SU-C-201-03: Coded Aperture Gamma-Ray Imaging Using Pixelated Semiconductor Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, S [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Kaye, W; Jaworski, J [H3D, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (United States); He, Z [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Improved localization of gamma-ray emissions from radiotracers is essential to the progress of nuclear medicine. Polaris is a portable, room-temperature operated gamma-ray imaging spectrometer composed of two 3×3 arrays of thick CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, which detect gammas between 30keV and 3MeV with energy resolution of <1% FWHM at 662keV. Compton imaging is used to map out source distributions in 4-pi space; however, is only effective above 300keV where Compton scatter is dominant. This work extends imaging to photoelectric energies (<300keV) using coded aperture imaging (CAI), which is essential for localization of Tc-99m (140keV). Methods: CAI, similar to the pinhole camera, relies on an attenuating mask, with open/closed elements, placed between the source and position-sensitive detectors. Partial attenuation of the source results in a “shadow” or count distribution that closely matches a portion of the mask pattern. Ideally, each source direction corresponds to a unique count distribution. Using backprojection reconstruction, the source direction is determined within the field of view. The knowledge of 3D position of interaction results in improved image quality. Results: Using a single array of detectors, a coded aperture mask, and multiple Co-57 (122keV) point sources, image reconstruction is performed in real-time, on an event-by-event basis, resulting in images with an angular resolution of ∼6 degrees. Although material nonuniformities contribute to image degradation, the superposition of images from individual detectors results in improved SNR. CAI was integrated with Compton imaging for a seamless transition between energy regimes. Conclusion: For the first time, CAI has been applied to thick, 3D position sensitive CZT detectors. Real-time, combined CAI and Compton imaging is performed using two 3×3 detector arrays, resulting in a source distribution in space. This system has been commercialized by H3D, Inc. and is being acquired for

  1. Thermal neutron detector and gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing a single material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Ashley; Burger, Arnold; Lukosi, Eric

    2017-05-02

    A combined thermal neutron detector and gamma-ray spectrometer system, including: a detection medium including a lithium chalcopyrite crystal operable for detecting thermal neutrons in a semiconductor mode and gamma-rays in a scintillator mode; and a photodetector coupled to the detection medium also operable for detecting the gamma rays. Optionally, the detection medium includes a .sup.6LiInSe.sub.2 crystal. Optionally, the detection medium comprises a compound formed by the process of: melting a Group III element; adding a Group I element to the melted Group III element at a rate that allows the Group I and Group III elements to react thereby providing a single phase I-III compound; and adding a Group VI element to the single phase I-III compound and heating; wherein the Group I element includes lithium.

  2. Development of CDZNTE Detectors for Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, N.

    1999-01-01

    Under this grant the UC Berkeley PI, K. Hurley, joined a Goddard-led effort to develop large area, multi-pixel Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe, or CZT) detectors for gamma-ray astronomy. His task was to advise the project of new developments in the area of cosmic gamma-ray bursts, in order to focus the detector development effort on the construction of an instrument which could be deployed on a spacecraft to localize and measure the energy spectra of bursts with good angular and energy resolution, respectively. UC Berkeley had no hardware role in this proposal. The result of this effort was the production, at Goddard, of five CZT prototype modules. A proposal was written for SWIFT, a MIDEX mission to study cosmic gamma-ray bursts. One experiment aboard SWIFT is the Burst Arcminute Telescope (BAT), which consists of a 5200 sq cm hard X-ray detector and a coded mask. The detector comprises 256 CZT modules, each containing 128 4 x 4 x 2 mm CZT detectors. Each detector is read out using an ASIC. The angular resolution achieved with this mask/array combination is 22 arcminutes, and a strong gamma-ray burst can be localized to an accuracy of 4 arcminutes in under 10 seconds. The energy resolution is typically 5 keV FWHM at 60 keV, and the energy range is 10 - 150 keV. The BAT views 2 steradians, and its sensitivity is such that the instrument can detect 350 gamma-ray burst/year, localizing 320 of them to better than 4 arcminute accuracy. The BAT concept therefore met the science goals for gamma-ray bursts. The UCB effort in the SWIFT proposal included the scientific objectives for gamma-ray bursts, and the assembly of a team of optical and radio observers who would use the BAT data to perform rapid multi-wavelength searches for the counterparts to bursts. This proposal was submitted to NASA and peer-reviewed. In January 1999 it was one of five such proposals selected for a Phase A study. This study was completed in June, and SWIFT was formally presented to NASA in

  3. Highly accurate determination of relative gamma-ray detection efficiency for Ge detector and its application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyahara, H.; Mori, C. [Nagoya Univeristy, Nagoya (Japan). Department of Nuclear Engineering; Ludington, M. [Albion College, Albion, Michigan (United States); Fleming, R.F.; Dewaraja, Y.K. [University of Michigan, An Arbor, Michigan (United States). Phoenix Memorial Laboratory

    1997-10-01

    When quantitative measurements of {gamma}-rays using High-Purity Ge (HPGe) detectors are made for a variety of applications, accurate knowledge of oy-ray detection efficiency is required. The emission rates of {gamma}-rays from sources can be determined quickly in the case that the absolute peak efficiency is calibrated. On the other hand, the relative peak efficiencies can be used for determination of intensity ratios for plural samples and for comparison to the standard source. Thus, both absolute and relative detection efficiencies are important in use of {gamma}-ray detector. The objective of this work is to determine the relative gamma-ray peak detection efficiency for an HPGe detector with the uncertainty approaching 0.1% . We used some nuclides which emit at least two gamma-rays with energies from 700 to 2400 keV for which the relative emission probabilities are known with uncertainties much smaller than 0.1%. The relative peak detection efficiencies were calculated from the measurements of the nuclides, {sup 46}Sc, {sup 48}Sc, {sup 60}Co and {sup 94}Nb, emitting two {gamma}- rays with the emission probabilities of almost unity. It is important that various corrections for the emission probabilities, the cascade summing effect, and the self-absorption are small. A third order polynomial function on both logarithmic scales of energy and efficiency was fitted to the data, and the peak efficiency predicted at certain energy from covariance matrix showed the uncertainty less than 0.5% except for near 700 keV. As an application, the emission probabilities of the 1037.5 and 1212.9 keV {gamma}-rays for {sup 48}Sc were determined using the function of the highly precise relative peak efficiency. Those were 0.9777+0,.00079 and 0.02345+0.00017 for the 1037.5 and 1212.9 keV {gamma}-rays, respectively. The sum of these probabilities is close to unity within the uncertainty which means that the certainties of the results are high and the accuracy has been improved

  4. Gamma-ray Full Spectrum Analysis for Environmental Radioactivity by HPGe Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meeyoung Jeong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Odyssey, one of the NASA’s Mars exploration program and SELENE (Kaguya, a Japanese lunar orbiting spacecraft have a payload of Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS for analyzing radioactive chemical elements of the atmosphere and the surface. In these days, gamma-ray spectroscopy with a High-Purity Germanium (HPGe detector has been widely used for the activity measurements of natural radionuclides contained in the soil of the Earth. The energy spectra obtained by the HPGe detectors have been generally analyzed by means of the Window Analysis (WA method. In this method, activity concentrations are determined by using the net counts of energy window around individual peaks. Meanwhile, an alternative method, the so-called Full Spectrum Analysis (FSA method uses count numbers not only from full-absorption peaks but from the contributions of Compton scattering due to gamma-rays. Consequently, while it takes a substantial time to obtain a statistically significant result in the WA method, the FSA method requires a much shorter time to reach the same level of the statistical significance. This study shows the validation results of FSA method. We have compared the concentration of radioactivity of 40K, 232Th and 238U in the soil measured by the WA method and the FSA method, respectively. The gamma-ray spectrum of reference materials (RGU and RGTh, KCl and soil samples were measured by the 120% HPGe detector with cosmic muon veto detector. According to the comparison result of activity concentrations between the FSA and the WA, we could conclude that FSA method is validated against the WA method. This study implies that the FSA method can be used in a harsh measurement environment, such as the gamma-ray measurement in the Moon, in which the level of statistical significance is usually required in a much shorter data acquisition time than the WA method.

  5. Chargеs collection efficiency in gamma-ray detectors with different electrodes configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondrik A. I.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of the charge collection efficiency n in gamma-ray detectors based on CdZnTe on the impurity composition of the material has been investigated. Plane-parallel, cylindrical and spherical electrodes have been considered. A comparative analysis of n for detectors with electrodes of different shape has been carried out and the optimum composition of the material CdxZn1–xTe placed in the electrode gap has been determined.

  6. Proof of Principle for Electronic Collimation of a Gamma Ray Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC TN-EQT-16-1 January 2016 Proof of Principle for Electronic Collimation of a Gamma...in achieving the proof of principle of the technique, which is intended to be further developed. A gamma ray detector system utilizing electronic...waveforms from longitudinal (along the axis) waveforms yield proof of principle . TECHNOLOGY DESCRIPTION: The component detector technologies were

  7. A novel detector assembly for detecting thermal neutrons, fast neutrons and gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cester, D., E-mail: davide.cester@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Nebbia, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Pino, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Sajo-Bohus, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Apartado 89000, 1080 A Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Stevanato, L.; Bonesso, I.; Turato, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2016-09-11

    A new composite detector has been developed by combining two different commercial scintillators. The device has the capability to detect gamma rays as well as thermal and fast neutrons; the signal discrimination between the three types is performed on-line by means of waveform digitizers and PSD algorithms. This work describes the assembled detector and its discrimination performance to be employed in the applied field.

  8. Measurement and Modeling of Blocking Contacts for Cadmium Telluride Gamma Ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Patrick R. [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States)

    2010-01-07

    Gamma ray detectors are important in national security applications, medicine, and astronomy. Semiconductor materials with high density and atomic number, such as Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), offer a small device footprint, but their performance is limited by noise at room temperature; however, improved device design can decrease detector noise by reducing leakage current. This thesis characterizes and models two unique Schottky devices: one with an argon ion sputter etch before Schottky contact deposition and one without. Analysis of current versus voltage characteristics shows that thermionic emission alone does not describe these devices. This analysis points to reverse bias generation current or leakage through an inhomogeneous barrier. Modeling the devices in reverse bias with thermionic field emission and a leaky Schottky barrier yields good agreement with measurements. Also numerical modeling with a finite-element physics-based simulator suggests that reverse bias current is a combination of thermionic emission and generation. This thesis proposes further experiments to determine the correct model for reverse bias conduction. Understanding conduction mechanisms in these devices will help develop more reproducible contacts, reduce leakage current, and ultimately improve detector performance.

  9. PICsIT detector for gamma-ray astronomy pixels qualification campaign

    CERN Document Server

    Di Cocco, G; Labanti, C; Malaguti, G; Pinazza, O; Rossi, E; Schiavone, F

    2002-01-01

    Position sensitive detectors coupled to coded masks are used for imaging in high energy astronomy. PICsIT is the gamma-ray position sensitive detector of the IBIS telescope to be flown onboard the INTEGRAL satellite in 2001. PICsIT detector functionalities and scientific performances as a whole are described in details elsewhere in this Conference (Labanti et al. (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A, this conference)). In this work, we present the aim, methodology, and results of the tests and calibrations performed on the first qualification lot of 136 PICsIT pixels carried out at SCIONIX laboratories in The Netherlands, in April 1999. Before being accepted for PICsIT, each detection unit has in fact to be fully characterized in terms of energy resolution and lower energy threshold. The principal aim of PICsIT pixel qualification campaign described in this work has been to measure the key parameters of each CsI(Tl)+photodiode detection unit: CsI(Tl) crystals light output, gain variation with temperature, energy resolut...

  10. Monte Carlo simulations for optimum design of composite detectors for high energy gamma ray

    CERN Document Server

    Wen Wan Xin

    2002-01-01

    The efficiencies of clover and cluster composite detectors using NaI and BGO crystals as the media for detection of high energy gamma ray are systematically simulated with Monte Carlo method. It is shown that for the same geometry of detection media concerned the efficiency of the composite BGO detector is much higher than that of the composite NaI detector. Therefore NaI crystal is not a suitable medium of composite detectors for high energy gamma ray duo to low efficiency. Doppler broadening and distortion to gamma spectrum in comparison with BGO crystal. The composite BGO detectors have many advantages such as large photopeak efficiency, small Doppler effect and regular gamma spectrum. As to the clover and cluster composite detectors consisting of the cylinders of BGO crystal with original size phi 76 x 127, the intrinsic photopeak efficiencies are over 40% and the enhanced factor of absolute efficiencies is as high as 2.4 and 2.7, respectively, for 22 MeV gamma ray

  11. Feasibility study for use of a germanium detector in the LOFT gamma-ray densitometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swierkowski, S. P.

    1976-04-27

    The primary aim of this study is to predict the performance of a gamma-ray densitometer system using computer modeling techniques. The system consists of a collimated /sup 137/Cs source, a pipe containing a variable amount of water absorber, and a shielded and collimated germanium detector system. The gamma-ray energy spectrum (number of photon counts as a function of energy) has been computed for several sources at the detector. The response for combined sourceconfigurations has been obtained by linear superposition. The signal essentially consists of the counts in an energy window centered on the /sup 137/Cs source at 662 keV that originate from this source. The noise is the background counts in the signal energy window that originate from /sup 16/N scatter radiation and direct and shield tank activation gammas. The detector signal has been computed for 0, 50, and 100 percent water in the pipe. (WHK)

  12. Limits on Neutrino Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the 40 String IceCube Detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J.A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S.W.; Bay, R.; Alba, J.L.B.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J.J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J.K.; Becker, K.H.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; BenZvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D.Z.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D.J.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Boser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brown, A.M.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D.F.; D'Agostino, M.V.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J.C.; Clercq, C. De; Demirors, L.; Depaepe, O.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; Vries-Uiterweerd, G. de; DeYoung, T.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J.P.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R.W.; Engdegard, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P.A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A.R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Foerster, M.M.; Fox, B.D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gallagher, J.; Geisler, M.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glusenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J.A.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Gross, A.; Grullon, S.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Lafebre, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    IceCube has become the first neutrino telescope with a sensitivity below the TeV neutrino flux predicted from gamma-ray bursts if gamma-ray bursts are responsible for the observed cosmic-ray flux above 10(18) eV. Two separate analyses using the half-complete IceCube detector, one a dedicated search

  13. Design and Performance of the Soft Gamma-ray Detector for the NeXT mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, Hiroyasu; Kamae, T.; Madejski, G.; Mitani, T.; Nakazawa, K.; Tanaka, T.; Takahashi, T.; Watanabe, S.; Fukazawa, Y.; Ikagawa, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kokubun, M.; Makishima, K.; Terada, Y.; Nomachi, M.; Tashiro, M.; /SLAC /Sagamihara, Inst. Space Astron. Sci. /Tokyo U. /Hiroshima U. /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /Wako, RIKEN /Osaka U. /Saitama U.

    2006-04-19

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) on board the NeXT (Japanese future high energy astrophysics mission) is a Compton telescope with narrow field of view (FOV), which utilizes Compton kinematics to enhance its background rejection capabilities. It is realized as a hybrid semiconductor gamma-ray detector which consists of silicon and CdTe (cadmium telluride) detectors. It can detect photons in a wide energy band (0.05-1 MeV) at a background level of 5 x 10{sup -7} counts/s/cm{sup 2}/keV; the silicon layers are required to improve the performance at a lower energy band (<0.3 MeV). Excellent energy resolution is the key feature of the SGD, allowing it to achieve both high angular resolution and good background rejection capability. An additional capability of the SGD, its ability to measure gamma-ray polarization, opens up a new window to study properties of astronomical objects. We will present the development of key technologies to realize the SGD: high quality CdTe, low noise front-end ASIC and bump bonding technology. Energy resolutions of 1.7 keV (FWHM) for CdTe pixel detectors and 1.1 keV for Si strip detectors have been measured. We also present the validation of Monte Carlo simulation used to evaluate the performance of the SGD.

  14. On the photopeak efficiency of germanium gamma-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeckel, B.; Westmeier, W.; Patzelt, P.

    1987-11-15

    An empirical equation describing the photopeak efficiency of Ge(Li) and high purity germanium (HPGe) photon detectors in the energy range from 60 keV to the onset of escape peak losses is presented. The functional parameters are fitted to calibration points obtained from long-lived commercially available standards (/sup 241/Am, /sup 109/Cd, /sup 57/Co, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 60/Co, /sup 22/Na). The fitted function is shown to describe 61 efficiency functions of 60 different detectors with an accuracy better than the quoted uncertainty of the calibration sources, including those energy regions where long-lived calibration standards are difficult to obtain. In contrast to other proposed functions, this equation has functional restrictions with respect to the general shape of the photopeak efficiency curve and, therefore, it is well suited to describe the photopeak efficiency, even when fitted only to a few calibration points.

  15. On the photopeak efficiency of germanium gamma-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäckel, B.; Westmeier, W.; Patzelt, P.

    1987-11-01

    An empirical equation describing the photopeak efficiency of Ge(Li) and high purity germanium (HPGe) photon detectors in the energy range from 60 keV to the onset of escape peak losses is presented. The functional parameters are fitted to calibration points obtained from long-lived commercially available standards ( 241Am, 109Cd, 57Co, 137Cs, 54Mn, 60Co, 22Na). The fitted function is shown to describe 61 efficiency functions of 60 different detectors with an accuracy better than the quoted uncertainty of the calibration sources, including those energy regions where long-lived calibration standards are difficult to obtain. In contrast to other proposed functions, this equation has functional restrictions with respect to the general shape of the photopeak efficiency curve and, therefore, it is well suited to describe the photopeak efficiency, even when fitted only to a few calibration points.

  16. Trigger design for a gamma ray detector of HIRFL-ETF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhong-Wei; Su, Hong; Qian, Yi; Kong, Jie

    2013-10-01

    The Gamma Ray Array Detector (GRAD) is one subsystem of HIRFL-ETF (the External Target Facility (ETF) of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL)). It is capable of measuring the energy of gamma-rays with 1024 CsI scintillators in in-beam nuclear experiments. The GRAD trigger should select the valid events and reject the data from the scintillators which are not hit by the gamma-ray. The GRAD trigger has been developed based on the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGAs) and PXI interface. It makes prompt trigger decisions to select valid events by processing the hit signals from the 1024 CsI scintillators. According to the physical requirements, the GRAD trigger module supplies 12-bit trigger information for the global trigger system of ETF and supplies a trigger signal for data acquisition (DAQ) system of GRAD. In addition, the GRAD trigger generates trigger data that are packed and transmitted to the host computer via PXI bus to be saved for off-line analysis. The trigger processing is implemented in the front-end electronics of GRAD and one FPGA of the GRAD trigger module. The logic of PXI transmission and reconfiguration is implemented in another FPGA of the GRAD trigger module. During the gamma-ray experiments, the GRAD trigger performs reliably and efficiently. The function of GRAD trigger is capable of satisfying the physical requirements.

  17. Numerical simulations on efficiency and measurement of capabilities of BGO detectors for high energy gamma ray

    CERN Document Server

    Wen Wan Xin

    2002-01-01

    The energy resolution and time resolution of two phi 75 x 100 BGO detectors for high energy gamma ray newly made were measured with sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs and sup 6 sup 0 Co resources. The two characteristic gamma rays of high energy emitted from the thermal neutron capture of germanium in BGO crystal were used for the energy calibration of gamma spectra. The intrinsic photopeak efficiency, single escape probability and double escape probabilities of BGO detectors in photon energy range of 4-30 MeV are numerically calculated with GEANT code. The real count response and count ratio of the uniformly distributed incident photons in energy range of 0-30 MeV are also calculated. The distortion of gamma spectra caused by the photon energy loss extension to lower energy in detection medium is discussed

  18. Laboratory tests on neutron shields for gamma-ray detectors in space

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, J; Hailey, C J

    2000-01-01

    Shields capable of suppressing neutron-induced background in new classes of gamma-ray detectors such as CdZnTe are becoming important for a variety of reasons. These include a high cross section for neutron interactions in new classes of detector materials as well as the inefficient vetoing of neutron-induced background in conventional active shields. We have previously demonstrated through Monte-Carlo simulations how our new approach, supershields, is superior to the monolithic, bi-atomic neutron shields which have been developed in the past. We report here on the first prototype models for supershields based on boron and hydrogen. We verify the performance of these supershields through laboratory experiments. These experimental results, as well as measurements of conventional monolithic neutron shields, are shown to be consistent with Monte-Carlo simulations. We discuss the implications of this experiment for designs of supershields in general and their application to future hard X-ray/gamma-ray experiments...

  19. A novel gamma-ray imaging concept using 'edge-on' microchannel plate detector

    CERN Document Server

    Shikhaliev, P M

    2001-01-01

    The 'edge-on' illuminated microchannel plate (MCP) position-sensitive detector (PSD) is used for gamma-ray imaging for the first time. The superior position resolution of the MCP is combined with high detection efficiency due to the 'edge-on' illumination mode. The results of imaging a 15 mu Ci sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs source (662 keV quantum energy) are presented.

  20. X-ray and gamma ray detector readout system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumer, Tumay O; Clajus, Martin; Visser, Gerard

    2010-10-19

    A readout electronics scheme is under development for high resolution, compact PET (positron emission tomography) imagers based on LSO (lutetium ortho-oxysilicate, Lu.sub.2SiO.sub.5) scintillator and avalanche photodiode (APD) arrays. The key is to obtain sufficient timing and energy resolution at a low power level, less than about 30 mW per channel, including all required functions. To this end, a simple leading edge level crossing discriminator is used, in combination with a transimpedance preamplifier. The APD used has a gain of order 1,000, and an output noise current of several pA/ Hz, allowing bipolar technology to be used instead of CMOS, for increased speed and power efficiency. A prototype of the preamplifier and discriminator has been constructed, achieving timing resolution of 1.5 ns FWHM, 2.7 ns full width at one tenth maximum, relative to an LSO/PMT detector, and an energy resolution of 13.6% FWHM at 511 keV, while operating at a power level of 22 mW per channel. Work is in progress towards integration of this preamplifier and discriminator with appropriate coincidence logic and amplitude measurement circuits in an ASIC suitable for a high resolution compact PET instrument. The detector system and/or ASIC can also be used for many other applications for medical to industrial imaging.

  1. A data inversion technique for four-detector gamma-ray logging in cased holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wensheng; Bing, Chen; Gang, Yu; Hanwu, Qu; Xiaolong, Li

    2017-07-01

    Scattered-gamma-ray logging in a cased hole not only offers cased-hole formation evaluation parameters, but also enables better cement bond evaluation when there is a microannulus outside the casing. Therefore, it is essential to study the response relations of measured values from cased-hole scattered-gamma-ray logging to casing thickness, cement sheath density, cement sheath thickness and formation density, as well as the data-processing methods used to solve for such parameters. In this paper, we outline the design of a four-detector scattered-gamma-ray logging tool for cased holes, apply Monte Carlo numerical simulation to study the response relations of the above four parameters to detector-measured values, thereby establishing the forward equations of values measured by the four detectors, and then use optimization inversion to solve for casing thickness, cement sheath density, cement sheath thickness and formation density, respectively. Inverted values of casing thickness had high accuracy and were less vulnerable to environmental impact. More accurate cement sheath density values were obtained at greater cement sheath thickness. Inverted values of cement sheath thickness had poor accuracy, being greatly affected by borehole and formation. Accurate formation density values were obtained, though they were influenced by the density and thickness of the cement sheath.

  2. Full Volume Imaging Gamma-Ray Detectors for Enhanced Sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziock, K; Kammeraad, J; Dougan, A; Archer, D; Blair, J; Knapp, D; Luke, S J; Schmid, G

    2001-03-09

    One of the problems faced by the post-cold-war world is the control of fissile materials. With the deterioration of the command and control structure inside the Former Soviet Union, there is an increased threat that fissile materials will be diverted from a legitimate use to production of weapons of mass destruction by rogue states and or terrorist organizations. The goal of this project was to study and build prototypes of a new class of highly sensitive detectors which could significantly enhance the remote detection of hidden fissile materials. Such an instrument would have a broad applicability in national security applications including nuclear smuggling, arms control, treaty inspections, and safeguards. Additional applications in the non-defense arenas of nuclear medicine, environmental restoration and basic science provide even more reasons to study this technology.

  3. Nuclear Material Accountability Applications of a Continuous Energy and Direction Gamma Ray Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Gerts; Robert Bean; Marc Paff

    2010-07-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory has recently developed a detector system based on the principle of a Wilson cloud chamber that gives the original energy and direction to a gamma ray source. This detector has the properties that the energy resolution is continuous and the direction to the source can be resolved to desired fidelity. Furthermore, the detector has low power requirements, is durable, operates in widely varying environments, and is relatively cheap to produce. This detector is expected, however, to require significant time to perform measurements. To mitigate the significant time for measurements, the detector is expected to scale to very large sizes with a linear increase in cost. For example, the proof of principle detector is approximately 30,000 cm3. This work describes the technical results that lead to these assertions. Finally, the applications of this detector are described in the context of nuclear material accountability.

  4. Performance optimization for hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Kahn, Steven M.; Hailey, Charles J.; Ziock, Klaus P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the optimization of the performance of imaging scintillation detectors used in the hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray (20-300) keV region of the spectrum. In these devices, absorption of an incident gamma-ray within an alkali halide crystal induces a scintillation light distribution which is centroided by an imaging photomultiplier tube mounted to the crystal. The ultimate imaging resolution is strongly affected by the detailed propagation of the scintillation light within the crystal and at the interface between the crystal and the phototube face plate. A number of refined techniques for preparing the scintillation crystals so as to optimize the imaging resolution have been investigated. The results indicate very good agreement with relatively simple models of the light propagation. It is shown that it is possible to achieve resolution consistent with the most optimistic models.

  5. The laser calibration system for the STACEE ground-based gamma ray detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hanna, D

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the laser system used for calibration monitoring of components of the STACEE detector. STACEE is a ground based gamma ray detector which uses the heliostats of a solar power facility to collect and focus Cherenkov light onto a system of secondary optics and photomultiplier tubes. To monitor the gain and check the linearity and timing properties of the phototubes and associated electronics, a system based on a dye laser, neutral density filters and optical fibres has been developed. In this paper we describe the system and present some results from initial tests made with it.

  6. Absorber-coupled lumped element kinetic inductance detectors for gamma-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Masato; Miyamoto, Noriaki; Taino, Tohru; Myoren, Hiroaki

    2017-10-01

    We propose gamma-ray detectors based on superconducting resonators that can be largely multiplexed and show potential for quick response time, high spatial resolution, and high energy resolution. The resonators were fabricated with a niobium film on a silicon wafer. Eight out of ten detectors could be operated at 0.3 K. The detectors were coupled to a 2-mm-thick lead absorber and examined with a cesium 137 source. The pulse decay time was 3.6 μs and energy resolution was 3.8 keV at 662 keV. We also describe the resonant properties of each detector. The proposed detectors are suitable for use as food-screening systems.

  7. Search for Gamma-Ray Bursts with the ARGO-YBJ Detector in Shower Mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartoli, B.; Catalanotti, S.; Piazzoli, B. D’Ettorre; Girolamo, T. Di [Dipartimento di Fisica dell’Universitá di Napoli “Federico II,” Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant’Angelo, via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Bernardini, P.; D’Amone, A.; Mitri, I. De [Dipartimento Matematica e Fisica “Ennio De Giorgi,” Universitá del Salento, via per Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Bi, X. J.; Cao, Z.; Chen, S. Z.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Gao, W.; Gou, Q. B. [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918, 100049 Beijing (China); Chen, T. L.; Danzengluobu [Tibet University, 850000 Lhasa, Xizang (China); Cui, S. W. [Hebei Normal University, 050024 Shijiazhuang Hebei (China); Dai, B. Z. [Yunnan University, 2 North Cuihu Road, 650091 Kunming, Yunnan (China); Sciascio, G. Di [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Feng, C. F. [Shandong University, 250100 Jinan, Shandong (China); Feng, Zhenyong, E-mail: chensz@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: zhouxx@swjtu.edu.cn [Southwest Jiaotong University, 610031 Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Collaboration: ARGO-YBJ Collaboration; and others

    2017-06-10

    The ARGO-YBJ detector, located at the Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (4300 m a. s. l., Tibet, China), was a “full coverage” (central carpet with an active area of ∼93%) air shower array dedicated to gamma-ray astronomy and cosmic-ray studies. The wide field of view (∼2 sr) and high duty cycle (>86%), made ARGO-YBJ suitable to search for short and unexpected gamma-ray emissions like gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Between 2007 November 6 and 2013 February 7, 156 satellite-triggered GRBs (24 of them with known redshift) occurred within the ARGO-YBJ field of view (zenith angle θ ≤ 45°). A search for possible emission associated with these GRBs has been made in the two energy ranges 10–100 GeV and 10–1000 GeV. No significant excess has been found in time coincidence with the satellite detections nor in a set of different time windows inside the interval of one hour after the bursts. Taking into account the EBL absorption, upper limits to the energy fluence at a 99% confidence level have been evaluated, with values ranging from ∼10{sup −5} erg cm{sup −2} to ∼10{sup −1} erg cm{sup −2}. The Fermi -GBM burst GRB 090902B, with a high-energy photon of 33.4 GeV detected by Fermi -LAT, is discussed in detail.

  8. Gamma-ray Astronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Pohl, Martin

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes recents results in gamma-ray astronomy, most of which were derived with data from ground-based gamma-ray detectors. Many of the contributions presented at this conference involve multiwavelength studies which combine ground-based gamma-ray measurements with optical data or space-based X-ray and gamma-ray measurements. Besides measurements of the diffuse emission from the Galaxy, observations of blazars, gamma-ray bursts, and supernova remnants this paper also covers theo...

  9. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  10. Basics of Gamma Ray Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinnett, Jacob [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Venkataraman, Ram [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-13

    The objective of this training is to explain the origin of x-rays and gamma rays, gamma ray interactions with matter, detectors and electronics used in gamma ray-spectrometry, and features of a gamma-ray spectrum for nuclear material that is safeguarded.

  11. Position sensitive semiconductor detectors for 0.5 MeV gamma-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusi, W.; Caroli, E.; Di Cocco, G.; Donati, A.; Landini, G.; Stephen, J. B.; Casali, F.; Baldazzi, G.; Chirco, P.; Rossi, M.

    1992-12-01

    A small prototype cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector optimized for the detection of gamma-rays having an energy of the order of 500 keV was designed. This detector was arranged as an array of 5x5 CdTe crystals, each having dimensions of 2x2x10 cu mm, and was constructed primarily in order to verify its technical feasibility and performances. The initial aim in developing this type of detector was for use in space applications such as measurement of annihilation radiation (511 keV photons) from the galactic center and possibly from extragalactic objects as for example AGN's (Active Galactic Nucleus). Many other applications may also benefit from the use of CdTe position sensitive detectors, in linear or square configuration, such as nuclear medicine diagnostics, nondestructive testing in industrial quality assurance processes, and safety inspection and controls.

  12. Simultaneous counting of alpha, beta and gamma rays with phoswich detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuda, Shigekazu; Abe, Hitoshi; Mihara, Akira

    1994-10-01

    Phoswich detectors for simultaneous counting of alpha, beta and gamma rays have been developed, which were prepared by combining two or three scintillators, ZnS(Ag), NE102A and/or BGO or NaI(Tl), with different rise times from each other. In order to adjust the pulse height ascribed to each scintillator within a dynamic range, a sheet of Au-Mylar was used, if necessary, as an optical neutral density filter for lowering the transmittance of scintillation of the ZnS(Ag). Characteristics of these phoswiches were examined by a pulse shape discrimination technique. Excellent discrimination among the radiations was attained for the prepared phoswiches.

  13. Measurements with the resonant gravitational wave detector EXPLORER during the gamma-ray burst 980425

    CERN Document Server

    Amati, L; Bassan, M; Bonifazi, P; Carelli, P; Coccia, E; Cosmelli, C; Costa, E; Fafone, V; Feroci, M; Frasca, S; Frontera, F; Longo, F; Mauceli, E; Minenkov, Y; Modena, I; Modestino, G; Moleti, A; Orlandini, M; Pallottino, G V; Piro, L; Pizzella, G; Preger, B; Salemi, F; Terenzi, R; Visco, M

    1999-01-01

    We report on the operation of the resonant gravitational wave (GW) detector EXPLORER of the Rome group (M=2300 kg, T=2.6 K, located at CERN) at the time of the gamma-ray burst GRB 980425 (April 25.90915 UT, 1998), which is probably associated with the supernova SN 1998bw. We present the data of the detector (with sensitivity h/sub c/=8*10 /sup -19/ for a 1 ms pulse), and use the BeppoSAX data to estimate the initial time of the GRB: a basic parameter for any correlation analysis. The GW data exhibit no significant time signature around the GRB 980425. We remark on the importance of making use, in spite of the present low sensitivity, of the data collected with GW detectors, that can be regarded as active observatories, in coincidence with the BeppoSAX data. (15 refs).

  14. Simultaneous measurement of neutron and gamma-ray radiation levels from a TRIGA reactor core using silicon carbide semiconductor detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulloo, A. R.; Ruddy, F. H.; Seidel, J. G.; Davison, C.; Flinchbaugh, T.; Daubenspeck, T.

    1999-06-01

    The ability of a silicon carbide radiation detector to measure neutron and gamma radiation levels in a TRIGA reactor's mixed neutron/gamma field was demonstrated. Linear responses to epicadmium neutron fluence rate (up to 3/spl times/10/sup 7/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/) and to gamma dose rate (0.6-234 krad-Si h/sup -1/) were obtained with the detector. Axial profiles of the reactor core's neutron and gamma-ray radiation levels were successfully generated through sequential measurements along the length of the core. The SiC detector shows a high level of precision for both neutrons and gamma rays in high-intensity radiation environments-1.9% for neutrons and better than 0.6% for gamma rays. These results indicate that SiC detectors are well suited for applications such as spent fuel monitoring where measurements in mixed neutron/gamma fields are desired.

  15. Novel ZnO:Al contacts to CdZnTe for X- and gamma-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, U. N.; Mundle, R. M.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; Pradhan, A. K.; James, R. B.

    2016-05-01

    CdZnTe (CZT) has made a significant impact as a material for room-temperature nuclear-radiation detectors due to its potential impact in applications related to nonproliferation, homeland security, medical imaging, and gamma-ray telescopes. In all such applications, common metals, such as gold, platinum and indium, have been used as electrodes for fabricating the detectors. Because of the large mismatch in the thermal-expansion coefficient between the metal contacts and CZT, the contacts can undergo stress and mechanical degradation, which is the main cause for device instability over the long term. Here, we report for the first time on our use of Al-doped ZnO as the preferred electrode for such detectors. The material was selected because of its better contact properties compared to those of the metals commonly used today. Comparisons were conducted for the detector properties using different contacts, and improvements in the performances of ZnO:Al-coated detectors are described in this paper. These studies show that Al:ZnO contacts to CZT radiation detectors offer the potential of becoming a transformative replacement for the common metallic contacts due to the dramatic improvements in the performance of detectors and improved long-term stability.

  16. Novel ZnO:Al contacts to CdZnTe for X- and gamma-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, U N; Mundle, R M; Camarda, G S; Cui, Y; Gul, R; Hossain, A; Yang, G; Pradhan, A K; James, R B

    2016-05-24

    CdZnTe (CZT) has made a significant impact as a material for room-temperature nuclear-radiation detectors due to its potential impact in applications related to nonproliferation, homeland security, medical imaging, and gamma-ray telescopes. In all such applications, common metals, such as gold, platinum and indium, have been used as electrodes for fabricating the detectors. Because of the large mismatch in the thermal-expansion coefficient between the metal contacts and CZT, the contacts can undergo stress and mechanical degradation, which is the main cause for device instability over the long term. Here, we report for the first time on our use of Al-doped ZnO as the preferred electrode for such detectors. The material was selected because of its better contact properties compared to those of the metals commonly used today. Comparisons were conducted for the detector properties using different contacts, and improvements in the performances of ZnO:Al-coated detectors are described in this paper. These studies show that Al:ZnO contacts to CZT radiation detectors offer the potential of becoming a transformative replacement for the common metallic contacts due to the dramatic improvements in the performance of detectors and improved long-term stability.

  17. High-Efficiency CdZnTe Gamma-Ray Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Ackley, K.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Eger, J. F.; De Geronimo, G.; Finfrock, C.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; Lee, W.; Prokesch, M.; Petryk, M.; Reiber, J. L.; Roy, U.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    The longer electron lifetime of today's CdZnTe (CZT) crystals allows for free carriers to travel longer distances in the crystals, which means that, in principle, thicker devices could be fabricated. These thicker CZT devices would offer greater detection efficiency for high-energy gamma-ray detectors. However, up to now, the thicknesses and sizes of actual detectors have still been limited by the nonuniform detector response, and the biggest devices reported in the literature are (20×20×15)-mm3 pixelated detectors with a drift distance of 15 mm. Although thicker and bigger single crystals are becoming available today, the high requirements on their crystal quality drastically reduce their acceptance yield and increase their cost. Fortunately, in many cases, the inhomogeneity in response can be corrected by segmenting the active volumes of the detectors and correcting the responses generated from each of the voxels. Such high-granularity position-sensitive detectors open up the opportunity for using thicker and less-expensive CZT crystals. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that today's commercial high electron mobility-lifetime CZT material is suitable for a new class of detectors with 20-25-mm drift distances and even larger in the near future, provided that the detectors' response nonuniformities can be corrected on a scale comparable to or larger than the sizes of the electron clouds, which is 100 μm.

  18. MeV-level electron and gamma ray sensitivites of modern far ultraviolet sensitive microchannel plate detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael W.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Cooke, Chathan M.; Blase, Ryan C.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Retherford, Kurt D.

    2016-07-01

    The Jovian system is the focus of multiple current and future NASA and ESA missions, but dangerously high radiation levels surrounding the planet make operations of instruments sensitive to high energy electrons or gamma rays problematic. Microchannel plate (MCP) detectors have been the detectors of choice in planetary ultraviolet spectrographs for decades. However, the same properties that give these detectors high response to vacuum ultraviolet photons also make them sensitive to high energy electrons and gamma rays. The success of ultraviolet investigations in the Jovian system depends on effectively shielding these MCP detectors to protect them as much as possible from this withering radiation. The design of such shielding hinges on our understanding of the response of MCP detectors to the high energy electrons and gamma rays found there. To this end, Southwest Research Institute and Massachusetts Institute of Technology collaborated in 2012-13 to measure the response of a flight-spare microchannel plate detector to a beam of high energy electrons. The detector response was measured at multiple beam energies ranging from 0.5-2.5 MeV and multiple currents. This response was then checked with MCNP6, a radiation transport simulation tool, to determine the secondary gamma rays produced by the primary electrons striking the detector window. We report on the measurement approach and the inferred electron and gamma sensitivities.

  19. Towards a global network of gamma-ray detector calibration facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijs, Marco; Koomans, Ronald; Limburg, Han

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray logging tools are applied worldwide. At various locations, calibration facilities are used to calibrate these gamma-ray logging systems. Several attempts have been made to cross-correlate well known calibration pits, but this cross-correlation does not include calibration facilities in Europe or private company calibration facilities. Our aim is to set-up a framework that gives the possibility to interlink all calibration facilities worldwide by using `tools of opportunity' - tools that have been calibrated in different calibration facilities, whether this usage was on a coordinated basis or by coincidence. To compare the measurement of different tools, it is important to understand the behaviour of the tools in the different calibration pits. Borehole properties, such as diameter, fluid, casing and probe diameter strongly influence the outcome of gamma-ray borehole logging. Logs need to be properly calibrated and compensated for these borehole properties in order to obtain in-situ grades or to do cross-hole correlation. Some tool providers provide tool-specific correction curves for this purpose. Others rely on reference measurements against sources of known radionuclide concentration and geometry. In this article, we present an attempt to set-up a framework for transferring `local' calibrations to be applied `globally'. This framework includes corrections for any geometry and detector size to give absolute concentrations of radionuclides from borehole measurements. This model is used to compare measurements in the calibration pits of Grand Junction, located in the USA; Adelaide (previously known as AMDEL), located in Adelaide Australia; and Stonehenge, located at Medusa Explorations BV in the Netherlands.

  20. Improving performance of a CdZnTe imaging array by mapping the detector with gamma rays

    CERN Document Server

    Marks, D G; Barrett, H H; Tüller, J; Woolfenden, J M

    1999-01-01

    We can greatly reduce image artifacts in our pixellated CdZnTe arrays by mapping imperfect regions with a narrow collimated beam of gamma rays. Portions of our detectors produce signals that agree well with simulations of gamma-ray interactions, but there are many examples of structures in the material that respond unpredictably to gamma rays. We mapped some of these imperfect regions using 60 and 140 keV gamma-ray beams, recording a 7x7 set of pixel signals for each interaction. The pixel pitch was 380 mu m. We used the mapped data to estimate the probability density function (PDF) of the pixel signals for each interaction position. Images were taken on the mapped sections, storing each gamma ray as a list of pixel signals. Images could be formed by either estimating each gamma-ray interaction position individually or using the entire set of image data in a single iterative computation using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. At 60 keV individual interaction positions were estimated by fitting the ...

  1. Gamma-ray pulse height spectrum analysis on systems with multiple Ge detectors using spectrum summing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killian, E.W. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    A technique has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to sum high resolution gamma-ray pulse spectra from systems with multiple Ge detectors. Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company operates a multi-detector spectrometer configuration at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant facility which is used to characterize the radionuclide contents in waste drums destined for shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This summing technique was developed to increase the sensitivity of the system, reduce the count times required to properly quantify the radio-nuclides and provide a more consistent methodology for combining data collected from multiple detectors. In spectrometer systems with multiple detectors looking at non homogeneous waste forms it is often difficult to combine individual spectrum analysis results from each detector to obtain a meaningful result for the total waste container. This is particularly true when the counting statistics in each individual spectrum are poor. The spectrum summing technique adds the spectra collected by each detector into a single spectrum which has better counting statistics than each individual spectrum. A normal spectral analysis program can then be used to analyze the sum spectrum to obtain radio-nuclide values which have smaller errors and do not have to be further manipulated to obtain results for the total waste container. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Radial position of single-site gamma-ray interactions from a parametric pulse shape analysis of germanium detector signals

    CERN Document Server

    Orrell, J L; Cooper, M W; Kephart, J D; Seifert, C E; Orrell, John L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

    2007-01-01

    Pulse shape analysis of germanium gamma-ray spectrometer signals can yield information on the radial position of individual gamma-ray interactions within the germanium crystal. A parametric pulse shape analysis based on calculation of moments of the reconstructed current pulses from a closed-ended coaxial germanium detector is used to preferentially select single-site gamma-ray interactions. The double escape peak events from the 2614.5 keV gamma-ray of 208-Tl are used as a training set to optimize the single-site event selection region in the pulse shape parameter space. A collimated source of 320.1 keV gamma-rays from 51-Cr is used to scan different radial positions of the same semi-coaxial germanium detector. The previously trained single-site selection region is used to preferentially identify the single-site photoelectric absorption events from the 320.1 keV full-energy peak. From the identified events, a comparison of the pulse shape parameter space distributions between different scan positions allows ...

  3. Constraints on Vesta's elemental composition: Fast neutron measurements by Dawn's gamma ray and neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David J; Peplowski, Patrick N; Prettyman, Thomas H; Feldman, William C; Bazell, David; Mittlefehldt, David W; Reedy, Robert C; Yamashita, Naoyuki

    2013-01-01

    Surface composition information from Vesta is reported using fast neutron data collected by the gamma ray and neutron detector on the Dawn spacecraft. After correcting for variations due to hydrogen, fast neutrons show a compositional dynamic range and spatial variability that is consistent with variations in average atomic mass from howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites. These data provide additional compositional evidence that Vesta is the parent body to HED meteorites. A subset of fast neutron data having lower statistical precision show spatial variations that are consistent with a 400 ppm variability in hydrogen concentrations across Vesta and supports the idea that Vesta's hydrogen is due to long-term delivery of carbonaceous chondrite material. PMID:26074718

  4. Low-background gamma-ray detector system for radiative capture reaction experiments with RI beams

    CERN Document Server

    Strasser, P; Miyachi, T; Tanaka, M H

    2000-01-01

    A low-background gamma-ray detector of NaI(Tl) comprising a core surrounded by an annulus was developed for nuclear astrophysics experiments with radioactive ion beams, mostly for detailed studies of low-energy radiative capture reactions that involve proton and alpha particles. Monte Carlo simulations using EGS4 were performed to calculate the full-energy detection efficiency. The background was satisfactorily reduced as designed. The best S/N ratio for very low-event rate was obtained using the annulus in anticoincidence with the core. A consideration of an experiment of astrophysical interest, the sup 1 sup 9 Ne(p,gamma) sup 2 sup 0 Na reaction, is also briefly discussed.

  5. Imaging plates as position-sensitive detectors of positrons and gamma-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Doyama, M; Yoshiie, T; Hayashi, Y; Kiritani, M; Oikawa, T

    2000-01-01

    Imaging plates have been used as position-sensitive detectors for positrons. Photo-stimulated luminescent material based on BaFX : Eu sup 2 sup + (X=Cl, Br, I) is used. A linear relation between the positron fluence and output signal intensity readout by a 'PIXsysTEM II' ( pixelized to 25 mu mx25 mu m is obtained, using sup 5 sup 8 Co and sup 2 sup 2 Na positron emitters. The linearity extends to six decades from 10 sup 5 to 10 sup 1 sup 1 positrons/cm sup 2. Sensitivities of one gamma-ray photon relative to a positron are 0.011 and 3.4x10 sup - sup 3 for sup 6 sup 5 Zn and sup 2 sup 2 Na, respectively.

  6. Development of marijuana and tobacco detectors using potassium-40 gamma ray emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Fission Energy and Systems Safety Program; Lindquist, R.P. [Customs Service, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Measurements were made at the Otay Mesa, Ca. border crossing between November 30 and December 4, 1992 to demonstrate proof of concept and the practicality of using potassium 40 (K40) gamma emissions to detect the presence of marijuana in vehicles. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) personnel, with the assistance of the EPA, set up three large volume gamma ray detectors with lead brick shielding and collimation under a stationary trailer and pickup truck. Measurements were performed for various positions and quantities of marijuana. Also, small quantities of marijuana, cigarettes, and other materials were subjected to gamma counting measurements under controlled geometry conditions to determine their K40 concentration. Larger quantities of heroin and cocaine were subjected to undefined geometry gamma counts for significant K40 gamma emissions.

  7. Gamma-ray Irradiation Effects on InAs/GaSb-based nBn IR Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    emerging detector architecture, complementary to SLS- technology and hence forth referred to here as nBn , mitigates this issue via a uni-polar barrier...Gamma-ray Irradiation Effects on InAs/GaSb-based nBn IR Detector Vincent M. Cowan*1, Christian P. Morath1, Seth M. Swift1, Stephen Myers2...2Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87106, USA ABSTRACT IR detectors operated in a space environment are

  8. Hard-X and gamma-ray imaging detector for astrophysics based on pixelated CdTe semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, J.-L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, L.; Artigues, B.; Ullán, M.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2016-01-01

    Stellar explosions are astrophysical phenomena of great importance and interest. Instruments with high sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators. In order to achieve the needed performance, a hard-X and gamma-ray imaging detector with mm spatial resolution and large enough efficiency is required. We present a detector module which consists of a single CdTe crystal of 12.5 × 12.5mm 2 and 2mm thick with a planar cathode and with the anode segmented in an 11x11 pixel array with a pixel pitch of 1 mm attached to the readout chip. Two possible detector module configurations are considered: the so-called Planar Transverse Field (PTF) and the Parallel Planar Field (PPF). The combination of several modules in PTF or PPF configuration will achieve the desired performance of the imaging detector. The sum energy resolution of all pixels of the CdTe module measured at 122 keV and 356 keV is 3.8% and 2% respectively, in the following operating conditions: PPF irradiation, bias voltage -500 V and temperature -10̂ C.

  9. Limits on neutrino emission from gamma-ray bursts with the 40 string IceCube detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R; Abdou, Y; Abu-Zayyad, T; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Bazo Alba, J L; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K-H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Depaepe, O; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Geisler, M; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Gross, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Huelsnitz, W; Hülss, J-P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K-H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kemming, N; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J-H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Krings, T; Kroll, G; Kuehn, K; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lafebre, S; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lehmann, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Majumdar, P; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Ono, M; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pérez de los Heros, C; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Porrata, R; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Prikockis, M; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H-G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schmidt, T; Schoenwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Slipak, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stephens, G; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Turčan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Voigt, B; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Weaver, C; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P

    2011-04-08

    IceCube has become the first neutrino telescope with a sensitivity below the TeV neutrino flux predicted from gamma-ray bursts if gamma-ray bursts are responsible for the observed cosmic-ray flux above 10(18)  eV. Two separate analyses using the half-complete IceCube detector, one a dedicated search for neutrinos from pγ interactions in the prompt phase of the gamma-ray burst fireball and the other a generic search for any neutrino emission from these sources over a wide range of energies and emission times, produced no evidence for neutrino emission, excluding prevailing models at 90% confidence.

  10. Measurement of 15 MeV gamma-rays with the Ge cluster detectors of EUROBALL

    CERN Document Server

    Million, B; Camera, F; Brambilla, S; Gadea, A; Giugni, D; Herskind, B; Kmiecik, M; Isocrate, R; Leoni, S; Maj, A; Prelz, F; Wieland, O

    2000-01-01

    A measurement of the response to 15.1 MeV gamma-rays has been made for the Ge cluster detectors in the EUROBALL array. Each cluster detector consists of seven germanium capsules surrounded by a single anticompton shield of BGO. The reaction D( sup 1 sup 1 B,gamma) sup 1 sup 2 C+n at E sub b sub e sub a sub m =19.1 MeV has been employed. The 'adding-back' of signals simultaneously present in the capsules composing each cluster detector has been made on an event by event basis. The intensity in full-energy peak increases by a factor of three as compared to that of the spectrum obtained by summing the individual spectra of the 7 capsules. The pulse height to energy conversion is found to be very linear from few hundreds keV to 15 MeV. The efficiency is discussed relative to that of large volume BaF sub 2 scintillators.

  11. Conversion factor and uncertainty estimation for quantification of towed gamma-ray detector measurements in Tohoku coastal waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, S., E-mail: ohnishi@nmri.go.jp [National Maritime Research Institute, 6-38-1, Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0004 (Japan); Thornton, B. [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Kamada, S.; Hirao, Y.; Ura, T.; Odano, N. [National Maritime Research Institute, 6-38-1, Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0004 (Japan)

    2016-05-21

    Factors to convert the count rate of a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector to the concentration of radioactive cesium in marine sediments are estimated for a towed gamma-ray detector system. The response of the detector against a unit concentration of radioactive cesium is calculated by Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation considering the vertical profile of radioactive material measured in core samples. The conversion factors are acquired by integrating the contribution of each layer and are normalized by the concentration in the surface sediment layer. At the same time, the uncertainty of the conversion factors are formulated and estimated. The combined standard uncertainty of the radioactive cesium concentration by the towed gamma-ray detector is around 25 percent. The values of uncertainty, often referred to as relative root mean squat errors in other works, between sediment core sampling measurements and towed detector measurements were 16 percent in the investigation made near the Abukuma River mouth and 5.2 percent in Sendai Bay, respectively. Most of the uncertainty is due to interpolation of the conversion factors between core samples and uncertainty of the detector's burial depth. The results of the towed measurements agree well with laboratory analysed sediment samples. Also, the concentrations of radioactive cesium at the intersection of each survey line are consistent. The consistency with sampling results and between different lines' transects demonstrate the availability and reproducibility of towed gamma-ray detector system.

  12. Research on CdZnTe and Other Novel Room Temperature Gamma Ray Spectrometer Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold Burger; Michael gGoza; Yunlong Cui; Utpal N. Roy; M. Guo

    2007-05-05

    Room temperature gamma-ray spectrometers are being developed for a number of years for national security applications where high sensitivity, low operating power and compactness are indispensable. The technology has matured now to the point where large volume (several cubic centimeters) and high energy resolution (approximately 1% at 660 eV) of gamma photons, are becoming available for their incorporation into portable systems for remote sensing of signatures from nuclear materials.

  13. Next generation gamma-ray Cherenkov detectors for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Young, C. S.; Lopez, F. E.; Griego, J. R.; Fatherley, V. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Stoeffl, W.; Khater, H.; Hernandez, J. E.; Carpenter, A.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Gales, S.; Leatherland, A.; Hilsabeck, T.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Malone, R. M.; Hares, J. D.; Milnes, J.; Shmayda, W. T.; Stoeckl, C.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    The newest generation of Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD-3) employed in Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the Omega Laser Facility has provided improved performance over previous generations. Comparison of reaction histories measured using two different deuterium-tritium fusion products, namely gamma rays using GCD and neutrons using Neutron Temporal Diagnostic (NTD), have provided added credibility to both techniques. GCD-3 is now being brought to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to supplement the existing Gamma Reaction History (GRH-6m) located 6 m from target chamber center (TCC). Initially it will be located in a reentrant well located 3.9 m from TCC. Data from GCD-3 will inform the design of a heavily-shielded "Super" GCD to be located as close as 20 cm from TCC. It will also provide a test-bed for faster optical detectors, potentially lowering the temporal resolution from the current ˜100 ps state-of-the-art photomultiplier tubes (PMT) to ˜10 ps Pulse Dilation PMT technology currently under development.

  14. Development of scintillation-light-transmission type phoswich detector for simultaneous alpha- and beta (gamma)-ray counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, K.; Usuda, S.; Gunji, H.

    2000-08-01

    A new type of scintillation-light-transmission ZnS(Ag)/NE102A phoswich detector has been developed, in which scintillation light emitted from the phoswich is transmitted through an optical fiber to a photomultiplier tube. By adjusting wavelength of the scintillation light to transmittance region of the optical fiber, the phoswich detector was capable of successfully performing simultaneous counting of alpha- and beta (including gamma)-rays. In addition, the detector has been applied to a dip-type inline monitor, which directly contacts with actinide solution. The detector will be available especially in a narrow and/or isolated space such as glove box and hot cell.

