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Sample records for temperature diffusion induced

  1. Low temperature diffusion of hydrogenic species in oxide crystals: Radiation induced diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Gonzalez, R. [Universidad `Carlos III` de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria

    1993-10-01

    Normally stable configurations of substitutional protons or deuterons in oxide crystal become highly unstable during ionizing radiation at room temperature, resulting in the displacements of these species. The cross section for radiation-induced-displacements of protons is exceedingly large and is a strong function of temperature. The displacement cross section of protons from cation sites is twice that of deuterons. Diffusion of these species can be induced at temperatures not otherwise possible by thermal means. For example, using electron irradiation near room temperature the O-H bond is readily broken and the hydrogenic species can be channeled along the c-axis in TiO{sub 2} by an applied electric field. Radiation induced displacements of protons from anion sites (hydride ions) at room temperature are also discussed.

  2. Temperature monitoring with FBG sensor during diffuser-assisted laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngot T.; Lee, Seul Lee; Lee, Yong Wook; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2017-02-01

    Temperature variations are often monitored by using sensors operating at the site of treatment during Laser-induced Interstitial Thermotherapy (LITT). Currently, temperature measurements during LITT have been performed with thermocouples (TCs). However, TCs could directly absorb laser light and lead to self-heating (resulting in an over-estimation). Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors can instead overcome this limitation of the TCs due to its insensitivity to electromagnetic interference. The aim of the current study was to quantitatively evaluate the FBG temperature sensor with a K-type thermocouple to real-time monitor temperature increase in ex vivo tissue during diffuser-assisted LITT. A 4-W 980-nm laser was employed to deliver optical energy in continuous mode through a 600-µm core-diameter diffusing applicator. A goniometric measurement validated the uniform light distribution in polar and longitudinal directions. The FBG sensor showed a linear relationship (R2 = 0.995) between wavelength shift and temperature change in air and tissue along with a sensitivity of 0.0114 nm/˚C. Regardless of sensor type, the measured temperature increased with irradiation time and applied power but decreased with increasing distance from the diffuser surface. The temperature elevation augmented the degree of thermal coagulation in the tissue during LITT (4.0±0.3-mm at 99˚C after 120-s). The temperature elevation augmented the degree of thermal coagulation in the tissue during LITT s irradiation). The FBG-integrated diffuser was able to monitor the interstitial temperature in tubular tissue (porcine urethra) real-time during laser treatment. However, the thermal coagulation thickness of the porcine urethra was measured to be 1.5 mm that was slightly thicker ( 20%) than that of the bovine liver after 4-W 980-nm laser for 48 s. The FBG temperature sensor can be a feasible tool to real-time monitor the temporal development of the temperature during the diffuser-assisted LITT to

  3. Application of aluminum diffusion coatings to mitigate the KCl-induced high-temperature corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiamehr, Saeed; Lomholt, T. N.; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2017-01-01

    Pack cementation was used to produce Fe1−xAl and Fe2Al5 diffusion coatings on ferritic-martensitic steel P91 and a Ni2Al3 diffusion coating on pure nickel. The performance of diffusion coatings against high-temperature corrosion induced by potassium chloride (KCl) was evaluated by exposing...... the samples at 600 °C for 168 h in static lab air under KCl deposit. In addition, a salt-free experiment was performed for comparison. Microstructure, chemical and phase composition of the samples were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X......-ray diffractometry (XRD) before and after the exposures. It was found that all the diffusion coatings formed protective oxides under salt-free exposure in air. Under the salt deposit, Fe1−xAl showed local failure while on large parts of the sample a protective layer had formed. Fe2Al5 was attacked over the entire...

  4. High temperature diffusion induced liquid phase joining of a heat resistant alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikstrom, N.P.; Egbewande, A.T.; Ojo, O.A.

    2008-01-01

    Transient liquid phase bonding (TLP) of a nickel base superalloy, Waspaloy, was performed to study the influence of holding time and temperature on the joint microstructure. Insufficient holding time for complete isothermal solidification of liquated insert caused formation of eutectic-type microconstituent along the joint centerline region in the alloy. In agreement with prediction by conventional TLP diffusion models, an increase in bonding temperature for a constant gap size, resulted in decrease in the time, t f, required to form a eutectic-free joint by complete isothermal solidification. However, a significant deviation from these models was observed in specimens bonded at and above 1175 deg. C. A reduction in isothermal solidification rate with increased temperature was observed in these specimens, such that a eutectic-free joint could not be achieved by holding for a time period that produced complete isothermal solidification at lower temperatures. Boron-rich particles were observed within the eutectic that formed in the joints prepared at the higher temperatures. An overriding effect of decrease in boron solubility relative to increase in its diffusivity with increase in temperature, is a plausible important factor responsible for the reduction in isothermal solidification rate at the higher bonding temperatures

  5. Real-time temperature monitoring with fiber Bragg grating sensor during diffuser-assisted laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngot Thi; Lee, Seul Lee; Park, Suhyun; Lee, Yong Wook; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2017-04-01

    High-sensitivity temperature sensors have been used to validate real-time thermal responses in tissue during photothermal treatment. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the feasible application of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor for diffuser-assisted laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) particularly to treat tubular tissue disease. A 600-μm core-diameter diffuser was employed to deliver 980-nm laser light for coagulation treatment. Both a thermocouple and a FBG were comparatively tested to evaluate temperature measurements in ex vivo liver tissue. The degree of tissue denaturation was estimated as a function of irradiation times and quantitatively compared with light distribution as well as temperature development. At the closer distance to a heat source, the thermocouple measured up to 41% higher maximum temperature than the FBG sensor did after 120-s irradiation (i.e., 98.7°C±6.1°C for FBG versus 131.0°C±5.1°C for thermocouple; p<0.001). Ex vivo porcine urethra tests confirmed the real-time temperature measurements of the FBG sensor as well as consistently circumferential tissue denaturation after 72-s irradiation (coagulation thickness=2.2±0.3 mm). The implementation of FBG can be a feasible sensing technique to instantaneously monitor the temperature developments during diffuser-assisted LITT for treatment of tubular tissue structure.

  6. Influence of sulfates on chloride diffusion and chloride-induced reinforcement corrosion in limestone cement materials at low temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sotiriadis, Konstantinos; Rakanta, E.; Mitzithra, M. E.; Batis, G.; Tsivilis, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 8 (2017), č. článku 04017060. ISSN 0899-1561 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : limestone cement * chloride diffusion * reinforcement corrosion * sulfate attack * low temperature Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 1.644, year: 2016 http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/%28ASCE%29MT.1943-5533.0001895

  7. Role of grain boundary diffusion on ion-induced composition change in alloys at elevated temperatures. [A/sup +/ ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, K.; Hayashibara, M.; Ohno, H.; Itoh, N. (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Crystalline Materials Science)

    1984-05-01

    We prepared nickel specimens which contain gold impurity only near the grain boundaries and measured thermal segregation of gold onto the surface and the change in the composition induced by bombardment with Ar/sup +/ ions. It is found that irradiation causes composition change over a depth much larger than the thickness of the altered layer for Ni-Au alloys. It is also found that when a two-layered Ni-Au film is bombarded with gold atoms from the nickel side at elevated temperatures, the nickel is protected by a thin gold film segregated on the nickel surface.

  8. Integrated Temperature Sensors based on Heat Diffusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vroonhoven, C.P.L.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the theory, design and implementation of a new class of integrated temperature sensors, based on heat diffusion. In such sensors, temperature is sensed by measuring the time it takes for heat to diffuse through silicon. An on-chip thermal delay can be determined by geometry and

  9. Multicomponent diffusion in two-temperature magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshaw, J.D.; Chang, C.H.

    1996-01-01

    A recent hydrodynamic theory of multicomponent diffusion in multitemperature gas mixtures [J. D. Ramshaw, J. Non-Equilib. Thermodyn. 18, 121 (1993)] is generalized to include the velocity-dependent Lorentz force on charged species in a magnetic field B. This generalization is used to extend a previous treatment of ambipolar diffusion in two-temperature multicomponent plasmas [J. D. Ramshaw and C. H. Chang, Plasma Chem. Plasma Process. 13, 489 (1993)] to situations in which B and the electrical current density are nonzero. General expressions are thereby derived for the species diffusion fluxes, including thermal diffusion, in both single- and two-temperature multicomponent magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). It is shown that the usual zero-field form of the Stefan-Maxwell equations can be preserved in the presence of B by introducing generalized binary diffusion tensors dependent on B. A self-consistent effective binary diffusion approximation is presented that provides explicit approximate expressions for the diffusion fluxes. Simplifications due to the small electron mass are exploited to obtain an ideal MHD description in which the electron diffusion coefficients drop out, resistive effects vanish, and the electric field reduces to a particularly simple form. This description should be well suited for numerical calculations. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  10. Helium diffusion in nickel at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipps, V.

    1980-09-01

    Helium has been implanted at certain temperatures between 800 and 1250 0 C into single and polycrystalline Ni-samples with implantation depths between 15 and 90 μm. Simultaneously the helium reemission from the sample is measured by a mass-spectrometer. It has been shown that the time dependence of the observed reemission rate is governed by volume diffusion of the helium. Measuring this time dependence as a function of temperature the helium diffusion constant has been determined. The He-diffusion is interpreted as a interstitial diffusion hindered by thermal vacancies. Depending on the implantation depth more or less of the implanted helium remains in the sample and forms large helium bubbles. (orig./GSCH)

  11. Brazing, high temperature brazing and diffusion welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Brazing and high temperature brazing is a major joining technology within the economically important fields of energy technology, aerospace and automotive engineering, that play a leading role for technical development everywhere in the world. Moreover diffusion welding has gained a strong position especially in advanced technologies due to its specific advantages. Topics of the conference are: 1. high-temperature brazing in application; 2. basis of brazing technology; 3. brazing of light metals; 4. nondestructive testing; 5. diffusion welding; 6. brazing of hard metals and other hard materials; and 7. ceramic-metal brazing. 28 of 20 lectures and 20 posters were recorded separately for the database ENERGY. (orig./MM) [de

  12. Gas diffusion and temperature dependence of bubble nucleation during irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foreman, A. J. E.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1986-01-01

    The continuous production of gases at relatively high rates under fusion irradiation conditions may enhance the nucleation of cavities. This can cause dimensional changes and could induce embrittlement arising from gas accumulation on grain boundaries. Computer calculations have been made...... of the diatomic nucleation of helium bubbles, assuming helium to diffuse substitutionally, with radiation-enhanced diffusion at lower temperatures. The calculated temperature dependence of the bubble density shows excellent agreement with that observed in 600 MeV proton irradiations, including a reduction...

  13. Caesium diffusion through cement paste cured at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, V.K.; Ray, A.

    1999-01-01

    Cs + diffusivity through ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples was investigated using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Secondary Ion Mass-Spectrometry (SIMS). Intrinsic diffusivities were calculated using modified diffusion equations. The intrinsic diffusivities of Cs + through OPC and cemented clinoptilolite samples cured at 25 deg C, 60 deg C and 150 deg C were compared. As expected, Cs + diffusivity was found to increase with increasing cure temperature of OPC. Cs + diffusivity through cemented clinoptilolite also varied with cure temperature. The addition of clinoptilolite to OPC reduced Cs + diffusivity through the sample, and this effect was more pronounced at greater cure temperatures

  14. Diffusion length and junction spectroscopy analysis of low-temperature annealing of electron irradiation-induced deep levels in 4H-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaldini, A.; Cavallini, A.; Rigutti, L.; Pizzini, S.; Le Donne, A.; Binetti, S.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of low-temperature annealing in 8.2 MeV electron-irradiated 4H-SiC Schottky diodes were investigated. Deep-level transient spectroscopy and minority-carrier diffusion length (L d ) measurements were carried out on not-irradiated samples and on irradiated samples before and after thermal treatments up to T=450 deg. C. We found that several deep levels in the upper half band gap (S1 with enthalpy E T =0.27 eV, S2 with E T =0.35 eV, S4 with E T =0.71 eV, and S5 with E T =0.96 eV) anneal out or modify at temperature values lower or equal to T=450 deg. C, whereby their progressive annealing out is accompanied by a net increase of L d , up to 50% of the value in the as-irradiated sample. We drew some conclusions regarding the microscopic nature of the defects related to the deep levels, according to their annealing behavior

  15. Thermal diffusivity of felsic to mafic granulites at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Labani; Förster, H.-J.; Schilling, F. R.; Förster, A.

    2006-11-01

    The thermal diffusivity of felsic and intermediate granulites (charnockites, enderbites), mafic granulites, and amphibolite-facies gneisses has been measured up to temperatures of 550 °C using a transient technique. The rock samples are from the Archean and Pan-African terranes of the Southern Indian Granulite Province. Thermal diffusivity at room temperature ( DRT) for different rock types ranges between 1.2 and 2.2 mm 2 s - 1 . For most of the rocks, the effect of radiative heat transfer is observed at temperatures above 450 °C. However, for few enderbites and mafic granulites, radiative heat transfer is negligible up to 550 °C. In the temperature range of conductive heat transfer, i.e., between 20 ° and 450 °C, thermal diffusivity decreases between 35% and 45% with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence of the thermal diffusivity is directly correlated with the thermal diffusivity at room temperature, i.e., the higher the thermal diffusivity at room temperature, DRT, the greater is its temperature dependence. In this temperature range i.e., between 20 and 450 °C, thermal diffusivity can be expressed as D = 0.7 mm 2 s -1 + 144 K ( DRT - 0.7 mm 2 s -1 ) / ( T - 150 K), where T is the absolute temperature in Kelvin. At higher temperatures, an additional radiative contribution is observed according to CT3, where C varies from 10 - 9 to 10 - 10 depending on intrinsic rock properties (opacity, absorption behavior, grain size, grain boundary, etc). An equation is presented that describes the temperature and pressure dependence thermal diffusivity of rocks based only on the room-temperature thermal diffusivity. Room-temperature thermal diffusivity and its temperature dependence are mainly dependent on the major mineralogy of the rock. Because granulites are important components of the middle and lower continental crust, the results of this study provide important constraints in quantifying more accurately the thermal state of the deeper continental

  16. Diffuse Transcranial Electrical Stimulation (DTES)-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Status epilepticus (SE) was induced in male and female Wistar rats by passing low direct current across the brain via steel electrodes clipped to their ear lobes, and the effects of some anti-convulsants on these animals were studied in a motility counter chamber. Sodium valproate was found to significantly attenuate diffuse ...

  17. Thermo-diffusive Darcy flow induced by a concentrated source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ganapathy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An analytic study is made of Soret-induced double diffusive Darcy flow produced in an unbounded homogeneous porous medium of uniform porosity and low permeability when a concentrated source embedded instantaneously in the medium starts liberating heat and at the same time a chemical substance too at a constant rate in a regime where the temperature gradient produces mass flux as well. A perturbation analysis in the limit of small Rayleigh number is employed to obtain analytical solution for the determination of the transient and steady-state development of the flow field and heat and mass transfer. Due to double diffusion, a bifurcation of the flow field is noticed when the buoyancy mechanisms are opposed and due to the Soret-induced cross-diffusion, the region in which the thermal effect of the source is felt, gets minimized with a simultaneous reduction in the rate of momentum and heat transfer.

  18. Diffuse Neutron Scattering of the High Temperature Phase of Fe3O4

    OpenAIRE

    Siratori , K.; Ishii , Y.; Morii , Y.; Funahashi , S.; Yanase , A.

    1997-01-01

    Diffuse neutron scattering is observed for the high temperature phase of magnetite, Fe3O4, in an extended range in the (001) and (011) plane of the Brillouin zone. Contours of scattered intensity shows a characteristic pattern, discs in the (100) plane around the Γ points, spheres around the X points, etc. The intensity of this diffuse scattering increases with decreasing temperature down to the Verwey point and is attributed to the lattice distortion induced by charge fluctuation in the B si...

  19. Moisture diffusivity of HPFRC exposed to high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fořt, Jan; Pavlík, Zbyšek; Černý, Robert

    2017-07-01

    Concrete structures suffer from a high-temperature exposure, among others from the damage induced by spalling. The cracks propagation is connected with the degree of material water saturation and rate of damage during the release of free and bound water from cement hydrates as a result of material high-temperature heating. In case of High Performance Concrete (HPC), its dense structure increases concrete damage due to the formation of higher water vapor pressures compared to normal strength concrete. On this account, detail information on the influence of a high-temperature load on the permeability of a High Performance Fiber Reinforced Concrete (HPFRC) represents worth information for proper building and structural design. In this study, 1-D liquid water transport in HPFRC samples exposed to the laboratory temperature and temperatures of 800 °C and 1000 °C is studied. Experimentally measured moisture profiles are used for the calculation of moisture dependent moisture diffusivity using inverse analysis method based on Boltzmann-Matano treatment. The K-spline software tool, developed at the Department of Materials Engineering and Chemistry, FCE, CTU in Prague is used to get high accuracy of the computational inverse procedure.

  20. Radiation-induced diffusion at ionic etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protsenko, A.N.; Chajkovskij, Eh.F.

    1986-01-01

    Effect of radiation-induced diffusion (RID) on profiles of cesium implanted into tantalum, tungsten and molybdenum with 100 keV energy was studied. Layer-by-layer analysis was performed by means of 4 keV argon ions and 100 μA/cm 2 beam density. For the case under investigation an integral equation, which solution permitted to determine impurity true distribution, has been derived. It is shown that RID taking place on ionic etching results in broadening and shifting cesium profiles peaks into the deep of a specimen and so perverts results of the layer-by-layer analysis

  1. Role of hydrogen diffusion in temperature-induced transformation of carbon nanostructures deposited on metallic substrates by using a specially designed fused hollow cathode cold atmospheric pressure plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bikash; Kar, R.; Pal, Arup R.; Shilpa, R. K.; Dusane, R. O.; Patil, D. S.; Suryawanshi, S. R.; More, M. A.; Sinha, S.

    2017-04-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are grown on inconel substrates under two different experimental conditions using atmospheric pressure glow discharge radio-frequency (RF) PECVD process. A specially designed hollow cathode is used for this plasma generation. The growth is carried out at 610 and 660 °C substrate temperatures on inconel substrates. Our results show that CNFs and CNTs could be synthesized at 610 and 660 °C respectively irrespective of pre-treatment methods in either set. HRTEM results indicate that a temperature-induced transformation of CNFs into CNTs occur when the growth temperature is raised from 610 to 660 °C. With the help of characterization results and a schematic model, it is shown how an increase in hydrogen diffusion (~44% increase) plays a pivotal role in this transformation by providing a sink for hydrogen atoms. Field emission results show that most defective CNFs contribute to the maximum emission current density. This better field emission behavior is explained on the basis that the outer surfaces of CNFs are more defective due to the presence of the open edges of the graphene planes, which results in better field emission from the outer surfaces of the CNFs.

  2. Temperature mapping, thermal diffusivity and subsoil heat flux at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Temperature mapping, thermal diffusivity and subsoil heat flux at Kariavattom of Kerala. Tessy Chacko P and G Renuka. Department of Physics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Thiruvananthapuram, 695 581, India. We have studied the soil and air temperature characteristics over a period of one year at Kariavat-.

  3. Temperature-gradient-induced

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol; Glaser, Matt; Maclennan, Joe; Clark, Noel; Trittel, Torsten; Stannarius, Ralf

    Freely-suspended smectic films of sub-micrometer thickness and lateral extensions of several millimeters were used to study thermally driven migration and convection in the film plane. Film experiments were performed during the 6 minute microgravity phase of a TEXUS suborbital rocket flight (Texus 52, launched April 27, 2015). We have found an attraction of the smectic material towards the cold edge of the film in a temperature gradient, similar to the Soret effect. This process is reversed when this edge is heated up again. Thermal convection driven by two thermocontacts in the film is practically absent, even at temperature gradients up to 10 K/mm, with thermally driven convection only setting in when the hot post reaches the transition temperature to the nematic phase. The Observation and Analysis of Smectic Islands in Space (OASIS) flight hardware was launched on SpaceX-6 in April 2015 and experiments on smectic bubbles were carried out on the International Space Station using four different smectic A and C liquid crystal materials in separate sample chambers. We observed that smectic islands on the surface of the bubbles migrated towards the colder part of the bubble in a temperature gradient. This work was supported by NASA Grant No. NNX-13AQ81G, by the Soft Materials Research Center under NSF MRSEC Grants No. DMR-0820579 and No. DMR-1420736, and by DLR Grants 50WM1127 and 50WM1430.

  4. Effects of arsenic deactivation on arsenic-implant induced enhanced diffusion in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dokumaci, O.; Law, M.E.; Krishnamoorthy, V.; Jones, K.S.

    1996-01-01

    The enhanced diffusion of boron due to high dose arsenic implantation into silicon is studied as a function of arsenic dose. The behavior of both the type-V and end-of-range loops is investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The role of arsenic deactivation induced interstitials and type-V loops on enhanced diffusion is assessed. Reduction of the boron diffusivity is observed with increasing arsenic dose at three different temperatures. The possible explanations for this reduction are discussed

  5. The temperature variation of hydrogen diffusion coefficients in metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion coefficients were measured as a function of temperature for a few metal alloys using an electrochemical evolution technique. Results from these measurements are compared to those obtained by the time-lag method. In all cases, diffusion coefficients obtained by the electrochemical method are larger than those by the time-lag method by an order of magnitude or more. These differences are attributed mainly to hydrogen trapping.

  6. Structure-property relationships in flavour-barrier membranes with reduced high-temperature diffusivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitfeld, Kevin A.; Schaefer, Dale W.

    2009-01-01

    Encapsulation is used to decrease the premature release of volatile flavour ingredients while offering protection against environmental damage such as oxidation, light-induced reactions, etc. Hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) is investigated here as a 'smart,' temperature responsive membrane for flavour encapsulation and delivery. Gel films were synthesized and characterized by diffusion and small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering techniques. Increasing temperature typically increases the diffusion rate across a membrane; HPC, however, can be tailored to give substantially improved elevated temperature properties. Scattering results indicate processing conditions have a significant impact on membrane morphology (micro phase separation). Under certain synthetic conditions, micro phase separation is mitigated and the membranes show temperature-independent diffusivity between 25 C and 60 C.

  7. Diffusion phenomena in polycrystalline chromium near the upper homological temperature of intercrystalline diffusion manifestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajgorodov, V.N.; Klothman, S.M.; Kurkin, M.I.; Dyakin, V.V.; Zherebthov, D.V.

    1997-01-01

    A study is made into the temperature dependences of density of states in a zone of intercrystalline diffusion of atomic probes 57 Co in polycrystalline chromium as well as in the temperature dependences of isomer shift and line width in Moessbauer spectra near the upper temperature boundary of manifestation of intercrystalline diffusion. In polycrystalline chromium the release of states in the core of the crystallite conjugation region (CCR) takes place only at high temperatures due to the fact that a stationary zone of high point defect concentration in the vicinity of CCR is conserved up to high temperatures. The atomic probe escape from the core of CCR starts at the temperatures at which the equilibrium vacancy concentration in the bulk of crystallite is equal to that in a stationary zone of high defect concentration

  8. Gas diffusion and temperature dependence of bubble nucleation during irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foreman, A. J. E.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1986-01-01

    of the diatomic nucleation of helium bubbles, assuming helium to diffuse substitutionally, with radiation-enhanced diffusion at lower temperatures. The calculated temperature dependence of the bubble density shows excellent agreement with that observed in 600 MeV proton irradiations, including a reduction...... in activation energy below Tm/2. The coalescence of diatomic nuclei due to Brownian motion markedly improves the agreement and also provides a well-defined terminal density. Bubble nucleation by this mechanism is sufficiently fast to inhibit any appreciable initial loss of gas to grain boundaries during...

  9. Radiation induced diffusion as a method to protect surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumvol, I.J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation induced diffusion forms a coating adeherent and without interface on the surface of metalic substrates. This coating improves the behaviour of metal to corrosion and abrasion. The effect of radiation induced diffusion of tin and calcium on pure iron surface is described and analyzed in this work. (author) [pt

  10. Mathematics of thermal diffusion in an exponential temperature field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaqi; Bai, Wenyu; Diebold, Gerald J.

    2018-04-01

    The Ludwig-Soret effect, also known as thermal diffusion, refers to the separation of gas, liquid, or solid mixtures in a temperature gradient. The motion of the components of the mixture is governed by a nonlinear, partial differential equation for the density fractions. Here solutions to the nonlinear differential equation for a binary mixture are discussed for an externally imposed, exponential temperature field. The equation of motion for the separation without the effects of mass diffusion is reduced to a Hamiltonian pair from which spatial distributions of the components of the mixture are found. Analytical calculations with boundary effects included show shock formation. The results of numerical calculations of the equation of motion that include both thermal and mass diffusion are given.

  11. Surface modifications by field induced diffusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Olsen

    Full Text Available By applying a voltage pulse to a scanning tunneling microscope tip the surface under the tip will be modified. We have in this paper taken a closer look at the model of electric field induced surface diffusion of adatoms including the van der Waals force as a contribution in formations of a mound on a surface. The dipole moment of an adatom is the sum of the surface induced dipole moment (which is constant and the dipole moment due to electric field polarisation which depends on the strength and polarity of the electric field. The electric field is analytically modelled by a point charge over an infinite conducting flat surface. From this we calculate the force that cause adatoms to migrate. The calculated force is small for voltage used, typical 1 pN, but due to thermal vibration adatoms are hopping on the surface and even a small net force can be significant in the drift of adatoms. In this way we obtain a novel formula for a polarity dependent threshold voltage for mound formation on the surface for positive tip. Knowing the voltage of the pulse we then can calculate the radius of the formed mound. A threshold electric field for mound formation of about 2 V/nm is calculated. In addition, we found that van der Waals force is of importance for shorter distances and its contribution to the radial force on the adatoms has to be considered for distances smaller than 1.5 nm for commonly used voltages.

  12. Low Temperature Diffusion Transformations in Fe-Ni-Ti Alloys During Deformation and Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaradze, Victor; Shabashov, Valery; Kataeva, Natalya; Kozlov, Kirill; Arbuzov, Vadim; Danilov, Sergey; Ustyugov, Yury

    2018-03-01

    The deformation-induced dissolution of Ni3Ti intermetallics in the matrix of austenitic alloys of Fe-36Ni-3Ti type was revealed in the course of their cascade-forming neutron irradiation and cold deformation at low temperatures via employment of Mössbauer method. The anomalous deformation-related dissolution of the intermetallics has been explained by the migration of deformation-induced interstitial atoms from the particles into a matrix in the stress field of moving dislocations. When rising the deformation temperature, this process is substituted for by the intermetallics precipitation accelerated by point defects. A calculation of diffusion processes has shown the possibility of the realization of the low-temperature diffusion of interstitial atoms in configurations of the crowdions and dumbbell pairs at 77-173 K. The existence of interstitial atoms in the Fe-36Ni alloy irradiated by electrons or deformed at 77 K was substantiated in the experiments of the electrical resistivity measurements.

  13. The effect of diffusion induced lattice stress on the open-circuit voltage in silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizer, V. G.; Godlewski, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    It is demonstrated that diffusion induced stresses in low resistivity silicon solar cells can significantly reduce both the open-circuit voltage and collection efficiency. The degradation mechanism involves stress induced changes in both the minority carrier mobility and the diffusion length. Thermal recovery characteristics indicate that the stresses are relieved at higher temperatures by divacancy flow (silicon self diffusion). The level of residual stress in as-fabricated cells was found to be negligible in the cells tested.

  14. Peak metamorphic temperatures from cation diffusion zoning in garnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Matthijs Arjen; Scherer, Erik; Mezger, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    is robust and provides a reliable means of estimating peak temperatures for different types of high-grade metamorphic rock. The tool could be of particular advantage in rocks where critical assemblages for conventional thermometry do not occur or have been replaced during retrogression.......) to develop a tool that uses the diffusion zoning of these cations in garnet to constrain peak temperature conditions for garnet-bearing rocks. The thermometric approach was externally tested by applying it to garnet crystals from various metamorphic terranes worldwide and comparing the results to published...

  15. Computation of shear-induced collective-diffusivity in emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malipeddi, Abhilash Reddy; Sarkar, Kausik

    2017-11-01

    The shear-induced collective-diffusivity of drops in an emulsion is calculated through simulation. A front-tracking finite difference method is used to integrate the Navier-Stokes equations. When a cloud of drops is subjected to shear flow, after a certain time, the width of the cloud increases with the 1/3 power of time. This scaling of drop-cloud-width with time is characteristic of (sub-)diffusion that arises from irreversible two-drop interactions. The collective diffusivity is calculated from this relationship. A feature of the procedure adopted here is the modest computational requirement, wherein, a few drops ( 70) in shear for short time ( 70 strain) is found to be sufficient to get a good estimate. As far as we know, collective-diffusivity has not been calculated for drops through simulation till now. The computed values match with experimental measurements reported in the literature. The diffusivity in emulsions is calculated for a range of Capillary (Ca) and Reynolds (Re) numbers. It is found to be a unimodal function of Ca , similar to self-diffusivity. A sub-linear increase of the diffusivity with Re is seen for Re limited to a viscosity matched case.

  16. Microscopic Foundation and Simulation of Coupled Carrier-Temperature Diffusions in Semiconductor Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    and energy relaxation rates. These rates expressed as functions of temperatures and densities lead to microscopic expressions for self- and mutual-diffusion coefficients in the coupled density-temperature diffusion equations. Approximations for reducing the general two-component description of the electron-hole plasma (EHP) to a single-component one are discussed. In particular, we show that a special single-component reduction is possible when e-h scattering dominates over c-LO phonon scattering. The ambipolar diffusion approximation is also discussed and we show that the ambipolar diffusion coefficients are independent of e-h scattering, even though the diffusion coefficients of individual components depend sensitively on the e-h scattering rates. Our discussions lead to new perspectives into the roles played in the single-component reduction by the electron-hole correlation in momentum space induced by scatterings and the electron-hole correlation in real space via internal static electrical field. Finally, the theory is completed by coupling the diffusion equations to the lattice temperature equation and to the effective optical polarization which in turn couples to the laser field. The equations derived above are implemented in various limiting cases to a typical diode laser to study the consequences of nonlinear diffusion and the cross diffusion terms on laser behavior, especially the dynamic behavior of a diode laser under modulation. Detailed results will be presented by comparing with the standard rate equation results.

  17. Temperature dependence of pulse-induced mechanoluminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    induced ML. It has been found that in the substances showing lumi- nescence at room temperature, the luminescence is quen- ched at some higher temperature. On the other hand, many substances which are not luminescent at room tem-.

  18. Diffusion-induced parametric dispersion and amplification in doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using the hydrodynamic model of semiconductor plasma, the diffusion-induced nonlinear current density and the consequent second-order effective susceptibility are obtained under off-resonant laser irradiation. The analysis deals with the qualitative behaviour of the anomalous parametric dispersion and the gain profile ...

  19. Micromechanics of diffusion-induced damage evolution in reinforced polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abhilash, A.S.; Joshi, Shailendra P.; Mukherjee, Abhijit

    2011-01-01

    –matrix interfacial debonding under moisture ingress. The heterogeneity of fiber distribution (clustering) is characterized by the coefficient of variation Cv of the center-to-center distances between interacting fibers, determined by identifying a cut-off radius around a typical fiber. The initial moisture diffusion......-induced damage provides synergistic conditions for the rapid evolution of debonding under subsequent mechanical loading. The results indicate that microstructural heterogeneity strongly affects the moisture diffusion characteristics that in turn hurt the overall load carrying capacity of a composite due...

  20. Coherent quantum transport in disordered systems: II. Temperature dependence of carrier diffusion coefficients from the time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Xinxin; Zhao, Yi; Cao, Jianshu

    2014-01-01

    The time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method for carrier quantum dynamics (Zhong and Zhao 2013 J. Chem. Phys. 138 014111), a truncated version of the stochastic Schrödinger equation/wavefunction approach that approximately satisfies the detailed balance principle and scales well with the size of the system, is applied to investigate the carrier transport in one-dimensional systems including both the static and dynamic disorders on site energies. The predicted diffusion coefficients with respect to temperature successfully bridge from band-like to hopping-type transport. As demonstrated in paper I (Moix et al 2013 New J. Phys. 15 085010), the static disorder tends to localize the carrier, whereas the dynamic disorder induces carrier dynamics. For the weak dynamic disorder, the diffusion coefficients are temperature-independent (band-like property) at low temperatures, which is consistent with the prediction from the Redfield equation, and a linear dependence of the coefficient on temperature (hopping-type property) only appears at high temperatures. In the intermediate regime of dynamic disorder, the transition from band-like to hopping-type transport can be easily observed at relatively low temperatures as the static disorder increases. When the dynamic disorder becomes strong, the carrier motion can follow the hopping-type mechanism even without static disorder. Furthermore, it is found that the memory time of dynamic disorder is an important factor in controlling the transition from the band-like to hopping-type motions. (paper)

  1. Hydrogen diffusion at moderate temperatures in p-type Czochralski silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y.L.; Ma, Y.; Job, R.; Ulyashin, A.G.

    2004-01-01

    In plasma-hydrogenated p-type Czochralski silicon, rapid thermal donor (TD) formation is achieved, resulting from the catalytic support of hydrogen. The n-type counter doping by TD leads to a p-n junction formation. A simple method for the indirect determination of the diffusivity of hydrogen via applying the spreading resistance probe measurements is presented. Hydrogen diffusion in silicon during both plasma hydrogenation and post-hydrogenation annealing is investigated. The impact of the hydrogenation duration, annealing temperature, and resistivity of the silicon wafers on the hydrogen diffusion is discussed. Diffusivities of hydrogen are determined in the temperature range 270-450 deg. C. The activation energy for the hydrogen diffusion is deduced to be 1.23 eV. The diffusion of hydrogen is interpreted within the framework of a trap-limited diffusion mechanism. Oxygen and hydrogen are found to be the main traps

  2. Molecular diffusion of stable water isotopes in polar firn as a proxy for past temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Christian; Gkinis, Vasileios; Vinther, Bo M.

    2018-03-01

    Polar precipitation archived in ice caps contains information on past temperature conditions. Such information can be retrieved by measuring the water isotopic signals of δ18O and δD in ice cores. These signals have been attenuated during densification due to molecular diffusion in the firn column, where the magnitude of the diffusion is isotopologue specific and temperature dependent. By utilizing the differential diffusion signal, dual isotope measurements of δ18O and δD enable multiple temperature reconstruction techniques. This study assesses how well six different methods can be used to reconstruct past surface temperatures from the diffusion-based temperature proxies. Two of the methods are based on the single diffusion lengths of δ18O and δD , three of the methods employ the differential diffusion signal, while the last uses the ratio between the single diffusion lengths. All techniques are tested on synthetic data in order to evaluate their accuracy and precision. We perform a benchmark test to thirteen high resolution Holocene data sets from Greenland and Antarctica, which represent a broad range of mean annual surface temperatures and accumulation rates. Based on the benchmark test, we comment on the accuracy and precision of the methods. Both the benchmark test and the synthetic data test demonstrate that the most precise reconstructions are obtained when using the single isotope diffusion lengths, with precisions of approximately 1.0 °C . In the benchmark test, the single isotope diffusion lengths are also found to reconstruct consistent temperatures with a root-mean-square-deviation of 0.7 °C . The techniques employing the differential diffusion signals are more uncertain, where the most precise method has a precision of 1.9 °C . The diffusion length ratio method is the least precise with a precision of 13.7 °C . The absolute temperature estimates from this method are also shown to be highly sensitive to the choice of fractionation factor

  3. Deep-tissue temperature mapping by multi-illumination photoacoustic tomography aided by a diffusion optical model: a numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan; Tang, Eric; Luo, Jianwen; Yao, Junjie

    2018-01-01

    Temperature mapping during thermotherapy can help precisely control the heating process, both temporally and spatially, to efficiently kill the tumor cells and prevent the healthy tissues from heating damage. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has been used for noninvasive temperature mapping with high sensitivity, based on the linear correlation between the tissue's Grüneisen parameter and temperature. However, limited by the tissue's unknown optical properties and thus the optical fluence at depths beyond the optical diffusion limit, the reported PAT thermometry usually takes a ratiometric measurement at different temperatures and thus cannot provide absolute measurements. Moreover, ratiometric measurement over time at different temperatures has to assume that the tissue's optical properties do not change with temperatures, which is usually not valid due to the temperature-induced hemodynamic changes. We propose an optical-diffusion-model-enhanced PAT temperature mapping that can obtain the absolute temperature distribution in deep tissue, without the need of multiple measurements at different temperatures. Based on the initial acoustic pressure reconstructed from multi-illumination photoacoustic signals, both the local optical fluence and the optical parameters including absorption and scattering coefficients are first estimated by the optical-diffusion model, then the temperature distribution is obtained from the reconstructed Grüneisen parameters. We have developed a mathematic model for the multi-illumination PAT of absolute temperatures, and our two-dimensional numerical simulations have shown the feasibility of this new method. The proposed absolute temperature mapping method may set the technical foundation for better temperature control in deep tissue in thermotherapy.

  4. Pump, sodium, inducer, intermediate size (ISIP) (impeller/inducer/diffuser retrofit)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradise, D.R.

    1978-01-01

    This specification defines the requirements for the Intermediate-Size Inducer Pump (ISIP), which is to be made by replacing the impeller of the FFTF Prototype Pump with a new inducer, impeller, diffuser, seal, and necessary adapter hardware. Subsequent testing requirements of the complete pump assembly are included

  5. Influence of annealing temperature on the Dy diffusion process in NdFeB magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sheng-qing; Peng, Kun; Chen, Hong

    2017-03-01

    Sintered NdFeB magnets were coated with a layer of Dy metal using electron beam evaporation method and then annealed at various temperatures to investigate the temperature dependence of Dy diffusion process in NdFeB magnets. A Dy-rich phase was observed along the grain boundaries after the grain boundary diffusion process, the diffusion coefficients of various temperatures were obtained, the diffusion coefficients of Dy along the grain boundaries at 800 °C and 900 °C were determined to be 9.8×10-8 cm2 s-1 and 2.4×10-7 cm2 s-1, respectively. The diffusion length depended on the annealing temperature and the maximum diffusion length of approximately 1.8 mm and 3.0 mm can be obtained after annealing at 800 °C and 900 °C for 8 h. Higher diffusion temperature results in the diffusion not only along the grain boundaries but also into grains and then decrease in magnetic properties. The optimum annealing conditions can be determined as 900 °C for 8 h. The coercivity was improved from 1040 kA/m to 1450 kA/m and its magnetization has no significant reduction after the grain boundary diffusion process at the optimum annealing conditions.

  6. Studies of mass diffusion of camphorquinone in linear and crosslinked polystyrene by the laser induced holographic relaxation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Wang, C. H.; Chen, Z.-X.

    1986-11-01

    Laser induced holographic grating relaxation studies of camphorquinone (CQ) diffusing in liner polystyrene (PS) (with both narrow and wide molecular weight distribution) and crosslinked PS (with bis-phenol-A-dimethacrylate as the crosslinking agent) are carried out. Diffusion coefficients of CQ in the polymer hosts are obtained from the decay rate of the intensity diffracted from the laser induced holographic grating. The diffusion coefficients (D) of CQ in polydispersed PS samples are compared with that in nearly monodispersed sample. Diffusion coefficients are found to be equal in both types of polymer samples over the whole temperature range studied, thereby indicating that at high molecular weight the molecular weight distribution has little effect on the diffusion coefficient of CQ. The diffusion coefficient of CQ in crosslinked PS is found to decrease with increasing concentration of the crosslinking agent. It decreases approximately 30 times as the concentration of the crosslinking agent increases to 20%. The relationship between the concentration of the crosslinking agent and polymer free volume is discussed. The diffusion coefficients of CQ in linear and crosslinked PS are also measured as a function of temperature. It is found that the temperature dependence of both D and D/T can be described by a Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) equation. However, the WLF constants C1 and C2 differ in both fits. The C2 constant obtained from the D/T vs T fit for linear PS sample agrees with that extracted from the viscoelastic measurement.

  7. Diffusion processes in bombardment-induced surface topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    The bombardment of surfaces with moderate energy ions can lead to the development of various micron-sized surface structures. These structures include ridges, ledges, flat planes, pits and cones. The causal phenomena in the production of these features are sputtering, ion reflection, redeposition of sputtered material, and surface diffusion of both impurity and target-atom species. The authors concentrate on the formation of ion bombardment-induced surface topography wherein surface diffusion is a dominant process. The most thoroughly understood aspect of this topography development is the generation of cone-like structures during sputtering. The formation of cones during sputtering has been attributed to three effects. These are: (1) the presence of asperities, defects, or micro-inclusions in the surface layers, (2) the presence of impurities on the surfaces, and (3) particular crystal orientations. (Auth.)

  8. Time-resolved measurements of laser-induced diffusion of CO molecules on stepped Pt(111)-surfaces; Zeitaufgeloeste Untersuchung der laser-induzierten Diffusion von CO-Molekuelen auf gestuften Pt(111)-Oberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrenz, M.

    2007-10-30

    In the present work the dynamics of CO-molecules on a stepped Pt(111)-surface induced by fs-laser pulses at low temperatures was studied by using laser spectroscopy. In the first part of the work, the laser-induced diffusion for the CO/Pt(111)-system could be demonstrated and modelled successfully for step diffusion. At first, the diffusion of CO-molecules from the step sites to the terrace sites on the surface was traced. The experimentally discovered energy transfer time of 500 fs for this process confirms the assumption of an electronically induced process. In the following it was explained how the experimental results were modelled. A friction coefficient which depends on the electron temperature yields a consistent model, whereas for the understanding of the fluence dependence and time-resolved measurements parallel the same set of parameters was used. Furthermore, the analysis was extended to the CO-terrace diffusion. Small coverages of CO were adsorbed to the terraces and the diffusion was detected as the temporal evolution of the occupation of the step sites acting as traps for the diffusing molecules. The additional performed two-pulse correlation measurements also indicate an electronically induced process. At the substrate temperature of 40 K the cross-correlation - where an energy transfer time of 1.8 ps was extracted - suggests also an electronically induced energy transfer mechanism. Diffusion experiments were performed for different substrate temperatures. (orig.)

  9. The potential role of diffusion-induced grain-boundary migration in extended life prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handwerker, C.A.; Blendell, J.E.; Interrante, C.G.; Ahn, T.M.

    1993-01-01

    The selection of materials that are suitable for various high-level waste-packaging designs must reflect the need to meet requirements for long-term performance in repository environments that change with time. With this in mind, we examine how grain boundaries in materials are induced to migrate as a result of solute diffusion even at low temperatures, how the composition of the matrix material is changed significantly by this diffusion-induced grain boundary migration (DIGM), and how the changing microstructures and compositions during DIGM lead to major changes in materials performance, such as corrosion or embrittlement. Methods are discussed for prediction of the long-term behavior of materials affected by DIGM

  10. Large concentration changes due to thermal diffusion effects in gas flow microsystems with temperature gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaade, Ulrich; Johannessen, Tue; Jensen, Søren

    Thermal diffusion, or Sorét diffusion, is shown to cause significant concentration changes and transients in gas flow microsystems with temperature gradients. In a silicon microsystem, a temperature gradient of about 100 oC/mm is measured to produce concentration transients of up to 13.7 % in an ......Thermal diffusion, or Sorét diffusion, is shown to cause significant concentration changes and transients in gas flow microsystems with temperature gradients. In a silicon microsystem, a temperature gradient of about 100 oC/mm is measured to produce concentration transients of up to 13.......7 % in an argon/helium mixture, when the flow is abruptly changed from a high value to a low value. Finite element simulations of the thermal diffusion in a geometry similar to the experimental setup reproduce the measurements....

  11. Laser-induced skin temperature oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podtaev, S.; Dumler, A.; Muravyov, N.; Myasnikov, M.; Tsiberkin, K.

    2010-11-01

    Adaptive wavelet analysis algorithms are used to study skin temperature oscillations caused by periodic changes in the blood flow resulting from oscillations in the vasomotor smooth muscle tone. Reduction in the amplitude of temperature fluctuations with frequency arises because the skin, owing to its low thermal diffusivity, has the properties of a lowfrequency filter. In view of their small amplitude, oscillations in the spectral range, reflecting the influence of heartbeat and respiration, cannot be distinguished from the external thermal noise. To analyze changes in oscillations of skin temperature during the laser stimulation (10 mW/cm2, 630 nm) we extract three frequency bands, corresponding to myogenic, neurogenic and endothelial vascular tone regulation mechanisms. Red laser irradiation causes temperature fluctuations changes within spectral ranges corresponding endothelial functioning and neurogenic activity.