  15. Measurement of gamma-ray intensities of sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Th using semiconductor detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chatani, H

    1999-01-01

    Nuclide sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Th was yielded by the sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th(n, 2n) reaction with neutron irradiation in the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). Moreover, the thorium was purified chemically. Gamma-ray spectra of thorium have been measured using low-energy photon spectrometers and a high-purity germanium detector. Relative gamma-ray intensities ranging from 25 to 352 keV in the decay of sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Th have been determined with satisfactory accuracy. The results are in very good agreement with those of earlier studies. We observe two new gamma-rays at 77.69 and 177.66 keV, whose intensities are found to be (0.063+-0.010)% and (0.00095+-0.00020)%, respectively, relative to that of 84.21 keV taken as 100%. Absolute intensity of 84.21 keV gamma-ray which is the most prominent one from the decay of sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Th and that of 185.739 keV following the decay of sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U are also determined from the secular equilibrium for sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U- sup 2 sup 3 sup 1 Th. The results obtained in t...

  16. CdZnTe and CdTe detector arrays for hard X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Stahle, C M; Parsons, A M; Barbier, L M; Barthelmy, S D; Gehrels, N A; Palmer, D M; Snodgrass, S J; Tüller, J

    1999-01-01

    A variety of CdZnTe and CdTe detector arrays were fabricated at NASA/GSFC for use in hard X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy. Mosaic, pixel, and 3-D position-sensitive detector arrays were built to demonstrate the capabilities for high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy for 10 to 2 MeV. This paper will summarize the different arrays and their applications for instruments being developed at NASA/GSFC. Specific topics to be addressed include materials characterization, fabrication of detectors, ASIC readout electronics, and imaging and spectroscopy tests.

  17. A prototype High Purity Germanium detector for high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at high count rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.J., E-mail: rjcooper@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Amman, M.; Luke, P.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Vetter, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    Where energy resolution is paramount, High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors continue to provide the optimum solution for gamma-ray detection and spectroscopy. Conventional large-volume HPGe detectors are typically limited to count rates on the order of ten thousand counts per second, however, limiting their effectiveness for high count rate applications. To address this limitation, we have developed a novel prototype HPGe detector designed to be capable of achieving fine energy resolution and high event throughput at count rates in excess of one million counts per second. We report here on the concept, design, and initial performance of the first prototype device.

  18. Development of a detector based on Silicon Drift Detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busca, P.; Butt, A. D.; Fiorini, C.; Marone, A.; Occhipinti, M.; Peloso, R.; Quaglia, R.; Bombelli, L.; Giacomini, G.; Piemonte, C.; Camera, F.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Nelms, N.; Shortt, B.

    2014-05-01

    This work deals with the development of a new gamma detector based on Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) to readout large LaBr3:Ce scintillators for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications. The research is supported by the European Space Agency through the Technology Research Programme (TRP) and by Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) within the Gamma project. The SDDs, produced at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK) semiconductor laboratories, are designed as monolithic arrays of 3 × 3 units, each one of an active area of 8 mm × 8 mm (overall area of 26 mm × 26 mm). The readout electronics and the architecture of the camera are briefly described and then first experimental results coupling the SDD array with a 1'' × 1'' LaBr3:Ce scintillator are reported. An energy resolution of 3% FWHM at 662 keV has been measured at -20°C, better than coupling the same scintillator with a photomultiplier tube. The same scintillator is also used to evaluate position sensitivity with a 1 mm collimated Cs-137 source. The main difficulty in determining the position of the gamma-ray interaction in the crystal is associated to the high thickness/diameter ratio of the crystal (1:1) and the use of reflectors on all lateral and top sides the crystal. This last choice enhances energy resolution but makes imaging capability more challenging because light is spread over all photodetectors. Preliminary results show that the camera is able to detect shifts in the measured signals, when the source is moved with steps of 5 mm. A modified version of the centroid method is finally implemented to evaluate the imaging capability of the system.

  19. CdTe and CdZnTe gamma ray detectors for medical and industrial imaging systems

    CERN Document Server

    Eisen, Y; Mardor, I

    1999-01-01

    CdTe and CdZnTe X-ray and gamma ray detectors in the form of single elements or as segmented monolithic detectors have been shown to be useful in medical and industrial imaging systems. These detectors possess inherently better energy resolution than scintillators coupled to either photodiodes or photomultipliers, and together with application specific integrated circuits they lead to compact imaging systems of enhanced spatial resolution and better contrast resolution. Photopeak efficiencies of these detectors is greatly affected by a relatively low hole mobility-lifetime product. Utilizing these detectors as highly efficient good spectrometers, demands use of techniques to improve their charge collection properties, i.e., correct for variations in charge losses at different depths of interaction in the detector. The corrections for the large hole trapping are made either by applying electronic techniques or by fabricating detector or electrical contacts configurations which differ from the commonly used pla...

  20. High-Z Nanoparticle/Polymer Nanocomposites for Gamma-Ray Scintillation Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao

    An affordable and reliable solution for spectroscopic gamma-ray detection has long been sought after due to the needs from research, defense, and medical applications. Scintillators resolve gamma energy by proportionally converting a single high-energy photon into a number of photomultiplier-tube-detectable low-energy photons, which is considered a more affordable solution for general purposes compared to the delicate semiconductor detectors. An ideal scintillator should simultaneously exhibit the following characteristics: 1) high atomic number (Z) for high gamma stopping power and photoelectron production; 2) high light yield since the energy resolution is inversely proportional to the square root of light yield; 3) short emission decay lifetime; and 4) low cost and scalable production. However, commercial scintillators made from either inorganic single crystals or plastics fail to satisfy all requirements due to their intrinsic material properties and fabrication limitations. The concept of adding high-Z constituents into plastic scintillators to harness high Z, low cost, and fast emission in the resulting nanocomposite scintillators is not new in and of itself. Attempts have been made by adding organometallics, quantum dots, and scintillation nanocrystals into the plastic matrix. High-Z organometallics have long been used to improve the Z of plastic scintillators; however, their strong spin-orbit coupling effect entails careful triplet energy matching using expensive triplet emitters to avoid severe quenching of the light yield. On the other hand, reported quantum dot- and nanocrystal-polymer nanocomposites suffer from moderate Z and high optical loss due to aggregation and self-absorption at loadings higher than 10 wt%, limiting their potential for practical application. This dissertation strives to improve the performance of nanoparticle-based nanocomposite scintillators. One focus is to synthesize transparent nanocomposites with higher loadings of high

  1. Detection of pulsed, bremsstrahlung-induced, prompt neutron capture gamma-rays with HPGe detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.L.

    1996-08-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is developing a novel photoneutron-based nondestructive evaluation technique which uses a pulsed, high-energy (up to 8-MeV) electron accelerator and gamma-ray spectrometry. Highly penetrating pulses of bremsstrahlung photons are produced by each pulse of electrons. Interrogating neutrons are generated by the bremsstrahlung photons interacting within a photoneutron source material. The interactions of the neutrons within a target result in the emission of elemental characteristic gamma-rays. Spectrometry is performed by analyzing the photoneutron-induced prompt gamma-rays acquired between accelerator pulses with a unique, high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray detection system using a modified transistor reset preamplifier. The detection system, the experimental configuration, and the accelerator operation used to characterize the detection system performance are described. Using a 6.5 MeV electron accelerator and a beryllium metal photoneutron source, gamma-ray spectra were successfully acquired for Al, Cu, polyethylene, NaC1, and depleted uranium targets as soon as 30 {mu}s after each bremsstrahlung (or x-ray) flash.

  2. Use of water-Cherenkov detectors to detect Gamma Ray Bursts at the Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard, D. [APC, CNRS et Universite Paris 7 (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro (Argentina); Alvarez, C. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Asorey, H. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro (Argentina); Barros, H. [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Bertou, X. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro (Argentina)], E-mail: bertou@cab.cnea.gov.ar; Burgoa, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas, UMSA (Bolivia); Gomez Berisso, M. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro (Argentina); Martinez, O. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Miranda Loza, P. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas, UMSA (Bolivia); Murrieta, T.; Perez, G. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Rivera, H. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas, UMSA (Bolivia); Rovero, A. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (Argentina); Saavedra, O. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale and INFN, Torino (Italy); Salazar, H. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Tello, J.C. [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Ticona Peralda, R.; Velarde, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas, UMSA (Bolivia); Villasenor, L. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad de Michoacan (Mexico)

    2008-09-21

    The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) project aims at the detection of high energy photons from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) using the single particle technique in ground-based water-Cherenkov detectors (WCD). To reach a reasonable sensitivity, high altitude mountain sites have been selected in Mexico (Sierra Negra, 4550 m a.s.l.), Bolivia (Chacaltaya, 5300 m a.s.l.) and Venezuela (Merida, 4765 m a.s.l.). We report on detector calibration and operation at high altitude, search for bursts in 4 months of preliminary data, as well as search for signal at ground level when satellites report a burst.

  3. Gamma-ray multiplicity measurement of the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf in a segmented HPGe/BGO detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleuel, D.L., E-mail: bleuel1@llnl.go [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Bernstein, L.A.; Burke, J.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Gibelin, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Heffner, M.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Mintz, J. [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Norman, E.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Phair, L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Scielzo, N.D.; Sheets, S.A.; Snyderman, N.J.; Stoyer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Wiedeking, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-12-21

    Coincident {gamma} rays from a {sup 252}Cf source were measured using an array of six segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) Clover detectors each enclosed by 16 bismuth-germanate (BGO) detectors. The detectors were arranged in a cubic pattern around a 1{mu}Ci{sup 252}Cf source to cover a large solid angle for {gamma}-ray measurement with a reasonable reconstruction of the multiplicity. Neutron multiplicity was determined in certain cases by identifying the prompt {gamma} rays from individual fission fragment pairs. Multiplicity distributions from previous experiments and theoretical models were convolved with the response function of the array and compared to the present results. These results suggest a {gamma}-ray multiplicity spectrum broader than previous measurements and models, and provide no evidence of correlation with neutron multiplicity.

  4. Effect of prolonged annealing on the performance of coaxial Ge gamma-ray detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owens, A.; Brandenburg, S.; Buis, E. -J.; Kozorezov, A. G.; Kraft, S.; Ostendorf, R. W.; Quarati, F.

    The effects of prolonged annealing at elevated temperatures have been investigated in a 53 cm(3) closed-end coaxial high purity germanium detector in the reverse electrode configuration. The detector was multiply annealed at 100 degrees C in block periods of 7 days. After each anneal cycle it was

  5. Gamma Large Area Silicon Telescope (GLAST): Applying silicon strip detector technology to the detection of gamma rays in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, W.B.; The GLAST Collaboration

    1993-06-01

    The recent discoveries and excitement generated by space satellite experiment EGRET (presently operating on Compton Gamma Ray Observatory -- CGRO) have prompted an investigation into modern detector technologies for the next generation space based gamma ray telescopes. The GLAST proposal is based on silicon strip detectors as the {open_quotes}technology of choice{close_quotes} for space application: no consumables, no gas volume, robust (versus fragile), long lived, and self triggerable. The GLAST detector basically has two components: a tracking module preceding a calorimeter. The tracking module has planes of crossed strip (x,y) 300 {mu}m pitch silicon detectors coupled to a thin radiator to measure the coordinates of converted electron-positron pairs. The gap between the layers ({approximately}5 cm) provides a lever arm for track fitting resulting in an angular resolution of <0.1{degree} at high energy. The status of this R & D effort is discussed including details on triggering the instrument, the organization of the detector electronics and readout, and work on computer simulations to model this instrument.

  6. Interconnect and bonding techniques for pixelated X-ray and gamma-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, A.; Veale, M. C.; Duarte, D. D.; Bell, S. J.; Wilson, M. D.; Lipp, J. D.; Seller, P.

    2015-02-01

    In the last decade, the Detector Development Group at the Technology Department of the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), U.K., established a variety of fabrication and bonding techniques to build pixelated X-ray and γ-ray detector systems such as the spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector HEXITEC [1]. The fabrication and bonding of such devices comprises a range of processes including material surface preparation, photolithography, stencil printing, flip-chip and wire bonding of detectors to application-specific integrated circuits (ASIC). This paper presents interconnect and bonding techniques used in the fabrication chain for pixelated detectors assembled at STFC. For this purpose, detector dies (~ 20× 20 mm2) of high quality, single crystal semiconductors, such as cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) are cut to the required thickness (up to 5mm). The die surfaces are lapped and polished to a mirror-finish and then individually processed by electroless gold deposition combined with photolithography to form 74× 74 arrays of 200 μ m × 200 μ m pixels with 250 μ m pitch. Owing to a lack of availability of CZT wafers, lithography is commonly carried out on individual detector dies which represents a significant technical challenge as the edge of the pixel array and the surrounding guard band lies close to the physical edge of the crystal. Further, such detector dies are flip-chip bonded to readout ASIC using low-temperature curing silver-loaded epoxy so that the stress between the bonded detector die and the ASIC is minimized. In addition, this reduces crystalline modifications of the detector die that occur at temperature greater than 150\\r{ }C and have adverse effects on the detector performance. To allow smaller pitch detectors to be bonded, STFC has also developed a compression cold-weld indium bump bonding technique utilising bumps formed by a photolithographic lift-off technique.

  7. Development and Applications of Position-Sensitive Solid-State Gamma Ray Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    astrophysics, medical imaging, nuclear physics, detection of fissile materials, and monitoring of environmental radioactivity . © 2001 Elsevier Science...presumed source is known (e.g. the location of a supernovae or novae in the astrophysical context) then separate energies of the incident gamma ray can...central region encompassing the radioactive regions was divided into 1 mm3 voxels, and each voxel was tested for consistency with the conical

  8. Development of a forward-angle gamma-ray detector array for MoNA-LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votaw, Daniel; MoNA Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In recent years invariant mass spectroscopy has been successfully applied to measure neutron-unbound states. In this method neutrons are measured in coincidence with charged fragments following reactions with radioactive beams produced in projectile fragmentation reactions. When the final nucleus has bound excited states it is necessary to include gamma-ray detection in order to extract the excitation energy of the initial state. Because the MoNA-LISA setup at NSCL uses a large-gap Sweeper magnet to deflect the charged particles, conventional gamma-ray scintillation arrays cannot be used efficiently because of the large fringe field of the magnet. Thus we are developing a small cesium iodide (CsI) array using silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) which are agnostic to the presence of a magnetic field. Using GEANT4 simulations the parameters of the array will be optimized to achieve the required efficiency and energy resolution of the Doppler-corrected energy spectra, necessary to extract the gamma-ray transitions in the final nucleus. NSF PHY-1002511, DOE-NNSA DE-NA0000979.

  9. Measurement of electron drift velocities in the mixture of Xe and He for a new high-pressure Xe gamma-ray detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, S; Dmitrenko, V V

    2003-01-01

    Drift velocities of electrons in a mixture of Xe (20 atm)-He (3 atm) were measured using a cylindrical high-pressure xenon chamber. The drift velocities were found to be greater than 3x10 sup 5 cm/s above the reduced electric field of 2.0x10 sup - sup 1 sup 8 V centre dot cm sup 2 at room temperature, which are close to those in Xe-H sub 2 (0.3%). The mixture of He gas into high-pressure xenon improved the resolving time of detectors because it increased the electron drift velocities. This implies that a high-pressure xenon chamber mixed with sup 3 He instead of He gas operates as a gamma-ray detector sensitive to thermal neutrons. (author)

  10. Proof of principle of a high-spatial-resolution, resonant-response {gamma}-ray detector for Gamma Resonance Absorption in {sup 14}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandis, M; Goldberg, M B; Vartsky, D; Mardor, I; Levi, S; Mor, I; Bar, D [Nuclear Physics Division, Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Friedman, E [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Kreslo, I [Laboratory for High Energy Physics (LHEP), University of Bern, Bern 3012 (Switzerland); Dangendorf, V, E-mail: michal_brandis@yahoo.com [Physikalisch-Technisch-Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig 38116 (Germany)

    2011-02-01

    The development of a mm-spatial-resolution, resonant-response detector based on a micrometric glass capillary array filled with liquid scintillator is described. This detector was developed for Gamma Resonance Absorption (GRA) in {sup 14}N. GRA is an automatic-decision radiographic screening technique that combines high radiation penetration (the probe is a 9.17 MeV {gamma}-ray) with very good sensitivity and specificity to nitrogenous explosives. Detailed simulation of the detector response to electrons and protons generated by the 9.17 MeV {gamma}-rays was followed by a proof-of-principle experiment, using a mixed {gamma}-ray and neutron source. Towards this, a prototype capillary detector was assembled, including the associated filling and readout systems. Simulations and experimental results indeed show that proton tracks are distinguishable from electron tracks at relevant energies, based on a criterion that combines track length and light intensity per unit length.

  11. Tl2LaCl5:Ce, high performance scintillator for gamma-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawrami, R.; Ariesanti, E.; Wei, H.; Finkelstein, J.; Glodo, J.; Shah, K. S.

    2017-10-01

    This paper reports on a new Ce-doped Tl-based scintillator, Tl2LaCl5 (TLC), for gamma-ray detection. 10 mm diameter crystals have been successfully grown using the vertical Bridgman method. The emission peak of TLC is detected at 383 nm under X-ray excitation. The light yield of TLC is 76,000 ph/MeV. The samples show excellent energy resolution of 3.4% (FWHM) at 662 keV. The non-proportionality is less than 1%, from 32 keV to 1275 keV. The major scintillation decay time is 36 ns.

  12. OPTIMIZATION OF VIRTUAL FRISCH-GRID CdZnTe DETECTOR DESIGNS FOR IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF GAMMA RAYS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOLOTNIKOV,A.E.; ABDUL-JABBAR, N.M.; BABALOLA, S.; CAMARDA, G.S.; CUI, Y.; HOSSAIN, A.; JACKSON, E.; JACKSON, H.; JAMES, J.R.; LURYI, A.L.; JAMES, R.B.

    2007-08-21

    In the past, various virtual Frisch-grid designs have been proposed for cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) and other compound semiconductor detectors. These include three-terminal, semi-spherical, CAPture, Frisch-ring, capacitive Frisch-grid and pixel devices (along with their modifications). Among them, the Frisch-grid design employing a non-contacting ring extended over the entire side surfaces of parallelepiped-shaped CZT crystals is the most promising. The defect-free parallelepiped-shaped crystals with typical dimensions of 5x5{approx}12 mm3 are easy to produce and can be arranged into large arrays used for imaging and gamma-ray spectroscopy. In this paper, we report on further advances of the virtual Frisch-grid detector design for the parallelepiped-shaped CZT crystals. Both the experimental testing and modeling results are described.

  13. Combined in-beam gamma-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy with radioactive ion beams. Simulations of a silicon detector for the SPEDE spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konki, J.; Papadakis, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Butler, P. A.; Davies, P.; Greenlees, P. T.; Herzberg, R. D.; Huyse, M.; Jenkins, D. G.; Julin, R.; O'Neill, G.; Page, R. D.; Rahkila, P.; Ranttila, K.; Thornhill, J.; Van Duppen, P.

    2013-12-01

    In-beam gamma-ray and electron spectroscopy have been widely used as tools to study the broad variety of phenomena in nuclear structure. The SPEDE spectrometer is a new device to be used in conjunction with the MINIBALL germanium detector array to enable the detection of internal conversion electrons in coincidence with gamma rays from de-exciting nuclei in radioactive ion beam experiments at the upcoming HIE-ISOLDE facility at CERN, Switzerland. Geant4 simulations were carried out in order to optimise the design and segmentation of the silicon detector to achieve good energy resolution and performance.

  14. Calibration and performance of a real-time gamma-ray spectrometry water monitor using a LaBr3(Ce) detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, E.; Casanovas, R.; Salvadó, M.

    2018-03-01

    A scintillation gamma-ray spectrometry water monitor with a 2″ × 2″ LaBr3(Ce) detector was characterized in this study. This monitor measures gamma-ray spectra of river water. Energy and resolution calibrations were performed experimentally, whereas the detector efficiency was determined using Monte Carlo simulations with EGS5 code system. Values of the minimum detectable activity concentrations for 131I and 137Cs were calculated for different integration times. As an example of the monitor performance after calibration, a radiological increment during a rainfall episode was studied.

  15. Applied gamma-ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dams, R; Crouthamel, Carl E

    1970-01-01

    Applied Gamma-Ray Spectrometry covers real life application of the gamma-ray and the devices used in their experimental studies. This book is organized into 9 chapters, and starts with discussions of the various decay processes, the possible interaction mechanisms of gamma radiation with matter, and the intrinsic and extrinsic variables, which affect the observed gamma-ray and X-ray spectra. The subsequent chapters deal with the properties and fabrication of scintillation detectors, semiconductor detectors, and proportional gas counters. These chapters present some of the most widely utilized

  16. Portable compton gamma-ray detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA; Oldaker, Mark E [Pleasanton, CA

    2008-03-04

    A Compton scattered gamma-ray detector system. The system comprises a gamma-ray spectrometer and an annular array of individual scintillators. The scintillators are positioned so that they are arrayed around the gamma-ray spectrometer. The annular array of individual scintillators includes a first scintillator. A radiation shield is positioned around the first scintillator. A multi-channel analyzer is operatively connected to the gamma-ray spectrometer and the annular array of individual scintillators.

  17. A LaF{sub 3}:Nd(10%) scintillation detector with microgap gas chamber read-out for the detection of {gamma}-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Marel, J.; Bom, V.R.; van Eijk, C.W.E.; Hollander, R.W. [Delft Univ. of Technol. (Netherlands). Radiat. Technol. Group; Sarro, P.M. [Delft Institute of Microelectronics and Submicrontechnology, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    1997-06-21

    A LaF{sub 3}:Nd(10%) scintillator crystal has been placed in a microgap gas chamber to obtain a position-sensitive detector for {gamma}-rays. Directly on the crystal a thin layer of nickel is evaporated, and on top of that a thin semi-transparant CsI photocathode. {gamma}-rays absorbed in the scintillator crystal produce a UV-light flash, which liberates electrons in the photocathode. These electrons are multiplied and detected in the microgap chamber. By comparing the spectrum measured when this detector is irradiated with 511 keV {gamma}-rays with a spectrum that is computed in a Monte Carlo simulation, it is concluded that the probability that a UV-light photon created in the scintillator produces a photoelectron in the photocathode, is about 2.5%. (orig.).

  18. SACI--a 4{pi} plastic phoswich array ancillary detector system of a {gamma}-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcantara-Nunez, J.A. E-mail: juan.alcantara@dfn.if.usp.br; Oliveira, J.R.B.; Cybulska, E.W.; Medina, N.H.; Rao, M.N.; Ribas, R.V.; Rizzutto, M.A.; Seale, W.A.; Falla-Sotelo, F.; Espinoza-Quinones, F.R.; Tenreiro, C

    2003-02-01

    A large solid angle low-Z charged particle detector system was built in order to improve the quality of the identification and selection of evaporation channels for in-beam {gamma}-spectroscopy measurements. The array consists of 11 plastic phoswich telescopes closely packed in a 4{pi} arrangement and to be used as an ancillary system for the Pelletron Laboratory {gamma}-ray spectrometer. The new system was tested in {gamma}-particle and {gamma}-{gamma}-particle coincidence measurements using the {sup 27}Al+{sup 16}O and {sup 100}Mo+{sup 11}B reactions, at 53 and 43 MeV incident beam energies, respectively. The values for the particle detection efficiency and improvement in the peak to background ratios are considered acceptable for the usefulness of the system.

  19. Gamma Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The project has progressed successfully during this period of performance. The highlights of the Gamma Ray Astronomy teams efforts are: (1) Support daily BATSE data operations, including receipt, archival and dissemination of data, quick-look science analysis, rapid gamma-ray burst and transient monitoring and response efforts, instrument state-of-health monitoring, and instrument commanding and configuration; (2) On-going scientific analysis, including production and maintenance of gamma-ray burst, pulsed source and occultation source catalogs, gamma-ray burst spectroscopy, studies of the properties of pulsars and black holes, and long-term monitoring of hard x-ray sources; (3) Maintenance and continuous improvement of BATSE instrument response and calibration data bases; (4) Investigation of the use of solid state detectors for eventual application and instrument to perform all sky monitoring of X-Ray and Gamma sources with high sensitivity; and (5) Support of BATSE outreach activities, including seminars, colloquia and World Wide Web pages. The highlights of this efforts can be summarized in the publications and presentation list.

  20. Curves for the response of a Ge(Li) detector to gamma rays in the energy range up to 11 MeV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopecký, J.; Ratyński, W.; Warming, Inge Elisabeth

    1967-01-01

    The response function of a Ge(Li) coaxial detector with a sensitive volume of 17 cm3 for gamma rays of energies ranging from 2.23 to 10.83 MeV has been determined. The measurements were carried out with an experimental set-up using the neutron beam from the DR 3 reactor ar Risö and the (n, γ......) reaction as gamma-ray source. The important features of the spectra are discussed, and the double-escape peak efficiency is determined....

  1. Influence of gamma ray irradiation on thermal conductivity of bismaleimide-triazine-based insulation tape at cryogenic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Idesaki, A.; Ogitsu, T.

    2018-01-01

    Recent accelerator-based experiments for particle physics require the superconducting magnets that can be operated under high radiation environment. An electrical insulation tape, which is composed of polyimide film and a boron free glass fabric pre-impregnated with epoxy resin blended with bismaleimide-triazine resin, is developed to enhance the radiation tolerance for superconducting magnets. Since the thermal conductivity of insulation tape is one of key parameters that affects the coil temperature during the operation, the influence of gamma-ray irradiation on the thermal conductivity of the insulation tape is investigated with a maximum dose of 5 MGy. The thermal conductivity is measured at cryogenic temperature from 5 K to 20 K cooled by a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. By comparing the thermal conductivity before and after the gamma ray irradiation, no significant degradation on the thermal conductivity has been observed.

  2. Studies relating to the choice of [gamma]-ray detectors for in vivo nitrogen measurement by prompt-capture neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamatelatos, I.E.M.; Chettle, D.R.; Scott, M.C. (Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Space Research)

    1993-03-01

    The choice of gamma-ray detectors for in vivo nitrogen determination is examined. NaI(T1), BiGeO and hyperpure Ge detectors are investigated. It is shown that several small (5.1 cm diameter x 10.2 cm long) NaI(T1) detectors offer advantages over a single large detector (15.2 cm diameter x 15.2 cm long). BiGeO has the disadvantage of an interference peak at 10.2 MeV, whilst hyperpure Ge detectors are expensive, and therefore not cost effective, unless used for simultaneous multi-elemental analysis. (author).

  3. A Search for gravitational waves associated with the gamma ray burst GRB030329 using the LIGO detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ageev, A.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S.B.; Anderson, W.G.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Asiri, F.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Balasubramanian, R.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B.C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barnes, M.; /Potsdam, Max Planck Inst. /Hannover, Max Planck Inst. Grav. /Australian

    2005-01-01

    We have performed a search for bursts of gravitational waves associated with the very bright Gamma Ray Burst GRB030329, using the two detectors at the LIGO Hanford Observatory. Our search covered the most sensitive frequency range of the LIGO detectors (approximately 80-2048 Hz), and we specifically targeted signals shorter than {approx_equal}150 ms. Our search algorithm looks for excess correlated power between the two interferometers and thus makes minimal assumptions about the gravitational waveform. We observed no candidates with gravitational wave signal strength larger than a pre-determined threshold. We report frequency dependent upper limits on the strength of the gravitational waves associated with GRB030329. Near the most sensitive frequency region, around {approx_equal}250 Hz, our root-sum-square (RSS) gravitational wave strain sensitivity for optimally polarized bursts was better than h{sub RSS} {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup -21} Hz{sup -1/2}. Our result is comparable to the best published results searching for association between gravitational waves and GRBs.

  4. SFERA: An Integrated Circuit for the Readout of X and gamma -Ray Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schembari, Filippo; Quaglia, Riccardo; Bellotti, Giovanni; Fiorini, Carlo

    2016-06-01

    In this work we present SFERA, a low-noise fully-programmable 16 channel readout ASIC designed for both Xand y-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications. The chip is designed to process signals coming from solid-state detectors and CMOS preamplifiers. The design has been guided by the use of Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) and CUBE charge sensitive amplifiers (CSAs), although we consider the ASIC sufficiently versatile to be used with other types of detectors. Five different gains are implemented, namely 2800 e-, 4400 e-, 10000 e-, 14000 e- and 20000 e-, considering the input connected to a 25 fF feedback capacitance CMOS preamplifier. Filter peaking times (tP) are also programmable among 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 μs. Each readout channel is the cascade of a 9th order semi-Gaussian shaping-amplifier (SA) and a peak detector (PKS), followed by a dedicated pile-up rejection (PUR) digital logic. Three data multiplexing strategies are implemented: the so-called polling X, intended for high-rate X-ray applications, the polling y, for scintillation light detection and the sparse, for signals derandomization. The spectroscopic characterization has shown an energy resolution of 122.1 eV FWHM on the Mn-Ku line of an 55Fe X-ray source using a 10 mm2 SDD cooled at -35 °C at 4 μs filter peaking time. The measured resolution is 130 eV at the peaking time of 500 ns. At 1 Mcps input count rate and 500 ns peaking time, we have measured 42% of processed events at the output of the ASIC after the PUR selection. Output data can be digitized on-chip by means of an embedded 12-bit successive-approximation ADC. The effective resolution of the data converter is 10.75-bit when operated at 4.5 MS/s. The chosen technology is the AMS 0.35 μm CMOS and the chip area occupancy is 5 × 5 mm2.

  5. Measurements of prompt fission gamma-rays and neutrons with lanthanide halide scintillation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Oberstedt, A; Billnert, R; Borcea, R; Brys, T; Chaves, C; Gamboni, T; Geerts, W; Göök, A; Guerrero, C; Hambsch, F-J; Kis, Z; Martinez, T; Oberstedt, S; Szentmiklosi, L; Takács, K; Vivaldi, M

    2014-01-01

    Photons have been measured with lanthanide halide scintillation detectors in coincidence with fission fragments. Using the time-of-flight information, reactions from γ-rays and neutrons could easily be distinguished. In several experiments on $^{252}$Cf(sf), $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) and $^{241}$Pu(n$_{th}$,f) prompt fission γ-ray spectra characteristics were determined with high precision and the results are presented here. Moreover, a measured prompt fission neutron spectrum for $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) is shown in order to demonstrate a new detection technique.

  6. A compact and modular x- and gamma-ray detector with a CsI scintillator and double-readout Silicon Drift Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, R.; Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Amati, L.; Fiorini, M.; Uslenghi, M.; Baldazzi, G.; Bellutti, P.; Evangelista, Y.; Elmi, I.; Feroci, M.; Ficorella, F.; Frontera, F.; Picciotto, A.; Piemonte, C.; Rachevski, A.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rignanese, L. P.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Zorzi, N.

    2016-07-01

    A future compact and modular X and gamma-ray spectrometer (XGS) has been designed and a series of proto- types have been developed and tested. The experiment envisages the use of CsI scintillator bars read out at both ends by single-cell 25 mm2 Silicon Drift Detectors. Digital algorithms are used to discriminate between events absorbed in the Silicon layer (lower energy X rays) and events absorbed in the scintillator crystal (higher energy X rays and -rays). The prototype characterization is shown and the modular design for future experiments with possible astrophysical applications (e.g. for the THESEUS mission proposed for the ESA M5 call) are discussed.

  7. SEARCH FOR GAMMA RAYS ABOVE 100 TeV FROM THE CRAB NEBULA WITH THE TIBET AIR SHOWER ARRAY AND THE 100 m{sup 2} MUON DETECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amenomori, M. [Department of Physics, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki 036-8561 (Japan); Bi, X. J.; Chen, W. Y.; Ding, L. K.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Gou, Q. B.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, H. H.; Hu, H. B.; Huang, J. [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, D. [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Chen, T. L.; Danzengluobu; Hu, Haibing [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Tibet University, Lhasa 850000 (China); Cui, S. W.; He, Z. T. [Department of Physics, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050016 (China); Feng, C. F. [Department of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Feng, Z. Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, SouthWest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Hibino, K. [Faculty of Engineering, Kanagawa University, Yokohama 221-8686 (Japan); Hotta, N. [Faculty of Education, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya 321-8505 (Japan); Collaboration: Tibet ASγ Collaboration; and others

    2015-11-10

    A 100 m{sup 2} muon detector (MD) was successfully constructed under the existing Tibet air shower (AS) array in the late fall of 2007. The sensitivity of the Tibet AS array to cosmic gamma rays can be improved by selecting muon-poor events with the MD. Our MC simulation of the MD response reasonably agrees with the experimental data in terms of the charge distribution for one-muon events and the background rejection power. Using the data collected by the Tibet AS array and the 100 m{sup 2} MD taken from 2008 March to 2010 February, we search for continuous gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula above ∼100 TeV. No significant excess is found, and the most stringent upper limit is obtained above 140 TeV.

  8. Results from a Prototype Multi-Element CdZnTe Gamma-Ray Detector for Planetary Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, C. E.; Browne, M. C.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Prettyman, T. H.; Reedy, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    We present high energy results for a 2 x 2 x 2 array of eight 10 mm x 10 mm x 5 mm coplanar grid CdZnTe detectors. We conclude that such an array can provide a room-temperature detector with good resolution and efficiency for planetary missions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Monte Carlo calculations of coincidence-summing corrections for volume sources in gamma-ray spectrometry with Ge detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Torano, Eduardo [Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, CIEMAT, Avda Complutense 22, 28040, Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: E.garciatorano@ciemat.es; Pozuelo, Milagros [Laboratorio de Radiactividad Ambiental, DIAE, CIEMAT (Spain); Salvat, Francesc [Facultat de Fisica (ECM), Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028, Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-06-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation approach to solve the problem of measuring volume sources in gamma-ray spectrometry is described. The simulation package PENELOPE, with a cylindrical geometry tool was used to model two measurement systems and to calculate the detection efficiency for volume sources of {gamma} emitters affected by coincidence-summing effects. {gamma}-Ray spectra and experimental detection efficiencies from multi-{gamma} emitting nuclides as {sup 60}Co, {sup 88}Y, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 152}Eu and {sup 166m}Ho are compared to the simulation results.

  10. Novel ZnO:Al contacts to CdZnTe for X- and gamma-ray detectors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roy, U N; Mundle, R M; Camarda, G S; Cui, Y; Gul, R; Hossain, A; Yang, G; Pradhan, A K; James, R B

    2016-01-01

    CdZnTe (CZT) has made a significant impact as a material for room-temperature nuclear-radiation detectors due to its potential impact in applications related to nonproliferation, homeland security, medical...

  11. Development of a pixelated CdTe detector module for a hard-x and gamma-ray imaging spectrometer application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvèz, J.-L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, L.; Artigues, B.; Álvarez, J.-M.; Ullán, M.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2016-07-01

    Stellar explosions are relevant and interesting astrophysical phenomena. Since long ago we have been working on the characterization of novae and supernovae in X and gamma-rays, with the use of space missions. We have also been involved in feasibility studies of future instruments in the energy range from several keV up to a few MeV, in collaboration with other research institutes. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae and Classical Novae. In order to fulfil the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution, an initial module prototype based on CdTe pixel detectors is being developed. The detector dimensions are 12.5mm x 12.5mm x 2mm with a pixel pitch of 1mm x 1mm. Two kinds of CdTe pixel detectors with different contacts have been tested: ohmic and Schottky. Each pixel is bump bonded to a fanout board made of Sapphire substrate and routed to the corresponding input channel of the readout VATAGP7.1 ASIC, to measure pixel position and pulse height for each incident gamma-ray photon. The study is complemented by the simulation of the CdTe module performance using the GEANT 4 and MEGALIB tools, which will help us to optimise the detector design. We will report on the spectroscopy characterisation of the CdTe detector module as well as the study of charge sharing.

  12. Gamma-ray bursts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe...

  13. X-ray and gamma-ray response of a 2 '' x 2 '' LaBr3 : Ce scintillation detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quarati, F.; Bos, A. J. J.; Brandenburg, S.; Dathy, C.; Dorenbos, P.; Kraft, S.; Ostendorf, R. W.; Ouspenski, V.; Owens, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Advances in material growth techniques have recently made large volume LaBr3:Ce crystals commercially available. These scintillators are currently being assessed by ESA for use as remote sensing gamma-ray spectrometers on future planetary missions. In addition to their superior scintillation

  14. Underground water Cherenkov muon detector array with the Tibet air shower array for gamma-ray astronomy in the 100 TeV region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenomori, M.; Ayabe, S.; Bi, X. J.; Chen, D.; Cui, S. W.; Danzengluobu; Ding, L. K.; Ding, X. H.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z. Y.; Gao, X. Y.; Geng, Q. X.; Guo, H. W.; He, H. H.; He, M.; Hibino, K.; Hotta, N.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H. B.; Huang, J.; Huang, Q.; Jia, H. Y.; Kajino, F.; Kasahara, K.; Katayose, Y.; Kato, C.; Kawata, K.; Labaciren; Le, G. M.; Li, A. F.; Li, J. Y.; Lu, H.; Lu, S. L.; Meng, X. R.; Mizutani, K.; Mu, J.; Munakata, K.; Nagai, A.; Nanjo, H.; Nishizawa, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohta, I.; Onuma, H.; Ouchi, T.; Ozawa, S.; Ren, J. R.; Saito, T.; Saito, T. Y.; Sakata, M.; Sako, T. K.; Sasaki, T.; Shibata, M.; Shiomi, A.; Shirai, T.; Sugimoto, H.; Takita, M.; Tan, Y. H.; Tateyama, N.; Torii, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Udo, S.; Wang, B.; Wang, H.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. G.; Wu, H. R.; Xue, L.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yan, C. T.; Yang, X. C.; Yasue, S.; Ye, Z. H.; Yu, G. C.; Yuan, A. F.; Yuda, T.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, N. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Yi; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.

    2007-06-01

    We propose to build a large water-Cherenkov-type muon-detector array (Tibet MD array) around the 37 000 m2 Tibet air shower array (Tibet AS array) already constructed at 4300 m above sea level in Tibet, China. Each muon detector is a waterproof concrete pool, 6 m wide × 6 m long × 1.5 m deep in size, equipped with a 20 inch-in-diameter PMT. The Tibet MD array consists of 240 muon detectors set up 2.5 m underground. Its total effective area will be 8640 m2 for muon detection. The Tibet MD array will significantly improve gamma-ray sensitivity of the Tibet AS array in the 100 TeV region (10 1000 TeV) by means of gamma/hadron separation based on counting the number of muons accompanying an air shower. The Tibet AS+MD array will have the sensitivity to gamma rays in the 100 TeV region by an order of magnitude better than any other previous existing detectors in the world.

  15. SNM Movement Detection/Radiation Sensors and Advanced Materials Portfolio Review, CdMnTe (CMT) Gamma Ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotnikov,A.

    2009-06-02

    The project goals are: (1) Develop CMT radiation detectors - Demonstrate feasibility (Phase 1 is complete) and Improve material properties and device performance; (2) This project will lead to novel radiation detectors - high detection efficiency, high energy-resolution, ambient-temperature operation, and low production cost; and (3) Such detectors are needed in areas of nonproliferation and national security for detection of SNM. Research highlights are: (1) We achieved our Phase-I goal - Demonstration of CMT detector performance approaching that of CZT detectors; (2) Demonstrated that In-doped CMT is much closer to its anticipated performance as radiation detectors than other alternative materials, TlBr and HgI{sub 2} - Large crystal volumes, 10{sup 10}{Omega}{center_dot}cm, 3 x 10{sup -3}cm{sup 2}/V, and stable response; and (3) Conducted material and device characterization experiments - Detectors: I-V, {mu}{sub e}, ({mu}{tau}){sub e}, internal E fields, energy spectra, and high-resolution x-ray response mapping data and Materials - DLTS, TCT, PL, EPDs, XRD, PCD and IR transmission.

  16. Calibration of gamma-ray detectors using Gaussian photopeak fitting in the multichannel spectra with a LabVIEW-based digital system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlattauer, Leo; Parali, Levent; Pechousek, Jiri; Sabikoglu, Israfil; Celiktas, Cuneyt; Tektas, Gozde; Novak, Petr; Jancar, Ales; Prochazka, Vit

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports on the development of a gamma-ray spectroscopic system for the (i) recording and (ii) processing of spectra. The utilized data read-out unit consists of a PCI digital oscilloscope, personal computer and LabVIEW™ programming environment. A pulse-height spectra of various sources were recorded with two NaI(Tl) detectors and analyzed, demonstrating the proper usage of the detectors. A multichannel analyzer implements the Gaussian photopeak fitting. The presented method provides results which are in compliance to the ones taken from commercial spectroscopy systems. Each individual hardware or software unit can be further utilized in different spectrometric user-systems. An application of the developed system for research and teaching purposes regarding the design of digital spectrometric systems has been successfully tested at the laboratories of the Department of Experimental Physics.

  17. Methods and Results of a Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the GEO 600, LIGO, and Virgo Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Blackburn, Lindy L.; hide

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report on a search for short-duration gravitational wave bursts in the frequency range 64 Hz-1792 Hz associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), using data from GEO600 and one of the LIGO or Virgo detectors. We introduce the method of a linear search grid to analyze GRB events with large sky localization uncertainties such as the localizations provided by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Coherent searches for gravitational waves (GWs) can be computationally intensive when the GRB sky position is not well-localized, due to the corrections required for the difference in arrival time between detectors. Using a linear search grid we are able to reduce the computational cost of the analysis by a factor of O(10) for GBM events. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our analysis pipeline can improve upon the sky localization of GRBs detected by the GBM, if a high-frequency GW signal is observed in coincidence. We use the linear search grid method in a search for GWs associated with 129 GRBs observed satellite-based gamma-ray experiments between 2006 and 2011. The GRBs in our sample had not been previously analyzed for GW counterparts. A fraction of our GRB events are analyzed using data from GEO600 while the detector was using squeezed-light states to improve its sensitivity; this is the first search for GWs using data from a squeezed-light interferometric observatory. We find no evidence for GW signals, either with any individual GRB in this sample or with the population as a whole. For each GRB we place lower bounds on the distance to the progenitor, assuming a fixed GW emission energy of 10(exp -2)Stellar Mass sq c, with a median exclusion distance of 0.8 Mpc for emission at 500 Hz and 0.3 Mpc at 1 kHz. The reduced computational cost associated with a linear search grid will enable rapid searches for GWs associated with Fermi GBM events in the Advanced detector era.

  18. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray spectrometers. Two...

  19. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray...

  20. Gamma-Ray Line Astronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Diehl, Roland

    2004-01-01

    Gamma-ray lines from radioactive isotopes, ejected into interstellar space by cosmic nucleosynthesis events, are observed with new space telescopes. The Compton Observatory had provided a sky survey for the isotopes 56Co, 22Na, 44Ti, and 26Al, detecting supernova radioactivity and the diffuse glow of long-lived radioactivity from massive stars in the Galaxy. High-resolution spectroscopy is now being exploited with Ge detectors: Since 2002, with ESA's INTEGRAL satellite and the RHESSI solar im...

  1. Gamma-ray triangles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibarra, Alejandro; Lopez-Gehler, Sergio; Molinaro, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new type of gamma-ray spectral feature, which we denominate gamma-ray triangle. This spectral feature arises in scenarios where dark matter self-annihilates via a chiral interaction into two Dirac fermions, which subsequently decay in flight into another fermion and a photon....... The resulting photon spectrum resembles a sharp triangle and can be readily searched for in the gamma-ray sky. Using data from the Fermi-LAT and H.E.S.S. instruments, we find no evidence for such a spectral feature and, therefore, set strong upper bounds on the corresponding annihilation cross section....... A concrete realization of a scenario yielding gamma-ray triangles consists of an asymmetric dark matter model where the dark matter particle carries lepton number. We show explicitly that this class of models can lead to intense gamma-ray spectral features, potentially at the reach of upcoming gamma...

  2. Gamma-ray irradiation and post-irradiation at room and elevated temperature response of pMOS dosimeters with thick gate oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejović Momčilo M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray irradiation and post-irradiation response at room and elevated temperature have been studied for radiation sensitive pMOS transistors with gate oxide thickness of 100 and 400 nm, respectively. Their response was followed based on the changes in the threshold voltage shift which was estimated on the basis of transfer characteristics in saturation. The presence of radiation-induced fixed oxide traps and switching traps - which lead to a change in the threshold voltage - was estimated from the sub-threshold I-V curves, using the midgap technique. It was shown that fixed oxide traps have a dominant influence on the change in the threshold voltage shift during gamma-ray irradiation and annealing.

  3. GRETA: utilizing new concepts in gamma-ray detection

    CERN Document Server

    Deleplanque, M A; Vetter, K; Schmid, G J; Stephens, F S; Clark, R M; Diamond, R M; Fallon, P; Macchiavelli, A O

    1999-01-01

    We present a new concept for gamma-ray detector arrays. An example, called GRETA (Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking Array), consists of highly segmented HPGe detectors covering 4 pi solid angle. The new feature is the ability to track the scattering sequence of incident gamma-rays and in every event, this potentially allows one to measure with high resolution the energy deposited, the location (incident angle) and the time of each gamma-ray that hits the array. GRETA will be of order of 1000 times more powerful than the best present arrays, such as Gammasphere or Euroball, and will provide access to new physics.

  4. MINIBALL The first $\\gamma$-ray spectrometer using segmented, encapsulated germanium detectors for studies with radioactive beams

    CERN Document Server

    Warr, N; Pascovici, G; Thomas, H G; Weisshaar, D

    2004-01-01

    MINIBALL is a new spectrometer of position-sensitive Ge detectors designed for nuclear-structure studies at the REX-ISOLDE (D. Habs et al., Prog. Part. Nucl. Phys. 38, 111 (1997)) radioactive-beam facility at CERN. It combines high efficiency and high granularity, using pulse-shape analysis and 6-fold segmented Ge detectors. (5 refs).

  5. Gamma ray camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1997-01-01

    A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

  6. Gamma ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentschel, M.; Günther, M. M.; Habs, D.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    Via refractive or diffractive scattering one can shape γ ray beams in terms of beam divergence, spot size and monochromaticity. These concepts might be particular important in combination with future highly brilliant gamma ray sources and might push the sensibility of planned experiments by several orders of magnitude. We will demonstrate the experimental feasibility of gamma ray monochromatization on a ppm level and the creation of a gamma ray beam with nanoradian divergence. The results are obtained using the inpile target position of the High Flux Reactor of the ILL Grenoble and the crystal spectrometer GAMS. Since the refractive index is believed to vanish to zero with 1/E2, the concept of refractive optics has never been considered for gamma rays. The combination of refractive optics with monochromator crystals is proposed to be a promising design. Using the crystal spectrometer GAMS, we have measured for the first time the refractive index at energies in the energy range of 180 - 2000 keV. The results indicate a deviation from simple 1/E2 extrapolation of X-ray results towards higher energies. A first interpretation of these new results will be presented. We will discuss the consequences of these results on the construction of refractive optics such as lenses or refracting prisms for gamma rays and their combination with single crystal monochromators.

  7. Gamma-ray spectroscopy with relativistic exotic heavy-ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Feasibility of gamma-ray spectroscopy at relativistic energies with exotic heavy-ions and new generation of germanium detectors (segmented Clover) is discussed. An experiment with such detector array and radioactive is discussed.

  8. Technology Needs for Gamma Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Gamma ray astronomy is currently in an exciting period of multiple missions and a wealth of data. Results from INTEGRAL, Fermi, AGILE, Suzaku and Swift are making large contributions to our knowledge of high energy processes in the universe. The advances are due to new detector and imaging technologies. The steps to date have been from scintillators to solid state detectors for sensors and from light buckets to coded aperture masks and pair telescopes for imagers. A key direction for the future is toward focusing telescopes pushing into the hard X-ray regime and Compton telescopes and pair telescopes with fine spatial resolution for medium and high energy gamma rays. These technologies will provide finer imaging of gamma-ray sources. Importantly, they will also enable large steps forward in sensitivity by reducing background.

  9. True coincidence-summing corrections for the coincident gamma-rays measured with coplanar grid CdZnTe detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, H; Solmaz, A N; Köse, E; Bor, D

    2010-06-01

    In this study, true coincidence-summing (TCS) correction factors have been measured for the sources (22)Na, (60)Co, (133)Ba and (152)Eu by use of three large volume coplanar grid CdZnTe (acronym: CZT) detectors. In case of a close-in detection geometry, two different TCS calculation algorithms were used to compute the required TCS correction factors. Both of the algorithms are based on the measured total-to-peak (TTP) ratio and full-energy peak (FEP) efficiency values that were obtained using almost "single" energy and coincidence-free nuclides. The results for TCS correction factors obtained by two different algorithms were agreeable to each other. The obtained TCS factors were ranged from about 7% to 30.5% in a 2250 mm(3) CZT detector when a close counting geometry was used. For other two detectors with a volume of 1000 and 1687.5mm(3), the resulted TCS correction factors were relatively smaller and varied between about 0.1% and 20% at the close counting geometry condition. Therefore, the results indicate that there is a need for the estimation of TCS corrections in CZT detectors, especially when their crystal volumes are greater than 1cm(3) and these detectors are used in the case of a close-in detection geometry. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-24

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  11. High-Efficiency CdZnTe Position-Sensitive VFG Gamma-Ray Detectors for Safeguards Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); James, Ralph B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cui, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); De Geronimo, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Vernon, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Camarda, G. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hossain, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yang, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Indusi, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Boyer, Brian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The goal of this project is to incorporate a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) detector (with 1% or better resolution) into a bench-top prototype for isotope identification and related safeguards applications. The bench-top system is based on a 2x2 array of 6x6x20 mm3 position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid (VFG) CZT detectors. The key features of the array are that it allows for the use of average-grade CZT material with a moderate content of defects, and yet it provides high energy resolution, 1% FWHM at 662 keV, large effective area, and low-power consumption. The development of this type of 3D detector and new instruments incorporating them is motivated by the high cost and low availability of large, > 1 cm3, CZT crystals suitable for making multi-pixel detectors with acceptable energy resolution and efficiency.

  12. Dynamics of native oxide growth on CdTe and CdZnTe X-ray and gamma-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zázvorka, Jakub; Franc, Jan; Beran, Lukáš; Moravec, Pavel; Pekárek, Jakub; Veis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We studied the growth of the surface oxide layer on four different CdTe and CdZnTe X-ray and gamma-ray detector-grade samples using spectroscopic ellipsometry. We observed gradual oxidization of CdTe and CdZnTe after chemical etching in bromine solutions. From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, we found that the oxide consists only of oxygen bound to tellurium. We applied a refined theoretical model of the surface layer to evaluate the spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. In this way we studied the dynamics and growth rate of the oxide layer within a month after chemical etching of the samples. We observed two phases in the evolution of the oxide layer on all studied samples. A rapid growth was visible within five days after the chemical treatment followed by semi-saturation and a decrease in the growth rate after the first week. After one month all the samples showed an oxide layer about 3 nm thick. The oxide thickness was correlated with leakage current degradation with time after surface preparation.

  13. Al-doped ZnO contact to CdZnTe for x- and gamma-ray detector applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, U. N.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; James, R. B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Mundle, R. M.; Pradhan, A. K. [Department of Engineering, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, Virginia 23504 (United States)

    2016-06-13

    The poor adhesion of common metals to CdZnTe (CZT)/CdTe surfaces has been a long-standing challenge for radiation detector applications. In this present work, we explored the use of an alternative electrode, viz., Al-doped ZnO (AZO) as a replacement to common metallic contacts. ZnO offers several advantages over the latter, such as having a higher hardness, a close match of the coefficients of thermal expansion for CZT and ZnO, and better adhesion to the surface of CZT due to the contact layer being an oxide. The AZO/CZT contact was investigated via high spatial-resolution X-ray response mapping for a planar detector at the micron level. The durability of the device was investigated by acquiring I–V measurements over an 18-month period, and good long-term stability was observed. We have demonstrated that the AZO/CZT/AZO virtual-Frisch-grid device performs fairly well, with comparable or better characteristics than that for the same detector fabricated with gold contacts.

  14. Melanin-gamma rays assistants for bismuth oxide nanoparticles synthesis at room temperature for enhancing antimicrobial, and photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Batal, Ahmed I; El-Sayyad, Gharieb S; El-Ghamry, Abbas; Agaypi, Kerolos M; Elsayed, Mohamed A; Gobara, Mohamed

    2017-08-01

    Melanin pigment has been deemed as a natural photoprotector with strong hydrophobicity. It allured considerable compatibility with many applications in medicine, food, and nanotechnology. Penicillium chrysogenium has been devoted to the green synthesis of melanin whereby optimizing its culture and environmental conditions. The impacts of alternative economic L-tyrosine natural sources (unprecedented alternate origins) and gamma radiation were pledged for the potential growing of the pigment. Herein, notable increases in melanin yield (6.4mg/ml; much higher than nonoptimized one by 40 folds) was obtained by optimizing the culture, and environmental requirements [potato starch (3.0%), yeast extract (5.0%), copper sulfate (0.2mM), 0.25% L-tyrosine, 0.1% L-glycine, and 0.1% Tween 20 at pH5.0, and 30°C for 7.0days using 180.0rpm shaking speed]. The addition of banana's peel (2.0%) has been led to increase the melanin production up to (8.3mg/ml; much higher than optimized one by 1.29 folds). It stimulated the induced enzymes, (i.e., tyrosinase) because it contained significant amounts of L-tyrosine, dopamine, and L-DOPA as resources for melanin biosynthesis. Then irradiated P. chrysogenium (2.5kGy) induced the pigment yield to 10.3mg/ml; much higher than optimized one by (1.61 folds). On the other hand, we tailored a methodology involved the product of melanin and gamma rays (25.0kGy) to an eco-friendly synthesis of Bismuth oxide nanoparticles (BiONPs) at the room temperature. Melanin under such alkaline condition functioning as simultaneously hydrolyzes, photoprotection of the Bi seeds, and stabilizer against the uncontrolled growth and the free radicals attack. Whereas the gamma irradiation induced the room temperature condensation reaction to occur, a novel mechanism proposal was discussed. BiONPs were characterized by UV-Vis., DLS, XRD, SEM, EDX, and FTIR. DLS and XRD calculations with TEM analysis exhibited the mean diameter of BiONPs was 29.82nm. Moreover, the as

  15. Gamma Ray Signatures of Neutrons From a Terrestrial Gamma Ray Flash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, G. S.; Smith, D. M.; Martinez-McKinney, G. F.; Kamogawa, M.; Cummer, S. A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Wang, D.; Stock, M.; Kawasaki, Z.

    2017-10-01

    Following a lightning strike to a wind turbine in Japan, we have observed a large burst of neutrons lasting 100 ms with a ground fluence of 1,000 n cm-2, thousands of times greater than the peak neutron flux associated with the largest ground level solar particle event ever observed. This is the first detection of an unequivocal signature of neutrons from a terrestrial gamma ray flash, consisting of a 2.223 MeV gamma-ray spectral line from a neutron-capture on hydrogen reaction occurring in our detector, and is shown to be consistent with the production of 1012-1013 photoneutrons from a downward terrestrial gamma ray flash (TGF) at 1.0 km, with a gamma ray brightness typical of upward TGFs observed by satellites.

  16. Coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Nikola; Roos, Per; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    2017-01-01

    events are recorded in a list mode file with their timestamp and energy, enabling coincidence identification and spectrum manipulation in post-processing. When coincidence gamma-spectrometry is used for cascade emitting nuclides, coincident signals can be extracted thus significantly reducing......Gamma-ray spectrometry with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors is often the technique of choice in an environmental radioactivity laboratory. When measuring environmental samples associated activities are usually low so an important parameter that describes the performance of the spectrometer...... for a nuclide of interest is the minimum detectable activity (MDA). There are many ways for lowering the MDAs in gamma spectrometry. Recently, developments of fast and compact digital acquisition systems have led to growing number of multiple HPGe detector spectrometers. In these applications all detected...

  17. Gamma rays from Galactic Pulsars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calore, F.; di Mauro, M.; Donato, F.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma rays from young pulsars and milli-second pulsars are expected to contribute to the diuse gamma-ray emission measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) at high latitudes. We derive the contribution of the pulsars undetected counterpart by using information from radio to gamma rays and we

  18. Gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Wijers, Ralph A M J; Woosley, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Cosmic gamma ray bursts (GRBs) have fascinated scientists and the public alike since their discovery in the late 1960s. Their story is told here by some of the scientists who participated in their discovery and, after many decades of false starts, solved the problem of their origin. Fourteen chapters by active researchers in the field present a detailed history of the discovery, a comprehensive theoretical description of GRB central engine and emission models, a discussion of GRB host galaxies and a guide to how GRBs can be used as cosmological tools. Observations are grouped into three sets from the satellites CGRO, BeppoSAX and Swift, and followed by a discussion of multi-wavelength observations. This is the first edited volume on GRB astrophysics that presents a fully comprehensive review of the subject. Utilizing the latest research, Gamma-ray Bursts is an essential desktop companion for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics.

  19. LaCl{sub 3}:Ce scintillator for Gamma ray detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, K.S.; Glodo, J.; Klugerman, M.; Cirignano, L.; Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Weber, M.J.

    2002-05-25

    In this paper, we report on a relatively new cerium doped scintillator - LaCl3 for gamma ray spectroscopy. Crystals of this scintillator have been grown using Bridgman method. This material when doped with 10 percent cerium has high light output ({approx} 50,000 photons/MeV) and fast principal decay time constant ({approx}20 ns). Furthermore, it shows excellent energy resolution for gamma ray detection. For example, energy resolution as low as 3.2 percent (FWHM) has been achieved with 662 keV photons (137Cs source) at room temperature. Also high timing resolution (264 ps - FWHM) has been recorded with LaCl3-PMT and BaF2-PMT detectors operating in coincidence using 511 keV positron annihilation gamma ray pairs. Details of crystal growth, scintillation properties, and variation of these properties with cerium concentration are also reported.

  20. Gamma-ray tracking method for pet systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailescu, Lucian; Vetter, Kai M.

    2010-06-08

    Gamma-ray tracking methods for use with granular, position sensitive detectors identify the sequence of the interactions taking place in the detector and, hence, the position of the first interaction. The improved position resolution in finding the first interaction in the detection system determines a better definition of the direction of the gamma-ray photon, and hence, a superior source image resolution. A PET system using such a method will have increased efficiency and position resolution.

  1. Black Hole Accretion in Gamma Ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Janiuk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the structure and evolution of the hyperaccreting disks and outflows in the gamma ray bursts central engines. The torus around a stellar mass black hole is composed of free nucleons, Helium, electron-positron pairs, and is cooled by neutrino emission. Accretion of matter powers the relativistic jets, responsible for the gamma ray prompt emission. The significant number density of neutrons in the disk and outflowing material will cause subsequent formation of heavier nuclei. We study the process of nucleosynthesis and its possible observational consequences. We also apply our scenario to the recent observation of the gravitational wave signal, detected on 14 September 2015 by the two Advanced LIGO detectors, and related to an inspiral and merger of a binary black hole system. A gamma ray burst that could possibly be related with the GW150914 event was observed by the Fermi satellite. It had a duration of about 1 s and appeared about 0.4 s after the gravitational-wave signal. We propose that a collapsing massive star and a black hole in a close binary could lead to the event. The gamma ray burst was powered by a weak neutrino flux produced in the star remnant’s matter. Low spin and kick velocity of the merged black hole are reproduced in our simulations. Coincident gravitational-wave emission originates from the merger of the collapsed core and the companion black hole.

  2. Neutron and Gamma-ray Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilnikov, Anatoly V.; Sasao, Mamiko; Kaschuck, Yuri A.; Kiptily, Vasily G.; Nishitani, Takeo; Popovichev, Sergey V.; Bertalot, Luciano

    2008-03-01

    Due to high neutron and gamma-ray yields and large size plasmas many future fusion reactor plasma parameters such as fusion power, fusion power density, ion temperature, fuel mixture, fast ion energy and spatial distributions can be well measured by various fusion product diagnostics. Neutron diagnostics provide information on fusion reaction rate, which indicates how close is the plasma to the ultimate goal of nuclear fusion and fusion power distribution in the plasma core, which is crucial for optimization of plasma breakeven and burn. Depending on the plasma conditions neutron and gamma-ray diagnostics can provide important information, namely about dynamics of fast ion energy and spatial distributions during neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron heating and generated by fast ions MHD instabilities. The influence of the fast particle population on the 2-D neutron source profile was clearly demonstrated in JET experiments. 2-D neutron and gamma-ray source measurements could be important for driven plasma heating profile optimization in fusion reactors. To meat the measurement requirements in ITER the planned set of neutron and gamma ray diagnostics includes radial and vertical neutron and gamma cameras, neutron flux monitors, neutron activation systems and neutron spectrometers. The necessity of using massive radiation shielding strongly influences the diagnostic designs in fusion reactor, determines angular fields of view of neutron and gamma-ray cameras and spectrometers and gives rise to unavoidable difficulties in the absolute calibration. The development, testing in existing tokomaks and a possible engineering integration of neuron and gamma-ray diagnostic systems into ITER are presented.

  3. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  4. gamma-ray anisotropy measurement in coincidence mode

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Yong; LiuMinLiang; Liu Zhong; He Jian Jun; Guo Ying Xiang; Lei Xiang Guo; Zhang Yu Hu; Luo Wan Ju

    2002-01-01

    In order to assign gamma-ray multipolarity, a method of ADO ratios deduced from coincidence data has been described. The factors affecting the reliability of the ADO ratios have been discussed using an experimental detector configuration. The multipolarities for known gamma rays deduced by the ADO method are consistent with the previous results obtained from gamma-ray angular distribution and DCO ratio measurements. This consistence proves that the ADO method is reliable. The advantages of the ADO method over the traditional DCO ratio measurement have been discussed

  5. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Jens

    A new method - Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition, NASVD - for processing gamma-ray spectra has been developed as part of a Ph.D. project. By using this technique one is able to decompose a large set of data - for example from airborne gamma-ray surveys - into a few spectral components...

  6. Gamma-ray spectroscopy at MHz counting rates with a compact LaBr{sub 3} detector and silicon photomultipliers for fusion plasma applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocente, M., E-mail: massimo.nocente@mib.infn.it [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “Piero Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Rigamonti, D.; Croci, G.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “Piero Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Perseo, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Tardocchi, M.; Cremona, A.; Muraro, A. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “Piero Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Boltruczyk, G.; Broslawski, A.; Gosk, M.; Korolczuk, S.; Zychor, I. [Narodowe Centrum Badan Jadrowych (NCBJ), Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Kiptily, V. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham (United Kingdom); Mazzocco, M.; Strano, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy); Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at MHz counting rates have been carried out, for the first time, with a compact spectrometer based on a LaBr{sub 3} scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. The instrument, which is also insensitive to magnetic fields, has been developed in view of the upgrade of the gamma-ray camera diagnostic for α particle measurements in deuterium-tritium plasmas of the Joint European Torus. Spectra were measured up to 2.9 MHz with a projected energy resolution of 3%-4% in the 3-5 MeV range, of interest for fast ion physics studies in fusion plasmas. The results reported here pave the way to first time measurements of the confined α particle profile in high power plasmas of the next deuterium-tritium campaign at the Joint European Torus.

  7. Production of gamma rays with energies greater than 30 MeV in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D.; Fichtel, C.; Kniffen, D.

    1974-01-01

    A three-dimensional study of atmospheric gamma rays with energy greater than 30 MeV has been carried out. Experimental results were obtained from four balloon flights from Palestine, Texas, with a 15 cm by 15 cm digitized wire grid spark chamber. The energy spectrum for downward-moving gamma rays steepens with increasing atmospheric depth. Near the top of the atmosphere, the spectrum steepens with increasing zenith angle. Experimental results compare reasonably well with a three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation of atmospheric gamma ray production. Inclusion of upward-moving gamma rays makes possible the use of atmospheric secondaries for in-flight calibration of satellite gamma ray detectors.

  8. GLAST, the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    De Angelis, A

    2000-01-01

    GLAST, a detector for cosmic gamma rays in the range from 20 MeV to 300 GeV, will be launched in space in 2005. Breakthroughs are expected in particular in the study of particle acceleration mechanisms in space and of gamma ray bursts, and maybe on the search for cold dark matter; but of course the most exciting discoveries could come from the unexpected.

  9. GLAST, the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    De Angelis, A

    2001-01-01

    GLAST, a detector for cosmic gamma rays in the range from 20 MeV to 300 GeV, will be launched in space in 2005. Breakthroughs are expected in particular in the study of particle acceleration mechanisms in space and of gamma ray bursts, and maybe on the search for cold dark matter; but of course the most exciting discoveries could come from the unexpected.

  10. The Future of Gamma Ray Astrophysics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, gamma ray astrophysics has entered the astrophysical mainstream. Extremely successful space-borne (GeV) and ground-based (TeV) detectors, combined with a multitude of partner telescopes, have revealed a fascinating “astroscape" of active galactic nuclei, pulsars, gamma ray bursts, supernova remnants, binary stars, star-forming galaxies, novae much more, exhibiting major pathways along which large energy releases can flow. From  a basic physics perspective, exquisitely sensitive measurements have constrained the nature of dark matter, the cosmological origin of magnetic field and the properties of black holes. These advances have motivated the development of new facilities, including HAWC, DAMPE, CTA and SVOM, which will further our understanding of the high energy universe. Topics that will receive special attention include merging neutron star binaries, clusters of galaxies, galactic cosmic rays and putative, TeV dark matter.

  11. Qualification model of the space ISGRI CdTe gamma-ray camera

    CERN Document Server

    Limousin, O; Bonnin, C; Cretolle, J; Goldwurm, A; Horeau, B; Laurent, P; Lebrun, F; Leray, J P

    2001-01-01

    A new generation of large area semiconductor based gamma-ray camera for astrophysics space application has been developed through the gamma-ray IBIS (Imager on Board INTEGRAL Satellite) telescope program, on board the ESA INTEGRAL satellite. This instrument features a coded-mask aperture imaging system, active and passive shields and two detector arrays. The first one (ISGRI : INTEGRAL Soft Gamma-Ray Imager) is made of 16384 CdTe detectors (4x4 mm large, 2 mm thick) operating at room temperature and will operate between 15 keV and 1 MeV. The second detector array (PICsIT : Pixelated CsI Telescope) is made of 4096 CsI scintillators (9.2x9.2 mm large, 30 mm high) coupled to silicon PIN photodiodes working between 150 keV and 10 MeV. IBIS combine broad band energy, spectroscopic capabilities and high spatial resolution imaging (12 arcmin) over a wide field of view (approx 20 deg. x 20 deg., 50% sensitivity). A 'flight-like' model of the detectors has been built, integrated and successfully tested. After a descri...

  12. About cosmic gamma ray lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Roland

    2017-06-01

    Gamma ray lines from cosmic sources convey the action of nuclear reactions in cosmic sites and their impacts on astrophysical objects. Gamma rays at characteristic energies result from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. The gamma-ray line from the annihilation of positrons at 511 keV falls into the same energy window, although of different origin. We present here the concepts of cosmic gamma ray spectrometry and the corresponding instruments and missions, followed by a discussion of recent results and the challenges and open issues for the future. Among the lessons learned are the diffuse radioactive afterglow of massive-star nucleosynthesis in 26Al and 60Fe gamma rays, which is now being exploited towards the cycle of matter driven by massive stars and their supernovae; large interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised to be of key importance here. Also, constraints on the complex processes making stars explode as either thermonuclear or core-collapse supernovae are being illuminated by gamma-ray lines, in this case from shortlived radioactivities from 56Ni and 44Ti decays. In particular, the three-dimensionality and asphericities that have recently been recognised as important are enlightened in different ways through such gamma-ray line spectroscopy. Finally, the distribution of positron annihilation gamma ray emission with its puzzling bulge-dominated intensity disctribution is measured through spatially-resolved spectra, which indicate that annihilation conditions may differ in different parts of our Galaxy. But it is now understood that a variety of sources may feed positrons into the interstellar medium, and their characteristics largely get lost during slowing down and propagation of positrons before annihilation; a recent microquasar flare was caught as an opportunity to see positrons annihilate at a source.

  13. An array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors and a front-end application-specific integrated circuit for large-area position-sensitive gamma-ray cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, A E; Ackley, K; Camarda, G S; Cherches, C; Cui, Y; De Geronimo, G; Fried, J; Hodges, D; Hossain, A; Lee, W; Mahler, G; Maritato, M; Petryk, M; Roy, U; Salwen, C; Vernon, E; Yang, G; James, R B

    2015-07-01

    We developed a robust and low-cost array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors coupled to a front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for spectroscopy and imaging of gamma rays. The array operates as a self-reliant detector module. It is comprised of 36 close-packed 6 × 6 × 15 mm(3) detectors grouped into 3 × 3 sub-arrays of 2 × 2 detectors with the common cathodes. The front-end analog ASIC accommodates up to 36 anode and 9 cathode inputs. Several detector modules can be integrated into a single- or multi-layer unit operating as a Compton or a coded-aperture camera. We present the results from testing two fully assembled modules and readout electronics. The further enhancement of the arrays' performance and reduction of their cost are possible by using position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, which allow for accurate corrections of the response of material non-uniformities caused by crystal defects.

  14. An array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors and a front-end application-specific integrated circuit for large-area position-sensitive gamma-ray cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotnikov, A. E., E-mail: bolotnik@bnl.gov; Ackley, K.; Camarda, G. S.; Cherches, C.; Cui, Y.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; Mahler, G.; Maritato, M.; Roy, U.; Salwen, C.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11793 (United States); Hodges, D. [University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Lee, W. [Korea University, Seoul 136-855 (Korea, Republic of); Petryk, M. [SUNY Binghamton, Vestal, New York 13902 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    We developed a robust and low-cost array of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors coupled to a front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for spectroscopy and imaging of gamma rays. The array operates as a self-reliant detector module. It is comprised of 36 close-packed 6 × 6 × 15 mm{sup 3} detectors grouped into 3 × 3 sub-arrays of 2 × 2 detectors with the common cathodes. The front-end analog ASIC accommodates up to 36 anode and 9 cathode inputs. Several detector modules can be integrated into a single- or multi-layer unit operating as a Compton or a coded-aperture camera. We present the results from testing two fully assembled modules and readout electronics. The further enhancement of the arrays’ performance and reduction of their cost are possible by using position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, which allow for accurate corrections of the response of material non-uniformities caused by crystal defects.

  15. A novel gamma-ray detector with submillimeter resolutions using a monolithic MPPC array with pixelized Ce:LYSO and Ce:GGAG crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, T., E-mail: katou.frme.8180@asagi.waseda.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Miura, T.; Matsuda, H.; Kishimoto, A. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, K.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Nakamura, S.; Kawabata, N. [Solid State Division, Hamamatsu Photonics K. K., 1126-1, Ichino-cho, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan); Ikeda, H. [ISAS/JAXA, 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa (Japan); Yamamoto, S. [Kobe City College of Technology, 8-3, Gakuenhigashimati, Nishi-ku, Kobe-shi, Hyougo 651-2194 (Japan); Kamada, K. [Materials Research Laboratory, Furukawa Co., Ltd., 1-25-13, Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0856 (Japan)

    2013-01-21

    We have developed a large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) array consisting of 4×4 channels with a three-side buttable package. Each channel has a photosensitive area of 3×3 mm{sup 2} and 3600 Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes (APDs). For typical operational gain of 7.5×10{sup 5} at +20 °C, gain fluctuation over the entire MPPC device is only ±5.6%, and dark count rates (as measured at the 1 p.e. level) amount to ≤400kcps per channel. We first fabricated a gamma-ray camera consisting of the MPPC array with one-to-one coupling to a Ce-doped (Lu,Y){sub 2}(SiO{sub 4})O (Ce:LYSO) crystal array (4×4 array of 3×3×10 mm{sup 3} crystals). Energy and time resolutions of 11.5±0.5% (FWHM at 662 keV) and 493±22ps were obtained, respectively. When using the charge division resistor network, which compiles signals into four position-encoded analog outputs, the ultimate positional resolution is estimated as 0.19 mm in both X and Y directions, while energy resolution of 10.2±0.4% (FWHM) was obtained. Finally, we fabricated submillimeter Ce:LYSO and Ce-doped Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 12} (Ce:GGAG) scintillator matrices each consisting of 1.0×1.0, 0.7×0.7 and 0.5×0.5 mm{sup 2} pixels, to further improve the spatial resolution. In all types of Ce:LYSO and Ce:GGAG matrices, each crystal was clearly resolved in the position histograms when irradiated by a {sup 137}Cs source. The energy resolutions for 662 keV gamma-rays for each Ce:LYSO and Ce:GGAG scintillator matrix were ≤14.3%. These results suggest excellent potential for its use as a high spatial medical imaging device, particularly in positron emission tomography (PET). -- Highlights: ► We developed a newly designed large-area monolithic MPPC array. ► We obtained fine gain uniformity, and good energy and time resolutions when coupled to the LYSO scintillator. ► We fabricated gamma-ray camera consisting of the MPPC array and submillimeter pixelized LYSO and GGAG scintillators. ► In

  16. Fast-neutron and gamma-ray imaging with a capillary liquid xenon converter coupled to a gaseous photomultiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelashvili, I.; Coimbra, A. E. C.; Vartsky, D.; Arazi, L.; Shchemelinin, S.; Caspi, E. N.; Breskin, A.

    2017-09-01

    Gamma-ray and fast-neutron imaging was performed with a novel liquid xenon (LXe) scintillation detector read out by a Gaseous Photomultiplier (GPM). The 100 mm diameter detector prototype comprised a capillary-filled LXe converter/scintillator, coupled to a triple-THGEM imaging-GPM, with its first electrode coated by a CsI UV-photocathode, operated in Ne/5%CH4 at cryogenic temperatures. Radiation localization in 2D was derived from scintillation-induced photoelectron avalanches, measured on the GPM's segmented anode. The localization properties of 60Co gamma-rays and a mixed fast-neutron/gamma-ray field from an AmBe neutron source were derived from irradiation of a Pb edge absorber. Spatial resolutions of 12± 2 mm and 10± 2 mm (FWHM) were reached with 60Co and AmBe sources, respectively. The experimental results are in good agreement with GEANT4 simulations. The calculated ultimate expected resolutions for our application-relevant 4.4 and 15.1 MeV gamma-rays and 1-15 MeV neutrons are 2-4 mm and ~ 2 mm (FWHM), respectively. These results indicate the potential applicability of the new detector concept to Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography (FNRR) and Dual-Discrete-Energy Gamma Radiography (DDEGR) of large objects.

  17. Enhanced gamma ray sensitivity in bismuth triiodide sensors through volumetric defect control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johns, Paul M.; Baciak, James E.; Nino, Juan C., E-mail: pauljohns@ufl.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, 100 Rhines Hall, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2016-08-29

    Some of the more attractive semiconducting compounds for ambient temperature radiation detector applications are impacted by low charge collection efficiency due to the presence of point and volumetric defects. This has been particularly true in the case of BiI{sub 3}, which features very attractive properties (density, atomic number, band gap, etc.) to serve as a gamma ray detector, but has yet to demonstrate its full potential. We show that by applying growth techniques tailored to reduce defects, the spectral performance of this promising semiconductor can be realized. Gamma ray spectra from >100 keV source emissions are now obtained from high quality Sb:BiI{sub 3} bulk crystals with limited concentrations of defects (point and extended). The spectra acquired in these high quality crystals feature photopeaks with resolution of 2.2% at 662 keV. Infrared microscopy is used to compare the local microstructure between radiation sensitive and non-responsive crystals. This work demonstrates that BiI{sub 3} can be prepared in melt-grown detector-grade samples with superior quality and can acquire the spectra from a variety of gamma ray sources.

  18. Enhanced gamma ray sensitivity in bismuth triiodide sensors through volumetric defect control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Paul M.; Baciak, James E.; Nino, Juan C.

    2016-08-01

    Some of the more attractive semiconducting compounds for ambient temperature radiation detector applications are impacted by low charge collection efficiency due to the presence of point and volumetric defects. This has been particularly true in the case of BiI3, which features very attractive properties (density, atomic number, band gap, etc.) to serve as a gamma ray detector, but has yet to demonstrate its full potential. We show that by applying growth techniques tailored to reduce defects, the spectral performance of this promising semiconductor can be realized. Gamma ray spectra from >100 keV source emissions are now obtained from high quality Sb:BiI3 bulk crystals with limited concentrations of defects (point and extended). The spectra acquired in these high quality crystals feature photopeaks with resolution of 2.2% at 662 keV. Infrared microscopy is used to compare the local microstructure between radiation sensitive and non-responsive crystals. This work demonstrates that BiI3 can be prepared in melt-grown detector-grade samples with superior quality and can acquire the spectra from a variety of gamma ray sources.

  19. The rarity of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, D. M.; Dwyer, J. R.; Hazelton, B. J.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Martinez-McKinney, G. F. M.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Lowell, A. W.; Kelley, N. A.; Splitt, M. E.; Lazarus, S. M.; Ulrich, W.; Schaal, M.; Saleh, Z. H.; Cramer, E.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the first search for Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) from altitudes where they are thought to be produced. The Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE), an array of gamma-ray detectors, was flown near the tops of Florida thunderstorms in August/September 2009. The plane passed within 10 km horizontal distance of 1213 lightning discharges and only once detected a TGF. If these discharges had produced TGFs of the same intensity as those seen from space, ever...

  20. Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Astrophysics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    During the last decades, various classes of radio-loud active galactic nuclei have been established as sources of high-energy radiation extending over a very broad range from soft gamma-rays (photon energies E~MeV) up to very-high-energy gamma-rays (E>100 GeV). These include blazars of different types, as well as young and evolved radio galaxies. The observed gamma-ray emission from such implies efficient particle acceleration processes taking place in highly magnetized and relativistic jets produced by supermassive black holes, processes that have yet to be identified and properly understood. In addition, nearby starforming and starburst galaxies, some of which host radio-quiet Seyfert-type nuclei, have been detected in the gamma-ray range as well. In their cases, the observed gamma-ray emission is due to non-thermal activity in the interstellar medium, possibly including also a contribution from accretion disks and nuclear outflows. Finally, the high-energy emission from clusters of galaxies remains elusive...

  1. Diagnosing ICF gamma-ray physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Hans W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Y H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Evoy, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Young, C S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mack, J M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoffman, N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, D C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langenbrunner, J R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batha, S H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dauffy, L [LLNL; Stoeffl, W [LLNL; Malone, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kaufman, M I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cox, B C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tunnel, T W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, E K [NSTEC/SB; Ali, Z A [NSREC/LIVERMORE; Horsfield, C J [AWE; Rubery, M [AWE

    2010-01-01

    Gamma rays produced in an ICF environment open up a host of physics opportunities we are just beginning to explore. A branch of the DT fusion reaction, with a branching ratio on the order of 2e-5 {gamma}/n, produces 16.7 MeV {gamma}-rays. These {gamma}-rays provide a direct measure of fusion reaction rate (unlike x-rays) without being compromised by Doppler spreading (unlike neutrons). Reaction-rate history measurements, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, are fundamental quantities that will be used to optimize ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Gas Cherenkov Detectors (GCD) that convert fusion {gamma}-rays to UV/visible Cherenkov photons for collection by fast optical recording systems established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns at OMEGA. Demonstrated absolute timing calibrations allow bang time measurements with accuracy better than 30 ps. System impulse response better than 95 ps fwhm have been made possible by the combination of low temporal dispersion GCDs, ultra-fast microchannel-plate photomultiplier tubes (PMT), and high-bandwidth Mach Zehnder fiber optic data links and digitizers, resulting in burn width measurement accuracy better than 10ps. Inherent variable energy-thresholding capability allows use of GCDs as {gamma}-ray spectrometers to explore other interesting nuclear processes. Recent measurements of the 4.44 MeV {sup 12}C(n,n{prime}) {gamma}-rays produced as 14.1 MeV DT fusion neutrons pass through plastic capsules is paving the way for a new CH ablator areal density measurement. Insertion of various neutron target materials near target chamber center (TCC) producing secondary, neutron-induced {gamma}y-rays are being used to study other nuclear interactions and as in-situ sources to calibrate detector response and DT branching ratio. NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics, based on the GCD concept, are now being developed based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth

  2. Measurement of the gamma-ray energy spectrum of the educational Kinki University Reactor (UTR-KINKI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Satoru; Taniguchi, Tatsuro; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Takada, Masashi; Kamada, So; Horiguchi, Tetsuo; Fujikawa, Kazuo

    2017-06-01

    The gamma-ray energy spectrum of the Kinki University Reactor (UTR-KINKI) was estimated from Ge detector measurements combined with Monte Carlo N-particle transport criticality calculations. The gamma rays mainly originated from prompt fission components, although small amounts of gamma rays from (n,γ) reactions, fission product gamma rays, and activation gamma rays were detected. The averaged gamma-ray tissue kerma rate in the irradiation port during UTR-KINKI operation at 1W was calculated as 10.5cGy/h based on the estimated gamma-ray energy spectrum. This value is consistent with a previous measurement with paired ionization chambers and a tissue equivalent gas proportional counter. This result demonstrates the reliability of the estimated gamma-ray energy spectrum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Coincidence Techniques in Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikit, Istvan; Mrdja, Dusan; Veskovic, Miroslav; Krmar, Miodrag; Slivka, Jaroslav; Todorovic, Natasa; Bikit, Kristina

    In many different gamma-ray detection systems, the events are registered in coincidence, i.e. within short time interval, by two or more detectors. Depending on purpose of an experiment, these events can be rejected (anticoincidence counting) or acquired (coincidence counting). The construction, setup and application of several coincidence systems in Laboratory for nuclear physics of Department of Physics in Novi sad are presented. The anti-Compton shield for HPGe detector based on big annular NaI(Tl) detector and corresponding measurement which proved existing of 283 keV level in Ba-137 populating by beta decay of Cs-137, is described. The application of this system (in addition with NaI(Tl) plug detector) where HPGe detector is actively shielded by NaI(Tl) detector for investigation of double beta decay of positron emitters (Cr-50, Zn-64,) is also shown. The improving of detection limit of HPGe detector by the active shield consisting of five plastic scintillation detectors is presented, as well as the measurements of cross sections for X-ray production, induced by interaction of cosmic-ray muons with massive lead shield. We found that the prompt and delayed coincidence events between plastic veto detector and Ge detector can be sharply divided in two groups. Also, the bremsstrahlung and annihilation events can be time resolved from (n,n') events, although all these events belong to the group of delayed events.

  4. Data pre-processing using an FPGA by binning gamma ray energies and forwarding consolidated spectra data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Ana, E-mail: anaf@ipfn.ist.utl.pt [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Pereira, Rita C. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Neto, André C. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Sousa, Jorge; Carvalho, Bernardo B. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Kiptily, Vasily [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Correia, Carlos M.B.A. [Centro de Instrumentação, Dept. de Física, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Gonçalves, Bruno [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • JET monitor equipped with a DAQ system to digitize gamma signals from 19 detectors. • DAQ FPGAs used for real-time processing and streaming the gamma-ray energy values. • New algorithm was designed to produce at FPGA real-time spectra from energy values. • Spectra built at FPGA ensures streamed packets not limited by count rate. • New algorithm is relevant for future experiments expecting high event count rates. - Abstract: Gamma-ray diagnostics are considered of crucial importance for understanding the plasma behavior of next fusion devices. Among other physical phenomena, gamma-ray spectra can provide information about the fusion reactions rate and the fast ions temperature and confinement, indicators of how close we are from reaching self-sustained burning plasmas. Accordingly, dedicated gamma-ray diagnostics are currently installed at the Joint European Torus (JET). The 2D gamma-ray profile monitor is one of these diagnostics, equipped with an Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture (ATCA) Data Acquisition (DAQ) system, capable of digitizing gamma-ray signals from the 19 photodiode detectors. The DAQ system includes Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices, with embedded processing algorithms. These algorithms are responsible for processing the gamma-ray signals acquired from each detector in real-time, and for periodically streaming the corresponding energy values to the DAQ host. However, for higher count rates it will be unfeasible to stream periodically all the energy values without loss. Thus, a new algorithm was designed, capable to produce real-time spectra at FPGA from the processed energy values. The spectra should be periodically streamed, delivering binned data rather than a value for each gamma-ray. This allows to reduce the data rate, avoiding data losses. Consequently, the streaming data can be used for control purposes, as demanded by next fusion experiments with long plasma discharges of high energy

  5. The Gamma-ray Sky with Fermi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays reveal extreme, nonthermal conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been exploring the gamma-ray sky for more than four years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge gamma-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

  6. The x-/gamma-ray camera ECLAIRs for the gamma-ray burst mission SVOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godet, O.; Nasser, G.; Atteia, J.-.; Cordier, B.; Mandrou, P.; Barret, D.; Triou, H.; Pons, R.; Amoros, C.; Bordon, S.; Gevin, O.; Gonzalez, F.; Götz, D.; Gros, A.; Houret, B.; Lachaud, C.; Lacombe, K.; Marty, W.; Mercier, K.; Rambaud, D.; Ramon, P.; Rouaix, G.; Schanne, S.; Waegebaert, V.

    2014-07-01

    We present ECLAIRs, the Gamma-ray burst (GRB) trigger camera to fly on-board the Chinese-French mission SVOM. ECLAIRs is a wide-field (~ 2 sr) coded mask camera with a mask transparency of 40% and a 1024 cm2 detection plane coupled to a data processing unit, so-called UGTS, which is in charge of locating GRBs in near real time thanks to image and rate triggers. We present the instrument science requirements and how the design of ECLAIRs has been optimized to increase its sensitivity to high-redshift GRBs and low-luminosity GRBs in the local Universe, by having a low-energy threshold of 4 keV. The total spectral coverage ranges from 4 to 150 keV. ECLAIRs is expected to detect ~ 200 GRBs of all types during the nominal 3 year mission lifetime. To reach a 4 keV low-energy threshold, the ECLAIRs detection plane is paved with 6400 4 × 4 mm2 and 1 mm-thick Schottky CdTe detectors. The detectors are grouped by 32, in 8×4 matrices read by a low-noise ASIC, forming elementary modules called XRDPIX. In this paper, we also present our current efforts to investigate the performance of these modules with their front-end electronics when illuminated by charged particles and/or photons using radioactive sources. All measurements are made in different instrument configurations in vacuum and with a nominal in-flight detector temperature of -20°C. This work will enable us to choose the in-flight configuration that will make the best compromise between the science performance and the in-flight operability of ECLAIRs. We will show some highlights of this work.

  7. Probing Intrinsic Properties of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts with Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xilong; Messenger, Christopher; Heng, Ik Siong

    2017-11-01

    Progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts are thought to be neutron stars coalescing with their companion black hole or neutron star, which are one of the main gravitational wave sources. We have devised a Bayesian framework for combining gamma-ray burst and gravitational wave information that allows us to probe short gamma-ray burst luminosities. We show that combined short gamma-ray burst and gravitational wave observations not only improve progenitor distance and inclination angle estimates, they also allow the isotropic luminosities of short gamma-ray bursts to be determined without the need for host galaxy or light-curve information. We characterize our approach by simulating 1000 joint short gamma-ray burst and gravitational wave detections by Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. We show that ˜90 % of the simulations have uncertainties on short gamma-ray burst isotropic luminosity estimates that are within a factor of two of the ideal scenario, where the distance is known exactly. Therefore, isotropic luminosities can be confidently determined for short gamma-ray bursts observed jointly with gravitational waves detected by Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. Planned enhancements to Advanced LIGO will extend its range and likely produce several joint detections of short gamma-ray bursts and gravitational waves. Third-generation gravitational wave detectors will allow for isotropic luminosity estimates for the majority of the short gamma-ray burst population within a redshift of z ˜1 .

  8. Cosmological Gamma-Ray Bursters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamblyn, P.; Melia, F.

    1993-05-01

    The distribution of gamma-ray burst sources detected with BATSE is iso\\-tro\\-pic yet non-uniform. There is a deficit of weak events which is commonly expressed by a \\vvm less than the 0.5 expected for a uniform Eu\\-clid\\-ean distribution. It has been argued (e.g., Mao and Paczynski 1992) that this may be a signature of a Cosmological expansion in a FRW universe with a uniform, co-moving distribution of sources. However, a comparison of the \\vvm and burst detection rates of several experiments presents an apparent paradox: e.g., Konus detected the bursts more frequently than SMM, implying a better sensitivity and larger sampling volume, yet its measured \\vvm was ~ 0.45 compared to SMM's value of ~ 0.40, suggesting instead a lesser deviation from Eu\\-clid\\-ean space. We point out that this apparent conflict stems from the assumption that all bursts have a standard spectrum with a single power law. But realistic spectra often exhibit broken power laws, with a break energy 100;keV ~ lessepsilon_b ~ less 3 MeV. \\ Thus, the flux measured by a particular instrument depends on both the redshift of the source and the energy window of the detector. In other words, for a given energy window, the flux of a more distant burst will be further decreased below the value expected from the Cosmological model due to the red-shifting of epsilon_b across the window. We show that the inclusion of an intrinsic epsilon_b ( ~ 500 keV) and a consideration of the different detector energy responses and sensitivities can self-consistently account for the rates and \\vvm of the Konus, PVO, SMM, and BATSE datasets. Because of the dependence of the observed characteristics on the energy window, a subset of the BATSE catalog, based solely on the burst fluence in the higher energy (i.e., 4{th}) channel, provides an additional ``data'' point in the \\vvm versus rate plane. In particular, Konus's higher rate for a larger value of \\vvm is due to its better sensitivity, but smaller and

  9. A terrestrial gamma ray flash observed from an aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. M.; Dwyer, J. R.; Hazelton, B. J.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Martinez-McKinney, G. F. M.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Lowell, A. W.; Kelley, N. A.; Splitt, M. E.; Lazarus, S. M.; Ulrich, W.; Schaal, M.; Saleh, Z. H.; Cramer, E.; Rassoul, H.; Cummer, S. A.; Lu, G.; Shao, X.-M.; Ho, C.; Hamlin, T.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Heckman, S.

    2011-10-01

    On 21 August 2009, the Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE), an array of six gamma-ray detectors, detected a brief burst of gamma rays while flying aboard a Gulfstream V jet near two active thunderstorm cells. The duration and spectral characteristics of the event are consistent with the terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) seen by instruments in low Earth orbit. A long-duration, complex +IC flash was taking place in the nearer cell at the same time, at a distance of ˜10 km from the plane. The sferics that are probably associated with this flash extended over 54 ms and included several ULF pulses corresponding to charge moment changes of up to 30 C km, this value being in the lower half of the range of sferics associated with TGFs seen from space. Monte Carlo simulations of gamma ray propagation in the Earth's atmosphere show that a TGF of normal intensity would, at this distance, have produced a gamma ray signal in ADELE of approximately the size and spectrum that was actually observed. We conclude that this was the first detection of a TGF from an aircraft. We show that because of the distance, ADELE's directional and spectral capabilities could not strongly constrain the source altitude of the TGF but that such constraints would be possible for TGFs detected at closer range.

  10. TPASS: a gamma-ray spectrum analysis and isotope identification computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickens, J.K.

    1981-03-01

    The gamma-ray spectral data-reduction and analysis computer code TPASS is described. This computer code is used to analyze complex Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectra to obtain peak areas corrected for detector efficiencies, from which are determined gamma-ray yields. These yields are compared with an isotope gamma-ray data file to determine the contributions to the observed spectrum from decay of specific radionuclides. A complete FORTRAN listing of the code and a complex test case are given.

  11. Using gamma-ray emission to measure areal density of inertial confinement fusion capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, N M; Wilson, D C; Herrmann, H W; Young, C S

    2010-10-01

    Fusion neutrons streaming from a burning inertial confinement fusion capsule generate gamma rays via inelastic nuclear scattering in the ablator of the capsule. The intensity of gamma-ray emission is proportional to the product of the ablator areal density (ρR) and the yield of fusion neutrons, so by detecting the gamma rays we can infer the ablator areal density, provided we also have a measurement of the capsule's total neutron yield. In plastic-shell capsules, for example, (12)C nuclei emit gamma rays at 4.44 MeV after excitation by 14.1 MeV neutrons from D+T fusion. These gamma rays can be measured by a new gamma-ray detector under development. Analysis of predicted signals is in progress, with results to date indicating that the method promises to be useful for diagnosing imploded capsules.

  12. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. After a short review of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), we discuss the physical implications of strong statistical correlations seen among some of the parameters of short duration bursts (90 < 2 s). Finally, we conclude with a brief sketch of a new unified model for long and short GRBs.

  13. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are transient extragalactic events appearing randomly in the sky as localized flashes of electromagnetic radiation, consisting predominantly of photons with energy in the range of ~0.1–1 MeV. These sporadic bursts, occurring at the rate of ~600 per year, are isotropically distributed in the sky, ...

  14. SROSS C-2 Detections of Gamma Ray Bursts and the SGR 1627-41

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The GRB monitor (GRBM) on board the Indian SROSS C-2 satellite has detected 53 classical gamma ray bursts since its launch in May, 1994 till its re-entry in July, 2001. For a subset of 26 events, locations were obtained from simultaneous observations by other gamma-ray detectors in space. The sky distribution of these ...

  15. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the WATCH wide field X-ray monitor during the 11 months flight of EURECA. The identification of the bursts were complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy, trap...

  16. Determination of gamma ray attenuation coefficients of Al–4% Cu ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gamma ray attenuation coefficients of metal matrix composites have been investigated. For this purpose, the linear attenuation coefficients of composites containing boron carbide (B4C) at different rates have been measured using a gamma spectrometer that contains a NaI(Tl) detector and MCA at 662, 1173 and 1332 keV, ...

  17. Determination of gamma ray attenuation coefficients of Al–4% Cu ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Gamma ray attenuation coefficients of metal matrix composites have been investigated. For this purpose, the linear attenuation coefficients of composites containing boron carbide (B4C) at different rates have been measured using a gamma spectrometer that contains a NaI(Tl) detector and MCA at 662, 1173 and.

  18. High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometers using Bulk Absorbers Coupled to Mo/Cu Multilayer Superconducting Transition-Edge Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, D.T.; Loshak, A.; Van Den Berg, M.L.; Frank, M.; Barbee Jr., T.W.; Labov, S.E.

    2000-07-04

    In x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy, it is desirable to have detectors with high energy resolution and high absorption efficiency. At LLNL, we have developed superconducting tunnel junction-based single photon x-ray detectors with thin film absorbers that have achieved these goals for photon energies up to 1 keV. However, for energies above 1 keV, the absorption efficiency of these thin-film detectors decreases drastically. We are developing the use of high-purity superconducting bulk materials as microcalorimeter absorbers for high-energy x-rays and gamma rays. The increase in absorber temperature due to incident photons is sensed by a superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) composed of a Mo/Cu multilayer thin film. Films of Mo and Cu are mutually insoluble and therefore very stable and can be annealed. The multilayer structure allows scaling in thickness to optimize heat capacity and normal state resistance. We measured an energy resolution of 70 eV for 60 keV incident gamma-rays with a 1 x 1 x 0.25 mm{sup 3} Sn absorber. We present x-ray and gamma-ray results from this detector design with a Sn absorber. We also propose the use of an active negative feedback voltage bias to improve the performance of our detector and show preliminary results.

  19. SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer System software design description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Femec, D.A.; Killian, E.W.

    1994-08-01

    To assist in the characterization of the radiological contents of contract-handled waste containers at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP), the SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) System has been developed by the Radiation Measurements and Development Unit of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SGRS system software controls turntable and detector system activities. In addition to determining the concentrations of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, this software also calculates attenuation-corrected isotopic mass ratios of-specific interest. This document describes the software design for the data acquisition and analysis software associated with the SGRS system.

  20. High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-11-29

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  1. Optical telescope BIRT in ORIGIN for gamma ray burst observing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Content, Robert; Content, Robert; Sharples, Ray

    2012-01-01

    The ORIGIN concept is a space mission with a gamma ray, an X-ray and an optical telescope to observe the gamma ray bursts at large Z to determine the composition and density of the intergalactic matter in the line of sight. It was an answer to the ESA M3 call for proposal. The optical telescope i...... length. All 3 instruments use the same 2k x 2k detector simultaneously so that telescope pointing and tip-tilt control of a fold mirror permit to place the gamma ray burst on the desired instrument without any other mechanism. © 2012 SPIE.......The ORIGIN concept is a space mission with a gamma ray, an X-ray and an optical telescope to observe the gamma ray bursts at large Z to determine the composition and density of the intergalactic matter in the line of sight. It was an answer to the ESA M3 call for proposal. The optical telescope....... All instruments fit together in a box of 80 mm x 80 mm x 200 mm. The low resolution spectrograph uses a very compact design including a special triplet. It contains only spherical surfaces except for one tilted cylindrical surface to disperse the light. To reduce the need for a high precision pointing...

  2. Demonstration of a collimated in situ method for determining depth distributions using gamma-ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Benke, R R

    2002-01-01

    In situ gamma-ray spectrometry uses a portable detector to quantify radionuclides in materials. The main shortcoming of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry has been its inability to determine radionuclide depth distributions. Novel collimator designs were paired with a commercial in situ gamma-ray spectrometry system to overcome this limitation for large area sources. Positioned with their axes normal to the material surface, the cylindrically symmetric collimators limited the detection of un attenuated gamma-rays from a selected range of polar angles (measured off the detector axis). Although this approach does not alleviate the need for some knowledge of the gamma-ray attenuation characteristics of the materials being measured, the collimation method presented in this paper represents an absolute method that determines the depth distribution as a histogram, while other in situ methods require a priori knowledge of the depth distribution shape. Other advantages over previous in situ methods are that this method d...

  3. EXIST's Gamma-Ray Burst Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D. L.; Grindlay, J. E.; Hong, J.; Fishman, G.; Hartmann, D. H.; Garson, A., III; Krawczynski, H.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Skinner, G.

    2008-02-01

    We use semianalytic techniques to evaluate the burst sensitivity of designs for the EXIST hard X-ray survey mission. Applying these techniques to the mission design proposed for the Beyond Einstein program, we find that with its very large field of view and faint gamma-ray burst detection threshold, EXIST will detect and localize approximately two bursts per day, a large fraction of which may be at high redshift. We estimate that EXIST's maximum sensitivity will be ~4 times greater than that of Swift's Burst Alert Telescope. Bursts will be localized to better than 40'' at threshold, with a burst position as good as a few arcseconds for strong bursts. EXIST's combination of three different detector systems will provide spectra from 3 keV to more than 10 MeV. Thus, EXIST will enable a major leap in the understanding of bursts, their evolution, environment, and utility as cosmological probes.

  4. gamma-ray tracking in germanium the backtracking method

    CERN Document Server

    Marel, J V D

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of a European TMR network project the concept for a gamma-ray tracking array is being developed for nuclear physics spectroscopy in the energy range of approx 10 keV up to several MeV. The tracking array will consist of a large number of position-sensitive germanium detectors in a spherical geometry around a target. Due to the high segmentation, a Compton scattered gamma-ray will deposit energy in several different segments. A method has been developed to reconstruct the tracks of multiple coincident gamma-rays and to find their initial energies. By starting from the final point the track can be reconstructed backwards to the origin with the help of the photoelectric and Compton cross-sections and the Compton scatter formula. Every reconstructed track is given a figure of merit, thus allowing suppression of wrongly reconstructed tracks and gamma-rays that have scattered out of the detector system. This so-called backtracking method has been tested on simulated events in a shell-like geometry ...

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of gamma ray tomography for image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedes, Karlos A.N.; Moura, Alex; Dantas, Carlos; Melo, Silvio; Lima, Emerson, E-mail: karlosguedes@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Meric, Ilker [University of Bergen (Norway)

    2015-07-01

    The Monte Carlo simulations of known density and shape object was validate with Gamma Ray Tomography in static experiments. An aluminum half-moon piece placed inside a steel pipe was the MC simulation test object that was also measured by means of gamma ray transmission. Wall effect of the steel pipe due to irradiation geometry in a single pair source-detector tomography was evaluated by comparison with theoretical data. MCNPX code requires a defined geometry to each photon trajectory which practically prevents this usage for tomography reconstruction simulation. The solution was found by writing a program in Delphi language to create input files automation code. Simulations of tomography data by automated MNCPX code were carried out and validated by experimental data. Working in this sequence the produced data needed a databank to be stored. Experimental setup used a Cesium-137 isotopic radioactive source (7.4 × 109 Bq), and NaI(Tl) scintillation detector of (51 × 51) × 10−3 m crystal size coupled to a multichannel analyzer. A stainless steel tubes of 0,154 m internal diameter, 0.014 m thickness wall. The results show that the MCNPX simulation code adapted to automated input file is useful for generating a matrix data M(θ,t), of a computerized gamma ray tomography for any known density and regular shape object. Experimental validation used RMSE from gamma ray paths and from attenuation coefficient data. (author)

  6. Gamma ray spectroscopy of {sup 10}{sub {lambda}}B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukai, Mifuyu [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Science

    2003-03-01

    Interaction between {lambda} and N are composed of the central force independent on spins and the spin dependent forces i.e. the spin-spin force, spin-orbit force dependent on nuclear spins, spin-orbit force dependent on {lambda} particle spin and the tensor force. The radially integrated value of the spin-spin force expressed by {delta} can be evaluated from the measurements of the excitation energies of various hypernuclei. For {sup 10}{sub {lambda}}B, {delta} < 0.22 MeV has been reported from the M1 {gamma}-ray transition of the ground state doublet, while {delta}=0.5 MeV from {sup 7}{sub {lambda}}Li M1 transition of ground state doublet. In the course to explore unified description of the p-shell hypernuclei, these contradictory results must be overcome. In this experiment, it was designed to measure {sup 10}{sub {lambda}}B {gamma}-ray spectroscopy with {gamma}-ray yield four times as high as the past experiments to solve the problem. Experiment was performed on D6 line of AGS at BNL using Hyperball detector. Data of the {gamma}-ray spectroscopy measurement of hypernuclei produced by (K{sup -}, {pi}{sup -}) reaction with {sup 10}B target were collected in 48 hours. The preliminary result of the data analysis shows that the energy is less than 80 keV. This result seems to be suggesting that the scheme which has been based on the two-body interaction should be reconsidered. In addition, numbers of {gamma}-rays from hyperfragments produced by the particles emitted from the excited states of {sup 10}{sub {lambda}}B were observed, which opens a new field of hypernuclei {gamma}-ray spectroscopy using hyperfragments. (S. Funahashi)

  7. Status of development of the Gamma Ray Energy Tracking Array (GRETA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, I.Y.; Schmid, G.J.; Vetter, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The current generation of large gamma-ray detector arrays, Gammasphere, Eurogam and GASP, are based on modules of Compton suppressed Ge detectors. Due to the solid angle occupied by the Compton shields and to gamma rays escaping the detector, the total peak efficiency of such a design is limited to about 20% for a 1.3 MeV gamma ray. A shell consisting of closely packed Ge detectors has been suggested as the solution to the efficiency limitation. In this case, the entire solid angle is covered by Ge detectors, and by adding the signal from neighboring detectors, the escaped energy is recovered and much higher efficiency can be achieved (e.g. 60% for a 1.3 MeV gamma ray). However, for high multiplicity cascades, the summing of two gamma rays hitting neighboring detectors reduces the efficiency and increases the background. In order to reduce this summing, a large number of detectors is required. For example, with a multiplicity of 25, one needs about 1500 detectors to keep the probability of false summing below 10% and the cost of such a detector array will be prohibitive. Rather than such an approach, the authors are developing a new concept for a gamma-ray array; a shell of closely-packed Ge detectors consisting of 100-200 highly-segmented elements. The high granularity of the segmented Ge detector enables the authors to resolve each of the scattering interactions and determine its position and energy. A tracking algorithm, using the position and energy information, will then identify the interactions belonging to a particular gamma ray and its energy is obtained by summing only these interactions. Such an array can reach a total efficiency about 60%, with a resolving power 1000 times higher than that of current arrays.

  8. Diagnosing inertial confinement fusion gamma ray physics (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N.; Wilson, D. C.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, M/S E526, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Stoeffl, W.; Dauffy, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Miller, E. K. [Special Technologies Laboratory, NSTec, Santa Barbara, California 93111 (United States); Ali, Z. A. [Livermore Operations, NSTec, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The gamma reaction history (GRH) diagnostic is a multichannel, time-resolved, energy-thresholded {gamma}-ray spectrometer that provides a high-bandwidth, direct-measurement of fusion reaction history in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments. 16.75 MeV deuterium+tritium (DT) fusion {gamma}-rays, with a branching ratio of the order of 10{sup -5}{gamma}/(14 MeV n), are detected to determine fundamental burn parameters, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, critical to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. During the tritium/hydrogen/deuterium ignition tuning campaign, an additional {gamma}-ray line at 19.8 MeV, produced by hydrogen+tritium fusion with a branching ratio of unity, will increase the available {gamma}-ray signal and may allow measurement of reacting fuel composition or ion temperature. Ablator areal density measurements with the GRH are also made possible by detection of 4.43 MeV {gamma}-rays produced by inelastic scatter of DT fusion neutrons on {sup 12}C nuclei in the ablating plastic capsule material.

  9. Assessment of a new ZnO:Al contact to CdZnTe for X- and gamma-ray detector applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. N. Roy

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The large mismatch of the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE between the metal contact and CdZnTe exerts thermal stress at the metal/CZT interface, which causes mechanical degradation of the contact in addition to the poor adhesion of the metallic thin film to CZT. To form a reliable and stable interface, the contact material should have better adhesion and a close match of the coefficients of thermal expansion with CZT/CdTe. Here, we report on our investigations of a novel non-metallic contact layer for use in radiation detector applications. The proposed ZnO:Al contact layer offers better adhesion due to the oxide interface, higher hardness and better matching of the CTE with CZT. It has high prospects for a reliable and stable device structure that can serve as a replacement to the common metallic electrodes used today. We evaluated AZO contacts to CZT and extracted the electronic characteristics, such as resistivity and mobility-lifetime product of electrons, and compared the results of the same characterization measurements for CZT with gold contacts. The present observations showed that the characteristics of CZT detectors with AZO contacts are nearly identical to the same detectors with gold contacts.