  12. Low temperature thermal diffusivity of LiKSO4 obtained using the photoacoustic phase lag method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge M.P.P.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the determination of the thermal diffusivity of LiKSO4 crystals using the photoacoustic phase lag method, in the 77 K to 300 K temperature interval. This method is quite simple and fast and when it is coupled to a specially designed apparatus, that includes a resonant photoacoustic cell, allows for the determination of the thermal diffusivity at low temperatures. The thermal diffusivity is an important parameter that depends on the temperature, and no values of this parameter for LiKSO4, at low temperature, have yet been reported. The LiKSO4 is a crystal with many phase transitions which can be detected via the anomalies in the variation of the thermal diffusivity as a function of the temperature.

  13. Diffusion Concept in Phase Stability of High Temperature Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Ji-Cheng

    2003-01-01

    A high-efficiency "diffusion multiple" approach was employed to determine the phase diagrams of nine ternary systems Nb-Ti-Si, Nb-Cr- Si, Nb-Cr-Ti, Ti-Cr-Si, Nb-Si-Al, Nb-Cr-Al, Nb-Ti-Al, Ti-Si-Al, and Ti-Cr-Al...

  14. Temperature mapping, thermal diffusivity and subsoil heat flux at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Thermal diffusivity (ks) of the soil depends on soil moisture, soil porosity and conductiv- ity of the soil particles. Of these, moisture con- tent is the only short term variable for the given soil. Experimental determination of ks of the soil is not easy in the field, hence it has been determined from the measured soil tempera- tures.

  15. Influence of annealing temperature on the Dy diffusion process in NdFeB magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Sheng-qing, E-mail: joy_hsq@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Peng, Kun, E-mail: kpeng@hnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Chen, Hong [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Sintered NdFeB magnets were coated with a layer of Dy metal using electron beam evaporation method and then annealed at various temperatures to investigate the temperature dependence of Dy diffusion process in NdFeB magnets. A Dy-rich phase was observed along the grain boundaries after the grain boundary diffusion process, the diffusion coefficients of various temperatures were obtained, the diffusion coefficients of Dy along the grain boundaries at 800 °C and 900 °C were determined to be 9.8×10{sup −8} cm{sup 2} s{sup −1} and 2.4×10{sup −7} cm{sup 2} s{sup −1}, respectively. The diffusion length depended on the annealing temperature and the maximum diffusion length of approximately 1.8 mm and 3.0 mm can be obtained after annealing at 800 °C and 900 °C for 8 h. Higher diffusion temperature results in the diffusion not only along the grain boundaries but also into grains and then decrease in magnetic properties. The optimum annealing conditions can be determined as 900 °C for 8 h. The coercivity was improved from 1040 kA/m to 1450 kA/m and its magnetization has no significant reduction after the grain boundary diffusion process at the optimum annealing conditions. - Highlights: • The optimum annealing conditions can be determined as 900 °C for 8 h. • The diffusion coefficient of Dy at 900 °Care determined to be 2.4×10{sup −7} cm{sup 2} s{sup −1}. • A maximum diffusion length of about 3 mm can be obtained.

  16. Contribution to the theory of positive muon diffusion in metals at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaouanc, A.

    1983-01-01

    We study the temperature dependence of the μ + diffusion in a metal within the small polaron theory. The geometry of the strain field due to an impurity is shown to strongly influence the μ + diffusion properties. We reanalyzed part of the Al data

  17. Extending reversed-flow chromatographic methods for the measurement of diffusion coefficients to higher temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGivern, W Sean; Manion, Jeffrey A

    2011-11-18

    A reversed-flow gas-chromatography (RF-GC) apparatus for the measurement of binary diffusion coefficients is described and utilized to measure the binary diffusion coefficients for several systems at temperatures from (300 to 723)K. Hydrocarbons are detected using flame ionization detection, and inert species can be detected by thermal conductivity. The present apparatus has been utilized to measure diffusion coefficients at substantially higher temperatures than previous RF-GC work. Characterization of the new apparatus was accomplished by comparing measured binary diffusion coefficients of dilute argon in helium to established reference values. Further diffusion coefficient measurements for dilute helium in argon and dilute nitrogen in helium (using thermal conductivity detection) and dilute methane in helium (using flame ionization detection) were performed and found to be in excellent agreement with literature values. The measurement of these well-established diffusion coefficients has shown that specific experimental conditions are required for accurate diffusion measurements using this technique, particularly at higher temperatures. Numerical simulations of the diffusion experiments are presented to demonstrate that artifacts of the analysis procedure must be specifically identified to ensure accuracy, particularly at higher temperatures. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Cerebral Effects of Targeted Temperature Management Methods Assessed by Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grejs, Anders Morten; Gjedsted, Jakob; Pedersen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this randomized porcine study was to compare surface targeted temperature management (TTM) to endovascular TTM evaluated by cerebral diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and by intracerebral/intramuscular microdialysis. It is well...

  19. Temperature effects on solute diffusion and adsorption in differently compacted kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mon, Ei Ei; Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Kawamoto, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Effects of soil temperature on the solute diffusion process in soils are important since subsurface temperature variation affects solute transport such as a fertilizer movement, leaching of salt, and pollutant movement to groundwater aquifers. However, the temperature dependency on the solute dif...

  20. Temperature-dependent ordinary and thermal diffusion of hydrogen isotopes through thermonuclear reactor components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendergrass, J.H.

    1976-09-01

    To permit more accurate calculations of tritium permeation for design purposes, theoretical expressions for quasiunidirectional ordinary diffusion of hydrogen isotopes through nonisothermal plane, cylindrical shell, and spherical shell barriers are presented. Arrhenium-type dependence of mass diffusivity on temperature and steady-state constant-thermal-conductivity temperature gradients through the barriers are considered. Analyses that consider thermal diffusion with both constant and temperature-dependent heat of transport are also presented. Other topics discussed are amounts of dissolved hydrogen, variable-thermal-conductivity temperature profiles, hydrogen isotope trapping by chemical impurities, crystal lattice imperfections, and grain boundaries, and mixing rules for dilute dissolution of hydrogen isotope mixtures in metals. Numerical results are given which reveal that neglect of thermal diffusion can lead to errors of up to several hundred percent in calculations of hydrogen isotope transfer through reactor components having large temperature gradients through them. Calculations of combined ordinary and thermal diffusion that rigorously treat the temperature dependences of thermophysical properties typically yield results that differ by only a few percent from results based on physical property evaluations at the arithmetic average of barrier face temperatures.

  1. Reference mean temperature for evaluation of performance of thermal diffusion column for isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Ichiro; Kanagawa, Akira

    1987-01-01

    In order to evaluate separative performance of a thermal diffusion column, a simplification is usually made in which the temperature dependence of the relevant properties such as thermal diffusion constant is ignored and some proper mean values evaluated at a specific ''mean'' temperature are used. Adoption of weighted average of temperature distribution is common for the ''mean'' temperature, but there exists no definite way of determining mean temperature. The present paper proposes a new reference mean temperature determined by the equation governing the free convection. It is based on the fact that the multiplication effect of free convection is essential to separation by thermal diffusion column. The reference mean temperature is related to pressure difference between top and bottom of column and is higher than a mass-averaged temperature (due to gravitational force) by a contribution of viscous force. The reference mean temperature was calculated, as a reference, for an Ar isotope separating column with an inner hot radius of 0.2 mm and an outer cold radius of 5 mm. The results confirmed the validity of an approximate formula expressing effects of temperature difference and ratio of inner and outer radii of column explicitly for the temperature. The reference mean temperature calculated from pressure difference given by axisymmetric solution of equations of change was in good agreement with the analytical solution. (author)

  2. Using the thermal diffusion cloud chamber to study the ion-induced nucleation by radon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yefei.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal diffusion cloud chamber is steady-state device and has been extensively used for nucleation research. In order to study the ion-induced nucleation by radon decay, a new chamber was designed with improved both upper and bottom plates, the system of circulating fluid, the gasketting, the temperature measurement and the insulation. An alternative method of using oxygen as carrier gas was examined. Therefore, the heavy carrier gas including nitrogen, oxygen, neon, argon and air can be used to study radon radiolysis-induced nucleation for the water or organic compounds in the TDCC. The effects of the pressure and temperature ranges on the density, supersaturation, temperature and partial pressure profile for the water-oxygen-helium in the TDCC have been examined. Based on the classical theory, the rate profile of ion-induced nucleation by radon decays was calculated and compared with the homogeneous nucleation. From measured indoor concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), thermodynamic theory models were used to assess the possibility that these compounds will form ultrafine particles in indoor air by ion-induced nucleation. The energy, number of molecules and equilibrium radius of clusters have been calculated based on Such and Thomson theories. These two sets of values have been compared. Ion cluster radii corresponding to 1--3 VOC molecules are in range of 3--5 x 10 -8 cm. 43 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs

  3. AC electric field induced vortex in laminar coflow diffusion flames

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan

    2014-09-22

    Experiments were performed by applying sub-critical high-voltage alternating current (AC) to the nozzle of laminar propane coflow diffusion flames. Light scattering, laser-induced incandescence and laser-induced fluorescence techniques were used to identify the soot zone, and the structures of OH and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Particle image velocimetry was adopted to quantify the velocity field. Under certain AC conditions of applied voltage and frequency, the distribution of PAHs and the flow field near the nozzle exit were drastically altered, leading to the formation of toroidal vortices. Increased residence time and heat recirculation inside the vortex resulted in appreciable formation of PAHs and soot near the nozzle exit. Decreased residence time along the jet axis through flow acceleration by the vortex led to a reduction in the soot volume fraction in the downstream sooting zone. Electromagnetic force generated by AC was proposed as a viable mechanism for the formation of the toroidal vortex. The onset conditions for the vortex formation supported the role of an electromagnetic force acting on charged particles in the flame zone. (C) 2014 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Rapid oxygen diffusion during high temperature alteration of zircon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Nick M W; Yang, Qiong-Yan; Santosh, M

    2018-02-26

    The mineral zircon through its isotopic and elemental signatures comprises the greatest archive recording the evolution of Earth's continental crust. Recognising primary from secondary zircon compositional signatures is thus important for the accurate interpretation of this archive. We report two examples of metasedimentary rocks from high-grade shear zones within the Southern Granulite Belt of India, where anomalously high and homogeneous oxygen isotope signatures indicate disturbance of this isotopic system. Utilising the combined U-Pb-Hf-O and trace element signatures from these zircon grains, we postulate that fluid-assisted alteration has led to complete resetting of the oxygen isotope signatures. This case study presents a rarely observed natural example of potentially fast diffusion of oxygen under hydrous conditions. Given the pervasive nature of fluid interaction within high-grade and highly deformed rocks, we expect that such isotopic disturbance might be more common to nature than is currently reported. A lack of correlation between isotopic disturbance with cathodoluminescence or Th/U values, suggests that these altered zircon grains would not clearly be classified as metamorphic, in which case they would be expected to yield primary compositions. Caution is therefore advised when using detrital δ 18 O zircon compilations without a high level of scrutiny for primary versus secondary compositions.

  5. Low temperature isotope effects of hydrogen diffusion in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, A.; Kronmueller, H.

    1989-01-01

    Snoek-like relaxation peaks of Hydrogen and Deuterium in amorphous Fe 80 B 20 , Fe 40 Ni 40 P 14 B 6 and Fe 91 Zr 9 are detected. At low H, D concentrations the peaks are near 200 K and show small isotope effects of the average activation energies (anti Q H ≅ 0.6 eV, anti Q D - anti Q H ≤ 10 meV). For higher H, D-contents the peaks shift to lower temperatures around to 120 K and show distinct isotope effects in the activation energies (anti Q H ≅ 0.3 eV, anti Q D - anti Q H ≅ 30 meV) and in the amplitude of the low temperature tails of the relaxation peaks. This points to isotope mass dependent deviations from the Arrhenius law due to nonthermal tunneling processes. (orig.)

  6. Low temperature Zn diffusion for GaSb solar cell structures fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulima, Oleg V.; Faleev, Nikolai N.; Kazantsev, Andrej B.; Mintairov, Alexander M.; Namazov, Ali

    1995-01-01

    Low temperature Zn diffusion in GaSb, where the minimum temperature was 450 C, was studied. The pseudo-closed box (PCB) method was used for Zn diffusion into GaAs, AlGaAs, InP, InGaAs and InGaAsP. The PCB method avoids the inconvenience of sealed ampoules and proved to be simple and reproducible. The special design of the boat for Zn diffusion ensured the uniformality of Zn vapor pressure across the wafer surface, and thus the uniformity of the p-GaSb layer depth. The p-GaSb layers were studied using Raman scattering spectroscopy and the x-ray rocking curve method. As for the postdiffusion processing, an anodic oxidation was used for a precise thinning of the diffused GaSb layers. The results show the applicability of the PCB method for the large-scale production of the GaSb structures for solar cells.

  7. Effect of Drying Temperature on the Chemical Properties and Diffusivity of belimbi (averrhoa belimbi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahari, N.; Jamil, N.; Rasmani, K. A.; Nursabrina

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, many dried fruit products have been developed in response to a strong demand by the customer. This type of fruit has a different composition and hence different moisture diffusivity (D). During drying, Fick's Law of diffusion, which describes the movement of liquid water was used to calculate this diffusivity. However diffusivity has strong effects on the material drying characteristics and these must be determined. In this paper, Fick's Law of diffusion with different kinds of boundary conditions was solve using separation of variable (SOV). In order to get the value of D, results obtained using SOV will be compared with the results from the drying of belimbi at temperature of 40°C, 50°C and 60°C. Although the results show that variation in the values of diffusivity for different temperatures is relatively small, but the variation in the total time required for drying is significantly bigger: between 3-7 hours. Its shown that diffusivity is an important measurement and should be considered in the modeling of the drying process. The chemical properties of belimbi slices in terms of vitamin C, total ash and antioxidant activity with different air temperatures and pretreatment were also investigated. Higher drying temperatures gives less drying time, a lower vitamin C and antioxidant activity but a greater total of ash, whilst pre-treatment can increased vitamin C and antioxidant activity. The results show that pre-treatment and the drying temperature are important variables to improve mass and heat transfer, as well as the belimbi chemical properties.

  8. Determination of hydrogen diffusivity and permeability in W near room temperature applying a tritium tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, T.; Otsuka, T.; Tanabe, T.

    2011-01-01

    Tungsten is a primary candidate of plasma facing material in ITER and beyond, owing to its good thermal property and low erosion. But hydrogen solubility and diffusivity near ITER operation temperatures (below 500 K) have scarcely studied. Mainly because its low hydrogen solubility and diffusivity at lower temperatures make the detection of hydrogen quite difficult. We have tried to observe hydrogen plasma driven permeation (PDP) through nickel and tungsten near room temperatures applying a tritium tracer technique, which is extremely sensible to detect tritium diluted in hydrogen. The apparent diffusion coefficients for PDP were determined by permeation lag times at first time, and those for nickel and tungsten were similar or a few times larger than those for gas driven permeation (GDP). The permeation rates for PDP in nickel and tungsten were larger than those for GDP normalized to the same gas pressure about 20 and 5 times larger, respectively.

  9. Thermal diffusivity and adiabatic limit temperature characterization of consolidate granular expanded perlite using the flash method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raefat, Saad; Garoum, Mohammed; Laaroussi, Najma; Thiam, Macodou; Amarray, Khaoula

    2017-07-01

    In this work experimental investigation of apparent thermal diffusivity and adiabatic limit temperature of expanded granular perlite mixes has been made using the flash technic. Perlite granulates were sieved to produce essentially three characteristic grain sizes. The consolidated samples were manufactured by mixing controlled proportions of the plaster and water. The effect of the particle size on the diffusivity was examined. The inverse estimation of the diffusivity and the adiabatic limit temperature at the rear face as well as the heat losses coefficients were performed using several numerical global minimization procedures. The function to be minimized is the quadratic distance between the experimental temperature rise at the rear face and the analytical model derived from the one dimension heat conduction. It is shown that, for all granulometry tested, the estimated parameters lead to a good agreement between the mathematical model and experimental data.

  10. Real-time transmission electron microscope observation of gold nanoclusters diffusing into silicon at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Tadashi; Nakajima, Yuuki; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Endo, Junji; Collard, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Gold diffusion into silicon at room temperature was observed in real time with atomic resolution. Gold nanoclusters were formed on a silicon surface by an electrical discharge between a silicon tip and a gold coated tip inside an ultrahigh-vacuum transmission electron microscope (TEM) specimen chamber. At the moment of the gold nanocluster deposition, the gold nanoclusters had a crystalline structure. The crystalline structure gradually disappeared due to the interdiffusion between silicon and gold as observed after the deposition of gold nanoclusters. The shape of the nanocluster gradually changed due to the gold diffusion into the damaged silicon. The diffusion front between silicon and gold moved toward the silicon side. From the observations of the diffusion front, the gold diffusivity at room temperature was extracted. The extracted activation energy, 0.21 eV, matched the activation energy in bulk diffusion between damaged silicon and gold. This information is useful for optimizing the hybridization between solid-state and biological nanodevices in which gold is used as an adhesive layer between the two devices.

  11. Soil thermal diffusivity estimated from data of soil temperature and single soil component properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quirijn de Jong van Lier

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Under field conditions, thermal diffusivity can be estimated from soil temperature data but also from the properties of soil components together with their spatial organization. We aimed to determine soil thermal diffusivity from half-hourly temperature measurements in a Rhodic Kanhapludalf, using three calculation procedures (the amplitude ratio, phase lag and Seemann procedures, as well as from soil component properties, for a comparison of procedures and methods. To determine thermal conductivity for short wave periods (one day, the phase lag method was more reliable than the amplitude ratio or the Seemann method, especially in deeper layers, where temperature variations are small. The phase lag method resulted in coherent values of thermal diffusivity. The method using properties of single soil components with the values of thermal conductivity for sandstone and kaolinite resulted in thermal diffusivity values of the same order. In the observed water content range (0.26-0.34 m³ m-3, the average thermal diffusivity was 0.034 m² d-1 in the top layer (0.05-0.15 m and 0.027 m² d-1 in the subsurface layer (0.15-0.30 m.

  12. Nickel in silicon: Room-temperature in-diffusion and interaction with radiation defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarykin, Nikolai [Institute of Microelectronics Technology, RAS, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Weber, Joerg [Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    Nickel is incorporated into silicon wafers during chemomechanical polishing in an alkaline Ni-contaminated slurry at room temperature. The nickel in-diffusion is detected by DLTS depth profiles of a novel Ni{sub 183} level, which is formed due to a reaction between the diffusing nickel and the VO centers introduced before the polishing. The Ni{sub 183} profile extends up to 10 μm after a 2 min polishing. The available data provide a lower estimate for the room-temperature nickel diffusivity D{sub Ni} > 10{sup -9} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Temperature and concentration dependence of hydrogen diffusion in vanadium measured by optical transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Book, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion is investigated in a 50 nm film of vanadium and a vanadium superlattice. Diffusion constants for three different temperature and pressure pairs are determined for the 50 nm film. The diffusion constants for the temperature and pressure pairs are determined to be 4.5 $\\pm$ 0.1 $\\cdot 10^{-5} \\text{ cm}^{-2}$ at 463 K and 0.05 H/V, 5.6 $\\pm$ 0.1 $\\cdot 10^{-5} \\text{ cm}^{-2}$ at 463 K and 0.12 H/V and 8.0 $\\pm$ 0.2 $\\cdot 10^{-5} \\text{ cm}^{-2}$ at 493 K and 0.05 H/V. The t...

  14. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of tantalum in the temperature range from 293 to 1800 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, I. V.; Stankus, S. V.

    2008-12-01

    Thermal diffusivity of polycrystalline tantalum at the temperature range from 293 to 1800 K has been measured by the laser flash method with the error of 2-4 %. Thermal conductivity has been calculated with the use of reference data on density and heat capacity. Approximating equations and tables of reference data for the temperature dependence of heat transfer coefficients have been obtained; comparison with the published data has been carried out.

  15. Temperature Measurements in an Ethylene-Air-Opposed Flow Diffusion Flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    camera optical pyrometer to thermocouple measurements and Cantera simulations for opposed flow diffusion flames. Unlike thermocouples, optical ...above the fuel duct was acquired from the optical pyrometer . A maximum centerline flame temperature of 1898 K at 3.70 mm above the fuel duct was...region used for the pyrometer measurement. 7 Interpretation of the pyrometry temperature measurements depends on the optical thickness of the flame

  16. Possible temperature dependence of the activation energy for grain boundary diffusion in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, J. C.M.; Balluffi, R. W.

    1978-05-01

    The apparent activation energy for existing grain boundary diffusion data shows a tendency to decrease with decreasing temperature. Such a decrease may conceivably be due to at least two causes: (1) The grain boundary diffusion must involve several different types of atomic jumps in the core region, each of which is characterized by a different activation energy. The resulting diffusion is then a weighted average over these jumps. As the temperature is lowered, the jump paths with higher activation energies become progressively ''frozen out.'' If the paths are connected in a parallel arrangement (in analogy to an electrical circuit) the averaged effective activation energy decreases as the temperature is reduced. (2) Experimental results were obtained using polycrystalline samples containing a spectrum of different types of grain boundaries. The overall observed diffusion is, therefore, a weighted average over these boundaries. As the temperature is lowered, the boundaries with the higher activation energies become progressively frozen out and the averaged effective activation energy decreases. (GHT)

  17. Six years of ground–air temperature tracking at Malence (Slovenia): thermal diffusivity from subsurface temperature data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dědeček, Petr; Rajver, D.; Čermák, Vladimír; Šafanda, Jan; Krešl, Milan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2013), 025012/1-025012/9 ISSN 1742-2132 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP210/11/0183; GA MŠk LM2010008 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : ground-air temperature coupling * thermal diffusivity * conductive-convective heat transfer Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.895, year: 2013

  18. Liquid-phase diffusion bonding: Temperature effects and solute redistribution in high temperature lead-free composite solders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iver [Ames Lab. and Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Choquette, Stephanie [Ames Lab. and Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-05-17

    Liquid-phase diffusion bonding (LPDB) is being studied as the primary phenomena occurring in the development of a high temperature lead-free composite solder paste composed of gas-atomized Cu-10Ni, wt.% (Cu-11Ni, at.%) powder blended with Sn-0.7Cu-0.05Ni-0.01Ge (Sn-1.3Cu-0.1Ni-0.02Ge, at.%) Nihon-Superior SN100C solder powder. Powder compacts were used as a model system. LPDB promotes enhanced interdiffusion of the low-melting alloy matrix with the solid Cu-10Ni reinforcement powder above the matrix liquidus temperature. The initial study involved the effective intermetallic compound (IMC) compositions and microstructures that occur at varying reflow temperatures and times between 250-300°C and 30-60s, respectively. Certain reflow temperatures encourage adequate interdiffusion to form a continuous highly-conductive network throughout the composite solder joints. The diffusion of nickel, in particular, has a disperse pattern that foreshadows the possibility of a highly-conductive low-melting solder that can be successfully utilized at high temperatures.

  19. Room temperature ferromagnetism in thermally diffused Cr in GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggisetti, P.; Banerjee, D.; Adari, R.; Pande, N.; Patil, T.; Ganguly, S.; Saha, D.

    2013-03-01

    We report room temperature ferromagnetism in crystalline GaCrN prepared by Cr deposition and drive-in diffusion with Curie temperature much above 300 K. The Curie temperature increases with increasing active Cr concentration. Cr doped GaN acts as an n-type material with significant increase in electron carrier concentration due to the presence of Cr. Optical property of GaCrN is found to be very similar to GaN with an additional peak at 3.29 eV due to Cr. The hysteresis measurements show that the ferromagnetic ordering is maintained up to 300 K with no significant change in saturation magnetization.

  20. Measurement of the full shear-induced self-diffusion tensor of noncolloidal suspensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breedveld, L.V.A.; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Bosscher, M.; Bosscher, M.; Jongschaap, R.J.J.; Mellema, J.

    2002-01-01

    The full diffusion tensor of shear-induced self-diffusion has been measured experimentally for the first time. In addition to the well-known components in the velocity gradient, Dyy, and vorticity direction, Dzz, the coefficients Dxx and Dxy have been determined for concentrated suspensions of

  1. Reconstructing bottom water temperatures from measurements of temperature and thermal diffusivity in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesner, F.; Lechleiter, A.; Müller, C.

    2015-07-01

    Continuous monitoring of oceanic bottom water temperatures is a complicated task, even in relatively easy-to-access basins like the North or Baltic seas. Here, a method to determine annual bottom water temperature variations from inverse modeling of instantaneous measurements of temperatures and sediment thermal properties is presented. This concept is similar to climate reconstructions over several thousand years from deep borehole data. However, in contrast, the presented method aims at reconstructing the recent temperature history of the last year from sediment thermal properties and temperatures from only a few meters depth. For solving the heat equation, a commonly used forward model is introduced and analyzed: knowing the bottom water temperature variations for the preceding years and the thermal properties of the sediments, the forward model determines the sediment temperature field. The bottom water temperature variation is modeled as an annual cosine defined by the mean temperature, the amplitude and a phase shift. As the forward model operator is non-linear but low-dimensional, common inversion schemes such as the Newton algorithm can be utilized. The algorithms are tested for artificial data with different noise levels and for two measured data sets: from the North Sea and from the Davis Strait. Both algorithms used show stable and satisfying results with reconstruction errors in the same magnitude as the initial data error. In particular, the artificial data sets are reproduced with accuracy within the bounds of the artificial noise level. Furthermore, the results for the measured North Sea data show small variances and resemble the bottom water temperature variations recorded from a nearby monitoring site with relative errors smaller than 1 % in all parameters.

  2. Free energy in plasmas under wave-induced diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisch, N.J.

    1993-05-01

    When waves propagate through a bounded plasma, the wave may be amplified or damped at the expense of the plasma kinetic energy. In many cases of interest, the primary effect of the wave is to cause plasma diffusion in velocity and configuration space. In the absence of collisions, the rearrangement of the plasma conserves entropy, as large-grain structures are mixed and fine-grain structures emerge. The maximum extractable energy by waves so diffusing the plasma is a quantity of fundamental interest; it can be defined, but it is difficult to calculate. Through the consideration of specific examples, certain strategies for maximizing energy extraction are identified

  3. The study of diffusion in network-forming liquids under pressure and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, P.K. [Department of Computational Physics, Hanoi University of Technology, 1Dai Co Viet, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Kien, P.H., E-mail: phkien80@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Thainguyen University of Education, 20 Luong Ngoc Quyen, Thainguyen (Viet Nam); San, L.T.; Hong, N.V. [Department of Computational Physics, Hanoi University of Technology, 1Dai Co Viet, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2016-11-15

    In this paper, the molecular dynamics simulation is applied to investigate the diffusion in silica liquids under different temperature and pressure. We show that the diffusion is controlled by the rate of effective SiO{sub x}→SiO{sub x±1} and OSi{sub y}→OSi{sub y±1} reaction. With increasing the pressure, the rate of reaction increases and the Si–O bond is weaker. Moreover, the reactions are not uniformly distributed in the space, but instead they happen frequently or rarely in separate regions. We also reveal two motion types: free and correlation motion. The correlation motion concerns the moving of a group of atoms which is similar to that of the diffusion of a super-molecule in the liquid. A detailed analysis of the movement of atoms from specified set shows the clustering of them which indicates structure and dynamics heterogeneity. Further, we find that the correlation motion is very important for the diffusion in network-forming liquid. The observed phenomena such as diffusion anomaly, dynamics heterogeneity and dynamical slowdown are originated from the correlation motion of atom.

  4. The study of diffusion in network-forming liquids under pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, P.K.; Kien, P.H.; San, L.T.; Hong, N.V.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the molecular dynamics simulation is applied to investigate the diffusion in silica liquids under different temperature and pressure. We show that the diffusion is controlled by the rate of effective SiO x →SiO x±1 and OSi y →OSi y±1 reaction. With increasing the pressure, the rate of reaction increases and the Si–O bond is weaker. Moreover, the reactions are not uniformly distributed in the space, but instead they happen frequently or rarely in separate regions. We also reveal two motion types: free and correlation motion. The correlation motion concerns the moving of a group of atoms which is similar to that of the diffusion of a super-molecule in the liquid. A detailed analysis of the movement of atoms from specified set shows the clustering of them which indicates structure and dynamics heterogeneity. Further, we find that the correlation motion is very important for the diffusion in network-forming liquid. The observed phenomena such as diffusion anomaly, dynamics heterogeneity and dynamical slowdown are originated from the correlation motion of atom.

  5. Influence of the atomic structure of crystal surfaces on the surface diffusion in medium temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousty, J.P.

    1981-12-01

    In this work, we have studied the influence of atomic structure of crystal surface on surface self-diffusion in the medium temperature range. Two ways are followed. First, we have measured, using a radiotracer method, the self-diffusion coefficient at 820 K (0.6 T melting) on copper surfaces both the structure and the cleanliness of which were stable during the experiment. We have shown that the interaction between mobile surface defects and steps can be studied through measurements of the anisotropy of surface self diffusion. Second, the behavior of an adatom and a surface vacancy is simulated via a molecular dynamics method, on several surfaces of a Lennard Jones crystal. An inventory of possible migration mechanisms of these surface defects has been drawn between 0.35 and 0.45 Tsub(m). The results obtained with both the methods point out the influence of the surface atomic structure in surface self-diffusion in the medium temperature range [fr

  6. Hindered diffusion of asphaltenes at elevated temperature and pressure. Semiannual report, March 20 - September 20, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guin, J.A.; Geelen, R.; Gregory, C.; Yang, X.

    1996-11-01

    The objectives are to: investigate the hindered diffusion of coal and petroleum asphaltenes in the pores of catalyst particles at elevated temperature and pressures; and examine the effects of concentration, temperature, solvent type, and pressure on the intraparticle diffusivity of asphaltenes. Progress was made in several areas during this time period. The high temperature/high pressure autoclave has been received from Parr Instrument Company and is in the process of being set up and checked out. During this time period we mainly worked in two areas. In the first area, we performed some measurements on the adsorption isotherms of the model compound quinoline in cyclohexane onto a Criterion 324 catalyst at three temperatures. We are looking at the effect of temperature on the adsorption isotherms of several model compounds. This area is important since the adsorptive uptake of asphaltenes is being studied and the model compound systems lend insight as to how we may expect the more complex asphaltene systems to behave during adsorption on the surface of the porous particles. We found that even for the simple model compound quinoline, the adsorption behavior vs. temperature was quite 0563 complex. The second area explored during this time period was the application of a mathematical model to adsorptive uptake data for asphaltenes on Criterion 324 catalyst particles. This adsorptive uptake data was obtained during the previous time period and was analyzed by mathematical modeling during the current time period. The detailed findings in both of these areas are presented in this report.

  7. Effect of Soret diffusion on lean hydrogen/air flames at normal and elevated pressure and temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Zhen

    2017-04-12

    The influence of Soret diffusion on lean premixed flames propagating in hydrogen/air mixtures is numerically investigated with a detailed chemical and transport models at normal and elevated pressure and temperature. The Soret diffusion influence on the one-dimensional (1D) flame mass burning rate and two-dimensional (2D) flame propagating characteristics is analysed, revealing a strong dependency on flame stretch rate, pressure and temperature. For 1D flames, at normal pressure and temperature, with an increase of Karlovitz number from 0 to 0.4, the mass burning rate is first reduced and then enhanced by Soret diffusion of H2 while it is reduced by Soret diffusion of H. The influence of Soret diffusion of H2 is enhanced by pressure and reduced by temperature. On the contrary, the influence of Soret diffusion of H is reduced by pressure and enhanced by temperature. For 2D flames, at normal pressure and temperature, during the early phase of flame evolution, flames with Soret diffusion display more curved flame cells. Pressure enhances this effect, while temperature reduces it. The influence of Soret diffusion of H2 on the global consumption speed is enhanced at elevated pressure. The influence of Soret diffusion of H on the global consumption speed is enhanced at elevated temperature. The flame evolution is more affected by Soret diffusion in the early phase of propagation than in the long run due to the local enrichment of H2 caused by flame curvature effects. The present study provides new insights into the Soret diffusion effect on the characteristics of lean hydrogen/air flames at conditions that are relevant to practical applications, e.g. gas engines and turbines.

  8. An analytical method for determining the temperature dependent moisture diffusivities of pumpkin seeds during drying process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Can, Ahmet [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Trakya, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)

    2007-02-15

    This paper presents an analytical method, which determines the moisture diffusion coefficients for the natural and forced convection hot air drying of pumpkin seeds and their temperature dependence. In order to obtain scientific data, the pumpkin seed drying process was investigated under both natural and forced hot air convection regimes. This paper presents the experimental results in which the drying air was heated by solar energy. (author)

  9. Modification of the glass surface induced by redox reactions and internal diffusion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Deubener, Joachim; Yue, Yuanzheng

    In this paper we report a novel way to modify the glass surface in favor of some physical performances. The main step is to perform iso-thermal treatments on the selected silicate glasses containing transition metal at temperatures near the glass transition temperature for various durations under...... different gases. As a result, we have observed a striking phenomenon, i.e., the outward diffusion of divalent cations occurs not only under an oxidizing atmosphere of heat-treatment, but also under nitrogen, even under reducing atmospheres like H2/N2 (10/90). The extent of the cationic diffusion depends...... on temperature and duration of heat-treatments. The mechanism of the diffusion depends on the type of the gases used for the heat-treatments. In this paper we propose several possible models describing mechanisms of the cationic diffusion, and hence, of the formation of the nano-layer. We also report the effect...

  10. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging reveals the effects of different cooling temperatures on the diffusion of water molecules and perfusion within human skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, O.; Fukubayashi, T.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of local cooling on the diffusion of water molecules and perfusion within muscle at different cooling temperatures. Materials and methods: Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted (DW) images of the leg (seven males) were obtained before and after 30 min cooling (0, 10, and 20 o C), and after a 30 min recovery period. Two types of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC; ADC1, reflecting both water diffusion and perfusion within muscle, and ADC2, approximating the true water diffusion coefficient) of the ankle dorsiflexors were calculated from DW images. T2-weighted images were also obtained to calculate T2 values of the ankle dorsiflexors. The skin temperature was measured before, during, and after cooling. Results: Both ADC values significantly decreased after cooling under all cooling conditions; the rate of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used (ADC1: -36% at 0 o C, -27.8% at 10 o C, and -22.6% at 20 o C; ADC2: -26% at 0 o C, -21.1% at 10 o C, and -14.6% at 20 o C). These significant decreases were maintained during the recovery period. Conversely, the T2 value showed no significant changes. Under all cooling conditions, skin temperature significantly decreased during cooling; the rate of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used (-74.8% at 0 o C, -51.1% at 10 o C, and -26.8% at 20 o C). Decreased skin temperatures were not restored to pre-cooling values during the recovery period under any cooling conditions. Conclusion: Local cooling decreased the water diffusion and perfusion within muscle with decreased skin temperature; the rates of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used. These decreases were maintained for 30 min after cooling.

  11. Thermal conductivity, diffusivity and expansion of Avery Island salt at pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.; Trimmer, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary data on the thermal propertes of a course-grained rock salt from Avery Island, Louisiana, indicate that hydrostatic pressure to 50 MPa has little effect on the thermal conductivity, diffusivity and linear expansion at temperatures from 300 to 573 K. The measurements were made in a new apparatus under conditions of true hydrostatic loading. At room temperature and effective confining pressure increasing from 10 to 50 MPa, thermal conductivity and diffusivity are constant at roughly 7 W/mK and 3.6 x 10 -6 m 2 /s, respectively. At 50 MPa and temperature increasing from 300 to 573 K, both conductivity and diffusivity drop by a factor of 2. Thermal linear expansion at 0 MPa matches that at 50 MPa, increasing from roughly 4.2 x 10 -5 /K at 300 K to 5.5 x 10 -5 /K at 573 K. The lack of a pressure effect on all three properties is confirmed by previous work. Simple models of microcracking suggest that among common geological materials the lack of pressure dependence is unique to rock salt

  12. Thermal conductivity, diffusivity and expansion of Avery Island salt at pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.; Trimmer, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    Preliminary data on the thermal properties of a coarse-grained rock salt from Avery Island, Louisiana, indicates that hydrostatic pressure to 50 MPa has little effect on the thermal conductivity, diffusivity and linear expansion at temperatures from 300 to 573 K. The measurements were made in a new apparatus under conditions of true hydrostatic loading. At room temperature and effective confining pressure increasing from 10 to 50 MPa, thermal conductivity and diffusivity are constant at roughly 7W/mK and 3.6 x 10 -6 m 2 /s, respectively. At 50 MPa and temperature increasing from 300 to 573K, both conductivity and diffusivity drop by a factor of 2. Thermal linear expansion at 0 MPa matches that at 50 MPa, increasing from roughly 4.2 x 10 -5 /K at 300 K to 5.5 x 10 -5 at 573 K. The lack of a pressure effect on all three properties is confirmed by previous work. Simple models of microcracking suggest that among common geological materials the lack of pressure dependence is unique to rock salt

  13. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo; Price, William S., E-mail: w.price@uws.edu.au [Nanoscale Organisation and Dynamics Group, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, NSW 2751 (Australia)

    2014-03-28

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magnetic properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested.

  14. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo; Price, William S.

    2014-03-01

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magnetic properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested.

  15. Molecular dynamics study of dislocation cores in copper: structure and diffusion at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jin

    1989-01-01

    The variation of the core structure of an easy glide dislocation with temperature and its influence on the stacking fault energy (γ) have been investigated for the first time by molecular-dynamics simulation in copper. The calculations have been performed at various temperatures, using an ab-initio pseudo-potential. Our results show that the core of the Shockley partials, into which the perfect edge dislocation dissociates, becomes increasingly extended as temperature increases. However their separation remains constant. The calculated energy values of the infinite extension stacking fault and the ribbon fault between the partials are quite different, but the evolution of the core structure does not affect the temperature dependence of the latter. We have found that a high disorder appears in the core region when temperature increases due to important anharmonicity effects of the atomic vibrations. The core structure remains solid-like for T m (T m : melting point of bulk) in spite of the high disorder. Above T m , the liquid nucleus germinates in the core region, and then propagates into the bulk. In addition we studied the mobility of vacancies and interstitials trapped on the partials. Although fast diffusion is thought to occur exclusively in a pipe surrounding the dislocation core, in the present study a quasi two-dimensional diffusion is observed for both defects not only in the cores but also in the stacking fault ribbon. On the opposite of current assumptions, the activation energy for diffusion is found to be identical for both defects, which may therefore comparably contribute to mass transport along the dislocations. (author) [fr

  16. Past surface temperatures at the NorthGRIP drill site from the difference in firn diffusion of water isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Sebastian Bjerregaard; Johnsen, S. J.; Popp, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    O. A model treatment of the diffusion process of the firn and the ice is presented along with a method of retrieving the diffusion signal from the ice core record of water isotopes using spectral methods. The model shows how the diffusion process is highly dependent on the inter-annual variations......A new ice core paleothermometer is introduced based on the temperature dependent diffusion of the stable water isotopes in the firn. A new parameter called differential diffusion length is defined as the difference between the diffusion length of the two stable water isotopologues 2H1H16O and 1H218...... warmer than observed in other ice core based temperature reconstructions. The mechanisms behind this behaviour are not fully understood. The method shows the need of an expansion of high resolution stable water isotope datasets from ice cores. However, the new ice core paleothermometer presented here...

  17. Effect of diluents on soot precursor formation and temperature in ethylene laminar diffusion flames

    KAUST Repository

    Abhinavam Kailasanathan, Ranjith Kumar

    2013-03-01

    Soot precursor species concentrations and flame temperature were measured in a diluted laminar co-flow jet diffusion flame at pressures up to eight atmospheres while varying diluent type. The objective of this study was to gain a better understanding of soot production and oxidation mechanisms, which could potentially lead to a reduction in soot emissions from practical combustion devices. Gaseous samples were extracted from the centerline of an ethylene-air laminar diffusion flame, which was diluted individually with four diluents (argon, helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide) to manipulate flame temperature and transport properties. The diluted fuel and co-flow exit velocities (top-hat profiles) were matched at all pressures to minimize shear-layer effects, and the mass fluxes were fixed over the pressure range to maintain constant Reynolds number. The flame temperature was measured using a fine gauge R-type thermocouple at pressures up to four atmospheres. Centerline concentration profiles of major non-fuel hydrocarbons collected via extractive sampling with a quartz microprobe and quantification using GC/MS+FID are reported within. The measured hydrocarbon species concentrations are vary dramatically with pressure and diluent, with the helium and carbon dioxide diluted flames yielding the largest and smallest concentrations of soot precursors, respectively. In the case of C2H2 and C6H6, two key soot precursors, helium diluted flames had concentrations more than three times higher compared with the carbon dioxide diluted flame. The peak flame temperature vary with diluents tested, as expected, with carbon dioxide diluted flame being the coolest, with a peak temperature of 1760K at 1atm, and the helium diluted flame being the hottest, with a peak temperature of 2140K. At four atmospheres, the helium diluted flame increased to 2240K, but the CO2 flame temperature increased more, decreasing the difference to approximately 250K. © 2012 The Combustion Institute.

  18. Composition-independent mean temperature measurements in laminar diffusion flames using spectral lineshape information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenak, D.; Narayanaswamy, V.

    2017-10-01

    Temperature is an important thermochemical property in combusting flows that holds the key to uncovering pollutant formation, flame extinction, and heat release. In a practical combustion environment, the local composition is typically unknown, which hinders the effectiveness of many traditional non-intrusive thermometry techniques. This study aims to offset this limitation by developing a laser-based thermometry technique that does not require prior knowledge of the local composition. Two methods for obtaining temperature are demonstrated in this work, both of which make use of the spectral line broadening of an absorbing species (krypton) seeded into the flow. In the first method, the local Doppler broadening is extracted from an excitation scan to yield the corresponding temperature, while the second method utilizes compositional scaling information of the collisional broadening and collisional shift to determine the temperature. Both methods are demonstrated by measuring the radial temperature profile of a steady laminar CH4/N2 diffusion flame with an air co-flow. The accuracy of the temperature measurements obtained using both methods are evaluated using corresponding temperature profiles determined from computational simulations.

  19. Milestone report: The simulation of radiation driven gas diffusion in UO2 at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Michael William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kuganathan, Navaratnarajah [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Burr, Patrick A [Univ. of New South Wales (Australia); Rushton, Michael J. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Grimes, Robin W [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Turbull, James Anthony [Independent Consultant (United Kingdom); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andersson, Anders David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-24

    Below 1000 K it is thought that fission gas diffusion in nuclear fuel during irradiation occurs through atomic mixing due to radiation damage. This is an important process for nuclear reactor performance as it affects fission gas release, particularly from the periphery of the pellet where such temperatures are normal. Here we present a molecular dynamics study of Xe and Kr diffusion due to irradiation. Thermal spikes and cascades have been used to study the electronic stopping and ballistic phases of damage, respectively. Our results predict that O and Kr exhibit the greatest diffusivity and U the least, while Xe lies in between. It is concluded that the ballistic phase does not sufficiently account for the experimentally observed diffusion. Preliminary thermal spike calculations indicate that the electronic stopping phase generates greater fission gas displacement than the ballistic phase, although further calculation must be carried out to confirm this. A good description of the system by the empirical potentials is important over the very wide temperatures induced during thermal spike and damage cascade simulations. This has motivated the development of a parameter set for gas-actinide and gas-oxygen interactions that is complementary for use with a recent many-body potential set. A comprehensive set of density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to study Xe and Kr incorporation at a number of sites in CeO2, ThO2, UO2 and PuO2. These structures were used to fit a potential, which was used to generate molecular dynamics (MD) configurations incorporating Xe and Kr at 300 K, 1500 K, 3000 K and 5000 K. Subsequent matching to the forces predicted by DFT for these MD configurations was used to refine the potential set. This fitting approach ensured weighted fitting to configurations that are thermodynamically significant over a broad temperature range, while avoiding computationally expensive DFT-MD calculations

  20. Temperature dependence of pulse-induced mechanoluminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. In practice, the relative efficiencies of different crystals are often determined under identical con- ditions of temperature and excitation. If the temperature of a crystal is increased or decreased with respect to room temperature, luminescence efficiency may get increased or decreased according to the composition of.

  1. Large diffusion anisotropy and orientation sorting of phosphorene nanoflakes under a temperature gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yingyan; Chang, Tienchong; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Cai, Yongqing; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2018-01-25

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the motion of phosphorene nanoflakes on a large graphene substrate under a thermal gradient. It is found that the atomic interaction between the graphene substrate and the phosphorene nanoflake generates distinct rates of motion for phosphorene nanoflakes with different orientations. Remarkably, for square phosphorene nanoflakes, the motion of zigzag-oriented nanoflakes is 2-fold faster than those of armchair-oriented and randomly-oriented nanoflakes. This large diffusion anisotropy suggests that sorting of phosphorene nanoflakes into specific orientations can be realized by a temperature gradient. The findings here provide interesting insights into strong molecular diffusion anisotropy and offer a novel route for manipulating two-dimensional materials.