  10. A Feasibility Study to Determine Cooling Time and Burnup of ATR Fuel Using a Nondestructive Technique and Three Types of Gamma-ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Navarro; Rahmat Aryaeinejad,; David W. Nigg

    2011-05-01

    A Feasibility Study to Determine Cooling Time and Burnup of ATR Fuel Using a Nondestructive Technique1 Rahmat Aryaeinejad, Jorge Navarro, and David W Nigg Idaho National Laboratory Abstract Effective and efficient Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel management require state of the art core modeling tools. These new tools will need isotopic and burnup validation data before they are put into production. To create isotopic, burn up validation libraries and to determine the setup for permanent fuel scanner system a feasibility study was perform. The study consisted in measuring short and long cooling time fuel elements at the ATR canal. Three gamma spectroscopy detectors (HPGe, LaBr3, and HPXe) and two system configurations (above and under water) were used in the feasibility study. The first stage of the study was to investigate which detector and system configuration would be better suited for different scenarios. The second stage of the feasibility study was to create burnup and cooling time calibrations using experimental isotopic data collected and ORIGEN 2.2 burnup data. The results of the study establish that a better spectra resolution is achieve with an above the water configuration and that three detectors can be used in the permanent fuel scanner system for different situations. In addition it was conclude that a number of isotopic ratios and absolute measurements could be used to predict ATR fuel burnup and cooling times. 1This work was supported by the U.S. Depart¬ment of Energy (DOE) under Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC Contract No. DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  11. High-Energy 3D Calorimeter based on position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors for use in Gamma-ray Astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotnikov, Alexey [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); De Geronimo, GianLuigi [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Vernon, Emerson [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hays, Elizabeth [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Thompson, David [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); James, Ralph [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Moiseev, Alexander [Center for Research and Exploration; Technology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and Univ. of Maryland, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2017-08-12

    We present a concept for a calorimeter based on a novel approach of 3D position-sensitive virtual Frischgrid CZT detectors. This calorimeter aims to measure photons with energies from ~100 keV to 10 (goal 50) MeV. The expected energy resolution at 662 keV is ~1% FWHM, and the photon interaction positionmeasurement accuracy is ~1 mm in all 3 dimensions. Each CZT bar is a rectangular prism with typical cross-section of 6x6 mm2 and length of 2-4 cm. The bars are arranged in modules of 4 x 4 bars, and the modules themselves can be assembled into a larger array. The 3D virtual voxel approach solves a long-standing problem with CZT detectors associated with material imperfections that limit the performance and usefulness of relatively thick detectors (i.e., > 1 cm). Also, it allows us to relax the requirements on the quality of the crystals, maintaining good energy resolution and significantly reducing the instrument cost. Such a calorimeter can be successfully used in space telescopes that use Compton scattering of γ rays, such as AMEGO, serving as part of its calorimeter and providing the position and energy measurement for Compton-scattered photons. Also, it could provide suitable energy resolution to allow for spectroscopic measurements of γ-ray lines from nuclear decays. Another viable option is to use this calorimeter as a focal plane to conduct spectroscopic measurements of cosmic γ-ray events. In combination with a coded-aperture mask, it potentially could provide mapping of the 511-keV radiation from the Galactic Center region.

  12. Gravitational microlensing of gamma-ray blazars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    F. Torres, Diego; E. Romero, Gustavo; F. Eiroa, Ernesto

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the effects of gravitational microlensing on compact and distant $\\gamma$-ray blazars. These objects have $\\gamma$-ray emitting regions which are small enough as to be affected by microlensing effects produced by stars lying in intermediate galaxies. We analyze...... the temporal evolution of the gamma-ray magnification for sources moving in a caustic pattern field, where the combined effects of thousands of stars are taken into account using a numerical technique. We propose that some of the unidentified $\\gamma$-ray sources (particularly some of those lying at high...... galactic latitude whose gamma-ray statistical properties are very similar to detected $\\gamma$-ray blazars) are indeed the result of gravitational lensing magnification of background undetected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs)....

  13. Gamma-Ray Astronomy Technology Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades gamma-ray observations have become a valuable tool for studying the universe. Progress made in diverse 8re1lS such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), nucleosynthesis, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has complimented and enriched our astrophysical understanding in many ways. We present an overview of current and future planned space y-ray missions and discussion technology needs for- the next generation of space gamma-ray instruments.

  14. Understanding Doppler Broadening of Gamma Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sullivan, John P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-03

    Doppler-broadened gamma ray peaks are observed routinely in the collection and analysis of gamma-ray spectra. If not recognized and understood, the appearance of Doppler broadening can complicate the interpretation of a spectrum and the correct identification of the gamma ray-emitting material. We have conducted a study using a simulation code to demonstrate how Doppler broadening arises and provide a real-world example in which Doppler broadening is found. This report describes that study and its results.

  15. Observation of TeV gamma ray extended sources with ARGO-YBJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernetto, Silvia, E-mail: vernetto@to.infn.it

    2014-04-01

    More than 80% of TeV galactic gamma ray sources are spatially extended and many of them are still unidentified. The extended emission could be the result of cosmic ray interactions with the ambient medium which provides the target to produce TeV gamma rays. The sensitivity of ground based gamma ray detectors decreases for extended sources; shower detectors, due to their large field of view, are less affected with respect to Cherenkov telescopes. The ARGO-YBJ experiment (Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Laboratory, Tibet, China, 4300 m of altitude) is an air shower detector devoted to gamma ray astronomy at energies above a few hundred GeV, with an integrated sensitivity ranging from 0.24 to ∼1 Crab units, depending on the source declination. In this paper the observation of galactic extended sources with ARGO-YBJ during 5 years is reviewed.

  16. Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are now generally believed to originate from cosmological distances and represent the largest known explosions in the Universe. These lectures will describe the temporal and spectral characteristic of gamma-ray bursts, their intensity and sky distribution, and other observed characteristics in the gamma-ray region, primarily from data obtained with the BATSE experiment on the Compton Observatory. A summary of recent discoveries and observations in other wavelength regions will also be presented, along with their implications for models of the burst emission mechanism. Various possibilities and models for the energy source(s) of gamma-ray bursts will be described.

  17. Integral's first look at the gamma-ray Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    powerful gamma-ray instruments. It has a camera, or imager, called IBIS and a spectrometer, SPI. Spectrometers are used to measure the energy of the gamma rays received. Gamma-ray sources are often extremely variable and can fluctuate within minutes or seconds. It is therefore crucial to record data simultaneously in different wavelengths. To achieve this, Integral also carries an X-ray and an optical monitor (JEM-X and OMC). All four instruments will observe the same objects, at the same time. In this way they can capture fleeting events completely. Integral sends the data from all the instruments to the Integral Science Data Centre (ISDC) near Geneva, Switzerland, where they are processed for eventual release to the scientific community. “We have been optimising the instruments’ performance to produce the best overall science. We expect to be ready for astronomers around the world to use Integral by the end of the year,” says Arvind Parmar, acting Integral Project Scientist at ESA. “These images and spectra prove that Integral can certainly do the job it was designed to do, and more", which is to unlock some of the secrets of the high-energy Universe. Integral’s primary mission will last for two years, but it is carrying enough fuel to continue for five years, all being well. Notes to Editors Integral was launched on board a Russian Proton rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, on 17 October 2002. The satellite was placed in a tilted orbit that looped from 600 to 153 000 kilometres above the Earth and back again. Integral’s own thrusters then steered the spacecraft, in a series of five manoeuvres, into its operational orbit, between 9 000 and 153 000 kilometres above the Earth. Although Integral orbits above the Earth's atmosphere and weather, it still has ‘space weather’ to contend with. Space weather consists of a constant rain of tiny particles that can temporarily blind detectors designed to register gamma radiation. “The flashes last

  18. Depth of interaction detection for {gamma}-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerche, Ch.W. [Instituto de Aplicaciones de las Tecnologias de la Informacion y de las Comunicaciones Avanzadas, (UPV) Camino de Vera s/n, E46022 (Spain)], E-mail: lerche@ific.uv.es; Doering, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, D52425 Juelich (Germany); Ros, A. [Institute de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-UV), 22085, Valencia E46071 (Spain); Herrero, V.; Gadea, R.; Aliaga, R.J.; Colom, R.; Mateo, F.; Monzo, J.M.; Ferrando, N.; Toledo, J.F.; Martinez, J.D.; Sebastia, A. [Instituto de Aplicaciones de las Tecnologias de la Informacion y de las Comunicaciones Avanzadas, (UPV) Camino de Vera s/n, E46022 (Spain); Sanchez, F.; Benlloch, J.M. [Institute de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-UV), 22085, Valencia E46071 (Spain)

    2009-03-11

    A novel design for an inexpensive depth of interaction capable detector for {gamma}-ray imaging has been developed. The design takes advantage of the strong correlation between the width of the scintillation light distribution in monolithic crystals and the interaction depth of {gamma}-rays. We present in this work an inexpensive modification of the commonly used charge dividing circuits which enables the instantaneous and simultaneous computation of the second order moment of light distribution. This measure provides a good estimate for the depth of interaction and does not affect the determination of the position centroids and the energy release of {gamma}-ray impact. The method has been tested with a detector consisting of a monolithic LSO block sized 42x42x10mm{sup 3} and a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube H8500 from Hamamatsu. The mean spatial resolution of the detector was found to be 3.4mm for the position centroids and 4.9mm for the DOI. The best spatial resolutions were observed at the center of the detector and yielded 1.4mm for the position centroids and 1.9mm for the DOI.

  19. Long duration gamma-ray emission from thunderclouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Nicole A.

    Gamma-ray glows are long duration emission coming from thunderclouds. They are one example of high-energy atmospheric physics, a relatively new field studying high-energy phenomena from thunderstorms and lightning. Glows arise from sustained relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREA). Gamma-ray instruments on the ground, balloons and airplanes have detected glows. The Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) is an array of gamma-ray detectors, built at the University of California, Santa Cruz. ADELE detected 12 gamma-ray glows during its summer 2009 campaign. ADELE was designed to study another type of high-energy atmospheric physics, terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs). TGFs are incredibly bright, sub-millisecond bursts of gamma-rays coming from thunderstorms. ADELE was installed on NCAR's Gulfstream V for the summer of 2009. While many glows were detected, only one TGF was observed. In this thesis I present a detailed explanation of the 2009 version of ADELE along with the results of the 2009 campaign. ADELE was modified to become a smaller, autonomous instrument to fly on the NASA drone, a Global Hawk. This was a piggyback to NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel mission. These flights took place during the summer of 2013. The following summer, ADELE flew on an Orion P3 as a piggyback of NOAA's Hurricane Hunters. This newer, modified instrument is discussed in detail in this thesis. The 12 gamma-ray glows from the 2009 campaign are presented, with information about nearby lightning activity. I show that lightning activity is suppressed after a glow. This could be from the glow causing the cloud to discharge and therefore reduce the lightning activity. It is also possible that glows can only occur once lightning activity has diminished. Lightning is also used to find a distance to the glow. Using this distance, it is found that the brightness of glow cannot be explained as a function of distance while the duration of the glow is

  20. Imaging and background in low-energy gamma ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Fan

    The current status of low energy gamma ray astronomy is reviewed and the conclusion drawn that the next generation of low energy gamma ray telescopes will require high sensitivity, good timing, and spectral resolution. High angular resolution imaging capability is also considered essential. The imaging of low energy gamma rays is hampered by the difficulties encountered in developing high resolution position sensitive detectors. To this end, an improved Rotation Modulation Collimator (RMC) imaging technique, the phoswich multi-pitch RMC, is discussed. This imaging method employs currently available detector and pulse-shape discrimination techniques and is capable of producing images with an angular resolution which is comparable with that of the Coded Aperture Mask (CAM) imaging techniques. The imaging property of this new technique is studied. A comparison of three of the main imaging techniques used in low energy gamma ray astronomy, CAM, Fourier Transform Collimator, and RMC, is performed in terms of both theoretical performances and simulated imaging of the Galactic Center region. A realistic assessment of the possible applications of these three techniques to different types of astronomical Observations is also given. The atmospheric gamma ray radiation was measured by a number of balloon and satellite-borne instruments. A model of this radiation is developed based on the data as measured by a Compton telescope designed by the Max-Planck group. Emission spectra, as predicted by the model, are compared with various observed data, both inside and outside the atmosphere. The sources of background noise in low energy gamma ray telescopes are discussed. A comprehensive model of the background sources is developed and a generalized simulation program is presented which uses a combination of Monte Carlo methods and empirical calculations. Photon, proton, and neutron induced backgrounds are all considered as well as the effects of spacecraft and orbit. The model is

  1. An optimum analysis sequence for environmental gamma-ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Torre, F.; Rios M, C.; Ruvalcaba A, M. G.; Mireles G, F.; Saucedo A, S.; Davila R, I.; Pinedo, J. L., E-mail: fta777@hotmail.co [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Centro Regional de Estudis Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    This work aims to obtain an optimum analysis sequence for environmental gamma-ray spectroscopy by means of Genie 2000 (Canberra). Twenty different analysis sequences were customized using different peak area percentages and different algorithms for: 1) peak finding, and 2) peak area determination, and with or without the use of a library -based on evaluated nuclear data- of common gamma-ray emitters in environmental samples. The use of an optimum analysis sequence with certified nuclear information avoids the problems originated by the significant variations in out-of-date nuclear parameters of commercial software libraries. Interference-free gamma ray energies with absolute emission probabilities greater than 3.75% were included in the customized library. The gamma-ray spectroscopy system (based on a Ge Re-3522 Canberra detector) was calibrated both in energy and shape by means of the IAEA-2002 reference spectra for software intercomparison. To test the performance of the analysis sequences, the IAEA-2002 reference spectrum was used. The z-score and the reduced {chi}{sup 2} criteria were used to determine the optimum analysis sequence. The results show an appreciable variation in the peak area determinations and their corresponding uncertainties. Particularly, the combination of second derivative peak locate with simple peak area integration algorithms provides the greater accuracy. Lower accuracy comes from the combination of library directed peak locate algorithm and Genie's Gamma-M peak area determination. (Author)

  2. BATSE Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, Valerie

    2002-01-01

    With the observation of low-energy radiation coming from the site of gamma-ray bursts in the hours to weeks after the initial gamma ray burst, it appears that astronomers have discovered a cosmological imprint made by the burster on its surroundings. This paper discusses the phenomenon of postburst emission in Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) gamma-ray bursts at energies usually associated with prompt emission. After summing up the background-subtracted signals from hundreds of bursts, it is found that tails out to hundreds of seconds after the trigger could be a common feature of events of a duration greater than 2 seconds, and perhaps of the shorter bursts at a lower and shorter-lived level. The tail component may be softer and seems independent of the duration (within the long-GRB sample) and brightness of the prompt burst emission. Some individual bursts have visible tails at gamma-ray energies, and the spectrum in a few cases differs from that of the prompt emission. For one of these bursts, GRB 991216, afterglow at lower energies was detected, which raised the possibility of seeing afterglow observations over large energy ranges using the next generation of GRB detectors in addition to sensitive space- or ground-based telescopes.

  3. Constraining axion by polarized prompt emission from gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, André

    2008-01-01

    A polarized gamma ray emission spread over a sufficiently wide energy band from a strongly magnetized astrophysical object like gamma ray bursts (GRBs) offers an opportunity to test the hypothesis of invisible axion. The axionic induced dichroism of gamma rays at different energies should cause a misalignment of the polarization plane for higher energy events relative to that one for lower energies events resulting in the loss of statistics needed to form a pattern of the polarization signal to be recognized in a detector. According to this, any evidence of polarized gamma rays coming from an object with extended magnetic field could be interpreted as a constraint on the existence of the invisible axion for a certain parameter range. Based on reports of polarized MeV emission detected in several GRBs we derive a constraint on the axion-photon coupling. This constraint $\\g_{a\\gamma\\gamma}\\le 2.2\\cdot 10^{-11} {\\rm GeV^{-1}}$ calculated for the axion mass $m_a=10^{-3} {\\rm eV}$ is competitive with the sensitivi...

  4. Borehole Logging for Uranium by Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvborg, Leif; Nyegaard, P.; Christiansen, E. M.

    1980-01-01

    The resources in a large syngenetic deposit of low-grade uranium (U) ore with thorium at Kvanefjeld, South Greenland, were evaluated by spectrometric gamma-ray logging of 23 boreholes, 46 mm in diameter and 200 m deep. The borehole probe's detector contained 22 cm3 of sodium-iodide, and the photo......The resources in a large syngenetic deposit of low-grade uranium (U) ore with thorium at Kvanefjeld, South Greenland, were evaluated by spectrometric gamma-ray logging of 23 boreholes, 46 mm in diameter and 200 m deep. The borehole probe's detector contained 22 cm3 of sodium...... to another; this variation is believed to be caused by emanation of radon (Rn) from the borehole walls. Block calculations based on individual calibration constants for the boreholes logged made it possible to obtain a reliable estimate of the tonnage of U. This estimate was only slightly different from...

  5. Performance analysis of gamma ray spectrometric parameters on digital signal and analog signal processing based MCA systems using NaI(Tl) detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreti, B M; Sharma, G K

    2012-05-01

    Accurate and speedy estimations of ppm range uranium and thorium in the geological and rock samples are most useful towards ongoing uranium investigations and identification of favorable radioactive zones in the exploration field areas. In this study with the existing 5 in. × 4 in. NaI(Tl) detector setup, prevailing background and time constraints, an enhanced geometrical setup has been worked out to improve the minimum detection limits for primordial radioelements K(40), U(238) and Th(232). This geometrical setup has been integrated with the newly introduced, digital signal processing based MCA system for the routine spectrometric analysis of low concentration rock samples. Stability performance, during the long counting hours, for digital signal processing MCA system and its predecessor NIM bin based MCA system has been monitored, using the concept of statistical process control. Monitored results, over a time span of few months, have been quantified in terms of spectrometer's parameters such as Compton striping constants and Channel sensitivities, used for evaluating primordial radio element concentrations (K(40), U(238) and Th(232)) in geological samples. Results indicate stable dMCA performance, with a tendency of higher relative variance, about mean, particularly for Compton stripping constants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Thermal Design and Performance of the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer for the MESSENGER Spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burks, M; Cork, C P; Eckels, D; Hull, E; Madden, N W; Miller, W; Goldsten, J; Rhodes, E; Williams, B

    2004-10-13

    A gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) has been built and delivered to the Mercury MESSENGER spacecraft which launched on August 3, 2004, from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The GRS, a part of seven scientific instruments on board MESSENGER, is based on a coaxial high-purity germanium detector. Gamma-ray detectors based on germanium have the advantage of providing excellent energy resolution, which is critical to achieving the science goals of the mission. However, germanium has the disadvantage that it must operate at cryogenic temperatures (typically {approx}80 K). This requirement is easy to satisfy in the laboratory but difficult near Mercury, which has an extremely hot thermal radiation environment. To cool the detector, a Stirling cycle mechanical cooler is employed. In addition, radiation and conduction techniques a are used to reduce the GRS heat load. Before delivering the flight sensor, a complete thermal prototype was built and tested. The results of these test, including thermal design, radiative and conductive heat loads, and cooler performance are described.

  7. A pneumatic sample changer for gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoni, C.J.; Fones, R.V.; Simon, F.O.

    1973-01-01

    A gravity-feed, pneumatic-ejection sample changer has been developed. The changer is suitable for both flat and well-type detectors and permits the continuous use of gamma-ray spectroscopy equipment 24 h a day, 7 days a week. The electronic circuitry has a fail-safe feature which stops the operation of the changer if a malfunction occurs. ?? 1973 The American Institute of Physics.

  8. The Most Remote Gamma-Ray Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    seconds is larger than that of the Sun during its entire life time (about 10,000 million years). "Gamma-ray bursts" are in fact by far the most powerful events since the Big Bang that are known in the Universe. While there are indications that gamma-ray bursts originate in star-forming regions within distant galaxies, the nature of such explosions remains a puzzle. Recent observations with large telescopes, e.g. the measurement of the degree of polarization of light from a gamma-ray burst in May 1999 with the VLT ( ESO PR 08/99), are now beginning to cast some light on this long-standing mystery. The afterglow of GRB 000131 ESO PR Photo 28a/00 ESO PR Photo 28a/00 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 475 pix - 41k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 949 pix - 232k] [Full-Res - JPEG: 1200 x 1424 pix - 1.2Mb] ESO PR Photo 28b/00 ESO PR Photo 28b/00 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 480 pix - 67k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 959 pix - 288k] [Full-Res - JPEG: 1200 x 1439 pix - 856k] Caption : PR Photo 28a/00 is a colour composite image of the sky field around the position of the gamma-ray burst GRB 000131 that was detected on January 31, 2000. It is based on images obtained with the ESO Very Large Telescope at Paranal. The object is indicated with an arrow, near a rather bright star (magnitude 9, i.e., over 1 million times brighter than the faintest objects visible on this photo). This and other bright objects in the field are responsible for various unavoidable imaging effects, caused by optical reflections (ring-shaped "ghost images", e.g. to the left of the brightest star) and detector saturation effects (horizontal and vertical straight lines and coloured "coronae" at the bright objects, and areas of "bleeding", e.g. below the bright star). PR Photo 28b/00 shows the rapid fading of the optical counterpart of GRB 000131 (slightly left of the centre), by means of exposures with the VLT on February 4 (upper left), 6 (upper right), 8 (lower left) and March 5 (lower right). It is no longer visible on the last photo

  9. Gamma rays from hidden millisecond pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, Marco

    1992-01-01

    The properties were studied of a new class of gamma ray sources consisting of millisecond pulsars totally or partially surrounded by evaporating material from irradiated companion stars. Hidden millisecond pulsars offer a unique possibility to study gamma ray, optical and radio emission from vaporizing binaries. The relevance of this class of binaries for GRO observations and interpretation of COS-B data is emphasized.

  10. Gamma rays from 'hidden' millisecond pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, M.

    1993-01-01

    The properties were studied of a new class of gamma ray sources consisting of millisecond pulsars totally or partially surrounded by evaporating material from irradiated companion stars. Hidden millisecond pulsars offer a unique possibility to study gamma ray, optical and radio emission from vaporizing binaries. The relevance of this class of binaries for GRO observations and interpretation of COS-B data is emphasized.

  11. Handbook on Mobile Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    2003-01-01

    Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing......Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing...

  12. Gamma-Ray Interactions for Reachback Analysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, Steven Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-02

    This presentation is a part of the DHS LSS spectroscopy training course and presents an overview of the following concepts: identification and measurement of gamma rays; use of gamma counts and energies in research. Understanding the basic physics of how gamma rays interact with matter can clarify how certain features in a spectrum were produced.

  13. Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, J. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique

    1996-11-01

    The paper deals with a brief description of the principles of prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA), with the detection of gamma-rays, the PGAA project at SINQ and with the expected performances. 8 figs., 3 tabs., 10 refs.

  14. Semiconductor quantum dot scintillation under gamma-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letant, S E; Wang, T

    2006-08-23

    We recently demonstrated the ability of semiconductor quantum dots to convert alpha radiation into visible photons. In this letter, we report on the scintillation of quantum dots under gamma-ray irradiation, and compare the energy resolution of the 59 keV line of Americium 241 obtained with our quantum dot-glass nanocomposite material to that of a standard sodium iodide scintillator. A factor 2 improvement is demonstrated experimentally and interpreted theoretically using a combination of energy-loss and photon transport models. These results demonstrate the potential of quantum dots for room-temperature gamma-ray detection, which has applications in medical imaging, environmental monitoring, as well as security and defense. Present technology in gamma radiation detection suffers from flexibility and scalability issues. For example, bulk Germanium provides fine energy resolution (0.2% energy resolution at 1.33 MeV) but requires operation at liquid nitrogen temperature. On the other hand, Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride is a good room temperature detector ( 1% at 662 keV) but the size of the crystals that can be grown is limited to a few centimeters in each direction. Finally, the most commonly used scintillator, Sodium Iodide (NaI), can be grown as large crystals but suffers from a lack of energy resolution (7% energy resolution at 662 keV). Recent advancements in nanotechnology6-10 have provided the possibility of controlling materials synthesis at the molecular level. Both morphology and chemical composition can now be manipulated, leading to radically new material properties due to a combination of quantum confinement and surface to volume ratio effects. One of the main consequences of reducing the size of semiconductors down to nanometer dimensions is to increase the energy band gap, leading to visible luminescence, which suggests that these materials could be used as scintillators. The visible band gap of quantum dots would also ensure both efficient photon counting

  15. Application of mobile gamma-ray spectrometry for soil mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werban, Ulrike; Lein, Claudia; Pohle, Marco; Dietrich, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Gamma-ray measurements have a long tradition for geological surveys and deposit exploration using airborne and borehole logging systems. For these applications, the relationships between the measured physical parameter - the concentration of natural gamma emitters 40K, 238U and 232Th - and geological origin or sedimentary developments are well described. Thus, Gamma-ray spectrometry seems a useful tool for carrying out spatial mapping of physical parameters related to soil properties. The isotope concentration in soils depends on different soil parameters (e.g. geochemical composition, grain size fractions), which are a result of source rock properties and processes during soil geneses. There is a rising interest in the method for application in Digital Soil Mapping or as input data for environmental, ecological or hydrological modelling, e.g. as indicator for clay content. However, the gamma-ray measurement is influenced by endogenous factors and processes like soil moisture variation, erosion and deposition of material or cultivation. We will present results from a time series of car borne gamma-ray measurements to observe heterogeneity of soil on a floodplain area in Central Germany. The study area is characterised by high variations in grain size distribution and occurrence of flooding events. For the survey, we used a 4 l NaI(Tl) detector with GPS connection mounted on a sledge, which is towed across the field sites by a four-wheel-vehicle. The comparison of data from different dates shows similar structures with small variation between the data ranges and shape of structures. We will present our experiences concerning the application of gamma-ray measurements under variable field conditions and their impacts on data quality.

  16. Method for on-line evaluation of materials using prompt gamma ray analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Douglas W [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-12-08

    A method for evaluating a material specimen comprises: Mounting a neutron source and a detector adjacent the material specimen; bombarding the material specimen with neutrons from the neutron source to create prompt gamma rays within the material specimen, some of the prompt gamma rays being emitted from the material specimen, some of the prompt gamma rays resulting in the formation of positrons within the material specimen by pair production; collecting positron annihilation data by detecting with the detector at least one emitted annihilation gamma ray resulting from the annihilation of a positron; storing the positron annihilation data on a data storage system for later retrieval and processing; and continuing to collect and store positron annihilation data, the continued collected and stored positron annihilation data being indicative of an accumulation of lattice damage over time.

  17. Gravitational Waves and Gamma-Rays from a Binary Neutron Star Merger: GW170817 and GRB 170817A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.

    2017-01-01

    On 2017 August 17, the gravitational-wave event GW170817 was observed by the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors, and the gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB 170817A was observed independently by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, and the Anti-Coincidence Shield for the Spectrometer for the International Gam...

  18. Selective Beta and Gamma-ray Discrimination by CdWO{sub 4} and PlasticScintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jun Woo; Kim, Hee Reyoung [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Radiation monitoring technique has been used for monitoring of decommissioning site of nuclear facility, radioactive waste disposal site, or in case of radioactivity accident. For rapid measurement of gamma-ray and beta-ray, many portable radiation detectors were developed but they are sensitive to specific radiation type. For example, portable detectors using NaI(Tl) or high purity germanium (HPGe) are suitable to detect gamma-ray. Otherwise, Geiger-müller (GM) tube or ionization chamber are suitable to detect all-types of radiation but it is hard to determine which particle is detected in the detector. In this reason, phoswich detectors for discrimination of beta-ray and gamma-ray were developed by using pulse shape discrimination. In this study, another approach to discriminate the beta-ray and gamma-ray is carried out. Two scintillators are used, cadmium tungstate (CdWO{sub 4}) and plastic scintillator. They have huge difference in their effective atomic number and mass density, thus they have huge difference in their gamma-ray sensitivity while the sensitivity of beta-ray is similar. The characterization of beta-ray and gamma-ray discrimination by using this characteristics is include. A technique of discrimination between beta-ray and gamma-ray was suggested. The method was verified by Monte Carlo simulation and experiment. This work showed feasibility on in field measurement of radiation with discrimination of beta-ray and gamma-ray.

  19. Radionuclides release from re-irradiated fuel under high temperature and pressure conditions. Gamma-ray measurements of VEGA-5 test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidaka, Akihide; Kudo, Tamotsu; Nakamura, Takehiko; Kanazawa, Toru; Kiuchi, Toshio; Uetsuka, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The VEGA (Verification Experiments of radionuclides Gas/Aerosol release) program is being performed at JAERI to clarify mechanisms of radionuclides release from irradiated fuel during severe accidents and to improve source term predictability. The fifth VEGA-5 test was conducted in January 2002 to confirm the reproducibility of decrease in cesium release under elevated pressure that was observed in the VEGA-2 test and to investigate the release behavior of short-life radionuclides. The PWR fuel of 47 GWd/tU after about 8.2 years of cooling was re-irradiated at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) for 8 hours before the heat-up test. After that, the two pellets of 10.9 g without cladding were heated up to about 2,900 K at 1.0 MPa under the inert He condition. The experiment reconfirmed the decrease in cesium release rate under the elevated pressure. The release data on short-life radionuclides such as Ru-103, Ba-140 and Xe-133 that have never been observed in the previous VEGA tests without re-irradiation was obtained using the {gamma} ray measurement. (author)

  20. Low-temperature tracking detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Niinikoski, T O; Anbinderis, P; Anbinderis, T; D'Ambrosio, N; de Boer, Wim; Borchi, E; Borer, K; Bruzzi, M; Buontempo, S; Chen, W; Cindro, V; Dezillie, B; Dierlamm, A; Eremin, V; Gaubas, E; Gorbatenko, V; Granata, V; Grigoriev, E; Grohmann, S; Hauler, F; Heijne, Erik H M; Heising, S; Hempel, O; Herzog, R; Härkönen, J; Ilyashenko, Yu S; Janos, S; Jungermann, L; Kalesinskas, V; Kapturauskas, J; Laiho, R; Li, Z; Luukka, Panja; Mandic, I; De Masi, R; Menichelli, D; Mikuz, M; Militaru, O; Nüssle, G; O'Shea, V; Pagano, S; Paul, S; Perea-Solano, B; Piotrzkowski, K; Pirollo, S; Pretzl, K; Rahman, M; Rato-Mendes, P; Rouby, X; Ruggiero, G; Smith, K; Sousa, P; Tuominen, E; Tuovinen, E; Vaitkus, J; Verbitskaya, E; Da Vià, C; Vlasenko, L; Vlasenko, M; Wobst, E; Zavrtanik, M

    2004-01-01

    RD39 collaboration develops new detector techniques for particle trackers, which have to withstand fluences up to 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -2 / of high-energy particles. The work focuses on the optimization of silicon detectors and their readout electronics while keeping the temperature as a free parameter. Our results so far suggest that the best operating temperature is around 130 K. We shall also describe in this paper how the current-injected mode of operation reduces the polarization of the bulk silicon at low temperatures, and how the engineering and materials problems related with vacuum and low temperature can be solved. (9 refs).

  1. Application of nondestructive gamma-ray and neutron techniques for the safeguarding of irradiated fuel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.R.; Halbig, J.K.; Lee, D.M.; Beach, S.E.; Bement, T.R.; Dermendjiev, E.; Hatcher, C.R.; Kaieda, K.; Medina, E.G.

    1980-05-01

    Nondestructive gamma-ray and neutron techniques were used to characterize the irradiation exposures of irradiated fuel assemblies. Techniques for the rapid measurement of the axial-activity profiles of fuel assemblies have been developed using ion chambers and Be(..gamma..,n) detectors. Detailed measurements using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry and passive neutron techniques were correlated with operator-declared values of cooling times and burnup.

  2. Scene data fusion: Real-time standoff volumetric gamma-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnowski, Ross [Department of Nuclear Engineering, UC Berkeley, 4155 Etcheverry Hall, MC 1730, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States of America (United States); Haefner, Andrew; Mihailescu, Lucian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab - Applied Nuclear Physics, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States of America (United States); Vetter, Kai [Department of Nuclear Engineering, UC Berkeley, 4155 Etcheverry Hall, MC 1730, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States of America (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab - Applied Nuclear Physics, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States of America (United States)

    2015-11-11

    An approach to gamma-ray imaging has been developed that enables near real-time volumetric (3D) imaging of unknown environments thus improving the utility of gamma-ray imaging for source-search and radiation mapping applications. The approach, herein dubbed scene data fusion (SDF), is based on integrating mobile radiation imagers with real-time tracking and scene reconstruction algorithms to enable a mobile mode of operation and 3D localization of gamma-ray sources. A 3D model of the scene, provided in real-time by a simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) algorithm, is incorporated into the image reconstruction reducing the reconstruction time and improving imaging performance. The SDF concept is demonstrated in this work with a Microsoft Kinect RGB-D sensor, a real-time SLAM solver, and a cart-based Compton imaging platform comprised of two 3D position-sensitive high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. An iterative algorithm based on Compton kinematics is used to reconstruct the gamma-ray source distribution in all three spatial dimensions. SDF advances the real-world applicability of gamma-ray imaging for many search, mapping, and verification scenarios by improving the tractiblity of the gamma-ray image reconstruction and providing context for the 3D localization of gamma-ray sources within the environment in real-time.

  3. Scene data fusion: Real-time standoff volumetric gamma-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnowski, Ross; Haefner, Andrew; Mihailescu, Lucian; Vetter, Kai

    2015-11-01

    An approach to gamma-ray imaging has been developed that enables near real-time volumetric (3D) imaging of unknown environments thus improving the utility of gamma-ray imaging for source-search and radiation mapping applications. The approach, herein dubbed scene data fusion (SDF), is based on integrating mobile radiation imagers with real-time tracking and scene reconstruction algorithms to enable a mobile mode of operation and 3D localization of gamma-ray sources. A 3D model of the scene, provided in real-time by a simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) algorithm, is incorporated into the image reconstruction reducing the reconstruction time and improving imaging performance. The SDF concept is demonstrated in this work with a Microsoft Kinect RGB-D sensor, a real-time SLAM solver, and a cart-based Compton imaging platform comprised of two 3D position-sensitive high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. An iterative algorithm based on Compton kinematics is used to reconstruct the gamma-ray source distribution in all three spatial dimensions. SDF advances the real-world applicability of gamma-ray imaging for many search, mapping, and verification scenarios by improving the tractiblity of the gamma-ray image reconstruction and providing context for the 3D localization of gamma-ray sources within the environment in real-time.

  4. Gamma Ray Bursts and Their Links With Supernovae and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszaros, Peter; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the Universe, whose origin and mechanism is the focus of intense interest. They appear connected to supernova remnants from massive stars or the merger of their remnants, and their brightness makes them temporarily detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. After pioneering breakthroughs from space and ground experiments, their study is entering a new phase with observations from the recently launched Fermi satellite, as well as the prospect of detections or limits from large neutrino and gravitational wave detectors. The interplay between such observations and theoretical models of gamma-ray bursts is reviewed, as well as their connections to supernovae and cosmology.

  5. Simulating Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes using SWORD (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwon, C.; Grove, J.; Dwyer, J. R.; Mattson, K.; Polaski, D.; Jackson, L.

    2013-12-01

    We report on simulations of the relativistic feedback discharges involved with the production of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs). The simulations were conducted using Geant4 using the SoftWare for the Optimization of Radiation Detectors (SWORD) framework. SWORD provides a graphical interface for setting up simulations in select high-energy radiation transport engines. Using Geant4, we determine avalanche length, the energy spectrum of the electrons and gamma-rays as they leave the field region, and the feedback factor describing the degree to which the production of energetic particles is self-sustaining. We validate our simulations against previous work in order to determine the reliability of our results. This work is funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  6. Strategies for Studying the Sources of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T. L.; Norris, J. P.; Hurley, K. C.

    2003-01-01

    The study of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) has rapidly evolved in recent years with the discovery of their cosmological nature and with BATSE, BeppoSAX, HETE and the IPN enabling a wide variety of associated . afterglow measurements. Multiwavelength observations ranging through the radio, optical, soft and hard x-ray, and gamma-ray regimes have exploded the field of GRB interpretation. Also, the Amanda, Milagro and LIGO experiments can search for related neutrino, cosmic-ray photon, and gravitational radiation events, even with the delayed alerts, such as from the IPN. The infrared region, where the optical emissions from sources at the extreme distances may be shifted, will become important but is undersubscribed. The soon-to-be launched Swift mission will greatly broaden the GRB discipline, and a strategy for associated ground-based measurements is outlined. The need for the improved global distribution of all instruments, in particular, robotic infrared detectors, is cited.

  7. First results from gamma ray diagnostics in EAST Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, R. J.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhong, G. Q., E-mail: gqzhong@ipp.ac.cn; Cao, H. R.; Liu, G. Z.; Li, K.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, S. Y.; Zhang, J. Z. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Gamma ray diagnostics has been developed in the EAST tokamak recently. Six BGO scintillator detectors are arranged on the down-half cross-section and pointed at the up-half cross-section of plasma, with space resolution about 15 cm and energy range from 0.3 MeV to 6 MeV. Three main gamma ray peaks in the energy spectra have been observed and are identified as the results of nuclear reactions {sup 207}Pb(n, n′){sup 207m}Pb, H(n, γ) D, and D(p, γ){sup 3}He, respectively. Upgrading of the system is in progress by using LaBr3(Ce) scintillator, fast photo-multiplier tubes, and a fully digital data acquisition system based on high sample frequency digitizers with digital pulse processing algorithms.

  8. Further development of IDGS: Isotope dilution gamma-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T. K.; Parker, J. L.; Kuno, Y.; Sato, S.; Kamata, M.; Akiyama, T.

    The isotope dilution gamma-ray spectrometry (IDGS) technique for determining the plutonium concentration and isotopic composition of highly radioactive spent-fuel dissolver solutions has been further developed. Both the sample preparation and the analysis have been improved. The plutonium isotopic analysis is based on high-resolution, low-energy gamma-ray spectrometry. The plutonium concentration in the dissolver solutions then is calculated from the measured isotopic differences among the spike, the dissolver solution, and the spiked dissolver solution. Plutonium concentrations and isotopic compositions of dissolver solutions analyzed from this study agree well with those obtained by traditional isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) and are consistent with the first IDGS experimental result. With the current detector efficiency, sample size, and a 100-min count time, the estimated precision is approximately 0.5 percent for Pu-239 and Pu-240 isotopic analyses and approximately 1 percent for the plutonium concentration analysis.

  9. Gamma rays from star-forming regions

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo E. Romero

    2008-01-01

    Star-forming regions have been tentatively associated with gamma-ray sources since the early days of the COS B satellite. After the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, the statistical evidence for such an association has became overwhelming. Recent results from Cherenkov telescopes indicate that some high-energy sources are produced in regions of active star formation like Cygnus OB2 and Westerlund 2. In this paper I will briefly review what kind of stellar objects can produce gamma-ray emission i...

  10. On Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, Remo; Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Caito, Letizia; Chardonnet, Pascal; Cherubini, Christian; Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Fraschetti, Federico; Geralico, Andrea; Guida, Roberto; Patricelli, Barbara; Rotondo, Michael; Hernandez, Jorge Armando Rueda; Vereshchagin, Gregory; Xue, She-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    (Shortened) We show by example how the uncoding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) offers unprecedented possibilities to foster new knowledge in fundamental physics and in astrophysics. After recalling some of the classic work on vacuum polarization in uniform electric fields by Klein, Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, we summarize some of the efforts to observe these effects in heavy ions and high energy ion collisions. We then turn to the theory of vacuum polarization around a Kerr-Newman black hole, leading to the extraction of the blackholic energy, to the concept of dyadosphere and dyadotorus, and to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma. We then present a new theoretical approach encompassing the physics of neutron stars and heavy nuclei. It is shown that configurations of nuclear matter in bulk with global charge neutrality can exist on macroscopic scales and with electric fields close to the critical value near their surfaces. These configurations may represent an initial condition for the...

  11. Gamma-ray spectrometry of LDEF samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winn, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    A total of 31 samples from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of aluminum, vanadium, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultra-low-level gamma spectroscopy. The study quantified particle induced activations of (sup 22)Na, {sup 46}Sc, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 56}Co, {sup 57}Co, {sup 58}Co, and {sup 60}Co. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include end pieces, which have been reported to collect noticeable {sup 7}Be on their leading surfaces. No significant {sup 7}Be was detected in the samples analyzed. The Underground Counting Facility at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) was used in this work. The facility is 50 ft. underground, constructed with low-background shielding materials, and operated as a clean room. The most sensitive analyses were performed with a 90%-efficient HPGe gamma-ray detector, which is enclosed in a purged active/passive shield. Each sample was counted for one to six days in two orientations to yield more representative average activities for the sample. The non-standard geometries of the LDEF samples prompted the development of a novel calibration method, whereby the efficiency about the samples surfaces (measured with point sources) predicted the efficiency for the bulk sample.

  12. Gamma-ray spectrometry of LDEF samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winn, W.G.

    1991-12-31

    A total of 31 samples from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of aluminum, vanadium, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultra-low-level gamma spectroscopy. The study quantified particle induced activations of (sup 22)Na, {sup 46}Sc, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 56}Co, {sup 57}Co, {sup 58}Co, and {sup 60}Co. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include end pieces, which have been reported to collect noticeable {sup 7}Be on their leading surfaces. No significant {sup 7}Be was detected in the samples analyzed. The Underground Counting Facility at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) was used in this work. The facility is 50 ft. underground, constructed with low-background shielding materials, and operated as a clean room. The most sensitive analyses were performed with a 90%-efficient HPGe gamma-ray detector, which is enclosed in a purged active/passive shield. Each sample was counted for one to six days in two orientations to yield more representative average activities for the sample. The non-standard geometries of the LDEF samples prompted the development of a novel calibration method, whereby the efficiency about the samples surfaces (measured with point sources) predicted the efficiency for the bulk sample.

  13. Gamma-ray mirror technology for NDA of spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descalle, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ruz-Armendariz, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Decker, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Alameda, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brejnholt, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Soufli, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Robinson, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dreyer, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pivovaroff, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ziock, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chichester, D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Watson, S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Trellue, H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-28

    Direct measurements of gamma rays emitted by fissile material have been proposed as an alternative to measurements of the gamma rays from fission products. From a safeguards applications perspective, direct detection of uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) K-shell fluorescence emission lines and specific lines from some of their isotopes could lead to improved shipper-receiver difference or input accountability at the start of Pu reprocessing. However, these measurements are difficult to implement when the spent fuel is in the line-of-sight of the detector, as the detector is exposed to high rates dominated by fission product emissions. To overcome the combination of high rates and high background, grazing incidence multilayer mirrors have been proposed as a solution to selectively reflect U and Pu hard X-ray and soft gamma rays in the 90 to 420 keV energy into a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector shielded from the direct line-of-sight of spent fuel. Several groups demonstrated that K-shell fluorescence lines of U and Pu in spent fuel could be detected with Ge detectors. In the field of hard X-ray optics the performance of reflective multilayer coated reflective optics was demonstrated up to 645 keV at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Initial measurements conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with sealed sources and scoping experiments conducted at the ORNL Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL) with spent nuclear fuel further demonstrated the pass-band properties of multilayer mirrors for reflecting specific emission lines into 1D and 2D HPGe detectors, respectively.

  14. Analyzing Space-Based Interferometric Measurements of Stars and Network Measurements of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taff, L. G.

    1998-01-01

    Since the announcement of the discovery of sources of bursts of gamma-ray radiation in 1973, hundreds more reports of such bursts have now been published. Numerous artificial satellites have been equipped with gamma-ray detectors including the very successful Compton Gamma Ray Observatory BATSE instrument. Unfortunately, we have made no progress in identifying the source(s) of this high energy radiation. We suspected that this was a consequence of the method used to define gamma-ray burst source "error boxes." An alternative procedure to compute gamma-ray burst source positions, with a purely physical underpinning, was proposed in 1988 by Taff. Since then we have also made significant progress in understanding the analytical nature of the triangulation problem and in computing actual gamma-ray burst positions and their corresponding error boxes. For the former, we can now mathematically illustrate the crucial role of the area occupied by the detectors, while for the latter, the Atteia et al. (1987) catalog has been completely re-reduced. There are very few discrepancies in locations between our results and those of the customary "time difference of arrival" procedure. Thus, we have numerically demonstrated that the end result, for the positions, of these two very different-looking procedures is the same. Finally, for the first time, we provide a sample of realistic "error boxes" whose non-simple shapes vividly portray the difficulty of burst source localization.

  15. Gamma-ray Spectra of Starburst Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Roberto Jose; Paglione, Timothy

    2018-01-01

    Starburst galaxies offer a unique window into the nature of star formation, its driving forces, and the energetic interactions within the galaxy. Their supernovae enrich the surrounding environment with cosmic rays that interact with the interstellar medium and galactic magnetic fields producing gamma-rays and non-thermal radio emission. We generated gamma-ray spectra for the 7 brightest starburst galaxies using 8.6 years of Pass 8 Large Area Telescope (LAT) data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In addition to new detections, we will report on the results of simultaneously modeling the gamma-ray and radio spectra. These results confirm prior studies favoring high magnetic field strengths in the starburst regions.

  16. Gamma-Ray Astrophysics NSSTC Fermi GBM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is not a pointed or imaging instrument. To determine fluxes for known sources, we measure the change in the count rate...

  17. Thermal neutron capture gamma-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuli, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    The energy and intensity of gamma rays as seen in thermal neutron capture are presented. Only those (n,..cap alpha..), E = thermal, reactions for which the residual nucleus mass number is greater than or equal to 45 are included. These correspond to evaluations published in Nuclear Data Sheets. The publication source data are contained in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The data presented here do not involve any additional evaluation. Appendix I lists all the residual nuclides for which the data are included here. Appendix II gives a cumulated index to A-chain evaluations including the year of publication. The capture gamma ray data are given in two tables - the Table 1 is the list of all gamma rays seen in (n,..gamma..) reaction given in the order of increasing energy; the Table II lists the gamma rays according to the nuclide.

  18. POPULATION SYNTHESIS AND GAMMA RAY BURST PROGENITORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. FREYER

    2000-12-11

    Population synthesis studies of binaries are always limited by a myriad of uncertainties from the poorly understood effects of binary mass transfer and common envelope evolution to the many uncertainties that still remain in stellar evolution. But the importance of these uncertainties depends both upon the objects being studied and the questions asked about these objects. Here I review the most critical uncertainties in the population synthesis of gamma-ray burst progenitors. With a better understanding of these uncertainties, binary population synthesis can become a powerful tool in understanding, and constraining, gamma-ray burst models. In turn, as gamma-ray bursts become more important as cosmological probes, binary population synthesis of gamma-ray burst progenitors becomes an important tool in cosmology.

  19. Applications of gamma-ray lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balko, B.; Cohen, L.; Hartmann, F. X.

    1985-11-01

    As a result of the IST/IDA Gamma-Ray Laser Workshop held in May 1985, a general picture of the gamma-ray laser has emerged. The characteristics of the radiation from this source are contrasted with those from other coherent sources; these include energy, bandwidth, intensity, and coherence length. Potential nonmilitary applications are listed; and two classes of military applications are suggested. Those characteristics which drive a specific application are spelled out.

  20. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Massimo Della [INAF-Napoli, Capodimonte Observatory, Salita Moiariello, 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics Network, Piazzale della Repubblica 10, I-65122, Pescara (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    I’ll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ∼ 0.4% − 3%.

  1. Polarization measurements of proton capture gamma rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suffert, M.; Endt, P.M.; Hoogenboom, A.M.

    1959-01-01

    The linear polarization has been measured of eight different gamma rays of widely differing energies (Eγ = 0.8 - 8.0 MeV) emitted at resonances in the 24Mg(p, γ)25Al, 30Si(p, γ)31P, and 32S(p, γ)33Cl reactions. The gamma rays emitted at 90° to the proton beam were Compton scattered in a 2″ NaI

  2. Gamma-ray constraints on supernova nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leising, Mark D.

    1994-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy holds great promise for probing nucleosynthesis in individual supernova explosions via short-lived radioactivity, and for measuring current global Galactic supernova nucleosynthesis with longer-lived radioactivity. It was somewhat surprising that the former case was realized first for a Type II supernova, when both Co-56 and Co-57 were detected in SN 1987A. These provide unprecedented constraints on models of Type II explosions and nucleosynthesis. Live Al-26 in the Galaxy might come from Type II supernovae, and if it is eventually shown to be so, can constrain massive star evolution, supernova nucleosynthesis, and the Galactic Type II supernova rate. Type Ia supernovae, thought to be thermonuclear explosions, have not yet been detected in gamma-rays. This is somewhat surprising given current models and recent Co-56 detection attempts. Ultimately, gamma-ray measurements can confirm their thermonuclear nature, probe the nuclear burning conditions, and help evaluate their contributions to Galactic nucleosynthesis. Type Ib/c supernovae are poorly understood. Whether they are core collapse or thermonuclear events might be ultimately settled by gamma-ray observations. Depending on details of the nuclear processing, any of these supernova types might contribute to a detectable diffuse glow of Fe-60 gamma-ray lines. Previous attempts at detection have come very close to expected emission levels. Remnants of any type of age less that a few centuries might be detectable as individual spots of Ti-44 gamma-ray line emission. It is in fact quite surprising that previous surveys have not discovered such spots, and the constraints on the combination of nucleosynthesis yields and supernova rates are very interesting. All of these interesting limits and possibilities mean that the next mission, International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), if it has sufficient sensitivity, is very likely to lead to the realization of much of the great potential

  3. Abstracts of papers to be presented at the fifth symposium on x- and gamma-ray sources and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The program and abstracts of papers are presented. Topics include radiation sources, radiation detectors, mathematical models and data analysis, gamma-ray spectroscopy, instrumentation, applications of x-ray fluorescence, PIXE, and x-ray absorption. (ACR)

  4. Modeling of Pulses in Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Celestin, Sebastien; Pasko, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are high-energy photon bursts originating from the Earth's atmosphere that are associated with lightning activities. After their discovery in 1994 by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) detector aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory [Fishman et al., Science, 264, 1313, 1994], this phenomenon has been further observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) [Smith et al., Science, 307, 1085, 2005], the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope [Briggs et al., JGR, 115, A07323, 2010] and the Astrorivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE) satellite [Marisaldi et al., JGR, 115, A00E13, 2010]. Photon spectra corresponding to the mechanism of relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) usually provide a very good agreement with satellite observations [Dwyer and Smith, GRL, 32, L22804, 2005]. On the other hand, Celestin and Pasko [JGR, 116, A03315, 2011] have shown theoretically that the large flux of thermal runaway electrons generated by streamers during the negative corona flash stage of stepping lightning leaders in intracloud lightning flashes could be responsible for TGFs. Recently, based on analysis of the temporal profiles of 278 TGF events observed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor, Foley et al. [JGR, 119, 5931, 2014] have suggested that 67% of TGF pulses detected are asymmetric and these asymmetric pulses are consistent with the production mechanism of TGFs by relativistic feedback discharges. In the present work, we employ a Monte Carlo model to study the temporal distribution of photons at low-orbit satellite altitudes during TGF events. Using the pulse fitting method described in [Foley et al., 2014], we further investigate the characteristics of TGF pulses. We mainly focus on the effects of Compton scattering on the symmetry properties and the rise and fall times of TGF pulses.

  5. Japanese VLBI Network Observations of a Gamma-Ray Narrow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We made simultaneous single-dish and VLBI observations of a gamma-ray narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxy 1H 0323+342. We found significant flux variation at 8 GHz on a time scale of one month. The total flux density varied by 5.5% in 32 days, corresponding to a variability brightness temperature of ...

  6. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Sahu, Kailash

    2001-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Gamma-ray burst-supernova relation B. Paczynski; Observations of gamma-ray bursts G. Fishman; Fireballs T. Piran; Gamma-ray mechanisms M. Rees; Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts R. Kehoe, C. Akerlof, R. Balsano, S. Barthelmy, J. Bloch, P. Butterworth, D. Casperson, T. Cline, S. Fletcher, F. Frontera, G. Gisler, J. Heise, J. Hills, K. Hurley, B. Lee, S. Marshall, T. McKay, A. Pawl, L. Piro, B. Priedhorsky, J. Szymanski and J. Wren; X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts L. Piro; The first year of optical-IR observations of SN1998bw I. Danziger, T. Augusteijn, J. Brewer, E. Cappellaro, V. Doublier, T. Galama, J. Gonzalez, O. Hainaut, B. Leibundgut, C. Lidman, P. Mazzali, K. Nomoto, F. Patat, J. Spyromilio, M. Turatto, J. Van Paradijs, P. Vreeswijk and J. Walsh; X-ray emission of Supernova 1998bw in the error box of GRB980425 E. Pian; Direct analysis of spectra of type Ic supernovae D. Branch; The interaction of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with their surroundings R. Chevalier; Magnetars, soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts A. Harding; Super-luminous supernova remnants Y. -H. Chu, C. -H. Chen and S. -P. Lai; The properties of hypernovae: SNe Ic 1998bw, 1997ef, and SN IIn 1997cy K. Nomoto, P. Mazzali, T. Nakamura, K. Iwanmoto, K. Maeda, T. Suzuki, M. Turatto, I. Danziger and F. Patat; Collapsars, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Supernovae S. Woosley, A. MacFadyen and A. Heger; Pre-supernova evolution of massive stars N. Panagia and G. Bono; Radio supernovae and GRB 980425 K. Weiler, N. Panagia, R. Sramek, S. Van Dyk, M. Montes and C. Lacey; Models for Ia supernovae and evolutionary effects P. Hoflich and I. Dominguez; Deflagration to detonation A. Khokhlov; Universality in SN Iae and the Phillips relation D. Arnett; Abundances from supernovae F. -K. Thielemann, F. Brachwitz, C. Freiburghaus, S. Rosswog, K. Iwamoto, T. Nakamura, K. Nomoto, H. Umeda, K. Langanke, G. Martinez-Pinedo, D. Dean, W. Hix and M. Strayer; Sne, GRBs, and the

  7. Characterization and Applications of a CdZnTe-Based Gamma-Ray Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Michelle Lee

    a 137Cs at a 20 m distance with 20 seconds of observation time is estimated to be ˜0.2 mCi in spectral mode and ˜20 mCi in Compton imaging mode. These performance parameters fulfilled the requirements of the nuclear security program. Following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident of March, 2011, efficient methods to assess levels of radioactive contamination over large areas are needed to aid in clean-up efforts. Although a field study was not initially intended for the HEMI prototype, its portability, low mass, and low power requirements made it a good candidate to test Compton imaging from an aerial platform. The instrument was brought to Japan in August, 2013, allowing for the first test of a Compton imager from a helicopter. The instrument and detectors proved reliable and performed well under high temperature, high humidity, and vibrations. Single-detector hit energy resolutions ranged from 2.5 - 2.8% FWHM at 662 keV. The field testing of the HEMI instrument in Fukushima revealed areas of higher activity of cesium among a diffuse background through aerial-based countrate mapping and through ground measurements. Although the Compton reconstructed events were dominated by random coincidences, preliminary Compton imaging results are promising. A future mission in medium-energy gamma-ray astrophysics would allow for many scientific advancements, e.g., a possible explanation for the excess positron emission from the Galactic Center, a better understanding of nucleosynthesis and explosion mechanisms in Type Ia supernovae, and a look at the physical forces at play in compact objects such as black holes and neutron stars. A next-generation telescope requires good energy resolution, good angular resolution, and high sensitivity in order to achieve these objectives. Large-volume CdZnTe detectors are an attractive candidate for a future instrument because of their good absorption, simple design, and minimal or no cooling requirements. Using the

  8. SEARCH FOR GAMMA-RAYS FROM THE UNUSUALLY BRIGHT GRB 130427A WITH THE HAWC GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeysekara, A. U. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Alfaro, R. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D. F. (Mexico); Alvarez, C.; Arceo, R. [CEFyMAP, Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas, Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Álvarez, J. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Cotti, U.; De León, C. [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Solares, H. A. Ayala [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI (United States); Barber, A. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Baughman, B. M.; Braun, J. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Bautista-Elivar, N. [Universidad Politécnica de Pachuca, Municipio de Zempoala, Hidalgo (Mexico); BenZvi, S. Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Rosales, M. Bonilla; Carramiñana, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Caballero-Mora, K. S. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D. F. (Mexico); Castillo, M.; Cotzomi, J. [Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Ciudad Universitaria, Puebla (Mexico); De la Fuente, E., E-mail: dirk.lennarz@gatech.edu [Departamento de Física, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenierías, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara (Mexico); Collaboration: HAWC collaboration; and others

    2015-02-20

    The first limits on the prompt emission from the long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A in the >100 GeV energy band are reported. GRB 130427A was the most powerful burst ever detected with a redshift z ≲ 0.5 and featured the longest lasting emission above 100 MeV. The energy spectrum extends at least up to 95 GeV, clearly in the range observable by the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory, a new extensive air shower detector currently under construction in central Mexico. The burst occurred under unfavorable observation conditions, low in the sky and when HAWC was running 10% of the final detector. Based on the observed light curve at MeV-GeV energies, eight different time periods have been searched for prompt and delayed emission from this GRB. In all cases, no statistically significant excess of counts has been found and upper limits have been placed. It is shown that a similar GRB close to zenith would be easily detected by the full HAWC detector, which will be completed soon. The detection rate of the full HAWC detector may be as high as one to two GRBs per year. A detection could provide important information regarding the high energy processes at work and the observation of a possible cut-off beyond the Fermi Large Area Telescope energy range could be the signature of gamma-ray absorption, either in the GRB or along the line of sight due to the extragalactic background light.