  2. Advection and diffusion in random media implications for sea surface temperature anomalies

    CERN Document Server

    Piterbarg, Leonid I

    1997-01-01

    The book presents the foundations of the theory of turbulent transport within the context of stochastic partial differential equations. It serves to establish a firm connection between rigorous and non-rigorous results concerning turbulent diffusion. Mathematically all of the issues addressed in this book are concentrated around a single linear equation: stochastic advection-diffusion (transport) equation. There is no attempt made to derive universal statistics for turbulent flow. Instead emphasis is placed on a statistical description of a passive scalar (tracer) under given velocity statistics. An application concerning transport of sea surface temperature anomalies reconciles the developed theory and a highly practical issue of modern physical oceanography by using the newly designed inversion techniques which take advantage of powerful maximum likelihood and autoregressive estimators. Audience: Graduate students and researchers in mathematics, fluid dynamics, and physical oceanography.

  3. Non-Markovian Quantum State Diffusion for temperature-dependent linear spectra of light harvesting aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschel, Gerhard; Suess, Daniel; Möbius, Sebastian; Strunz, Walter T; Eisfeld, Alexander

    2015-01-21

    Non-Markovian Quantum State Diffusion (NMQSD) has turned out to be an efficient method to calculate excitonic properties of aggregates composed of organic chromophores, taking into account the coupling of electronic transitions to vibrational modes of the chromophores. NMQSD is an open quantum system approach that incorporates environmental degrees of freedom (the vibrations in our case) in a stochastic way. We show in this paper that for linear optical spectra (absorption, circular dichroism), no stochastics is needed, even for finite temperatures. Thus, the spectra can be obtained by propagating a single trajectory. To this end, we map a finite temperature environment to the zero temperature case using the so-called thermofield method. The resulting equations can then be solved efficiently by standard integrators.

  4. Radial diffusion of toroidally trapped particles induced by lower hybrid and fast waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krlin, L.

    1992-10-01

    The interaction of RF field with toroidally trapped particles (bananas) can cause their intrinsic stochastically diffusion both in the configuration and velocity space. In RF heating and/or current drive regimes, RF field can interact with plasma particles and with thermonuclear alpha particles. The aim of this contribution is to give some analytical estimates of induced radial diffusion of alphas and of ions. (author)

  5. Diffusion and agglomeration of helium in stainless steel in the temperature range from RT to 600 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, C.H.; Chen, K.Q.; Zhu, Z.Y.

    2000-01-01

    Diffusion of helium and formation of helium bubbles in stainless steel in conditions of atomic displacement in the temperature range from RT to 600 deg. C are studied theoretically using standard rate equations. The dissociative mechanism via self-interstitial/He replacement is assumed to control helium diffusion and bubble formation. The numerical analysis shows that the temperature dependence of the effective diffusion coefficient of helium, the number density and the mean radius of bubbles has two distinctly different regimes with the transition occurring around 300 deg. C. The effective diffusion coefficient of helium, the number density and the mean radius of bubbles show weak temperature dependence in the low temperature regime, while they change abruptly with temperature in the high temperature regime. The results are qualitatively in agreement with the results of our experimental study on helium diffusion and bubble formation in helium-implanted 316L stainless steel. However, the discrepancy in the absolute values of number density and mean radius of bubbles between theoretical and experimental studies indicates that helium diffusion and bubble formation may be controlled by some athermal mechanisms in the low temperature regime

  6. Laser-induced diffusion decomposition in Fe–V thin-film alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polushkin, N.I., E-mail: nipolushkin@fc.ul.pt [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto de Ciência e Engenharia de Materiais e Superfícies, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Duarte, A.C.; Conde, O. [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto de Ciência e Engenharia de Materiais e Superfícies, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Alves, E. [Associação Euratom/IST e Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Barradas, N.P. [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); García-García, A.; Kakazei, G.N.; Ventura, J.O.; Araujo, J.P. [Departamento de Física, Universidade do Porto e IFIMUP, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Oliveira, V. [Instituto de Ciência e Engenharia de Materiais e Superfícies, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, 1959-007 Lisboa (Portugal); Vilar, R. [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto de Ciência e Engenharia de Materiais e Superfícies, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Irradiation of an Fe–V alloy by femtosecond laser triggers diffusion decomposition. • The decomposition occurs with strongly enhanced (∼4 orders) atomic diffusivity. • This anomaly is associated with the metallic glassy state achievable under laser quenching. • The ultrafast diffusion decomposition is responsible for laser-induced ferromagnetism. - Abstract: We investigate the origin of ferromagnetism induced in thin-film (∼20 nm) Fe–V alloys by their irradiation with subpicosecond laser pulses. We find with Rutherford backscattering that the magnetic modifications follow a thermally stimulated process of diffusion decomposition, with formation of a-few-nm-thick Fe enriched layer inside the film. Surprisingly, similar transformations in the samples were also found after their long-time (∼10{sup 3} s) thermal annealing. However, the laser action provides much higher diffusion coefficients (∼4 orders of magnitude) than those obtained under standard heat treatments. We get a hint that this ultrafast diffusion decomposition occurs in the metallic glassy state achievable in laser-quenched samples. This vitrification is thought to be a prerequisite for the laser-induced onset of ferromagnetism that we observe.

  7. Diffusive Imaging of Hydraulically Induced and Natural Fracture Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, B.; Marder, M. P.; Patzek, T. W.

    2017-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing of tight shales continues to provide the US with a major source of energy. Efficiency of gas recovery in shales depends upon the geometry of the resulting network of fractures, the details of which are not yet fully understood. The present research explores how much of the underlying geometry can be deduced from the time dependence of the flow of gas out of the reservoir. We consider both ideal and real gas. In the case of real gas, we calculate production rate for parallel planar hydrofractures embedded in an infinite reservoir. Transport is governed by a nonlinear diffusion equation, which we solve exactly with a scaling curve. The scaling curve production rate declines initially as 1 over square root time, then as an exponential, and finally as 1 over square root of time again at late time. We show that for a given hydraulically fractured well, the onsets of transition between different decline regimes provides a direct estimate of a characteristic spacing of the underlying fracture network. We show that the scaling solution accurately fits the production history of more than 15,000 wells in the Barnett Shale. Almost all of the wells either have not yet transitioned into the late time decline or have been refractured while in exponential decline. However, there are 36 wells which show the late time transition. These allow us to calculate the characteristic spacing, which turns out to have a mode at about 10 m, a minimum at 1.6 m and a maximum at 13.3 m. We estimate that over 30 years these wells will produce on average about 45% more gas because of diffusion from the infinite external reservoir than they would if this contribution is neglected. Finally, we compute the rate at which ideal gas diffuses within an infinite region of rock into a specific absorbing fractal fracture network, which we model using geological constraints and percolation theory. Our solution employs a Brownian walk and the first passage kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm

  8. The water-induced linear reduction gas diffusivity model extended to three pore regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, Deepagoda; De Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Kawamoto, Ken

    2015-01-01

    An existing gas diffusivity model developed originally for sieved, repacked soils was extended to characterize gas diffusion in differently structured soils and functional pore networks. A gas diffusivity-derived pore connectivity index was used as a measure of soil structure development. Charact......An existing gas diffusivity model developed originally for sieved, repacked soils was extended to characterize gas diffusion in differently structured soils and functional pore networks. A gas diffusivity-derived pore connectivity index was used as a measure of soil structure development....... Characterization of soil functional pore structure is an essential prerequisite to understand key gas transport processes in variably saturated soils in relation to soil ecosystems, climate, and environmental services. In this study, the water-induced linear reduction (WLR) soil gas diffusivity model originally...... gas diffusivity from moist to dry conditions across differently structured porous media, including narrow soil size fractions, perforated plastic blocks, fractured limestone, peaty soils, aggregated volcanic ash soils, and particulate substrates for Earth- or space-based applications. The new Cip...

  9. Room-temperature near-infrared electroluminescence from boron-diffused silicon pn junction diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si eLi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Silicon pn junction diodes with different doping concentrations were prepared by boron diffusion into Czochralski (CZ n-type silicon substrate. Their room-temperature near-infrared electroluminescence (EL was measured. In the EL spectra of the heavily boron doped diode, a luminescence peak at ~1.6 m (0.78 eV was observed besides the band-to-band line (~1.1eV under the condition of high current injection, while in that of the lightly boron doped diode only the band-to-band line was observed. The intensity of peak at 0.78 eV increases exponentially with current injection with no observable saturation at room temperature. Furthermore, no dislocations were found in the cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy image, and no dislocation-related luminescence was observed in the low-temperature photoluminescence spectra. We deduce the 0.78 eV emission originates from the irradiative recombination in the strain region of diodes caused by the diffusion of large number of boron atoms into silicon crystal lattice.

  10. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity of climax stock quartz monzonite at high pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.

    1981-11-01

    Measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity have been made on two samples of Climax Stock quartz monzonite at pressures between 3 and 50 MPa and temperatures between 300 and 523 0 K. Following those measurements the apparatus was calibrated with respect to the thermal conductivity measurement using a reference standard of fused silica. Corrected thermal conductivity of the rock indicates a value at room temperature of 2.60 +- 0.25 W/mK at 3 MPa increasing linearly to 2.75 +- 0.25 W/mK at 50 MPa. These values are unchanged (+- 0.07 W/mK) by heating under 50-MPa pressure to as high as 473 0 K. The conductivity under 50-MPa confining pressure falls smoothly from 2.75 +- 0.25 W/mK at 313 0 K to 2.15 +- 0.25 W/mK at 473 0 K. Thermal diffusivity at 300 0 K was found to be 1.2 +- 0.4 X 10 -6 m 2 /s and shows approximately the same pressure and temperature dependencies as the thermal conductivity

  11. Numerical investigation of temperature field in magnetic hyperthermia considering mass transfer and diffusion in interstitial tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yundong; Flesch, Rodolfo C. C.; Jin, Tao

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) hyperthermia ablates malignant cells by heating the region of interest when MNPs are subjected to an external alternating magnetic field. The energy density to be dissipated into heat, and consequently the temperature profile during treatment, depends on the distribution of MNPs within the tumoral region. This paper uses numerical models to evaluate the temporal and spatial temperature distributions inside a tumor when intratumoral injection of MNPs is considered. To this end, the theories of mass transfer and diffusion in interstitial tissue are combined with Rosensweig’s theory and Pennes bio-heat transfer equation, and the finite element method is used for analyzing the temperature field under different scenarios. Simulation results demonstrate that the treatment temperature field strongly depends on factors, such as the injection method, particle size, injection concentration and injection dose. However, the maximal temperature reached during hyperthermia and the effective treatment area are difficult to control. In order to obtain better treatment effects, this paper investigates a solution that uses a kind of material with low Curie temperature and the results show that the effective treatment area of hyperthermia can be significantly improved using this type of MNP.

  12. Introduction of high oxygen concentrations into silicon wafers by high-temperature diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Casse, G L; Lemeilleur, F; Ruzin, A; Wegrzecki, M

    1999-01-01

    The tolerance of silicon detectors to hadron irradiation can be improved by the introduction of a high concentration of oxygen into the starting material. High-resistivity Floating-Zone (FZ) silicon is required for detectors used in particle physics applications. A significantly high oxygen concentration (>10/sup 17/ atoms cm/sup -3 /) cannot readily be achieved during the FZ silicon refinement. The diffusion of oxygen at elevated temperatures from a SiO/sub 2/ layer grown on both sides of a silicon wafer is a simple and effective technique to achieve high and uniform concentrations of oxygen throughout the bulk of a 300 mu m thick silicon wafer. (7 refs).

  13. On the Dynamics of the Self-organized Structures in a Low-Temperature Diffusion Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talasman, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the dynamics of self organized space charge structures a in low-temperature diffusion plasma, in order to see what are the processes responsible for the appearance of such structures. This is performed through the time-resolved axial distributions of the light emitted from the plasma and through a particular cross section of the phase-space. One obtains that excitations, de-excitations and ionizations are implied in both the transient regimes of the formation of these structures, and the oscillating steady states of them. On the other hand it was found that the dynamics of such structures verify the KAM theorem. (author)

  14. Trace elements in migrating high-temperature fluids: Effects of diffusive exchange with the adjoining solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Patricia M.

    1993-01-01

    Trace element concentrations and isotopic ratios are frequently used to study the behavior of high-temperature fluids in both metamorphic and igneous systems. Many theoretical formulations of the effects of fluid migration on trace elements have assumed instantaneous reequilibration between the migrating fluid and the solid material through which it is passing. This paper investigates the additional effects which arise when equilibration is not instantaneous due to a limited rate of diffusion in the solid, using an analytical steady state solution to a set of partial differential equations describing the exchange of trace elements between the fluid and the solid during the migration of the fluid.

  15. Chemical activity induces dynamical force with global structure in a reaction-diffusion-convection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahara, Hitoshi; Okada, Koichi; Nomura, Atsushi; Miike, Hidetoshi; Sakurai, Tatsunari

    2009-07-01

    We found a rotating global structure induced by the dynamical force of local chemical activity in a thin solution layer of excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction coupled with diffusion. The surface flow and deformation associated with chemical spiral waves (wavelength about 1 mm) represents a global unidirectional structure and a global tilt in the entire Petri dish (100 mm in diameter), respectively. For these observations, we scanned the condition of hierarchal pattern selection. From this result, the bromomalonic acid has an important role to induce the rotating global structure. An interaction between a reaction-diffusion process and a surface-tension-driven effect leads to such hierarchal pattern with different scales.

  16. Spin diffusion in the double-exchange model far above the Curie temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishman, R.S.

    2002-01-01

    Spin diffusion within the double-exchange model is studied in the limits W H S (intermediate temperatures) and W H S H is the Hund's coupling. In both limits, T is still far above the Curie temperature T C ∼W. All dynamical properties are obtained from the spin-current correlation function C(x), where x denotes time. While C(x) is real (even) at infinite temperature, it contains both real (even) and imaginary (odd) parts at intermediate temperatures. Upper and lower Tchebycheff bounds are used to evaluate the real part of C(x) in each limit. From C(ω), we construct the spin conductivity D(ω), which has Gaussian peaks at ω=0 and ± 2J H S, all with the same width ∼W. Whereas the central peak is produced by the hopping of electrons between sites, the side peaks are produced by the mutual precession of the local and itinerant spins at every site. At infinite temperature, each of the side peaks has half the weight of the central peak. But at intermediate temperatures, the side peaks are reduced by T/(J H S) s =(1/2)D(ω=0) yields the relaxation time τ r (k)=1/(D s k 2 ) for a magnetic disturbance with wavevector k. Whereas D s reaches a maximum at half-filling (an average of one electron per site) for infinite temperature, it vanishes at half-filling for intermediate temperatures because an electron cannot hop to a neighbouring site without sacrificing enormous Hund's energy. The predictions of this work are compared with recent neutron-scattering measurements on the manganites. (author)

  17. A method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient (KdPAR)from paired temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jordan S.; Rose, Kevin C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Read, Emily K.

    2015-01-01

    A new method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient for photosynthetically active radiation (KdPAR) from paired temperature sensors was derived. We show that during cases where the attenuation of penetrating shortwave solar radiation is the dominant source of temperature changes, time series measurements of water temperatures at multiple depths (z1 and z2) are related to one another by a linear scaling factor (a). KdPAR can then be estimated by the simple equation KdPAR ln(a)/(z2/z1). A suggested workflow is presented that outlines procedures for calculating KdPAR according to this paired temperature sensor (PTS) method. This method is best suited for conditions when radiative temperature gains are large relative to physical noise. These conditions occur frequently on water bodies with low wind and/or high KdPARs but can be used for other types of lakes during time periods of low wind and/or where spatially redundant measurements of temperatures are available. The optimal vertical placement of temperature sensors according to a priori knowledge of KdPAR is also described. This information can be used to inform the design of future sensor deployments using the PTS method or for campaigns where characterizing sub-daily changes in temperatures is important. The PTS method provides a novel method to characterize light attenuation in aquatic ecosystems without expensive radiometric equipment or the user subjectivity inherent in Secchi depth measurements. This method also can enable the estimation of KdPAR at higher frequencies than many manual monitoring programs allow.

  18. Temperature and concentration calibration of aqueous polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP solutions for isotropic diffusion MRI phantoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Wagner

    Full Text Available To use the "apparent diffusion coefficient" (Dapp as a quantitative imaging parameter, well-suited test fluids are essential. In this study, the previously proposed aqueous solutions of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP were examined and temperature calibrations were obtained. For example, at a temperature of 20°C, Dapp ranged from 1.594 (95% CI: 1.593, 1.595 μm2/ms to 0.3326 (95% CI: 0. 3304, 0.3348 μm2/ms for PVP-concentrations ranging from 10% (w/w to 50% (w/w using K30 polymer lengths. The temperature dependence of Dapp was found to be so strong that a negligence seems not advisable. The temperature dependence is descriptively modelled by an exponential function exp(c2 (T - 20°C and the determined c2 values are reported, which can be used for temperature calibration. For example, we find the value 0.02952 K-1 for 30% (w/w PVP-concentration and K30 polymer length. In general, aqueous PVP solutions were found to be suitable to produce easily applicable and reliable Dapp-phantoms.

  19. Determination of heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed: Extension to high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, Jarrett A.; Pokorny, Richard; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2014-01-01

    The heat conductivity (λ) and the thermal diffusivity (a) of reacting glass batch, or melter feed, control the heat flux into and within the cold cap, a layer of reacting material floating on the pool of molten glass in an all-electric continuous waste glass melter. After previously estimating λ of melter feed at temperatures up to 680 deg C, we focus in this work on the λ(T) function at T > 680 deg C, at which the feed material becomes foamy. We used a customized experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples, which monitored the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible with feed was heated at a constant rate from room temperature up to 1100°C. Approximating measured temperature profiles by polynomial functions, we used the heat transfer equation to estimate the λ(T) approximation function, which we subsequently optimized using the finite-volume method combined with least-squares analysis. The heat conductivity increased as the temperature increased until the feed began to expand into foam, at which point the conductivity dropped. It began to increase again as the foam turned into a bubble-free glass melt. We discuss the implications of this behavior for the mathematical modeling of the cold cap

  20. Kinetics of island diffusion on Cu(111) and Ag(111) studied with variable-temperature STM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlößer, Dietmar C.; Morgenstern, Karina; Verheij, Laurens K.; Rosenfeld, G.; Besenbacher, Flemming; Comsa, George

    2000-01-01

    The diffusion of vacancy islands on Cu(111) and Ag(111) and of adatom islands on Ag(111) has been studied using fast scanning STM. Diffusion of atoms along island edges (periphery diffusion) is much more effective in contributing to the diffusion of the islands than diffusion of atoms via terrace

  1. Self-induced temperature gradients in Brownian dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Jack; Jack, M. W.

    2017-12-01

    Brownian systems often surmount energy barriers by absorbing and emitting heat to and from their local environment. Usually, the temperature gradients created by this heat exchange are assumed to dissipate instantaneously. Here we relax this assumption to consider the case where Brownian dynamics on a time-independent potential can lead to self-induced temperature gradients. In the same way that externally imposed temperature gradients can cause directed motion, these self-induced gradients affect the dynamics of the Brownian system. The result is a coupling between the local environment and the Brownian subsystem. We explore the resulting dynamics and thermodynamics of these coupled systems and develop a robust method for numerical simulation. In particular, by focusing on one-dimensional situations, we show that self-induced temperature gradients reduce barrier-crossing rates. We also consider a heat engine and a heat pump based on temperature gradients induced by a Brownian system in a nonequilibrium potential.

  2. One-dimensional advection diffusion modeling of upwelled hyporheic stream temperature along Deer Creek, Vina, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, N. L.; Hunt, J. R.; Tompkins, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    Hyporheic exchange can locally mitigate thermal stress caused by high water temperatures by upwelling water cooler than ambient stream temperatures and thus providing thermal refuge for critical cold water organisms like salmonids. Ten hyporheic exchange locations were identified by dye tracer experiments along a 16 km stretch of Deer Creek near Vina, California. Four months of continuous temperature measurements were made in the late summer of 2005 at each downwelling and upwelling location and revealed upwelled temperatures that were lagged in time and damped in amplitude. Upwelling hyporheic temperatures that could provide thermal refuge were observed in seven of the ten temperature records. This data was modeled by an analytical one-dimensional advection-diffusion equation solution using subsurface water velocity and the hydrodynamic dispersivity fitting parameters. At each location variations in upwelling temperature are explained by changing subsurface water velocities and flow pathways. The lag time in hyporheic heat flow ranged from a few hours to 44 hours over distances of 15 to 76 meters. The daily stream temperature variation was on the order of 10°C, which was reduced to 1 to 8°C in the upwelling hyporheic flow. At four locations, there was evidence that changes in stream flow produced changes in the amplitude and phase of the upwelling hyporheic water temperature by altering both the subsurface water velocity and hydrodynamic dispersivity. At two locations, additional cold water refuge was created by decreases in surface water flow because it reduced the estimated subsurface water velocity increasing the lag time between the peak surface water and subsurface water temperatures. Increases in surface water flow increased the dispersivity at three locations providing more cold water refuge by reducing the amplitude of the upwelling hyporheic temperature. Such changes alter thermal refuge for salmonids placing a new emphasis on managing surface water

  3. Laser-induced desorption determinations of surface diffusion on Rh(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seebauer, E.G.; Schmidt, L.D.

    1987-01-01

    Surface diffusion of hydrogen, deuterium and CO on Rh(111) has been investigated by laser-induced thermal desorption (LITD) and compared with previous results for these species on Pt(111) and on other metals. For deuterium in the coverage range 0.02 0 - 8 x 10 -2 cm 2 /s, with a diffusion activation energy 3.7 0 rises from 10 -3 to 10 -2 cm 2 /s between θ = 0.01 and 0.40. Values of E/sub diff/ on different surfaces appear to correlate with differences in heats of adsorption in different binding states which form saddle point configurations in surface diffusion. In addition, oxidation reactions on Rh and on several other transition metal surfaces may be limited to CO or H surface diffusion. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  4. Determination of thermal diffusivity of dental enamel and dentin as a function of temperature, using infrared thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Thiago Martini

    2009-01-01

    In this work it was developed a software that calculates automatically, the thermal diffusivity value as a function of temperature in materials. The infrared thermography technique was used for data acquisition of temperature distribution as a function of time. These data were used to adjust a temperature function obtained from the homogeneous heat equation with specific boundary conditions. For that, an infrared camera (detecting from 8 μm to 9 μm) was calibrated to detect temperature ranging from 185 degree C up to 1300 degree C at an acquisition rate of 300 Hz. It was used, 10 samples of dental enamel and 10 samples of dentin, with 4 mm x 4 mm x 2 mm, which were obtained from bovine lower incisor teeth. These samples were irradiated with an Er:Cr:YSGG pulsed laser (λ = 2,78 μm). The resulting temperature was recorded 2 s prior, 10 s during irradiation and continuing for 2 more seconds after it. After each irradiation, all obtained thermal images were processed in the software, creating a file with the data of thermal diffusivity as a function of temperature. Another file with the thermal diffusivity values was also calculated after each laser pulse. The mean result of thermal diffusivity obtained for dental enamel was 0,0084 ± 0,001 cm2/s for the temperature interval of 220-550 degree C. The mean value for thermal diffusivity obtained for dentin was 0,0015 0,0004 cm2/s in temperatures up to 360 degree C; however, this value increases for higher temperatures. According to these results, it was possible to conclude that the use of infrared thermography, associated with the software developed in this work, is an efficient method to determine the thermal diffusivity values as a function of temperature in different materials. (author)

  5. Effective Tolman temperature induced by trace anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eune, Myungseok [Sangmyung University, Department of Civil Engineering, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Gim, Yongwan [Sogang University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sogang University, Research Institute for Basic Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Wontae [Sogang University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Despite the finiteness of stress tensor for a scalar field on the four-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole in the Israel-Hartle-Hawking vacuum, the Tolman temperature in thermal equilibrium is certainly divergent on the horizon due to the infinite blue-shift of the Hawking temperature. The origin of this conflict is due to the fact that the conventional Tolman temperature was based on the assumption of a traceless stress tensor, which is, however, incompatible with the presence of the trace anomaly responsible for the Hawking radiation. Here, we present an effective Tolman temperature which is compatible with the presence of the trace anomaly by using the modified Stefan-Boltzmann law. Eventually, the effective Tolman temperature turns out to be finite everywhere outside the horizon, and so an infinite blue-shift of the Hawking temperature at the event horizon does not appear any more. In particular, it is vanishing on the horizon, so that the equivalence principle is exactly recovered at the horizon. (orig.)

  6. Effective Tolman temperature induced by trace anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eune, Myungseok; Gim, Yongwan; Kim, Wontae

    2017-01-01

    Despite the finiteness of stress tensor for a scalar field on the four-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole in the Israel-Hartle-Hawking vacuum, the Tolman temperature in thermal equilibrium is certainly divergent on the horizon due to the infinite blue-shift of the Hawking temperature. The origin of this conflict is due to the fact that the conventional Tolman temperature was based on the assumption of a traceless stress tensor, which is, however, incompatible with the presence of the trace anomaly responsible for the Hawking radiation. Here, we present an effective Tolman temperature which is compatible with the presence of the trace anomaly by using the modified Stefan-Boltzmann law. Eventually, the effective Tolman temperature turns out to be finite everywhere outside the horizon, and so an infinite blue-shift of the Hawking temperature at the event horizon does not appear any more. In particular, it is vanishing on the horizon, so that the equivalence principle is exactly recovered at the horizon. (orig.)

  7. Scale dependent controls of stream water temperatures - interaction of advective and diffusive energy fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Weiler, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Diurnal stream water temperature amplitudes (WTA) have a large impact on local ecohydrological conditions, e.g. aquatic habitat quality or biogeochemical cycling. Depending on discharge, streambed geomorphology, connectivity to the groundwater, hyporheic exchange flow and other local factors such as shading and climate conditions observable WTAs vary strongly from up- to downstream and can locally even exceed seasonal temperature variations. The main process which is responsible for the local expression of WTA is the energy balance which can be either dominated by advective energy fluxes (e. g. discharge and upwelling groundwater) or by diffusive energy fluxes (e. g. radiation, latent and sensible heat fluxes, heat exchange with the streambed). In recent years research has mainly focused on improving our knowledge how groundwater-surface water interaction, hyporheic exchange and shading processes influence locally observable WTA in smaller streams, while for larger streams or rivers WTA might even be non-observable throughout the year. Within this study we analyze the scaling behavior of advective and diffusive energy fluxes from small to large streams to better understand on which scales and under which conditions WTA might be dominated either by advective or diffusive energy fluxes and how groundwater - surface water interaction influences this relationship. For this purpose, we carried out a synthetic model study. Using published hydraulic geometry relations for different types of rivers, we apply a conceptual energy balance- and mixing model, which includes GW-SW interaction, discharges from 100 l/s up to 50 m3/s on length scales from 100 m up to 50 km. Simulated boundary conditions were constant discharges at the upstream boundary and constant and uniformly distributed exchange fluxes to the groundwater. Upstream water temperatures were 15 °C (WTA of 5 °C), while groundwater temperature was assumed to be cooler than the stream with 9°C. Net diffusive energy

  8. Effects of translational symmetry breaking induced by the boundaries in a driven diffusive system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Vitting; Leung, Kwan-tai

    1991-01-01

    We study the effects of the boundary conditions in a driven diffusive lattice-gas model which is known to display kinetic phase transitions. We find, in the case of attractive interaction, that a boundary-condition-induced symmetry breaking of the translational invariance, along the direction...

  9. Persistent wind-induced enhancement of diffusive CO2 transport in a mountain forest snowpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. R. Bowling; W. J. Massman

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion dominates the transport of trace gases between soil and the atmosphere. Pressure gradients induced by atmospheric flow and wind interacting with topographical features cause a small but persistent bulk flow of air within soil or snow. This forcing, called pressure pumping or wind pumping, leads to a poorly quantified enhancement of gas transport beyond the...

  10. Modelling the effect of temperature on the range expansion of species by reaction-diffusion equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Otto; Moenickes, Sylvia; Suhling, Frank

    2012-02-01

    The spatial dynamics of range expansion is studied in dependence of temperature. The main elements population dynamics, competition and dispersal are combined in a coherent approach based on a system of coupled partial differential equations of the reaction-diffusion type. The nonlinear reaction terms comprise population dynamic models with temperature dependent reproduction rates subject to an Allee effect and mutual competition. The effect of temperature on travelling wave solutions is investigated for a one dimensional model version. One main result is the importance of the Allee effect for the crossing of regions with unsuitable habitats. The nonlinearities of the interaction terms give rise to a richness of spatio-temporal dynamic patterns. In two dimensions, the resulting non-linear initial boundary value problems are solved over geometries of heterogeneous landscapes. Geo referenced model parameters such as mean temperature and elevation are imported into the finite element tool COMSOL Multiphysics from a geographical information system. The model is applied to the range expansion of species at the scale of middle Europe. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Thermal diffusivity measurements of liquid materials at high temperature with the ''laser flash'' method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, Claude; Vandevelde, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Two solutions, one analytical and the other numerical are proposed to solve the thermokinetic problem encountered when measuring the thermal diffusivity of liquid materials at very high temperature (T>3123K). The liquid material is contained in a parallel faced vessel. This liquid is traversed by a short thermal pulse from a relaxed laser. The temperature response of the back face of the measurement cell is analysed. The first model proposed which does not take thermal losses into consideration, is a mathematical model derived from the ''two layer model'' (Larson and Koyama, 1968) extended to ''three layers''. In order to take the possibility of thermal losses to the external environment at high temperature into consideration, a Crank-Nicolson (1947) type numerical model utilizing finite differences is employed. These thermokinetic studies were performed in order to interpret temperature response curves obtained from the back face of a tungsten-liquid UO 2 -tungsten thermal wall, the purpose of the measurements made being to determine the thermal properties of liquid uranium oxide [fr

  12. Study by neutron diffusion of magnetic fluctuations in iron in the curie temperature region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson-Galula, M.

    1958-12-01

    The critical diffusion of neutrons in iron is due to the magnetisation fluctuations which occur in ferromagnetic substances in the neighbourhood of the Curie temperature. The fluctuations can be described in correlation terms; a correlation function γ R vector (t) is defined, γ R vector (t) = 0 vector (0) S R vector (t)> mean value of the scalar product of a reference spin and a spin situated at a distance (R) from the first and considered at the instant t. In chapter I we recall the generalities on neutron diffusion cross-sections; a brief summary is given of the theory of VAN HOVE, who has shown that the magnetic diffusion cross section of neutrons is the Fourier transformation of the correlation function. In chapter Il we study the spatial dependence of the correlation function, assumed to be independent of time. It can then be characterised by two parameters K 1 and r 1 , by means of which the range and intensity of the correlations can be calculated respectively. After setting out the principle of the measurement of these parameters, we shall describe the experimental apparatus. The experimental values obtained are in good agreement with the calculations, and the agreement is better if it is supposed that the second and not the first neighbours of an iron atom are magnetically active, as proposed by Neel. In chapter III we study the evolution with time of the correlation function; this evolution is characterised by a parameter Λ depending on the temperature, which occurs in the diffusion equation obeyed by the magnetisation fluctuations: δM vector /δt = Λ ∇ 2 M vector . The principle of the measurement of Λ is given, after which the modifications carried out on the experimental apparatus mentioned in chapter II are described. The results obtained are then discussed and compared with the theoretical forecasts of De Gennes, mode by using the Heinsenberg model and a simple band model; our values in good agreement with those calculated in the Heisenberg

  13. Assessment of brain temperatures during different phases of the menstrual cycle using diffusion-weighted imaging thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Taro; Shimono, Taro; Sai, Asari; Sakai, Koji; Yamamoto, Akira; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Miki, Yukio

    2016-04-01

    To investigate changes in brain temperature according to the menstrual cycle in women using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) thermometry and to clarify relationships between brain and body temperatures. In 20 healthy female volunteers (21.3-38.8 years), DWI of the brain was performed during the follicular and luteal phases to calculate the brain temperature. During DWI, body temperatures were also measured. Group comparisons of each temperature between the two phases were performed using the paired t test. Correlations between brain and body temperatures were analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient test. Mean diffusion-based brain temperature was 36.24 °C (follicular) and 36.96 °C (luteal), showing a significant difference (P < 0.0001). Significant differences were also seen for each body temperature between the two phases. Correlation coefficients between diffusion-based brain and each body temperature were r = 0.2441 (P = 0.1291), -0.0332 (0.8387), and -0.0462 (0.7769), respectively. In women of childbearing age, brain and body temperatures appear significantly higher in the luteal than in the follicular phase. However, brain and body temperatures show no significant correlations.

  14. Diffusion-controlled reference material for VOC emissions testing: effect of temperature and humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z; Howard-Reed, C; Cox, S S; Ye, W; Little, J C

    2014-06-01

    A polymethylpentene film loaded with toluene is being developed as a reference material to support the reliable measurement of volatile organic compound emissions from building materials using environmental chambers. Earlier studies included the measurement of the material-phase diffusion coefficient (D) and material/air partition coefficient (K) at 23°C. A fundamental mass-transfer model can then be used to predict toluene emissions from the reference material at 23°C, serving as a reference for validating chamber-measured emission profiles. In this study, the effect of temperature and humidity on performance of the reference material was investigated. Reference material emissions were measured at 10, 23, and 30°C and at different relative humidity (RH) levels. D and K at different temperatures and RH were determined using an independent method. Results showed that RH does not significantly affect D and K and had no effect on emissions. However, emissions increased substantially at elevated temperatures due to the relationship between D and temperature. A statistical analysis shows good agreement between model-predicted and measured gas-phase concentrations, indicating that the model can accurately predict emission profiles as a function of temperature. The reference material can therefore be applied to a wide range of emission chamber testing conditions. A reference material with a dynamic emissions profile was previously developed as a validation tool for emission testing in chambers. This follow-up study investigated the effect of temperature and humidity on the performance of the reference material. The results show that the reference material can be used to calibrate and validate chamber testing procedures over a broad range of environmental conditions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Temperature measurement of wick stabilized micro diffusion flame under the influence of magnetic field using digital holographic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shilpi; Kumar, Varun; Shakher, Chandra

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the effect of magnetic field (upward decreasing, uniform and upward increasing) on wick stabilized micro diffusion flame by using digital holographic interferometry (DHI). The investigations reveal that under the influence of upward decreasing and uniform magnetic field temperature inside the micro flame increases in comparison to temperature inside micro flame without magnetic field. This is in contrary to normal diffusion flame, where uniform magnetic field has a little or no effect on the temperature. DHI is inherently more accurate more precise and is having better spatial resolution. DHI is ideally suited to study micro flame.

  16. Temperature dependence of pulse-induced mechanoluminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Mechanoluminescence; dislocations; pulse-induced excitation; alkali halides; radiative recombination. ... B P Chandra2. Department of Post Graduate Studies and Research in Physics and Electronics, Rani Durgawati University, Jabalpur 482 001, India; Pt. Ravi Shanker Shukla University, Raipur 492 010, India ...

  17. Productivity effects of technology diffusion induced by an energy tax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walz, R.

    1999-01-01

    In the political discussion, the economy-wide effects of an energy tax have gained considerable attention. So far, macroeconomic analyses have focused on either (positive or negative) costs triggered by an energy tax, or on the efficiency gains resulting from new energy taxes combined with lower distortionary taxes. By contrast, the innovative effects of climate protection measures have not yet been thoroughly analysed. This paper explores the productivity effects of a 50 per cent energy tax in the German industry sector employing a technology-based, three-step bottom-up approach. In the first step, the extensive IKARUS database is used to identify the technological adjustments arising from an energy tax. In the second step, the technologies are classified into different clusters. In the third step, the productivity effects generated by the technological adjustments are examined. The results imply that an energy tax induces mainly sector-specific and process-integrated technologies rather than add-on and cross-cutting technologies. Further, it is shown that the energy-saving technologies tend to increase productivity. This is particularly the case for process-integrated, sector specific technologies. (author)

  18. Cross-diffusion-induced subharmonic spatial resonances in a predator-prey system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambino, G.; Lombardo, M. C.; Sammartino, M.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the complex dynamics originated by a cross-diffusion-induced subharmonic destabilization of the fundamental subcritical Turing mode in a predator-prey reaction-diffusion system. The model we consider consists of a two-species Lotka-Volterra system with linear diffusion and a nonlinear cross-diffusion term in the predator equation. The taxis term in the search strategy of the predator is responsible for the onset of complex dynamics. In fact, our model does not exhibit any Hopf or wave instability, and on the basis of the linear analysis one should only expect stationary patterns; nevertheless, the presence of the nonlinear cross-diffusion term is able to induce a secondary instability: due to a subharmonic spatial resonance, the stationary primary branch bifurcates to an out-of-phase oscillating solution. Noticeably, the strong resonance between the harmonic and the subharmonic is able to generate the oscillating pattern albeit the subharmonic is below criticality. We show that, as the control parameter is varied, the oscillating solution (sub T mode) can undergo a sequence of secondary instabilities, generating a transition toward chaotic dynamics. Finally, we investigate the emergence of sub T -mode solutions on two-dimensional domains: when the fundamental mode describes a square pattern, subharmonic resonance originates oscillating square patterns. In the case of subcritical Turing hexagon solutions, the internal interactions with a subharmonic mode are able to generate the so-called "twinkling-eyes" pattern.

  19. Nanoporous, Metal Carbide, Surface Diffusion Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Way, J. Douglas [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Wolden, Colin A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Colorado School of Mines (CSM) developed high temperature, hydrogen permeable membranes that contain no platinum group metals with the goal of separating hydrogen from gas mixtures representative of gasification of carbon feedstocks such as coal or biomass in order to meet DOE NETL 2015 hydrogen membrane performance targets. We employed a dual synthesis strategy centered on transition metal carbides. In the first approach, novel, high temperature, surface diffusion membranes based on nanoporous Mo2C were fabricated on ceramic supports. These were produced in a two step process that consisted of molybdenum oxide deposition followed by thermal carburization. Our best Mo2C surface diffusion membrane achieved a pure hydrogen flux of 367 SCFH/ft2 at a feed pressure of only 20 psig. The highest H2/N2 selectivity obtained with this approach was 4.9. A transport model using “dusty gas” theory was derived to describe the hydrogen transport in the Mo2C coated, surface diffusion membranes. The second class of membranes developed were dense metal foils of BCC metals such as vanadium coated with thin (< 60 nm) Mo2C catalyst layers. We have fabricated a Mo2C/V composite membrane that in pure gas testing delivered a H2 flux of 238 SCFH/ft2 at 600 °C and 100 psig, with no detectable He permeance. This exceeds the 2010 DOE Target flux. This flux is 2.8 times that of pure Pd at the same membrane thickness and test conditions and over 79% of the 2015 flux target. In mixed gas testing we achieved a permeate purity of ≥99.99%, satisfying the permeate purity milestone, but the hydrogen permeance was low, ~0.2 SCFH/ft2.psi. However, during testing of a Mo2C coated Pd alloy membrane with DOE 1 feed gas mixture a hydrogen permeance of >2 SCFH/ft2.psi was obtained which was stable during the entire test, meeting the permeance associated with

  20. Diffusion voltage in polymer light emitting diodes measured with electric field induced second harmonic generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristensen, P.K.; Rafaelsen, J.; Pedersen, T.G.; Pedersen, K. [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, Pontoppidanstraede 103, 9220 Aalborg East (Denmark)

    2005-12-01

    We apply electric field induced second harmonic (EFISH) to polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) and demonstrate the ability to determine the diffusion voltage in PLED devices. The EFISH signal is proportional to the square of the effective field, which is the sum of the diffusion voltage and the applied voltage. By minimizing the EFISH-signal as a function of the applied voltage, the diffusion voltage is determined by measuring the applied voltage that cancels out the diffusion voltage. The PLEDs are fabricated with indium tin oxide (ITO) as the hole injecting contact and two different electron injecting contacts, namely aluminum and calcium. The diffusion voltage originates from the rearranged charges caused by the difference in Fermi levels in the materials in the PLEDs. Different contacts will thus cause different diffusion voltages. We demonstrate here that the EFISH signal is proportional to the square of the effective field in both reverse and forward bias, and discuss the dependence on contact materials. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Colloidal attraction induced by a temperature gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leonardo, R; Ianni, F; Ruocco, G

    2009-04-21

    Colloidal crystals are of extreme importance for applied research and for fundamental studies in statistical mechanics. Long-range attractive interactions, such as capillary forces, can drive the spontaneous assembly of such mesoscopic ordered structures. However, long-range attractive forces are very rare in the colloidal realm. Here we report a novel strong, long-ranged attraction induced by a thermal gradient in the presence of a wall. By switching the thermal gradient on and off, we can rapidly and reversibly form stable hexagonal 2D crystals. We show that the observed attraction is hydrodynamic in nature and arises from thermally induced slip flow on particle surfaces. We used optical tweezers to measure the force law directly and compare it to an analytical prediction based on Stokes flow driven by Marangoni-like forces.

  2. Charge effect on the diffusion coefficient and the bimolecular reaction rate of diiodide anion radical in room temperature ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yoshio; Terazima, Masahide; Kimura, Yoshifumi

    2009-04-16

    The diffusion coefficients of diiodide anion radical, I(2)(-), in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) were determined by the transient grating (TG) method using the photochemical reaction of iodide. The diffusion coefficients we obtained were larger in RTILs than the theoretical predictions by the Stokes-Einstein relation, whereas both values are similar in conventional solvents. By comparison with the diffusion coefficients of neutral molecules, it was suggested that the Coulomb interaction between I(2)(-) and constituent ions of RTILs strongly affects the diffusion coefficients. The bimolecular reaction rates between I(2)(-) were calculated by the Debye-Smoluchowski equation using the experimentally determined diffusion coefficients. These calculated reaction rate were much smaller than the experimentally determined rates (Takahashi, K.; et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2007, 111, 4807), indicating the charge screening effect of RTILs.

  3. Diffusion Filters for Variational Data Assimilation of Sea Surface Temperature in an Intermediate Climate Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequential, adaptive, and gradient diffusion filters are implemented into spatial multiscale three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3DVAR as alternative schemes to model background error covariance matrix for the commonly used correction scale method, recursive filter method, and sequential 3DVAR. The gradient diffusion filter (GDF is verified by a two-dimensional sea surface temperature (SST assimilation experiment. Compared to the existing DF, the new GDF scheme shows a superior performance in the assimilation experiment due to its success in extracting the spatial multiscale information. The GDF can retrieve successfully the longwave information over the whole analysis domain and the shortwave information over data-dense regions. After that, a perfect twin data assimilation experiment framework is designed to study the effect of the GDF on the state estimation based on an intermediate coupled model. In this framework, the assimilation model is subject to “biased” initial fields from the “truth” model. While the GDF reduces the model bias in general, it can enhance the accuracy of the state estimation in the region that the observations are removed, especially in the South Ocean. In addition, the higher forecast skill can be obtained through the better initial state fields produced by the GDF.

  4. Heterogeneity of soil surface temperature induced by xerophytic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Variation characteristics of the soil surface temperature induced by shrub canopy greatly affects the nearsurface biological and biochemical processes in desert ecosystems. However, information regarding the effects of shrub upon the heterogeneity of soil surface temperature is scarce. Here we aimed to characterize the ...

  5. Weak Nonlinear Double-Diffusive Magnetoconvection in a Newtonian Liquid under Temperature Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Bhadauria

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with a weak nonlinear theory of double-diffusive magnetoconvection in an electrically conducting Newtonian liquid, confined between two horizontal surfaces, under a constant vertical magnetic field, and subjected to imposed time-periodic thermal boundaries. The temperature of both walls is varied time periodic in this case. The disturbances are expanded in terms of power series of amplitude of convection, which is assumed to be small. Using nonautonomous Ginzburg-Landau equation, the Nusselt and Sherwood numbers obtained analytically and studied heat and mass transport in the system. Effect of various parameters on the heat and mass transport is discussed extensively. It is found that the effect of magnetic field is to stabilize the system. Further, it is also notified that the heat and mass transport can be controlled by suitably adjusting the external parameters of the system.