  9. The Gamma-Ray Imager GRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderer, Cornelia B.; GRI Collaboration

    2008-03-01

    Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles are accelerated to extreme relativistic energies by mechanisms which are still poorly understood, and nuclear reactions are synthesizing the basic constituents of our world. Cosmic accelerators and cosmic explosions are major science themes that are addressed in the gamma-ray regime. ESA's INTEGRAL observatory currently provides the astronomical community with a unique tool to investigate the sky up to MeV energies and hundreds of sources, new classes of objects, extraordinary views of antimatter annihilation in our Galaxy, and fingerprints of recent nucleosynthesis processes have been discovered. NASA's GLAST mission will similarly take the next step in surveying the high-energy ( GeV) sky, and NuSTAR will pioneer focusing observations at hard X-ray energies (to 80 keV). There will be clearly a growing need to perform deeper, more focused investigations of gamma-ray sources in the 100-keV to MeV regime. Recent technological advances in the domain of gamma-ray focusing using Laue diffraction and multilayer-coated mirror techniques have paved the way towards a gamma-ray mission, providing major improvements compared to past missions regarding sensitivity and angular resolution. Such a future Gamma-Ray Imager will allow the study of particle acceleration processes and explosion physics in unprecedented detail, providing essential clues on the innermost nature of the most violent and most energetic processes in the Universe.

  10. New insights from cosmic gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Diehl

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of gamma rays from cosmic sources at ~MeV energies is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and their impacts on objects and phenomena throughout the universe. Gamma rays trace nuclear processes most directly, as they originate from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this astronomical window and is discussed here: Cosmic positrons are often produced from β-decays, thus also of nuclear physics origins. The nuclear reactions leading to radioactive isotopes occur inside stars and stellar explosions, which therefore constitute the main objects of such studies. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivities have been measured though 56Ni, 56Co, and 44Ti lines, and a beginning has thus been made to complement conventional supernova observations with such measurements of the prime energy sources of supernova light created in their deep interiors. The diffuse radioactive afterglow of massive-star nucleosynthesis in gamma rays is now being exploited towards astrophysical studies on how massive stars feed back their energy and ejecta into interstellar gas, as part of the cosmic cycle of matter through generations of stars enriching the interstellar gas and stars with metals. Large interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised to be the dominating structures where new massive-star ejecta are injected, from 26Al gamma-ray spectroscopy. Also, constraints on the complex interiors of stars derive from the ratio of 60Fe/26Al gamma rays. Finally, the puzzling bulge-dominated intensity distribution of positron annihilation gamma rays is measured in greater detail, but still not understood; a recent microquasar flare provided evidence that such objects may be prime sources for positrons in interstellar space, rather than

  11. A Unique Outside Neutron and Gamma Ray Instrumentation Development Test Facility at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Parsons, A.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-01-01

    An outside neutron and gamma ray instrumentation test facility has been constructed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to evaluate conceptual designs of gamma ray and neutron systems that we intend to propose for future planetary lander and rover missions. We will describe this test facility and its current capabilities for operation of planetary in situ instrumentation, utilizing a l4 MeV pulsed neutron generator as the gamma ray excitation source with gamma ray and neutron detectors, in an open field with the ability to remotely monitor and operate experiments from a safe distance at an on-site building. The advantage of a permanent test facility with the ability to operate a neutron generator outside and the flexibility to modify testing configurations is essential for efficient testing of this type of technology. Until now, there have been no outdoor test facilities for realistically testing neutron and gamma ray instruments planned for solar system exploration

  12. Coded-aperture Compton camera for gamma-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Aaron M.

    This dissertation describes the development of a novel gamma-ray imaging system concept and presents results from Monte Carlo simulations of the new design. Current designs for large field-of-view gamma cameras suitable for homeland security applications implement either a coded aperture or a Compton scattering geometry to image a gamma-ray source. Both of these systems require large, expensive position-sensitive detectors in order to work effectively. By combining characteristics of both of these systems, a new design can be implemented that does not require such expensive detectors and that can be scaled down to a portable size. This new system has significant promise in homeland security, astronomy, botany and other fields, while future iterations may prove useful in medical imaging, other biological sciences and other areas, such as non-destructive testing. A proof-of-principle study of the new gamma-ray imaging system has been performed by Monte Carlo simulation. Various reconstruction methods have been explored and compared. General-Purpose Graphics-Processor-Unit (GPGPU) computation has also been incorporated. The resulting code is a primary design tool for exploring variables such as detector spacing, material selection and thickness and pixel geometry. The advancement of the system from a simple 1-dimensional simulation to a full 3-dimensional model is described. Methods of image reconstruction are discussed and results of simulations consisting of both a 4 x 4 and a 16 x 16 object space mesh have been presented. A discussion of the limitations and potential areas of further study is also presented.

  13. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M.S.; Goldstein, A.; Meegan, C.A.; Paciesas, W.S.; Preece, R.D.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.; Gibby, M.H.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R.M.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Yu, H-F.; Bhat, P.N.; Burgess, J.M.; Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Giles, M.M.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A.J.; von Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Tierney, D.; Zhang, B..B.

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the

  14. Gamma-Ray Lenses for Astrophysics-and the Gamma-Ray Imager Mission GRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunderer, C. B.; Ballmoos, P. V.; Barriere, N.

    2009-01-01

    Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles are acc...

  15. Porosity measurement of solid pharmaceutical dosage forms by gamma-ray transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins de Oliveira, Jose, E-mail: jose.oliveira@prof.uniso.b [Universidade de Sorocaba, UNISO, Campus Seminario, Caixa Postal 578, Avenue, Dr. Eugenio Salermo, 100, Centro, 18035-430 Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Andreo Filho, Newton; Vinicius Chaud, Marco; Angiolucci, Tatiana; Aranha, Norberto [Universidade de Sorocaba, UNISO, Campus Seminario, Caixa Postal 578, Avenue, Dr. Eugenio Salermo, 100, Centro, 18035-430 Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Germano Martins, Antonio Cesar [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho, UNESP, GAGI, Avenue, 3 de Marco, 511, Alto da Boa Vista, 18087-180 Sorocaba, SP (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    The aim of the present work is the determination of porosity in tablets by using the gamma-ray transmission technique. Tablet dissolution depends on some inherent characteristics of the manufacturing process, such as compression force, tablet volume, density and porosity, nature of excipients, preparation methods and its physical-chemical properties. Porosity is a measure of empty spaces in a material and can be determined by various techniques. In this paper, we propose the use of a gamma-ray transmission technique to obtain the porosity of experimental formulation of tablets. The results of porosity were compared with those obtained by using conventional methodology (density and mercury intrusion). The experimental setup for gamma-ray transmission consists of a gamma-ray source of {sup 241}Am (photons of 59.6 keV and an activity of 3.7x10{sup 9} Bq), an NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, collimators and a standard gamma-ray spectrometry electronics. Our results suggest that the gamma-ray transmission technique is a powerful tool for non-destructive porosity quantification of solid pharmaceutical forms and presents smaller errors than those obtained with conventional methodologies.

  16. Gamma-ray rejection, or detection, with gadolinium as a converter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandlakunta, Praneeth; Cao, Lei

    2012-09-01

    Gadolinium is a competent neutron conversion material for neutron detection due to its extremely high neutron capture cross section. It differs from the other neutron reactive materials by emitting large amounts of low-energy electrons for the consequent signal generation in a detector. Such low-energy electrons, though abundant, are prone to be contaminated by internal and/or external gamma rays, such as the activated 43.0 keV K-X rays, given the high atomic number of gadolinium. While the 43.0 keV K-X ray ought to be rejected as it originates in part from the external gamma rays when neutron detection is concerned, the ability to separate this energy line from other signals points to a practical mode of gamma-ray detection by a thin-film semiconductor with gadolinium as a converter. In this paper, a gamma-ray discrimination scheme for neutron detection is studied, which also provides insight into gamma-ray detection with a small semiconductor device with gadolinium as a converter, in line with the same principle of isolating the K-X rays activated by high- or medium-energy gamma rays.

  17. The effect of incremental gamma-ray doses and incremental neutron fluences upon the performance of self-biased sup 1 sup 0 B-coated high-purity epitaxial GaAs thermal neutron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gersch, H K; Simpson, P A

    2002-01-01

    High-purity epitaxial GaAs sup 1 sup 0 B-coated thermal neutron detectors advantageously operate at room temperature without externally applied voltage. Sample detectors were systematically irradiated at fixed grid locations near the core of a 2 MW research reactor to determine their operational neutron dose threshold. Reactor pool locations were assigned so that fast and thermal neutron fluxes to the devices were similar. Neutron fluences ranged between 10 sup 1 sup 1 and 10 sup 1 sup 4 n/cm sup 2. GaAs detectors were exposed to exponential fluences of base ten. Ten detector designs were irradiated and studied, differentiated between p-i-n diodes and Schottky barrier diodes. The irradiated sup 1 sup 0 B-coated detectors were tested for neutron detection sensitivity in a thermalized neutron beam. Little damage was observed for detectors irradiated at neutron fluences of 10 sup 1 sup 2 n/cm sup 2 and below, but signals noticeably degraded at fluences of 10 sup 1 sup 3 n/cm sup 2. Catastrophic damage was appare...

  18. Airborne Gamma-ray Measurements in the Chernobyl Plume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grasty, R. L.; Hovgaard, Jens; Multala, J.

    1997-01-01

    On 29 April 1986, the Geological Survey of Finland (GSF) survey aircraft with a gamma ray spectrometer flew through a radioactive plume from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. The aircraft became contaminated and the gamma spectrometer measured radioactivity in the plume as well as radioactivity...... on the aircraft. By using simple assumptions on the build-up of contamination it has been possible to separate the signals from contamination and from plume. The analysis further showed that even a detector/spectrometer with low energy resolution is able to identify a contamination with iodine....

  19. Combined in-beam gamma-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy with radioactive ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konki J.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In-beam gamma-ray and electron spectroscopy have been widely used as tools to study the broad variety of phenomena in nuclear structure. The SPEDE spectrometer is a new device to be used in conjunction with the MINIBALL germanium detector array to enable the detection of internal conversion electrons in coincidence with gamma rays from de-exciting nuclei in radioactive ion beam experiments at the upcoming HIE-ISOLDE facility at CERN, Switzerland. Geant4 simulations were carried out in order to optimise the design and segmentation of the silicon detector to achieve good energy resolution and performance.

  20. Inverse compton scattering gamma ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, S.; Frigola, P.; Murokh, A.; Ruelas, M.; Jovanovic, I.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Travish, G.

    2009-09-01

    Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) (e.g. U-235, Pu-239) can be detected by active interrogation with gamma rays (>6 MeV) through photofission. For long-range detection (˜1 km), an intense beam of gamma rays (˜10 14 per second) is required in order to produce measurable number of neutrons. The production of such fluxes of gamma rays, and in the pulse formats useful for detection, presents many technical challenges, and requires novel approaches to the accelerator and laser technology. RadiaBeam is currently designing a gamma ray source based on Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) from a high-energy electron beam. To achieve this, improvements in photoinjector, linac, final focus, and laser system are planned. These enhanced sub-systems build on parallel work being performed at RadiaBeam, UCLA, and elsewhere. A high-repetition rate photoinjector, a high-gradient S-band linac, and a laser pulse recirculator will be used. The proposed system will be a transportable source of high-flux, high-energy quasi-monochromatic gamma rays for active interrogation of special nuclear materials.

  1. Stellar Photon Archaeology with Gamma-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing deep surveys of galaxy luminosity distribution functions, spectral energy distributions and backwards evolution models of star formation rates can be used to calculate the past history of intergalactic photon densities and, from them, the present and past optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays from pair production interactions with these photons. The energy-redshift dependence of the optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays has become known as the Fazio-Stecker relation (Fazio & Stecker 1970). Stecker, Malkan & Scully have calculated the densities of intergalactic background light (IBL) photons of energies from 0.03 eV to the Lyman limit at 13.6 eV and for 0$ < z < $6, using deep survey galaxy observations from Spitzer, Hubble and GALEX and have consequently predicted spectral absorption features for extragalactic gamma-ray sources. This procedure can also be reversed. Determining the cutoff energies of gamma-ray sources with known redshifts using the recently launched Fermi gamma-ray space telescope may enable a more precise determination of the IBL photon densities in the past, i.e., the "archaeo-IBL.", and therefore allow a better measure of the past history of the total star formation rate, including that from galaxies too faint to be observed.

  2. GRI: The Gamma-Ray Imager mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knödlseder, Jürgen; GRI Consortium

    With the INTEGRAL observatory ESA has provided a unique tool to the astronomical community revealing hundreds of sources, new classes of objects, extraordinary views of antimatter annihilation in our Galaxy, and fingerprints of recent nucleosynthesis processes. While INTEGRAL provides the global overview over the soft gamma-ray sky, there is a growing need to perform deeper, more focused investigations of gamma-ray sources. In soft X-rays a comparable step was taken going from the Einstein and the EXOSAT satellites to the Chandra and XMM/Newton observatories. Technological advances in the past years in the domain of gamma-ray focusing using Laue diffraction have paved the way towards a new gamma-ray mission, providing major improvements regarding sensitivity and angular resolution. Such a future Gamma-Ray Imager will allow studies of particle acceleration processes and explosion physics in unprecedented detail, providing essential clues on the innermost nature of the most violent and most energetic processes in the Universe.

  3. Fermi Results on Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzano, Massimiliano; Guillemot, Lucas

    By detecting pulsed gamma-ray emission from more than 130 young and recycled pulsars since it began operating in 2008, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite has revolutionized our view of the gamma-ray pulsar population. In addition to detecting and characterizing the gamma-ray emission from many more pulsars, the LAT has discovered a large number of new gamma-ray sources whose properties suggest that they harbor unknown gamma-ray pulsars. Radio observations in support of the Fermi mission have provided a vital contribution to the success of LAT pulsar studies. For instance, radio detections or non-detections of LAT-discovered pulsars constrain the ratio of radio-loud to radio-quiet pulsars, and radio searches in LAT unassociated sources have uncovered several tens of new millisecond pulsars. In this presentation I will summarize some of the main results and implications from pulsar observations with the Fermi LAT and supporting multi-wavelength observations, in particular in the radio domain.

  4. Determination of photon attenuation coefficient, porosity and field capacity of soil by gamma-ray transmission for 60, 356 and 662 keV gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, D; Un, A; Ozgül, M; Sahin, Y

    2008-12-01

    Gamma-ray transmission methods have been used accurately for the study of the properties of soil in the agricultural purposes. In this study, photon attenuation coefficient, porosity and field capacity of soil are determined by using gamma-ray transmission method. To this end, the soil sample was collected from Erzurum and a 2 x 2 in NaI (Tl) scintillation detector measured the attenuation of strongly collimated monoenergetic gamma beam through soil sample. The radioactive sources used in the experiment were (241)Am, (133)Ba and (137)Cs. The mass attenuation coefficients of dry soil samples were calculated from the transmission measurements. The soil samples were irrigated by adding known quantities of water and the soil-water properties were examined. It was observed that gamma-ray transmission method for determination of the soil parameters has advantages such as practical, inexpensive, non-destructive and fast analysis.

  5. On Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, R.; Bernardini, M. G.; Bianco, C. L.; Caito, L.; Chardonnet, P.; Cherubini, C.; Dainotti, M. G.; Fraschetti, F.; Geralico, A.; Guida, R.; Patricelli, B.; Rotondo, M.; Rueda Hernandez, J. A.; Vereshchagin, G.; Xue, S.-S.

    2008-09-01

    We show by example how the uncoding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) offers unprecedented possibilities to foster new knowledge in fundamental physics and in astrophysics. After recalling some of the classic work on vacuum polarization in uniform electric fields by Klein, Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, we summarize some of the efforts to observe these effects in heavy ions and high energy ion collisions. We then turn to the theory of vacuum polarization around a Kerr-Newman black hole, leading to the extraction of the blackholic energy, to the concept of dyadosphere and dyadotorus, and to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma. We then present a new theoretical approach encompassing the physics of neutron stars and heavy nuclei. It is shown that configurations of nuclear matter in bulk with global charge neutrality can exist on macroscopic scales and with electric fields close to the critical value near their surfaces. These configurations may represent an initial condition for the process of gravitational collapse, leading to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma: the basic self-accelerating system explaining both the energetics and the high energy Lorentz factor observed in GRBs. We then turn to recall the two basic interpretational paradigms of our GRB model: 1) the Relative Space-Time Transformation (RSTT) paradigm and 2) the Interpretation of the Burst Structure (IBS) paradigm. These paradigms lead to a "canonical" GRB light curve formed from two different components: a Proper-GRB (P-GRB) and an extended afterglow comprising a raising part, a peak, and a decaying tail. When the P-GRB is energetically predominant we have a "genuine" short GRB, while when the afterglow is energetically predominant we have a so-called long GRB or a "fake" short GRB. We compare and contrast the description of the relativistic expansion of the electron-positron plasma within our approach and within the other ones in the current literature. We then turn

  6. Light Dawns on Dark Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    [1] Gamma-ray bursts lasting longer than two seconds are referred to as long bursts and those with a shorter duration are known as short bursts. Long bursts, which were observed in this study, are associated with the supernova explosions of massive young stars in star-forming galaxies. Short bursts are not well understood, but are thought to originate from the merger of two compact objects such as neutron stars. [2] The Gamma-Ray burst Optical and Near-infrared Detector (GROND) was designed and built at the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in collaboration with the Tautenburg Observatory, and has been fully operational since August 2007. [3] Other studies relating to dark gamma-ray bursts have been released. Early this year, astronomers used the Subaru Telescope to observe a single gamma-ray burst, from which they hypothesised that dark gamma-ray bursts may indeed be a separate sub-class that form through a different mechanism, such as the merger of binary stars. In another study published last year using the Keck Telescope, astronomers studied the host galaxies of 14 dark GRBs, and based on the derived low redshifts they infer dust as the likely mechanism to create the dark bursts. In the new work reported here, 39 GRBs were studied, including nearly 20 dark bursts, and it is the only study in which no prior assumptions have been made and the amount of dust has been directly measured. [4] Because the afterglow light of very distant bursts is redshifted due to the expansion of the Universe, the light that left the object was originally bluer than the light we detect when it gets to Earth. Since the reduction of light intensity by dust is greater for blue and ultraviolet light than for red, this means that the overall dimming effect of dust is greater for the more distant gamma-ray bursts. This is why GROND's ability to observe near-infrared radiation makes such a difference. More information This research is presented in a paper to appear in the

  7. Mapping of radiation anomalies using UAV mini-airborne gamma-ray spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šálek, Ondřej; Matolín, Milan; Gryc, Lubomír

    2018-02-01

    Localization of size-limited gamma-ray anomalies plays a fundamental role in uranium prospecting and environmental studies. Possibilities of a newly developed mini-airborne gamma-ray spectrometric equipment were tested on a uranium anomaly near the village of Třebsko, Czech Republic. The measurement equipment was based on a scintillation gamma-ray spectrometer specially developed for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) mounted on powerful hexacopter. The gamma-ray spectrometer has two 103 cm 3 BGO scintillation detectors of relatively high sensitivity. The tested anomaly, which is 80 m by 40 m in size, was investigated by ground gamma-ray spectrometric measurement in a detail rectangular measurement grid. Average uranium concentration is 25 mg/kg eU attaining 700 mg/kg eU locally. The mini-airborne measurement across the anomaly was carried out on three 100 m long parallel profiles at eight flight altitudes from 5 to 40 m above the ground. The resulting 1 s 1024 channel gamma-ray spectra, recorded in counts per second (cps), were processed to concentration units of K, U and Th, while total count (TC) was reported in cps. Increased gamma ray intensity of the anomaly was indicated by mini-airborne measurement at all profiles and altitudes, including the highest altitude of 40 m, at which the recorded intensity is close to the natural radiation background. The reported instrument is able to record data with comparable quality as standard airborne survey, due to relative sensitive detector, lower flight altitude and relatively low flight speed of 1 m/s. The presented experiment brings new experience with using unmanned semi-autonomous aerial vehicles and the latest mini-airborne radiometric instrument. The experiment has demonstrated the instrument's ability to localize size-limited uranium anomalies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. All-Sky Monitoring with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    We are currently monitoring the transient hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi. The twelve GBM NaI detectors span 8 keV to 1MeV, while the two GBM BGO detectors span about 150 keV to 40 MeV. With GBM, we detect transient events on multiple timescales. Brief events, such as Gamma Ray Bursts, Solar flares, and magnetar bursts are detected with on-board triggers. On longer timescales, we use the Earth occultation technique to monitor a number of sources, including X-ray binaries, AGN, and solar flaring activity. To date we have detected 7 sources above 100 keV. Transient activity from accretion-powered pulsars is monitored using epoch-folding techniques. With GBM we track the pulsed flux and frequency for a number of pulsars. We will present highlights of GBM observations on various timescales.

  9. Designing a Gamma-Ray Telescope on a Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    Major space-based observatories are imperative in astronomy, but they take a long time to plan, build, and launch and they arent cheap. A new study examines an interesting compromise: a low-cost, space-based gamma-ray detector that we could use while we wait for the next big observatory to launch.Coverage and sensitivity of past and future missions for the X-ray to gamma-ray energy range (click for a better look!). The only past mission to explore the 1 MeV region was COMPTEL, on board CGRO. e-ASTROGAM is a proposed future space mission that would explore this range. [Lucchetta et al. 2017]A Gap in CoverageIn the last few decades, weve significantly expanded our X-ray and gamma-ray viewof the sky. One part of the electromagnetic spectrum remains poorly explored, however: the approximate transition point between X-rays and gamma rays near 1 MeV.Space-based gamma-ray telescopes have been proposed for the future to better explore this energy range. But these major observatories have costs of around half a billion Euros and will take roughly a decade to build and launch. Is there a way to get eyes on this energy range sooner?Scaling Down with CubeSatA team of scientists led by Giulio Lucchetta (University of Padova and INFN Padova, Italy) has proposed an intriguing solution for the more immediate future: a nano-satellite telescope based on the CubeSat standard.Structure of the proposed gamma-ray detector, in a 2U CubeSat design. [Lucchetta et al. 2017]A CubeSat is a miniaturized satellite design that can be easily deployed in space, either from the International Space Station or by hitching a ride as a secondary payload on a large rocket. The size of a CubeSat is a standardized unit of measurement: a single CubeSat unit, or 1U, is a mere 10x10x10 cm and a maximum of 1.33 kg in weight.The gamma-ray telescope proposed by Lucchetta and collaborators would use a 2U standard for the instrument, so the instrument would be only 10x10x20 cm in size! The design for the

  10. Gamma-ray albedo of the moon

    OpenAIRE

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.

    2007-01-01

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the gamma-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of gamma rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disc). Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalisation;...

  11. VHE Gamma-ray Supernova Remnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, Stefan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-01-22

    Increasing observational evidence gathered especially in X-rays and {gamma}-rays during the course of the last few years support the notion that Supernova remnants (SNRs) are Galactic particle accelerators up to energies close to the ''knee'' in the energy spectrum of Cosmic rays. This review summarizes the current status of {gamma}-ray observations of SNRs. Shell-type as well as plerionic type SNRs are addressed and prospect for observations of these two source classes with the upcoming GLAST satellite in the energy regime above 100 MeV are given.

  12. Nuclear forensics using gamma-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Norman, Eric B

    2016-01-01

    Much of George Dracoulis's research career was devoted to utilizing gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the past several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low- resolution gamma ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  13. Precise absolute gamma-ray wavelength measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, E. G.; Dewey, M. S.; Greene, G. L.; Deslattes, R. D.; Börner, H.

    1991-10-01

    Gamma-ray wavelengths measured with the joint NIST/ILL GAMS4 facility at the High Flux Reactor, Grenoble, France, are discussed. This primary goal of these measurements is gamma-ray wavelengths which are consistent with the optical wavelength scale and the Rydberg constant with an uncertainty no larger than 0.1 ppm for energies up to 5 MeV. The current status of the Bragg angle and crystal lattice spacing measurements on reference energy values, the neutron mass, and the determination of fundamental constants is reviewed. Measurement of structure factors at high energies is also considered.

  14. Nuclear Forensics using Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Much of George Dracoulis’s research career was devoted to utilising gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the last several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  15. Gamma ray spectroscopy monitoring method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, William R; Policke, Timothy A

    2017-05-16

    The present invention relates generally to the field of gamma ray spectroscopy monitoring and a system for accomplishing same to monitor one or more aspects of various isotope production processes. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a monitoring system, and method of utilizing same, for monitoring one or more aspects of an isotope production process where the monitoring system comprises: (A) at least one sample cell; (B) at least one measuring port; (C) at least one adjustable collimator device; (D) at least one shutter; and (E) at least one high resolution gamma ray spectrometer.

  16. Radioactivities and gamma-rays from supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woosley, S. E.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the implications of several calculations relevant to the estimation of gamma-ray signals from various explosive astronomical phenomena. After discussing efforts to constrain the amounts of Ni-57 and Ti-44 produced in SN 1987A, attention is given to the production of Al-27 in massive stars and SNs. A 'delayed detonation' model of type Ia SNs is proposed, and the gamma-ray signal which may be expected when a bare white dwarf collapses directly into a neutron star is discussed.

  17. The observation of gamma ray bursts and terrestrial gamma-ray flashes with AGILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Monte, E.; Barbiellini, G.; Fuschino, F.; Giuliani, A.; Longo, F.; Marisaldi, M.; Mereghetti, S.; Moretti, E.; Trifoglio, M.; Vianello, G.; Costa, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Gallil, M.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lipari, P.; Pacciani, L.; Rapisarda, M.; Soffitta, P.; Tavani, M.; Vercellone, S.; Cutini, S.; Boffelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Chen, A.; Di Cocco, G.; Gianotti, F.; Labanti, C.; Morselli, A.; Pellizzoni, A.; Perotti, F.; Piano, G.; Picozza, P.; Pilia, M.; Prest, M.; Pucella, G.; Rappoldi, A.; Sabatini, S.; Striani, E.; Trois, A.; Vallazza, E.; Vittorini, V.; Antonelli, L. A.; Pittori, C.; Preger, B.; Santolamazza, P.; Verrecchia, F.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.

    2011-02-01

    Since its early phases of operation, the AGILE mission is successfully observing Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the hard X-ray band with the SuperAGILE imager and in the MeV range with the Mini-Calorimeter. Up to now, three firm GRB detections were obtained above 25 MeV and some bursts were detected with lower statistical confidence in the same energy band. When a GRB is localized, either by SuperAGILE or Swift/BAT or INTEGRAL/IBIS or Fermi/GBM or IPN, inside the field of view of the Gamma Ray Imager of AGILE, a detection is searched for in the gamma ray band or an upper limit is provided. A promising result of AGILE is the detection of very short gamma ray transients, a few ms in duration and possibly identified with Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes. In this paper we show the current status of the observation of Gamma Ray Bursts and Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes with AGILE.

  18. INTEGRAL & RXTE View of Gamma-ray Binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jian; Torres, Diego F.; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Jianmin

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray binaries are X-ray binaries with gamma-ray emissions. Their multi-wavelength emissions range from radio, optical, X-ray and to very high energy (TeV). X-ray emissions are crucial to understand the nature of gamma-ray binaries. INTEGRAL and RXTE have covered and monitored most of the gamma-ray binaries in hard and soft X-rays. Here we report the results of several gamma-ray binaries and possible gamma-ray binaries from INTEGRAL and RXTE.

  19. Active Neutron and Gamma-Ray Instrumentation for In Situ Planetary Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, A.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We describe the development of an instrument capable of detailed in situ bulk geochemical analysis of the surface of planets, moons, asteroids, and comets. This instrument technology uses a pulsed neutron generator to excite the solid materials of a planet and measures the resulting neutron and gamma-ray emission with its detector system. These time-resolved neutron and gamma-ray data provide detailed information about the bulk elemental composition, chemical context, and density distribution of the soil within 50 cm of the surface. While active neutron scattering and neutron-induced gamma-ray techniques have been used extensively for terrestrial nuclear well logging applications, our goal is to apply these techniques to surface instruments for use on any solid solar system body. As described, experiments at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center use a prototype neutron-induced gamma-ray instrument and the resulting data presented show the promise of this technique for becoming a versatile, robust, workhorse technology for planetary science, and exploration of any of the solid bodies in the solar system. The detection of neutrons at the surface also provides useful information about the material. This paper focuses on the data provided by the gamma-ray detector.

  20. The rarity of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. M.; Dwyer, J. R.; Hazelton, B. J.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Martinez-McKinney, G. F. M.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Lowell, A. W.; Kelley, N. A.; Splitt, M. E.; Lazarus, S. M.; Ulrich, W.; Schaal, M.; Saleh, Z. H.; Cramer, E.; Rassoul, H. K.; Cummer, S. A.; Lu, G.; Blakeslee, R. J.

    2011-04-01

    We report on the first search for Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) from altitudes where they are thought to be produced. The Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE), an array of gamma-ray detectors, was flown near the tops of Florida thunderstorms in August/September 2009. The plane passed within 10 km horizontal distance of 1213 lightning discharges and only once detected a TGF. If these discharges had produced TGFs of the same intensity as those seen from space, every one should have been seen by ADELE. Separate and significant nondetections are established for intracloud lightning, negative cloud-to-ground lightning, and narrow bipolar events. We conclude that TGFs are not a primary triggering mechanism for lightning. We estimate the TGF-to-flash ratio to be on the order of 10-2 to 10-3 and show that TGF intensities cannot follow the well-known power-law distribution seen in earthquakes and solar flares, due to our limits on the presence of faint events.

  1. Earth Occultation Monitoring with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique (EOT). Each time a source in our catalog is occulted by (or exits occultation by) the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors for daily monitoring. Light curves, updated daily, are available on our website http://heastro.phys.lsu.edu/gbm. Our software is also capable of performing the Earth occultation monitoring using up to 128 energy bands, or any combination of those bands, using our 128-channel, 4-s CSPEC data. The GBM BGO detectors, sensitive from about 200 keV to 40 keV, can also be used with this technique. In our standard application of the EOT, we use a catalog of sources to drive the measurements. To ensure that our catalog is complete, our team has developed an Earth occultation imaging method. In this talk, I will describe both techniques and the current data products available. I will highlight recent and important results from the GBM EOT, including the current status of our observations of hard X-ray variations in the Crab Nebula.

  2. A gamma-Ray spectrometer system for low energy photons by coupling two detectors; Un sistema de espectrometria gamma de fotones de baja energia mediante acoplamiento de dos detectores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, A.; Palomares, J.; Romero, L.; Travesi, A.

    1986-07-01

    This report describes the study performed to obtain a composite (sun uma) spectrum from a Low Energy Gamma Spectrometry System by coupling two planar Germanium detectors. This disposition allows to obtain a high counting efficiency for the total system. It shows the improvement achieved by the synthetic spectrum which is obtained by adding the two original spectra through the LULEPS code. This code corrects the differences (channel/energy) between both two spectra before performing the addition. (Author) 6 refs.

  3. System and method for dose verification and gamma ray imaging in ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailescu, Lucian

    2017-12-26

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to ion beam therapy. In one aspect, a system includes a position sensitive detector and a collimator. The position sensitive detector configured to detect gamma rays generated by an ion beam interacting with a target. The collimator is positioned between the target and the position sensitive detector. The collimator includes a plurality of knife-edge slits, with a first knife-edge slit intersecting with a second knife-edge slit.

  4. A theory of gamma-ray bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, G.E.; Lee, C.-H.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Lee, H.K.; Israelian, G.; Bethe, H.A.

    2000-01-01

    Recent observations and theoretical considerations have linked gamma-ray bursts with ultra-bright type Ibc supernovae (`hypernovae'). We here work out a specific scenario for this connection. Based on earlier work, we argue that especially the longest bursts must be powered by the Blandford-Znajek

  5. Gamma-ray Emission from Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Pak-Hin T.; Hui, Chung Y.; Kong, Albert K. H.

    2016-03-01

    Over the last few years, the data obtained using the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided new insights on high-energy processes in globular clusters, particularly those involving compact objects such as MilliSecond Pulsars (MSPs). Gamma-ray emission in the 100 MeV to 10 GeV range has been detected from more than a dozen globular clusters in our galaxy, including 47 Tucanae and Terzan 5. Based on a sample of known gammaray globular clusters, the empirical relations between gamma-ray luminosity and properties of globular clusters such as their stellar encounter rate, metallicity, and possible optical and infrared photon energy densities, have been derived. The measured gamma-ray spectra are generally described by a power law with a cut-off at a few gigaelectronvolts. Together with the detection of pulsed γ-rays from two MSPs in two different globular clusters, such spectral signature lends support to the hypothesis that γ-rays from globular clusters represent collective curvature emission from magnetospheres of MSPs in the clusters. Alternative models, involving Inverse-Compton (IC) emission of relativistic electrons that are accelerated close to MSPs or pulsar wind nebula shocks, have also been suggested. Observations at >100 GeV by using Fermi/LAT and atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S.-II, MAGIC-II, VERITAS, and CTA will help to settle some questions unanswered by current data.

  6. Gamma-ray Emission from Globular Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak-Hin T. Tam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, the data obtained using the Large Area Telescope (LAT aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided new insights on high-energy processes in globular clusters, particularly those involving compact objects such as MilliSecond Pulsars (MSPs. Gamma-ray emission in the 100 MeV to 10 GeV range has been detected from more than a dozen globular clusters in our galaxy, including 47 Tucanae and Terzan 5. Based on a sample of known gammaray globular clusters, the empirical relations between gamma-ray luminosity and properties of globular clusters such as their stellar encounter rate, metallicity, and possible optical and infrared photon energy densities, have been derived. The measured gamma-ray spectra are generally described by a power law with a cut-off at a few gigaelectronvolts. Together with the detection of pulsed γ-rays from two MSPs in two different globular clusters, such spectral signature lends support to the hypothesis that γ-rays from globular clusters represent collective curvature emission from magnetospheres of MSPs in the clusters. Alternative models, involving Inverse-Compton (IC emission of relativistic electrons that are accelerated close to MSPs or pulsar wind nebula shocks, have also been suggested. Observations at >100 GeV by using Fermi/LAT and atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S.-II, MAGIC-II, VERITAS, and CTA will help to settle some questions unanswered by current data.

  7. Gamma-ray bursts as cosmological probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergani, S. D.

    2013-11-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short, intense burstsof gamma-rays which during seconds to minutes outshine all other sources of gamma-ray emission in the sky.Following the prompt gamma-ray emission, an `afterglow' of emission from the X-ray range to radio wavelengthspersists up to months after the initial burst. The association of the class of long GRBs with the explosion of broad-line type Ic SNe GRBs allow galaxies to be selected independently oftheir emission properties (independently of dust obscuration and, uniquely, independently of their brightnesses atany wavelength) and they also permit the study of the gas in the interstellar medium (ISM) systematically and at anyredshift by the absorption lines present in the afterglow spectra. Moreover, the fading nature of GRBs and theprecise localization of the afterglow allow a detailed investigation of the emission properties of the GRB hostgalaxy once the afterglow has vanished. GRBs therefore constitute a unique tool to understand the link between theproperties of the ISM in the galaxy and the star formation activity, and this at any redshift. This is a unique wayto reveal the physical processes that trigger galaxy formation. The SVOM space mission project is designed to improve the use GRBs as cosmological probes.

  8. HYPERNUCLEAR STRUCTURE FROM GAMMA-RAY SPECTROSCOPY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MILLENER,D.J.

    2003-10-14

    The energies of p-shell hypernuclear {gamma} rays obtained from recent experiments using the Hyperball at BNL and KEK are used to constrain the YN interaction which enters into shell-model calculations which include both {Lambda} and {Sigma} configurations.

  9. Effects of Shielding on Gamma Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-13

    The interaction of gamma rays with matter results in an effect we call attenuation (i.e. ‘shielding’). Attenuation can dramatically alter the appearance of a spectrum. Attenuating materials may actually create features in a spectrum via x-ray fluorescence

  10. Radio Afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lekshmi Resmi

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) were serendipitously discovered in late 1960s by the Vela military satel- lites. In the following years, dedicated scanning instru- ments on-board high energy missions like BeppoSAX1,. CGRO2, HETE3, Swift4 and Fermi5 have increased the number of GRB detections to several ...

  11. Study of gamma-ray strength functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.; Dietrich, F.S.

    1980-08-07

    The use of gamma-ray strength function systematics to calculate neutron capture cross sections and capture gamma-ray spectra is discussed. The ratio of the average capture width, GAMMA/sub ..gamma../-bar, to the average level spacing, D/sub obs/, both at the neutron separation energy, can be derived from such systematics with much less uncertainty than from separate systematics for values of GAMMA/sub ..gamma../-bar and D/sub obs/. In particular, the E1 gamma-ray strength function is defined in terms of the giant dipole resonance (GDR). The GDR line shape is modeled with the usual Lorentzian function and also with a new energy-dependent, Breit-Wigner (EDBW) function. This latter form is further parameterized in terms of two overlapping resonances, even for nuclei where photonuclear measurements do not resolve two peaks. In the mass ranges studied, such modeling is successful for all nuclei away from the N = 50 closed neutron shell. Near the N = 50 shell, a one-peak EDBW appears to be more appropriate. Examples of calculated neutron capture excitation functions and capture gamma-ray spectra using the EDBW form are given for target nuclei in the mass-90 region and also in the Ta-Au mass region. 20 figures.

  12. Gamma-Ray Telescope and Uncertainty Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivalingaswamy, T.; Kagali, B. A.

    2012-01-01

    Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle is one of the important basic principles of quantum mechanics. In most of the books on quantum mechanics, this uncertainty principle is generally illustrated with the help of a gamma ray microscope, wherein neither the image formation criterion nor the lens properties are taken into account. Thus a better…

  13. Low-temperature high-Z gamma-detectors with very high energy resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobes, Carlos; Brofferio, Chiara; Bucci, Carlo; Cremonesi, Oliviero; Fiorini, Ettore; Giuliani, Andrea; Nucciotti, Angelo; Pavan, Maura; Pedretti, Marisa; Pessina, Gianluigi; Pirro, Stefano; Previtali, Ezio; Sisti, Monica; Vanzini, Marco; Zanotti, Luigi

    2001-12-01

    High-Z low-temperature calorimeters are developed by an Italian collaboration (Milano-Como-Gran Sasso Underground Laboratories) in order to search for rare nuclear events and Dark Matter massive candidates. They exhibit an excellent energy resolution, close to that of Ge-diodes, but a much higher efficiency. Different high-Z materials were initially employed . A many-years optimisation work on tellurium oxide (TeO2) lead to impressive results: devices with total masses around 750 g present FWHM energy resolutions on gamma-ray peaks ranging from 1 KeV (close to the 5 KeV energy threshold) to 2.6 KeV at 2615 KeV (208Tl gamma line). A 3.2 KeV FWHM energy resolution was obtained at 5.4 MeV (210Po alpha line), which is by far the best one ever achieved with any alpha detector. These devices, operated at about 10 mK, consist of a TeO2 single crystal thermally coupled to a 50 mg Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) Ge crystal working as a temperature sensor. Special care was devoted to methods for response linearization and temporal stabilisation. Devices based on the same principle and specifically optimised could find applications in several fields like gamma-ray astrophysics, nuclear physics searches, environmental monitoring and radiation metrology.

  14. Temperature Study of CdZnTe Coplanar-Grid Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amman, Mark; Lee, Julie S.; Luke, Paul N.

    2006-02-14

    The coplanar-grid (CPG) and other electron only detection techniques have made possible the use of CdZnTe-based detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy when high efficiency, good energy resolution, and near room temperature operation are required. Despite the demonstrated potential of the technologies, widespread use remains hampered in part by the limited availability of the highly uniform CdZnTe material required for high-resolution spectroscopy. However, it has been recently shown that mild cooling of CdZnTe CPG detectors can result in a significant improvement in the energy resolution of the detectors thereby allowing a wider range of material to be used for high-resolution applications. In this paper, we show that improved spectroscopic performance can consistently be achieved through a combination of detector cooling and increased detector bias. Energy resolutions of about 1 % FWHM at 662 keV for detector volumes up to 2.3 cm{sup 3} have been obtained at -20 C. With the electronic noise subtracted, this amounts to an intrinsic resolution of 0.76 %. We also show that further cooling of the detectors to -30 C leads to field polarization and a loss of spectroscopic performance.

  15. Early AGILE gamma-ray observations of the recent Glitch in the Crab Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrecchia, F.; Piano, G.; Tavani, M.; Pilia, M.; Pittori, C.; Lucarelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Cardillo, M.; Fioretti, V.; Parmiggiani, N.; Striani, E.; Vercellone, S.; Donnarumma, I.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Ferrari, A.; Paoletti, F.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2017-11-01

    AGILE observed the Crab region in its spinning mode after the large glitch recently reported in the radio band (ATel #10939). At the glitch event time (T_0) the AGILE satellite was occulted by the Earth, and no observation of any relevant gamma-ray signal could be obtained by the GRID detector.

  16. Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts in the IceCube and ARA Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guetta Dafne

    2016-01-01

    I discuss the constraints on the hadronic component of GRBs derived from the search of four years of IceCube data for a prompt neutrino fux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs and more in general I present the results of the search for high-energy neutrinos interacting within the IceCube detector between 2010 and 2013.

  17. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Robert K [Hinsdale, IL

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  18. Search for Galactic PeV gamma rays with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Tjus, J. Becker; Becker, K.-H.; Bell, M.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohaichuk, S.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Boeser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Brown, A. M.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Silva, A. H. Cruz; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; De Clercq, C.; De Ridder, S.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz-Velez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegard, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Frantzen, K.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Gluesenkamp, T.; Golup, G.; Goodman, J. A.; Gora, D.; Grant, D.; Gross, A.; Grullon, S.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Ismail, A. Haj; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Heereman, D.; Heimann, P.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jlelati, O.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klaes, J.; Klein, S. R.; Koehne, J-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Koepke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krasberg, M.; Kroll, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lauer, R.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Luenemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Meszaros, P.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; O'Murchadha, A.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; de los Heros, C. Perez; Pieloth, D.; Pirk, N.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raedel, L.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Salameh, T.; Sander, H. -G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheel, M.; Scheriau, F.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schoeneberg, S.; Schoenherr, L.; Schoenwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schulz, O.; Seckel, D.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Sheremata, C.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soiron, M.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stoessl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Strom, R.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Usner, M.; van der Drift, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Walter, M.; Wasserman, R.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Ziemann, J.; Zierke, S.; Zilles, A.; Zoll, M.; Aartsen, M.

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray induced air showers are notable for their lack of muons, compared to hadronic showers. Hence, air shower arrays with large underground muon detectors can select a sample greatly enriched in photon showers by rejecting showers containing muons. IceCube is sensitive to muons with energies

  19. Thermal-neutron capture gamma rays from natural magnesium and enriched 25Mg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spilling, P.; Gruppelaar, H.; Kamp, A.M.F. op den

    1967-01-01

    Gamma rays from neutron capture in natural magnesium and in enriched 25Mg have been studied with Ge(Li) detectors. Altogether 101 γ-rays have been observed. Most of these γ-rays could be fitted into the level schemes of 25Mg, 26Mg and 27Mg. If it is assumed that the capture cross section for

  20. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts detected in the RELEC experiment onboard the Vernov satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, A. V.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Iyudin, A. F.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Minaev, P. Yu.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Pozanenko, A. S.; Prokhorov, A. V.; Svertilov, S. I.; Chernenko, A. M.

    2017-08-01

    The RELEC scientific instrumentation onboard the Vernov spacecraft launched on July 8, 2014, included the DRGE gamma-ray and electron spectrometer. This instrument incorporates a set of scintillation phoswich detectors, including four identical X-ray and gamma-ray detectors in the energy range from 10 keV to 3 MeV with a total area of 500 cm2 directed toward the nadir, and an electron spectrometer containing three mutually orthogonal detector units with a geometry factor of 2 cm2 sr, which is also sensitive to X-rays and gamma-rays. The goal of the space experiment with the DRGE instrument was to investigate phenomena with fast temporal variability, in particular, terrestrial gammaray flashes (TGFs) and magnetospheric electron precipitations. However, the detectors of the DRGE instrument could record cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and allowed one not only to perform a detailed analysis of the gamma-ray variability but also to compare the time profiles with the measurements made by other instruments of the RELEC scientific instrumentation (the detectors of optical and ultraviolet flashes, the radio-frequency and low-frequency analyzers of electromagnetic field parameters). We present the results of our observations of cosmicGRB 141011A and GRB 141104A, compare the parameters obtained in the GBM/Fermi and KONUS-Wind experiments, and estimate the redshifts and E iso for the sources of these GRBs. The detectability of GRBs and good agreement between the independent estimates of their parameters obtained in various experiments are important factors of the successful operation of similar detectors onboard the Lomonosov spacecraft.

  1. The e-astrogam Gamma-Ray Space Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatischeff, V.; Tavani, M.; Von Ballmoos, P.; Hanlon, L.; Oberlack, U.; Aboudan, A.; Argan, A.; Bernard, D.; Brogna, A.; Bulgarelli, A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    e-ASTROGAM is a gamma-ray space mission to be proposed as the M5 Medium-size mission of the European Space Agency. It is dedicated to the observation of the Universe with unprecedented sensitivity in the energy range 0.2-100 MeV, extending up to GeV energies, together with a groundbreaking polarization capability. It is designed to substantially improve the COMPTEL and Fermi sensitivities in the MeV-GeV energy range and to open new windows of opportunity for astrophysical and fundamental physics space research. e-ASTROGAM will operate as an open astronomical observatory, with a core science focused on (1) the activity from extreme particle accelerators, including gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei and the link of jet astrophysics to the new astronomy of gravitational waves, neutrinos, ultra-high energy cosmic rays, (2) the high-energy mysteries of the Galactic center and inner Galaxy, including the activity of the supermassive black hole, the Fermi Bubbles, the origin of the Galactic positrons, and the search for dark matter signatures in a new energy window; (3) nucleosynthesis and chemical evolution, including the life cycle of elements produced by supernovae in the Milky Way and the Local Group of galaxies. e-ASTROGAM will be ideal for the study of high-energy sources in general, including pulsars and pulsar wind nebulae, accreting neutron stars and black holes, novae, supernova remnants, and magnetars. And it will also provide important contributions to solar and terrestrial physics. The e-ASTROGAM telescope is optimized for the simultaneous detection of Compton and pair-producing gamma-ray events over a large spectral band. It is based on a very high technology readiness level for all subsystems and includes many innovative features for the detectors and associated electronics.

  2. Gamma-ray-burst beaming and gravitational-wave observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Holz, Daniel E

    2013-11-01

    Using the observed rate of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) it is possible to make predictions for the detectable rate of compact binary coalescences in gravitational-wave detectors. We show that the nondetection of mergers in the existing LIGO/Virgo data constrains the beaming angles and progenitor masses of gamma-ray bursts, although these limits are fully consistent with existing expectations. We make predictions for the rate of events in future networks of gravitational-wave observatories, finding that the first detection of a neutron-star-neutron-star binary coalescence associated with the progenitors of short GRBs is likely to happen within the first 16 months of observation, even in the case of only two observatories (e.g., LIGO-Hanford and LIGO-Livingston) operating at intermediate sensitivities (e.g., advanced LIGO design sensitivity, but without signal recycling mirrors), and assuming a conservative distribution of beaming angles (e.g., all GRBs beamed within θ(j) = 30°). Less conservative assumptions reduce the waiting time until first detection to a period of weeks to months, with an event detection rate of >/~10/yr. Alternatively, the compact binary coalescence model of short GRBs can be ruled out if a binary is not seen within the first two years of operation of a LIGO-Hanford, LIGO-Livingston, and Virgo network at advanced design sensitivity. We also demonstrate that the gravitational wave detection rate of GRB triggered sources (i.e., those seen first in gamma rays) is lower than the rate of untriggered events (i.e., those seen only in gravitational waves) if θ(j)≲30°, independent of the noise curve, network configuration, and observed GRB rate. The first detection in gravitational waves of a binary GRB progenitor is therefore unlikely to be associated with the observation of a GRB.

  3. INTEGRAL Results on Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Kevin C.

    2008-03-01

    Prompt, precise localizations of gamma-ray bursts imaged by IBIS are being disseminated at a rate of about 10 per year (49 to date). The INTEGRAL Burst Alert System (IBAS) produces automated alerts within 10's of seconds, giving positions which are accurate to several arcminutes for events as weak as 5.7 x 10-8 erg cm-2. IBIS is also a very sensitive detector of soft gamma repeaters (SGRs). It has detected well over 200 bursts from SGR1806-20, down to a fluence of 7×10-9 erg cm-2. An unexpected discovery is that the quiescent X-ray emission of this source and SGR 1900+14 is considerably harder than previous measurements indicated, and extends to 200 keV, a property which SGRs share with the AXP's. In addition, the SPI anti-coincidence shield (ACS) system is an extremely useful component of the interplanetary network. With its isotropic response, it detects about 66 confirmed bursts/year ( 450 to date) down to a threshold of 4.8×10-8 erg cm-2, many of which can be localized by triangulation. Most of these events are not detected by Swift or IBIS due to their limited fields of view. The triangulation results are currently being used to search for coincident neutrino emission, for gravitational radiation simultaneous with GRBs, and for coincidences between Type Ic supernovae and bursts, among other things. The SPI ACS has recently played a key role in localizing and identifying two events which are believed to be extragalactic giant magnetar flares (EMFs), from M81 and M31. LIGO was operating at the time of one of these events, and their observations support the EMF hypothesis. SPI is also being used as a Compton-scatter polarimeter for GRBs. Kalemci et al. (2007) and McGlynn et al. (2007) studied its response to GRB041219a, and obtained polarizations of 98% +/- 33%, and 63% (+31%,-30%) respectively.

  4. Simultaneous optical/gamma-ray observations of GRBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, J.; Wenzel, W.; Hudec, R.; Moskalenko, E. I.; Metlov, V.; Chernych, N. S.; Getman, V. S.; Ziener, Rainer; Birkle, K.; Bade, N.

    1994-01-01

    Details on the project to search for serendipitous time correlated optical photographic observations of Gamma Ray Bursters (GRB's) are presented. The ongoing photographic observations at nine observatories are used to look for plates which were exposed simultaneously with a gamma ray burst detected by the gamma ray instrument team (BATSE) and contain the burst position. The results for the first two years of the gamma ray instrument team operation are presented.

  5. PC/FRAM plutonium isotopic analysis of CdTe gamma-ray spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Vo, D T

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the results of isotopics measurements of plutonium with the new CdTe gamma-ray spectrometer. These are the first wide-range plutonium gamma-ray isotopics analysis results obtained with other than germanium spectrometers. The CdTe spectrometer measured small plutonium reference samples in reasonable count times, covering the range from low to high burnup. The complete experimental hardware included the new, commercial, portable CdTe detector and two commercial portable multichannel analyzers. Version 4 of FRAM is the software that performed the isotopics analysis.

  6. Recent results and observational status of TeV gamma-ray astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Kohnle, A

    2001-01-01

    TeV gamma-ray astronomy has come of age in the last ten years: there are several well-established and well-studied sources in the TeV sky; presently there are nine imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope (IACT) facilities and several next-generation instruments coming online 2001 to 2004 with an order of magnitude improved sensitivity and lower energy threshold. Solar farm experiments have already demonstrated energy thresholds of 50 GeV, and large field-of-view and high duty cycle detectors exist to monitor bright transients and search for gamma-ray burst emission.

  7. Low-background gamma-ray spectrometry for the international monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, L R; Cantaloub, M G; Burnett, J L; Myers, A W; Overman, C T; Forrester, J B; Glasgow, B G; Miley, H S

    2017-08-01

    PNNL has developed two low-background gamma-ray spectrometers in a new shallow underground laboratory, thereby significantly improving its ability to detect low levels of gamma-ray emitting fission or activation products in airborne particulate in samples from the IMS (International Monitoring System). The combination of cosmic veto panels, dry nitrogen gas to reduce radon and low background shielding results in a reduction of the background count rate by about a factor of 100 compared to detectors operating above ground at our laboratory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. LgrbWorldModel: Long-duration Gamma-Ray Burst World Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmoradi, Amir; Nemiroff, Robert J.

    2017-12-01

    LgrbWorldModel is written in Fortran 90 and attempts to model the population distribution of the Long-duration class of Gamma-Ray Bursts (LGRBs) as detected by the NASA's now-defunct Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). It is assumed that the population distribution of LGRBs is well fit by a multivariate log-normal distribution. The best-fit parameters of the distribution are then found by maximizing the likelihood of the observed data by BATSE detectors via a native built-in Adaptive Metropolis-Hastings Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (AMH-MCMC) Sampler.

  9. Improvement in the practical implementation of neutron source strength calibration using prompt gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabaz, Rahim; Rene Vega-Carrillo, Hector

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the neutron emission rate from neutron sources using prompt gamma rays in hydrogen was determined, and several improvements were applied. Using Monte Carlo calculations, the best positions for the source, moderator and detector relative to each other were selected. For (241)Am-Be and (252)Cf sources, the sizes for polyethylene spheres with the highest efficiency were 12- and 10-inch, respectively. In addition, a new shielding cone was designed to account for scattered neutrons and gamma rays. The newly designed shielding cone, which is 45 cm in length, provided suitable attenuation for the source radiation. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope with nuclear emulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Satoru; Group, for the Emulsion Gamma-ray Telescope

    2010-01-01

    By detecting the beginning of electron pairs with nuclear emulsion, precise gamma-ray direction and gamma-ray polarization can be detected. With recent advancement in emulsion scanning system, emulsion analyzing capability is becoming powerful. Now we are developing the balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope with nuclear emulsion. Overview and status of our telescope is described.

  11. Direction-Sensitive Hand-Held Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2012-10-04

    A novel, light-weight, hand-held gamma-ray detector with directional sensitivity is being designed. The detector uses a set of multiple rings around two cylindrical surfaces, which provides precise location of two interaction points on two concentric cylindrical planes, wherefrom the source location can be traced back by back projection and/or Compton imaging technique. The detectors are 2.0 × 2.0 mm europium-doped strontium iodide (SrI2:Eu2+) crystals, whose light output has been measured to exceed 120,000 photons/MeV, making it one of the brightest scintillators in existence. The crystal’s energy resolution, less than 3% at 662 keV, is also excellent, and the response is highly linear over a wide range of gamma-ray energies. The emission of SrI2:Eu2+ is well matched to both photo-multiplier tubes and blue-enhanced silicon photodiodes. The solid-state photomultipliers used in this design (each 2.0 × 2.0 mm) are arrays of active pixel sensors (avalanche photodiodes driven beyond their breakdown voltage in reverse bias); each pixel acts as a binary photon detector, and their summed output is an analog representation of the total photon energy, while the individual pixel accurately defines the point of interaction. A simple back-projection algorithm involving cone-surface mapping is being modeled. The back projection for an event cone is a conical surface defining the possible location of the source. The cone axis is the straight line passing through the first and second interaction points.

  12. Effects of charge sharing in 3-D position sensitive CdZnTe gamma-ray spectrometers

    CERN Document Server

    He, Z; Knoll, G F; Wehe, D K; Du, Y F

    2000-01-01

    Two 3-D position-sensitive semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometers operable at room temperature, have been fabricated using 1 cm sup 3 cubic CdZnTe crystals. gamma-Ray spectra have been obtained from 11(x)x11(y)x20(z) voxels, each corresponding to approx 0.7x0.7x0.5 mm in the detector volume. Individual spectra from each of the 2420 voxels were corrected for electron trapping, differences in weighting potentials, and the gain variation of the readout circuitry. Energy resolutions of 1.70% (11.3 keV) FWHM and 1.84% (12.2 keV) FWHM were obtained at 662 keV from the combined output of the entire volume for single-pixel events. Charge sharing between neighboring pixels has been observed and the sizes of electron clouds are estimated from these experimental data. An understanding of electron cloud dimensions is important for the design of future detectors using pixellated electrodes.

  13. Correlations in prompt neutrons and gamma-rays from Cf-252 spontaneous fission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcath M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New event-by-event fission models have prompt neutrons and gamma-rays that are correlated in time, energy, and multiplicity, however there is limited measurement data available to validate these models. Measurement of high-order fission neutron and gamma-ray coincidences is difficult and there has previously been little motivation to measure properties of both particle types simultaneously. High-order Cf-252 spontaneous fission neutron and gamma-ray coincidences were measured with a cylindrical array of 22 liquid organic and 8 NaI(Tl scintillation detectors, 50 cm from a central axis. Waveforms were acquired and saved for post-processing using four time-synchronized CAEN V1720 digitizers. Liquid organic scintillator waveforms were analyzed with off-line pulse shape discrimination techniques to categorize neutron and gamma-ray detections. Detected multiplicity was compared with MCNPX-PoliMi simulation results, where built-in fission models and event-by-event fission models, CGMF and FREYA, have been implemented. Additionally, measured neutron energy by time-of-flight and gamma-ray energy correlated by detected multiplicity were compared to simulated results.

  14. Investigation Study on Gamma Ray Imaging Technology for Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Guk; Jeong, Woo Tae [Machinery and Materials Laboratory, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The gamma ray imaging system provides an estimated dose-rate of the source at 30 cm above. The gamma detector is a terbium activated glass scintillator. The system is capable of producing a color two dimensional image of a radiation field superimposed on a black and white visual image. The system used in US power plants consists of a portable sensor head that contains both gamma ray and visual imaging systems and a portable control computer. The gamma ray imaging system has been successfully used as an ALARA tool for identifying source terms and determining the adequacy of existing shielding. Because the control system can be positioned away from the camera, the radiation exposure to personnel can be reduced without extensive shielding requirements. The gamma ray imaging system has been used to date in the decommissioning of Maine Yankee, Big Rock point,Trojan, San Onofre1, and Millstone 1. The equipment has also been used at normal refueling outages at a number of commercial nuclear power plants and at several Department of Energy Decommissioning sites. This paper is intended to review the applicability of gamma ray imaging system as decommissioning tool. In order to review the actual applicability, we are going to introduce applications for US power plants.

  15. Correlations in prompt neutrons and gamma-rays from Cf-252 spontaneous fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcath, M. J.; Shin, T. H.; Fulvio, A. Di; Clarke, S. D.; Pozzi, S. A.

    2017-09-01

    New event-by-event fission models have prompt neutrons and gamma-rays that are correlated in time, energy, and multiplicity, however there is limited measurement data available to validate these models. Measurement of high-order fission neutron and gamma-ray coincidences is difficult and there has previously been little motivation to measure properties of both particle types simultaneously. High-order Cf-252 spontaneous fission neutron and gamma-ray coincidences were measured with a cylindrical array of 22 liquid organic and 8 NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors, 50 cm from a central axis. Waveforms were acquired and saved for post-processing using four time-synchronized CAEN V1720 digitizers. Liquid organic scintillator waveforms were analyzed with off-line pulse shape discrimination techniques to categorize neutron and gamma-ray detections. Detected multiplicity was compared with MCNPX-PoliMi simulation results, where built-in fission models and event-by-event fission models, CGMF and FREYA, have been implemented. Additionally, measured neutron energy by time-of-flight and gamma-ray energy correlated by detected multiplicity were compared to simulated results.

  16. Simulation and optimization of a soft gamma-ray concentrator using thin film multilayer structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Farzane; Bloser, Peter F.; Krzanowski, James E.; Legere, Jason S.; McConnell, Mark L.

    2017-08-01

    We are reporting the investigation result of using multilayer thin film structures for channeling and concentrating soft gamma rays with energies greater than 100 keV, beyond the reach of current grazing-incidence hard X-ray mirrors. This will enable future telescopes for higher energies with same mission parameters already proven by NuSTAR. A suitable arrangement of bent multilayer structures of alternating low and high-density materials will channel soft gamma-ray photons via total external reflection and then concentrate the incident radiation to a point. We present the latest results of producing Ir/Si and W/Si multilayers with the required thicknesses and smoothness by using magnetron sputter technique. In addition to experimental works, we have been working on gamma-ray tracking model of the concentrator by IDL, making use of optical properties calculated by the IMD software. This modeling allows us to calculate efficiency and track photon for different energy bands and materials and compare them with experimental result. Also, we describe combine concentrator modeling result and detector simulation by MEGAlib to archive a complete package of gamma-ray telescope simulation. This technology offers the potential for soft gamma-ray telescopes with focal lengths of less than 10 m, removing the need for formation flying spacecraft and providing greatly increased sensitivity for modest cost and complexity and opening the field up to balloon-borne instruments.

  17. Drill-Core Scanning for Radioelements by Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvborg, Leif; Wollenberg, H.; Rose-Hansen, J.

    1972-01-01

    A system has been developed for the continuous and stepwise scanning of rock drill cores for gamma-ray spectrometric determinations of uranium, thorium, and potassium. The apparatus accomodates 3- to 4-cm-diameter core as it passes two opposing 2-inch diameter by 3-inch- thick NaI(Tl) detectors......, either continuously, at speeds ranging from one to several meters per hour, or in steps of 5 cm or more. Resulting gamma-ray spectra, as recorded with a multi channel analyzer, are computer processed, furnishing scale diagrams of individual radioelement contents and Th/U ratios in the core. Whole......, disclosing detailed variations of U and Th. Contents of U and Th determined by scanning of drill core were consistent with the gross gamma-ray counting rates measured in the boreholes. ©1972 Society of Exploration Geophysicists...

  18. Energy spectra of cosmic gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Strong, I. B.

    1973-01-01

    Spectral measurements of six cosmic gamma-ray bursts in the energy region of 0.1 to 1.2 MeV, made using a semi-omnidirectional X-ray detector on IMP-6 are reported. These measurements confirm the hard X-ray or gamma-ray nature of the bursts, as inferred from the original observations by Klebesadel et al., (1973), and show that their maximum energy release is in this several hundred keV region. Each burst consists of several 1 or 2-second pulses each with the characteristic spectrum of approximately 150-keV exponential, followed by a softer decay. There is no evidence of line structure in this energy region, or for a marked change in the energy spectrum within a given pulse. Event size spectra are estimated for galactic and extragalactic models; the total emission is consistent with present measurements of the diffuse background, and unlikely to account for any spectral feature in the few-MeV region.

  19. Recent progress in single sided gamma-ray tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoe, R.S.

    1994-04-01

    The use of scattered radiation for radiography has many potential advantages over conventional projection techniques: For high energy photons the scattering process strongly dominates all other processes. The intensity of scattered radiation is due directly to the electron density and highly insensitive to chemical composition. Finally, the use of scattered radiation allows the investigator to position the radiation source-on-the same side of the object as the detector. In this paper I will present some recent results of a set of measurements made with our uncollimated Compton backscattering tomography apparatus. This technique uses the Compton energy shift of scattered gamma rays to determine the scattering site. By measuring the spectrum of these scattered gamma rays it is then possible to determine the electron density of the object being investigated. I will give a brief description of the apparatus and present the results of numerous measurements made on a brass phantom with voids placed at various depths. These results imply that for this crude apparatus occlusions as small as one cubic millimeter may be located to an accuracy of about one millimeter at depths of about 15 millimeters in solid brass.

  20. Stellar Photon Archaeology with Gamma-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing deep surveys of galaxy luminosity distribution functions, spectral energy distributions and backwards evolution models of star formation rates can be used to calculate the past history of intergalactic photon densities and, from them, the present and past optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays from pair production interactions with these photons. The energy-redshift dependence of the optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays has become known as the Fazio-Stecker relation (Fazio & Stecker 1970). Stecker, Malkan & Scully have calculated the densities of intergalactic background light (IBL) photons of energies from 0.03 eV to the Lyman limit at 13.6 eV and for 0$ photon densities in the past, i.e., the "archaeo-IBL.", and therefore allow a better measure of the past history of the total star formation rate, including that from galaxies too faint to be observed.

  1. Gamma Ray Bursts Observations and Theoretical Conjectures

    CERN Document Server

    Alagoz, E; Carrillo, C; Golup, G T; Grimes, M; Herrera, Mora C; Gallo, Palomino J L; López, Vega A; Wicht, J

    2008-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are short bursts of very high energy photons which were discovered in the late 1960s. Ever since their discovery, scientists have wondered about their origin. Nowadays it is known that they originate outside the Milky Way because of their high red shift rst measured in the afterglows thanks to the Beppo-SAX satellite and ground-based observations. However, theoreticians still do not agree about the mechanism that generates the bursts, and different competing models are animatedly debated. Current GRB experiments include the Swift satellite and the Pierre Auger Observatory that could detect GRBs with an increase of the background. A forthcoming dedicated experiment is GLAST, a satellite observatory for detecting gamma rays with energies up to 300 GeV, whose launch is scheduled for early 2008.

  2. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Mark [Alamo, CA; Gosnell, Tom B [Moraga, CA; Ham, Cheryl [Livermore, CA; Perkins, Dwight [Livermore, CA; Wong, James [Dublin, CA

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  3. The cannonball model of gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Dar, Arnon

    2003-01-01

    The cannonball model (CB) of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) is incredibly more successful than the standard blast-wave models (SM) of GRBs, which suffer from profound inadequacies and limited predictive power. The CB model is falsifiable in its hypothesis and results. Its predictions are summarized in simple analytical expressions, derived, in fair approximations, from first principles. It provides a good description on a universal basis of the properties of long-duration GRBs and of their afterglows (AGs).

  4. Nucleosynthesis and gamma-ray lines

    OpenAIRE

    Prantzos, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    Astrophysical gamma-ray spectroscopy is an invaluable tool for studying nuclear astrophysics, supernova structure, recent star formation in the Milky Way and mixing of nucleosynthesis products in the interstellar medium. After a short, historical, introduction to the field, I present a brief review of the most important current issues. Emphasis is given to radioactivities produced by massive stars and associated supernova explosions, and in particular, those related to observations carried ou...

  5. RADIO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Harrison, R. [Department of Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Japelj, J.; Gomboc, A. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Guidorzi, C. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Melandri, A., E-mail: D.Kopac@ljmu.ac.uk [INAF/Brera Astronomical Observatory, via Bianchi 46, I-23807, Merate (Italy)

    2015-06-20

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1–1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  6. Gamma-Ray Pulsars Models and Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K

    2001-01-01

    Pulsed emission from gamma-ray pulsars originates inside the magnetosphere, from radiation by charged particles accelerated near the magnetic poles or in the outer gaps. In polar cap models, the high energy spectrum is cut off by magnetic pair production above an energy that is dependent on the local magnetic field strength. While most young pulsars with surface fields in the range B = 10^{12} - 10^{13} G are expected to have high energy cutoffs around several GeV, the gamma-ray spectra of old pulsars having lower surface fields may extend to 50 GeV. Although the gamma-ray emission of older pulsars is weaker, detecting pulsed emission at high energies from nearby sources would be an important confirmation of polar cap models. Outer gap models predict more gradual high-energy turnovers at around 10 GeV, but also predict an inverse Compton component extending to TeV energies. Detection of pulsed TeV emission, which would not survive attenuation at the polar caps, is thus an important test of outer gap models. N...

  7. Development of Monte Carlo code for coincidence prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaogang

    Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) offers a non-destructive, relatively rapid on-line method for determination of elemental composition of bulk and other samples. However, PGNAA has an inherently large background. These backgrounds are primarily due to the presence of the neutron excitation source. It also includes neutron activation of the detector and the prompt gamma rays from the structure materials of PGNAA devices. These large backgrounds limit the sensitivity and accuracy of PGNAA. Since most of the prompt gamma rays from the same element are emitted in coincidence, a possible approach for further improvement is to change the traditional PGNAA measurement technique and introduce the gamma-gamma coincidence technique. It is well known that the coincidence techniques can eliminate most of the interference backgrounds and improve the signal-to-noise ratio. A new Monte Carlo code, CEARCPG has been developed at CEAR to simulate gamma-gamma coincidence spectra in PGNAA experiment. Compared to the other existing Monte Carlo code CEARPGA I and CEARPGA II, a new algorithm of sampling the prompt gamma rays produced from neutron capture reaction and neutron inelastic scattering reaction, is developed in this work. All the prompt gamma rays are taken into account by using this new algorithm. Before this work, the commonly used method is to interpolate the prompt gamma rays from the pre-calculated gamma-ray table. This technique works fine for the single spectrum. However it limits the capability to simulate the coincidence spectrum. The new algorithm samples the prompt gamma rays from the nucleus excitation scheme. The primary nuclear data library used to sample the prompt gamma rays comes from ENSDF library. Three cases are simulated and the simulated results are benchmarked with experiments. The first case is the prototype for ETI PGNAA application. This case is designed to check the capability of CEARCPG for single spectrum simulation. The second

  8. Stacked search for time shifted high energy neutrinos from gamma ray bursts with the Antares neutrino telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Ardid, M.; Felis, I.; Martinez-Mora, J.A.; Saldana, M. [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Institut d' Investigacio per a la Gestio Integrada de les Zones Costaneres (IGIC), Gandia (Spain); Albert, A.; Drouhin, D.; Racca, C. [GRPHE-Institut Universitaire de Technologie de Colmar, 34 rue du Grillenbreit, BP 50568, Colmar (France); Andre, M. [Technical University of Catalonia, Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics, Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Anghinolfi, M. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Anton, G.; Eberl, T.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Fehn, K.; Folger, F.; Geisselsoeder, S.; Geyer, K.; Gleixner, A.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; Hoessl, J.; Hofestaedt, J.; James, C.W.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kiessling, D.; Lahmann, R.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Tselengidou, M.; Wagner, S. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Aubert, J.J.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Carr, J.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Dornic, D.; Mathieu, A.; Vallee, C. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Baret, B.; Barrios-Marti, J.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Toennis, C.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zuniga, J. [CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, IFIC-Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Edificios Investigacion de Paterna, Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Basa, S.; Marcelin, M.; Nezri, E. [Pole de l' Etoile Site de Chateau-Gombert, LAM-Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Biagi, S.; Coniglione, R.; Distefano, C.; Piattelli, P.; Riccobene, G.; Sapienza, P.; Trovato, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS), Catania (Italy); Bormuth, R.; Jong, M. de; Samtleben, D.F.E. [Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit Leiden, Leids Instituut voor Onderzoek in Natuurkunde, Leiden (Netherlands); Bouwhuis, M.C.; Heijboer, A.J.; Michael, T.; Steijger, J.J.M.; Visser, E. [Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bruijn, R. [Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit van Amsterdam, Instituut voor Hoge-Energie Fysica, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Capone, A.; De Bonis, G.; Fermani, P.; Perrina, C. [INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Caramete, L.; Pavalas, G.E.; Popa, V. [Institute for Space Sciences, Bucharest, Magurele (Romania); Chiarusi, T. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Circella, M. [INFN-Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Creusot, A.; Galata, S.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Van Elewyck, V. [APC, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Dekeyser, I.; Lefevre, D.; Tamburini, C. [Aix-Marseille University, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO), Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Universite du Sud Toulon-Var, CNRS-INSU/IRD UM 110, La Garde Cedex (France); Deschamps, A.; Hello, Y. [Geoazur, Universite Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS/INSU, IRD, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, Sophia Antipolis (France); Donzaud, C. [APC, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay Cedex (France); Dumas, A.; Gay, P. [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Elsaesser, D.; Kadler, M.; Kreter, M.; Mueller, C. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Fusco, L.A.; Margiotta, A.; Pellegrino, C.; Spurio, M. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Bologna (Italy); Giordano, V. [INFN-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Haren, H. van [Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), ' t Horntje, Texel (Netherlands); Hugon, C.; Taiuti, M. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Genoa (Italy); Kooijman, P. [Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Universiteit Utrecht, Faculteit Betawetenschappen, Utrecht (Netherlands); Universiteit van Amsterdam, Instituut voor Hoge-Energie Fysica, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kouchner, A. [APC, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Institut Universitaire de France, Paris (France); Kreykenbohm, I.; Wilms, J. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Bamberg (Germany); Kulikovskiy, V. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS), Catania (Italy); Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Leonora, E. [INFN-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Universita, Catania (Italy); Loucatos, S. [APC, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers, Service de Physique des Particules, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Marinelli, A. [INFN-Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Pisa (Italy); Migliozzi, P. [INFN-Sezione di Napoli, Naples (IT); Moussa, A. [University Mohammed I, Laboratory of Physics of Matter and Radiations, Oujda (MA); Pradier, T. [Universite de Strasbourg et CNRS/IN2P3, IPHC-Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, Strasbourg Cedex 2 (FR); Sanguineti, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Genoa (IT); Schuessler, F.; Stolarczyk, T.; Vallage, B. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers, Service de Physique des Particules, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (FR); Vivolo, D. [INFN-Sezione di Napoli, Naples (IT); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita Federico II di Napoli, Naples (IT)

    2017-01-15

    A search for high-energy neutrino emission correlated with gamma-ray bursts outside the electromagnetic prompt-emission time window is presented. Using a stacking approach of the time delays between reported gamma-ray burst alerts and spatially coincident muon-neutrino signatures, data from the Antares neutrino telescope recorded between 2007 and 2012 are analysed. One year of public data from the IceCube detector between 2008 and 2009 have been also investigated. The respective timing profiles are scanned for statistically significant accumulations within 40 days of the Gamma Ray Burst, as expected from Lorentz Invariance Violation effects and some astrophysical models. No significant excess over the expected accidental coincidence rate could be found in either of the two data sets. The average strength of the neutrino signal is found to be fainter than one detectable neutrino signal per hundred gamma-ray bursts in the Antares data at 90% confidence level. (orig.)

  9. Implications of Gamma-Ray Transparency Constraints in Blazars: Minimum Distances and Gamma-Ray Collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Peter A.; Kafatos, Menas

    1995-01-01

    We develop a general expression for the gamma - gamma absorption coefficient, alpha(sub gamma(gamma)) for gamma-rays propagating in an arbitrary direction at an arbitrary point in space above an X-ray-emitting accretion disk. The X-ray intensity is assumed to vary as a power law in energy and radius between the outer disk radius, R(sub 0), and the inner radius, R(sub ms) which is the radius of marginal stability for a Schwarzschild black hole. We use our result for alpha(sub gamma(gamma)) to calculate the gamma - gamma optical depth, tau(sub gamma(gamma)) for gamma - rays created at height z and propagating at angle Phi relative to the disk axis, and we show that for Phi = 0 and z greater than or approx equal to R(sub 0), tau(sub gamma(gamma)) proportional to Epsilon(sup alpha)z(sup -2(alpha) - 3), where alpha is the X-ray spectral index and Epsilon is the gamma - ray energy. As an application, we use our formalism to compute the minimum distance between the central black hole and the site of production of the gamma-rays detected by EGRET during the 1991 June flare of 3C 279. In order to obtain an upper limit, we assume that all of the X-rays observed contemporaneously by Ginga were emitted by the disk. Our results suggest that the observed gamma - rays may have originated within less than or approx equal to 45 GM/sq c from a black hole of mass greater than or approx equal to 10(exp 9) solar mass, perhaps in active plasma located above the central funnel of the accretion disk. This raises the possibility of establishing a direct connection between the production of the observed gamma - rays and the accretion of material onto the black hole. We also consider the variation of the optical depth as a function of the angle of propagation Phi. Our results indicate that the "focusing" of the gamma - rays along the disk axis due to pair production is strong enough to explain the observed degree of alignment in blazar sources. If the gamma - rays are produced isotropically

  10. Method and system for determining radiation shielding thickness and gamma-ray energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klann, Raymond T.; Vilim, Richard B.; de la Barrera, Sergio

    2015-12-15

    A system and method for determining the shielding thickness of a detected radiation source. The gamma ray spectrum of a radiation detector is utilized to estimate the shielding between the detector and the radiation source. The determination of the shielding may be used to adjust the information from known source-localization techniques to provide improved performance and accuracy of locating the source of radiation.

  11. On the origin of gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryde, Felix

    2008-12-13

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most energetic explosions in the Universe, occurring at cosmological distances. The initial phase of the emission from these bursts is predominantly of gamma rays and stems from a highly relativistic outflow. The nature of this emission is still under debate. Here, I present the interpretation that the peak in the photon spectrum can be attributed to the black-body emission of the photosphere of the outflow, having a temperature of approximately 109K. An additional non-thermal spectral component can be attributed to additional dissipation of the kinetic energy in the outflow. This two-component model can be well fitted to most instantaneous spectra. Interestingly, the thermal component exhibits a recurring behaviour over emission pulse structures. Both the temperature and the energy flux vary as broken power laws. During the pre-break phase, the temperature is approximately constant while the energy flux rises. Furthermore, the ratio of the observed thermal flux to the emergent flux increases as a power law over the whole pulse. It is argued that these observations hold the key to our understanding of the prompt emission and the properties of the site from which it emanates.

  12. The ISGRI CdTe gamma-ray camera: first steps

    CERN Document Server

    Limousin, O; Cretolle, J; Dzitko, H; Laurent, P; Lebrun, F; Leray, J P; Arques, M; Baffert, N; Mathy, F; Noca, A; Trystram, P; Villard, P; Baron, P; Delagnes, E; Rouger, M

    2000-01-01

    The gamma-ray telescope IBIS, on board the INTEGRAL satellite, features a coded-mask aperture, active and passive shields and two detector arrays. The first one (ISGRI) is an assembly of 16384 CdTe detectors (4x4 mm large, 2 mm thick) operating at room temperature. ISGRI covers the lower part (15 keV-1 MeV) of the IBIS energy range (15 keV-10 MeV). Detectors are arranged on polycells, each including 16 crystals, connected to their front-end electronics (ASICs). Each of the eight independent ISGRI modules are made of 128 polycells. The ASICs contain a low noise charge-sensitive preamplifier and feature pulse rise-time measurement in addition to the standard pulse height measurement. This permits to compute a charge loss correction based on the charge drift time. After application of this correction, a spectral resolution around 7.5% at 122 keV is obtained with the ASICs. Today, 16 polycells have been mounted on the first representative ISGRI module. This module has been interfaced with the entire ISGRI data-pr...

  13. A Compact, Portable, Reduced-Cost, Gamma Ray Spectroscopic System for Nuclear Verification Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1551-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavietes, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kalkhoran, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate a compact gamma-ray spectroscopic system with better energy resolution and lower costs than scintillator-based detector systems for uranium enrichment analysis applications.

  14. Effects of Goldstone bosons on gamma-ray bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Huitzu; Ng, Kin-Wang, E-mail: huitzu2@gate.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: nkw@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, 128 Sec. 2, Academia Rd., Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic explosion events in the universe. An amount of gravitational energy of the order of the rest-mass energy of the Sun is released from a small region within a short time. This should lead to the formation of a fireball of temperature in the MeV range, consisting of electrons/positrons, photons, and a small fraction of baryons. We exploit the potential of GRB fireballs for being a laboratory for testing particle physics beyond the Standard Model, where we find that Weinberg's Higgs portal model serves as a good candidate for this purpose. Due to the resonance effects, the Goldstone bosons can be rapidly produced by electron-positron annihilation process in the initial fireballs of the gamma-ray bursts. On the other hand, the mean free path of the Goldstone bosons is larger than the size of the GRB initial fireballs, so they are not coupled to the GRB's relativistic flow and can lead to significant energy loss. Using generic values for the GRB initial fireball energy, temperature, radius, expansion rate, and baryon number density, we find that the GRB bounds on the parameters of Weinberg's Higgs portal model are indeed competitive to current laboratory constraints.

  15. Pocket PC-based portable gamma-ray spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamontip Ploykrachang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A portable gamma-ray spectrometer based on a Pocket PC has been developed. A 12-bit pipeline analog-to-digitalconverter (ADC associated with an implemented pulse height histogram function on field programmable gate array (FPGAoperating at 15 MHz is employed for pulse height analysis from built-in pulse amplifier. The system, which interfaces withthe Pocket PC via an enhanced RS-232 serial port under the microcontroller facilitation, is utilized for spectrum acquisition,display and analysis. The pulse height analysis capability of the system was tested and it was found that the ADC integralnonlinearity of ±0.45% was obtained with the throughput rate at 160 kcps. The overall system performance was tested usinga PIN photodiode-CsI(Tl crystal coupled scintillation detector and gamma standard radioactive sources of Cs-137 andCo-60. Low cost and the compact system size as a result of the implemented logical function are also discussed.

  16. CdWO sub 4 scintillator as a compact gamma ray spectrometer for planetary lander missions

    CERN Document Server

    Eisen, Y; Starr, R; Trombka, J I

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a gamma ray spectrometer (GRS) suitable for use on planetary rover missions. The main characteristics of this detector are low weight, small volume low power and resistance to cosmic ray radiation over a long period of time. We describe a 3 cm diameter by 3 cm thick CdWO sub 4 cylindrical scintillator coupled to a PMT as a GRS for the energy region 0.662-7.64 MeV. Its spectral performance and efficiency are compared to that of a CsI(Tl) scintillator 2.5 cm diameter by 6 cm thick coupled to a 28 mmx28 mm PIN photodiode. The comparison is made experimentally using sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs, sup 6 sup 0 Co, 6.13 MeV gamma rays from a sup 1 sup 3 C(alpha,gamma n)O sup 1 sup 6 * source, 7.64 MeV thermal neutron capture gamma rays emitted from iron bars using a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf neutron source, and natural radioactivity 1.46 MeV sup 4 sup 0 K and 2.61 MeV sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th gamma rays. We use a Monte Carlo method to calculate the total peak efficiency of these detectors and ...

  17. Université de Genève : Gamma-ray lines astronomy

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél. : (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 8 March PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium Gamma-ray lines astronomy by Prof. Nicolas Prantzos / CNRS, Paris Gamma-ray lines from cosmic sources provide unique isotopic information, since they originate from energy level transitions in the atomic nucleus. Gamma-ray telescopes explored this astronomical window in the past three decades, detecting radioactive isotopes that have been ejected in interstellar space by cosmic nucleosynthesis events. Astronomical gamma-ray telescopes feature standard detectors of nuclear physics, but have to be surrounded by effective shields against local instrumental background, and need special detector and/or mask arrangements to collect imaging information. Due to exceptionally-low signal/noise ratios, progress in the field has been slow compared with other wavelengths. Despite the...

  18. Precision X-Band Linac Technologies for Nuclear Photonics Gamma-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Houck, T L; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Adolphsen, C E; Chu, T S; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, F; Wang, J W; Raubenheimer, T O; Ighigeanu, D; Toma, M; Cutoiu, D

    2011-08-31

    Nuclear photonics is an emerging field of research requiring new tools, including high spectral brightness, tunable gamma-ray sources; high photon energy, ultrahigh-resolution crystal spectrometers; and novel detectors. This presentation focuses on the precision linac technology required for Compton scattering gamma-ray light sources, and on the optimization of the laser and electron beam pulse format to achieve unprecedented spectral brightness. Within this context, high-gradient X-band technology will be shown to offer optimal performance in a compact package, when used in conjunction with the appropriate pulse format, and photocathode illumination and interaction laser technologies. The nascent field of nuclear photonics is enabled by the recent maturation of new technologies, including high-gradient X-band electron acceleration, robust fiber laser systems, and hyper-dispersion CPA. Recent work has been performed at LLNL to demonstrate isotope-specific detection of shielded materials via NRF using a tunable, quasi-monochromatic Compton scattering gamma-ray source operating between 0.2 MeV and 0.9 MeV photon energy. This technique is called Fluorescence Imaging in the Nuclear Domain with Energetic Radiation (or FINDER). This work has, among other things, demonstrated the detection of {sup 7}Li shielded by Pb, utilizing gamma rays generated by a linac-driven, laser-based Compton scattering gamma-ray source developed at LLNL. Within this context, a new facility is currently under construction at LLNL, with the goal of generating tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range, at a repetition rate of 120 Hz, and with a peak brightness in the 10{sup 20} photons/(s x mm{sup 2} x mrad{sup 2} x 0.1% bw).

  19. Energy- and time-resolved detection of prompt gamma-rays for proton range verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verburg, Joost M; Riley, Kent; Bortfeld, Thomas; Seco, Joao

    2013-10-21

    In this work, we present experimental results of a novel prompt gamma-ray detector for proton beam range verification. The detection system features an actively shielded cerium-doped lanthanum(III) bromide scintillator, coupled to a digital data acquisition system. The acquisition was synchronized to the cyclotron radio frequency to separate the prompt gamma-ray signals from the later-arriving neutron-induced background. We designed the detector to provide a high energy resolution and an effective reduction of background events, enabling discrete proton-induced prompt gamma lines to be resolved. Measuring discrete prompt gamma lines has several benefits for range verification. As the discrete energies correspond to specific nuclear transitions, the magnitudes of the different gamma lines have unique correlations with the proton energy and can be directly related to nuclear reaction cross sections. The quantification of discrete gamma lines also enables elemental analysis of tissue in the beam path, providing a better prediction of prompt gamma-ray yields. We present the results of experiments in which a water phantom was irradiated with proton pencil-beams in a clinical proton therapy gantry. A slit collimator was used to collimate the prompt gamma-rays, and measurements were performed at 27 positions along the path of proton beams with ranges of 9, 16 and 23 g cm(-2) in water. The magnitudes of discrete gamma lines at 4.44, 5.2 and 6.13 MeV were quantified. The prompt gamma lines were found to be clearly resolved in dimensions of energy and time, and had a reproducible correlation with the proton depth-dose curve. We conclude that the measurement of discrete prompt gamma-rays for in vivo range verification of clinical proton beams is feasible, and plan to further study methods and detector designs for clinical use.

  20. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    OpenAIRE

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.; Gibby, M. H.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Yu, H-F

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in July, 2008. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network (IPN), to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1 degree, underestimat...

  1. Calculation of the low-energy gamma ray detection efficiency for a GM tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, S.; Ahmadi, S.

    2017-06-01

    Experiment and Monte-Carlo calculations indicate that the efficiency of the Geiger-Müller (GM) tube for gamma ray detection depends on the radial and axial positions of the point source. Given the extensive use that is made of this type of detector in industry and dosimetry, an accurate geometric model of the detector efficiency as a function of the source position would be welcome. In this paper, by calculating the solid angle of photons incident on the cathode wall and considering the probability of interaction of photons with the detector components, we obtain a calculation model for the detection efficiency of GM tubes (for soft gamma rays). This model is in good agreement with measurements and MCNPX simulations. We used isotropic 241Am as source.

  2. Prompt {gamma}-ray activation analysis of Martian analogues at the FRM II neutron reactor and the verification of a Monte Carlo planetary radiation environment model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, M.S. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: mss16@star.le.ac.uk; Ambrosi, R.M.; Vernon, D. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Calzada, E. [Neutronentomographie ANTARES, Forschungsreaktor FRM II, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Benedix, G.K. [Department of Mineralogy, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Buecherl, T. [Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, TU Muenchen, Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, Garching 85748 (Germany); Schillinger, B. [Neutronentomographie ANTARES, Forschungsreaktor FRM II, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2009-08-11

    Planetary radiation environment modelling is important to assess the habitability of a planetary body. It is also useful when interpreting the {gamma}-ray data produced by natural emissions from radioisotopes or prompt {gamma}-ray activation analysis. {gamma}-ray spectra acquired in orbit or in-situ by a suitable detector can be converted into meaningful estimates of the concentration of certain elements on the surface of a planet. This paper describes the verification of a Monte Carlo model developed using the MCNPX code at University of Leicester. The model predicts the performance of a geophysical package containing a {gamma}-ray spectrometer operating at a depth of up to 5 m. The experimental verification of the Monte Carlo model was performed at the FRM II facility in Munich, Germany. The paper demonstrates that the model is in good agreement with the experimental data and can be used to model the performance of an in-situ {gamma}-ray spectrometer.

  3. Gamma ray constraints on decaying dark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirelli, M.; Moulin, E.; Panci, P.

    2012-01-01

    We derive new bounds on decaying dark matter from the gamma ray measurements of (i) the isotropic residual (extragalactic) background by Fermi and (ii) the Fornax galaxy cluster by H.E.S.S. We find that those from (i) are among the most stringent constraints currently available, for a large range...... of dark matter masses and a variety of decay modes, excluding half-lives up to similar to 10(26) to few 10(27) seconds. In particular, they rule out the interpretation in terms of decaying dark matter of the e(+/-) spectral features in PAMELA, Fermi and H.E.S.S., unless very conservative choices...

  4. Characteristics of Gamma-Ray Line Flares,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    extended-burst flares (Royng, Brown, and van Beek 1976). The R a classifications of these flares are 3B. The next veill -observed gamma-ray line flare...R.., Kiplinger, A. L., Orwig, L. K., and Frost, K. J. 1983a, Solar Phys. (in press ). Bai, T., Hudson, H. S., Pelling, R. M., Lin, R. P., Schwartz, R...409. 32 112________k__________ ____________1983, Solar Phys. (in press ). Chupp, E. L., Forrest, D. J., Higbie, P. R., Suni, A. N., Tsai, C., and Dunphy

  5. Polarized gamma-rays with laser-Compton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohgaki, H.; Noguchi, T.; Sugiyama, S. [Electrotechnical Lab., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Polarized gamma-rays were generated through laser-Compton backscattering (LCS) of a conventional Nd:YAG laser with electrons circulating in the electron storage ring TERAS at Electrotechnical Laboratory. We measured the energy, the energy spread, and the yield of the gamma-rays to characterize our gamma-ray source. The gamma-ray energy can be varied by changing the energy of the electrons circulating the storage ring. In our case, the energy of electrons in the storage ring were varied its energy from 200 to 750 MeV. Consequently, we observed gamma-ray energies of 1 to 10 MeV with 1064 run laser photons. Furthermore, the gamma-ray energy was extended to 20 MeV by using the 2nd harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser. This shows a good agreement with theoretical calculation. The gamma-ray energy spread was also measured to be 1% FWHM for -1 MeV gamma-rays and to be 4% FWHM for 10 MeV gamma-rays with a narrow collimator that defined the scattering cone. The gamma-ray yield was 47.2 photons/mA/W/s. This value is consistent with a rough estimation of 59.5 photons/mA/W/s derived from theory. Furthermore, we tried to use these gamma-rays for a nuclear fluorescence experiment. If we use a polarized laser beam, we can easily obtain polarized gamma-rays. Elastically scattered photons from {sup 208} Pb were clearly measured with the linearly polarized gamma-rays, and we could assign the parity of J=1 states in the nucleus. We should emphasize that the polarized gamma-ray from LCS is quit useful in this field, because we can use highly, almost completely, polarized gamma-rays. We also use the LCS gamma-rays to measure the photon absorption coefficients. In near future, we will try to generate a circular polarized gamma-ray. We also have a plan to use an FEL, because it can produce intense laser photons in the same geometric configuration as the LCS facility.

  6. Physics of ion acceleration in the solar flare on 2003 October 28 determines gamma-ray and neutron production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Murphy, R. J.; Share, G. H.; Stoker, P. H.; Lin, R. P.

    Observations of gamma-rays and neutrons provide information about acceleration and transport of ions in solar flares. Neutrons from the X17.2 flare on 2003 October 28 were observed by the ground-based neutron monitor at Tsumeb in Namibia. This observation was made 5 minutes before the GLE event produced by the energetic protons. The full time history of gamma rays for this event was observed by the INTEGRAL satellite, while the RHESSI satellite observed gamma-rays during the decay phase. Gamma-ray lines at 2.2, 4.4, and 6.1 MeV were observed by both detectors, and a 2.2 MeV gamma-ray image was also obtained by RHESSI. Based on these gamma-ray line observations, we calculate predicted time-dependent neutron spectra arriving at Earth using the solar flare magnetic loop transport and interaction model of Hua et al. (2002). These spectra are then convolved with the response functions of the Earth's atmosphere and the neutron monitor to provide predicted neutron monitor count rates. We compare these predicted and observed rates to determine the accelerated ion spectrum and magnetic-loop transport properties.

  7. Superluminal blazars and the extragalactic gamma ray background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xinyu Chi; Young, Enoch C.M. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    1997-07-01

    The detection of a few dozen extragalactic gamma ray blazars of extremely high luminosity by the EGRET instrument on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory appears to suggest that blazars make the overwhelming contribution to the cosmic gamma ray background in the energy range 100 MeV - 10 GeV. In this paper we point out that the superluminal effect which boosts and beams the gamma ray emission in the jets of blazars will flatten the source count in the low flux part. Consequently, the unresolved blazars would not be expected to make much contribution to the gamma ray background. From our direct modelling of the source count, we conclude that the contribution of the unresolved blazars to the gamma ray background is only 10% of the latest estimate of the EGRET data. The implication for the cosmological evolution of the blazars is discussed. (author)

  8. Highlights of GeV Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Because high-energy gamma rays are primarily produced by high-energy particle interactions, the gamma-ray survey of the sky by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope offers a view of sites of cosmic ray production and interactions. Gamma-ray bursts, pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, binary sources, and Active Galactic Nuclei are all phenomena that reveal particle acceleration through their gamma-ray emission. Diffuse Galactic gamma radiation, Solar System gamma-ray sources, and energetic radiation from supernova remnants are likely tracers of high-energy particle interactions with matter and photon fields. This paper will present a broad overview of the constantly changing sky seen with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi spacecraft.

  9. SYSTEMATIC STUDY OF GAMMA-RAY-BRIGHT BLAZARS WITH OPTICAL POLARIZATION AND GAMMA-RAY VARIABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Ryosuke; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Kanda, Yuka; Shiki, Kensei; Kawabata, Miho; Nakaoka, Tatsuya; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Takata, Koji; Ui, Takahiro [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Madejski, Greg M. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road M/S 29, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Uemura, Makoto; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Kawabata, Koji S.; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Ohsugi, Takashi [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Schinzel, Frank K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Moritani, Yuki [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Sasada, Mahito [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Yamanaka, Masayuki, E-mail: itoh@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: itoh@hp.phys.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); and others

    2016-12-10

    Blazars are highly variable active galactic nuclei that emit radiation at all wavelengths from radio to gamma rays. Polarized radiation from blazars is one key piece of evidence for synchrotron radiation at low energies, and it also varies dramatically. The polarization of blazars is of interest for understanding the origin, confinement, and propagation of jets. However, even though numerous measurements have been performed, the mechanisms behind jet creation, composition, and variability are still debated. We performed simultaneous gamma-ray and optical photopolarimetry observations of 45 blazars between 2008 July and 2014 December to investigate the mechanisms of variability and search for a basic relation between the several subclasses of blazars. We identify a correlation between the maximum degree of optical linear polarization and the gamma-ray luminosity or the ratio of gamma-ray to optical fluxes. Since the maximum polarization degree depends on the condition of the magnetic field (chaotic or ordered), this result implies a systematic difference in the intrinsic alignment of magnetic fields in parsec-scale relativistic jets between different types of blazars (flat-spectrum radio quasars vs. BL Lacs) and consequently between different types of radio galaxies (FR I versus FR II).

  10. Detection Optimization for Prompt Gamma Ray Imaging during Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT): A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moo Sub; Yoon, Do Kun; Suh, Tae Suk [Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this study was the statistical analysis of the prompt gamma ray peak induced by the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) from spectra using Monte Carlo simulation. For the simulation, the information of the sixteen detector materials was used to simulate spectra by the neutron capture reaction. The results in this study are the first reported data regarding the peak discrimination of 478 keV energy prompt gamma ray using the many cases. (sixteen detector materials). The reliable data based on the Monte Carlo method and statistical method with the identical conditions was deducted. Our results are important data in the BNCT study for the peak detection within actual experiments.

  11. Lingering Problems in Gamma-Ray Observations of GRBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    Although observations of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) in other wavelengths have transformed the field, the gamma-ray region of the spectrum remains important. This talk will summarize a number of unresolved issues specific to gamma-ray observations. For example, the apparent narrowness of the distribution of peak energy is difficult to explain either as an intrinsic characteristic of bursts or as a selection effect. There have also been controversial claims for anisotropy in subgroups of bursts.

  12. News from Cosmic Gamma-ray Line Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Diehl, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of gamma rays at MeV energies from cosmic radioactivities is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and how they shape objects such as massive stars and supernova explosions. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this same astronomical window, and positrons are often produced from radioactive beta decays. Nuclear gamma-ray telescopes face instrumental challenges from penetrating gamm...

  13. Measuring Cosmological Parameters with Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amati, Lorenzo; Della Valle, Massimo

    2013-12-01

    In a few dozen seconds, gamma ray bursts (GRBs) emit up to 1054 erg in terms of an equivalent isotropically radiated energy Eiso, so they can be observed up to z 10. Thus, these phenomena appear to be very promising tools to describe the expansion rate history of the universe. Here, we review the use of the Ep,i-Eiso correlation of GRBs to measure the cosmological density parameter ΩM. We show that the present data set of GRBs, coupled with the assumption that we live in a flat universe, can provide independent evidence, from other probes, that ΩM 0.3. We show that current (e.g. Swift, Fermi/GBM, Konus-WIND) and forthcoming gamma ray burst (GRB) experiments (e.g. CALET/GBM, SVOM, Lomonosov/UFFO, LOFT/WFM) will allow us to constrain ΩM with an accuracy comparable to that currently exhibited by Type Ia supernovae (SNe-Ia) and to study the properties of dark energy and their evolution with time.

  14. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jay P.

    2003-01-01

    The unrivalled, extreme luminosities of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) make them the favored beacons for sampling the high redshift Universe. To employ GRBs to study the cosmic terrain -- e.g., star and galaxy formation history -- GRB luminosities must be calibrated, and the luminosity function versus redshift must be measured or inferred. Several nascent relationships between gamma-ray temporal or spectral indicators and luminosity or total energy have been reported. These measures promise to further our understanding of GRBs once the connections between the luminosity indicators and GRB jets and emission mechanisms are better elucidated. The current distribution of 33 redshifts determined from host galaxies and afterglows peaks near z $\\sim$ 1, whereas for the full BATSE sample of long bursts, the lag-luminosity relation predicts a broad peak z $\\sim$ 1--4 with a tail to z $\\sim$ 20, in rough agreement with theoretical models based on star formation considerations. For some GRB subclasses and apparently related phenomena -- short bursts, long-lag bursts, and X-ray flashes -- the present information on their redshift distributions is sparse or entirely lacking, and progress is expected in Swift era when prompt alerts become numerous.

  15. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Characteristics and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, W. J.; Zitouni, H.; Guessoum, N.

    2017-06-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most powerful explosions in the universe. They have remained the object of intense research ever since their discovery was declassified in the early 1970s. Several space-borne missions have been dedicated to their study, including the Compton Gamma-Ray Burst Observatory (CGRO) in the 1990s and the current Swift and Fermi satellites. However, despite several decades of focused research, the precise mechanisms behind these enigmatic explosions have not been fully established. In the first part of this paper, we review what is currently known about GRBs. This includes: GRB light-curves and spectra; the different progenitor models, i.e., the "collapsar" and "merger" models; and the afterglow characteristics, including external shocks and the surrounding medium. In the second part of the paper, we present our work, which focuses on utilizing GRBs as cosmological probes. GRBs are ideal cosmological tools, because they have been observed to great distances (redshifts up to z = 9.4) and their radiation is unencumbered by any intervening dust. Although GRBs are not standard candles, the discovery of several energy and luminosity correlations, like the Amati relation which correlates the intrinsic spectral peak energy, Ep,i to the equivalent isotropic energy, Eiso , has ushered in a new era in which GRBs are used to investigate cosmological issues like the star formation rate and the value of the matter-density parameter, ΩM.

  16. Radiation hardness of GaAs sensors against gamma-rays, neutrons and electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Šagátová, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.sagatova@stuba.sk [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); University Centre of Electron Accelerators, Slovak Medical University, Ku kyselke 497, 911 06 Trenčín (Slovakia); Zaťko, Bohumír; Dubecký, František [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ly Anh, Tu [Faculty of Applied Science, University of Technology VNU HCM, 268 Ly Thuong Kiet Street, District 10, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Nečas, Vladimír; Sedlačková, Katarína; Pavlovič, Márius [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Fülöp, Marko [University Centre of Electron Accelerators, Slovak Medical University, Ku kyselke 497, 911 06 Trenčín (Slovakia)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Radiation hardness of SI GaAs detectors against gamma-rays, neutrons and electrons was compared. • Good agreement was achieved between the experimental results and displacement damage factor of different types of radiation. • CCE and FWHM first slightly improved (by 1–8%) and just then degraded with the cumulative dose. • An increase of detection efficiency with cumulative dose was observed. - Abstract: Radiation hardness of semi-insulating GaAs detectors against {sup 60}Co gamma-rays, fast neutrons and 5 MeV electrons was compared. Slight improvements in charge collection efficiency (CCE) and energy resolution in FWHM (Full Width at Half Maximum) were observed at low doses with all kinds of radiation followed by their degradation. The effect occurred at a dose of about 10 Gy of neutrons (CCE improved by 1%, FWHM by 5% on average), at 1 kGy of electrons (FWHM decreased by 3% on average) and at 10 kGy of gamma-rays (CCE raised by 5% and FWHM dropped by 8% on average), which is in agreement with the relative displacement damage of the used types of radiation. Gamma-rays of MeV energies are 1000-times less damaging than similar neutrons and electrons about 10-times more damaging than photons. On irradiating the detectors with neutrons and electrons, we observed a global increase in their detection efficiency, which was caused probably by enlargement of the active detector area as a consequence of created radiation defects in the base material. Detectors were still functional after a dose of 1140 kGy of ∼1 MeV photons, 104 kGy of 5 MeV electrons but only up to 0.576 kGy of fast (∼2 to 30 MeV) neutrons.

  17. Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-ray Source List

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Ajello, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Band, D.L.; /NASA, Goddard /NASA, Goddard; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bignami, G.F.; /Pavia U.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Pavia U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /NASA, Goddard; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the {gamma}-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than {approx}10{sigma}) {gamma}-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) {gamma}-ray sources in the early mission data.

  18. Review of GRANAT observations of gamma-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terekhov, O.; Denissenko, D.; Sunyaev, R.

    1995-01-01

    of the observations of the time histories and spectral evolution of the detected events provided by the different instruments in different energy ranges. Short Gamma-Ray Bursts (histories. They have harder energy spectra than the long (> 2 s) events. Evidence of the existence...... of four differently behaving componenents in gamma-ray burst spectra is discussed. Statistical properties of the gamma-ray burst sources based on the 5 years of observations with (∼ 10−6 erg/cm2) sensitivity as well as the results of high sensitivity (∼ 10−8 erg/cm2) search for Gamma-Ray Bursts within...

  19. Gamma-ray burst interaction with dense interstellar medium

    OpenAIRE

    Barkov, Maxim; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, Gennady

    2004-01-01

    Interaction of cosmological gamma ray burst radiation with the dense interstellar medium of host galaxy is considered. Gas dynamical motion of interstellar medium driven by gamma ray burst is investigated in 2D approximation for different initial density distributions of host galaxy matter and different total energy of gamma ray burst. The maximum velocity of motion of interstellar medium is $1.8\\cdot10^4$ km/s. Light curves of gamma ray burst afterglow are calculated for set of non homogeneo...

  20. Radio and Gamma-ray Emission from Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, G. J.; Lee, K. J.; Wang, H. G.; Xu, R. X.

    The radiation of pulsars have been observed for many years. A few pulsars are discovered to have both radio and gamma-ray emission. Many models on pulsar radiation have been developed, but so far we are still lacking an elaborate model which can explain the emission from radio to gamma-rays in detail. In this paper we present a joint model for radio and gamma-ray emission, in which both the dominate emission mechanisms are inverse Compton scattering. The pulse profiles at radio and gamma-ray bands are reproduced for the Crab-like, Vela-like and Geminga-like pulsars, in good agreement with observations.

  1. A gamma-ray tracking algorithm for the GRETA spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, G J; Lee, I Y; Stephens, F S; Vetter, K; Clark, R M; Diamond, R M; Fallon, P; Macchiavelli, A O; MacLeod, R W

    1999-01-01

    We discuss a gamma-ray tracking algorithm that has been developed for the proposed gamma-ray energy tracking array (GRETA). This algorithm has been designed so as to maximize the resolving power for detecting high-multiplicity gamma-ray events. The conceptual basis for this algorithm will be presented. In addition, Monte Carlo simulated data will be used to assess performance over a large range of relevant parameters. A discussion of the potential gamma-ray polarimeter performance of GRETA is also presented.

  2. A new processing technique for airborne gamma-ray data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Jens

    1997-01-01

    The mathematical-statistical background for at new technique for processing gamma-ray spectra is presented. The technique - Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition - decomposes at set of gamma-ray spectra into a few basic spectra - the spectral components. The spectral components can be proce......The mathematical-statistical background for at new technique for processing gamma-ray spectra is presented. The technique - Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition - decomposes at set of gamma-ray spectra into a few basic spectra - the spectral components. The spectral components can...... be processed in different ways aiming at getting new information that cannot be directly extracted from the original spectra....

  3. Fermi Bubbles: an elephant in the gamma-ray sky

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malyshev Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fermi bubbles are one of the most remarkable features in the gamma-ray sky revealed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT. The nature of the gamma-ray emission and the origin of the bubbles are still open questions. In this note, we will review some basic features of leptonic and hadronic modes of gamma-ray production. At the moment, gamma rays are our best method to study the bubbles, but in order to resolve the origin of the bubbles multi-wavelength and multi-messenger observations will be crucial.