  6. Temperature-Dependent Oxygen Effect on NMR D-[Formula: see text] Relaxation-Diffusion Correlation of n-Alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikhov, Igor; Arns, Christoph H

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion-relaxation correlation experiments ( D -[Formula: see text]) are widely used for the petrophysical characterisation of rocks saturated with petroleum fluids both in situ and for laboratory analyses. The encoding for both diffusion and relaxation offers increased fluid typing contrast by discriminating fluids based on their self-diffusion coefficients, while relaxation times provide information about the interaction of solid and fluid phases and associated confinement geometry (if NMR responses of pure fluids at particular temperature and pressure are known). Petrophysical interpretation of D -[Formula: see text] correlation maps is typically assisted by the "standard alkane line"-a relaxation-diffusion correlation valid for pure normal alkanes and their mixtures in the absence of restrictions to diffusing molecules and effects of internal gradients. This correlation assumes fluids are free from paramagnetic impurities. In situations where fluid samples cannot be maintained at air-free state the diffusion-relaxation response of fluids shift towards shorter relaxation times due to oxygen paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. Interpretation of such a response using the "standard alkane line" would be erroneous and is further complicated by the temperature-dependence of oxygen solubility for each component of the alkane mixture. We propose a diffusion-relaxation correlation suitable for interpretation of low-field NMR D -[Formula: see text] responses of normal alkanes and their mixtures saturating rocks over a broad temperature range, in equilibrium with atmospheric air. We review and where necessary revise existing viscosity-relaxation correlations. Findings are applied to diffusion-relaxation dependencies taking into account the temperature dependence of oxygen solubility and solvent vapour pressure. The effect is demonstrated on a partially saturated carbonate rock.

  7. Uncertainty in assessment of radiation-induced diffusion index changes in individual patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazem-Zadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Chapman, Christopher H.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina I.; Cao, Yue

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate repeatability coefficients of diffusion tensor indices to assess whether longitudinal changes in diffusion indices were true changes beyond the uncertainty for individual patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT). Twenty-two patients who had low-grade or benign tumors and were treated by partial brain radiation therapy (PBRT) participated in an IRB-approved MRI protocol. The diffusion tensor images in the patients were acquired pre-RT, week 3 during RT, at the end of RT, and 1, 6, and 18 months after RT. As a measure of uncertainty, repeatability coefficients (RC) of diffusion indices in the segmented cingulum, corpus callosum, and fornix were estimated by using test-retest diffusion tensor datasets from the National Biomedical Imaging Archive (NBIA) database. The upper and lower limits of the 95% confidence interval of the estimated RC from the test and retest data were used to evaluate whether the longitudinal percentage changes in diffusion indices in the segmented structures in the individual patients were beyond the uncertainty and thus could be considered as true radiation-induced changes. Diffusion indices in different white matter structures showed different uncertainty ranges. The estimated RC for fractional anisotropy (FA) ranged from 5.3% to 9.6%, for mean diffusivity (MD) from 2.2% to 6.8%, for axial diffusivity (AD) from 2.4% to 5.5%, and for radial diffusivity (RD) from 2.9% to 9.7%. Overall, 23% of the patients treated by RT had FA changes, 44% had MD changes, 50% had AD changes, and 50% had RD changes beyond the uncertainty ranges. In the fornix, 85.7% and 100% of the patients showed changes beyond the uncertainty range at 6 and 18 months after RT, demonstrating that radiation has a pronounced late effect on the fornix compared to other segmented structures. It is critical to determine reliability of a change observed in an individual patient for clinical decision making. Assessments of the repeatability and

  8. Uncertainty in assessment of radiation-induced diffusion index changes in individual patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazem-Zadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Chapman, Christopher H; Lawrence, Theodore S; Tsien, Christina I; Cao, Yue

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate repeatability coefficients of diffusion tensor indices to assess whether longitudinal changes in diffusion indices were true changes beyond the uncertainty for individual patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT). Twenty-two patients who had low-grade or benign tumors and were treated by partial brain radiation therapy (PBRT) participated in an IRB-approved MRI protocol. The diffusion tensor images in the patients were acquired pre-RT, week 3 during RT, at the end of RT, and 1, 6, and 18 months after RT. As a measure of uncertainty, repeatability coefficients (RC) of diffusion indices in the segmented cingulum, corpus callosum, and fornix were estimated by using test–retest diffusion tensor datasets from the National Biomedical Imaging Archive (NBIA) database. The upper and lower limits of the 95% confidence interval of the estimated RC from the test and retest data were used to evaluate whether the longitudinal percentage changes in diffusion indices in the segmented structures in the individual patients were beyond the uncertainty and thus could be considered as true radiation-induced changes. Diffusion indices in different white matter structures showed different uncertainty ranges. The estimated RC for fractional anisotropy (FA) ranged from 5.3% to 9.6%, for mean diffusivity (MD) from 2.2% to 6.8%, for axial diffusivity (AD) from 2.4% to 5.5%, and for radial diffusivity (RD) from 2.9% to 9.7%. Overall, 23% of the patients treated by RT had FA changes, 44% had MD changes, 50% had AD changes, and 50% had RD changes beyond the uncertainty ranges. In the fornix, 85.7% and 100% of the patients showed changes beyond the uncertainty range at 6 and 18 months after RT, demonstrating that radiation has a pronounced late effect on the fornix compared to other segmented structures. It is critical to determine reliability of a change observed in an individual patient for clinical decision making. Assessments of the repeatability

  9. Laser induced temperature jump investigations of fast protein folding dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Linlin

    Protein folding has a large parameter space, diverse mechanism, and multipath kinetics. However, there are some common features many proteins share in their folding processes: all seem to fold at the rates much faster than the random conformation search, and all fold into the structures which have the highly regular motifs like alpha-helices, beta-sheets and turns. Understanding how fast proteins can fold is one of the central issues in solving the protein folding problem. Ultrafast folding kinetics had not been accessible until a few sub-millisecond probes were invented and applied lately. We constructed a laser induced temperature jump spectrometer which is a great utility in identifying the local structure and tertiary contact formation of proteins on the time scale from 10 -8 to 10-3 s with time resolution of 10 -9 s. With this spectrometer we studied the fast folding mini-protein, TrpCage and a few short stable beta-hairpins, the TrpZip series. Studying TrpCage was a major breakthrough it was a pioneer protein model which brought experiment and simulation very close: its structures measured by NMR and predicted by the molecular dynamics were amazingly alike. Our kinetic results showed that it folds in 4 mus at room temperature which turned out to be the fastest ever known for protein-like molecules. Also this folding time constant is consistent with what was later on simulated by distributed computation. TrpZips are among the smallest and stablest polypeptide chains which form secondary structures. They are slightly different from each other based on structural stability and by forming various types of beta-hairpins which are the minimum units of beta tertiary structure. The beta-hairpins form in the time range of 1--10 mus that confirms the theory that loop formation is controlled by the diffusion process (˜mus). We also investigated the kinetics of the protein chain collapse, a very controversial problem. By comparing the collapse of the foldable 104

  10. Application of Shear Plate Interferometry to Jet Diffusion Flame Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDerWege, Brad A.; OBrien, Chris J.; Hochgreb, Simone

    1997-01-01

    The recent ban on the production of bromotrifluoromethane (CF3Br) because of its high stratospheric ozone depletion potential has led to interest in finding alternative agents for fire extinguishing applications. Some of the promising alternatives are fluorinated hydrocarbons. A clear understanding of the effects of CF3Br and alternative chemical suppressants on diffusion flames is therefore necessary in the selection of alternative suppressants for use in normal and microgravity. The flame inhibition effects of halogen compounds have been studied extensively in premixed systems. The effect of addition of halocarbons (carbon-halogen compounds) to diffusion flames has been studied experimentally in coflow configurations and in counterflow gaseous and liquid-pool flames. Halogenated compounds are believed to inhibit combustion by scavenging hydrogen radicals to form the relatively unreactive compound HF, or through a catalytic recombination cycle involving HBr to form H2. Comparisons between halogens show that bromine inhibition is significantly more effective than chlorine or fluorine. Although fluorinated compounds are only slightly more effective inhibitors on a mass basis than nitrogen, they are more effective on a volume basis and are easily stored in liquid form. The objectives of this study are (a) to determine the stability limits of laminar jet diffusion flames with respect to inhibitor concentration in both normal and microgravity, and (b) to investigate the structure of halocarbon-inhibited flames. In the initial phase of this project, visual diagnostics were used to observe the structure and behavior of normal and microgravity flames. The initial observations showed significant changes in the structure of the flames with the addition of halocarbons to the surrounding environment, as discussed below. Furthermore, the study established that the flames are more stable relative to the addition of halocarbons in microgravity than in normal gravity. Visual

  11. Induced-Charge Enhancement of the Diffusion Potential in Membranes with Polarizable Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhkov, I I; Lebedev, D V; Solodovnichenko, V S; Shiverskiy, A V; Simunin, M M

    2017-12-01

    When a charged membrane separates two salt solutions of different concentrations, a potential difference appears due to interfacial Donnan equilibrium and the diffusion junction. Here, we report a new mechanism for the generation of a membrane potential in polarizable conductive membranes via an induced surface charge. It results from an electric field generated by the diffusion of ions with different mobilities. For uncharged membranes, this effect strongly enhances the diffusion potential and makes it highly sensitive to the ion mobilities ratio, electrolyte concentration, and pore size. Theoretical predictions on the basis of the space-charge model extended to polarizable nanopores fully agree with experimental measurements in KCl and NaCl aqueous solutions.

  12. Temperature gradient-induced magnetization reversal of single ferromagnetic nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Ann-Kathrin; Corinna Niemann, Anna; Boehnert, Tim; Martens, Stephan; Montero Moreno, Josep M.; Goerlitz, Detlef; Zierold, Robert; Reith, Heiko; Vega, Victor; Prida, Victor M.; Thomas, Andy; Gooth, Johannes; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the temperature- and temperature gradient-dependent magnetization reversal process of individual, single-domain Co39Ni61 and Fe15Ni85 ferromagnetic nanowires via the magneto-optical Kerr effect and magnetoresistance measurements. While the coercive fields (H C) and therefore the magnetic switching fields (H SW) generally decrease under isothermal conditions at elevated base temperatures (T base), temperature gradients (ΔT) along the nanowires lead to an increased switching field of up to 15% for ΔT  = 300 K in Co39Ni61 nanowires. This enhancement is attributed to a stress-induced, magneto-elastic anisotropy term due to an applied temperature gradient along the nanowire that counteracts the thermally assisted magnetization reversal process. Our results demonstrate that a careful distinction between locally elevated temperatures and temperature gradients has to be made in future heat-assisted magnetic recording devices.

  13. Creep and stress relaxation induced by interface diffusion in metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinfeng; Li, Zhonghua

    2013-03-01

    An analytical solution is developed to predict the creep rate induced by interface diffusion in unidirectional fiber-reinforced and particle reinforced composites. The driving force for the interface diffusion is the normal stress acting on the interface, which is obtained from rigorous Eshelby inclusion theory. The closed-form solution is an explicit function of the applied stress, volume fraction and radius of the fiber, as well as the modulus ratio between the fiber and the matrix. It is interesting that the solution is formally similar to that of Coble creep in polycrystalline materials. For the application of the present solution in the realistic composites, the scale effect is taken into account by finite element analysis based on a unit cell. Based on the solution, a closed-form solution is also given as a description of stress relaxation induced by interfacial diffusion under constant strain. In addition, the analytical solution for the interface stress presented in this study gives some insight into the relationship between the interface diffusion and interface slip. This work was supported by the financial support from the Nature Science Foundation of China (No. 10932007), the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2010CB631003/5), and the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20100073110006).

  14. Mixed Herbal Medicine Induced Diffuse Infiltrative Lung Disease: The HRCT and Histopathologic Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Gyu; Shin, Eun A; Kim, Joung Sook

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the high-resolution CT (HRCT) and pathologic findings of mixed herbal medicine-induced diffuse interstitial lung disease. Eight patients (6 women and 2 men, age range: 31 to 81 years, mean age: 51.4 years) who presented with cough or dyspnea after taking mixed herbal medicine were included in this study. All the patients underwent plain chest radiography and HRCT. We obtained pathologic specimens from 7 patients via fluoroscopy guided large bore cutting needle biopsy and transbronchial lung biopsy. All the patients were treated with steroid therapy. The most common HRCT finding was bilateral diffuse ground glass opacity (n=7), followed by peribronchial consolidation (n=5) and inter- or intralobular septal thickening (n=2). For the disease distribution, the lower lung zone was dominantly involved. The pathologic results of 7 patients were nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (n=3), bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (n=2), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (n=1) and eosinophilic pneumonia (n=1). Irrespective of the pathologic results, all 8 patients improved clinically and radiologically after steroid treatment. The HRCT findings of mixed herbal medicine-induced diffuse infiltrative lung disease were mainly bilateral diffuse ground glass opacity, peribronchial consolidation and dominant involvement of the lower lung zone. Those pathologic findings were nonspecific and the differential diagnosis could include interstitial pneumonia, bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and eosinophilic pneumonia

  15. Mixed Herbal Medicine Induced Diffuse Infiltrative Lung Disease: The HRCT and Histopathologic Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Gyu; Shin, Eun A [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joung Sook [Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the high-resolution CT (HRCT) and pathologic findings of mixed herbal medicine-induced diffuse interstitial lung disease. Eight patients (6 women and 2 men, age range: 31 to 81 years, mean age: 51.4 years) who presented with cough or dyspnea after taking mixed herbal medicine were included in this study. All the patients underwent plain chest radiography and HRCT. We obtained pathologic specimens from 7 patients via fluoroscopy guided large bore cutting needle biopsy and transbronchial lung biopsy. All the patients were treated with steroid therapy. The most common HRCT finding was bilateral diffuse ground glass opacity (n=7), followed by peribronchial consolidation (n=5) and inter- or intralobular septal thickening (n=2). For the disease distribution, the lower lung zone was dominantly involved. The pathologic results of 7 patients were nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (n=3), bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (n=2), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (n=1) and eosinophilic pneumonia (n=1). Irrespective of the pathologic results, all 8 patients improved clinically and radiologically after steroid treatment. The HRCT findings of mixed herbal medicine-induced diffuse infiltrative lung disease were mainly bilateral diffuse ground glass opacity, peribronchial consolidation and dominant involvement of the lower lung zone. Those pathologic findings were nonspecific and the differential diagnosis could include interstitial pneumonia, bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and eosinophilic pneumonia

  16. NMR relaxation in spin ice at low temperature due to diffusing emergent monopoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Christopher L.

    2013-03-01

    At low temperatures, spin dynamics in ideal spin ice is due mainly to dilute, thermally excited magnetic ``monopole'' excitations. I consider how these will affect the longitudinal (T1) and dephasing (T2) relaxation functions of a nuclear spin in the spin-ice pyrochlore Dy2Ti2O4. Up to the time scale for nearby monopoles to be rearranged, a stretched-exponential form of the relaxation functions is expected, due to averaging over nuclei that have different local environments. ror the dephasing (T2) relaxation, the power of time in the stretched exponential is 3/2 in the case of diffusing monopoles, but 1/2 in the case of fixed, fluctuating magnetic impurities. The flip rate and density of fluctuating spins (whatever their nature) can be extracted from the measured relaxation times T1 and T2, and from known parameters. However, the actual experimental relaxation measured by Kitagawa and Takigawa becomes temperature independent in the very low T limit, and the T2 has a power t 1 / 2 in the exponential, neither of which can be explained by monopoles. I suggest the very low T behavior could be due to magnetic impurities on the (normally nonmagnetic) Ti sites. Supported by NSF grant DMR-1005466.

  17. Earthquakes in Kansas Induced by Extremely Far-Field Pressure Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterie, Shelby L.; Miller, Richard D.; Intfen, John W.; Gonzales, Julio B.

    2018-02-01

    Pressure diffusion from high-volume saltwater disposal wells near the Kansas-Oklahoma border appears to have contributed to triggering earthquakes as far as 90 km away. Elevated seismicity that began in southern Kansas in 2013 is largely believed to be induced by pore pressure increase from dozens of disposal wells injecting unprecedented volumes. Earthquakes initially occurred in dense swarms near the wells, and in subsequent years migrated into surrounding areas with minimal fluid injection. By 2017, earthquakes advanced 90 km from areas surrounding the high-volume injection wells into areas with considerable fluid injection volumes but historically consistent rates. Fluid pressure within the injection interval in southern Kansas increased subsequent to high-volume saltwater disposal in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma. Temporal pressure trends across central Kansas suggest that fluid migration and pressure diffusion from cumulative disposal to the south likely induced earthquakes much farther than previously documented for individual injection wells.

  18. Flexible temperature and flow sensor from laser-induced graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Marengo, Marco

    2017-12-25

    Herein we present a flexible temperature sensor and a flow speed sensor based on laser-induced graphene. The main benefits arise from peculiar electrical, thermal and mechanical performances of the material thus obtained, along with a cheap and simple fabrication process. The temperature sensor is a negative temperature coefficient thermistor with non-linear response typical of semi-metals. The thermistor shows a 4% decrease of the resistance in a temperature range of 20–60 °C. The flow sensor exploits the piezoresistive properties of laser-induced graphene and can be used both in gaseous and liquid media thanks to a protective polydimethylsiloxane coating. Main characteristics are ultra-fast response and versatility in design offered by the laser technology.

  19. Determination of an unknown source term temperature distribution for the sub-diffusion equation at the initial and final data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhtar Kirane

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider a class of problems modeling the process of determining the temperature and density of nonlocal sub-diffusion sources given by initial and finite temperature. Their mathematical statements involve inverse problems for the fractional-time heat equation in which, solving the equation, we have to find the an unknown right-hand side depending only on the space variable. The results on existence and uniqueness of solutions of these problems are presented.

  20. Topological terms induced by finite temperature and density fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, A.J.; Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210)

    1986-01-01

    In (3+1)-dimensional finite-temperature and -density SU(2) gauge theories with left-handed fermions, the three-dimensional Chern-Simons term (topological mass) can be induced by radiative corrections. This result is derived by use of a family's index theorem which also implies that in many other quantum field theories various additional lower-dimensional topological terms can be induced. In the high-temperature limit these terms dominate the partition function, which suggests applications to early-Universe cosmology

  1. Pressure induced ionic-superionic transition in silver iodide at ambient temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y H; Wang, H B; Troyan, I A; Gao, C X; Eremets, M I

    2014-01-28

    Silver iodide (AgI-V) is an archetypical ionic compound for studying the formation mechanism of a superionic state. Previous studies have proven that superionic AgI with high ionic conductivity greater than 0.1 Ω(-1)cm(-1) could only be obtained at high temperatures. We show in this paper that high pressure could also induce the superionic state in AgI even at ambient temperature. Using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, we investigated Ag(+) ions diffusing in rock-salt structured AgI-III and KOH-type AgI-V under high pressures and directly observed the superionic state in AgI-V. The diffusion coefficient of AgI-V is ∼3.4 × 10(-4)-8.6 × 10(-4) cm(2)/s in the investigated pressure range of 12-17 GPa, comparable with those of superionic α-AgI and AgI-III'. By analyzing the half infinite length Warburg diffusion process, two parameters α and β, which closely relate to the disordered state of Ag(+) ions, have been determined and it was suggested that Ag(+) ions in AgI-V become disordered. The ionic conductivity of AgI-V is three orders of magnitude higher than that of AgI-III, and has reached around 0.1 Ω(-1)cm(-1). Evidence for all three, the diffusion coefficient, α and β, and conductivity have proven that AgI-V is a superionic conductor at ambient temperature.

  2. Nanoindentation-induced phase transformations in silicon at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffell, S; Bradby, J E; Williams, J S; Munoz-Paniagua, D; Tadayyon, S; Coatsworth, L L; Norton, P R

    2009-01-01

    The nanoindentation-induced phase transformation behavior of silicon at elevated temperatures (25-150 deg. C) has been studied. Nucleation of Si-III/Si-XII on unloading is enhanced with increasing temperature and at the highest temperatures in an amorphous Si matrix, occurs in a continuous fashion without a pop-out event. Interestingly, for slow unloading at the highest temperatures, formation of Si-III/Si-XII in a crystalline Si matrix was not observed. Elevated temperatures enhance the nucleation of Si-III and Si-XII during unloading but the final composition of the phase transformed zone is also dependent on the thermal stability of the phases in their respective matrices.

  3. Ambient-temperature diffusion and gettering of Pt atoms in GaN with surface defect region under 60Co gamma or MeV electron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ruixiang; Li, Lei; Fang, Xin; Xie, Ziang; Li, Shuti; Song, Weidong; Huang, Rong; Zhang, Jicai; Huang, Zengli; Li, Qiangjie; Xu, Wanjing; Fu, Engang; Qin, G. G.

    2018-01-01

    Generally, the diffusion and gettering of impurities in GaN needs high temperature. Calculated with the ambient-temperature extrapolation value of the high temperature diffusivity of Pt atoms in GaN reported in literature, the time required for Pt atoms diffusing 1 nm in GaN at ambient temperature is about 19 years. Therefore, the ambient-temperature diffusion and gettering of Pt atoms in GaN can hardly be observed. In this work, the ambient-temperature diffusion and gettering of Pt atoms in GaN is reported for the first time. It is demonstrated by use of secondary ion mass spectroscopy that in the condition of introducing a defect region on the GaN film surface by plasma, and subsequently, irradiated by 60Co gamma-ray or 3 MeV electrons, the ambient-temperature diffusion and gettering of Pt atoms in GaN can be detected. It is more obvious with larger irradiation dose and higher plasma power. With a similar surface defect region, the ambient-temperature diffusion and gettering of Pt atoms in GaN stimulated by 3 MeV electron irradiation is more marked than that stimulated by gamma irradiation. The physical mechanism of ambient-temperature diffusion and gettering of Pt atoms in a GaN film with a surface defect region stimulated by gamma or MeV electron irradiation is discussed.

  4. The costae presenting in high-temperature-induced vestigial wings ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Most of the wings have defects in the wing blade and partially formed wing margin, which are the result of autonomous cell death in the ... [Yang D. 2007 The costae presenting in high-temperature-induced vestigial wings of Drosophila: implications for anterior wing margin formation. J. Genet. .... The relevant gene(s) may be.

  5. Thermal diffusivity of spinels at elevated temperature: implications for heat transfer in the transition zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, A. M.

    2006-12-01

    The dependence of the vibrational component of thermal diffusivity (D) of spinel-family minerals on chemical composition, disorder, and temperature (T) is discerned using laser-flash measurements of single-crystals up to 1850 K, and used along with data on garnets and radiative transfer calculations to constrain heat transport in Earth's transition zone (TZ). Laser-flash analysis lacks the systematic errors associated with conventional methods, namely, corruption with radiative transfer, and thermal contact losses. Chemical compositions are synthetic disordered spinel, 4 natural samples near MgAl2O4; 4 natural hercynites (Mg,Fe,Al)3O4], nearly ZnAl2O4, and 2 magnetites [Fe3O4]. The magnetic transition is manifest as a lambda curve in 1/D, but otherwise, 1/D is described by low-order polynomial fits with temperature. Ordered, MgAl2O4 has D(298K) = 7.78 mm2/s, which should approximate that of γ-Mg2SiO4. At 298 K, D decreases strongly as cation substitution or Mg-Al disorder increases: D(298K) for ringwoodite is estimated as 5.8 mm2/s. However, above 1400 K, D becomes constant: this limit (Dsat=0.70-1.07 mm2/s) weakly depends on composition and disorder and is analogous to the Dulong-Petit limit in heat capacity (Cp). Mantle garnets have Dsat=0.65 mm2/s (Hofmeister 2006 Phys Chem Min.). To obtain TZ values, we use d(lnD)/dP= (4γth 2/3)KT, literature data on bulk modulus and thermal Gruneisen parameter, density from PREM, and Cp=1.3 J/g-K, which depends weakly on composition, T, and P. Average thermal conductivity (k)in the TZ is 5-6 W/m-K, depending on garnet proportion, and increase with P. Radiative transfer provides ca 1 W/m-K, depending on Fe content and grain-size (Hofmeister 2005 J. Geodyn.). Our estimate of large k = 6-7 W/m-K is twice recent estimates, and is a consequence of phonon saturation revealed by laser-flash measurements. Efficient vibrational transport of heat in the TZ and deeper stabilizes against convection, as does the positive temperature

  6. Ground Thermal Diffusivity Calculation by Direct Soil Temperature Measurement. Application to very Low Enthalpy Geothermal Energy Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar Márquez, José Manuel; Martínez Bohórquez, Miguel Ángel; Gómez Melgar, Sergio

    2016-02-29

    This paper presents a methodology and instrumentation system for the indirect measurement of the thermal diffusivity of a soil at a given depth from measuring its temperature at that depth. The development has been carried out considering its application to the design and sizing of very low enthalpy geothermal energy (VLEGE) systems, but it can has many other applications, for example in construction, agriculture or biology. The methodology is simple and inexpensive because it can take advantage of the prescriptive geotechnical drilling prior to the construction of a house or building, to take at the same time temperature measurements that will allow get the actual temperature and ground thermal diffusivity to the depth of interest. The methodology and developed system have been tested and used in the design of a VLEGE facility for a chalet with basement at the outskirts of Huelva (a city in the southwest of Spain). Experimental results validate the proposed approach.

  7. Enhanced iron gettering by short, optimized low-temperature annealing after phosphorus emitter diffusion for industrial silicon solar cell processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, Jasmin; Luque, Antonio; Canizo, Carlos del [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Avd. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Lelievre, Jean-Francois [Centro de Tecnologia del Silicio Solar, CENTESIL, Madrid (Spain); Fenning, David P.; Bertoni, Mariana I.; Buonassisi, Tonio [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    The introduction of a low-temperature (LT) tail after P emitter diffusion was shown to lead to considerable improvements in electron lifetime and solar cell performance by different researchers. So far, the drawback of the investigated extended gettering treatments has been the lack of knowledge about optimum annealing times and temperatures and the important increase in processing time. In this manuscript, we calculate optimum annealing temperatures of Fe-contaminated Si wafers for different annealing durations. Subsequently, it is shown theoretically and experimentally that a relatively short LT tail of 15 min can lead to a significant reduction of interstitial Fe and an increase in electron lifetime. Finally, we calculate the potential improvement of solar cell efficiency when such a short-tail extended P diffusion gettering is included in an industrial fabrication process. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Propilthiouracil-induced diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage: a case report with the clinical and radiologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Joung Sook; Kim, Ji Young; Choi, Soo Jeon

    2007-01-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU) is a drug that's used to manage hyperthyroidism and it can, on rare occasions, induce antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis that involved multiple organ systems and it can also cause extremely rare isolated or diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage. We report here on a case of a patient who develop diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage after she had been taking PTU for five years. The patient is a 33-year-old woman who presented with hemoptysis. Simple chest radiographs and the chest CT showed bilateral ground-glass opacity, consolidation and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed alveolar hemorrhage. The laboratory values showed increased perinuclear-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ρ - ANCA) and anti-peroxidase antibody titers

  9. Propilthiouracil-induced diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage: a case report with the clinical and radiologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Joung Sook; Kim, Ji Young; Choi, Soo Jeon [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-05-15

    Propylthiouracil (PTU) is a drug that's used to manage hyperthyroidism and it can, on rare occasions, induce antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis that involved multiple organ systems and it can also cause extremely rare isolated or diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage. We report here on a case of a patient who develop diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage after she had been taking PTU for five years. The patient is a 33-year-old woman who presented with hemoptysis. Simple chest radiographs and the chest CT showed bilateral ground-glass opacity, consolidation and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed alveolar hemorrhage. The laboratory values showed increased perinuclear-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody ({rho} - ANCA) and anti-peroxidase antibody titers.

  10. Flow-induced symmetry reduction in two-dimensional reaction-diffusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hai Xiang; Li, Xiao Chun; Li, Qian Shu

    2009-03-01

    The influence of uniform flow on the pattern formation is investigated in a two-dimensional reaction-diffusion system. It is found that the convective flow plays a key role on pattern modulation. Both traveling and stationary periodic patterns are obtained. At moderate flow rates, the perfect hexagon, phase-shifted hexagon and stable square, which are essentially unstable in unperturbed reaction-diffusion systems, are obtained. These patterns move downstream. If the flow rate is increased further, the stationary flow-oriented stripes develop and compete with the spots. If the flow rate exceeds some critical value, the system is convectively unstable and the stationary stripes prevail against the traveling spots. The above patterns all have the same critical wavenumber associated with Turing bifurcation, which indicates that Turing instability produces the patterns while the flow induces the symmetry reduction, i.e., from six-fold symmetry to four-fold one, and to two-fold one ultimately.

  11. Pressure-Induced Changes in Inter-Diffusivity and Compressive Stress in Chemically Strengthened Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Thirion, Lynn M.; Youngman, Randall E.

    Glass exhibits a significant change in microstructure and properties when subjected to high pressure, since the short- and intermediate-range structures of a glass are tunable through compression. Understanding the link between the microscopic structure and macroscopic properties of glasses under...... and more damage resistant glasses. However, the interplay among isostatic compression, pressure-induced changes in alkali diffusivity, compressive stress generated through ion exchange, and the resulting mechanical properties are poorly understood. In this work, we employ a specially designed gas pressure...... stress, and slightly increased hardness. Compression after the ion exchange treatment changes the shape of the potassium-sodium diffusion profiles and significantly increases glass hardness. We discuss these results in terms of the underlying structural changes in network-modifier environments...

  12. Temperature rise and stress induced by microcracks in accelerating structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The temperature rise and induced stress due to Ohmic heating in the vicinity of microcracks on the walls of high-gradient accelerating structures are considered. The temperature rise and induced stress depend on the orientation of the crack with respect to the rf magnetic field, the shape of the crack, and the power and duration of the rf pulse. Under certain conditions the presence of cracks can double the temperature rise over that of a smooth surface. Stress at the bottom of the cracks can be several times larger than that of the case when there are no cracks. We study these effects both analytically and by computer simulation. It is shown that the stress in cracks is maximal when the crack depth is on the order of the thermal penetration depth.

  13. A reaction-diffusion model of ROS-induced ROS release in a mitochondrial network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lufang Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of mitochondrial function is a fundamental determinant of cell injury and death. In heart cells under metabolic stress, we have previously described how the abrupt collapse or oscillation of the mitochondrial energy state is synchronized across the mitochondrial network by local interactions dependent upon reactive oxygen species (ROS. Here, we develop a mathematical model of ROS-induced ROS release (RIRR based on reaction-diffusion (RD-RIRR in one- and two-dimensional mitochondrial networks. The nodes of the RD-RIRR network are comprised of models of individual mitochondria that include a mechanism of ROS-dependent oscillation based on the interplay between ROS production, transport, and scavenging; and incorporating the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and Ca(2+ handling. Local mitochondrial interaction is mediated by superoxide (O2.- diffusion and the O2.(--dependent activation of an inner membrane anion channel (IMAC. In a 2D network composed of 500 mitochondria, model simulations reveal DeltaPsi(m depolarization waves similar to those observed when isolated guinea pig cardiomyocytes are subjected to a localized laser-flash or antioxidant depletion. The sensitivity of the propagation rate of the depolarization wave to O(2.- diffusion, production, and scavenging in the reaction-diffusion model is similar to that observed experimentally. In addition, we present novel experimental evidence, obtained in permeabilized cardiomyocytes, confirming that DeltaPsi(m depolarization is mediated specifically by O2.-. The present work demonstrates that the observed emergent macroscopic properties of the mitochondrial network can be reproduced in a reaction-diffusion model of RIRR. Moreover, the findings have uncovered a novel aspect of the synchronization mechanism, which is that clusters of mitochondria that are oscillating can entrain mitochondria that would otherwise display stable dynamics. The work identifies the

  14. Increased Risk of Drug-Induced Hyponatremia during High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K Jönsson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the relationship between outdoor temperature in Sweden and the reporting of drug-induced hyponatremia to the Medical Products Agency (MPA. Methods: All individual adverse drug reactions (ADR reported to MPA from 1 January 2010 to 31 October 2013 of suspected drug-induced hyponatremia and random controls were identified. Reports where the ADR had been assessed as having at least a possible relation to the suspected drug were included. Information on administered drugs, onset date, causality assessment, sodium levels, and the geographical origin of the reports was extracted. A case-crossover design was used to ascertain the association between heat exposure and drug-induced hyponatremia at the individual level, while linear regression was used to study its relationship to sodium concentration in blood. Temperature exposure data were obtained from the nearest observation station to the reported cases. Results: During the study period, 280 reports of hyponatremia were identified. More cases of drug-induced hyponatremia were reported in the warmer season, with a peak in June, while other ADRs showed an opposite annual pattern. The distributed lag non-linear model indicated an increasing odds ratio (OR with increasing temperature in the warm season with a highest odds ratio, with delays of 1–5 days after heat exposure. A cumulative OR for a lag time of 1 to 3 days was estimated at 2.21 at an average daily temperature of 20 °C. The change in sodium per 1 °C increase in temperature was estimated to be −0.37 mmol/L (95% CI: −0.02, −0.72. Conclusions: Warm weather appears to increase the risk of drug-induced hyponatremia

  15. Low-Temperature Electron Beam-Induced Transformations of Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Cesium lead halide perovskite (CsPbX3, with X = Br, Cl, I) nanocrystals have been found to undergo severe modifications under the high-energy electron beam irradiation of a transmission electron microscope (80/200 keV). In particular, in our previous work, together with halogen desorption, Pb2+ ions were found to be reduced to Pb0 and then diffused to form lead nanoparticles at temperatures above −40 °C. Here, we present a detailed irradiation study of CsPbBr3 nanocrystals at temperatures below −40 °C, a range in which the diffusion of Pb0 atoms/clusters is drastically suppressed. Under these conditions, the irradiation instead induces the nucleation of randomly oriented CsBr, CsPb, and PbBr2 crystalline domains. In addition to the Br desorption, which accompanies Pb2+ reduction at all the temperatures, Br is also desorbed from the CsBr and PbBr2 domains at low temperatures, leading to a more pronounced Br loss, thus the final products are mainly composed of Cs and Pb. The overall transformation involves the creation of voids, which coalesce upon further exposure, as demonstrated in both nanosheets and nanocuboids. Our results show that although low temperatures hinder the formation of Pb nanoparticles in CsPbBr3 nanocrystals when irradiated, the nanocrystals are nevertheless unstable. Consequently, we suggest that an optimum combination of temperature range, electron energy, and dose rate needs to be carefully chosen for the characterization of halide perovskite nanocrystals to minimize both the Pb nanoparticle formation and the structural decomposition. PMID:28983524

  16. Temperature effects on vaccine induced immunity to viruses in fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lorenzen, Ellen; Rasmussen, Jesper Skou

    a problem in terms of inducing a protective immune response by vaccination in aquaculture, since it is often desirable to vaccinate fish during autumn, winter, or spring. In experimental vaccination trials with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) using a DNA-vaccine encoding the viral glycoprotein of viral...... haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), non-specific as well as specific immune mechanisms seemed to be delayed at low temperature. At five weeks post vaccination fish kept at 5C had no detectable response of neutralising antibodies while two thirds of the fish kept at 15C had sero-converted. While protective...... immunity was still established at both temperatures, specificity analysis suggested that protection at the lower temperature was mainly due to non-specific innate antiviral mechanisms, which appeared to last longer at low temperature. This was presumably related to a prolonged persistence of the vaccine...

  17. Theory of laser-induced demagnetization at high temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2012-02-17

    Laser-induced demagnetization is theoretically studied by explicitly taking into account interactions among electrons, spins, and lattice. Assuming that the demagnetization processes take place during the thermalization of the subsystems, the temperature dynamics is given by the energy transfer between the thermalized interacting baths. These energy transfers are accounted for explicitly through electron-magnon and electron-phonon interactions, which govern the demagnetization time scale. By properly treating the spin system in a self-consistent random phase approximation, we derive magnetization dynamic equations for a broad range of temperature. The dependence of demagnetization on the temperature and pumping laser intensity is calculated in detail. In particular, we show several salient features for understanding magnetization dynamics near the Curie temperature. While the critical slowdown in dynamics occurs, we find that an external magnetic field can restore the fast dynamics. We discuss the implication of the fast dynamics in the application of heat-assisted magnetic recording.

  18. Diffusion characteristics of specific metals at the high temperature hydrogen separation; Diffusionseigenschaften bestimmter Metalle bei der Hochtemperatur-Wasserstoffabtrennung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Christian

    2010-09-07

    This paper evaluates the metals palladium, nickel, niobium, tantalum, titanium and vanadium according to their ability to separate hydrogen at high temperatures. This evaluation is chiefly based on a thorough consideration of the properties of diffusion for these metals. The various known hydrogen permeabilities of the metals in a temperature range from 300 to 800 C, as well as their physical and mechanical properties will be presented consistent with the current state of technology. The theory of hydrogen diffusion in metals and the mathematical basis for the calculation of diffusion will also be shown. In the empirical section of the paper, permeability measurements are taken in a temperature range of 400 to 825 C. After measurement, the formation of the oxide coating on these membranes is examined using a light-optical microscope. The results of these examinations allow a direct comparison of the different permeabilities of the various metals within the temperature range tested, and also allow for a critical evaluation of the oxide coating formed on the membranes. The final part of the paper shows the efficiency of these metals in the context of in-situ hydrogen separation in a biomass reformer. (orig.)

  19. Hopf Bifurcation and Delay-Induced Turing Instability in a Diffusive lac Operon Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xin; Song, Yongli; Zhang, Tonghua

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of a lac operon model with delayed feedback and diffusion effect. If the system is without delay or the delay is small, the positive equilibrium is stable so that there are no spatial patterns formed; while the time delay is large enough the equilibrium becomes unstable so that rich spatiotemporal dynamics may occur. We have found that time delay can not only incur temporal oscillations but also induce imbalance in space. With different initial values, the system may have different spatial patterns, for instance, spirals with one head, four heads, nine heads, and even microspirals.

  20. [Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma complicated with drug-induced vasculitis during administration of pegfilgrastim].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuta; Noda, Kentaro; Aiba, Keisuke; Yano, Shingo; Fujii, Tsunehiro

    A 59-year-old female with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (R-CHOP) regimen. In addition, we administered pegfilgrastim for treating chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia. She complained of fever and neck and chest pain a few days after pegfilgrastim administration during the third and fourth courses of R-CHOP. Radiological imaging revealed an inflammation of large vessels, which led to the diagnosis of drug-associated vasculitis. We confirmed that vasculitis observed in this case was caused by pegfilgrastim administration because similar symptoms appeared with both injections of pegfilgrastim.

  1. Use of thermogravimetry and thermodynamic calculations for specifying chromium diffusion occurring in alloys containing chromium carbides during high temperature oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthod, Patrice; Conrath, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    The chromium diffusion is of great importance for the high temperature oxidation behaviour of the chromium-rich carbides-strengthened superalloys. These ones contain high chromium quantities for allowing them well resisting hot corrosion by constituting and maintaining a continuous external scale of chromia. Knowing how chromium can diffuse in such alloys is thus very useful for predicting the sustainability of their chromia-forming behaviour. Since Cr diffusion occurs through the external part of the alloy already affected by the previous steps of oxidation (decarburized subsurface) it is more judicious to specify this diffusion during the oxidation process itself. This was successfully carried out in this work in the case of a model chromia-forming nickel-based alloy containing chromium carbides, Ni(bal.)–25Cr–0.5C (in wt.%). This was done by specifying, using real-time thermogravimetry, the mass gain kinetic due to oxidation, and by combining it with the post-mortem determination of the Cr concentration profiles in subsurface. The values of D Cr thus obtained for 1000, 1050 and 1100 °C in the alloy subsurface are consistent with the values obtained in earlier works for similar alloy's chemical compositions. - Highlights: • A Ni25Cr0.50C alloy was oxidized at high temperature in a thermo-balance. • The mass gain files were analysed to specify the Cr 2 O 3 volatilization constant K v . • Concentration profiles were acquired to specify the chromium gradient. • The diffusion coefficient of chromium through the subsurface was deduced. • The obtained diffusion coefficient is consistent with values previously obtained.

  2. Role Played by Shear-Induced Hydrodynamic Diffusion on the Continuous Separation of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos, Mauricio; Kurowski, Pascal; Moore, Lee; Williams, Stephen; Zborowski, Maciej

    2001-11-01

    The continuous sorting of hematopoietic stem cells, lymphocytes or other blood cells can be performed using a membraneless hydrodynamic technique called split-flow thin channel fractionation, SPLITT. Two streams are introduced to the separator: carrier at one inlet and a suspension containing a mixture of immunomagnetically-labeled cells and unlabeled cells at the other inlet. The SPLITT channel, comprising a thin annulus between two concentric cylinders, is fitted into a permanent quadrupole magnet. The sample is transported along the axis of the separation column, and the labeled cells migrate perpendicular to the bulk flow under the influence of the magnetic field. The aim is to recover - at high purity - all of the magnetized cells in the enriched outlet. However, other cells contaminate the enriched fraction. This may be due to a transversal transport of non-immunomagnetically-labeled cells - termed crossover - by shear-induced hydrodynamic diffusion, SIHD, occurring along the separator. The unwanted cell crossover strongly influences the target cell purity in the enriched fraction. We investigate the possible presence of SIHD on the separation of progenitor cells and particles by studying the cross-stream concentration as a function of different parameters: namely, shear rate, inlet concentration and particle size. With our SIHD model we can solve the convection-diffusion equation by assuming an effective diffusion coefficient, which predicts the observed crossover.

  3. Role of spin diffusion in current-induced domain wall motion for disordered ferromagnets

    KAUST Repository

    Akosa, Collins Ashu

    2015-03-12

    Current-induced spin transfer torque and magnetization dynamics in the presence of spin diffusion in disordered magnetic textures is studied theoretically. We demonstrate using tight-binding calculations that weak, spin-conserving impurity scattering dramatically enhances the nonadiabaticity. To further explore this mechanism, a phenomenological drift-diffusion model for incoherent spin transport is investigated. We show that incoherent spin diffusion indeed produces an additional spatially dependent torque of the form ∼∇2[m×(u⋅∇)m]+ξ∇2[(u⋅∇)m], where m is the local magnetization direction, u is the direction of injected current, and ξ is a parameter characterizing the spin dynamics (precession, dephasing, and spin-flip). This torque, which scales as the inverse square of the domain wall width, only weakly enhances the longitudinal velocity of a transverse domain wall but significantly enhances the transverse velocity of vortex walls. The spatial-dependent spin transfer torque uncovered in this study is expected to have significant impact on the current-driven motion of abrupt two-dimensional textures such as vortices, skyrmions, and merons.

  4. Nanofiltration Membranes with Narrow Pore Size Distribution via Contra-Diffusion-Induced Mussel-Inspired Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yong; Qiu, Wen-Ze; Lv, Yan; Wu, Jian; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2016-11-02

    Nanofiltration membranes (NFMs) are widely used in saline water desalination, wastewater treatment, and chemical product purification. However, conventional NFMs suffer from broad pore size distribution, which limits their applications for fine separation, especially in complete separation of molecules with slight differences in molecular size. Herein, defect-free composite NFMs with narrow pore size distribution are fabricated using a contra-diffusion method, with dopamine/polyethylenimine solution on the skin side and ammonium persulfate solution on the other side of the ultrafiltration substrate. Persulfate ions can diffuse through the ultrafiltration substrate into the other side and in situ trigger dopamine to form a codeposited coating with polyethylenimine. The codeposition is hindered on those sites completely covered by the polydopamine/polyethylenimine coating, although it is promoted at the defects or highly permeable regions because it is induced by the diffused persulfate ions. Such a "self-completion" process results in NFMs with highly uniform structures and narrow pore size distribution, as determined by their rejection of neutral solutes. These near electrically neutral NFMs show a high rejection of divalent ions with a low rejection of monovalent ions (MgCl 2 rejection = 96%, NaCl rejection = 23%), majorly based on a steric hindrance effect. The as-prepared NFMs can be applied in molecular separation such as isolating cellulose hydrogenation products.

  5. Beam-induced temperature changes in HVEM irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Thomas, L.E.; Gelles, D.S.

    1975-01-01

    The peak value of the temperature distribution induced by energy loss of 1.0 MeV electrons in traversing a typical HVEM irradiation specimen can be very substantial. The origin and various features of this distribution were analyzed for a variety of specimen geometries. The major parametric dependencies are shown to be relatively independent of specimen geometry, however, and allow the definition of a scaling relationship that can be employed to predict temperature rises in materials that cannot be measured directly. The use of this scaling relationship requires that the experimenter minimize perturbations of the heat flow due to proximity of the central hole in the specimen. An experimental method of determining directly the magnitude and distribution of beam-induced temperature profiles was developed which utilizes the order-disorder transformation in Fe 3 Al and Cu 3 Au. Scaling of experimentally determined temperature changes leads to more realistic estimates of the total temperature rise than are currently available in various literature tabulations. The factors which determine the optimum selection of irradiation parameters for a given experiment are also discussed

  6. The diffusion of H and D in Nb and Ta at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelhard, J.

    1978-01-01

    The mobility of hydrogen and deuterium in niobium and tantalum has been studied by quenching to 4.2 K and annealing between 10 K and 100 K. The concentration of quenched hydrogen has been computed from the resistivity increase after quenching. The decrease of the residual resistivity during annealing is interpreted by the trapping of hydrogen and by the formation of precipitations. By the variation of the hydrogen concentration and the impurity content, the annealing stage corresponding to the intrinsic diffusion of the hydrogen has been identified. Diffusion coefficients and activation energies for H and D diffusion in niobium and tantalum were determined. (orig./GSCH)

  7. Room temperature single-crystal diffuse scattering and ab initio lattice dynamics in CaTiSiO5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, M J; Refson, K; Zimmermann, M V; Swainson, I P; Dabkowski, A; Dabkowska, H

    2013-08-07

    Single-crystal diffuse scattering data have been collected at room temperature on synthetic titanite using both neutrons and high-energy x-rays. A simple ball-and-springs model reproduces the observed diffuse scattering well, confirming its origin to be primarily due to thermal motion of the atoms. Ab initio phonons are calculated using density-functional perturbation theory and are shown to reproduce the experimental diffuse scattering. The observed diffuse x-ray and neutron scattering patterns are consistent with a summation of mode frequencies and displacement eigenvectors associated with the entire phonon spectrum, rather than with a simple, short-range static displacement. A band gap is observed between 600 and 700 cm(-1) with only two modes crossing this region, both associated with antiferroelectric Ti-O motion along a. One of these modes (of Bu symmetry), displays a large LO-TO mode-splitting (562-701.4 cm(-1)) and has a dominant component coming from Ti-O bond-stretching and, thus, the mode-splitting is related to the polarizability of the Ti-O bonds along the chain direction. Similar mode-splitting is observed in piezo- and ferroelectric materials. The calculated phonon dispersion model may be of use to others in future to understand the phase transition at higher temperatures, as well as in the interpretation of measured phonon dispersion curves.

  8. Shear-induced diffusion of red blood cells measured with dynamic light scattering-optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jianbo; Erdener, Sefik Evren; Li, Baoqiang; Fu, Buyin; Sakadzic, Sava; Carp, Stefan A; Lee, Jonghwan; Boas, David A

    2018-02-01

    Quantitative measurements of intravascular microscopic dynamics, such as absolute blood flow velocity, shear stress and the diffusion coefficient of red blood cells (RBCs), are fundamental in understanding the blood flow behavior within the microcirculation, and for understanding why diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measurements of blood flow are dominantly sensitive to the diffusive motion of RBCs. Dynamic light scattering-optical coherence tomography (DLS-OCT) takes the advantages of using DLS to measure particle flow and diffusion within an OCT resolution-constrained three-dimensional volume, enabling the simultaneous measurements of absolute RBC velocity and diffusion coefficient with high spatial resolution. In this work, we applied DLS-OCT to measure both RBC velocity and the shear-induced diffusion coefficient within penetrating venules of the somatosensory cortex of anesthetized mice. Blood flow laminar profile measurements indicate a blunted laminar flow profile and the degree of blunting decreases with increasing vessel diameter. The measured shear-induced diffusion coefficient was proportional to the flow shear rate with a magnitude of ~0.1 to 0.5 × 10 -6  mm 2 . These results provide important experimental support for the recent theoretical explanation for why DCS is dominantly sensitive to RBC diffusive motion. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Utilization of axisymmetrical models in the description of the fluctuating temperature field and in the calculation of turbulent thermal diffusivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cintra Filho, J. de S.

    1981-01-01

    The fluctuating temperature field structure is studied for the case of turbulent circular pipe flow. Experimentally determined integral length scales are used in modeling this structure in terms of axisymmetric forms. It is found that the appropriate angle of axisymmetry is larger than the one for modeling the large scale velocity structure. The axisymmetric model is then used to examine the validity and the prediction capability of the Tyldesley and Silver's non-spherical eddy diffusivity theory. (Author) [pt

  10. Thermal field induced by intense pulsed ion beam and its possible application in thermal diffusivity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Huang, Wanying; Shen, Jie; Zhang, Jie; Zhong, Haowen; Cui, Xiaojun; Liang, Guoying; Zhang, Xiaofu; Zhang, Gaolong; Yan, Sha; Remnev, Gennady Efimovich; Le, Xiaoyun

    2017-10-01

    As a type of flash heating source, intense pulsed ion beam (IPIB) can induce strong thermal effect in the near-surface region of the target. Compared with laser, the energy deposition efficiency of IPIB is significantly higher and is less dependent on the optical properties of the target. The range of ions in matter can be changed more flexibly by adjusting the accelerating voltage. This makes IPIB an ideal candidate for pulsed heating source of the flash method for the measurement of thermal diffusivity of materials. In present work, numerical verification of flash method with IPIB generated by magnetically insulated diode (MID) was carried out. By exploring the features of the induced thermal field, it is demonstrated that IPIB composed of protons and carbon ions with energy of several hundred keV and cross-sectional energy density of several J/cm2 can be used for the measurement of thermal diffusivity with flash method, and the principles of optimization in experimental parameters are discussed.

  11. Translational diffusion of water and its dependence on temperature in charged and uncharged clays: A neutron scattering study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Sánchez, Fátima; Jurányi, Fanni; Gimmi, Thomas; Van Loon, Luc; Unruh, Tobias; Diamond, Larryn W

    2008-11-07

    The water diffusion in four different, highly compacted clays [montmorillonite in the Na- and Ca-forms, illite in the Na- and Ca-forms, kaolinite, and pyrophyllite (bulk dry density rho(b)=1.85+/-0.05 gcm(3))] was studied at the atomic level by means of quasielastic neutron scattering. The experiments were performed on two time-of-flight spectrometers and at three different energy resolutions [FOCUS at SINQ, PSI (3.65 and 5.75 A), and TOFTOF at FRM II (10 A)] for reliable data analysis and at temperatures between 27 and 95 degrees C. Two different jump diffusion models were used to describe the translational motion. Both models describe the data equally well and give the following ranking of diffusion coefficients: Na-montmorilloniteclays had slightly larger diffusion coefficients than that of bulk water due to their hydrophobic surfaces. The time between jumps, tau(t), follows the sequence: Ca-montmorillonite>or=Na-montmorillonite>Ca-illite>Na-illite>or=kaolinite>pyrophyllite>or=water, in both jump diffusion models. For clays with a permanent layer charge (montmorillonite and illite) a reduction in the water content by a factor of 2 resulted in a decrease in the self-diffusion coefficients and an increase in the time between jumps as compared to the full saturation. The uncharged clay kaolinite exhibited no change in the water mobility between the two hydration states. The rotational relaxation time of water was affected by the charged clay surfaces, especially in the case of montmorillonite; the uncharged clays presented a waterlike behavior. The activation energies for translational diffusion were calculated from the Arrhenius law, which adequately describes the systems in the studied temperature range. Na- and Ca-montmorillonite (approximately 11-12 kJmol), Na-illite (approximately 13 kJmol), kaolinite and pyrophyllite (approximately 14 kJmol), and Ca-illite (approximately 15 kJmol) all had lower activation energies than bulk water (approximately 17 kJmol in

  12. Effect of low temperature oxidation (LTO) in reducing boron skin in boron spin on dopant diffused emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singha, Bandana; Solanki, Chetan Singh [Department of Energy Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay Mumbai-400076, Maharashtra (India)

    2016-05-06

    Formation of boron skin is an unavoidable phenomenon in p-type emitter formation with boron dopant source. The boron skin thickness is generally less than 100 nm and difficult to remove by chemical and physical means. Low temperature oxidation (LTO) used in this work is useful in removing boron skin thickness up to 30 nm and improves the emitter performance. The effective minority carrier lifetime gets improved by more than 30% after using LTO and leakage current of the emitter gets lowered by 100 times thereby showing the importance of low temperature oxidation in boron spin on dopant diffused emitters.

  13. The diffusion cross section for atomic hydrogen in helium gas at low temperature and the H-He potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochemsen, R.; Berlinsky, A.J.; Hardy, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    A calculation of the diffusion cross section Q sub(D) of hydrogen atoms in helium gas at low temperature is performed and compared with recent experimental results. The comparison allows an improved determination of the H-He potential. Calculations were done for three different potentials: our own empirical potential based on experimental high-energy scattering results and calculated long-range dispersion terms, which gives good results for Q sub(D) and total collision cross sections; a recently determined semi-empirical potential, and an ab initio calculated potential. All three potentials imply a strong temperature dependence of Q sub(D) for T < 1.5 K

  14. Temperature Induced Aggregation and Clouding in Humic Acid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Shaffer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Humic acids in aqueous solution demonstrate inverse temperature-solubility relationships when solution conditions are manipulated to reduce coulombic repulsion among the humic polyanions. These effects were followed by dynamic light scattering (DLS measurements of the resulting aggregates, as well as the addition of a polarity sensitive fluorescent probe (pyrene. The humic solutions could be primed for temperature induced clouding by carefully lowering the pH to a point where hydration effects became dominant. The exact value of the cloud point (CP was a function of both pH and humate concentration. The CPs mostly lay in the range 50–90°C, but DLS showed that temperature induced aggregation proceeded from approximately 30°C onward. Similar effects could be achieved by adding multivalent cations at concentrations below those which cause spontaneous precipitation. The declouding of clouded humate solutions could be affected by lowering the temperature combined with mechanical agitation to disentangle the humic polymers.

  15. Strain-induced high-temperature perovskite ferromagnetic insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Dechao; Guo, Hongli; Cui, Zhangzhang; Ma, Chao; Zhao, Jin; Lu, Jiangbo; Xu, Hui; Wang, Zhicheng; Hu, Xiang; Fu, Zhengping; Peng, Ranran; Guo, Jinghua; Zhai, Xiaofang; Brown, Gail J; Knize, Randy; Lu, Yalin

    2018-03-20

    Ferromagnetic insulators are required for many new magnetic devices, such as dissipationless quantum-spintronic devices, magnetic tunneling junctions, etc. Ferromagnetic insulators with a high Curie temperature and a high-symmetry structure are critical integration with common single-crystalline oxide films or substrates. So far, the commonly used ferromagnetic insulators mostly possess low-symmetry structures associated with a poor growth quality and widespread properties. The few known high-symmetry materials either have extremely low Curie temperatures (≤16 K), or require chemical doping of an otherwise antiferromagnetic matrix. Here we present compelling evidence that the LaCoO 3 single-crystalline thin film under tensile strain is a rare undoped perovskite ferromagnetic insulator with a remarkably high T C of up to 90 K. Both experiments and first-principles calculations demonstrate tensile-strain-induced ferromagnetism which does not exist in bulk LaCoO 3 The ferromagnetism is strongest within a nearly stoichiometric structure, disappearing when the Co 2+ defect concentration reaches about 10%. Significant impact of the research includes demonstration of a strain-induced high-temperature ferromagnetic insulator, successful elevation of the transition over the liquid-nitrogen temperature, and high potential for integration into large-area device fabrication processes. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  16. Diffusion tensor imaging detects ventilation-induced brain injury in preterm lambs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhafer M Alahmari

    Full Text Available Injurious mechanical ventilation causes white matter (WM injury in preterm infants through inflammatory and haemodynamic pathways. The relative contribution of each of these pathways is not known. We hypothesised that in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can detect WM brain injury resulting from mechanical ventilation 24 h after preterm delivery. Further we hypothesised that the combination of inflammatory and haemodynamic pathways, induced by umbilical cord occlusion (UCO increases brain injury at 24 h.Fetuses at 124±2 days gestation were exposed, instrumented and either ventilated for 15 min using a high tidal-volume (VT injurious strategy with the umbilical cord intact (INJ; inflammatory pathway only, or occluded (INJ+UCO; inflammatory and haemodynamic pathway. The ventilation groups were compared to lambs that underwent surgery but were not ventilated (Sham, and lambs that did not undergo surgery (unoperated control; Cont. Fetuses were placed back in utero after the 15 min intervention and ewes recovered. Twenty-four hours later, lambs were delivered, placed on a protective ventilation strategy, and underwent MRI of the brain using structural, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS techniques.Absolute MRS concentrations of creatine and choline were significantly decreased in INJ+UCO compared to Cont lambs (P = 0.03, P = 0.009, respectively; no significant differences were detected between the INJ or Sham groups and the Cont group. Axial diffusivities in the internal capsule and frontal WM were lower in INJ and INJ+UCO compared to Cont lambs (P = 0.05, P = 0.04, respectively. Lambs in the INJ and INJ+UCO groups had lower mean diffusivities in the frontal WM compared to Cont group (P = 0.04. DTI colour mapping revealed lower diffusivity in specific WM regions in the Sham, INJ, and INJ+UCO groups compared to the Cont group, but the differences did not reach significance. INJ+UCO lambs more likely to exhibit

  17. XRD study of laser induced crystallisation of (Ag)-Sb-S amorphous thin films prepared by thermal evaporation combined with optically induced diffusion and dissolution of Ag

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gutwirth, J.; Wágner, T.; Frumar, M.; Bezdička, Petr; Vlček, Milan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2006), s. 229-232 ISSN 0031-9090 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : laser induced crystallisation * optically induced diffusion Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.577, year: 2006

  18. Determination of thermal diffusivity at low temperature using the two-beam phase-lag photoacoustic method with observation of phase-transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorge, M.P.P.

    1992-01-01

    This study consists of the determination of thermal diffusivity int he temperature range from 77 K to 300 K by the two-beam phase-lag photoacoustic method. Room temperature measurements of NTD (neutron transmutation doping) silicon suggest that the doping process does not affect its thermal properties. For the superconductor Y Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7 - x it has been verified that the sample density affects its thermal diffusivity. The validity of the experimental method on the Li K SO 4 crystal has been examined by using the thermal diffusivity of a Li F crystal and an Y 2 O 3 ceramic, at room temperature. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity as a function of the temperature for the Li K SO 4 crystal shows two anomalies which correspond at phase-transitions of this crystal in the studied temperature range. (author)

  19. Oxidation and diffusion process in the ferrous iron-bearing glass fibres near glass temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng; Korsgaard, Martin; Kirkegaard, Lise

    2004-01-01

    modifier diffusion; 2) between the oxidation process and the glass transition. Based on these couplings, a phenomenological equation is proposed, which describes both kinetics and dynamics of the oxidation process of the Fe2+-bearing glass fibers. The equation can be used to predict the degree of oxidation......The Fe2+ oxidation and the network modifier diffusion in the Fe2+-bearing glass fibers are studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry (TG), and secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS). The results show two couplings: 1) between the Fe2+ oxidation and the network...

  20. Water Redistribution, Temperature Change and CO2 Diffusion of Reconstruction Soil Profiles Filled with Gangue in Coal Mining Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Zhan, H.; Chen, X.; Hu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    There were a great many projects of reconstruction soil profile filled with gangue to restore ecological environment and land resources in coal mining areas. A simulation experimental system in laboratory was designed for studying water transport and gas-heat diffusion of the reconstruction soil as to help the process of engineering and soil-ripening technology application. The system could be used for constantly measuring soil content, temperature and soil CO2 concentration by laid sensors and detectors in different depth of soil column. The results showed that soil water infiltration process was slowed down and the water-holding capacity of the upper soil was increased because of good water resistance from coal gangue layer. However, the water content of coal gangue layer, 10% approximately, was significantly lower than that of topsoil for the poor water-holding capacity of gangue. The temperature of coal gangue layer was also greater than that of soil layer and became easily sustainable temperature gradient under the condition with heating in reconstruction soil due to the higher thermal diffusivity from gangue, especially being plenty of temperature difference between gangue and soil layers. The effects of heated from below on topsoil was small, which it was mainly influenced from indoor temperature in the short run. In addition, the temperature changing curve of topsoil is similar with the temperature of laboratory and its biggest fluctuation range was for 2.89°. The effects of aerating CO2 from column bottom on CO2 concentration of topsoil soil was also very small, because gas transport from coal gangue layers to soil ones would easily be cut off as so to gas accumulated below the soil layer. The coal gangue could have a negative impact on microbial living environment to adjacent topsoil layers and declined microorganism activities. The effects of coal gangue on topsoil layer were brought down when the cove soil thickness was at 60 cm. And the influences

  1. Modeling of the transient interstitial diffusion of implanted atoms during low-temperature annealing of silicon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velichko, O.I.; Kavaliova, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that many of the phenomena related to the formation of “tails” in the low-concentration region of ion-implanted impurity distribution are due to the anomalous diffusion of nonequilibrium impurity interstitials. These phenomena include boron implantation in preamorphized silicon, a “hot” implantation of indium ions, annealing of ion-implanted layers et cetera. In particular, to verify this microscopic mechanism, a simulation of boron redistribution during low-temperature annealing of ion-implanted layers has been carried out under different conditions of transient enhanced diffusion suppression. Due to the good agreement with the experimental data, the values of the average migration length of nonequilibrium impurity interstitials have been obtained. It has been shown that for boron implanted into a silicon layer preamorphized by germanium ions the average migration length of impurity interstitials at the annealing temperature of 800 °C can be reduced from 11 nm to approximately 6 nm due to additional implantation of nitrogen. The further shortening of the average migration length is observed if the processing temperature is reduced to 750 °C. It is also found that for implantation of BF 2 ions into silicon crystal, the value of the average migration length of boron interstitials is equal to 7.2 nm for thermal treatment at a temperature of 800 °C.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of phase separation under dynamic temperature and shear: Coupling effects of shear convection and thermal diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heping, Wang; Xingguo, Geng; Xiaoguang, Li; Duyang, Zang

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents an exploration of the separation behavior and pattern formation in a shear binary fluid with dynamic temperature after slow cooling via coupled lattice Boltzmann method. The phase separation procedure can be divided into three different stages: spinodal decomposition, domain growth, and domain stretch. The effect of thermal diffusion was observed to be more significant than that of shear convection in the spinodal decomposition stage, while the opposite was observed in the domain growth stage. The slow cooling temperature field significantly prolonged the spinodal decomposition stage, and decreased the separated domain size in domain growth stage. The phase behavior and pattern formation from the disordered state into the coexistence state after slow cooling was investigated during the domain stretch stage. Two typical length scales were obtained according to the equilibrium of two phases, where the number of layers in the corresponding domains was controllable by adjusting the Prandtl number for systems of different scales. The manner in which various viscosities and thermal diffusivities influence the morphologies and kinetic characterizations of the materials was also demonstrated: numerical results indicated that decrease in viscosity can cause increase in the growth exponents of separation fronts and velocity of domain growth, as well as increase in thermal diffusion.

  3. Variation in diffusion-induced solidification rate of liquated Ni-Cr-B insert during TLP bonding of Waspaloy superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokoro, K.; Wikstrom, N.P.; Ojo, O.A.; Chaturvedi, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    A microstructural study was performed on transient liquid phase (TLP) bonded Waspaloy superalloy with a Ni-Cr-B filler. The applicability of a diffusion model based on Fick's second law of diffusion to determine the time required for complete isothermal solidification (t f ) was investigated. Over the temperature range of 1065-1110 deg. C, experimental observations of t f were in reasonable agreement with t f values predicted by the diffusion model. However, a notable deviation was observed in joints prepared between 1175 and 1225 deg. C in that the rate of isothermal solidification was reduced at these temperatures resulting in the formation of a centerline eutectic-type microconstituent, which in contrast, was prevented from forming after holding the brazing assembly for an equivalent bonding time at a lower temperature of 1145 deg. C. Boride particles were observed as part of the eutectic product, which suggested that diffusion of boron out of the liquated insert was also reduced at these higher temperatures. A decrease in solubility of the melting point depressing solute, boron, with increase in temperature is suggested to be an important factor contributing to the reduction in isothermal solidification rate observed at the higher bonding temperatures

  4. Low-temperature hydrogenation of diamond nanoparticles using diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kromka, Alexander; Čech, J.; Kozak, Halyna; Artemenko, Anna; Ižák, Tibor; Čermák, Jan; Rezek, Bohuslav; Černák, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 252, č. 11 (2015), s. 2602-2607 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : atmospheric plasma * diamond nanoparticles * diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge * FTIR * XPS Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.522, year: 2015

  5. Single-particle thermal diffusion of charged colloids: Double-layer theory in a temperature gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhont, J.K.G.; Briels, Willem J.

    2008-01-01

    The double-layer contribution to the single-particle thermal diffusion coefficient of charged, spherical colloids with arbitrary double-layer thickness is calculated and compared to experiments. The calculation is based on an extension of the Debye-Hückel theory for the double-layer structure that

  6. The Effect of Temperature on Kinetics and Diffusion Coefficients of Metallocene Derivatives in Polyol-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh Bahadori

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the density, dynamic viscosity and ionic conductivity of several deep eutectic solvents (DESs containing ammonium-based salts and hydrogen bond donvnors (polyol type are investigated. The temperature-dependent electrolyte viscosity as a function of molar conductivity is correlated by means of Walden's rule. The oxidation of ferrocene (Fc/Fc+ and reduction of cobaltocenium (Cc+/Cc at different temperatures are studied by cyclic voltammetry and potential-step chronoamperometry in DESs. For most DESs, chronoamperometric transients are demonstrated to fit an Arrhenius-type relation to give activation energies for the diffusion of redox couples at different temperatures. The temperature dependence of the measured conductivities of DES1 and DES2 are better correlated with the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher equation. The kinetics of the Fc/Fc+ and Cc+/Cc electrochemical systems have been investigated over a temperature range from 298 to 338 K. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant is then calculated at different temperatures by means of a logarithmic analysis. The glycerol-based DES (DES5 appears suitable for further testing in electrochemical energy storage devices.

  7. The Effect of Temperature on Kinetics and Diffusion Coefficients of Metallocene Derivatives in Polyol-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Laleh; Chakrabarti, Mohammed Harun; Manan, Ninie Suhana Abdul; Hashim, Mohd Ali; Mjalli, Farouq Sabri; AlNashef, Inas Muen; Brandon, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the density, dynamic viscosity and ionic conductivity of several deep eutectic solvents (DESs) containing ammonium-based salts and hydrogen bond donvnors (polyol type) are investigated. The temperature-dependent electrolyte viscosity as a function of molar conductivity is correlated by means of Walden's rule. The oxidation of ferrocene (Fc/Fc+) and reduction of cobaltocenium (Cc+/Cc) at different temperatures are studied by cyclic voltammetry and potential-step chronoamperometry in DESs. For most DESs, chronoamperometric transients are demonstrated to fit an Arrhenius-type relation to give activation energies for the diffusion of redox couples at different temperatures. The temperature dependence of the measured conductivities of DES1 and DES2 are better correlated with the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher equation. The kinetics of the Fc/Fc+ and Cc+/Cc electrochemical systems have been investigated over a temperature range from 298 to 338 K. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant is then calculated at different temperatures by means of a logarithmic analysis. The glycerol-based DES (DES5) appears suitable for further testing in electrochemical energy storage devices.

  8. Heroin-induced leukoencephalopathy: characterization using MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging, and MR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offiah, C. [Department of Neuroradiology, St Bartholomew' s and the London Hospitals NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Hall, E. [Department of Neuroradiology, St Bartholomew' s and the London Hospitals NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: curtis.offiah@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk

    2008-02-15

    Aim: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of heroin-induced leukoencephalopathy or 'chasing the dragon syndrome' and, in particular, the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) features. Material and methods: Six patients with a clinical or histopathological diagnosis of heroin-induced leukoencephalopathy were identified and MRI examinations, including DWI and single-voxel MRS, reviewed. Results: Cerebellar white matter was involved in all six cases demonstrating similar symmetrical distribution with sparing of the dentate nuclei. Brain stem signal change was evident in five of the six patients imaged. Supratentorial brain parenchymal involvement, as well as brain stem involvement, correlated anatomically with corticospinal tract distribution. None of the areas of signal abnormality were restricted on DWI. Of those patients subjected to MRS, the areas of parenchymal damage demonstrated reduced N-acetylaspartate, reduced choline, and elevated lactate. Conclusion: Heroin-induced leukoencephalopathy results in characteristic and highly specific signal abnormalities on MRI, which can greatly aid diagnosis. DWI and MRS findings can be explained by known reported neuropathological descriptions in this condition and can be used to support a proposed mechanism for the benefit of current recommended drug treatment regimes.

  9. Portable laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy/diffuse reflectance hybrid spectrometer for analysis of inorganic pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siozos, Panagiotis; Philippidis, Aggelos; Anglos, Demetrios

    2017-11-01

    A novel, portable spectrometer, combining two analytical techniques, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, was developed with the aim to provide an enhanced instrumental and methodological approach with regard to the analysis of pigments in objects of cultural heritage. Technical details about the hybrid spectrometer and its operation are presented and examples are given relevant to the analysis of paint materials. Both LIBS and diffuse reflectance spectra in the visible and part of the near infrared, corresponding to several neat mineral pigment samples, were recorded and the complementary information was used to effectively distinguish different types of pigments even if they had similar colour or elemental composition. The spectrometer was also employed in the analysis of different paints on the surface of an ancient pottery sherd demonstrating the capabilities of the proposed hybrid diagnostic approach. Despite its instrumental simplicity and compact size, the spectrometer is capable of supporting analytical campaigns relevant to archaeological, historical or art historical investigations, particularly when quick data acquisition is required in the context of surveys of large numbers of objects and samples.

  10. Impact of compression on gas transport in non-woven gas diffusion layers of high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froning, Dieter; Yu, Junliang; Gaiselmann, Gerd; Reimer, Uwe; Manke, Ingo; Schmidt, Volker; Lehnert, Werner

    2016-06-01

    Gas transport in non-woven gas diffusion layers of a high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell was calculated with the Lattice Boltzmann method. The underlying micro structure was taken from two sources. A real micro structure was analyzed in the synchrotron under the impact of a compression mask mimicking the channel/rib structure of a flow field. Furthermore a stochastic geometry model based on synchrotron X-ray tomography studies was applied. The effect of compression is included in the stochastic model. Gas transport in these micro structures was simulated and the impact of compression was analyzed. Fiber bundles overlaying the micro structure were identified which affect the homogeneity of the gas flow. There are significant deviations between the impact of compression on effective material properties for this type of gas diffusion layers and the Kozeny-Carman equation.

  11. INFLUENCE OF THERMOHALINE CONVECTION ON DIFFUSION-INDUCED IRON ACCUMULATION IN A STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theado, S.; Vauclair, S.; Alecian, G.; LeBlanc, F.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic diffusion may lead to heavy-element accumulation inside stars in certain specific layers. Iron accumulation in the Z-bump opacity region has been invoked by several authors to quantitatively account for abundance anomalies observed in some stars, or to account for stellar oscillations through the induced κ-mechanism. These authors, however, never took into account the fact that such an accumulation creates an inverse μ-gradient, unstable for thermohaline convection. Here, we present results for A-F stars, where abundance variations are computed with and without this process. We show that iron accumulation is still present when thermohaline convection is taken into account, but much reduced compared to when this physical process is neglected. The consequences of thermohaline convection for A-type stars as well as for other types of stars are presented.

  12. The role of temperature and temperature-induced drought on forest productivity in the Northern Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Pérez, Guiomar; Vico, Giulia

    2017-04-01

    Forests play an important role in the climate system and the global carbon cycle and is of considerable socioeconomic importance for Northern countries. For example, Sweden has pursued more intensive forest harvesting as a way of fulfilling the requirements of the EU renewable energy directive. Due to ecological and economical role of forests, it is imperative to better understand the physical and biological processes leading to potential changes in productivity. There is no consensus regarding the net effect of raising temperatures on vegetation productivity in this area. There exist the idea that in response to warmer temperatures, forests located in cold regions may benefit from longer growing seasons and, consequently, become more productive. However, radial growth and wood density measurements suggest that in recent decades, there has been a "divergence" between warming and tree growth, with localized shifts to a negative relationship between temperature and growth. This unexpected adverse response of forests in northern areas under warming is consistent with the fact that they are becoming more vulnerable to warm-related disturbances including temperature-induced drought stress. Here we focus on satellite NDVI record as an indicator of greenness vegetation across the Northern Countries for the period 2000 to present and explore corresponding relationships with high-resolution gridded climate data from E-OBS. By focusing on the whole Sweden, we were able to assess whether the role played by each climatic driver (precipitation, temperature and a dryness index) differed in different locations. In particular, a Partial Least Square (PLS) regression analysis was conducted to investigate the model component structure among the potential drivers explaining the annual variations of the mean NDVI observed during the growing season. We observed how forests respond differently to climatic drivers and their extremes when the increasing temperature occurs together with

  13. Examining the Effect of Temperature, Pressure, Seismicity and Diffuse Fluid Flow on Floc Events at Axial Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M.; Crone, T. J.; Knuth, F.; Garcia, C.; Soule, D. C.; Fatland, R.

    2017-12-01

    Flocculation (floc) events are characterized by the ejection of bacterial material, possibly associated with thermophiles originating from warmer sub-seafloor habitats, into the water column. These events are anecdotally linked to magmatic and tectonic processes common in mid-ocean ridge seafloor environments. However, little is known about the relationship between flocculation events and other potentially triggering processes. The Cabled Array at Axial Seamount provides a suite of interdisciplinary real-time datasets to examine system-level processes governing the volcanic marine environment. The eruption at Axial Seamount in 2015 creates an opportunity to study this volcanic system as it evolves post eruption and identify the relationships between the temperature, pressure, seismicity and the biological response. The Diffuse Vent Fluid 3-D Temperature Array (TMPSF), located within the ASHES hydrothermal vent field at Axial Seamount, uses 24 separate sensors to provide a 3-dimensional distribution of diffuse flow temperatures near the Mushroom hydrothermal vent. Preliminary analysis suggests that the temperature signal is strongly influenced by tides observed using the ocean bottom pressure sensors, which may be related to either gradual shifts in tidal currents above the seafloor, or related to subsurface flux. CamHD, also located within the ASHES field, produces high definition video data, which we analyze to identify changes in water column floc concentration. These data streams allow us to examine the controls on the temperature signal and the associated correlations with microbial seafloor processes. We are currently examining the flocculation event identified in Crone (2016) to determine its relationship to changes in seawater temperatures near the seafloor, seismic activity and seafloor pressure. We will use this proxy to examine other CamHD data and determine if subsequent flocculation events have occurred and if they have a similar relationship to local

  14. Kalman filtered MR temperature imaging for laser induced thermal therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, D; Yung, J; Hazle, J D; Weinberg, J S; Stafford, R J

    2012-04-01

    The feasibility of using a stochastic form of Pennes bioheat model within a 3-D finite element based Kalman filter (KF) algorithm is critically evaluated for the ability to provide temperature field estimates in the event of magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) data loss during laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). The ability to recover missing MRTI data was analyzed by systematically removing spatiotemporal information from a clinical MR-guided LITT procedure in human brain and comparing predictions in these regions to the original measurements. Performance was quantitatively evaluated in terms of a dimensionless L(2) (RMS) norm of the temperature error weighted by acquisition uncertainty. During periods of no data corruption, observed error histories demonstrate that the Kalman algorithm does not alter the high quality temperature measurement provided by MR thermal imaging. The KF-MRTI implementation considered is seen to predict the bioheat transfer with RMS error corruption subsides. In its present form, the KF-MRTI method currently fails to compensate for consecutive for consecutive time periods of data loss ∆t > 10 sec.

  15. Modelling of neutron absorbers in high temperature reactors by combined transport diffusion methods

    OpenAIRE

    Fen, V.; Lebedev, M.; Sarytchev, V.; Scherer, W.

    1992-01-01

    Today, the neutron-physical description of strong neutron absorbing materials for control and shut-down of nuclear power plants is performed using combined transport and diffusion methods. Two of these approaches are described and compared in this paper. The method of equivalent cross-sections has been developed at the KFA-Jülich Institute for Safety Research and Reactor Technology (ISR) and was widely used for all german HTR reactor concepts. The Obninsk Institute for Nuclear Power Engineeri...

  16. Preparation of gas diffusion electrodes for high temperature PEM-type fuel cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazur, P.; Mališ, J.; Paidar, M.; Schauer, Jan; Bouzek, K.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 14, 1-3 (2010), s. 101-105 ISSN 1944-3994. [PERMEA 2009. Prague, 07.06.2009-11.06.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0465 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : gas diffusion electrode * polymer electrolyte * ionic liquid Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.752, year: 2010

  17. Development of Be/Glidcop joint obtained by hot isostatic pressing diffusion bonding for high in-service temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint-Antonin, F.; Bucci, P.; Burlet, H.; Le Marois, G. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France); Barberi, D.; Laille, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper addresses some aspects of the beryllium-Glidcop joining by Hot Isostatic Pressing diffusion Bonding. The quality of a joint is mainly dependent on the interface microstructure. Thus, as Be/copper direct bonding is not recommended, the choice of interlayers is a critical point. The joining process parameters, i.e. temperature, pressure and time, must take into account the in-service requirements, the mechanical and metallurgical properties of each material. The Be/Glidcop joining process developed at CEA/Grenoble is presented here. (author)

  18. Effects of diluents on soot surface temperature and volume fraction in diluted ethylene diffusion flames at pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Kailasanathan, Ranjith Kumar Abhinavam

    2014-05-20

    Soot surface temperature and volume fraction are measured in ethylene/air coflowing laminar diffusion flames at high pressures, diluted with one of four diluents (argon, helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide) using a two-color technique. Both temperature and soot measurements presented are line-of-sight averages. The results aid in understanding the kinetic and thermodynamic behavior of the soot formation and oxidation chemistry with changes in diluents, ultimately leading to possible methods of reducing soot emission from practical combustion hardware. The diluted fuel and coflow exit velocities (top-hat profiles) were matched at all pressures to minimize shear effects. In addition to the velocity-matched flow rates, the mass fluxes were held constant for all pressures. Addition of a diluent has a pronounced effect on both the soot surface temperature and volume fraction, with the helium diluted flame yielding the maximum and carbon dioxide diluted flame yielding minimum soot surface temperature and volume fraction. At low pressures, peak soot volume fraction exists at the tip of the flame, and with an increase in pressure, the location shifts lower to the wings of the flame. Due to the very high diffusivity of helium, significantly higher temperature and volume fraction are measured and explained. Carbon dioxide has the most dramatic soot suppression effect. By comparing the soot yield with previously measured soot precursor concentrations in the same flame, it is clear that the lower soot yield is a result of enhanced oxidation rates rather than a reduction in precursor formation. Copyright © 2014 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  19. Laser filamentation induced air-flow motion in a diffusion cloud chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Cheng; Ju, Jingjing; Wang, Zhanxin; Wang, Wentao; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Chuang; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-04-22

    We numerically simulated the air-flow motion in a diffusion cloud chamber induced by femtosecond laser filaments for different chopping rates. A two dimensional model was employed, where the laser filaments were treated as a heat flux source. The simulated patterns of flow fields and maximum velocity of updraft compare well with the experimental results for the chopping rates of 1, 5, 15 and 150 Hz. A quantitative inconsistency appears between simulated and experimental maximum velocity of updraft for 1 kHz repetition rate although a similar pattern of flow field is obtained, and the possible reasons were analyzed. Based on the present simulated results, the experimental observation of more water condensation/snow at higher chopping rate can be explained. These results indicate that the specific way of laser filament heating plays a significant role in the laser-induced motion of air flow, and at the same time, our previous conclusion of air flow having an important effect on water condensation/snow is confirmed.

  20. Gas diffusion electrode setup for catalyst testing in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Gustav Karl Henrik; Fleige, Michael; Arenz, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    temperature, i.e., very close to the actual conditions in high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs). The cell consists of a stainless steel flow field and a PEEK plastic cell body comprising the electrochemical cell, which exhibits a three electrode configuration. The cell body and flow...

  1. Stability and Temperature-Induced Agglomeration of Rh Nanoparticles Supported by CeO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Erika; Pusztai, Péter; Oszkó, Albert; Baán, Kornélia; Erdőhelyi, András; Kónya, Zoltán; Kiss, János

    2016-03-22

    The effects of reduction by H2 and by heat treatment in vacuum and in O2 flow on Rh particle size changes of Rh/CeO2 samples were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM), and CO adsorption followed by diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Low-temperature (373-423 K) reduction of Rh without agglomeration is demonstrated. An average particle size of 2.3 ± 1.1 nm was measured by HRTEM regardless of the metal loading (1-5%). On Rh/CeO2, a significant particle size increase of the Rh particles was detected on heating (773 K). In this work, we suggest that the temperature-induced surface decrease resulting from the sintering of Rh is favored only for well-dispersed particles. XP spectra revealed that the mobile oxygens of CeO2 fundamentally determine the oxidation state of the supported metals. At elevated temperature, the oxidation of the reduced support surface as well as the metal component takes place because of the segregation of ceria oxygens. When the aggregated particles were reoxidized, the redispersion of Rh was observed probably because of the formation of Rh-O-Ce bonds.

  2. Radiation-Induced Changes in Normal-Appearing White Matter in Patients With Cerebral Tumors: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagesh, Vijaya; Tsien, Christina I.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Ross, Brian D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Junick, Larry; Cao Yue

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the radiation-induced changes in normal-appearing white matter before, during, and after radiotherapy (RT) in cerebral tumor patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with low-grade glioma, high-grade glioma, or benign tumor treated with RT were studied using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. The biologically corrected doses ranged from 50 to 81 Gy. The temporal changes were assessed before, during, and to 45 weeks after the start of RT. The mean diffusivity of water ( ), fractional anisotropy of diffusion, diffusivity perpendicular (λ perpendicular ) and parallel (λ parallel ) to white matter fibers were calculated in normal-appearing genu and splenium of the corpus callosum. Results: In the genu and splenium, fractional anisotropy decreased and , λ parallel , λ -perpendicular increased linearly and significantly with time (p -perpendicular had increased ∼30% in the genu and splenium, and λ parallel had increased 5% in the genu and 9% in the splenium, suggesting that demyelination is predominant. The increases in λ perpendicular and λ parallel were dose dependent, starting at 3 weeks and continuing to 32 weeks from the start of RT. The dose-dependent increase in λ perpendicular and λ parallel was not sustained after 32 weeks, indicating the transition from focal to diffuse effects. Conclusion: The acute and subacute changes in normal-appearing white matter fibers indicate radiation-induced demyelination and mild structural degradation of axonal fibers. The structural changes after RT are progressive, with early dose-dependent demyelination and subsequent diffuse dose-independent demyelination and mild axonal degradation. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging is potentially a biomarker for the assessment of radiation-induced white matter injury

  3. Simultaneous measurement of speed of sound, thermal diffusivity, and bulk viscosity of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids using laser-induced gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Dimitrii N; Kiefer, Johannes; Seeger, Thomas; Fröba, Andreas P; Leipertz, Alfred

    2014-12-11

    The technique of laser-induced gratings (LIGs) has been applied to the simultaneous determination of speed of sound and thermal diffusivity of four 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ([EMIm])-based room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs)-[EMIm][N(CN)2], [EMIm][MeSO3], [EMIm][C(CN)3], and [EMIm][NTf2]-at ambient pressure (1 bar (0.1 MPa)) and temperature (28 °C (301 K)). Transient laser-induced gratings were created as a result of thermalization of a quasi-resonant excitation of highly lying combinational vibrational states of the RTIL molecules and electrostrictive compression of the liquid by radiation of a pulse-repetitive Q-switched Nd:YAG pump laser (1064 nm). The LIGs temporal evolution was recorded using Bragg diffraction of the radiation from a continuous-wave probe laser (532 nm). By fitting the temporal profiles of the LIG signals, the speed of sound and thermal diffusivity were determined, and the isentropic compressibility and thermal conductivity were calculated. Independently, the special experimental arrangement allowed the measurement of the damping of the laser-excited acoustic waves and the derivation of the RTIL bulk viscosity for the first time.

  4. Contribution of the actomyosin motor to the temperature-dependent translational diffusion of water by cytoplasmic streaming in Elodea canadensis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorob'ev, V N; Anisimov, A V; Dautova, N R

    2004-12-01

    The extent to which the actomyosin motor responsible for cytoplasmic streaming contributes to the translational diffusion of water in Elodea canadensis cells was studied by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-echo technique. The relative contribution of the actomyosin motor was determined from the corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient by the Einstein-Smolukhovsky relation. It is equal to the difference between the diffusional displacements of the cytoplasmic and the bulk water (deltaX). The NMR data show that the temperature dependence of deltaX is humpshaped, which is characteristic of enzyme reactions. At the same time, the apparent diffusion coefficient of cytoplasmic water increases with an increase in temperature. The most significant contribution of the actomyosin motor to deltaX is observed at temperatures below 20 degrees C. Within the temperature range of 20 to 33 degrees C, deltaX changes only slightly, and a further increase in temperature reduces deltaX to zero.

  5. Complex fine-scale diffusion coating formed at low temperature on high-speed steel substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaus, A. S.; Pokorný, P.; Čaplovič, Ľ.; Sitkevich, M. V.; Peterka, J.

    2018-04-01

    A complex B-C-N diffusion coating was produced at 580 °C for 1 h on AISI M35 steel substrate and compared with a reference coating formed at 880 °C for 2.5 h. The surface and the cross-sections of the samples were subjected to detailed characterisation. The surface roughness, hardness, residual stresses and adhesion of the coatings were also evaluated together with cutting tests using drills on coated and uncoated samples while monitoring cutting force and torque. The surface of the steel treated at 580 °C revealed Fe2B, boron nitride and boron iron carbide, but FeB was noted to be absent. The 580 °C coating had the fine-scale microstructure, which resulted in the excellent adhesion and enhanced wear resistance, relative to reference samples that contained coarse borides. The results established that a complex fine-scale diffusion coating enhanced the wear resistance and reduces the cutting force and torque during drilling, thereby increasing the drill life by a factor of 2.2.

  6. Estimation of Water Diffusion Coefficient into Polycarbonate at Different Temperatures Using Numerical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shojaee Nasirabadi, Parizad; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, many electronic systems are exposed to harsh conditions of relative humidity and temperature. Masstransport properties of electronic packaging materials are needed in order to investigate the influence of moisture andtemperature on reliability of electronic devices. Polycarbonate (PC...

  7. Linear thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity and melting temperature of Am-MOX and Np-MOX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieur, D.; Belin, R.C.; Manara, D.; Staicu, D.; Richaud, J.-C.; Vigier, J.-F.; Scheinost, A.C.; Somers, J.; Martin, P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The thermal properties of Np- and Am-MOX solid solutions were investigated. • Np- and Am-MOX solid solutions exhibit the same linear thermal expansion. • The thermal conductivity of Am-MOX is about 10% higher than that of Np-MOX. • The melting temperatures of Np-MOX and Am-MOX are 3020 ± 30 K and 3005 ± 30 K, respectively. - Abstract: The thermal properties of Np- and Am-MOX solid solution materials were investigated. Their linear thermal expansion, determined using high temperature X-ray diffraction from room temperature to 1973 K showed no significant difference between the Np and the Am doped MOX. The thermal conductivity of the Am-MOX is about 10% higher than that of Np-MOX. The melting temperatures of Np-MOX and Am-MOX, measured using a laser heating self crucible arrangement were 3020 ± 30 K and 3005 ± 30 K, respectively

  8. Facile synthesis of Mn-doped ZnS nanocrystals and determination of critical temperature for lattice diffusion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Rongan; Zeng, Ruosheng; Yin, Yuehong; Wan, Jie; Sun, Zhiguo; Zhao, Yunqiang; Zhao, Haixing

    2012-11-01

    High-quality Mn:ZnS doped nanocrystals (d-dots) with photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) of 50-70% have been synthesized based on nucleation-doping strategy by choosing 1-dodecanethiol (DDT) as the capping ligand. Controlling the growth of small-sized MnS core nanoclusters was successfully achieved by changing the injection temperature of sulfur precursor, the growth time of MnS nuclei, and the amount of DDT. Furthermore, MnS/ZnS core/shell d-dots with a diffusion layer at the interface between the MnS core and the ZnS shell were fabricated through an overcoating of the ZnS shell layer on the presynthesized MnS core nanoclusters. The resulting monodisperse d-dots exhibited spherical shape with a zinc-blende crystal structure. The critical temperature for lattice diffusion of Mn ions in the ZnS host lattice was determined to be about 260 degrees C by annealing the presynthesized and purified Mn:ZnS d-dots.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation to assess the effect of temperature on diffusion coefficients of different ions and water molecules in C-S-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehtab, B.; Tarighat, A.