  4. Active Neutron and Gamma Ray Instrumentation for In Situ Planetary Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsed Neutron Generator-Gamma Ray And Neutron Detectors (PNG-GRAND) experiment is an innovative application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology so successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth. The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA-GSFC) is to bring the PNG-GRAND instrument to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Menus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets. Gamma-Ray Spectrometers (GRS) have been incorporated into numerous orbital planetary science missions and, especially its the case of the Mars Odyssey GRS, have contributed detailed maps of the elemental composition over the entire surface of Mars. However, orbital gamma ray measurements have low spatial sensitivity (100's of km) due to their low surface emission rates from cosmic rays and subsequent need to be averaged over large surface areas. PNG-GRAND overcomes this impediment by incorporating a powerful neutron excitation source that permits high sensitivity surface and subsurface measurements of bulk elemental compositions. PNG-GRAND combines a pulsed neutron generator (PNG) with gamma ray and neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument to determine subsurface elemental composition without needing to drill into a planet's surface a great advantage in mission design. We are currently testing PNG-GRAND prototypes at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility recently constructed at NASA/GSFC that consists of a 2 m x 2 in x 1 m granite structure placed outdoors in an empty field. Because an independent trace elemental analysis has been performed on the material, this granite sample is a known standard with which to compare both Monte Carlo simulations and our experimentally measured elemental composition data. We will present data from operating PNG-GRAND in various experimental configurations on a

  5. Dual-mode capacitance and gamma-ray tomography using the Landweber reconstruction algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjertaker, B. T.; Maad, R.; Johansen, G. A.

    2011-10-01

    A dual-mode tomography system based on electrical capacitance and gamma-ray tomography has been developed at the Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen. The objective of the dual-mode tomograph is to acquire cross-sectional images, i.e. tomograms, of hydrocarbon flow comprising oil, water and gas constituents. The capacitance tomograph utilizes an eight-electrode sensor set-up mounted around a PVC pipe structure which is sensitive to the electrical permittivity ɛr of the fluid. By using the capacitance tomograph, the produced water constituent can be separated from the gas and crude oil constituents, assuming that the liquid phase is oil continuous. The high-speed gamma-ray tomograph comprises five 500 mCi 241Am gamma-ray sources, each at a principal energy of 59.5 keV, which corresponds to five detector modules, each consisting of 17 CdZnTe detectors mounted around the same pipe section as the capacitance sensor. The gamma-ray tomograph discriminates between the gas and the liquid phase, since these have different photon attenuation properties. As a result, the gamma-ray tomograph is able to distinguish the gas phase from the liquid phase of the hydrocarbon flow. Consequently, the dual-mode capacitance and gamma-ray tomography set-up is able to distinguish the oil, water and gas constituents of hydrocarbon flow. This paper presents the work that has been performed related to static characterization of the dual-mode tomograph using the Landweber reconstruction algorithm on polypropylene phantoms. The objective of the work has been to quantitatively evaluate the static imaging performance of the dual-mode tomograph with respect to relative spatial measurement errors, i.e. root mean square errors of the reconstructed tomograms compared to that of the phantom. The work shows that dual-mode tomography using electrical capacitance and gamma-ray sensors is feasible on hydrocarbon flow components using a pixel-to-pixel fusion procedure on separately

  6. The 2HWC HAWC Observatory Gamma-Ray Catalog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Barber, A. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Albert, A. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Alfaro, R.; Becerril, A.; Belmont-Moreno, E. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City (Mexico); Alvarez, C.; Arceo, R.; Caballero-Mora, K. S. [Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas, Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Álvarez, J. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C. [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia (Mexico); Solares, H. A. Ayala; Brisbois, C. [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI (United States); Baughman, B.; Berley, D. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Bautista-Elivar, N. [Universidad Politecnica de Pachuca, Pachuca, Hidalgo (Mexico); Gonzalez, J. Becerra [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); BenZvi, S. Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Bernal, A. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City (Mexico); Braun, J., E-mail: riviere@umdgrb.umd.edu [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); and others

    2017-07-01

    We present the first catalog of TeV gamma-ray sources realized with data from the newly completed High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC). It is the most sensitive wide field-of-view TeV telescope currently in operation, with a one-year survey sensitivity of ∼5%–10% of the flux of the Crab Nebula. With an instantaneous field of view >1.5 sr and >90% duty cycle, it continuously surveys and monitors the sky for gamma-ray energies between hundreds of GeV and tens of TeV. HAWC is located in Mexico, at a latitude of 19° N, and was completed in 2015 March. Here, we present the 2HWC catalog, which is the result of the first source search performed with the complete HAWC detector. Realized with 507 days of data, it represents the most sensitive TeV survey to date for such a large fraction of the sky. A total of 39 sources were detected, with an expected number of false detections of 0.5 due to background fluctuation. Out of these sources, 19 are new sources that are not associated with previously known TeV sources (association criteria: <0.°5 away). The source list, including the position measurement, spectrum measurement, and uncertainties, is reported, then each source is briefly discussed. Of the 2HWC associated sources, 10 are reported in TeVCat as PWN or SNR: 2 as blazars and the remaining eight as unidentified.

  7. Searching for Short GRBs in Soft Gamma Rays with INTEGRAL/PICsIT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodi, James; Bazzano, Angela; Ubertini, Pietro

    With gravitational wave (GW) detections by the LIGO/Virgo collaboration over the past several years, there is heightened interest in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), especially “short” GRBs (T PICsIT detector (~0.2 ─ 10 MeV) on-board the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory...... (INTEGRAL) is able to observe sources out to approximately 70° off-axis, making it essentially a soft gamma-ray, all-sky monitor for impulsiveevents, such as SGRBs. Because SGRBs typically have hard spectra with peak energies of a few hundred keV, PICsIT with its ~ 3000 cm collecting area is able to provide...... spectral information about these sources at soft gamma-ray energies.We have begun a study of PICsIT data for faint SGRB ssimilar to the one associated with the binary neutron star (BNS) merger GW170817, and also are preparing for future GW triggers by developing a realtime burst analysis for PICs...

  8. Interaction studies and gamma-ray properties of some low-Z materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhosale Rameshwar R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In present work we use NaI(Tl detector in narrow-beam good geometry set-up for the gamma ray attenuation studies of some low-Z materials. The parameters such as mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities, atomic cross-sections, electronic cross-sections of materials for graphitic powder, polycarbonate, polyvinyl chloride, plaster of Paris, gypsum, and limestone were determined using gamma ray sources 57Co, 133Ba, 137Bs, 60Co, and 22Na at energies of 122, 356, 511, 662, 840, 1170, 1275, and 1330 keV. It was observed that the effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities initially decrease and tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. An attempt was done to check the availability of these low-Z materials at large scales and obtainable at low cost as gamma ray shielding materials. The investigated data are useful in electronic industry, plastic industry, building materials, and agriculture fields.

  9. Gamma ray heating rates due to chromium isotopes in stellar core during late stages of high mass stars (>10M⊙

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabi Jameel-Un

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma ray heating rates are thought to play a crucial role during the pre-supernova stage of high mass stars. Gamma ray heating rates, due to β±-decay and electron (positron capture on chromium isotopes, are calculated using proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation theory. The electron capture significantly affects the lepton fraction (Ye and accelerates the core contraction. The gamma rays emitted as a result of weak processes heat the core and tend to hinder the cooling and contraction due to electron capture and neutrino emission. The emitted gamma rays tend to produce enormous entropy and set the convection to play its role at this stage. The gamma heating rates, on 50-60Cr, are calculated for the density range 10 < ρ (g.cm-3 < 1011 and temperature range 107 < T (K < 3.0×1010.

  10. Validation of gamma-ray detection techniques for safeguards monitoring at natural uranium conversion facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewji, S. A.; Lee, D. L.; Croft, S.; Hertel, N. E.; Chapman, J. A.; McElroy, R. D.; Cleveland, S.

    2016-07-01

    Recent IAEA circulars and policy papers have sought to implement safeguards when any purified aqueous uranium solution or uranium oxides suitable for isotopic enrichment or fuel fabrication exists. Under the revised policy, IAEA Policy Paper 18, the starting point for nuclear material under safeguards was reinterpreted, suggesting that purified uranium compounds should be subject to safeguards procedures no later than the first point in the conversion process. In response to this technical need, a combination of simulation models and experimental measurements were employed to develop and validate concepts of nondestructive assay monitoring systems in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP). In particular, uranyl nitrate (UO2(NO3)2) solution exiting solvent extraction was identified as a key measurement point (KMP), where gamma-ray spectroscopy was selected as the process monitoring tool. The Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was employed to simulate the full-scale operating conditions of a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in an NUCP. Nondestructive assay techniques using gamma-ray spectroscopy were evaluated to determine their viability as a technical means for drawing safeguards conclusions at NUCPs, and if the IAEA detection requirements of 1 significant quantity (SQ) can be met in a timely way. This work investigated gamma-ray signatures of uranyl nitrate circulating in the UNCLE facility and evaluated various gamma-ray detector sensitivities to uranyl nitrate. These detector validation activities include assessing detector responses to the uranyl nitrate gamma-ray signatures for spectrometers based on sodium iodide, lanthanum bromide, and high-purity germanium detectors. The results of measurements under static and dynamic operating conditions at concentrations ranging from 10-90 g U/L of natural uranyl nitrate are presented. A range of gamma-ray lines is

  11. Compact high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography system for multiphase flow studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieberle, A; Nehring, H; Berger, R; Arlit, M; Härting, H-U; Schubert, M; Hampel, U

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a compact high-resolution gamma-ray Computed Tomography (CompaCT) measurement system for multiphase flow studies and tomographic imaging of technical objects is presented. Its compact and robust design makes it particularly suitable for studies on industrial facilities and outdoor applications. Special care has been given to thermal ruggedness, shock resistance, and radiation protection. Main components of the system are a collimated (137)Cs isotopic source, a thermally stabilised modular high-resolution gamma-ray detector arc with 112 scintillation detector elements, and a transportable rotary unit. The CompaCT allows full CT scans of objects with a diameter of up to 130 mm and can be operated with any tilting angle from 0° (horizontal) to 90° (vertical).

  12. Simulation of CdZnTe gamma-ray spectrometer response

    CERN Document Server

    Gliere, A; Verger, L

    2000-01-01

    A model of a semiconductor gamma-ray planar detector is presented. The model takes into account the physical phenomena involved in the detection process, namely the gamma-ray's interaction with the crystal, the physics of the semiconductor's charge collection and the electric field distribution. Its outputs are conventional pulse-height spectra and biparametric (rise time versus pulse height) spectra. Some of the model's capabilities are demonstrated by comparison with spectra obtained for CdZnTe detectors. The comparison between simulated and experimental pulse-height spectra shows a good agreement when the measured electric field profile is used in the simulation. (Electric field is measured via the Pockels effect). A better modeling of the electronics will improve the current quantitative agreement between model and experiment for biparametric spectra.

  13. All-Sky Earth Occultation Observations with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Case, G.; Jenke, P.; Chaplin, V.; Cherry, M.; Connaughton, V.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/ soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique. Each time a source in our catalog is occulted by (or exits occultation by) the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors and spanning 150 keV to 40 MeV for the GBM BGO detectors. Our preliminary catalog consists of galactic X-ray binaries, the Crab Nebula, and active galactic nuclei. In addition, to Earth occultations, we have observed numerous occultations with Fermi's solar panels.

  14. SgrbWorldModel: Short-duration Gamma-Ray Burst World Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmoradi, Amir; Nemiroff, Robert J.

    2017-12-01

    SgrbWorldModel, written in Fortran 90, presents an attempt at modeling the population distribution of the Short-duration class of Gamma-Ray Bursts (SGRBs) as detected by the NASA's now-defunct Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). It is assumed that the population distribution of SGRBs is well fit by a multivariate log-normal distribution, whose differential cosmological rate of occurrence follows the Star-Formation-Rate (SFR) convolved with a log-normal binary-merger delay-time distribution. The best-fit parameters of the model are then found by maximizing the likelihood of the observed data by the BATSE detectors via a native built-in Adaptive Metropolis-Hastings Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (AMH-MCMC)Sampler that is part of the code. A model for the detection algorithm of the BATSE detectors is also provided.

  15. Recent advances in BazookaSPECT: Real-time data processing and the development of a gamma-ray microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brian W; Barrett, Harrison H; Furenlid, Lars R; Barber, H Bradford; Hunter, Robert J

    2008-06-11

    Recent advances have been made with the BazookaSPECT detector, a high-resolution CCD-based gamma camera which utilizes an MCP-based image intensifier for upfront optical gain. Operating the gamma camera at high frame rates leads to a massive amount of data throughput, thereby inducing the need for real-time processing. We have developed and implemented a list-mode algorithm which allows for real-time data acquisition and processing at high frame rates. This is accomplished with a graphics processing unit (GPU), which provides processing capabilities in addition to the CPU. We have also developed a gamma-ray microscope based on the BazookaSPECT detector and micro-coded apertures. Experimental phantom images show the gamma-ray microscope having an estimated reconstruction resolution of ~30 μm, an unprecedented resolution in gamma-ray imaging.

  16. A joint model of pulsar radio and gamma ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, G.

    The radiation of radio pulsars have been observed from radio to gamma -rays for many years. Observations present abundance infor-mation. Theoretical models for radio and gamma-rays are presented separately. Until now we do not found a model can show emission from radio to gamma -rays at the same time detailedly. For a certain pul-sar, the emission from radio to gamma-rays can be observed at the same time (such as Crab pulsar and so on). So a reasonable model should present the emission from radio to gamma - rays at the same time more detailedly. A joint model for emission from radio to gamma -rays is presented in this paper. Which can show emission characters for both radio and gamma -ray emission band. Such as core and cone emis -s i o n beams at radio emission band, and gamma - rays for Geminga-like, Crab-like and Vela - like emission beams can be shown at the same time. First of all, an inverse Compton scattering model(ICS model, partly see ICS I A &A 1998; ICS II A &A 2001; ICS III ApJ 2000) of radio pulsars will be introduced more detailedly. Then a new model for gamma - ray emission will be introduced. In this model both radio and gamma-ray emission mechanisms are jointed, and the emission beams from radio to gamma -rays can be presented. Various kind of pulse profiles and other observational characteristics can be shown and the theory in agreement with observations well.

  17. Novel Chalcogenide Materials for X-ray and Gamma-ray Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Physics ) Mr. Hao Li ( Chemistry ) Ms Maria Sebastian (Materials Science, to graduate Fall 2014) Chris Malliakas ( Chemistry ) Past postdocs: John...native defects in the gamma-ray detector material Cs2Hg6S1, Applied Physics Letters 2012, 101. (4) Li, H.; Peters, J. A.; Liu, Z. F.; Sebastian, M... Applied Physics 2012, 112. (7) Li, H.; Malliakas, C. D.; Peters, J. A.; Liu, Z. F.; Im, J.; Jin, H.; Morris, C. D.; Zhao, L. D.; Wessels, B. W

  18. Europe's space camera unmasks a cosmic gamma-ray machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-11-01

    , just one step short of a black hole. A neutron star is created by the force of a supernova explosion in a large star, which crushes the star's core to an unimaginable density. A mass greater than the Sun's is squeezed into a ball no wider than a city. The gravity and magnetic fields are billions of times stronger than the Earth's. The neutron star revolves rapidly, which causes it to wink like a cosmic lighthouse as it swivels its magnetic poles towards and away from the Earth. Pulsar 1055-52 spins at five revolutions per second. At its formation in a supernova explosion, a neutron star is endowed with two main forms of energy. One is heat, at temperatures of millions of degrees, which the neutron star radiates mainly as X-rays, with only a small proportion emerging as visible light. The other power supply for the neutron star comes from its high rate of spin and a gradual slowing of the rotation. By a variety of processes involving the magnetic field and accelerated particles in the neutron star's vicinity, the spin energy of the neutron star is converted into radiation at many different wavelengths, from radio waves to gamma-rays. The exceptional gamma-ray intensity of Pulsar 1055-52 was first appreciated in observations by NASA's Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The team in Milan recently used the Hubble Space Telescope to find the distance of the peculiar neutron star Geminga, which is not detectable by radio pulses but is a strong source of gamma-rays (see ESA Information Note 04-96, 28 March 1996). Pulsar 1055-52 is even more powerful in that respect. About 50 per cent of its radiant energy is gamma-rays, compared with 15 per cent from Geminga and 0.1 per cent from the famous Crab Pulsar, the first neutron star seen by visible light. Making the gamma-rays requires the acceleration of electrons through billions of volts. The magnetic environment of Pulsar 1055-52 fashions a natural gamma-ray machine of amazing power. The orientation of the neutron star's magnetic

  19. Gravitational Waves and Gamma-Rays from a Binary Neutron Star Merger: GW170817 and GRB 170817A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Aloy, M. A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Angelova, S. V.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atallah, D. V.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Austin, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barkett, K.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bawaj, M.; Bayley, J. C.; Bazzan, M.; Bécsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Bero, J. J.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonilla, E.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bossie, K.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chase, E.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Chatziioannou, K.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H.-P.; Chia, H.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Clearwater, P.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Cohen, D.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordero-Carrión, I.; Corley, K. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Dálya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D’Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Demos, N.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; De Pietri, R.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rossi, C.; DeSalvo, R.; de Varona, O.; Devenson, J.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Dovale Álvarez, M.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Dreissigacker, C.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dupej, P.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Estevez, D.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fee, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finstad, D.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fishbach, M.; Fisher, R. P.; Fitz-Axen, M.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Font, J. A.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garcia-Quiros, C.; Garufi, F.; Gateley, B.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glover, L.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gomes, S.; Goncharov, B.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Gretarsson, E. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Halim, O.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, E. Z.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hinderer, T.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hreibi, A.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Johnson-McDaniel, N. K.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kamai, B.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Kastaun, W.; Katolik, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kemball, A. J.; Kennedy, R.; Kent, C.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinley-Hanlon, M.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knowles, T. D.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Krämer, C.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwang, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Linker, S. D.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lo, R. K. L.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macas, R.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña Hernandez, I.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Markowitz, A.; Maros, E.; Marquina, A.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Massera, E.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McNeill, L.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Mejuto-Villa, E.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Milovich-Goff, M. C.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moffa, D.; Moggi, A.; Mogushi, K.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muñiz, E. A.; Muratore, M.; Murray, P. G.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Neilson, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Nevin, L.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Ng, K. K. Y.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nichols, D.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; North, C.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; O’Dea, G. D.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Okada, M. A.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O’Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R.; Ortega, L. F.; O’Shaughnessy, R.; Ossokine, S.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, Howard; Pan, Huang-Wei; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Parida, A.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patil, M.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pirello, M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Pratten, G.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rajbhandari, B.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Ramos-Buades, A.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ren, W.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Rutins, G.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sanchis-Gual, N.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheel, M.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaner, M. B.; Shao, L.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somala, S.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staats, K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Stops, D. J.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Strunk, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Suresh, J.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Tait, S. C.; Talbot, C.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Tasson, J. D.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Tewari, S. V.; Theeg, T.; Thies, F.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres-Forné, A.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tsukada, L.; Tsuna, D.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Wang, Y. F.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Weßels, P.; Westerweck, J.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Wilken, D.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, K. W. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wysocki, D. M.; Xiao, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, L.; Yap, M. J.; Yazback, M.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zimmerman, A. B.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; (LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; Burns, E.; Veres, P.; Kocevski, D.; Racusin, J.; Goldstein, A.; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Blackburn, L.; Hamburg, R.; Hui, C. M.; von Kienlin, A.; McEnery, J.; Preece, R. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Bissaldi, E.; Cleveland, W. H.; Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M.; Kippen, R. M.; McBreen, S.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Poolakkil, S.; Roberts, O. J.; Stanbro, M.; Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, (Fermi; Savchenko, V.; Ferrigno, C.; Kuulkers, E.; Bazzano, A.; Bozzo, E.; Brandt, S.; Chenevez, J.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Diehl, R.; Domingo, A.; Hanlon, L.; Jourdain, E.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F.; Lutovinov, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Natalucci, L.; Rodi, J.; Roques, J.-P.; Sunyaev, R.; Ubertini, P.; (INTEGRAL

    2017-10-01

    On 2017 August 17, the gravitational-wave event GW170817 was observed by the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors, and the gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB 170817A was observed independently by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, and the Anti-Coincidence Shield for the Spectrometer for the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory. The probability of the near-simultaneous temporal and spatial observation of GRB 170817A and GW170817 occurring by chance is 5.0× {10}-8. We therefore confirm binary neutron star mergers as a progenitor of short GRBs. The association of GW170817 and GRB 170817A provides new insight into fundamental physics and the origin of short GRBs. We use the observed time delay of (+1.74+/- 0.05) {{s}} between GRB 170817A and GW170817 to: (I) constrain the difference between the speed of gravity and the speed of light to be between -3× {10}-15 and +7× {10}-16 times the speed of light, (II) place new bounds on the violation of Lorentz invariance, (III) present a new test of the equivalence principle by constraining the Shapiro delay between gravitational and electromagnetic radiation. We also use the time delay to constrain the size and bulk Lorentz factor of the region emitting the gamma-rays. GRB 170817A is the closest short GRB with a known distance, but is between 2 and 6 orders of magnitude less energetic than other bursts with measured redshift. A new generation of gamma-ray detectors, and subthreshold searches in existing detectors, will be essential to detect similar short bursts at greater distances. Finally, we predict a joint detection rate for the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors of 0.1–1.4 per year during the 2018–2019 observing run and 0.3–1.7 per year at design sensitivity.

  20. High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Robert K [Hinsdale, IL

    2008-12-23

    A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

  1. Use of a solar panel as a directionally sensitive large-area radiation monitor for direct and scattered x-rays and gamma-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Majid, S

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of a 25.4 X 91 cm solar cell panel used as an x-ray and gamma-ray radiation monitor are presented. Applications for monitoring the primary x-ray beam are described at different values of operating currents and voltages as well as for directional dependence of scattered radiation. Other applications in gamma-ray radiography are also given. The detector showed linear response to both x-ray and gamma-ray exposures. The equipment is rigid, easy to use, relatively inexpensive and requires no power supply or any complex electronic equipment.

  2. Determination of photon emission probabilities for the main gamma-rays of ²²³Ra in equilibrium with its progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pibida, L; Zimmerman, B; Fitzgerald, R; King, L; Cessna, J T; Bergeron, D E

    2015-07-01

    The currently published (223)Ra gamma-ray emission probabilities display a wide variation in the values depending on the source of the data. The National Institute of Standards and Technology performed activity measurements on a (223)Ra solution that was used to prepare several sources that were used to determine the photon emission probabilities for the main gamma-rays of (223)Ra in equilibrium with its progeny. Several high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors were used to perform the gamma-ray spectrometry measurements. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. A review of gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rees, Martin J

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts, an enigma for more than 25 years, are now coming into focus. They involve extraordinary power outputs, and highly relativistic dynamics. The 'trigger' involves stellar-mass compact objects. The most plausible progenitors, ranging from neutron star binary mergers to collapsars (sometimes called 'hypernovae') eventually lead to the formation of a black hole with a torus of hot neutron-density material around it, the extractable energy being up to 10 sup 5 sup 4 ergs. Magnetic fields may exceed 10 sup 1 sup 5 G and particles may be accelerated up to > or approx. 10 sup 2 sup 0 eV. Details of the afterglow may be easier to understand than the initial trigger. Bursts at very high redshift can be astronomically-important as probes of the distant universe.

  4. The Theory of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zigao; Daigne, Frédéric; Mészáros, Peter

    2017-10-01

    This chapter gives a brief review on the theory of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), including the models of multi-messengers (e.g., prompt multiwavelength electromagnetic emissions, high-energy neutrinos, ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and gravitational waves) and central engines (in particular, mergers of binary neutron stars for short GRBs). For detailed reviews, please see (Piran in Phys. Rep. 314:575, 1999; Rev. Mod. Phys. 76:1143, 2004; Mészáros in Annu. Rev. Astron. Astrophys. 40:137, 2002; Rep. Prog. Phys. 69:2259, 2006; Zhang and Mészáros in Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 19:2385, 2004; Zhang in Chin. J. Astron. Astrophys. 7:1, 2007; Nakar in Phys. Rep. 442:166, 2007; Kumar and Zhang in Phys. Rep. 561:1, 2015).

  5. Gamma-Ray Burst Prompt Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Dainotti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism responsible for the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs is still a debated issue. The prompt phase-related GRB correlations can allow discriminating among the most plausible theoretical models explaining this emission. We present an overview of the observational two-parameter correlations, their physical interpretations, and their use as redshift estimators and possibly as cosmological tools. The nowadays challenge is to make GRBs, the farthest stellar-scaled objects observed (up to redshift z=9.4, standard candles through well established and robust correlations. However, GRBs spanning several orders of magnitude in their energetics are far from being standard candles. We describe the advances in the prompt correlation research in the past decades, with particular focus paid to the discoveries in the last 20 years.

  6. Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Radio Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs are extremely energetic events at cosmological distances. They provide unique laboratory to investigate fundamental physical processes under extreme conditions. Due to extreme luminosities, GRBs are detectable at very high redshifts and potential tracers of cosmic star formation rate at early epoch. While the launch of Swift and Fermi has increased our understanding of GRBs tremendously, many new questions have opened up. Radio observations of GRBs uniquely probe the energetics and environments of the explosion. However, currently only 30% of the bursts are detected in radio bands. Radio observations with upcoming sensitive telescopes will potentially increase the sample size significantly and allow one to follow the individual bursts for a much longer duration and be able to answer some of the important issues related to true calorimetry, reverse shock emission, and environments around the massive stars exploding as GRBs in the early Universe.

  7. Pulsar gamma rays from polar cap regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, James; Romani, Roger W.

    1992-01-01

    The production is studied of pulsar gamma rays by energetic electrons flowing in the open field region above pulsar polar caps. The propagation was followed of curvature radiation from primary electrons, as well as hard synchrotron radiation generated by secondary pairs, through the pulsar magnetosphere for vacuum dipole open field geometries. Using data from radio and optical observations, models were constructed for the specific geometries and viewing angles appropriate to particular pulsars. These detailed models produce normalized spectra above 10 MeV, pulse profiles, beaming fractions and phase resolved spectra appropriate for direct comparison with COS-B and GRO data. Models are given for the Crab, Vela, and other potentially detectable pulsars; general agreement with existing data is good, although perturbations to the simplified models are needed for close matches. The calculations were extended to the millisecond pulsar range, which allows the production of predictions for the flux and spectra of populations of recycled pulsars and search strategies are pointed out.

  8. The Chase to Capture Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most powerful explosions in the universe, thought to be the birth cries of black holes. It has taken 40 years of international cooperation and competition to begin to unravel the mystery of their origin. The most recent chapter in this field is being written by the SWIFT mission, a fast-response satellite with 3 power telescopes. An international team from countries all over the world participates in the chase to capture the fading light of bursts detected by SWIFT. This talk will discuss the challenges and excitement of building this space observatory. New results will be presented on our growing understanding of exploding stars and fiery mergers of orbiting stars.

  9. Gamma ray bursts observed with WATCH‐EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    The WATCH wide field x‐ray monitor has the capability of independently locating bright Gamma Ray Bursts to 1° accuracy. We report the preliminary positions of 12 Gamma Ray Bursts observed with the WATCH monitor flown on the ES spacecraft EURECA during its 11 month mission. Also the recurrence...

  10. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, Ramj; Keppens, R.

    2011-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on

  11. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on

  12. Wolf-Rayet stars as gamma-ray burst progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langer, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829498; van Marle, A. -J; Yoon, S.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/266576753

    2010-01-01

    It became clear in the last few years that long gamma-ray bursts are associated with the endpoints of massive star evolution. They occur in star forming regions at cosmological distances (Jakobsson et al., 2005), and are associated with supernova-type energies. The collapsar model explains gamma-ray

  13. Supernova sheds light on gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 29 March the HETE-II satellite detected the most violent explosion in the universe to date - an enormous burst of gamma rays. Observers across the world recorded and studied the event. It appears to prove that gamma ray bursts originate in supernovae (1 page)

  14. The First Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ackermann, M.; et al., [Unknown; van der Horst, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (gsim 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected

  15. Determination of intergalactic magnetic fields from gamma ray data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essey, W.; Ando, S.; Kusenko, A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a measurement of intergalactic magnetic fields using combined data from Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes and Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, based on the spectral data alone. If blazars are assumed to produce both gamma rays and cosmic rays, the observed spectra are not sensitive to the

  16. Gammapy: Python toolbox for gamma-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deil, Christoph; Donath, Axel; Owen, Ellis; Terrier, Regis; Bühler, Rolf; Armstrong, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Gammapy analyzes gamma-ray data and creates sky images, spectra and lightcurves, from event lists and instrument response information; it can also determine the position, morphology and spectra of gamma-ray sources. It is used to analyze data from H.E.S.S., Fermi-LAT, and the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA).

  17. A simple empirical redshift indicator for gamma-ray bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Atteia, J-L

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new empirical redshift indicator for gamma-ray bursts. This indicator is easily computed from the gamma-ray burst spectral parameters, and its duration, and it provides ``pseudo-redshifts'' accurate to a factor two. Possible applications of this redshift indicator are briefly discussed.

  18. Effectiveness of gamma ray irradiation and ethyl methane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experiment was conducted to study the effect of gamma-ray irradiation on the high concentration thidiazuron (TDZ) produced buds. In vitro buds were irradiated with different gamma-ray doses. Akihime cultivar ('Akihime') was irradiated with the doses of 0, 30, 80, 130, 180, and 230 Gy while 'DNKW001 accession' ...

  19. In-flight observation of long duration gamma-ray glows by aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochkin, Pavlo; (Lex) van Deursen, A. P. J.; de Boer, Alte; Bardet, Michiel; Allasia, Cedric; Boissin, Jean Francois; Ostgaard, Nikolai

    2017-04-01

    The Gamma-Ray Glow is a long-lasting (several seconds to minutes) X- and gamma radiation presumably originated from high-electric field of thunderclouds. Such glows were previously observed by aircraft, balloons, and from the ground. When detected on ground with other particles, i.e. electrons and neutrons, they are usually called Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs). Their measured spectra are often consistent with Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA) mechanism. That is why RREA is a commonly accepted explanation for their existence. The gamma-ray glows are observed to be interrupted by lightning discharge, which terminates the high-electric field region. In January 2016 an Airbus A340 factory test aircraft was performing intentional flights through thunderstorms over Northern Australia. The aircraft was equipped with a dedicated in-flight lightning detection system called ILDAS (http://ildas.nlr.nl). The system also contained two scintillation detectors each with 38x38 mm cylinder LaBr3 crystals. While being at 12 km altitude the system detected a gamma-ray flux enhancement 30 times the background counts. It lasted for 20 seconds and was abruptly terminated by a lightning flash. The flash hit the aircraft and its parameters were recorded with 10 ns sampling time including gamma radiation. Ground-based lightning detection network WWLLN detected 4 strikes in the nearby region, all in association with the same flash. The ILDAS system recorded the time-resolved spectrum of the glow. In 6 minutes, after making a U-turn, the aircraft passed the same glow region. Smaller gamma-ray enhancement was again detected. In this presentation we will show the mapped event timeline including airplane, gamma-ray glow, WWLLN, and cloud data. We will discuss the glow's properties, i.e. intensity and differential spectrum, and its possible origin. This result will also be compared to previously reported observations.

  20. Determination of the optimal positions for installing gamma ray detection systems at Tehran Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayyah, A. [Department of Radiation Application, Shahid Beheshti University (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahmani, F., E-mail: FRahamni@kntu.ac.in [K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Department of Physics (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalafi, H. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI) (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-01

    Dosimetric instruments must constantly monitor radiation dose levels in different areas of nuclear reactor. Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) has seven beam tubes for different research purposes. All the beam tubes extend from the reactor core to Beam Port Floor (BPF) of the reactor facility. During the reactor operation, the gamma rays exiting from each beam tube outlet produce a specific gamma dose rate field in the space of the BPF. To effectively monitor the gamma dose rates on the BPF, gamma ray detection systems must be installed in optimal positions. The selection of optimal positions is a compromise between two requirements. First, the installation positions must possess largest gamma dose rates and second, gamma ray detectors must not be saturated in these positions. In this study, calculations and experimental measurements have been carried out to identify the optimal positions of the gamma ray detection systems. Eight three dimensional models of the reactor core and related facilities corresponding to eight scenarios have been simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code to calculate the gamma dose equivalent rate field in the space of the BPF. These facilities are beam tubes, thermal column, pool, BPF space filled with air, facilities such as neutron radiography facility, neutron powder diffraction facility embedded in the beam tubes as well as biological shields inserted into the unused beam tubes. According to the analysis results of the combined gamma dose rate field, three positions on the north side and two positions on the south side of the BPF have been recognized as optimal positions for installing the gamma ray detection systems. To ensure the consistency of the simulation data, experimental measurements were conducted using TLDs (600 and 700) pairs during the reactor operation at 4.5 MW.

  1. Gamma-ray Explosion in Multiple Compton Scattering Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Z; Shou, Y R; Qiao, B; Bulanov, S V; Esirkepov, T Zh; Bulanov, S S; Chen, C E; He, X T; Yan, X Q

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray explosion from near critical density (NCD) target irradiated by four symmetrical imploding laser pulses is numerically investigated. With peak intensities about $10^{23}$ W/cm$^2$, the laser pulses boost electron energy through direct laser acceleration, while pushing them inward with the ponderomotive force. After backscattering with counter-propagating laser, the accelerated electron will be trapped in the optical lattice or the electromagnetic standing waves (SW) created by the coherent overlapping of the laser pulses, and meanwhile emit gamma-ray photon in Multiple Compton Scattering regime, where electron acts as a medium to transfer energy from laser to gamma-ray. The energy conversion rate from laser pulses to gamma-ray can be as high as around 50\\%. It may become one of the most efficient gamma-ray sources in laboratory.

  2. Polarization measurements of gamma ray bursts and axion like particles

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, André

    2008-01-01

    A polarized gamma ray emission spread over a sufficiently wide energy band from a strongly magnetized astrophysical object like gamma ray bursts (GRBs) offers an opportunity to test the hypothesis of axion like particles (ALPs). Based on evidences of polarized gamma ray emission detected in several gamma ray bursts we estimated the level of ALPs induced dichroism, which could take place in the magnetized fireball environment of a GRB. This allows to estimate the sensitivity of polarization measurements of GRBs to the ALP-photon coupling. This sensitivity $\\gag\\le 2.2\\cdot 10^{-11} {\\rm GeV^{-1}}$ calculated for the ALP mass $m_a=10^{-3}~{\\rm eV}$ and MeV energy spread of gamma ray emission is competitive with the sensitivity of CAST and becomes even stronger for lower ALPs masses.

  3. Precision measurement of radioactivity in gamma-rays spectrometry using two HPGe detectors (BEGe-6530 and GC0818-7600SL models comparison techniques: Application to the soil measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guembou Shouop Cebastien Joel

    2017-01-01

    • Proved that the activity concentration determination in gamma spectrometry depended on the energy range emitted by a radionuclide. This study showed that the standard deviation measurement was less important to the result realized with BEGe-6530 HPGe model. Our findings were demonstrated that the results of the Broad Energy Germanium detector were more reliable.

  4. A Detailed Observational Analysis of V1324 Sco, the Most Gamma-Ray-luminous Classical Nova to Date

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finzell, Thomas; Chomiuk, Laura; Metzger, Brian D.; Walter, Frederick M.; Linford, Justin D.; Mukai, Koji; Nelson, Thomas; Weston, Jennifer H. S.; Zheng, Yong; Sokoloski, Jennifer L.; Mioduszewski, Amy; Rupen, Michael P.; Dong, Subo; Starrfield, Sumner; Cheung, C. C.; Woodward, Charles E.; Taylor, Gregory B.; Bohlsen, Terry; Buil, Christian; Prieto, Jose; Wagner, R. Mark; Bensby, Thomas; Bond, I. A.; Sumi, T.; Bennett, D. P.; Abe, F.; Koshimoto, N.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Christie, Grant W.; Natusch, Tim; McCormick, Jennie; Yee, Jennifer; Gould, Andy

    2018-01-01

    It has recently been discovered that some, if not all, classical novae emit GeV gamma-rays during outburst, but the mechanisms involved in the production ofgamma-rays are still not well understood. We present here a comprehensive multiwavelength data set—from radio to X-rays—for the most gamma-ray-luminous classical nova to date, V1324 Sco. Using this data set, we show that V1324 Sco is a canonical dusty Fe II-type nova, with a maximum ejecta velocity of 2600 km s‑1 and an ejecta mass of a few × {10}-5 {M}ȯ . There is also evidence for complex shock interactions, including a double-peaked radio light curve which shows high brightness temperatures at early times. To explore why V1324 Sco was so gamma-ray luminous, we present a model of the nova ejecta featuring strong internal shocks and find that higher gamma-ray luminosities result from higher ejecta velocities and/or mass-loss rates. Comparison of V1324 Sco with other gamma-ray-detected novae does not show clear signatures of either, and we conclude that a larger sample of similarly well-observed novae is needed to understand the origin and variation of gamma-rays in novae.

  5. Development of a Telescope for Medium-Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunter, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Since the launch of AGILE and FERMI, the scientific progress in high-energy (Eg greater than approximately 200 MeV) gamma-ray science has been, and will continue to be dramatic. Both of these telescopes cover a broad energy range from approximately 20 MeV to greater than 10 GeV. However, neither instrument is optimized for observations below approximately 200 MeV where many astrophysical objects exhibit unique, transitory behavior, such as spectral breaks, bursts, and flares. Hence, while significant progress from current observations is expected, there will nonetheless remain a significant sensitivity gap in the medium-energy (approximately 0.1-200 MeV) regime; the lower end of this range remains largely unexplored whereas the upper end will allow comparison with FERMI data. Tapping into this unexplored regime requires significant improvements in sensitivity. A major emphasis of modern detector development, with the goal of providing significant improvements in sensitivity in the medium-energy regime, focuses on high-resolution electron tracking. The Three-Dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) technology being developed at GSFC provides high resolution tracking of the electron-positron pair from gamma-ray interactions from 5 to 200 MeV. The 3-DTI consists of a time projection chamber (TPC) and 2-D cross-strip microwell detector (MWD). The low-density and homogeneous design of the 3-DTI, offers unprecedented sensitivity by providing angular resolution near the kinematic limit. Electron tracking also enables measurement of gamma-ray polarization, a new tool to study astrophysical phenomenon. We describe the design, fabrication, and performance of a 30x30x30 cm3 3-DTI detector prototype of a medium-energy gamma-ray telescope.

  6. Range verification of passively scattered proton beams using prompt gamma-ray detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verburg, Joost M; Testa, Mauro; Seco, Joao

    2015-02-07

    We performed an experimental study to verify the range of passively scattered proton beams by detecting prompt gamma-rays emitted from proton-nuclear interactions. A method is proposed using a single scintillation detector positioned near the distal end of the irradiated target. Lead shielding was used to attenuate gamma-rays emitted along most of the entrance path of the beam. By synchronizing the prompt gamma-ray detector to the rotation of the range modulation wheel, the relation between the gamma emission from the distal part of the target and the range of the incident proton beam was determined. In experiments with a water phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom, this relation was found to be sensitive to range shifts that were introduced. The wide opening angle of the detector enabled a sufficient signal-to-background ratio to be achieved in the presence of neutron-induced background from the scattering and collimating devices. Uniform range shifts were detected with a standard deviation of 0.1 mm to 0.2 mm at a dose level of 30 cGy to 50 cGy (RBE). The detectable magnitude of a range shift limited to a part of the treatment field area was approximately proportional to the ratio between the field area and the area affected by the range shift. We conclude that it is feasible to detect changes in the range of passively scattered proton beams using a relatively simple prompt gamma-ray detection system. The method can be employed for in vivo verification of the consistency of the delivered range in fractionated treatments.

  7. Gamma astronomy above 30 GeV. A new method for identifying cosmic gamma rays from the ground based detector Celeste; Astronomie gamma au-dessus de 30 GeV. Une nouvelle methode d'identification des rayons gamma cosmiques a partir du sol avec le detecteur CELESTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manseri, H

    2004-03-15

    Celeste is an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope based on the reconversion of the Themis solar facility, located in the Eastern Pyrenees. The mirrors, named heliostats, recover the Cherenkov light emitted by the electromagnetic shower created by gamma-rays in the atmosphere. The Celeste experiment was designed during the 90's to cover the 30-300 GeV energy range and to fill the gap between satellites and imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. In 2000, we attained our goal with the detection of the Crab Nebula and those of the active galactic nucleus Markarian 421. This thesis presents the work accomplished since then to improve the sensitivity of our instrument by studying the detector and by developing a new analysis. Despite the very bad weather conditions, a new detection of the Crab Nebula is presented here which validates the principle of the new analysis. This manuscript ends with the study of the data sample taken on two Active Galactic Nuclei, the blazars Markarian 421 and 1ES1426+428. (author)

  8. Characterization of uranium bearing material using x-ray fluorescence and direct gamma-rays measurement techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujaini, M., E-mail: madihah@uniten.edu.my; Chankow, N. [Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University Phyathai Rd., Wang Mai, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Yusoff, M. Z.; Hamid, N. A. [College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Uranium ore can be easily detected due to various gamma-ray energies emitted from uranium daughters particularly from {sup 238}U daughters such as {sup 214}Bi, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 226}Ra. After uranium is extracted from uranium ore, only low energy gamma-rays emitted from {sup 235}U may be detected if the detector is placed in close contact to the specimen. In this research, identification and characterization of uranium bearing materials is experimentally investigated using direct measurement of gamma-rays from {sup 235}U in combination with the x-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique. Measurement of gamma-rays can be conducted by using high purity germanium (HPGe) detector or cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector while a {sup 57}Coradioisotope-excited XRF spectrometer using CdTe detector is used for elemental analysis. The proposed technique was tested with various uranium bearing specimens containing natural, depleted and enriched uranium in both metallic and powder forms.

  9. Gamma-ray astronomy: From Fermi up to the HAWC high-energy {gamma}-ray observatory in Sierra Negra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carraminana, Alberto [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica Luis Enrique Erro 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72840 (Mexico); Collaboration: HAWC Collaboration

    2013-06-12

    Gamma-rays represent the most energetic electromagnetic window for the study of the Universe. They are studied both from space at MeV and GeV energies, with instruments like the Fermi{gamma}-ray Space Telescope, and at TeV energies with ground based instruments profiting of particle cascades in the atmosphere and of the Cerenkov radiation of charged particles in the air or in water. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory represented the first instrument to successfully implement the water Cerenkov technique for {gamma}-ray astronomy, opening the ground for the more sensitive HAWC {gamma}-ray observatory, currently under development in the Sierra Negra site and already providing early science results.

  10. A novel comprehensive utilization of vanadium slag: As gamma ray shielding material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Mengge [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liaoning Key Laboratory of Metallurgical Resources Recycling Science, Shenyang 110004 (China); Xue, Xiangxin, E-mail: xuexx@mail.neu.edu.cn [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liaoning Key Laboratory of Metallurgical Resources Recycling Science, Shenyang 110004 (China); Yang, He; Liu, Dong [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liaoning Key Laboratory of Metallurgical Resources Recycling Science, Shenyang 110004 (China); Wang, Chao [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Zhefu [Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A novel comprehensive utilization method for vanadium slag is proposed. • Shielding properties of vanadium slag are better than ordinary concrete. • HVL of vanadium slag is between Lead and concrete to shield {sup 60}Co gamma ray. • HVL of composite is higher than concrete when adding amount of vanadium slag is 900. • Composite can be used as injecting mortar for cracks developed in concrete shields. - Abstract: New exploration of vanadium slag as gamma ray shielding material was proposed, the shielding properties of vanadium slag was higher than concrete when the energy of photons was in 0.0001 MeV–100000 MeV. Vanadium slag/epoxy resin composites were prepared, shielding and material properties of materials were tested by {sup 60}Co gamma ray, simultaneous DSC-TGA, electronic universal testing machine and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results showed that the shielding properties of composite would be better with the increase of vanadium slag addition amount. The HVL (half value layer thickness) of vanadium slag was between Lead and concrete while composite was higher than concrete when the addition amount of vanadium slag was 900 used as material to shield {sup 60}Co gamma ray, also the resistance temperature of composite was about 215 °C and the bending strength was over 10 MPa. The composites could be used as injecting mortar for cracks developed in biological concrete shields, coating for the floor of the nuclear facilities, and shielding materials by itself.

  11. Gamma ray astronomy above 30 TeV and the IceCube results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernetto Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the diffuse Galactic gamma ray emission is of fundamental importance to understand the properties of cosmic ray propagation in the Milky Way, and extending the measurements to E ≳ 30 TeV is of great interest. In the same energy range the IceCube detector has also recently observed a flux of astrophysical neutrinos, and it is important to test experimentally if the neutrino production is accompanied by a comparable emission of high energy photons. For E ≳ 30 TeV, the absorption effects due to e+e− pair production when the high energy photons interact with radiation fields present in space are not negligible and must be taken into account. Gamma rays, in good approximation, are completely absorbed if they have an extragalactic origin, but the absorption is significant also for Galactic photons. In this case the size and angular dependence of the absorption depends on the space distribution of the emission. In this work we estimate the absorption for different models of the space distribution of the gamma ray emission, and discuss the potential of future detectors.

  12. The AGILE silicon tracker An innovative gamma-ray instrument for space

    CERN Document Server

    Prest, M; Bordignon, G; Fedel, G; Liello, F; Longo, F; Pontoni, C; Vallazza, E

    2003-01-01

    AGILE (Light Imager for Gamma-ray Astrophysics) is the first small scientific mission of ASI, the Italian Space Agency. It is a light (100 kg for the scientific instrument) satellite for the detection of gamma-ray sources in the energy range 30 MeV-50 GeV within a large field of view (14 of the sky). It is planned to be operational in the years 2003-2006, a period in which no other gamma-ray mission in the same energy range is foreseen. AGILE is made of a silicon tungsten tracker, a CsI(Tl) minicalorimeter (1.5X//0), an anticoincidence system of segmented plastic scintillators and a X-ray imaging detector sensitive in the 10-40 keV range. The tracker consists of 14 planes, each of them made of two layers of 16 single-sided, AC coupled, 410 mum thick, 9.5 multiplied by 9.5 cm**2 silicon detectors with a readout pitch of 242 mum and a floating strip. The readout ASIC is the TAA1, an analog-digital, low noise, self-triggering ASIC used in a very low power configuration ( less than 400 muW/channel) with full anal...

  13. Optimizing a three-stage Compton camera for measuring prompt gamma rays emitted during proton radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, S W; Robertson, D; Polf, J

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the use of a three-stage Compton camera to measure secondary prompt gamma rays emitted from patients treated with proton beam radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was (1) to develop an optimal three-stage Compton camera specifically designed to measure prompt gamma rays emitted from tissue and (2) to determine the feasibility of using this optimized Compton camera design to measure and image prompt gamma rays emitted during proton beam irradiation. The three-stage Compton camera was modeled in Geant4 as three high-purity germanium detector stages arranged in parallel-plane geometry. Initially, an isotropic gamma source ranging from 0 to 15 MeV was used to determine lateral width and thickness of the detector stages that provided the optimal detection efficiency. Then, the gamma source was replaced by a proton beam irradiating a tissue phantom to calculate the overall efficiency of the optimized camera for detecting emitted prompt gammas. The overall calculated efficiencies varied from ~10−6 to 10−3 prompt gammas detected per proton incident on the tissue phantom for several variations of the optimal camera design studied. Based on the overall efficiency results, we believe it feasible that a three-stage Compton camera could detect a sufficient number of prompt gammas to allow measurement and imaging of prompt gamma emission during proton radiotherapy. PMID:21048295

  14. Low energy secondary cosmic ray flux (gamma rays) monitoring and its constrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghav, Anil; Bhaskar, Ankush; Yadav, Virendra; Bijewar, Nitinkumar

    2015-02-01

    Temporal variation of secondary cosmic rays (SCR) flux was measured during the full and new moon and days close to them at Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Mumbai (Geomagnetic latitude: 10.6 °N), India. The measurements were done by using NaI (Tl) scintillation detector with energy threshold of 200 keV. The SCR flux showed sudden enhancement for approximately about 2 hour during few days out of all observations. The maximum enhancement in SCR flux is about 200 % as compared to the diurnal trend of SCR temporal variations. Weather parameters (temperature and relative humidity) were continuously monitored during all observations. The influences of geomagnetic field, interplanetary parameters and tidal effect on SCR flux have been considered. Summed spectra corresponding to enhancement duration indicates appearance of atmospheric radioactivity which shows single gamma ray line. Detail investigation revealed the presence of radioactive Ar41. Present study indicates origin of Ar41 could be due to anthropogenic source or due to gravitational tidal forces. This measurements point out limitations on low energy SCR flux monitoring. This study will help many researchers in measurements of SCR flux during eclipses and to find unknown mechanism behind decrease/increase in SCR flux during solar/lunar eclipse.

  15. Parsec-scale jet properties of the gamma-ray quasar 3C 286

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, T.; Lao, B.-Q.; Zhao, W.; Mohan, P.; Cheng, X.-P.; Cui, Y.-Z.; Zhang, Z.-L.

    2017-04-01

    The quasar 3C 286 is one of two compact steep-spectrum sources detected by the Fermi/Large Area Telescope. Here, we investigate the radio properties of the parsec(pc)-scale jet and its (possible) association with the gamma-ray emission in 3C 286. The Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) images at various frequencies reveal a one-sided core-jet structure extending to the south-west at a projected distance of ˜1 kpc. The component at the jet base showing an inverted spectrum is identified as the core, with a mean brightness temperature of 2.8 × 109 K. The jet bends at about 600 pc (in projection) away from the core, from a position angle of -135° to -115°. Based on the available VLBI data, we inferred the proper-motion speed of the inner jet as 0.013 ± 0.011 mas yr-1 (βapp = 0.6 ± 0.5), corresponding to a jet speed of about 0.5 c at an inclination angle of 48° between the jet and the line of sight of the observer. The brightness temperature, jet speed and Lorentz factor are much lower than those of gamma-ray-emitting blazars, implying that the pc-scale jet in 3C 286 is mildly relativistic. Unlike blazars in which gamma-ray emission is in general thought to originate from the beamed innermost jet, the location and mechanism of gamma-ray emission in 3C 286 may be different as indicated by the current radio data. Multiband spectrum fitting may offer a complementary diagnostic clue of the gamma-ray production mechanism in this source.

  16. Gamma-ray line measurements from supernova explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Roland

    2017-02-01

    Gamma ray lines are expected to be emitted as part of the afterglow of supernova explosions, because radioactive decay of freshly synthesised nuclei occurs. Significant radioactive gamma ray line emission is expected from 56Ni and 44Ti decay on time scales of the initial explosion (56Ni, τ ~days) and the young supernova remnant (44Ti,τ ~90 years). Less specific, and rather informative for the supernova population as a whole, are lessons from longer lived isotopes such as 26Al and 60Fe. From isotopes of elements heavier than iron group elements, any interesting gamma-ray line emission is too faint to be observable. Measurements with space-based gamma-ray telescopes have obtained interesting gamma ray line emissions from two core collapse events, Cas A and SN1987A, and one thermonuclear event, SN2014J. We discuss INTEGRAL data from all above isotopes, including all line and continuum signatures from these two objects, and the surveys for more supernovae, that have been performed by gamma ray spectrometry. Our objective here is to illustrate what can be learned from gamma-ray line emission properties about the explosions and their astrophysics.

  17. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Their Links with Supernovae and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszaros, Peter; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the Universe, whose origin and mechanism are the focus of intense interest. They appear connected to supernova remnants from massive stars or the merger of their remnants, and their brightness makes them temporarily detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the universe. After pioneering breakthroughs from space and ground experiments, their study is entering a new phase with observations from the recently launched Fermi satellite, as well as the prospect of detections or limits from large neutrino and gravitational wave detectors. The interplay between such observations and theoretical models of gamma-ray bursts is reviewed, as well as their connections to supernovae and cosmology.

  18. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mozin, Vladimir [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Campbell, Luke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hunt, Alan W. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Reedy, Edward T. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Seipel, Heather A. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Modeling capabilities were added to an existing framework and codes were adapted as needed for analyzing experiments and assessing application-specific assay concepts including simulation of measurements over many short irradiation/spectroscopy cycles. The code package was benchmarked against the data collected at the IAC for small targets and assembly-scale data collected at LANL. A study of delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy for nuclear safeguards was performed for a variety of assemblies in the extensive NGSI spent fuel library. The modeling results indicate that delayed gamma-ray responses can be collected from spent fuel assemblies with statistical quality sufficient for analyzing their isotopic composition using a 1011 n/s neutron generator and COTS detector instrumentation.

  19. First observation of low-energy {\\gamma}-ray enhancement in the rare-earth region

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, A; Larsen, A C; Beausang, C W; Humby, P; Burke, J T; Casperson, R J; Hughes, R O; Ross, T J; Allmond, J M; Chyzh, R; Dag, M; Koglin, J; McCleskey, E; McCleskey, M; Ota, S; Saastamoinen, A

    2016-01-01

    The {\\gamma}-ray strength function and level density in the quasi-continuum of 151,153Sm have been measured using BGO shielded Ge clover detectors of the STARLiTeR system. The Compton shields allow for an extraction of the {\\gamma} strength down to unprecedentedly low {\\gamma} energies of about 500 keV. For the first time an enhanced low- energy {\\gamma}-ray strength has been observed in the rare-earth region. In addition, for the first time both the upbend and the well known scissors resonance have been observed simultaneously for the same nucleus. Hauser-Feshbach calculations show that this strength enhancement at low {\\gamma} energies could have an impact of 2-3 orders of magnitude on the (n,{\\gamma}) reaction rates for the r-process nucleosynthesis.

  20. Locating very high energy gamma-ray sources with arcminute accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerlof, C. W.; Cawley, M. F.; Chantell, M.; Harris, K.; Lawrence, M. A.; Fegan, D. J.; Lang, M. J.; Hillas, A. M.; Jennings, D. G.; Lamb, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    The angular accuracy of gamma-ray detectors is intrinsically limited by the physical processes involved in photon detection. Although a number of pointlike sources were detected by the COS B satellite, only two have been unambiguously identified by time signature with counterparts at longer wavelengths. By taking advantage of the extended longitudinal structure of VHE gamma-ray showers, measurements in the TeV energy range can pinpoint source coordinates to arcminute accuracy. This has now been demonstrated with new data analysis procedures applied to observations of the Crab Nebula using Cherenkov air shower imaging techniques. With two telescopes in coincidence, the individual event circular probable error will be 0.13 deg. The half-cone angle of the field of view is effectively 1 deg.