    2017-10-01

    Diffusion is a particle transportation process beginning from one point of a system to another through random molecular motion. This process depends on various parameters like temperature, concentration gradient, and particle size. The objective of this article is to assess the variation of diffusion coefficients of water molecules, chloride and sodium ions against different temperatures in calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) through molecular dynamics simulation. A uniform sodium chloride solution is modeled between cement hydrate layers with no concentration gradient. In such a solution, temperature could affect diffusion process in a significant manner. The two most important crystalline mineral analogues of C-S-H, tobermorite and jennite, are applied in this simulation. Diffusion coefficients of different ions and water molecules are found in different temperatures. It is revealed that diffusion coefficient is higher at high temperatures. Activation energies of chloride and sodium ions transport in cement hydrates are calculated through Arrhenius law. Output values of diffusion coefficients and activation energies are compared to previous experimental and simulation results in the related literature. A multi-scale analysis is run to estimate the penetration depth of Cl- ions in cement paste through Fick's second law.

  10. Lithium diffusion in silicon and induced structure disorder: A molecular dynamics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanyu Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Using molecular dynamics method, we investigate the diffusion property of lithium in different silicon structures and silicon structure's disorder extent during lithium's diffusion process. We find that the pathway and the incident angle between the direction of barrier and diffusion of lithium are also the essential factors to the lithium's diffusion property in silicon anode besides the barrier. Smaller incident angle could decrease the scattering of lithium in silicon structure effectively. Moreover, lithium diffuses easier in the Li-Si alloy structure of higher lithium concentration with deeper injection depth. The silicon's structure will be damaged gradually during the charge and discharge process. However, it will also recover to initial state to a great extent after relaxation. Therefore, the damage of lithium diffusion to silicon anode in the structure of low lithium concentration is reversible to a great degree. In addition, the silicon structure of crystal orientation perform better properties in both lithium's diffusivity and structural stability.

  11. Stress-induced core temperature changes in pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Myla de Aguiar; Melleu, Fernando Falkenburger; Marino-Neto, José

    2015-02-01

    Changes in body temperature are significant physiological consequences of stressful stimuli in mammals and birds. Pigeons (Columba livia) prosper in (potentially) stressful urban environments and are common subjects in neurobehavioral studies; however, the thermal responses to stress stimuli by pigeons are poorly known. Here, we describe acute changes in the telemetrically recorded celomatic (core) temperature (Tc) in pigeons given a variety of potentially stressful stimuli, including transfer to a novel cage (ExC) leading to visual isolation from conspecifics, the presence of the experimenter (ExpR), gentle handling (H), sham intracelomatic injections (SI), and the induction of the tonic immobility (TI) response. Transfer to the ExC cage provoked short-lived hyperthermia (10-20 min) followed by a long-lasting and substantial decrease in Tc, which returned to baseline levels 2 h after the start of the test. After a 2-hour stay in the ExC, the other potentially stressful stimuli evoked only weak, marginally significant hyperthermic (ExpR, IT) or hypothermic (SI) responses. Stimuli delivered 26 h after transfer to the ExC induced definite and intense increases in Tc (ExpR, H) or hypothermic responses (SI). These Tc changes appear to be unrelated to modifications in general activity (as measured via telemetrically recorded actimetric data). Repeated testing failed to affect the hypothermic responses to the transference to the ExC, even after nine trials and at 1- or 8-day intervals, suggesting that the social (visual) isolation from conspecifics may be a strong and poorly controllable stimulus in this species. The present data indicated that stress-induced changes in Tc may be a consistent and reliable physiological parameter of stress but that they may also show stressor type-, direction- and species-specific attributes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cross-Diffusion Induced Turing Instability and Amplitude Equation for a Toxic-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton Model with Nonmonotonic Functional Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Renji; Dai, Binxiang

    2017-06-01

    The spatiotemporal pattern induced by cross-diffusion of a toxic-phytoplankton-zooplankton model with nonmonotonic functional response is investigated in this paper. The linear stability analysis shows that cross-diffusion is the key mechanism for the formation of spatial patterns. By taking cross-diffusion rate as bifurcation parameter, we derive amplitude equations near the Turing bifurcation point for the excited modes in the framework of a weakly nonlinear theory, and the stability analysis of the amplitude equations interprets the structural transitions and stability of various forms of Turing patterns. Furthermore, we illustrate the theoretical results via numerical simulations. It is shown that the spatiotemporal distribution of the plankton is homogeneous in the absence of cross-diffusion. However, when the cross-diffusivity is greater than the critical value, the spatiotemporal distribution of all the plankton species becomes inhomogeneous in spaces and results in different kinds of patterns: spot, stripe, and the mixture of spot and stripe patterns depending on the cross-diffusivity. Simultaneously, the impact of toxin-producing rate of toxic-phytoplankton (TPP) species and natural death rate of zooplankton species on pattern selection is also explored.

  13. Effects of temperature gradient induced nanoparticle motion on conduction and convection of fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Leping; Peterson, George P.; Yoda, Minani; Wang Buxuan

    2012-01-01

    The role of temperature gradient induced nanoparticle motion on conduction and convection was investigated. Possible mechanisms for variations resulting from variations in the thermophysical properties are theoretically and experimentally discussed. The effect of the nanoparticle motion on conduction is demonstrated through thermal conductivity measurement of deionized water with suspended CuO nanoparticles (50 nm in diameter) and correlated with the contributions of Brownian diffusion, thermophoresis, etc. The tendencies observed is that the magnitude of and the variation in the thermal conductivity increases with increasing volume fraction for a given temperature, which is due primarily to the Brownian diffusion of the nanoparticles. Using dimensional analysis, the thermal conductivity is correlated and both the interfacial thermal resistance and near-field radiation are found to be essentially negligible. A modification term that incorporates the contributions of Brownian motion and thermophoresis is proposed. The effect of nanoscale convection is illustrated through an experimental investigation that utilized fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticle tracers (200 nm in diameter) and multilayer nanoparticle image velocimetry. The results indicate that both the magnitude and the deviation of the fluid motion increased with increasing heat flux in the near-wall region. Meanwhile, the fluid motion tended to decrease with the off-wall distance for a given heating power. A corresponding numerical study of convection of pure deionized water shows that the velocity along the off-wall direction is several orders of magnitude lower than that of deionized water, which indicates that Brownian motion in the near-wall region is crucial for fluid with suspended nanoparticles in convection.

  14. What is the Role of the Transition State in Soret and Chemical Diffusion Induced Isotopic Fractionation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, G.

    2013-12-01

    For over six decades, Urey's (1) statistical mechanical model of isotopic fractionation based on partition functions with quantized energy levels have enjoyed enormous success in quantitatively explaining equilibrium isotopic fractionation in a wide variety of geochemical systems For example, the interpretation of oxygen isotopic variations in carbonate systems (e.g. foraminiferas), in terms of partition functions with quantized energy levels, forms the basis for paleothermometry (2). Recent observations of isotopic fractionation from chemical and thermal (Soret) diffusion (3-7) appear to challenge our theoretical understanding of mass-transport and isotopic fractionation (8, 9). For example, a recently proposed quantum mechanical model of Soret diffusion, which correctly predicts the isotopic fractionation in thermal gradients for isotopes of Mg, Ca, Fe, Si, and possibly oxygen, was critiqued as being unphysical. First, it was argued that the zero point energies needed to explain the magnitude of isotopic fractionation in basalt melts were unrealistically high based on infrared spectra of these melts. Second, it was argued that the chemical diffusion isotopic fractionation (beta) factors expected from these zero-point energies were also unphysical (10). A recently proposed collision-momentum transfer model partially explains observed fractionation factors, although it fails miserably (by a factor of 3) to account for the isotopic fractionation of Mg isotopes (11). In this presentation, I will review recent observations and models of isotopic fractionation in geochemical melts with thermal gradients and expand upon previous work (8, 12) to show how transition state theory can simultaneously explain mass-transport induced isotopic fractionation, including kinetic, equilibrium, and Soret isotopic fractionation. I show this by providing a few example calculations of the kinetic fractionation factors (a.k.a. beta factors) expected in chemical diffusion as well as

  15. Establishment of diffuse type stomach carcinoma orthotopic-implanted model and study on apoptosis induced by X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yi; Qian Haixin

    2003-01-01

    To observe whether ionizing radiation could induce up - regulation of Fas receptor expression and apoptosis in diffuse type stomach carcinoma. To investigate the relationship among ionizing radiation, apoptosis and the expression of Fas in stomach carcinoma. Methods: Firstly, the experimental model of SGC - 7901 cell lines was set up and diffuse type stomach carcinoma orthotopically implanted in nude mice. Then 21 model mice were randomized into three groups equally i.e., the control group ( group A ) and two irradiation groups ( group B and group C, executed at 24 hours and 48 hours after irradiation respectively ). The mice in group B and group C were irradiated with 6 MV X-rays at a dose of 20 Gy. By using the methods of TUNEL and immunohistochemical staining, the changes of apoptosis index and Fas expression in tumor tissues were examined. Results: (1) The spontaneous apoptosis index (AI) of tumor tissues was significantly lower than that of mucosa tissues (P 0.05). (3) The Fas LI of tumor tissues increased after irradiation compared with the control group (P<0.05). (4) The changes of AI and Fas LI in all groups with similar tendency showed positive correlation (P<0.01). Conclusion: The apoptosis of diffuse type stomach carcinoma is seriously restrained. Ionizing radiation can induce apoptosis and up - regulate the expression of Fas in diffuse type stomach carcinoma. The apoptosis induced by irradiation maybe depend on the up - regulating of Fas after irradiation

  16. Diffusive versus Displacive Contact Plasticity of Nanoscale Asperities: Temperature- and Velocity-Dependent Strongest Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Wang, Zhao; Li, Ju

    2015-10-14

    We predict a strongest size for the contact strength when asperity radii of curvature decrease below 10 nm. The reason for such strongest size is found to be correlated with the competition between the dislocation plasticity and surface diffusional plasticity. The essential role of temperature is calculated and illustrated in a comprehensive asperity size-strength-temperature map taking into account the effect of contact velocity. Such a map should be essential for various phenomena related to nanoscale contacts such as nanowire cold welding, self-assembly of nanoparticles and adhesive nanopillar arrays, as well as the electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties of macroscopic interfaces.

  17. Reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake- induced settlements at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.W.; Yule, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    This report documents a reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake-induced settlements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), located southwest of Paducah, KY. The U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was authorized to conduct this study from FY91 to FY94 by the DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO), Oak Ridge, TN, through Inter- Agency Agreement (IAG) No. DE-AI05-91OR21971. The study was conducted under the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report (GDP SAR) Program

  18. Does Acupuncture Needling Induce Analgesic Effects Comparable to Diffuse Noxious Inhibitory Controls?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juerg Schliessbach

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC is described as one possible mechanism of acupuncture analgesia. This study investigated the analgesic effect of acupuncture without stimulation compared to nonpenetrating sham acupuncture (NPSA and cold-pressor-induced DNIC. Forty-five subjects received each of the three interventions in a randomized order. The analgesic effect was measured using pressure algometry at the second toe before and after each of the interventions. Pressure pain detection threshold (PPDT rose from 299 kPa (SD 112 kPa to 364 kPa (SD 144, 353 kPa (SD 135, and 467 kPa (SD 168 after acupuncture, NPSA, and DNIC test, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between acupuncture and NPSA at any time, but a significantly higher increase of PPDT in the DNIC test compared to acupuncture and NPSA. PPDT decreased after the DNIC test, whereas it remained stable after acupuncture and NPSA. Acupuncture needling at low pain stimulus intensity showed a small analgesic effect which did not significantly differ from placebo response and was significantly less than a DNIC-like effect of a painful noninvasive stimulus.

  19. Pattern formation induced by cross-diffusion in a predator–prey system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Guiquan; Jin Zhen; Liu Quanxing; Li Li

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the Holling–Tanner model for predator–prey with self and cross-diffusion. From the Turing theory, it is believed that there is no Turing pattern formation for the equal self-diffusion coefficients. However, combined with cross-diffusion, it shows that the system will exhibit spotted pattern by both mathematical analysis and numerical simulations. Furthermore, asynchrony of the predator and the prey in the space. The obtained results show that cross-diffusion plays an important role on the pattern formation of the predator–prey system. (general)

  20. Regulation of respiration and the oxygen diffusion barrier in soybean protect symbiotic nitrogen fixation from chilling-induced inhibition and shoots from premature senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerden, Philippus D R; Kiddle, Guy; Pellny, Till K; Mokwala, Phatlane W; Jordaan, Anine; Strauss, Abram J; de Beer, Misha; Schlüter, Urte; Kunert, Karl J; Foyer, Christine H

    2008-09-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is sensitive to dark chilling (7 degrees C-15 degrees C)-induced inhibition in soybean (Glycine max). To characterize the mechanisms that cause the stress-induced loss of nodule function, we examined nodule structure, carbon-nitrogen interactions, and respiration in two soybean genotypes that differ in chilling sensitivity: PAN809 (PAN), which is chilling sensitive, and Highveld Top (HT), which is more chilling resistant. Nodule numbers were unaffected by dark chilling, as was the abundance of the nitrogenase and leghemoglobin proteins. However, dark chilling decreased nodule respiration rates, nitrogenase activities, and NifH and NifK mRNAs and increased nodule starch, sucrose, and glucose in both genotypes. Ureide and fructose contents decreased only in PAN nodules. While the chilling-induced decreases in nodule respiration persisted in PAN even after return to optimal temperatures, respiration started to recover in HT by the end of the chilling period. The area of the intercellular spaces in the nodule cortex and infected zone was greatly decreased in HT after three nights of chilling, an acclimatory response that was absent from PAN. These data show that HT nodules are able to regulate both respiration and the area of the intercellular spaces during chilling and in this way control the oxygen diffusion barrier, which is a key component of the nodule stress response. We conclude that chilling-induced loss of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in PAN is caused by the inhibition of respiration coupled to the failure to regulate the oxygen diffusion barrier effectively. The resultant limitations on nitrogen availability contribute to the greater chilling-induced inhibition of photosynthesis in PAN than in HT.

  1. Re-oxygenation of post-mortem lividity by passive diffusion through the skin at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watchman, Hannah; Walker, G Stewart; Randeberg, Lise L; Langlois, Neil E I

    2011-12-01

    Post-mortem hypostasis develops due to passive settling of the blood under the effect of gravity after death. Due to consumption of oxygen in the tissues by residual cellular activity after the circulation has stopped, lividity is composed of deoxygenated blood. It has been previously shown that cooling of a body causes lividity to oxygenate, changing from a dark red/blue to a pink/red color, due to hemoglobin's increased affinity for oxygen at low temperature. This study has confirmed that this occurs by passive diffusion through the skin, but that this can only occur within a limited time frame. The reasons for this process and its potential forensic application require further investigation.

  2. Cross-diffusion induced Turing patterns in a sex-structured predator-prey model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, J.; Zhou, H.; Zhang, Lai

    2012-01-01

    that the unique homogenous steady-state is locally asymptotically stable for the associated ODE system and PDE system with self-diffusion. With the presence of the cross-diffusion, the homogeneous equilibrium is destabilized, and a heterogenous steady-state emerges as a consequence. In addition, the conditions...

  3. Infrared spectroscopy and Mie scattering of acetylene aerosols formed in a low temperature diffusion cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunder, T.; Miller, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for forming and spectroscopically characterizing cryogenic aerosols formed in a low temperature gas cell. By adjusting the cell pressure, gas composition and flow rate, the size distribution of aerosol particles can be varied over a wide range. The combination of pressure and flow rate determine the residence time of the aerosols in the cell and hence the time available for the particles to grow. FTIR spectroscopy, over the range from 600/cm to 6000/cm, is used to characterize the aerosols. The particle size distribution can be varied so that, at one extreme, the spectra show only absorption features associated with the infrared active vibrational bands and, at the other, they display both absorption and Mie scattering. In the latter case, Mie scattering theory is used to obtain semiquantitative aerosol size distributions, which can be understood in terms of the interplay between nucleation and condensation. In the case of acetylene aerosols, the infrared spectra suggest that the particles exist in the high temperature cubic phase of the solid.

  4. The Temperature Dependence of Micro-Leakage between Restorative and Pulp Capping Materials by Cu Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    H, Kamalak; A, Mumcu; S, Altin

    2015-01-01

    We used the Cu ions for the leakage analysis between pulp capping and restorative materials. Theoretically, Cu has more advantages than Ag ions due to their smaller radii (rCu2+=73 pm and rAg2+=94 pm), lower mass density (dCu=8.96 g/cm3 and dAg=10.49 g/cm3) and higher radio opacity which can be more useful by X-ray or EDX detectors, cheaper price and more abundance in planet when compared with Ag element which is generally used in the leakage studies. The micro leakage between dental restorations and pulp capping materials has been determined by using Micro Computed Tomography, Scanning Electron Microscopy and EDX analysis. It is found that the leakage has temperature dependent mechanism which increases with the increasing temperature. As a result, using Cu solution for leakage studies in dentine is an effective and easy method which can be used in dental science. PMID:25926897

  5. Telemetry pill versus rectal and esophageal temperature during extreme rates of exercise-induced core temperature change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, L.P.J.; Haan, A. de; Koning, J.J. de; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Core temperature measurement with an ingestible telemetry pill has been scarcely investigated during extreme rates of temperature change, induced by short high-intensity exercise in the heat. Therefore, nine participants performed a protocol of rest, (sub)maximal cycling and recovery at 30 °C. The

  6. Diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding. At least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces is coated with nickel. A coated surface portion is positioned in a contiguous relationship with another surface portion and subjected to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure. A force is applied on the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other. The contiguous surface portions are heated to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, and the applied force is decreased while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature. A portion of the applied force is maintained at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions

  7. pH-jump induced leucine zipper folding beyond the diffusion limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donten, Mateusz L; Hassan, Shabir; Popp, Alexander; Halter, Jonathan; Hauser, Karin; Hamm, Peter

    2015-01-29

    The folding of a pH-sensitive leucine zipper, that is, a GCN4 mutant containing eight glutamic acid residues, has been investigated. A pH-jump induced by a caged proton (o-nitrobenzaldehyde, oNBA) is employed to initiate the process, and time-resolved IR spectroscopy of the amide I band is used to probe it. The experiment has been carefully designed to minimize the buffer capacity of the sample solution so that a large pH jump can be achieved, leading to a transition from a completely unfolded to a completely folded state with a single laser shot. In order to eliminate the otherwise rate-limiting diffusion-controlled step of the association of two peptides, they have been covalently linked. The results for the folding kinetics of the cross-linked peptide are compared with those of an unlinked peptide, which reveals a detailed picture of the folding mechanism. That is, folding occurs in two steps, one on an ∼1-2 μs time scale leading to a partially folded α-helix even in the monomeric case and a second one leading to the final coiled-coil structure on distinctively different time scales of ∼30 μs for the cross-linked peptide and ∼200 μs for the unlinked peptide. By varying the initial pH, it is found that the folding mechanism is consistent with a thermodynamic two-state model, despite the fact that a transient intermediate is observed in the kinetic experiment.

  8. Segregation and diffusion of deffects induced by radiation in binary copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    Actually considerable theoretical and experimental progress has been made in establishing and in understanding the general feactures of the Radiation Induced Solute Difusion or Segregation such as its temperature, time and displacement rate dependence and the effects of some important materials factors such as the initial solute misfit. During irradiation, the local alloy compositions will change by defect flux driven, non-equilibrium segregation near sinks such as voids, external surfaces and grain boundaries and the compositional change are likely to influence a number of properties and phenomena important to Thermonuclear Reactors, as for example, Ductility, Corrosion, Stress, Corrosion Craking, Sputtering and Blistering. Our work is correlated with the 1 MeV electrons irradiations effects in Copper alloys where the alloying elements are Be, Pt, Sn. These three elements are undersized, similar and oversized relating the Copper atom radius, respectively. How starts and develops the Segregation Induced by Irradiation 'In Situ' with help of the High Voltage Electron Microscopy as technique. (Author) [pt

  9. On the electrical intestine turbulence induced by temperature changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gizzi, A; Cherubini, C; Migliori, S; Filippi, S; Alloni, R; Portuesi, R

    2010-01-01

    Paralytic ileus is a temporary syndrome with impairment of peristalsis and no passage of food through the intestine. Although improvements in supportive measures have been achieved, no therapy useful to specifically reduce or eliminate the motility disorder underlying postoperative ileus has been developed yet. In this paper, we draw a plausible, physiologically fine-tuned scenario, which explains a possible cause of paralytic ileus. To this aim we extend the existing 1D intestinal electrophysiological Aliev–Richards–Wikswo ionic model based on a double-layered structure in two and three dimensions. Thermal coupling is introduced here to study the influence of temperature gradients on intestine tissue which is an important external factor during surgery. Numerical simulations present electrical spiral waves similar to those experimentally observed already in the heart, brain and many other excitable tissues. This fact seems to suggest that such peculiar patterns, here electrically and thermally induced, may play an important role in clinically experienced disorders of the intestine, then requiring future experimental analyses in the search for possible implications for medical and physiological practice and bioengineering

  10. Temperature distribution in the human body under various conditions of induced hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobko, O. V.; Perelman, T. L.; Fradkin, S. Z.

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical model based on heat balance equations was developed for studying temperature distribution in the human body under deep hyperthermia which is often induced in the treatment of malignant tumors. The model yields results which are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. The distribution of temperature under various conditions of induced hyperthermia, i.e. as a function of water temperature and supply rate, is examined on the basis of temperature distribution curves in various body zones.

  11. Diffusion-Controlled Recrystallization of Water Sorbed into Poly(meth)acrylates Revealed by Variable-Temperature Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasoshima, Nobuhiro; Fukuoka, Mizuki; Kitano, Hiromi; Kagaya, Shigehiro; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Gemmei-Ide, Makoto

    2017-05-18

    Recrystallization behaviors of water sorbed into four poly(meth)acrylates, poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate), poly(tetrahydrofurfuryl acrylate), poly(methyl acrylate), and poly(methyl methacrylate), are investigated by variable-temperature mid-infrared (VT-MIR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. VT-MIR spectra demonstrate that recrystallization temperatures of water sorbed into the polymers are positively correlated with their glass-transition temperatures reported previously. The present MD simulation shows that a lower-limit temperature of the diffusion for the sorbed water and the glass-transition temperatures of the polymers also have a positive correlation, indicating that the recrystallization is controlled by diffusion mechanism rather than reorientation mechanism. Detailed molecular processes of not only recrystallization during rewarming but also crystallization during cooling and hydrogen-bonding states of water in the polymers are systematically analyzed and discussed.

  12. Determination of the Fe-Cr-Ni and Fe-Cr-Mo Phase Diagrams at Intermediate Temperatures using a Novel Dual-Anneal Diffusion-Multiple Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Siwei

    Phase diagrams at intermediate temperatures are critical both for alloy design and for improving the reliability of thermodynamic databases. There is a significant shortage of experimental data for phase diagrams at the intermediate temperatures which are defined as around half of the homologous melting point (in Kelvin). The goal of this study is to test a novel dual-anneal diffusion multiple (DADM) methodology for efficient determination of intermediate temperature phase diagrams using both the Fe-Cr-Ni and Fe-Cr-Mo systems as the test beds since both are very useful for steel development. Four Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Co diffusion multiples were made and annealed at 1200 °C for 500 hrs. One sample was used directly for evaluating the isothermal sections at 1200 ° C. The other samples (and cut slices) were used to perform a subsequent dual annealing at 900 °C (500 hrs), 800 °C (1000 hrs), 700 °C (1000 hrs), and 600 °C (4500 hrs), respectively. The second annealing induced phase precipitation from the supersaturated solid solutions that were created during the first 1200 °C annealing. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to identify the phases and precipitation locations in order to obtain the compositions to construct the isothermal sections of both ternary systems at four different temperatures. The major results obtained from this study are isothermal sections of the Fe-Cr-Ni and Fe-Cr-Mo systems at 1200 °C, 900 °C, 800 °C, and 700 °C. For the Fe-Cr-Ni system, the results from DADMs agree with the majority of the literature results except for results at both 800 °C and 700 °C where the solubility of Cr in the fcc phase was found to be significantly higher than what was computed from thermodynamic calculations using the TCFE5 database. Overall, it seems that the Fe-Cr-Ni thermodynamic assessment only needs slight improvement to

  13. Controlling molecular condensation/diffusion of copper phthalocyanine by local electric field induced with scanning tunneling microscope tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Katsumi; Yaginuma, Shin; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2018-02-01

    We have discovered the condensation/diffusion phenomena of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules controlled with a pulsed electric field induced by the scanning tunneling microscope tip. This behavior is not explained by the conventional induced dipole model. In order to understand the mechanism, we have measured the electronic structure of the molecule by tunneling spectroscopy and also performed theoretical calculations on molecular orbitals. These data clearly indicate that the molecule is positively charged owing to charge transfer to the substrate, and that hydrogen bonding exists between CuPc molecules, which makes the molecular island stable.

  14. Using light transmission to watch hydrogen diffuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pálsson, Gunnar K; Bliersbach, Andreas; Wolff, Max; Zamani, Atieh; Hjörvarsson, Björgvin

    2012-06-12

    Because of its light weight and small size, hydrogen exhibits one of the fastest diffusion rates in solid materials, comparable to the diffusion rate of liquid water molecules at room temperature. The diffusion rate is determined by an intricate combination of quantum effects and dynamic interplay with the displacement of host atoms that is still only partially understood. Here we present direct observations of the spatial and temporal changes in the diffusion-induced concentration profiles in a vanadium single crystal and we show that the results represent the experimental counterpart of the full time and spatial solution of Fick's diffusion equation. We validate the approach by determining the diffusion rate of hydrogen in a single crystal vanadium (001) film, with net diffusion in the [110] direction.

  15. Electron density and temperature in an atmospheric-pressure helium diffuse dielectric barrier discharge from kHz to MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, J.-S.; Stafford, L.; Naudé, N.; Margot, J.; Massines, F.

    2018-03-01

    Diffuse dielectric barrier discharges are generated over a very wide range of frequencies. According to the targeted frequency, the glow, Townsend-like, hybrid, Ω and RF-α modes are sustained. In this paper, the electrical characterization of the discharge cell together with an electrical model are used to estimate the electron density from current and voltage measurements for excitation frequencies ranging from 50 kHz to 15 MHz. The electron density is found to vary from 1014 to 1017 m-3 over this frequency range. In addition, a collisional-radiative model coupled with optical emission spectroscopy is used to evaluate the electron temperature (assuming Maxwellian electron energy distribution function) in the same conditions. The time and space-averaged electron temperature is found to be about 0.3 eV in both the low-frequency and high-frequency ranges. However, in the medium-frequency range, it reaches almost twice this value as the discharge is in the hybrid mode. The hybrid mode is similar to the atmospheric-pressure glow discharge usually observed in helium DBDs at low frequency with the major difference being that the plasma is continuously sustained and is characterized by a higher power density.

  16. Unequal diffusivities case of homogeneous–heterogeneous reactions within viscoelastic fluid flow in the presence of induced magnetic-field and nonlinear thermal radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.L. Animasaun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the effects of nonlinear thermal radiation and induced magnetic field on viscoelastic fluid flow toward a stagnation point. It is assumed that there exists a kind of chemical reaction between chemical species A and B. The diffusion coefficients of the two chemical species in the viscoelastic fluid flow are unequal. Since chemical species B is a catalyst at the horizontal surface, hence homogeneous and heterogeneous schemes are of the isothermal cubic autocatalytic reaction and first order reaction respectively. The transformed governing equations are solved numerically using Runge–Kutta integration scheme along with Newton’s method. Good agreement is obtained between present and published numerical results for a limiting case. The influence of some pertinent parameters on skin friction coefficient, local heat transfer rate, together with velocity, induced magnetic field, temperature, and concentration profiles is illustrated graphically and discussed. Based on all of these assumptions, results indicate that the effects of induced magnetic and viscoelastic parameters on velocity, transverse velocity and velocity of induced magnetic field are almost the same but opposite in nature. The strength of heterogeneous reaction parameter is very helpful to reduce the concentration of bulk fluid and increase the concentration of catalyst at the surface.

  17. Methanol induces low temperature resilient methanogens and improves methane generation from domestic wastewater at low to moderate temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shaswati; Badhe, Neha; De Vrieze, Jo; Biswas, Rima; Nandy, Tapas

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature (methanol is a preferred substrate by methanogens in cold habitats. The study hypothesizes that methanol can induce the growth of low-temperature resilient, methanol utilizing, hydrogenotrophs in UASB reactor. The hypothesis was tested in field conditions to evaluate the impact of seasonal temperature variations on methane yield in the presence and absence of methanol. Results show that 0.04% (v/v) methanol increased methane up to 15 times and its effect was more pronounced at lower temperatures. The qPCR analysis showed the presence of Methanobacteriales along with Methanosetaceae in large numbers. This indicates methanol induced the growth of both the hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic groups through direct and indirect routes, respectively. This study thus demonstrated that methanol can impart resistance in methanogenic biomass to low temperature and can improve performance of UASB reactor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Correlation between low-temperature creep and intergranular diffusion of Kh16N15M3B type steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solonin, M.I.; Kondrat'ev, V.P.; Krasina, T.A.; Voejkov, V.P.; Tarasyuk, V.B.; Fedorov, G.B.; Ryabenko, A.V.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented for Kh16N15M3B type steel containing different amounts of carbon, molybdenum and niobium that was tested the diffusion mobility of iron-59 species. It is shown that at 400-500 deg C the diffusion of iron-59 is only intergranular. The correlation established between creep and diffusion. It is shwn that the activation energies for creep and intergranular diffusion correlate. 5 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  19. Disorder-induced transition from grain boundary to bulk dominated ionic diffusion in pyrochlores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perriot, Romain; Dholabhai, Pratik P.; Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the role of grain boundaries (GBs) on ionic diffusion in pyrochlores, as a function of the GB type, chemistry of the compound, and level of cation disorder. We observe that the presence of GBs promotes oxygen transport in ordered and low-disordered systems, as the GBs are found to have a higher concentration of mobile carriers with higher mobilities than in the bulk. Thus, in ordered samples, the ionic diffusion is 2D, localized along the grain boundary. When cation disorder is introduced, bulk carriers begin to contribute to the overall diffusion, while the GB contribution is only slightly enhanced. In highly disordered samples, the diffusive behavior at the GBs is bulk-like, and the two contributions (bulk vs. GB) can no longer be distinguished. There is thus a transition from 2D/GB dominated oxygen diffusivity to 3D/bulk dominated diffusivity versus disorder in pyrochlores. Finally, these results provide new insights into the possibility of using internal interfaces to enhance ionic conductivity in nanostructured complex oxides.

  20. Effects of consecutive irradiation and bias temperature stress in p-channel power vertical double-diffused metal oxide semiconductor transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidović, Vojkan; Danković, Danijel; Ilić, Aleksandar; Manić, Ivica; Golubović, Snežana; Djorić-Veljković, Snežana; Prijić, Zoran; Prijić, Aneta; Stojadinović, Ninoslav

    2018-04-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the effects of consecutive irradiation and negative bias temperature (NBT) stress in p-channel power vertical double-diffused MOS (VDMOS) transistors are presented in this paper. The investigation was performed in order to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the effects of specific kind of stress in devices previously subjected to the other kind of stress. In addition, it may help in assessing the behaviour of devices subjected to simultaneous irradiation and NBT stressing. It is shown that irradiation of previously NBT stressed devices leads to additional build-up of oxide trapped charge and interface traps, while NBT stress effects in previously irradiated devices depend on gate bias applied during irradiation and on the total dose received. In the cases of low-dose irradiation or irradiation without gate bias, the subsequent NBT stress leads to slight further device degradation. On the other hand, in the cases of devices previously irradiated to high doses or with gate bias applied during irradiation, NBT stress may have a positive role, as it actually anneals a part of radiation-induced degradation.

  1. Correction for Eddy Current-Induced Echo-Shifting Effect in Partial-Fourier Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Trong-Kha; Song, Allen W; Chen, Nan-Kuei

    2015-01-01

    In most diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies, images are acquired with either a partial-Fourier or a parallel partial-Fourier echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence, in order to shorten the echo time and increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, eddy currents induced by the diffusion-sensitizing gradients can often lead to a shift of the echo in k-space, resulting in three distinct types of artifacts in partial-Fourier DTI. Here, we present an improved DTI acquisition and reconstruction scheme, capable of generating high-quality and high-SNR DTI data without eddy current-induced artifacts. This new scheme consists of three components, respectively, addressing the three distinct types of artifacts. First, a k-space energy-anchored DTI sequence is designed to recover eddy current-induced signal loss (i.e., Type 1 artifact). Second, a multischeme partial-Fourier reconstruction is used to eliminate artificial signal elevation (i.e., Type 2 artifact) associated with the conventional partial-Fourier reconstruction. Third, a signal intensity correction is applied to remove artificial signal modulations due to eddy current-induced erroneous T2(∗) -weighting (i.e., Type 3 artifact). These systematic improvements will greatly increase the consistency and accuracy of DTI measurements, expanding the utility of DTI in translational applications where quantitative robustness is much needed.

  2. Correction for Eddy Current-Induced Echo-Shifting Effect in Partial-Fourier Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trong-Kha Truong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In most diffusion tensor imaging (DTI studies, images are acquired with either a partial-Fourier or a parallel partial-Fourier echo-planar imaging (EPI sequence, in order to shorten the echo time and increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. However, eddy currents induced by the diffusion-sensitizing gradients can often lead to a shift of the echo in k-space, resulting in three distinct types of artifacts in partial-Fourier DTI. Here, we present an improved DTI acquisition and reconstruction scheme, capable of generating high-quality and high-SNR DTI data without eddy current-induced artifacts. This new scheme consists of three components, respectively, addressing the three distinct types of artifacts. First, a k-space energy-anchored DTI sequence is designed to recover eddy current-induced signal loss (i.e., Type 1 artifact. Second, a multischeme partial-Fourier reconstruction is used to eliminate artificial signal elevation (i.e., Type 2 artifact associated with the conventional partial-Fourier reconstruction. Third, a signal intensity correction is applied to remove artificial signal modulations due to eddy current-induced erroneous T2*-weighting (i.e., Type 3 artifact. These systematic improvements will greatly increase the consistency and accuracy of DTI measurements, expanding the utility of DTI in translational applications where quantitative robustness is much needed.

  3. Self-diffusion and molecular association of acetylsalicylic acid and methyl salicylate in methanol- d4 in the temperature range 278-318 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, V. A.; Kumeev, R. S.; Gurina, D. L.; Nikiforov, M. Yu.

    2017-05-01

    The effect of concentration on the self-diffusion coefficients of acetylsalicylic acid and methyl salicylate in methanol- d4 is investigated in the temperature range of 278-318 K using NMR. It is found that the self-diffusion coefficients increase along with temperature and fall as concentration rises. Within the limit of an infinitely dilute solution, the effective radii of solute molecules, calculated using the Stokes-Einstein equation shrink as the temperature grows. It is shown that the observed reduction of effective radii is associated with an increase in the fraction of solute monomers as the temperature rises. The physicochemical parameters of heteroassociation of acetylsalicylic acid and methyl salicylate with methanol are determined.

  4. Temperature-induced processes for size-selected metallic nanoparticles on surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettermann, H., E-mail: hendrik.bettermann@uni-duesseldorf.de; Werner, M.; Getzlaff, M., E-mail: getzlaff@uni-duesseldorf.de

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • FeNi nanoparticles on W(110) are stable at room temperature and above. • Unrolling carpet mechanism is driving the melting of nanoparticles. • Ostwald ripening is driving the formation of FeNi islands after melting. - Abstract: The melting behavior of Iron-Nickel alloy nanoparticles on W(110) was studied under UHV conditions as a function of heating temperature and heating duration. These particles were found to be stable at 423 K without evaporation or diffusion taking place. Unrolling carpet behavior occurs at higher temperatures. This creates ramified islands around the nanoparticles. Ostwald ripening at higher temperatures or longer heating times is creating compact islands. The melting of these nanoparticles opens the possibility for thin film growth of FeNi alloys. The formation of monolayer high islands is a strong contrast to Fe, Co, and FeCo alloy nanoparticles which are dominated by direct evaporation, single atom surface diffusion and anisotropic spreading.

  5. Temperature Dependence of Faraday Effect-Induced Bias Error in a Fiber Optic Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuyou; Liu, Pan; Guang, Xingxing; Xu, Zhenlong; Guan, Lianwu; Li, Guangchun

    2017-09-07

    Improving the performance of interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) in harsh environments, such as magnetic field and temperature field variation, is necessary for its practical applications. This paper presents an investigation of Faraday effect-induced bias error of IFOG under varying temperature. Jones matrix method is utilized to formulize the temperature dependence of Faraday effect-induced bias error. Theoretical results show that the Faraday effect-induced bias error changes with the temperature in the non-skeleton polarization maintaining (PM) fiber coil. This phenomenon is caused by the temperature dependence of linear birefringence and Verdet constant of PM fiber. Particularly, Faraday effect-induced bias errors of two polarizations always have opposite signs that can be compensated optically regardless of the changes of the temperature. Two experiments with a 1000 m non-skeleton PM fiber coil are performed, and the experimental results support these theoretical predictions. This study is promising for improving the bias stability of IFOG.

  6. Lung injury induced by secondhand smoke exposure detected with hyperpolarized helium-3 diffusion MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengbo; Mugler, John P; de Lange, Eduard E; Patrie, James T; Mata, Jaime F; Altes, Talissa A

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether helium-3 diffusion MR can detect the changes in the lungs of healthy nonsmoking individuals who were regularly exposed to secondhand smoke. Three groups were studied (age: 59 ± 9 years): 23 smokers, 37 exposure-to-secondhand-smoke subjects, and 29 control subjects. We measured helium-3 diffusion values at diffusion times from 0.23 to 1.97 s. One-way analysis of variance revealed that the mean area under the helium-3 diffusion curves (ADC AUC) of the smokers was significantly elevated compared with the controls and to the exposure-to-secondhand-smoke subjects (P exposure-to-secondhand-smoke subjects and that of the controls was found (P = 0.115). However, application of a receiver operator characteristic-derived rule to classify subjects as either a "control" or a "smoker," based on ADC AUC, revealed that 30% (11/37) of the exposure-to-secondhand subjects were classified as "smokers" indicating an elevation of the ADC AUC. Using helium-3 diffusion MR, elevated ADC values were detected in 30% of nonsmoking healthy subjects who had been regularly exposed to secondhand smoke, supporting the concept that, in susceptible individuals, secondhand smoke causes mild lung damage. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Reduction-induced inward diffusion and crystal growth on the surfaces of iron-bearing silicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S.J.; Tao, H.Z.; Zhang, Y.F.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the sodium inward diffusion (i.e., sodium diffusion from surface toward interior) in iron containing alkaline earth silicate glasses under reducing conditions around Tg and the induced surface crystallization. The surface crystallization is caused by formation of a silicate-gel layer...... first and then the growth of silica crystals on the glass surface. The type of alkaline earth cations has a strong impact on both the glass transition and the surface crystallization. In the Mg-containing glass, a quartz layer forms on the glass surface. This could be attributed to the fact that Mg2......+ ions have stronger bonds to oxygen and lower coordination number (4~5) than Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ ions. In contrast, a cristobalite layer forms in Ca-, Sr- and Ba-containing glasses....

  8. Wind induced errors on retrieving SSS with SMOS brightness temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, X.; Boutin, J.; Martin, N.; Vergely, J.; Spurgeon, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite, launched in November 2009, carries the first interferometric radiometer at L-band (1.4GHz) in orbit. The global distribution of SMOS SSS is very encouraging [Font et al., 2011]. In particular, the latitudinal variation of SSS is well captured by SMOS [Yin et al., 2012] and SSS anomalies in tropical regions seen by ARGO floats also appear on SMOS SSS [Boutin et al., 2011]. However, large discrepancies between SMOS SSS and Argo are noticed when there are large differences between SSMI wind and ECMWF wind, which is used for initializing iterations of SSS retrieval. SMOS does not carry microwave scatterometer or microwave radiometer at high frequency to simultaneously measure roughness, although it's proved in this paper that SMOS retrieved wind speed in the center of the swath (± 300 km) is partly (but not entirely) corrected for inconsistencies between ECMWF wind speeds and true wind speeds, whereas it's not possible to correct wind speed in the border of the swath. Two main aspects of wind induced errors on retrieving SSS with SMOS are: 1) The difference between and ECMWF forecast model wind and neutral equivalent wind which is defined for microwave remote sensing 2) The difference between wind used as prior and the truth. When the discrepancies between ECMWF wind and SSMI wind is out of SMOS's capability of wind correction, the retrieved SSS is biases. In this paper, we show some examples of large discrepancies between SMOS SSS and Argo when there are large differences between SSMI wind and ECMWF wind: 1) The SMOS is systematically to high in the equatorial area in the Eastern Pacific in Summer of 2010, where there is a strong westward current. 2) A case with strong wind front in the southern Pacific ocean. In this paper, we study the precision on SMOS SSS when SSMI wind speed is used as prior and compare it with SSS when ECMWF wind speed is used as prior. We also present the result of SMOS SSS when ECMWF wind

  9. Formation of rutile fasciculate zone induced by sunlight irradiation at room temperature and its hemocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xuan-Hui; Zheng, Xiang; Cheng, Yuan; Li, Guo-Hua; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Zheng, Jian-Hui

    2013-01-01

    The fasciculate zone of phase pure rutile was fabricated under sunlight irradiation at room temperature, using titanium tetrachloride as a sole precursor. The crystal phase, morphology and microstructure, and optical absorption behavior of the samples were characterized by X-ray Diffraction, High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM) and UV–vis Diffuse Reflectance Spectra (DRS), respectively. XRD results show that the crystal phase of the sample is composed of rutile only, and a lattice distortion displays in the crystallite of the sample. HRTEM results show that the morphology of rutile particle is fasciculate zone constituted of nanoparticles with a diameter of 4–7 nm, and these particles grow one by one and step by step. The pattern of the selected area electron diffraction of the sample is Kikuchi type, which can be attributed to the predominant orientation growth of rutile nanoparticles along [001] induced by sunlight irradiation. DRS results show that the absorption threshold of the sample is 415 nm, corresponding to the band gap energy of 2.99 eV, which is lower than the band gap energy of rutile, 3.03 eV. Blood compatibility measurement shows that the sample has no remarkable effect on hemolytic and coagulation activity. The percent hemolysis of red blood cells is less than 5% even treated with a big dosage of the fasciculate rutile and under UV irradiation, and there are no obvious changes of plasma recalcification time after the rutile treatment. Thus, the novel structure of rutile fasciculate has low potential toxicity for blood and is hemocompatibility safe. Highlights: • A novel approach to fabricate the fasciculate zone of phase pure rutile • The fasciculate grows from a particle to nanorod and to fasciculate, step by step. • A preferred orientation growth induced by sunlight irradiation in the fasciculate • The rutile fasciculate is low toxicity for blood and is hemocompatibility safe

  10. Phytochrome Control of Germination of Rumex crispus L. Seeds Induced by Temperature Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylorson, R B; Hendricks, S B

    1972-12-01

    High germination of curly dock (Rumex crispus L.) seeds is evident after suitable imbibition and temperature shift treatment, but germination at constant temperatures fails without an input of far red-absorbing form of phytochrome. Preliminary imbibitions at high temperatures (30 C) sharply reduce germination induced by temperature shifts. High germination may be restored by low energies of red radiation, or by brief far red adequate for the photosteady state. Prolonged far red during imbibition also nullifies temperature shift-induced germination. After prolonged far red, high germination may be restored by red radiation of an energy dependent upon the duration of the far red treatment. The evidence supports the conclusion that dark germination induced by temperature shifts arises from the interaction of pre-existent far red-absorbing form of phytochrome in the mature seeds with the temperature shift.

  11. Temperature sensitivity of the penicillin-induced autolysis mechanism in nongrowing cultures of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Kusser, W; Ishiguro, E E

    1987-01-01

    The effect of incubation temperature on the ampicillin-induced autolysis of nongrowing Escherichia coli was determined. The autolysis mechanisms in amino acid-deprived relA mutant cells treated with chloramphenicol were temperature sensitive. This temperature-sensitive autolysis was demonstrated in three independent ways: turbidimetric determinations, viable cell counts, and solubilization of radiolabeled peptidoglycan.

  12. Effects of temperature and immersion time on diffusion of moisture and minerals during rehydration of osmotically treated pork meat cubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šuput Danijela Z.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the changes in osmotically treated pork meat during rehydration. Meat samples were osmotically treated in sugar beet molasses solution, at temperature of (23±2°C for 5 hours. After being osmotically treated, meat samples were rehydrated at constant temperature (20- 40°C during different times (15-60 min in distilled water. The effective diffusivity were between 8.35 and 9.11•10-10 (m2•s-1 for moisture, 6.30-6.94 • 10-10 (m2•s-1, for Na, 5.73-7.46 10-10 (m2•s-1, for K, 4.43-6.25 • 10-10 (m2•s-1, for Ca, 5.35-6.25 • 10-10 (m2•s-1, for Mg, 4.67-6.78 10-10 (m2•s-1, for Cu, 4.68-5.33 • 10-10 (m2•s-1, for Fe, 4.21-5.04 • 10-10 (m2•s-1, for Zn and 5.44-7.16 10-10 (m2•s-1, for Mn. Zugarramurdi and Lupin’s model was used to predict the equilibrium condition, which was shown to be appropriate for moisture uptake and solute loss during rehydration. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-31055: Osmotic dehydration of food - energy and environmental aspects of sustainable production

  13. Hydrogen diffusion and induced-crystallization in intrinsic and doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kail, F.; Hadjadj, A.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the evolution of the structure of intrinsic and doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films exposed to a hydrogen plasma. For this purpose, we combine in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements. We show that hydrogen diffuses faster in boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon than in intrinsic samples, leading to a thicker subsurface layer from the early stages of hydrogen plasma exposure. At longer times, hydrogen plasma leads to the formation of a microcrystalline layer via chemical transport, but there is no evidence for crystallization of the a-Si:H substrate. Moreover, we observe that once the microcrystalline layer is formed, hydrogen diffuses out of the sample

  14. Modeling of Ni Diffusion Induced Austenite Formation in Ferritic Stainless Steel Interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ming; Molin, Sebastian; Zhang, L.

    2015-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steel interconnect plates are widely used in planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) or electrolysis cell (SOEC) stacks. During stack production and operation, nickel from the Ni/YSZ fuel electrode or from the Ni contact component diffuses into the IC plate, causing transformation...... of the ferritic phase into an austenitic phase in the interface region. This is accompanied with changes in volume and in mechanical and corrosion properties of the IC plates. In this work, kinetic modeling of the inter-diffusion between Ni and FeCr based ferritic stainless steel was conducted, using the CALPHAD...

  15. Modeling of Ni Diffusion Induced Austenite Formation in Ferritic Stainless Steel Interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ming; Alimadadi, Hossein; Molin, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steel interconnect plates are widely used in planar solid oxide fuel cell and electrolysis cell stacks. During stack production and operation, nickel from the Ni/yttria stabilized zirconia fuel electrode or from the Ni contact component layer diffuses into the interconnect plate......, causing transformation of the ferritic phase into an austenitic phase in the interface region. This is accompanied with changes in volume, and in mechanical and corrosion properties of the interconnect plates. In this work, kinetic modeling of the inter-diffusion between Ni and FeCr based ferritic...

  16. Topology and temperature dependence of the diffuse X-ray scattering in Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3 ferroelectric single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorfman, Semën; Keeble, Dean S; Bombardi, Alessandro; Thomas, Pam A

    2015-10-01

    The results of high-resolution measurements of the diffuse X-ray scattering produced by a perovskite-based Na 0.5 Bi 0.5 TiO 3 ferroelectric single crystal between 40 and 620 K are reported. The study was designed as an attempt to resolve numerous controversies regarding the average structure of Na 0.5 Bi 0.5 TiO 3 , such as the mechanism of the phase transitions between the tetragonal, P 4 bm , and rhombohedral | monoclinic, R 3 c  |  Cc , space groups and the correlation between structural changes and macroscopic physical properties. The starting point was to search for any transformations of structural disorder in the temperature range of thermal depoling (420-480 K), where the average structure is known to remain unchanged. The intensity distribution around the {032} pseudocubic reflection was collected using a PILATUS 100K detector at the I16 beamline of the Diamond Light Source (UK). The data revealed previously unknown features of the diffuse scattering, including a system of dual asymmetric L-shaped diffuse scattering streaks. The topology, temperature dependence, and relationship between Bragg and diffuse intensities suggest the presence of complex microstructure in the low-temperature R 3 c  |  Cc phase. This microstructure may be formed by the persistence of the higher-temperature P 4 bm phase, built into a lower-temperature R 3 c  |  Cc matrix, accompanied by the related long-range strain fields. Finally, it is shown that a correlation between the temperature dependence of the X-ray scattering features and the temperature regime of thermal depoling is present.

  17. Heterogeneity of soil surface temperature induced by xerophytic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    found between soil surface temperature and solar altitude, suggesting an empirical predicator that solar altitude can serve for soil surface ...... of soil surface temperature are often more important to plants and animals than the average ... shrub, and a long light shadow is obvious on the lee side. At 14:00, shadow is much ...

  18. Heterogeneity of soil surface temperature induced by xerophytic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the effects of shrub (Caragana korshinskii) canopy on the soil surface temperature heterogeneity at areas under shrub canopy ... Results indicated that diurnal mean soil surface temperature under the C. korshinskii canopy (ASB and BMC) was ...... dunes and interdunes in southern New Mexico: A study of soil properties ...

  19. Diffusion-time-resolved ion-beam-induced charge collection from stripe-like test junctions induced by heavy-ion microbeams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, B.N.; El Bouanani, M.; Renfrow, S.N.; Nigam, M.; Walsh, D.S.; Doyle, B.L.; Duggan, J.L.; McDaniel, F.D.

    2001-01-01

    To design more radiation-tolerant integrated circuits (ICs), it is necessary to design and test accurate models of ionizing-radiation-induced charge collection dynamics. A new technique, diffusion-time-resolved ion-beam-induced charge collection (DTRIBICC), is used to measure the average arrival time of the diffused charge, which is related to the average time of the arrival carrier density at the junction. Specially designed stripe-like test junctions are studied using a 12 MeV carbon microbeam with a spot size of ∼1 μm. The relative arrival time of ion-generated charge and the collected charge are measured using a multiple parameter data acquisition system. A 2-D device simulation code, MEDICI, is used to calculate the charge collection dynamics on the stripe-like test junctions. The simulations compare well with experimental microbeam measurements. The results show the importance of the diffused charge collection by junctions, which is especially significant for single-event upsets (SEUs) and multiple-event upsets (MEUs) in electronic devices. The charge sharing results also indicate that stripe-like junctions may be used as position-sensitive detectors with a resolution of ∼0.1 μm

  20. Wound-induced Ca2+wave propagates through a simple release and diffusion mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handly, L Naomi; Wollman, Roy

    2017-06-01

    Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are critical mediators of information concerning tissue damage from damaged cells to neighboring healthy cells. ATP acts as an effective DAMP when released into extracellular space from damaged cells. Extracellular ATP receptors monitor tissue damage and activate a Ca 2+ wave in the surrounding healthy cells. How the Ca 2+ wave propagates through cells after a wound is unclear. Ca 2+ wave activation can occur extracellularly via external receptors or intracellularly through GAP junctions. Three potential mechanisms to propagate the Ca 2+ wave are source and sink, amplifying wave, and release and diffusion. Both source and sink and amplifying wave regulate ATP levels using hydrolysis or secretion, respectively, whereas release and diffusion relies on dilution. Here we systematically test these hypotheses using a microfluidics assay to mechanically wound an epithelial monolayer in combination with direct manipulation of ATP hydrolysis and release. We show that a release and diffusion model sufficiently explains Ca 2+ -wave propagation after an epithelial wound. A release and diffusion model combines the benefits of fast activation at short length scales with a self-limiting response to prevent unnecessary inflammatory responses harmful to the organism. © 2017 Handly et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  1. Circulation induced by diffused aeration in a shallow lake | Toné ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field surveys were carried out to investigate the surface jet flows and the resulting circulation patterns generated by diffused aeration in a shallow lake. In conrast to previous studies, the experimental conditions included point-source bubble plumes with very high air flow rates (100–400 L/min) relative to the shallow water ...

  2. Cyclic steady states in diffusion-induced plasticity with applications to lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peigney, Michaël

    2018-02-01

    Electrode materials in lithium-ion batteries offer an example of medium in which stress and plastic flow are generated by the diffusion of guest atoms. In such a medium, deformation and diffusion are strongly coupled processes. For designing electrodes with improved lifetime and electro-mechanical efficiency, it is crucial to understand how plasticity and diffusion evolve over consecutive charging-recharging cycles. With such questions in mind, this paper provides general results for the large-time behavior of media coupling plasticity with diffusion when submitted to cyclic chemo-mechanical loadings. Under suitable assumptions, we show that the stress, the plastic strain rate, the chemical potential and the flux of guest atoms converge to a cyclic steady state which is largely independent of the initial state. A special emphasis is laid on the special case of elastic shakedown, which corresponds to the situation where the plastic strain stops evolving after a sufficiently large number of cycles. Elastic shakedown is expected to be beneficial for the fatigue behavior and - in the case of lithium-ion batteries - for the electro-chemical efficiency. We provide a characterization of the chemo-mechanical loadings for which elastic shakedown occurs. Building on that characterization, we suggest a general method for designing structures in such fashion that they operate in the elastic shakedown regime, whatever the initial state is. An attractive feature of the proposed method is that incremental analysis of the fully coupled plasticity-diffusion problem is avoided. The results obtained are applied to the model problem of a battery electrode cylinder particle under cyclic charging. Closed-form expressions are obtained for the set of charging rates and charging amplitudes for which elastic shakedown occurs, as well as for the corresponding cyclic steady states of stress, lithium concentration and chemical potential. Some results for a spherical particle are also presented.

  3. A novel pulse technique for thermal diffusivity determination of high-temperature levitated materials - Inverse analysis and experimental set-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, F.; Khodadadi, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    In order to determine the thermal diffusivity of materials at high temperatures, a two-step extended flash technique, which is applicable to levitated spherical samples, is proposed. The containerless flash method is modeled as an axisymmetric transient conduction heat transfer problem within the sphere subjected to a radiative boundary condition on its surface. The problem of nonlinearity which arises from the radiative heat transfer boundary condition is solved by replacing it with the measured time-dependent surface temperature data, thus giving rise to an 'Inverse Analysis'. Upon obtaining the analytic solution for the temperature field, the determination of the thermal diffusivity turns into a minimization problem, whereby the difference between the actual surface boundary condition and the analytic solution is minimized. In performing the proposed experiments, there is a need to undertake a cool-down experiment which should be governed by the lumped parameter analysis.

  4. Characterization and improvement gas diffusion layer of low temperature fuel cell; Caracterizacao e aprimoramento da camada difusora de celulas a combustivel de funcionamento a baixa temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, C.Z.; Dantas, R.; Oliveira, I.S. de; Azevedo, C.M.N.; Pires, M. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Quimica; Canalli, V. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia

    2006-07-01

    In low temperature fuel cells the main part is the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The gas diffusion layer is a component of the MEA, being a composite material constituted by carbon powder and polytetrafluoroethylene, used to increases hydrofobicity, fundamental characteristic in water transport into system. In this work methods were adapted with the aim to a better characterization of the diffusion layer by the measuring the following parameter: contact angle and hysteresis; morphology, thickness and porosity. From these characterization results optimized MEAS will be produced to better fuel cell performance. (author)

  5. Temperature-induced structural changes in fluorozirconate glasses and liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, S.; Youngman, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    The atomic structure and its temperature dependence in fluorozirconate glasses and supercooled liquids have been studied with high-resolution and high-temperature 19 F and 23 Na nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The 19 F NMR spectra in these glasses show the presence of multiple F environments. Temperature dependence of the 19 F magic-angle-spinning NMR spectra indicates a progressive change in the average F coordination environment in the glass structure, besides motional narrowing due to substantial mobility of F - ions. The observed change in the average 19 F NMR chemical shift is consistent with progressive breaking of the Zr-F-Zr linkages in the glass structure with increasing temperature. The onset of such a change in F speciation is observed at temperatures well below T g . This result is evidence of changes in the average equilibrium structure in an inorganic glass-forming liquid at T g , albeit on a local scale. The 23 Na NMR spectra indicate that the cations in these glasses become significantly mobile only at temperatures T≥T g , which allows for the onset of global structural relaxation and viscous flow

  6. Telemetry pill versus rectal and esophageal temperature during extreme rates of exercise-induced core temperature change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teunissen, L P J; Daanen, H A M; De Haan, A; De Koning, J J

    2012-01-01

    Core temperature measurement with an ingestible telemetry pill has been scarcely investigated during extreme rates of temperature change, induced by short high-intensity exercise in the heat. Therefore, nine participants performed a protocol of rest, (sub)maximal cycling and recovery at 30 °C. The pill temperature (T pill ) was compared with the rectal temperature (T re ) and esophageal temperature (T es ). T pill corresponded well to T re during the entire trial, but deviated considerably from T es during the exercise and recovery periods. During maximal exercise, the average ΔT pill −T re and ΔT pill −T es were 0.13 ± 0.26 and −0.57 ± 0.53 °C, respectively. The response time from the start of exercise, the rate of change during exercise and the peak temperature were similar for T pill and T re. T es responded 5 min earlier, increased more than twice as fast and its peak value was 0.42 ± 0.46 °C higher than T pill . In conclusion, also during considerable temperature changes at a very high rate, T pill is still a representative of T re . The extent of the deviation in the pattern and peak values between T pill and T es (up to >1 °C) strengthens the assumption that T pill is unsuited to evaluate central blood temperature when body temperatures change rapidly. (paper)

  7. A Model-Based Temperature-Prediction Method by Temperature-Induced Spectral Variation and Correction of the Temperature Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qhi-xiao; Peng, Si-long; Shan, Peng; Bi, Yi-ming; Tang, Liang; Xie, Qiong

    2015-05-01

    In the present paper, a new model-based method was proposed for temperature prediction and correction. First, a temperature prediction model was obtained from training samples; then, the temperature of test samples were predicted; and finally, the correction model was used to reduce the nonlinear effects of spectra from temperature variations. Two experiments were used to verify the proposed method, including a water-ethanol mixture experiment and a ternary mixture experiment. The results show that, compared with classic method such as continuous piecewise direct standardization (CPDS), our method is efficient for temperature correction. Furthermore, the temperatures of test samples are not necessary in the proposed method, making it easier to use in real applications.

  8. Measurement of the thermal diffusivity and speed of sound of hydrothermal solutions via the laser-induced grating technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butenhoff, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    Hydrothermal processing is being developed as a method for organic destruction for the Hanford Site in Washington. Hydrothermal processing refers to the redox reactions of chemical compounds in supercritical or near-supercritical aqueous solutions. In order to design reactors for the hydrothermal treatment of complicated mixtures found in the Hanford wastes, engineers need to know the thermophysical properties of the solutions under hydrothermal conditions. The author used the laser-induced grating technique to measure the thermal diffusivity and speed of sound of hydrothermal solutions. In this non-invasive optical technique, a transient grating is produced in the hydrothermal solution by optical absorption from two crossed time-coincident nanosecond laser pulses. The grating is probed by measuring the diffraction efficiency of a third laser beam. The grating relaxes via thermal diffusion, and the thermal diffusivity can be determined by measuring the decay of the grating diffraction efficiency as a function of the pump-probe delay time. In addition, intense pump pulses produce counterpropagating acoustic waves that appear as large undulations in the transient grating decay spectrum. The speed of sound in the sample is simply the grating fringe spacing divided by the undulation period. The cell is made from a commercial high pressure fitting and is equipped with two diamond windows for optical access. Results are presented for dilute dye/water solutions with T = 400 C and pressures between 20 and 70 MPa

  9. Evaluation of a novel diffusion cell for in vitro transdermal permeation : effects of injection height, volume and temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, IJ; Avegaart, [No Value; Lawant, AL; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, RA

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of a new, compact, dynamic diffusion cell for in vitro transdermal permeation. These so-called Kelder-cells were developed as an automated alternative to the static Franz diffusion cells. The new cells were used in combination with the

  10. Disorder effect on heat capacity, self-diffusion coefficient, and choosing best potential model for melting temperature, in gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster with 55 atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taherkhani, Farid; Akbarzadeh, Hamed; Feyzi, Mostafa; Rafiee, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been implemented for doping effect on melting temperature, heat capacity, self-diffusion coefficient of gold–copper bimetallic nanostructure with 55 total gold and copper atom numbers and its bulk alloy. Trend of melting temperature for gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster is not same as melting temperature copper–gold bulk alloy. Molecular dynamics simulation of our result regarding bulk melting temperature is consistence with available experimental data. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that melting temperature of gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster increases with copper atom fraction. Semi-empirical potential model and quantum Sutton–Chen potential models do not change melting temperature trend with copper doping of gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster. Self-diffusion coefficient of copper atom is greater than gold atom in gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster. Semi-empirical potential within the tight-binding second moment approximation as new application potential model for melting temperature of gold–copper bulk structure shows better result in comparison with EAM, Sutton–Chen potential, and quantum Sutton–Chen potential models

  11. Mechanism of light-induced translocation of arrestin and transducin in photoreceptors: interaction-restricted diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepak, Vladlen Z; Hurley, James B

    2008-01-01

    Many signaling proteins change their location within cells in response to external stimuli. In photoreceptors, this phenomenon is remarkably robust. The G protein of rod photoreceptors and rod transducin concentrates in the outer segments (OS) of these neurons in darkness. Within approximately 30 minutes after illumination, rod transducin redistributes throughout all of the outer and inner compartments of the cell. Visual arrestin concurrently relocalises from the inner compartments to become sequestered primarily within the OS. In the past several years, the question of whether these proteins are actively moved by molecular motors or whether they are redistributed by simple diffusion has been extensively debated. This review focuses on the most essential works in the area and concludes that the basic principle driving this protein movement is diffusion. The directionality and light dependence of this movement is achieved by the interactions of arrestin and transducin with their spatially restricted binding partners.

  12. Study of defects induced by phosphorus diffusion in silicon. Correlations with some electrical parameters of devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortini, Patrick

    1973-01-01

    Structural defects are created during the diffusion of phosphorus in silicon. These defects are correlated with the deteriorations of the generation - recombination and avalanche phenomena in the charge - space region of planar diodes. The main topics studied are: choice of electrical parameters and test devices; experimental means of characterisation of defects: X-ray topography, transmission electron microscopy and mainly chemical etching which has been particularly emphasized; generation of the defects as a function of technological conditions; electrical measurements and correlations. (author) [fr

  13. Brain metabolism and diffusion in the rat cerebral cortex during pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlais, Karel; Voříšek, Ivan; Zoremba, N.; Homola, Aleš; Dmytrenko, Lesia; Syková, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 209, č. 1 (2008), s. 145-154 ISSN 0014-4886 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:EU(DE) 512146 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : Diffusion * Microdialysis * Pilocarpine Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.974, year: 2008

  14. Low temperature diffusion process using rare earth-Cu eutectic alloys for hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B bulk magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiya, T., E-mail: akiya.takahiro@nims.go.jp; Sepehri-Amin, H.; Ohkubo, T. [Elements Strategy Initiative Center for Magnetic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Liu, J.; Hono, K. [Elements Strategy Initiative Center for Magnetic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan); Hioki, K.; Hattori, A. [Daido Steel Co., LTD, Nagoya 457-8545 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    The low temperature grain boundary diffusion process using RE{sub 70}Cu{sub 30} (RE = Pr, Nd) eutectic alloy powders was applied to sintered and hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B bulk magnets. Although only marginal coercivity increase was observed in sintered magnets, a substantial enhancement in coercivity was observed when the process was applied to hot-deformed anisotropic bulk magnets. Using Pr{sub 70}Cu{sub 30} eutectic alloy as a diffusion source, the coercivity was enhanced from 1.65 T to 2.56 T. The hot-deformed sample expanded along c-axis direction only after the diffusion process as RE rich intergranular layers parallel to the broad surface of the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B are thickened in the c-axis direction.

  15. Thermal conditions influence changes in body temperature induced by intragastric administration of capsaicin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Noriyuki; Urata, Tomomi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2016-08-01

    Capsaicin has been reported to have unique thermoregulatory actions. However, changes in core temperature after the administration of capsaicin are a controversial point. Therefore, we investigated the effects of environmental thermal conditions on changes in body temperature caused by capsaicin in mice. We showed that intragastric administration of 10 and 15 mg/kg capsaicin increased tail temperature and decreased colonic temperatures in the core temperature (CT)-constant and CT-decreasing conditions. In the CT-increasing condition, 15 mg/kg capsaicin increased tail temperature and decreased colonic temperature. However, 10 mg/kg capsaicin increased colonic temperature. Furthermore, the amount of increase in tail temperature was greater in the CT-decreasing condition and lower in the CT-increasing condition, compared with that of the CT-constant condition. These findings suggest that the changes in core temperature were affected by the environmental thermal conditions and that preliminary thermoregulation state might be more important than the constancy of temperature to evaluate the effects of heat diffusion and thermogensis.

  16. Induced lattice dielectric gauge theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, O.A.; Petrov, V.K.; Zinovjev, G.M.

    1993-11-01

    Some properties of the lattice dielectric gauge theories (LDGT) at finite temperature are studied and discussed. We have found several essential points to be mentioned: 1) deconfinement phase transition at certain values of dielectric potential parameters takes place; 2) space-like Wilson loop obeys area law at any temperature; 3) a possibility to introduce gauge invariant mass for dielectric field leads to existence of magnetic charge and sources of gluon current screening; such properties could mean a lack of infrared problem in dielectric theories unlike pure Yang-Mills theories at T ≠ 0. We show how an effective theory for static modes of high-temperature lattice Willson QCD can appear to be LDGT performing a corresponding reduction and discuss the general properties of the effective model obtained. (author)

  17. In Vivo Evaluation of the Visual Pathway in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes by Diffusion Tensor MRI and Contrast Enhanced MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarupa Kancherla

    Full Text Available Visual function has been shown to deteriorate prior to the onset of retinopathy in some diabetic patients and experimental animal models. This suggests the involvement of the brain's visual system in the early stages of diabetes. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by examining the integrity of the visual pathway in a diabetic rat model using in vivo multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Ten-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into an experimental diabetic group by intraperitoneal injection of 65 mg/kg streptozotocin in 0.01 M citric acid, and a sham control group by intraperitoneal injection of citric acid only. One month later, diffusion tensor MRI (DTI was performed to examine the white matter integrity in the brain, followed by chromium-enhanced MRI of retinal integrity and manganese-enhanced MRI of anterograde manganese transport along the visual pathway. Prior to MRI experiments, the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats showed significantly smaller weight gain and higher blood glucose level than the control rats. DTI revealed significantly lower fractional anisotropy and higher radial diffusivity in the prechiasmatic optic nerve of the diabetic rats compared to the control rats. No apparent difference was observed in the axial diffusivity of the optic nerve, the chromium enhancement in the retina, or the manganese enhancement in the lateral geniculate nucleus and superior colliculus between groups. Our results suggest that streptozotocin-induced diabetes leads to early injury in the optic nerve when no substantial change in retinal integrity or anterograde transport along the visual pathways was observed in MRI using contrast agent enhancement. DTI may be a useful tool for detecting and monitoring early pathophysiological changes in the visual system of experimental diabetes non-invasively.

  18. Anomalous temperature-induced volume contraction in GeTe

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterji, Tapan; Kumar, C. M. N.; Wdowik, Urszula D.

    2015-01-01

    The recent surge of interest in phase-change materials GeTe, Ge2Sb2Te5, and related compounds motivated us to revisit the structural phase transition in GeTe in more detail than was done before. The rhombohedral-to-cubic ferroelectric phase transition in GeTe has been studied using high-resolution neutron powder diffraction on a spallation neutron source. We determined the temperature dependence of the structural parameters in a wide temperature range extending from 309 to 973 K. The results ...

  19. Diffusion processes in nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwala, P.

    1992-01-01

    Diffusion phenomena have played an important role for the materials scientist in improving products in a variety of fields. An ever widening number of diffusion limited processes have found their way into development, fabrication and irradiation of nuclear materials in controlling grain growth, recrystallization, sintering, creep, etc. This volume gives a comprehensive overview on the various diffusion processes involved in nuclear materials, whether they are operative in fissionable or fissile nuclear fuels or in the prospective fuels or clads under passive or reactor operating conditions. Unless this information is well understood, it is not possible to develop or fabricate these fuels to withstand the vagaries of temperature, its gradient or changes in stoichiometry, role of defects and impurities in controlling diffusion processes in nuclear proper evaluation. On radiation, under reactor operating conditions, nuclear fuels undergo fission gas release resulting in precipitation into bubbles, or their venting, or radiation induced re-solution, the effects of this irradiation are also examined in depth. The work will be of value to all those interested in getting clearer insight into different mechanisms of diffusion, latest techniques of studying diffusion phenomena, effect of some the constraints such as impurities (chemical doping or fission product build up), and temperature and stoichiometry changes. (author). reds., figs., tabs

  20. Effect of stress-induced grain growth during room temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The TEM observations reveal that stress-induced grain growth during tensile deformation is significantly suppressed for the nc Ni–Co alloys rich in Co in sharp contrast to those poor in Co. We believe that sufficient solutes could effectively pin grain boundaries making grain boundary motions (e.g. grain boundary migration ...

  1. Coupling of temperature with pressure induced initial decomposition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and 116 atoms, figure 1) and a 1 × 2 × 1 super- cell (8 molecules and 88 atoms, figure 1) respectively. First, the system was equilibrated at 298.15 K for 5 ps using NVT. Then, based on this equilibrated system, for. PETN, at 475 K (thermal decomposition temperature),. AIMD simulations were carried out using NPT at 1, 2,.

  2. Microwave oven-induced decalcification at varying temperatures: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of decalcifying fluid types on bone tissue architecture and its staining properties following decalcification at varying temperatures. A decalcification methodology using Golding and Stewards (GS) fluid, and Jenkings fluid (JK), and a modern household microwave oven to ...

  3. Temperature induced changes in the heterocyst glycolipid composition of N

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauersachs, T.; Stal, L.J.; Grego, M.; Schwark, L.; Schwark, L.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of temperature on the heterocyst glycolipid (HG) composition of the diazotrophic heterocystous cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. strain CCY9613 and Nostoc sp. strain CCY9926 grown at 9, 12, 16, 20 and 24 degrees C. Both strains contained an overall similar composition of

  4. Electronically induced nuclear transitions - temperature dependence and Rabi oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Niez, J J

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with a nucleus electromagnetically coupled with the bound states of its electronic surroundings. It describes the temperature dependence of its dynamics and the onset of potential Rabi oscillations by means of a Master Equation. The latter is generalized in order to account for possible strong resonances. Throughout the paper the approximation schemes are discussed and tested. (authors)

  5. The costae presenting in high-temperature-induced vestigial wings ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Judging by the costae presenting in the anterior wing margin, I propose that the proximal and distal costal sections are independent growth units. ... The distal costal section seems to be an extension of the radius vein. vestigial, one of the most intensely researched temperature-sensitive mutations, is a good candidate for ...

  6. microwave oven-induced decalcification at varying temperatures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uwaifoh

    2012-09-30

    Sep 30, 2012 ... This study was designed to evaluate the effect of decalcifying fluid types on bone tissue architecture and its staining properties following decalcification at varying temperatures. A decalcification methodology using Golding and. Stewards (GS) fluid, and Jenkings fluid (JK), and a modern household ...

  7. An analysis of the effects of temperature and structural arrangements on the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of tropocollagen-hydroxyapatite interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Tao; Tomar, Vikas

    2014-05-01

    The ability of a biomaterial to transport energy by conduction is best characterized in the steady state by its thermal conductivity and in the non-steady state by its thermal diffusivity. The complex hierarchical structure of most biomaterials makes the direct determination of the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity difficult using experimental methods. This study presents a classical molecular simulation based approach for the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity prediction for a set of tropocollagen and hydroxyapatite based idealized biomaterial interfaces. The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity values are calculated using the presented approach at three different temperatures (300 K, 500 K and 700 K). The effects of temperature, structural arrangements, and size of simulated systems on the thermal properties are analyzed. Analyses point out important role played by the interface orientation, interface area, and structural hierarchy. Ensuing discussions establish that the interface structural arrangement and interface orientation combined with biomimetic structural hierarchy can lead to non-intuitive thermal property variations as a function of structural features. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Titanite chronology, thermometry, and speedometry of ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) calc-silicates from south Madagascar: U-Pb dates, Zr temperatures, and lengthscales of trace-element diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, R. M.; Hacker, B. R.

    2017-12-01

    Calc-silicate rocks are often overlooked as sources of pressure-temperature-time data in granulite-UHT metamorphic terranes due to the strong dependence of calc-silicate mineral assemblages on complex fluid compositions and a lack of thermodynamic data on common high-temperature calc-silicate minerals such as scapolite. In the Ediacaran-Cambrian UHT rocks of southern Madagascar, clinopyroxene-scapolite-feldspar-quartz-zircon-titanite calc-silicate rocks are wide-spread. U-Pb dates of 540-520 Ma from unaltered portions of titanite correspond to cooling of the rocks through upper-amphibolite facies and indicate UHT metamorphism occurred before 540 Ma. Zr concentrations in these domains preserve growth temperatures of 900-950 °C, consistent with peak temperatures calculated by pseudosection modeling of nearby osumilite-bearing gneisses. Younger U-Pb dates (510-490 Ma) correspond to fluid-mediated Pb loss from titanite grains, which occurred below their diffusive Pb-closure temperature, along fractures. The extent of fluid alteration is seen clearly in back-scattered electron images and Zr-, Al-, Fe-, Ce-, and Nb-concentration maps. Laser-ablation depth profiling of idioblastic titanite grains shows preserved Pb diffusion profiles at grain rims, but there is no evidence for Zr diffusion, indicating that it was effectively immobile even at UHT.

  9. Reactions and Diffusion During Annealing-Induced H(+) Generation in SOI Buried Oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devine, R.A.B.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Vanheusden, K; Warren, W.L.

    1999-01-01

    We report experimental results suggesting that mobile protons are generated at strained Si-O-Si bonds near the Si/SiO 2 interface during annealing in forming gas. Our data further suggest that the presence of the top Si layer plays a crucial role in the mobile H + generation process. Finally, we show that the diffusion of the reactive species (presumably H 2 or H 0 ) towards the H + generation sites occurs laterally along the buried oxide layer, and can be impeded significantly due to the presence of trapping sites in the buried oxide

  10. New macroscopic theory of anamalous diffusion induced by the dissipative trapped-ion instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmel, H.K.

    1975-03-01

    For an axisymmetric toroidal plasma of the TOKAMAK type a new set of dissipative trapped-fluid equations is established. In addition to E vector x B vector drifts and collisions of the trapped particles, these equations take full account of the effect of Esub(//) (of the trapped ion modes) on free and trapped particles, and of the effect of grad delta 0 (delta 0 = equilibrium fraction of trapped particles). From the new equations the linear-mode properties of the dissipative trapped-ion instability and the anomalous diffusion flux of the trapped particles are derived. (orig.) [de

  11. Laser-induced generation of surface periodic structures in media with nonlinear diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, V. M.; Zolotovskii, I. O.; Korobko, D. A.; Morozov, V. M.; Svetukhin, V. V.; Yavtushenko, I. O.; Yavtushenko, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    A model of fast formation of high-contrast periodic structure appearing on a semiconductor surface under action of laser radiation is proposed. The process of growing a surface structure due to the interaction surface plasmon- polaritons excited on nonequilibrium electrons with incident laser radiation are considered in the framework of a medium with nonlinear diffusion of nonequilibrium carriers (defects). A resonance effect of superfast pico- and subpicosecond amplification of the plasmon-polariton structure generated on the surface, the realization of which can result in a high-contrast defect lattice.

  12. The temperature influence in the toluene diffusion coefficient in type y zeolites; Influencia da temperatura no coeficiente de difusao do tolueno em zeolitas do tipo Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwanke, R.O.; Chagas, C.U.; Souza, S.M.A. Guelli U.; Souza, A.A. Ulson de [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica e Engenharia de Alimentos]. E-mail: augusto@enq.ufsc.br; Oliveira, J.S. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: juarzoli@engquim.ufpr.br; Maliska, C.R. [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mail: maliska@sinmec.ufsc.br

    2003-07-01

    This study presents the results of the toluene intra crystalline diffusivity in pellets of Y-type zeolite, packed in a fixed bed column. For the evaluation of the adsorption dynamics, High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) technique was utilized, which promotes the adsorption of liquids in extremely small and uniforms particles to generate a high sensibility. The equilibrium and kinetics adsorption parameters were obtained through the pulse chromatography technique and evaluated by the method of moments, based on the analysis of the first and second statistical moments of the chromatographic response peaks. The experiment was performed with changes in the diffusional properties of the eluent/sorbate/adsorbent system, such as feeding flow and temperature. The equilibrium constant, the adsorption energy and the temperature influence over toluene diffusivity were determined. (author)

  13. Frequency loss induced quench protection system for high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijagbemi, K.; Noyes, P.; Stiers, E.; Pamidi, S.

    2017-12-01

    A novel circuit design for Frequency Loss Induced Quench (FLIQ) protection system for safely driving REBCO coated conductor superconducting coils to quench is reported. The details of the H-bridge circuit design with Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT)s and the various elements used to build a prototype are reported. The results of a successful test of the circuit conducted to demonstrate the validity of the circuit design is presented.

  14. Temperature-induced membrane-lipid adaptation in Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A L; Hann, A C; Harwood, J L; Lloyd, D

    1993-01-01

    A method has been developed for the separation of the major membrane fractions of Acanthamoeba castellanii after growth at different temperatures. The acyl-lipid compositions of individual membrane fractions, microsomal membranes, plasma membrane and mitochondria were analysed after a shift in culture temperature from 30 degrees C to 15 degrees C. The major change in lipid composition observed was an alteration in the relative proportions of oleate and linoleate. This reciprocal change was seen in all the membrane fractions, but occurred most rapidly in the phosphatidylcholine of the microsomal fraction. Thus, there appears to be a rapid induction of delta 12-desaturase activity in A. castellanii after a downward shift in growth temperature. Changes were also seen in the proportions of the n-6 C20 fatty acids, with a decrease in the proportions of icosadienoate and increases of icosatrienoate and arachidonate. However, unlike the alteration in oleate/linoleate ratios, this change was not seen in all the individual lipids of each membrane fraction. Images Figure 1 PMID:8439295

  15. The transport of a radio-active species by adsorption and diffusion through a porous medium in the presence of a temperature gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faircloth, R.L.; Thomas, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical treatment is given of the migration of fission products through a porous medium in the presence of a temperature gradient. The system is simplified by considering the behaviour in an idealised single pore in which movement is occurring by a combination of gas phase and surface diffusion, the distribution between these modes of transfer being governed by the adsorption isotherm constant. The effect of carrier gas flow within the pore is also considered. (author)

  16. Study of temperature distribution of fuel, clad and coolant in the VVER-1000 reactor core during group-10 control rod scram by using diffusion and point kinetic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahgoshay, M.; Rahmani, Y.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, through the application of two different methods (point kinetic and diffusion), the temperature distribution of fuel, clad and coolant has been studied and calculated during group-10 control rod scram, in the Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant (Iran) with a VVER-1000 reactor core. In the reactor core of Bushehr NPP, 10 groups of control rods are used of which, group-10 control rods contain the highest amount of injected negative reactivity in terms of quantity as compared to other groups of control rods. In this paper we explain impacts of negative reactivity, caused by a complete or minor scram of group-10 control rods, on thermoneutronic parameters of the VVER-1000 nuclear reactor core. It should be noted that through these calculations and by using the results, we can develop a sound understanding of impacts of this controlling element in optimum control of the reactor core and, on this basis, with careful attention and by gaining access to a reliable simulation (on the basis of results of calculations made in this survey) we can monitor the VVER-1000 reactor core through a smart control system. In continuation, for a more accurate survey and for comparing results of different calculation systems (point kinetic and diffusion), by using COSTANZA-R,Z calculation code (in which neutronic calculations are based on diffusion model) and using WIMS code at different areas and temperatures (for calculation of constant physical coefficients and temperature coefficients needed in COSTANZAR, Z code) for the VVER-1000 reactor core of Bushehr NPP, calculation of temperature distribution of fuel elements and coolant by using diffusion model is made in the course of group-10 control rods scram and afterwards. (author)

  17. Temperature dependence of ion irradiation induced amorphization of zirconolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K. L.; Blackford, M. G.; Lumpkin, G. R.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1999-01-01

    Zirconolite is one of the major host phases for actinides in various wasteforms for immobilizing high level radioactive waste (HLW). Over time, zirconolite's crystalline matrix is damaged by α-particles and energetic recoil nuclei recoil resulting from α-decay events. The cumulative damage caused by these particles results in amorphization. Data from natural zirconolites suggest that radiation damage anneals over geologic time and is dependant on the thermal history of the material. Proposed HLW containment strategies rely on both a suitable wasteform and geologic isolation. Depending on the waste loading, depth of burial, and the repository-specific geothermal gradient, burial could result in a wasteform being exposed to temperatures of between 100--450 C. Consequently, it is important to assess the effect of temperature on radiation damage in synthetic zirconolite. Zirconolite containing wasteforms are likely to be hot pressed at or below 1,473 K (1,200 C) and/or sintered at or below 1,623 K (1,350 C). Zirconolite fabricated at temperatures below 1,523 K (1,250 C) contains many stacking faults. As there have been various attempts to link radiation resistance to structure, the authors decided it was also pertinent to assess the role of stacking faults in radiation resistance. In this study, they simulate α-decay damage in two zirconolite samples by irradiating them with 1.5 MeV Kr + ions using the High Voltage Electron Microscope-Tandem User Facility (HTUF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and measure the critical dose for amorphization (D c ) at several temperatures between 20 and 773 K. One of the samples has a high degree of crystallographic perfection, the other contains many stacking faults on the unit cell scale. Previous authors proposed a model for estimating the activation energy of self annealing in zirconolite and for predicting the critical dose for amorphization at any temperature. The authors discuss their results and earlier published data in

  18. Histone H3 lysine 36 methylation affects temperature-induced alternative splicing and flowering in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajoro, A; Severing, E; Angenent, G C; Immink, R G H

    2017-06-01

    Global warming severely affects flowering time and reproductive success of plants. Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is an important mechanism underlying ambient temperature-controlled responses in plants, yet its regulation is poorly understood. An increase in temperature promotes changes in plant morphology as well as the transition from the vegetative to the reproductive phase in Arabidopsis thaliana via changes in splicing of key regulatory genes. Here we investigate whether a particular histone modification affects ambient temperature-induced alternative splicing and flowering time. We use a genome-wide approach and perform RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses and histone H3 lysine 36 tri-methylation (H3K36me3) chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) in plants exposed to different ambient temperatures. Analysis and comparison of these datasets reveal that temperature-induced differentially spliced genes are enriched in H3K36me3. Moreover, we find that reduction of H3K36me3 deposition causes alteration in temperature-induced alternative splicing. We also show that plants with mutations in H3K36me3 writers, eraser, or readers have altered high ambient temperature-induced flowering. Our results show a key role for the histone mark H3K36me3 in splicing regulation and plant plasticity to fluctuating ambient temperature. Our findings open new perspectives for the breeding of crops that can better cope with environmental changes due to climate change.

  19. Temperature suppression of STM-induced desorption of hydrogen on Si(100) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.; Nakayama, T.

    1999-01-01

    The temperature dependence of hydrogen (H) desorption from Si(100) H-terminated surfaces by a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is reported for negative sample bias. It is found that the STM induced H desorption rate (R) decreases several orders of magnitude when the substrate temperature...... Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  20. Temperature induced alternative splicing is affected in sdg8 and sdg26

    OpenAIRE

    Pajoro, A.; Severing, E.I.; Immink, G.H.

    2017-01-01

    Plants developed a plasticity to environmental conditions, such as temperature, that allows their adaptation. A change in ambient temperature leads to changes in the transcriptome in plants, such as the production of different splicing isoforms. Here we study temperature induced alternative splicing events in Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type and two epigenetic mutants, sdg8-2 and sdg26-1 using an RNA-seq approach.

  1. Temperature-gradient instability induced by conducting end walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Ryutov, D.D.; Tsidulko, Yu.A.

    1990-04-01

    A new rapidly growing electron temperature gradient instability is found for a plasma in contact with a conducting wall. The linear instability analysis is presented and speculations are given for its nonlinear consequences. This instability illustrates that conducting walls can produce effects that are detrimental to plasma confinement. This mode should be of importance in open-ended systems including astrophysical plasmas, mirror machines and at the edge of tokamaks where field lines are open and are connected to limiters or divertors. 16 refs., 2 figs

  2. Health Impacts of Climate Change-Induced Subzero Temperature Fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Monika Metallinou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available General fire risk and the special risk related to cold climate cellulosic drying processes are outlined. Four recent subzero temperatures fires are studied with respect to health impacts: a wooden village fire, a single wood structure fire, a wildland urban interface (WUI fire and a huge wildland fire. The health impacts range from stress related to loss of jobs, psychological effects of lost possessions, exposure to smoke and heat as well as immediate, or delayed, loss of lives. These four fires resulted in 32 fatalities, 385 persons hospitalized for shorter or longer periods, 104 structures lost and 1015 km2 of wildland burned north of, and just south of, the Arctic Circle. It is shown that the combination of subzero temperature dry weather, strong winds, changing agricultural activities and declining snowpack may lead to previously anticipated threats to people and the environment. There are reasons to believe that these fires are a result of the ongoing climate changes. Risk impacts are discussed. Rural districts and/or vulnerable populations seem to be most affected. Training methods to identify and better monitor critical fire risk parameters are suggested to mitigate the health impacts of a possibly increasing number of such fires.

  3. Health Impacts of Climate Change-Induced Subzero Temperature Fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metallinou, Maria-Monika; Log, Torgrim

    2017-07-20

    General fire risk and the special risk related to cold climate cellulosic drying processes are outlined. Four recent subzero temperatures fires are studied with respect to health impacts: a wooden village fire, a single wood structure fire, a wildland urban interface (WUI) fire and a huge wildland fire. The health impacts range from stress related to loss of jobs, psychological effects of lost possessions, exposure to smoke and heat as well as immediate, or delayed, loss of lives. These four fires resulted in 32 fatalities, 385 persons hospitalized for shorter or longer periods, 104 structures lost and 1015 km² of wildland burned north of, and just south of, the Arctic Circle. It is shown that the combination of subzero temperature dry weather, strong winds, changing agricultural activities and declining snowpack may lead to previously anticipated threats to people and the environment. There are reasons to believe that these fires are a result of the ongoing climate changes. Risk impacts are discussed. Rural districts and/or vulnerable populations seem to be most affected. Training methods to identify and better monitor critical fire risk parameters are suggested to mitigate the health impacts of a possibly increasing number of such fires.

  4. Anomalous temperature-induced volume contraction in GeTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterji, Tapan; Kumar, C. M. N.; Wdowik, Urszula D.

    2015-02-01

    The recent surge of interest in phase-change materials GeTe, Ge2Sb2Te5 , and related compounds motivated us to revisit the structural phase transition in GeTe in more detail than was done before. The rhombohedral-to-cubic ferroelectric phase transition in GeTe has been studied using high-resolution neutron powder diffraction on a spallation neutron source. We determined the temperature dependence of the structural parameters in a wide temperature range extending from 309 to 973 K. The results of our studies clearly show an anomalous volume contraction of 0.6% at the phase transition from the rhombohedral-to-cubic phase. In order to better understand the phase transition and the associated anomalous volume decrease in GeTe, we have performed phonon calculations based on the density functional theory. Results of the present investigations are also discussed with respect to the experimental data obtained for single crystals of GeTe.