  1. Locating very high energy gamma ray sources with arc minute accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerlof, C. W.; Cawley, M. F.; Chantell, M.; Fegan, D. J.; Harris, K.; Hillas, A. M.; Jennings, D. G.; Lamb, R. C.; Lawrence, M. A.; Lang, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The angular accuracy of gamma-ray detectors is intrinsically limited by the physical processes involved in photon detection. Although a number of point-like sources were detected by the COS-B satellite, only two were unambiguously identified by time signature with counterparts at longer wavelengths. By taking advantage of the extended longitudinal structure of Very High Energy gamma-ray showers, measurements in the TeV energy range can pinpoint source coordinates to arc minute accuracy. This was demonstrated using Cerenkov air shower imaging techniques. With two telescopes in coincidence, the individual event circular probable error will be 0.13 deg. The half-cone angle of the field of view is effectively 1 deg.

  2. Attenuation of the gamma rays in tissues; Atenuacion de los rayos gamma en tejidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcos P, A.; Rodriguez N, S.; Pinedo S, A.; Amador V, P.; Chacon R, A.; Vega C, H.R. [Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The mass and lineal attenuation coefficient and of hepatic tissue, muscular, osseous and of brain before gamma rays of 10{sup -3} to 10{sup 5} MeV were calculated. For the case of the osseous tissue the calculation was made for the cartilage, the cortical tissue and the bone marrow. During the calculations the elementary composition of the tissues of human origin was used. The calculations include by separate the Photoelectric effect, the Compton scattering and the Pair production, as well as the total. For to establish a comparison with the attenuation capacities, the coefficients of the water, the aluminum and the lead also were calculated. The study was complemented measuring the attenuation coefficient of hepatic tissue of bovine before gamma rays of 0.662 MeV of a source of {sup 137} Cs. The measurement was made through of an experiment of photons transmission through samples frozen of hepatic tissue and with a Geiger-Mueller detector. (Author)

  3. Rapid, autonomous analysis of HPGe gamma-ray spectra III: Plutonium identification and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosnell, Thomas B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wong, James L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-02-11

    RadID is a gamma-ray spectrum analysis program originally written to assist in the detection of the illicit movement of nuclear material. It is specific to the rapid analysis of HPGe gamma-ray data to reveal the radionuclide signatures of interest that may be present in the spectra. It is an autonomous, rule-based heuristic system that can identify well over 200 radioactive sources in about one second. RadID does not require knowledge of the detector efficiency, the source-todetector distance, or the geometry of the inspected radiation source—including any shielding. In this third of a three-document series we discuss how RadID detects the presence of plutonium isotopes and determines a number of its characteristics, most notably: the spectral characteristics of weapons-grade plutonium, reactor-grade plutonium, and heat-source plutonium used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators.

  4. High energy irradiations simulating cosmic-ray-induced planetary gamma ray production. I - Fe target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, A. E.; Parker, R. H.; Yellin, J.

    1986-01-01

    Two thick Fe targets were bombarded by a series of 6 GeV proton irradiations for the purpose of simulating the cosmic ray bombardment of planetary objects in space. Gamma ray energy spectra were obtained with a germanium solid state detector during the bombardment, and 46 of the gamma ray lines were ascribed to the Fe targets. A comparison between observed and predicted values showed good agreement for Fe lines from neutron inelastic scattering and spallation reactions, and less satisfactory agreement for neutron capture reactions, the latter attributed to the difference in composition between the Fe target and the mean lunar abundance used in the modeling. Through an analysis of the irradiation results together with continuum data obtained in lunar orbit, it was found that 100 hours of measurement with a current instrument should generate a spectrum containing approximately 20 lines due to Fe alone, with a 2-sigma sensitivity for detection of about 0.2 percent.

  5. LYNX: An unattended sensor system for detection of gamma-ray and neutron emissions from special nuclear materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkle, Robert C.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Kiff, Scott D.; Sidor, Daniel E.; Morris, Scott J.; Rohrer, John S.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Pfund, David M.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Bowler, Ryan S.; Mullen, Crystal A.

    2009-01-01

    This manuscript profiles an unattended and fully autonomous radiation detection system sensitive to gamma-ray and neutron emissions. The L YNX design is intended for locations that require radiation detection capabilities for detection of special nuclear materials but lack supporting infrastructure. Signal-starved data is common in these environments since little or no control may be exerted over measurement conditions. The fundamental sensing elements of the L YNX system are traditional NaI(Tl) and 3He detectors. The new developments reported here center on two themes: low-power electronics and computationally simple analysis algorithms capable of discriminating gamma-ray signatures indicative of special nuclear materials from those of naturally occurring radioactive material. Incorporating tripwire-detection algorithms based on gamma-ray spectral signatures into a low-power electronics package significantly improves performance in environments where sensors encounter nuisance sources.

  6. LYNX: An unattended sensor system for detection of gamma-ray and neutron emissions from special nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runkle, Robert C.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Kiff, Scott D.; Sidor, Daniel E.; Morris, Scott J.; Rohrer, John S.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Pfund, David M.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Bowler, Ryan S.; Mullen, Crystal A.

    2009-01-21

    This manuscript profiles an unattended and fully autonomous detection system sensitive to gamma-ray and neutron emissions from special nuclear material. The LYNX design specifically targets applications that require radiation detection capabilities but possess little or no infrastructure. In these settings, users need the capability to deploy sensors for extended periods of time that analyze whatever signal-starved data can be captured, since little or no control may be exerted over measurement conditions. The fundamental sensing elements of the LYNX system are traditional NaI(Tl) and 3He detectors. The new developments reported here center on two themes: low-power electronics and computationally simple analysis algorithms capable of discriminating gamma-ray signatures indicative of special nuclear materials from those of naturally occurring radioactive material. Incorporating tripwire-detection algorithms based on gamma-ray spectral signatures into a low-power electronics package significantly improves performance in environments where sensors encounter nuisance sources.

  7. News from Cosmic Gamma-ray Line Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Roland

    The measurement of gamma rays at MeV energies from cosmic radioactivities is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and how they shape objects such as massive stars and supernova explosions. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this same astronomical window, and positrons are often produced from radioactive beta decays. Nuclear gamma-ray telescopes face instrumental challenges from penetrating gamma rays and cosmic-ray induced backgrounds. But the astrophysical benefits of such efforts are underlined by the discoveries of nuclear gamma rays from the brightest of the expected sources. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivity gamma rays have been measured in spectral detail, and complement conventional supernova observations with measurements of origins in deep supernova interiors, from the decay of 56Ni, 56Co, and 44Ti . The diffuse afterglow in gamma rays of radioactivity from massive-star nucleosynthesis is analysed on the large (galactic) scale, with findings important for recycling of matter between successive stellar generations: From 26Al gamma-ray line spectroscopy, interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised in their importance for ejecta transport and recycling. Diffuse galactic emissions from radioactivity and positron-annihilation γ rays should be connected to nucleosynthesis sources: Recently new light has been shed on this connection, among others though different measurements of radioactive 60Fe, and through spectroscopy of positron annihilation gamma rays from a flaring microquasar and from different parts of our Galaxy.

  8. Hybrid X-ray and {gamma}-ray spectrometer for in-situ planetary science missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, M.S. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: mss16@star.le.ac.uk; Ambrosi, R.M. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Simon, H. [Eurorad, 2, rue Ettore Bugatti, 67201 Eckbolsheim (France)

    2009-06-11

    {gamma}-Ray spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and {gamma}-ray backscatter densitometry for planetary science applications are three complementary analytical techniques that can be used to determine surface and sub-surface composition, constrain heat flow through a planetary regolith and hence understand more about the processes that formed planetary bodies. Evaluating different detector types and configurations in order to achieve these scientific objectives is a key enabling step for a successful flight instrument development programme. In this study, we evaluate and compare different detector solutions and configurations including: planar and hemispherical CdTe, a CsI(Tl) scintillator, a LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillator and a HPGe detector. The LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) detector was chosen as the most suitable detector for an in-situ planetary science mission due to its high-radiation tolerance, low mass compared with HPGe detector systems, its comparable resolution ({approx}3.4% at 662 keV) to compound semiconductors (planar CdTe {approx}2.4% at 662 keV) and high efficiency.

  9. Performance measurement of HARPO: A time projection chamber as a gamma-ray telescope and polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, P.; Amano, S.; Attié, D.; Baron, P.; Baudin, D.; Bernard, D.; Bruel, P.; Calvet, D.; Colas, P.; Daté, S.; Delbart, A.; Frotin, M.; Geerebaert, Y.; Giebels, B.; Götz, D.; Hashimoto, S.; Horan, D.; Kotaka, T.; Louzir, M.; Magniette, F.; Minamiyama, Y.; Miyamoto, S.; Ohkuma, H.; Poilleux, P.; Semeniouk, I.; Sizun, P.; Takemoto, A.; Yamaguchi, M.; Yonamine, R.; Wang, S.

    2018-01-01

    We analyse the performance of a gas time projection chamber (TPC) as a high-performance gamma-ray telescope and polarimeter in the e+e- pair-creation regime. We use data collected at a gamma-ray beam of known polarisation. The TPC provides two orthogonal projections (x, z) and (y, z) of the tracks induced by each conversion in the gas volume. We use a simple vertex finder in which vertices and pseudo-tracks exiting from them are identified. We study the various contributions to the single-photon angular resolution using Monte Carlo simulations, compare them with the experimental data and find that they are in excellent agreement. The distribution of the azimuthal angle of pair conversions shows a bias due to the non-cylindrical-symmetric structure of the detector. This bias would average out for a long duration exposure on a space mission, but for this pencil-beam characterisation we have ensured its accurate simulation by a double systematics-control scheme, data taking with the detector rotated at several angles with respect to the beam polarisation direction and systematics control with a non-polarised beam. We measure, for the first time, the polarisation asymmetry of a linearly polarised gamma-ray beam in the low energy pair-creation regime. This sub-GeV energy range is critical for cosmic sources as their spectra are power laws which fall quickly as a function of increasing energy. This work could pave the way to extending polarised gamma-ray astronomy beyond the MeV energy regime.

  10. A second-generation low-background gamma-ray spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Richard M

    2017-08-01

    For the ultimate sensitivity in trace radiochemical analysis, the radiation detector must have high efficiency and low background. A low-background gamma-ray spectrometer in regular use at NIST for over twenty years is being supplemented by a new system, improved in several ways. The new detector is much larger, a shield of iron reduces cosmic neutron background compared with lead, large plastic scintillators reduce the muon continuum background, and a digital data acquisition system gives new opportunities for optimization. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Early Time Optical Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopac, D.; Gomboc, A.; Japelj, J.

    We present the study of a sample of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) with contemporaneous early time optical and gamma-ray detections. By performing detailed temporal and spectral analysis of 18 GRBs which show optical peaks during prompt gamma-ray emission, we find that in most cases early time optical emission shows sharp and steep behavior, with a rich diversity of GRBs' broadband spectral properties. These observational results, supported by a simple internal shock dissipation model, show that the standard external shock interpretation for early time optical emission is disfavored in most cases where early time optical peaks are sharp (Delta t/t robotic optical telescopes.

  12. Energy sources in gamma-ray burst models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taam, Ronald E.

    1987-01-01

    The current status of energy sources in models of gamma-ray bursts is examined. Special emphasis is placed on the thermonuclear flash model which has been the most developed model to date. Although there is no generally accepted model, if the site for the gamma-ray burst is on a strongly magnetized neutron star, the thermonuclear model can qualitatively explain the energetics of some, but probably not all burst events. The critical issues that may differentiate between the possible sources of energy for gamma-ray bursts are listed and briefly discussed.

  13. Constraints on emission regions of gamma-ray pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. G.; Qiao, G. J.; Lee, K. J.; Xu, R. X.; Liu, Y.

    A geometric method is developed to constrain the 3-D structure of emission regions of pulsars In terms of retarded magnetic dipolar field and with inclusion of aberration and retardation effects the method is endeavored to constrain the geometrical parameters of emission regions via reproducing some multi-wavelength features e g pulse widths phase offsets between different pulses and polarization properties It is applied to six known gamma-ray pulsars with radio profiles and gamma-ray light curves The constrained results of radio and gamma-ray emission regions of these pulsars are reported

  14. Exploration of Galactic {\\gamma}-Ray Supernova Remnants

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Wenwu; Zhang, Jianli

    2013-01-01

    New generational very-high-energy telescope arrays have been detecting more than 120 TeV {\\gamma}-ray sources. Multi-wavelength observations on these Gamma-ray sources have proven to be robust in shedding light on their nature. The coming radio telescope arrays like ASKAP and FAST may find more faint (extended) radio sources due to their better sensitivities and resolutions, might identify more previously un-identified {\\gamma}-ray sources and set many new targets for future deep surveys by v...

  15. The Lunar Prospector Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, W. C.; Binder, A. B.; Hubbard, G. S.; McMurry, R. E., Jr.; Miller, M. C.; Prettyman, T. H.

    1996-03-01

    The third mission in the NASA Discovery series is Lunar Prospector. It is scheduled for launch on 9 October, 1997 into a circular, 100 km altitude lunar polar orbit. The nominal mission lifetime is one year. One of the five components of its experimental payload is a gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS), whose primary scientific objective is to provide global maps of the lunar elemental composition to depths of 20 cm. Scientifically discriminating results are expected for Fe, Ti, U, Th, K, Si, O, and perhaps Al, Ca, and Mg. In combination with a separate neutron spectrometer, also included on Lunar Prospector, a secondary objective of GRS is to search for, and determine the abundance of water ice to depths of 50 cm within permanently shaded craters at the lunar poles. Both experiments will also be used to search for, and determine the abundance of hydrogen implanted by the solar wind into lunar regolith to depths of 50 cm, thereby providing maps of regolith maturity. All Lunar Prospector experiments will be mounted at the ends of three, 1.9-m long booms that define the spin-plane of the satellite. The Lunar Prospector spin axis will be perpendicular to the lunar orbital plane and be flipped by 180deg half way through the mission.

  16. Gamma-ray blazars: The view from AGILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ammando, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Chen, A. W.; Donnarumma, I.; Giuliani, A.; Longo, F.; Pacciani, L.; Pucella, G.; Striani, E.; Tavani, M.; Vercellone, S.; Vittorini, V.; Covino, S.; Krimm, H. A.; Raiteri, C. M.; Romano, P.; Villata, M.

    2011-07-01

    During the first 3 years of operation the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector onboard the AGILE satellite detected several blazars in a high γ-ray activity: 3C 279, 3C 454.3, PKS 1510-089, S5 0716+714, 3C 273, W Comae, Mrk 421, PKS 0537-441 and 4C +21.35. Thanks to the rapid dissemination of our alerts, we were able to obtain multiwavelength data from other observatories such as Spitzer, Swift, RXTE, Suzaku, INTEGRAL, MAGIC, VERITAS, and ARGO as well as radio-to-optical coverage by means of the GASP Project of the WEBT and the REM Telescope. This large multifrequency coverage gave us the opportunity to study the variability correlations between the emission at different frequencies and to obtain simultaneous Spectral Energy Distributions of these sources from radio to γ-ray energy bands, investigating the different mechanisms responsible for their emission and uncovering in some cases a more complex behavior with respect to the standard models. We present a review of the most interesting AGILE results on these γ-ray blazars and their multifrequency data.

  17. The gamma-ray sky as seen with HAWC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüntemeyer, Petra

    2015-12-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) TeV Gamma-Ray Observatory located at a site about two hours drive east of Puebla, Mexico on the Sierra Negra plateau (4100 m a.s.l.) was inaugurated in March 2015. The array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors can observe large portions of the sky simultaneously and, with an energy range of 100 GeV to 100 TeV, is currently one of the most sensitive instruments capable of probing particle acceleration near PeV energies. HAWC has already started science operation in the Summer of 2013 and preliminary sky maps have been produced from 260 days of data taken with a partial array. Multiple > 5 σ (pre-trials) hotspots are visible along the galactic plane and some appear to coincide with known TeV sources from the H.E.S.S. catalog, SNRs and molecular cloud associations, and pulsars wind nebulae (PWNe). The sky maps based on partial HAWC array data are discussed as well as the scientific potential of the completed instrument especially in the context of multi-wavelengths studies.

  18. The gamma-ray sky as seen with HAWC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüntemeyer Petra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC TeV Gamma-Ray Observatory located at a site about two hours drive east of Puebla, Mexico on the Sierra Negra plateau (4100 m a.s.l. was inaugurated in March 2015. The array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors can observe large portions of the sky simultaneously and, with an energy range of 100 GeV to 100 TeV, is currently one of the most sensitive instruments capable of probing particle acceleration near PeV energies. HAWC has already started science operation in the Summer of 2013 and preliminary sky maps have been produced from 260 days of data taken with a partial array. Multiple > 5 σ (pre-trials hotspots are visible along the galactic plane and some appear to coincide with known TeV sources from the H.E.S.S. catalog, SNRs and molecular cloud associations, and pulsars wind nebulae (PWNe. The sky maps based on partial HAWC array data are discussed as well as the scientific potential of the completed instrument especially in the context of multi-wavelengths studies.

  19. ESA presents INTEGRAL, its space observatory for Gamma-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    more strange than the energetic radiation coming from the centre of distant galaxies are flashes of extremely powerful radiation that suddenly appear somewhere on the gamma-sky and disappear again after a short time. These gamma-bursts seem to be the biggest observed explosions in the Universe. But nobody knows their source. Integral will help to solve this long-standing mystery. ESA, the pioneer in gamma-ray astronomy The satellite as it can now be seen at ESA's test centre is five meters high and weighs more than four tonnes. Two main instruments observe the gamma-rays. An imager will give the sharpest gamma-ray images. It is provided by a consortium led by an Italian scientist. Gamma-rays ignore lenses and mirror, so INTEGRAL makes its images with so-called coded-masks. A coded-mask telescope is basically a pinhole camera, but with a larger aperture, i.e. many pinholes. A spectrometer will gauge gamma-ray energies extremely precisely. It is developed by a team of scientists under joint French-German leadership and will be a 100 times more sensitive than the previous high spectral resolution space instrument. It is made of a high-purity Germanium detector that has to be cooled down to minus 188 degree Celsius. These two gamma-ray-instruments are supported by two monitor instruments that play a crucial role in the detection and identification of the gamma-ray sources. An X-ray monitor developed in Denmark will observe X-rays, still powerful but less energetic than gamma-rays. An optical telescope provided by Spain will observe the visible light emitted by the energetic objects. Switzerland will host the Integral Science Data Centre which will preprocess and distribute the scientific data. The mission is conceived as an observatory led by ESA with Russia contributing the launcher and NASA providing tracking support with its Deep Space Network. Alenia Aerospazio in Turin, Italy is ESA's prime contractor for building INTEGRAL. Launch by a Russian Proton rocket from

  20. Gamma-ray imaging and holdup assays of 235-F PuFF cells 1 & 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aucott, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-12-20

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Nuclear Measurements (L4120) was tasked with performing enhanced characterization of the holdup in the PuFF shielded cells. Assays were performed in accordance with L16.1-ADS-2460 using two high-resolution gamma-ray detectors. The first detector, an In Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS)-characterized detector, was used in conjunction with the ISOCS Geometry Composer software to quantify grams of holdup. The second detector, a Germanium Gamma-ray Imager (GeGI), was used to visualize the location and relative intensity of the holdup in the cells. Carts and collimators were specially designed to perform optimum assays of the cells. Thick, pencil-beam tungsten collimators were fabricated to allow for extremely precise targeting of items of interest inside the cells. Carts were designed with a wide range of motion to position and align the detectors. A total of 24 measurements were made, each typically 24 hours or longer to provide sufficient statistical precision. This report presents the results of the enhanced characterization for cells 1 and 2. The measured gram values agree very well with results from the 2014 study. In addition, images were created using both the 2014 data and the new GeGI data. The GeGI images of the cells walls reveal significant Pu-238 holdup on the surface of the walls in cells 1 and 2. Additionally, holdup is visible in the two pass-throughs from cell 1 to the wing cabinets. This report documents the final element (exterior measurements coupled with gamma-ray imaging and modeling) of the enhanced characterization of cells 1-5 (East Cell Line).

  1. Synchrotron cooling in energetic gamma-ray bursts observed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Hoi Fung; Greiner, Jochen; van Eerten, Hendrik; Burgess, J. Michael; P. Narayana Bhat; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Diehl, Roland; Goldstein, Adam; Gruber, David; Jenke, Peter A.; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Paciesas, William S.; Pelassa, Veronique

    2015-01-01

    Context. We study the time-resolved spectral properties of energetic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with good high-energy photon statistics observed by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Aims. We aim to constrain in detail the spectral properties of GRB prompt emission on a time-resolved basis and to discuss the theoretical implications of the fitting results in the context of various prompt emission models. Methods. Our sample comprises eight GRBs observe...

  2. A New View of the High Energy Gamma-Ray Sky with the Ferrni Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have opened a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including pulsars, black holes and active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants and the origin of cosmic rays, and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as super symmetric dark matter annihilations. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from the first year of observations.

  3. PREFACE: International Workshop on Beamed and Unbeamed Gamma-Rays from Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert; Maraschi, Laura; Sillanpää, Aimo

    2012-03-01

    Both the number and types of extragalactic very high-energy gamma-ray emitters have pleasingly increased substantially during the last few years, due to the extremely successful Fermi mission and the achievements of ground-based gamma-ray detectors since 2003. The international scientific workshop 'Beamed and Unbeamed Gamma-rays from Galaxies' took place from 11-15 April 2011 at the Lapland Hotel Olos, Muonio, Finland, with the aim of reviewing and discussing current knowledge and understanding of gamma-ray emission, both from active and other types of galaxies (e.g. starburst galaxies), particularly in the light of results delivered recently from high-energy and very-high energy gamma-ray instruments and by multi-wavelength studies. Following the 2008 Workshop on AGN and Related Fundamental Physics in High-Energy Gamma Astronomy, this workshop consisted of invited review talks and contributed talks. 'Round table' discussions enabled the exchange of facts and ideas. Ample time was provided for discussions not only inside, but also outside the lecture theatre. As for the 2008 workshop, Lapland was chosen for the meeting as an extraordinary location which provided more than just beautiful winter scenery. The 'isolated location' led to an intimate but also open and informal atmosphere for discussions. This, together with the broad approach of the workshop, facilitated communication between theorists, phenomenologists and observers, and started new collaborations. The scientific scope and the topics of the workshop intentionally covered a wide range of topics, including: blazars and jetted AGNs blazar and AGN physics, observations and phenomenology black holes, central engines, jets and environment of the central engine non-blazar AGNs and non-AGN galaxies: star-forming and starburst galaxies, cosmic-ray generation observational tools: variability, correlations, power spectra analysis and periodicity multi-wavelength aspects and approaches: radio, optical and X

  4. The new prompt gamma-ray catalogue for PGAA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar; Revay; Belgya; Firestone

    2000-10-01

    A new catalogue of subthermal neutron-induced prompt gamma rays has been created for 79 elements, from hydrogen to uranium (including fission), on the basis of recent measurements at the Budapest guided-neutron PGAA facility. New energy values have been measured using 35Cl neutron-capture gamma rays, while the gamma-ray production cross-sections have been determined with respect to the 1H thermal capture cross-section. The elemental data have been compared with thermal neutron-capture data for individual nuclides from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File, ENSDF, hence isotope identifications could be made. The catalogue contains elemental spectra and a table with nearly 7000 gamma rays with relative intensity over 1% of the strongest line. The average accuracy is about 0.08 keV for energies and about 5% for cross-sections in the whole energy range, from about 40 keV to 11 MeV.

  5. Gamma-ray emission profile measurements during JET ICRH discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, O.N.; Marcus, F.B.; Sadler, G.; Van Belle, P. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Howarth, P.J.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Adams, J.M.; Bond, D.S. [UKAEA Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Div.

    1994-07-01

    Gamma-ray emission from plasma-impurity reactions caused by minority ICRH accelerating fuel ions to MeV energies has been measured using the JET neutron profile monitor. A successful data analysis technique has been used to isolate the RF-induced gamma-ray emission that was detected, enabling profiles of gamma-ray emission to be obtained. The 2-d gamma-ray emission profiles show that virtually all the radiation originates from the low field side of the RF resonance layer, as expected from RF-induced pitch angle diffusion. The emission profiles indicate the presence of a small population of resonant {sup 3}He ions that possess orbits lying near the passing-trapped boundary. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Prompt Optical Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerlof; Balsano; Barthelmy; Bloch; Butterworth; Casperson; Cline; Fletcher; Frontera; Gisler; Heise; Hills; Hurley; Kehoe; Lee; Marshall; McKay; Pawl; Piro; Szymanski; Wren

    2000-03-20

    The Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) seeks to measure simultaneous and early afterglow optical emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). A search for optical counterparts to six GRBs with localization errors of 1 deg2 or better produced no detections. The earliest limiting sensitivity is mROTSE>13.1 at 10.85 s (5 s exposure) after the gamma-ray rise, and the best limit is mROTSE>16.0 at 62 minutes (897 s exposure). These are the most stringent limits obtained for the GRB optical counterpart brightness in the first hour after the burst. Consideration of the gamma-ray fluence and peak flux for these bursts and for GRB 990123 indicates that there is not a strong positive correlation between optical flux and gamma-ray emission.

  7. On the energetics and number of gamma-ray pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermer, Charles D.; Sturner, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    We examine a nearly aligned pulsar model with polar cap acceleration in order to explain the energetics and number of the known gamma-ray pulsars. In this model, the efficiency of converting spin-down luminosity to gamma-ray luminosity increases with decreasing spin-down luminosity, a trend recently emphasized by Ulmer. The predicted gamma-ray flux is proportional to dot P(exp 3/4)/P(exp 5/4) d(exp 2), where P is the period, dot P is the period derivative, and d is the distance to the pulsar. For initial spin periods between approximately equals 10 and 30 ms and neutron star polar magnetic fields between approximately equals 1 and 4 TG, this model accounts for the number and age distribution of the five pulsars which have been observed to emit gamma rays at energies greater than 100 MeV. Implications for pulsar studies are considered.

  8. Public List of LAT-Detected Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The following is a compilation of all publicly-announced gamma-ray pulsars detected using the Fermi LAT. Each of the detections has been vetted by the LAT team,...

  9. Gamma-Ray Imager Polarimeter for Solar Flares Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose here to develop the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS), the next-generation instrument for high-energy solar observations. GRIPS will...

  10. Gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Allafort, A; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Cannon, A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Çelik, Ö; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Luca, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashi, K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Horan, D; Itoh, R; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Khangulyan, D; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lee, S-H; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Naumann-Godo, M; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Romani, R W; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Wood, K S; Yang, Z; Ziegler, M

    2011-02-11

    A young and energetic pulsar powers the well-known Crab Nebula. Here, we describe two separate gamma-ray (photon energy greater than 100 mega-electron volts) flares from this source detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The first flare occurred in February 2009 and lasted approximately 16 days. The second flare was detected in September 2010 and lasted approximately 4 days. During these outbursts, the gamma-ray flux from the nebula increased by factors of four and six, respectively. The brevity of the flares implies that the gamma rays were emitted via synchrotron radiation from peta-electron-volt (10(15) electron volts) electrons in a region smaller than 1.4 × 10(-2) parsecs. These are the highest-energy particles that can be associated with a discrete astronomical source, and they pose challenges to particle acceleration theory.

  11. Gamma-rays from pulsar wind nebulae in starburst galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Karl; Elsässer, Dominik; Tibolla, Omar

    2012-07-01

    Recently, gamma-ray emission at TeV energies has been detected from the starburst galaxies NGC253 (Acero et al., 2009) [1] and M82 (Acciari et al., 2009) [2]. It has been claimed that pion production due to cosmic rays accelerated in supernova remnants interacting with the interstellar gas is responsible for the observed gamma rays. Here, we show that the gamma-ray pulsar wind nebulae left behind by the supernovae contribute to the TeV luminosity in a major way. A single pulsar wind nebula produces about ten times the total luminosity of the Sun at energies above 1 TeV during a lifetime of 105 years. A large number of 3 × 104 pulsar wind nebulae expected in a typical starburst galaxy at a distance of 4 Mpc can readily produce the observed TeV gamma rays.

  12. X-raying a nearby gamma-ray millisecond pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, George

    2013-10-01

    We propose an exploratory EPIC observation of a nearby recycled gamma-ray pulsar recently detected in the radio. The radio pulsations were found in a follow-up search at the location of a bright Fermi source. There are few millisecond pulsars whose spectral properties have been studied both in X-rays and gamma-rays. Those for which a multiwavelength analysis has been done show an intriguing connection between the gamma-ray and X-ray spectra. In a modest exposure we will collect enough counts to test the putative link between the the gamma-ray and X-ray spectra. The results will advance our understanding of the inner workings of the pulsar magnetospheres, including pair cascades, particle acceleration, magnetospheric current distribution, and radiation processes in superstrong magnetic fields.

  13. On The Origin Of High Energy Correlations in Gamma-ray Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocevski, Daniel

    2012-04-03

    I investigate the origin of the observed correlation between a gamma-ray burst's {nu}F{sub {nu}} spectral peak E{sub pk} and its isotropic equivalent energy E{sub iso} through the use of a population synthesis code to model the prompt gamma-ray emission from GRBs. By using prescriptions for the distribution of prompt spectral parameters as well as the population's luminosity function and co-moving rate density, I generate a simulated population of GRBs and examine how bursts of varying spectral properties and redshift would appear to a gamma-ray detector here on Earth. I find that a strong observed correlation can be produced between the source frame Epk and Eiso for the detected population despite the existence of only a weak and broad correlation in the original simulated population. The energy dependance of a gamma-ray detector's flux-limited detection threshold acts to produce a correlation between the source frame E{sub pk} and E{sub iso} for low luminosity GRBs, producing the left boundary of the observed correlation. Conversely, very luminous GRBs are found at higher redshifts than their low luminosity counterparts due to the standard Malquest bias, causing bursts in the low E{sub pk}, high E{sub iso} regime to go undetected because their E{sub pk} values would be redshifted to energies at which most gamma-ray detectors become less sensitive. I argue that it is this previously unexamined effect which produces the right boundary of the observed correlation. Therefore, the origin of the observed correlation is a complex combination of the instrument's detection threshold, the intrinsic cutoff in the GRB luminosity function, and the broad range of redshifts over which GRBs are detected. Although the GRB model presented here is a very simplified representation of the complex nature of GRBs, these simulations serve to demonstrate how selection effects caused by a combination of instrumental sensitivity and the cosmological nature of an

  14. Gamma-ray Emission from Millisecond Pulsars - An Outergap Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, K. S.

    2013-01-01

    In this review paper we explain the following gamma-ray emission features from the millisecond pulsars. (1)Why is the dipolar field of millisecond pulsars so weak but the magnetic pair creation process may still be able to control the size of the outergap? (2)A sub-GeV pulse component could occur in the vicinity of the radio pulse of millisecond pulsars. (3)Orbital modulated gamma-rays should exist in the black widow systems for large viewing angle.

  15. Multiwavelength observations of unidentified high energy gamma ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1993-10-01

    As was the case for COS B, the majority of high-energy (greater than 100 MeV) gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET instrument on GRO are not immediately identifiable with cataloged objects at other wavelengths. These persistent gamma-ray sources are, next to the gamma-ray bursts, the least understood objects in the universe. Even a rudimentary understanding of their nature awaits identifications and follow-up work at other wavelengths to tell us what they are. The as yet unidentified sources are potentially the most interesting, since they may represent unrecognized new classes of astronomical objects, such as radio-quiet pulsars or new types of active galactic nuclei (AGN's). This two-year investigation is intended to support the analysis, correlation, and theoretical interpretation of data that we are obtaining at x ray, optical, and radio wavelengths in order to render the gamma-ray data interpretable. According to plan, in the first year concentration was on the identification and study of Geminga. The second year will be devoted to studies of similar unidentified gamma-ray sources which will become available in the first EGRET catalogs. The results obtained so far are presented in the two papers which are reproduced in the Appendix. In these papers, we discuss the pulse profiles of Geminga, the geometry and efficiency of the magnetospheric accelerator, the distance to Geminga, the implications for theories of polar cap heating, the effect of the magnetic field on the surface emission and environment of the neutron star, and possible interpretations of a radio-quiet Geminga. The implications of the other gamma-ray pulsars which were discovered to have high gamma-ray efficiency are also discussed, and the remaining unidentified COS B sources are attributed to a population of efficient gamma-ray sources, some of which may be radio quiet.

  16. Cutaway artist concept of Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) showing instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Cutaway artist concept drawing shows Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) and its instrument locations. The high gain antenna (HGA) and solar array (SA) panels are deployed. The four complement instruments are the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) (at the four corners of the satellite), the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) (left), the Imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL) (center), and the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) (right). The exterior covering of each of the four instruments is cutaway showing various components.

  17. Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy at the Institut Laue Langevin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, H. G.; Simpson, G. S.; Jentschel, M.; Mutti, P.

    2005-05-01

    Some aspects of neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy studies, as currently carried out at the high-flux reactor of the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL), are discussed. Neutron-induced fission allows us to study very neutron-rich nuclei, using in-pile and external target arrangements, respectively. The use of high-resolution crystal spectrometers allows investigations of gamma rays with ppm resolution.

  18. Computers in activation analysis and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, B. S.; D' Agostino, M. D.; Yule, H. P. [eds.

    1979-01-01

    Seventy-three papers are included under the following session headings: analytical and mathematical methods for data analysis; software systems for ..gamma..-ray and x-ray spectrometry; ..gamma..-ray spectra treatment, peak evaluation; least squares; IAEA intercomparison of methods for processing spectra; computer and calculator utilization in spectrometer systems; and applications in safeguards, fuel scanning, and environmental monitoring. Separate abstracts were prepared for 72 of those papers. (DLC)

  19. Heterogeneity in Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jay P.; Gehrels Neil; Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample comprises 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales - durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals - for EE bursts are factors of approx 2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts - the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width - continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/XRT. The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts (approx 6 X 10(exp -10) erg / sq cm/ s) is approx > 20 x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts (approx 60,000 s) is approx 30 x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into more dense environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently p()wers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

  20. LOCALIZATION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS USING THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Goldstein, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Astrophysics Office, ZP12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Meegan, C. A.; Jenke, P.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Bhat, P. N. [CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL (United States); Preece, R. D. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Gibby, M. H. [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); Greiner, J.; Yu, H.-F. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Gruber, D. [Planetarium Südtirol, Gummer 5, I-39053 Karneid (Italy); Kippen, R. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87545 (United States); Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S., E-mail: valerie@nasa.gov [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); and others

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  1. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Gibby, M. H.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Yu, H.-F.; Bhat, P. N.; Burgess, J. M.; Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Giles, M. M.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Tierney, D.; Zhang, B.-B.

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  2. Central Engine Memory of Gamma-Ray Bursts and Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Bing; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.

    2016-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bursts of γ-rays generated from relativistic jets launched from catastrophic events such as massive star core collapse or binary compact star coalescence. Previous studies suggested that GRB emission is erratic, with no noticeable memory in the central engine. Here we report a discovery that similar light curve patterns exist within individual bursts for at least some GRBs. Applying the Dynamic Time Warping method, we show that similarity of light curve patterns between pulses of a single burst or between the light curves of a GRB and its X-ray flare can be identified. This suggests that the central engine of at least some GRBs carries “memory” of its activities. We also show that the same technique can identify memory-like emission episodes in the flaring emission in soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), which are believed to be Galactic, highly magnetized neutron stars named magnetars. Such a phenomenon challenges the standard black hole central engine models for GRBs, and suggest a common physical mechanism behind GRBs and SGRs, which points toward a magnetar central engine of GRBs.

  3. CENTRAL ENGINE MEMORY OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND SOFT GAMMA-RAY REPEATERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucá (IAA-CSIC), P.O. Box 03004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Zhang, Bing, E-mail: zhang.grb@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bursts of γ-rays generated from relativistic jets launched from catastrophic events such as massive star core collapse or binary compact star coalescence. Previous studies suggested that GRB emission is erratic, with no noticeable memory in the central engine. Here we report a discovery that similar light curve patterns exist within individual bursts for at least some GRBs. Applying the Dynamic Time Warping method, we show that similarity of light curve patterns between pulses of a single burst or between the light curves of a GRB and its X-ray flare can be identified. This suggests that the central engine of at least some GRBs carries “memory” of its activities. We also show that the same technique can identify memory-like emission episodes in the flaring emission in soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), which are believed to be Galactic, highly magnetized neutron stars named magnetars. Such a phenomenon challenges the standard black hole central engine models for GRBs, and suggest a common physical mechanism behind GRBs and SGRs, which points toward a magnetar central engine of GRBs.

  4. Spatial distribution of reflected gamma rays by Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jehouani, A. [LPTN, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences Semlalia, B.P. 2390, 40000 Marrakech (Morocco)], E-mail: jehouani@ucam.ac.ma; Merzouki, A. [LPTN, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences Semlalia, B.P. 2390, 40000 Marrakech (Morocco); Remote Sensing and Geomatics of the Environment Laboratory, Ottawa-Carleton Geoscience Centre, Marion Hall, 140 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON, KIN 6N5 (Canada); Boutadghart, F.; Ghassoun, J. [LPTN, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences Semlalia, B.P. 2390, 40000 Marrakech (Morocco)

    2007-10-15

    In nuclear facilities, the reflection of gamma rays of the walls and metals constitutes an unknown origin of radiation. These reflected gamma rays must be estimated and determined. This study concerns reflected gamma rays on metal slabs. We evaluated the spatial distribution of the reflected gamma rays spectra by using the Monte Carlo method. An appropriate estimator for the double differential albedo is used to determine the energy spectra and the angular distribution of reflected gamma rays by slabs of iron and aluminium. We took into the account the principal interactions of gamma rays with matter: photoelectric, coherent scattering (Rayleigh), incoherent scattering (Compton) and pair creation. The Klein-Nishina differential cross section was used to select direction and energy of scattered photons after each Compton scattering. The obtained spectra show peaks at 0.511{sup *} MeV for higher source energy. The Results are in good agreement with those obtained by the TRIPOLI code [J.C. Nimal et al., TRIPOLI02: Programme de Monte Carlo Polycinsetique a Trois dimensions, CEA Rapport, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. ].

  5. Inactivation of citrus tristeza virus by gamma ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ieki, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Akira

    1984-12-01

    The total exposure of gamma ray and the intensity of gamma ray per hour for the inactivation of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and also the effect on citrus tissues are described. The budwoods of Morita navel orange infected with a severe seedling-yellow strain of CTV were irradiated with gamma ray from a /sup 60/Co source for 20 - 52 hours. The buds or small tissue pieces of the irradiated budwoods were subsequently grafted onto Mexcan lime. CTV was easily inactivated by the irradiation from 10 to 18 kR for from 20 to 52 hours. The higher the total exposure, the higher the rate of inactivation. The CTV in the budwoods was almost inactivated after the irradiation with 20 kR. When the total exposure to gamma ray on budwoods was the same, CTV was more efficiently inactivated by the irradiation for long period with low intensity of gamma ray per hour than that for short period with high intensity per hour. Gamma ray irradiation was effective to eliminate CTV from citrus tissues. (Mori, K.).

  6. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Telescope Mission Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of GeV from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  7. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of GeV from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  8. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of GeV from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  9. Delayed Fission Product Gamma-Ray Transmission Through Low Enriched UO2 Fuel Pin Lattices in Air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumbull, TH [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2004-10-18

    The transmission of delayed fission-product gamma rays through various arrangements of low-enriched UO2 fuel pin lattices in an air medium was studied. Experimental measurements, point-kernel and Monte Carlo photon transport calculations were performed to demonstrate the shielding effect of ordered lattices of fuel pins on the resulting gamma-ray dose to a detector outside the lattice. The variation of the gamma-ray dose on the outside of the lattice as a function of radial position, the so-called “channeling” effect, was analyzed. Techniques for performing experimental measurements and data reduction at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s Reactor Critical Facility (RCF) were derived. An experimental apparatus was constructed to hold the arrangements of fuel pins for the measurements. A gamma-ray spectroscopy system consisting of a sodium-iodide scintillation detector was used to collect data. Measurements were made with and without a collimator installed. A point-kernel transport code was developed to map the radial dependence of the gamma-ray flux. Input files for the Monte Carlo code, MCNP, were also developed to accurately model the experimental measurements. The results of the calculations were compared to the experimental measurements. In order to determine the delayed fission-product gamma-ray source for the calculations, a technique was developed using a previously written code, DELBG and the reactor state-point data obtained during the experimental measurements. Calculations were performed demonstrating the effects of material homogenization on the gamma-ray transmission through the fuel pin lattice.Homogeneous and heterogeneous calculations were performed for all RCF fuel pin lattices as well as for a typical commercial pressurized water reactor fuel bundle. The results of the study demonstrated the effectiveness of the experimental measurements to isolate the channeling effect of delayed fission-product gamma-rays through lattices of RCF fuel pins

  10. Network of wireless gamma ray sensors for radiological detection and identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilov, A.; Womble, P.; Novikov, I.; Paschal, J.; Board, J.; Moss, K.

    2007-04-01

    The paper describes the design and development of a network of wireless gamma-ray sensors based on cell phone or WiFi technology. The system is intended for gamma-ray detection and automatic identification of radioactive isotopes and nuclear materials. The sensor is a gamma-ray spectrometer that uses wireless technology to distribute the results. A small-size sensor module contains a scintillation detector along with a small size data acquisition system, PDA, battery, and WiFi radio or a cell phone modem. The PDA with data acquisition and analysis software analyzes the accumulated spectrum on real-time basis and returns results to the screen reporting the isotopic composition and intensity of detected radiation source. The system has been programmed to mitigate false alarms from medical isotopes and naturally occurring radioactive materials. The decision-making software can be "trained" to indicate specific signatures of radiation sources like special nuclear materials. The sensor is supplied with GPS tracker coupling radiological information with geographical coordinates. The sensor is designed for easy use and rapid deployment in common wireless networks.

  11. Thick target yields of proton induced gamma-ray emission from Al, Si and P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokar, A., E-mail: arezajokar@gmail.com; Kakuee, O.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.; Fathollahi, V.

    2017-03-01

    Thick target excitation yield curves of gamma-rays from the reactions {sup 27}Al(p,p′γ){sup 27}Al (E{sub γ} = 844 and 1014 keV), {sup 27}Al(p,αγ){sup 27}Al (E{sub γ} = 1369 keV), {sup 28}Si(p,p′γ){sup 28}Si (E{sub γ} = 1779 keV), {sup 29}Si(p,p′γ){sup 29}Si (E{sub γ} = 1273 keV) and {sup 31}P(p,p′γ){sup 31}P (E{sub γ} = 1266 keV) were measured by bombarding pure-element targets with protons at energies below 3 MeV. Gamma-rays were detected with a High Purity Ge detector placed at an angle of 90° with respect to the beam direction. The obtained thick target gamma-ray yields were compared with the previously published data. The overall systematic uncertainty of the thick target yield values was estimated to be better than ±9%.

  12. Gamma-ray astronomy by the air shower technique: performance and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronin, J.W. [Chicago, Univ. of Chicago (United States). Dept. of Phisycs and Enrico Fermi Inst.

    1996-11-01

    The techniques for {gamma}-ray astronomy at energies {>=}10 TeV using air shower detectors are discussed. The results, based on a number of large arrays, are negative, with no point sources being identified. While the contributions to {gamma}-ray astronomy so far have been only upper limits, these arrays in the future will make significant progress in the understanding of cosmic rays in the energy range 10{sup 13} eV to 10{sup 16} eV. Also, contributions to solar physics are being made by observations of shape and time dependence of the shadow of the Sun as observed in cosmic rays. For the advancement of {gamma}-ray astronomy a greater sensitivity is required in the energy region of 10 TeV. A number of promising techniques to accomplish a greater sensitivity are discussed. They include the enlargement of the Tibet array at 4300 meters altitude, the array of open photomultipliers at La Palma (AIROBICC), which views the shower by the Cherenkov photons produced in the atmosphere, and the instrumentation of a pond at Los Alamos with photomultipliers (Milagro).

  13. The redshift and afterglow of the extremely energetic gamma-ray burst GRB 080916C

    CERN Document Server

    Greiner, J.; Kruehler, T.; Kienlin, A.v.; Rau, A.; Sari, R.; Fox, Derek B.; Kawai, N.; Afonso, P.; Ajello, M.; Berger, E.; Cenko, S.B.; Cucchiara, A.; Filgas, R.; Klose, S.; Yoldas, A.Kuepue; Lichti, G.G.; Loew, S.; McBreen, S.; Nagayama, T.; Rossi, A.; Sato, S.; Szokoly, G.; Yoldas, A.; Zhang, X.-L.

    2009-01-01

    The detection of GeV photons from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has important consequences for the interpretation and modelling of these most-energetic cosmological explosions. The full exploitation of the high-energy measurements relies, however, on the accurate knowledge of the distance to the events. Here we report on the discovery of the afterglow and subsequent redshift determination of GRB 080916C, the first GRB detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope with high significance detection of photons at >0.1 GeV. Observations were done with 7-channel imager GROND at the 2.2m MPI/ESO telescope, the SIRIUS instrument at the Nagoya-SAAO 1.4m telescope in South Africa, and the GMOS instrument at Gemini-S. The afterglow photometric redshift of z=4.35+-0.15, based on simultaneous 7-filter observations with the Gamma-Ray Optical and Near-infrared Detector (GROND), places GRB 080916C among the top 5% most distant GRBs, and makes it the most energetic GRB known to date. The detection of GeV photons from such a dista...

  14. Gamma-ray burst standard sirens: Precision cosmology from gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Daniel; Nissanke, Samaya; Hughes, Scott; Dalal, Neal; Sievers, Jonathan

    2011-04-01

    It has long been hypothesized that at least some gamma-ray bursts are associated with the merger of binary neutron stars, or with the merger of a neutron star with a black hole. Recent observations have accumulated compelling evidence supporting this hypothesis, at least for short-hard gamma-ray bursts. These bursts should then be accompanied by a gravitational-wave signal corresponding to the ?nal inspiral of the compact binary. Simultaneous observation of the gravitational and electromagnetic waves from these bursts would allow us to directly and independently determine both luminosity distance and redshift to the binary, thereby providing an absolutely calibrated, high accuracy standard siren (the gravitational wave analog of a standard candle). We examine the cosmological measurements to be expected from observations of gamma-ray burst standard sirens with a ground-based gravitational wave detector network (including LIGO and Virgo, and possible extensions with AIGO and LCGT). We find that these measurements should be able to map the low-redshift Hubble ?ow with excellent accuracy.

  15. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mozin, Vladimir [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Campbell, Luke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hunt, Alan W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Reedy, Edward T.E. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Seipel, Heather A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-09-28

    This project has been a collaborative effort of researchers from four National Laboratories, Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Idaho State University’s (ISU) Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). Experimental measurements at the Oregon State University (OSU) were also supported. The research included two key components, a strong experimental campaign to characterize the delayed gamma-ray signatures of the isotopes of interests and of combined targets, and a closely linked modeling effort to assess system designs and applications. Experimental measurements were performed to evaluate fission fragment yields, to test methods for determining isotopic fractions, and to benchmark the modeling code package. Detailed signature knowledge is essential for analyzing the capabilities of the delayed gamma technique, optimizing measurement parameters, and specifying neutron source and gamma-ray detection system requirements. The research was divided into three tasks: experimental measurements, characterization of fission yields, and development of analysis methods (task 1), modeling in support of experiment design and analysis and for the assessment of applications (task 2), and high-rate gamma-ray detector studies (task 3).

  16. Attenuation of X and Gamma Rays in Personal Radiation Shielding Protective Clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovska, Michaela; Cerny, Radek; Otahal, Petr

    2015-11-01

    A collection of personal radiation shielding protective clothing, suitable for use in case of accidents in nuclear facilities or radiological emergency situations involving radioactive agents, was gathered and tested at the Nuclear Protection Department of the National Institute for Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Protection, Czech Republic. Attenuating qualities of shielding layers in individual protective clothing were tested via spectra measurement of x and gamma rays, penetrating them. The rays originated from different radionuclide point sources, the gamma ray energies of which cover a broad energy range. The spectra were measured by handheld spectrometers, both scintillation and High Purity Germanium. Different narrow beam geometries were adjusted using a special testing bench and a set of various collimators. The main experimentally determined quantity for individual samples of personal radiation shielding protective clothing was x and gamma rays attenuation for significant energies of the spectra. The attenuation was assessed comparing net peak areas (after background subtraction) in spectra, where a tested sample was placed between the source and the detector, and corresponding net peak areas in spectra, measured without the sample. Mass attenuation coefficients, which describe attenuating qualities of shielding layers materials in individual samples, together with corresponding lead equivalents, were determined as well. Experimentally assessed mass attenuation coefficients of the samples were compared to the referred ones for individual heavy metals.

  17. A New View of the High Energy Gamma-ray Sky with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the findings that have been made possible by the use of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. It describes the current status of the Fermi Telescope and reviews some of the science highlights.

  18. Atmospheric transport of neutrons and gamma rays from a high-altitude nuclear detonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrd, R.C.

    1995-07-01

    Although radiation outputs from nuclear detonations in free space are well established, few studies exist of effect of atmospheric transport on the resulting intensity, energy, and time signatures. This report presents calculations for generic sources at high altitudes, 20-50 km above the Earth`s surface, in an atmosphere whose density decreases almost exponentially with height. The sources are instantaneous time bursts with simple energy dependences: gamma rays use an evaporation spectrum; neutrons use either a Gaussian fusion or a Maxwell fission spectrum. The observation angles vary from vertical to 5{degrees} below the horizon, and detectors are placed in either geosynchronous or low Earth orbits (100 km). All calculations use the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code in either its photon, neutron, or coupled neutron-photon modes, with the coupled mode being applied to the production of gamma rays by neutron inelastic scattering. The standard MCNP outputs are analyzed to extract the intensity, energy, and time dependences of the fluence as functions of either source altitude or observation angle. In general, the intensities drop rapidly below about 30-km source altitude or +5` slant angle. Above these limits, the gamma-ray signal loses substantial intensity but still contains most of the original source information. In contrast, neutron scattering produces little or no decrease in intensity, but it rapidly degrades much of the information about the original source spectrum. Finally, although there is abundant gamma-ray production from neutron inelastic scattering, the resulting signatures appear to provide little additional information.

  19. Searching for Short GRBs in Soft Gamma Rays with INTEGRAL/PICsIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodi, James; Bazzano, Angela; Ubertini, Pietro; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Savchenko, V.; Kuulkers, E.; Ferrigno, Carlo; Bozzo, Enrico; Brandt, Soren; Chenevez, Jerome; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Diehl, R.; Domingo, A.; Hanlon, L.; Jourdain, E.; von Kienlin, A.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F.; Lutovinov, A.; Martin-Carrillo, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Roques, J.-P.; Sunyaev, R.

    2018-01-01

    With gravitational wave (GW) detections by the LIGO/Virgo collaboration over the past several years, there is heightened interest in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), especially “short” GRBs (T90 <2s). The high-energy PICsIT detector (~0.2 – 10 MeV) on-board the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) is able to observe sources out to approximately 70° off-axis, making it essentially a soft gamma-ray, all-sky monitor for impulsive events, such as SGRBs. Because SGRBs typically have hard spectra with peak energies of a few hundred keV, PICsIT with its ~ 3000 cm2 collecting area is able to provide spectral information about these sources at soft gamma-ray energies.We have begun a study of PICsIT data for faint SGRBs similar to the one associated with the binary neutron star (BNS) merger GW 170817, and also are preparing for future GW triggers by developing a real-time burst analysis for PICsIT. Searching the PICsIT data for significant excesses during ~30 min-long pointings containing times of SGRBs, we have been able to differentiate between SGRBs and spurious events. Also, this work allows us to assess what fraction of reported SGRBs have been detected by PICsIT, which can be used to provide an estimate of the number of GW BNS events seen by PICsIT during the next LIGO/Virgo observing run starting in Fall 2018.

  20. Ground level gamma-ray and electric field enhancements during disturbed weather: Combined signatures from convective clouds, lightning and rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuveni, Yuval; Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin; Steinitz, Gideon

    2017-11-01

    We report coincidences of ground-level gamma-ray enhancements with precipitation events and strong electric fields typical of thunderstorms, measured at the Emilio Segre Cosmic Ray observatory located on the western slopes of Mt. Hermon in northern Israel. The observatory hosts 2 × 2″ Nal(TI) gamma ray scintillation detectors alongside a vertical atmospheric electric field (Ez) mill and conduction current (Jz) plates. During several active thunderstorms that occurred near the Mt. Hermon station in October and November 2015, we recorded prolonged periods of gamma ray enhancements, which lasted tens of minutes and coincided with peaks both in precipitation and the vertical electric field. Two types of events were detected: slow increase (up to 300 min) of atmospheric gamma ray radiation due to radon progeny washout (or rainout) along with minutes of Ez enhancement, which were not associated with the occurrences of nearby CG lightning discharges. The second type showed 30 min bursts of gamma rays, coinciding with minutes of Ez enhancement that closely matched the occurrences of nearby CG lightning discharges, and are superimposed on the radiation from radon daughters washed out to near surface levels by precipitation. We conclude that a superposition of accelerated high energy electrons by thunderstorm electric fields and radon progeny washout (or rainout) explains the relatively fast near surface gamma-ray increase, where the minutes-scale vertical electric field enhancement are presumably caused due to nearby convective clouds. Our results show that the mean exponential half-life depletion times of the residual nuclei produced during events without lightning occurrences were between 25-65 min, compared to 55-100 min when lightning was present, indicating that different types of nuclei were involved.