  5. Radiation-induced temperature shift of thhe ASME KIc curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Haggag, F.M.; Iskander, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on the temperature shift and shape of the K Ic curve described in Sect. XI of the ASME Boiler and pressure Vessel Code. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 215-mm-thick plate. Charpy impact, tensile, dropweight, and compact specimens up to 203.2 mm thick were fabricated and tested to provide a large data for unirradiated material. Similar specimens with compacts up to 101.6 mm thick, irradiated at about 288 degree C to a mean fluence of about 1.6 times 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor, were tested to provide a similarly large data base with which to evaluate the temperature shift and shape of the ASME K Ic curves. Testing was performed by both Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Materials Engineering Associates. Both linear-elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze test results. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  6. Joining of superalloy Inconel 600 by diffusion induced isothermal solidification of a liquated insert metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbewande, A.T.; Chukwukaeme, C.; Ojo, O.A.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of process variables on the microstructure of transient liquid phase bonded IN 600 using a commercial filler alloy was studied. Microstructural examination of bonded specimens showed that isothermal solidification of the liquated insert occurred during holding at the joining temperatures. In cases where the holding time was insufficient for complete isothermal solidification, the residual liquid transformed on cooling into a centerline eutectic product. The width of the eutectic decreased with increased holding time and an increase in initial gap width resulted in thicker eutectic width in specimens bonded at the same temperature and for equivalent holding times. In addition to the centerline eutectic microconstituent, precipitation of boron-rich particles was observed within the base metal region adjacent to the substrate-joint interface. Formation of these particles appeared to have influenced the rate of solidification of the liquated interlayer during bonding. In contrast to the conventional expectation of an increase in the rate of isothermal solidification with an increase in temperature, a decrease in the rate was observed with an increase in temperatures above 1160 deg. C. This could be related to a decrease in solubility of boron in nickel above the Ni-B eutectic temperature

  7. The Successful Use of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Induced Diffuse Alveolar Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faye Pais

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse alveolar haemorrhage (DAH is a catastrophic pulmonary complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. It can result in refractory hypoxaemia despite mechanical ventilation. Increasing lung compliance and worsening pulmonary hypertension can potentiate cardiogenic shock from acute right ventricular failure. In such patients with cardiopulmonary collapse, veno-arterial (V-A ECMO maybe a viable option that can provide the required haemodynamic support. However, the use of V-A ECMO in such patients is limited due to an associated increased risk of bleeding. Our case report describes the successful use of V-A ECMO without the use of systemic anticoagulation in a patient with DAH. Despite the absence of systemic anticoagulation, no thrombotic complications within the circuit were noted.

  8. A new model to produce sagittal plane rotational induced diffuse axonal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan eDavidsson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new in vivo animal model that produces diffuse brain injuries (DBI in sagittal plane rearward rotational acceleration has been developed. In this model, the skull of an anesthetized adult rat is tightly secured to a rotating bar. During trauma, the bar is impacted by a striker that causes the bar and the animal head to rotate rearward; the acceleration phase last 0.4 ms and is followed by a rotation at constant speed and a gentle deceleration when the bar makes contact with a padded stop. The total head angle change is less than 30 degrees. By adjusting the air pressure in the rifle used to accelerate the striker, resulting rotational acceleration between 0.3 and 2.1 Mrad/s2 can be produced.Numerous combinations of trauma levels, post-trauma survival times, brain and serum retrieval and tissue preparation techniques were adopted to characterise this new model. The trauma caused subdural bleedings in animals exposed to severe trauma. Staining brain tissue with β-Amyloid Precursor Protein antibodies and FD Neurosilver that detect degenerating axons revealed wide spread axonal injuries (AI in the corpus callosum, the border between the corpus callosum and cortex and in tracts in the brain stem. The observed AI:s were apparent only when the rotational acceleration level was moderate and above. On the contrary, only limited signs of contusion injuries were observed following trauma. S100 serum analyses indicate that blood vessel and glia cell injuries occur following moderate levels of trauma despite the absence of obvious BBB injuries. We conclude that this rotational trauma model is capable of producing graded axonal injury, is repeatable and produces limited other types of traumatic brain injuries (TBI and as such is useful in the study of injury biomechanics, diagnostics and treatment strategies following diffuse axonal injury (DAI.

  9. A new model to produce sagittal plane rotational induced diffuse axonal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsson, Johan; Risling, Marten

    2011-01-01

    A new in vivo animal model that produces diffuse brain injuries in sagittal plane rearward rotational acceleration has been developed. In this model, the skull of an anesthetized adult rat is tightly secured to a rotating bar. During trauma, the bar is impacted by a striker that causes the bar and the animal head to rotate rearward; the acceleration phase last 0.4 ms and is followed by a rotation at constant speed and a gentle deceleration when the bar makes contact with a padded stop. The total head angle change is less than 30°. By adjusting the air pressure in the rifle used to accelerate the striker, resulting rotational acceleration between 0.3 and 2.1 Mrad/s(2) can be produced. Numerous combinations of trauma levels, post-trauma survival times, brain and serum retrieval, and tissue preparation techniques were adopted to characterize this new model. The trauma caused subdural bleedings in animals exposed to severe trauma. Staining brain tissue with β-Amyloid Precursor Protein antibodies and FD Neurosilver that detect degenerating axons revealed wide spread axonal injuries (AI) in the corpus callosum, the border between the corpus callosum and cortex and in tracts in the brain stem. The observed AIs were apparent only when the rotational acceleration level was moderate and above. On the contrary, only limited signs of contusion injuries were observed following trauma. Macrophage invasions, glial fibrillary acidic protein redistribution or hypertrophy, and blood brain barrier (BBB) changes were unusual. S100 serum analyses indicate that blood vessel and glia cell injuries occur following moderate levels of trauma despite the absence of obvious BBB injuries. We conclude that this rotational trauma model is capable of producing graded axonal injury, is repeatable and produces limited other types of traumatic brain injuries and as such is useful in the study of injury biomechanics, diagnostics, and treatment strategies following diffuse axonal injury.

  10. Temperature rise induced by some light emitting diode and quartz-tungsten-halogen curing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmussen, Erik; Peutzfeldt, Anne

    2005-02-01

    Because of the risk of thermal damage to the pulp, the temperature rise induced by light-curing units should not be too high. LED (light emitting diode) curing units have the main part of their irradiation in the blue range and have been reported to generate less heat than QTH (quartz-tungsten-halogen) curing units. This study had two aims: first, to measure the temperature rise induced by ten LED and three QTH curing units; and, second, to relate the measured temperature rise to the power density of the curing units. The light-induced temperature rise was measured by means of a thermocouple embedded in a small cylinder of resin composite. The power density was measured by using a dental radiometer. For LED units, the temperature rise increased with increasing power density, in a statistically significant manner. Two of the three QTH curing units investigated resulted in a higher temperature rise than LED curing units of the same power density. Previous findings, that LED curing units induce less temperature rise than QTH units, does not hold true in general.

  11. Quasi-two-layer morphodynamic model for bedload-dominated problems: bed slope-induced morphological diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Sergio; Borthwick, Alistair G L

    2018-02-01

    We derive a two-layer depth-averaged model of sediment transport and morphological evolution for application to bedload-dominated problems. The near-bed transport region is represented by the lower (bedload) layer which has an arbitrarily constant, vanishing thickness (of approx. 10 times the sediment particle diameter), and whose average sediment concentration is free to vary. Sediment is allowed to enter the upper layer, and hence the total load may also be simulated, provided that concentrations of suspended sediment remain low. The model conforms with established theories of bedload, and is validated satisfactorily against empirical expressions for sediment transport rates and the morphodynamic experiment of a migrating mining pit by Lee et al. (1993 J. Hydraul. Eng. 119 , 64-80 (doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9429(1993)119:1(64))). Investigation into the effect of a local bed gradient on bedload leads to derivation of an analytical, physically meaningful expression for morphological diffusion induced by a non-zero local bed slope. Incorporation of the proposed morphological diffusion into a conventional morphodynamic model (defined as a coupling between the shallow water equations, Exner equation and an empirical formula for bedload) improves model predictions when applied to the evolution of a mining pit, without the need either to resort to special numerical treatment of the equations or to use additional tuning parameters.

  12. Deafferentation-Induced Plasticity of Visual Callosal Connections: Predicting Critical Periods and Analyzing Cortical Abnormalities Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime F. Olavarria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Callosal connections form elaborate patterns that bear close association with striate and extrastriate visual areas. Although it is known that retinal input is required for normal callosal development, there is little information regarding the period during which the retina is critically needed and whether this period correlates with the same developmental stage across species. Here we review the timing of this critical period, identified in rodents and ferrets by the effects that timed enucleations have on mature callosal connections, and compare it to other developmental milestones in these species. Subsequently, we compare these events to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI measurements of water diffusion anisotropy within developing cerebral cortex. We observed that the relationship between the timing of the critical period and the DTI-characterized developmental trajectory is strikingly similar in rodents and ferrets, which opens the possibility of using cortical DTI trajectories for predicting the critical period in species, such as humans, in which this period likely occurs prenatally. Last, we discuss the potential of utilizing DTI to distinguish normal from abnormal cerebral cortical development, both within the context of aberrant connectivity induced by early retinal deafferentation, and more generally as a potential tool for detecting abnormalities associated with neurodevelopmental disorders.

  13. Quasi-two-layer morphodynamic model for bedload-dominated problems: bed slope-induced morphological diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Sergio; Borthwick, Alistair G. L.

    2018-02-01

    We derive a two-layer depth-averaged model of sediment transport and morphological evolution for application to bedload-dominated problems. The near-bed transport region is represented by the lower (bedload) layer which has an arbitrarily constant, vanishing thickness (of approx. 10 times the sediment particle diameter), and whose average sediment concentration is free to vary. Sediment is allowed to enter the upper layer, and hence the total load may also be simulated, provided that concentrations of suspended sediment remain low. The model conforms with established theories of bedload, and is validated satisfactorily against empirical expressions for sediment transport rates and the morphodynamic experiment of a migrating mining pit by Lee et al. (1993 J. Hydraul. Eng. 119, 64-80 (doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9429(1993)119:1(64))). Investigation into the effect of a local bed gradient on bedload leads to derivation of an analytical, physically meaningful expression for morphological diffusion induced by a non-zero local bed slope. Incorporation of the proposed morphological diffusion into a conventional morphodynamic model (defined as a coupling between the shallow water equations, Exner equation and an empirical formula for bedload) improves model predictions when applied to the evolution of a mining pit, without the need either to resort to special numerical treatment of the equations or to use additional tuning parameters.

  14. Laser induced surface modification of low temperature cofired ceramics (LTCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duitsch, U.; Rohde, M.; Heidinger, R. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Materials Research

    2004-07-01

    In the present study a laser induced surface modification process is used to increase the electrical conductivity of ceramic substrates locally. The laser experiments were carried out with a CO{sub 2}-Laser ({lambda}=10,6 {mu}m, cw) on LTCC-Substrates DuPont 951 by using tungsten powder as additive. The resulting microstructures within the modified lines were characterised and changes in the electrical properties have been determined. By means of the laser process and using preheating substrates to avoid thermoshock a composite of LTCC and tungsten particles was produced. The tungsten volume fraction within the modified lines was determined between 15.. 50 vol.%. The electrical conductivity in the paths reached a level of {sigma}=10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} S/m, which is only one or two orders of magnitude below the value of bulk tungsten. (orig.)

  15. Impact of the structural anisotropy of La2NiO4+δ on on high temperature surface modifications and diffusion of oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauquelin, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    La 2 NiO 4+δ was first studied due to its structural similarities with the High Temperature superconductor La 2 NiO 4+δ and more recently due to its promise as a cathode material in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells as well as an oxygen exchange membrane. It crystallizes in the K 2 NiF 4 layered structure and accommodates highly mobile oxygen at its ground state and is therefore overstoichiometric. During this thesis, pure single crystals of La 2 NiO 4+δ were successfully grown using the floating-zone method, subsequently characterized using neutron and Laue Backscattering diffraction and oriented pieces of single crystal with [100] and [001] orientation were prepared. The surface morphology behavior after long term exposure to high temperature in different atmospheres was observed using microscopy techniques because stability at high temperature is required for application purposes and it was discovered a structural change to nickel-rich phases at T>1173 K. The sensibility of the oxygen non-stoichiometry to cooling was studied and subsequently a new 18 O- 18 O exchange apparatus allowing quenching of the samples using liquid nitrogen was developed. Oxygen selfdiffusion was studied using SIMS in the range 673-873K in both [100] and [001] crystallographic directions. The effect of the disorientation of the sample surface on the determination of the slowest diffusion coefficient was discovered and revealed the very strong anisotropy (>5 orders of magnitude difference) between the different diffusion paths. Finally using HTXRD and oxygen release experiments, it was shown that oxygen diffusion from interstitial oxygen starts to be relevant at 550-600 K and a change of behavior is observed around 700 K, corresponding to a possible change in the diffusion mechanism from interstitial to interstitialcy.

  16. Impact of the structural anisotropy of La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} on on high temperature surface modifications and diffusion of oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauquelin, Nicolas

    2010-11-29

    La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} was first studied due to its structural similarities with the High Temperature superconductor La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} and more recently due to its promise as a cathode material in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells as well as an oxygen exchange membrane. It crystallizes in the K{sub 2}NiF{sub 4} layered structure and accommodates highly mobile oxygen at its ground state and is therefore overstoichiometric. During this thesis, pure single crystals of La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} were successfully grown using the floating-zone method, subsequently characterized using neutron and Laue Backscattering diffraction and oriented pieces of single crystal with [100] and [001] orientation were prepared. The surface morphology behavior after long term exposure to high temperature in different atmospheres was observed using microscopy techniques because stability at high temperature is required for application purposes and it was discovered a structural change to nickel-rich phases at T>1173 K. The sensibility of the oxygen non-stoichiometry to cooling was studied and subsequently a new {sup 18}O-{sup 18}O exchange apparatus allowing quenching of the samples using liquid nitrogen was developed. Oxygen selfdiffusion was studied using SIMS in the range 673-873K in both [100] and [001] crystallographic directions. The effect of the disorientation of the sample surface on the determination of the slowest diffusion coefficient was discovered and revealed the very strong anisotropy (>5 orders of magnitude difference) between the different diffusion paths. Finally using HTXRD and oxygen release experiments, it was shown that oxygen diffusion from interstitial oxygen starts to be relevant at 550-600 K and a change of behavior is observed around 700 K, corresponding to a possible change in the diffusion mechanism from interstitial to interstitialcy.

  17. Behavior of specific heat and self diffusion coefficient of sodium near transition temperature: a molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.; Khan, G.

    1990-09-01

    In this report the author used of a very useful technique of simulation and applied it to successfully for determining the various properties of sodium, both in liquid and solid phase near transition point. As a first step the determination of specific heat and diffusion coefficient have been carried out. In liquid state the molecular dynamics (MD) values calculated matched the experimental data. But in solid state the diffusion coefficient obtained were not consistent with the one expected for a solid, rather the values obtained suggested that sodium remained in liquid state even below the melting point. (A.B.)

  18. Transmission electron microscopy study for investigating high-temperature reliability of Ti10W90-based and Ta-based diffusion barriers up to 600 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budhiman, Nando; Schuermann, Ulrich; Kienle, Lorenz; Jensen, Bjoern; Chemnitz, Steffen; Wagner, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Abstractauthoren Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, including energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) (elemental mapping, line, and point measurements) and energy filtered TEM (EFTEM) methods, is applied to investigate the high temperature reliability, especially material diffusion, of two types of diffusion barriers: titanium-tungsten-based (Ti 10 W 90 -based) and tantalum-based (Ta-based), with nickel (Ni) layer on top. Both barriers were deposited as a form of stacked layers on sili-con (Si) wafers using the physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique. TEM analysis is performed on both barriers before and after annealing (at 600 C for 24 h inside a vacuum chamber). No diffusion of material into the Si substrate as observed. Additionally, only diffusion between the Ni and adjoining Ti 10 W 90 layers, and between Ni and adjoining Ta layers in the Ti 10 W 90 -based and Ta-based barriers, respectively, are observed due to annealing. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Diffuse X-ray scattering as a probe of strain-induced nanoscale structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welberry, T.R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: We show in this paper that a feature that has been observed in the diffuse scattering patterns of a wide variety of different materials-a diffuse 'ring' or toroidal shaped region of scattering-can be understood in terms of a simple model that has been borrowed from the field of sol-gel science. In this it is supposed that there is a balance between the local attractive forces that are trying to make a particular structure and a rather longer-range repulsive force. In the present context we believe this latter force has its origin in the strain that builds as the preferred local structure tries to fit into the average crystal lattice. We describe here simple Monte Carlo (MC) models in which this principle has been demonstrated for three examples: cubic stabilized zirconia, the didecylbenzene/urea inclusion compound and the pure molecular compound 1,3-dibromo-2,5-diethyl-4,6-dimethyl-benzene (BEMB2). A similar feature is also observed in the alumino-silicate ceramic mullite. Although we are confident that this feature in mullite has similar origins to those of the other examples described, no attempt has been made to model it at this stage as this system shows additional incommensurate diffraction effects not easily described by the kind of simple model presented here. The result of the present work is particularly important in the context of the stabilised zirconia problem. The realisation that the very complex structural problem can be explained by such a simple physical idea should enable further progress to be made in understanding the properties of a wide range of these materials. A description in terms of the cation ordering is, from a chemical point of view, a much more natural approach than that used in previous studies where the oxygen vacancies were given prominence. To incorporate the anions into the derived cation distributions should be quite feasible using simple bond-valence criteria, so that a much more complete model should now be

  20. Background Si-doping effects on Zn diffusion-induced disordering in GaAs/AlGaAs multiple-quantum-well structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hong Ky; Ganière, J. D.; Reinhart, F. K.; Blanchard, B.

    1996-04-01

    Identical GaAs/Al0.2Ga0.8As multiple-quantum-well (MQW) structures uniformly doped with Si at various concentrations ranging from 1×1017 to 1×1019 cm-3 are grown by molecular-beam epitaxy to study the effects of the background Si-doping level on the Zn diffusion-induced disordering process. After Zn diffusions at 575 °C for 4 and 16 h, the structures are investigated by secondary-ion-mass spectrometry, and by transmission electron microscopy on cleaved wedges of the sample. The results show that the totally and partially disordered regions are always behind the Zn diffusion front. A dependence of the effective Zn diffusivity and of the disordering rate of the structures on the background Si-doping level is observed. The effective Zn diffusivity and the disordering rate are significantly reduced with increasing background Si concentration. Before Zn diffusion, photoluminescence spectra of the Si-doped MQW structures exhibit an increase in intensity of the Si donor-column-III vacancy complex emission band with increasing Si-doping level. This indicates that the concentration of column-III vacancies in the MQW structures increases as the background Si concentration increases. After Zn diffusion, an important decrease in intensity of the column-III vacancy related emission band is observed on the photoluminescence spectra taken in the Zn-diffused regions. The systematical analysis of the photoluminescence spectra of the Zn-diffused MQW structures as a function of diffusion time and as a function of etching depth below the sample surface makes it possible to describe the physical processes occurring during Zn diffusion. A model based on the ``kick-out'' mechanism of Zn diffusion is proposed to explain the effect of the background Si-doping level on the effective Zn diffusivity. The model shows that the effective Zn diffusivity is controlled by the concentration of column-III interstitials behind the Zn diffusion front and by the donor concentration in the sample

  1. Temperature-Induced Surface Effects on Drug Nanosuspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleandri, Simone; Schönenberger, Monica; Niederquell, Andres; Kuentz, Martin

    2018-02-21

    The trial-and-error approach is still predominantly used in pharmaceutical development of nanosuspensions. Physicochemical dispersion stability is a primary focus and therefore, various analytical bulk methods are commonly employed. Clearly less attention is directed to surface changes of nanoparticles even though such interface effects can be of pharmaceutical relevance. Such potential effects in drug nanosuspensions were to be studied for temperatures of 25 and 37°C by using complementary surface analytical methods. Atomic force microscopy, inverse gas chromatography and UV surface dissolution imaging were used together for the first time to assess pharmaceutical nanosuspensions that were obtained by wet milling. Fenofibrate and bezafibrate were selected as model drugs in presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and hydroxypropyl cellulose as anionic and steric stabilizer, respectively. It was demonstrated that in case of bezafibrate nanosuspension, a surface modification occurred at 37°C compared to 25°C, which notably affected dissolution rate. By contrast, no similar effect was observed in case of fenofibrate nanoparticles. The combined usage of analytical surface methods provides the basis for a better understanding of phenomena that take place on drug surfaces. Such understanding is of importance for pharmaceutical development to achieve desirable quality attributes of nanosuspensions.

  2. Temperature Induced Degradation of Nb Ti/Cu Composite Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Senatore, C; Di Michiel, M; Thilly, L; Gerardin, A; Reluner, B; Oberli, L; Willering, G; Bottura, L

    2009-01-01

    The degradation mechanisms of state-of-the-art Nb-Ti/Cu superconductors are described, based on in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements during heat treatment. A quantitative description of the Nb-Ti/Cu degradation in terms of critical current density, Cu stabiliser resistivity and mechanical composite strength is presented. In an applied magnetic field a significant critical current degradation is already observed after a 5-minute 400 °C heat treatment, due to variations of a-Ti precipitate size and distribution within the Nb-Ti alloy filaments. A strong degradation of the strand mechanical properties is observed after several minutes heating above 550 °C, which is also the temperature at which the formation of Cu Ti intermetallic phases is detected. Several minutes heating at 250 °C are sufficient to increase the RRR of the strongly cold work strands inside a Rutherford type cable from about 80 to about 240. Heating for several minutes at 400 °C does not cause a significant conductor degradati...

  3. High-temperature laser induced spectroscopy in nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allmon, W.E.; Berthold, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for conducting optical spectroscopy in a hostile environment. It comprises: a source of high intensity light; an optical fiber connected to the source of high intensity light for transmitting light therefrom. The optical fiber having an end for discharging light onto a material to be spectroscopically analyzed; a sheath defining a space around at least a part of the optical fiber carrying the end of the optical fiber for shielding the optical fiber from the hostile environment; a window in the sheath for closing the space and for passing light transmitted through the end of the optical fiber out of the sheath; light detector means for detecting and spectroscopically analyzing emitted light from the material; an optical fiber means for transmitting the emitted light from the material to the light detector means; a standardization module for containing a sample having a known composition and being exposed to known temperature and pressure conditions; an additional optical fiber connected to the module for transmitting light to the sample in the module; multiplexer means; and additional optical fiber means for returning light from the module to the detector through the multiplexer means

  4. A possibility of local measurements of ion temperature in a high-temperature plasma by laser induced ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantor, M

    2012-01-01

    A new diagnostic for local measurements of ion temperature and drift velocity in fusion plasmas is proposed in the paper. The diagnostic is based on laser induced ionization of excited hydrogen and deuterium atoms from the levels which ionization energy less than the laser photon energy. A high intensive laser beam ionizes nearly all the excited atoms in the beam region resulting in a quench of spontaneous line emission of the appropriate optical transitions. The measurements of the quenching emission have been used in the past for local measurements of hydrogen atom density in tokamak plasma. The idea of the new diagnostic is spectral resolution of the quenching emission. The measured spectrum relates directly to the velocity distribution of the excited atoms. This distribution is strongly coupled to the distribution of the hydrogen atoms at the ground state. So, the spectral resolution of quenching emission is a way of local measurements of the temperature and drift velocity of hydrogen atoms in plasma. The temperature of hydrogen atoms is well coupled to the local ion temperature as long as the mean free path of the atoms is shorter than the ion gradient length in plasma. In this case the new diagnostic can provide local measurements of ion temperature in plasma. The paper considers technical capabilities of the diagnostic, physical restrictions of its application and interpretation of the measurements.

  5. Real-time correction of rigid body motion-induced phase errors for diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Rafael; Aksoy, Murat; Aboussouan, Eric; Peterson, Eric; Van, Anh; Bammer, Roland

    2015-02-01

    Diffusion contrast in diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is generated through the constructive addition of signal from many coherence pathways. Motion-induced phase causes destructive interference which results in loss of signal magnitude and diffusion contrast. In this work, a three-dimensional (3D) navigator-based real-time correction of the rigid body motion-induced phase errors is developed for diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession MRI. The efficacy of the real-time prospective correction method in preserving phase coherence of the steady state is tested in 3D phantom experiments and 3D scans of healthy human subjects. In nearly all experiments, the signal magnitude in images obtained with proposed prospective correction was higher than the signal magnitude in images obtained with no correction. In the human subjects, the mean magnitude signal in the data was up to 30% higher with prospective motion correction than without. Prospective correction never resulted in a decrease in mean signal magnitude in either the data or in the images. The proposed prospective motion correction method is shown to preserve the phase coherence of the steady state in diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession MRI, thus mitigating signal magnitude losses that would confound the desired diffusion contrast. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Diffusion tensor and volumetric magnetic resonance imaging using an MR-compatible hand-induced robotic device suggests training-induced neuroplasticity in patients with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridou, Asimina; Astrakas, Loukas; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Khanicheh, Azadeh; Singhal, Aneesh B; Moskowitz, Michael A; Rosen, Bruce; Tzika, Aria A

    2013-11-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of mortality and a frequent cause of long-term adult impairment. Improved strategies to enhance motor function in individuals with chronic disability from stroke are thus required. Post‑stroke therapy may improve rehabilitation and reduce long-term disability; however, objective methods for evaluating the specific impact of rehabilitation are rare. Brain imaging studies on patients with chronic stroke have shown evidence for reorganization of areas showing functional plasticity after a stroke. In this study, we hypothesized that brain mapping using a novel magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible hand device in conjunction with state‑of‑the‑art magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can serve as a novel biomarker for brain plasticity induced by rehabilitative motor training in patients with chronic stroke. This hypothesis is based on the premises that robotic devices, by stimulating brain plasticity, can assist in restoring movement compromised by stroke-induced pathological changes in the brain and that these changes can then be monitored by advanced MRI. We serially examined 15 healthy controls and 4 patients with chronic stroke. We employed a combination of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and volumetric MRI using a 3-tesla (3T) MRI system using a 12-channel Siemens Tim coil and a novel MR-compatible hand‑induced robotic device. DTI data revealed that the number of fibers and the average tract length significantly increased after 8 weeks of hand training by 110% and 64%, respectively (probotics in the molecular medicine era.

  7. Multiphase chemical kinetics of OH radical uptake by molecular organic markers of biomass burning aerosols: humidity and temperature dependence, surface reaction, and bulk diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arangio, Andrea M; Slade, Jonathan H; Berkemeier, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich; Knopf, Daniel A; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2015-05-14

    Multiphase reactions of OH radicals are among the most important pathways of chemical aging of organic aerosols in the atmosphere. Reactive uptake of OH by organic compounds has been observed in a number of studies, but the kinetics of mass transport and chemical reaction are still not fully understood. Here we apply the kinetic multilayer model of gas-particle interactions (KM-GAP) to experimental data from OH exposure studies of levoglucosan and abietic acid, which serve as surrogates and molecular markers of biomass burning aerosol (BBA). The model accounts for gas-phase diffusion within a cylindrical coated-wall flow tube, reversible adsorption of OH, surface-bulk exchange, bulk diffusion, and chemical reactions at the surface and in the bulk of the condensed phase. The nonlinear dependence of OH uptake coefficients on reactant concentrations and time can be reproduced by KM-GAP. We find that the bulk diffusion coefficient of the organic molecules is approximately 10(-16) cm(2) s(-1), reflecting an amorphous semisolid state of the organic substrates. The OH uptake is governed by reaction at or near the surface and can be kinetically limited by surface-bulk exchange or bulk diffusion of the organic reactants. Estimates of the chemical half-life of levoglucosan in 200 nm particles in a biomass burning plume increase from 1 day at high relative humidity to 1 week under dry conditions. In BBA particles transported to the free troposphere, the chemical half-life of levoglucosan can exceed 1 month due to slow bulk diffusion in a glassy matrix at low temperature.

  8. High-quality multilayer graphene on an insulator formed by diffusion controlled Ni-induced layer exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, H.; Saitoh, N.; Yoshizawa, N.; Suemasu, T.; Toko, K.

    2017-12-01

    The Ni-induced layer-exchange growth of amorphous carbon is a unique method used to fabricate uniform multilayer graphene (MLG) directly on an insulator. To improve the crystal quality of MLG, we prepare AlOx or SiO2 interlayers between amorphous C and Ni layers, which control the extent of diffusion of C atoms into the Ni layer. The growth morphology and Raman spectra observed from MLG formed by layer exchange strongly depend on the material type and thickness of the interlayers; a 1-nm-thick AlOx interlayer is found to be ideal for use in experiments. Transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectra reveal that the crystal quality of the resulting MLG is much higher than that of a sample without an interlayer. The grain size reaches a few μm, leading to an electrical conductivity of 1290 S/cm. The grain size and the electrical conductivity are the highest among MLG synthesized using a solid-phase reaction including metal-induced crystallization. The direct synthesis of uniform, high-quality MLG on arbitrary substrates will pave the way for advanced electronic devices integrated with carbon materials.

  9. Temperature dependence of the amorphization process induced by ion beam mixing in a metallic bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, L.; Benkoulal, T.; Jagielski, J.

    1994-01-01

    Amorphization induced by ion beam mixing has been investigated via Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and channelling experiments on a Zr/Ni bilayer as a function of the bombardment temperature. Irradiation was performed with various noble gas ions (Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) in a temperature range between 100K and 500K. The results show that both the mixing and the amorphization processes are influenced by the temperature at which ion bombardment is performed. The mixing rate is much higher at 500K than at low temperature; conversely, the amorphization rate decreases as the temperature increases. The composition of the amorphous phase formed during mixing was also demonstrated to depend on the irradiation temperature. ((orig.))

  10. Material Solutions to Mitigate the Alkali Chloride-Induced High Temperature Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiamehr, Saeed

    High temperature corrosion induced by potassium chloride (KCl) is a major challenge for biomass-based power plants. The current study aims at identification or development of alloys or coatings that can yield a better performance at a target metal temperature of 600oC compared to austenitic...... of metals. This was aimed at identifying the constituent elements of a corrosion resistant alloy. Calculations suggested Al, Si, Cr, Ti, Y, Ce, Ta, Hf and Zr as suitable oxide-forming elements as well as Mo, Ni and Co as suitable matrix-forming elements. However, the presence of potassium in the environment...... further knowledge on the mechanism of high temperature corrosion induced by KCl, a wide range of commercial and model alloys were exposed under conditions relevant to high temperature corrosion in biomass-firing power plants. The exposures were conducted at 600oC for 168h in flowing N2(g)+5%O2(g)+15%H2O...

  11. Temperature-Induced Switchable Adhesion using Nickel-Titanium-Polydimethylsiloxane Hybrid Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frensemeier, Mareike; Kaiser, Jessica S; Frick, Carl P; Schneider, Andreas S; Arzt, Eduard; Fertig, Ray S; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-05-01

    A switchable dry adhesive based on a nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape-memory alloy with an adhesive silicone rubber surface has been developed. Although several studies investigate micropatterned, bioinspired adhesive surfaces, very few focus on reversible adhesion. The system here is based on the indentation-induced two-way shape-memory effect in NiTi alloys. NiTi is trained by mechanical deformation through indentation and grinding to elicit a temperature-induced switchable topography with protrusions at high temperature and a flat surface at low temperature. The trained surfaces are coated with either a smooth or a patterned adhesive polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer, resulting in a temperature-induced switchable surface, used for dry adhesion. Adhesion tests show that the temperature-induced topographical change of the NiTi influences the adhesive performance of the hybrid system. For samples with a smooth PDMS layer the transition from flat to structured state reduces adhesion by 56%, and for samples with a micropatterned PDMS layer adhesion is switchable by nearly 100%. Both hybrid systems reveal strong reversibility related to the NiTi martensitic phase transformation, allowing repeated switching between an adhesive and a nonadhesive state. These effects have been discussed in terms of reversible changes in contact area and varying tilt angles of the pillars with respect to the substrate surface.

  12. Does the presence of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction at CT have any prognostic value in newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Hugo J A; de Klerk, John M H; Fijnheer, Rob; Heggelman, Ben G F; Dubois, Stefan V.; Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Kwee, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prognostic value of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction at computed tomography (CT) in newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 105 patients with newly diagnosed DLBCL who had undergone CT and bone

  13. Shock-induced spall in copper: the effects of anisotropy, temperature, loading pulse and defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; An, Qi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Han, Li - Bo [USTC

    2009-07-28

    Shock-induced spall in Cu is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. We examine spallation in initially perfect crystals and defective solids with grain boundaries (columnar bicrystals), stacking faults or vacancies, as well as the effect of temperature and loading pulses. Spall in single crystal Cu is anisotropic, and defects and high temperature may reduce the spall strength. Taylor-wave (triangular shock-release wave) loading is explored in comparison with square wave shock loading.

  14. Brazing, high temperature brazing and diffusion welding. Lectures and posters; Hart- und Hochtemperaturloeten und Diffusionsschweissen. Vortraege und Posterbeitraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1998-12-01

    This collection of papers contains the following main aspects: Brazing in traffic and transport, brazing in refrigeration and air conditioning and other applications, materials development, process development, diffusion bonding, brazing of high-performance materials and composite materials, quality and testing. (orig./MM) [Deutsch] Dieser Tagungsband enthaelt folgende Themenschwerpunkte: Loeten in der Verkehrstechnik, Loeten in der Kaelte- und Klimatechnik und andere Anwendungen, Werkstoffentwicklung, Prozessentwicklung, Diffusionsfuegen, Loeten von Hochleistungswerkstoffen und Verbundwerkstoffen, Qualitaet und Pruefung. (orig./MM)

  15. Comparison of inter-diffusion coefficients for Ni/Cu thin films determined from classical heating analysis and linear temperature ramping analysis by means of profile reconstruction and a numerical solution of Fick's law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joubert, H.D.; Terblans, J.J.; Swart, H.C.

    2009-01-01

    Classical inter-diffusion studies assume a constant time of annealing when samples are annealed in a furnace. It is assumed that the sample temperature reaches the annealing temperature immediately after insertion, while the sample temperature immediately drops to room temperature after removal, the annealing time being taken as the time between insertion and removal. Using the above assumption, the diffusion coefficient can be calculated in a number of ways. In reality, the sample temperature does not immediately reach the annealing temperature; instead it rises at a rate governed by several heat transfer mechanisms, depending on the annealing procedure. For short annealing times, the sample temperature may not attain the annealing temperature, while for extended annealing times the sample temperature may reach the annealing temperature only for a fraction of the annealing time. To eliminate the effect of heat transfer mechanisms, a linear temperature ramping regime is proposed. Used in conjunction with a suitable profile reconstructing technique and a numerical solution of Fick's second law, the inter-diffusion parameters obtained from a linear ramping of Ni/Cu thin film samples can be compared to those obtained from calculations performed with the so-called Mixing-Roughness-Information model or any other suitable method used to determine classical diffusion coefficients.

  16. A computational study of radiation and gravity effect on temperature and soot formation in a methane air co-flow diffusion flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhowal, Arup Jyoti, E-mail: arupjyoti.bhowal@heritageit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Heritage Institute of Technology, Chowbaga Road, Anandapur, Kolkata-700 107, West Bengal (India); Mandal, Bijan Kumar, E-mail: bkm375@yahoo.co.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah – 711103, West Bengal (India)

    2016-07-12

    An effort has been made for a quantitative assessment of the soot formed under steady state in a methane air co flow diffusion flame by a numerical simulation at normal gravity and at lower gravity levels of 0.5 G, 0.1 G and 0.0001 G (microgravity). The peak temperature at microgravity is reduced by about 50 K than that at normal gravity level. There is an augmentation of soot formation at lower gravity levels. Peak value at microgravity multiplies by a factor of ∼7 of that at normal gravity. However, if radiation is not considered, soot formation is found to be much more.

  17. All-fiber probe for laser-induced thermotherapy with integrated temperature measurement capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Chen, W.; Yu, H.; Gassino, R.; Braglia, A.; Olivero, M.; Perrone, Guido; Vallan, A.

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents our recent results towards the development of a miniaturized all-fiber probe for laser induced thermal ablation of tumor cells, which combines the optimal delivery of a near-infrared high power ablating beam, a low power visible aiming beam and fast Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensors. Specific combiner and probe end-cap based on dual cladding fibers have been developed to allow the simultaneous handling of the laser beams and of the signal that feeds the temperature sensor. Moreover, a very fast FBG interrogation system has been implemented to track abrupt temperature variations during medical treatment.

  18. Temperature measurements in hypersonic air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation is reported of the use of laser-induced fluorescence on oxygen for the measurement of air temperature and its fluctuations owing to turbulence in hypersonic wind tunnel flows. The results show that for temperatures higher than 60 K and densities higher than 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature measurement can be less than 2 percent if it is limited by photon-statistical noise. The measurement is unaffected by collisional quenching and, if the laser fluence is kept below 1.5 J/sq cm, it is also unaffected by nonlinear effects which are associated with depletion of the absorbing states.

  19. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of metastatic abdominal and pelvic tumours is sensitive to early changes induced by a VEGF inhibitor using alternative diffusion attenuation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orton, Matthew R. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, CRUK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Messiou, Christina; DeSouza, Nandita [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, CRUK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Collins, David; Leach, Martin O. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, CRUK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Morgan, Veronica A. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Tessier, Jean; Young, Helen [Early Clinical Development, AstraZeneca, Macclesfield (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    To assess the utility of diffusion weighted imaging for monitoring early treatment effects associated with a VEGF inhibitor. Twenty-nine patients with metastatic abdominal and pelvic tumours were recruited and imaged with DW-MRI: twice at baseline, and after 7 and 28 days of treatment with cediranib. Tumour measures were derived using mono-exponential, bi-exponential and stretched-exponential models, and parameter repeatability and treatment effects seen after 7 and 28 days were assessed. Correlations with volume changes and DCE-MRI metrics were also assessed. Diffusion coefficient repeatabilities from all models were < 6 %; f and D* (bi-exponential) were 22 % and 44 %; α (stretched-exponential) was 4.2 %. Significant increases in the diffusion coefficients from all models were observed at day 28 but not day 7. Significant decreases in D* and f.D* were observed at day 7 and in f at day 28; significant increases in α were observed at both time-points. Weak correlations between DW-MRI changes and volume changes and DCE-MRI changes were observed. DW-MRI is sensitive to early and late treatment changes caused by a VEGF inhibitor using non-mono-exponential models. Evidence of over-fitting using the bi-exponential model suggests that the stretched-exponential model is best suited to monitor such changes. (orig.)

  20. Medical image of the week: chemotherapy-induced diffuse alveolar hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan S

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 65-year-old man presented with relapse of his acute myeloid leukemia (AML. On admission he was seen to have a reduced ejection fraction at 40-50%. His chest X-ray showing pulmonary edema and bilateral pleural effusions (Figure 1A. He was diuresed to his dry weight to improve his clinical status. The decision was made to re-induce him for his AML with fludarabine and cytarabine without idarubicin (due to his reduced ejection fraction. After 2 doses of each the fludarabine and cytarabine the patient showed worsening respiratory distress, had increasing oxygen requirements and started having hemoptysis. Repeat imaging of his chest showed bilateral infiltrates in his lungs on both chest x-ray (Figure 1B and chest CT (Figure 2. Infectious causes for the changes were sought and ruled out. He was transferred to the ICU where he was put on high flow oxygen and received methylprednisolone 1000 mg IV daily for 3 days. …

  1. Far-from-equilibrium sheared colloidal liquids: Disentangling relaxation, advection, and shear-induced diffusion

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Neil Y. C.

    2013-12-01

    Using high-speed confocal microscopy, we measure the particle positions in a colloidal suspension under large-amplitude oscillatory shear. Using the particle positions, we quantify the in situ anisotropy of the pair-correlation function, a measure of the Brownian stress. From these data we find two distinct types of responses as the system crosses over from equilibrium to far-from-equilibrium states. The first is a nonlinear amplitude saturation that arises from shear-induced advection, while the second is a linear frequency saturation due to competition between suspension relaxation and shear rate. In spite of their different underlying mechanisms, we show that all the data can be scaled onto a master curve that spans the equilibrium and far-from-equilibrium regimes, linking small-amplitude oscillatory to continuous shear. This observation illustrates a colloidal analog of the Cox-Merz rule and its microscopic underpinning. Brownian dynamics simulations show that interparticle interactions are sufficient for generating both experimentally observed saturations. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  2. Lateral migration and diffusion of a mechanical engineer through emulsion of drops induced by Andy's influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Kausik

    2014-11-01

    My initiation to analytical sides of Stokes flow was thorough cyclostyled notes of Andy's Stanford fluid mechanics notes distributed by Ashok Sangani when he taught a course at Hopkins. Since then, reversibility of Stokes flow and singularity solution remained with me during my research carrier. I will discuss how it and Frankel and Acrivos (1970) paper in JFM influenced my research in drop deformation and emulsion rheology at finite inertia, winning the 2009 Acrivos award by my first PhD student Xiaoyi Li. Finally, I will discuss migration of suspended particles, drops, polymers and biological cells caused by breaking of Stokes reversibility due to deformation and viscoelasticity. Here, we show that the migration is induced by the image stresslet field, as was also indicated by Dave Leighton's thesis and a paper with Smart [1991, Phys. Fluid A, 3, 21]. We relate the stresslet field to the Interface tensor, and investigate the effects of drop inclination. In contrast to a plausible notion asserted also in the literature, that reduced inclination (increased alignment with flow) decreases migration, it is shown here that reduced inclination increases the stresslet and thereby the migration velocity.

  3. Data-driven analysis for the temperature and momentum dependence of the heavy-quark diffusion coefficient in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingru; Bernhard, Jonah E.; Bass, Steffen A.; Nahrgang, Marlene; Cao, Shanshan

    2018-01-01

    By applying a Bayesian model-to-data analysis, we estimate the temperature and momentum dependence of the heavy quark diffusion coefficient in an improved Langevin framework. The posterior range of the diffusion coefficient is obtained by performing a Markov chain Monte Carlo random walk and calibrating on the experimental data of D -meson RAA and v2 in three different collision systems at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collidaer (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC): Au-Au collisions at 200 GeV and Pb-Pb collisions at 2.76 and 5.02 TeV. The spatial diffusion coefficient is found to be consistent with lattice QCD calculations and comparable with other models' estimation. We demonstrate the capability of our improved Langevin model to simultaneously describe the RAA and v2 at both RHIC and the LHC energies, as well as the higher order flow coefficient such as D meson v3. We show that by applying a Bayesian analysis, we are able to quantitatively and systematically study the heavy flavor dynamics in heavy-ion collisions.

  4. Fluctuations in Brain Temperature Induced by Lypopolysaccharides: Central and Peripheral Contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy S. Tang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we examined changes in central (anterior-preoptic hypothalamus and peripheral (temporal muscle and facial skin temperatures in freely moving rats following intravenous administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS at low doses (1 and 10 μg/kg at thermoneutral conditions (28˚C. Recordings were made with high temporal resolution (5-s bin and the effects of LPS were compared with those induced by a tail-pinch, a standard arousing somato-sensory stimulus. At each dose, LPS moderately elevated brain, muscle and skin temperatures. In contrast to rapid, monophasic and relatively short hyperthermic responses induced by a tail-pinch, LPS-induced increases in brain and muscle temperatures occurred with ~40 min onset latencies, showed three not clearly defined phases, were slightly larger with the 10 μm/kg dose and maintained for the entire 4-hour post-injection recording duration. Based on dynamics of brain-muscle and skin-muscle temperature differentials, it appears that the hyperthermic response induced by LPS at the lowest dose originates from enhanced peripheral heat production, with no evidence of brain metabolic activation and skin vasoconstriction. While peripheral heat production also appears to determine the first phase of brain and body temperature elevation with LPS at 10 μg/kg, a further prolonged increase in brain-muscle differentials (onset at ~100 min suggests metabolic brain activation as a factor contributing to brain and body hyperthermia. At this dose, skin temperature increase was weaker than in temporal muscle, suggesting vasoconstriction as another contributor to brain/ body hyperthermia. Therefore, although both LPS at low doses and salient sensory stimuli moderately increase brain and body temperatures, these hyperthermic responses have important qualitative differences, reflecting unique underlying mechanisms.

  5. Fluctuations in brain temperature induced by lipopolysaccharides: central and peripheral contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jeremy S; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined changes in central (anterior-preoptic hypothalamus) and peripheral (temporal muscle and facial skin) temperatures in freely moving rats following intravenous administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) at low doses (1 and 10 μg/kg) at thermoneutral conditions (28°C). Recordings were made with high temporal resolution (5-s bin) and the effects of LPS were compared with those induced by a tail-pinch, a standard arousing somato-sensory stimulus. At each dose, LPS moderately elevated brain, muscle, and skin temperatures. In contrast to rapid, monophasic and relatively short hyperthermic responses induced by a tail-pinch, LPS-induced increases in brain and muscle temperatures occurred with ~40 min onset latencies, showed three not clearly defined phases, were slightly larger with the 10 μm/kg dose, and maintained for the entire 4-hour post-injection recording duration. Based on dynamics of brain-muscle and skin-muscle temperature differentials, it appears that the hyperthermic response induced by LPS at the lowest dose originates from enhanced peripheral heat production, with no evidence of brain metabolic activation and skin vasoconstriction. While peripheral heat production also appears to determine the first phase of brain and body temperature elevation with LPS at 10 μg/kg, a further prolonged increase in brain-muscle differentials (onset at ~100 min) suggests metabolic brain activation as a factor contributing to brain and body hyperthermia. At this dose, skin temperature increase was weaker than in temporal muscle, suggesting vasoconstriction as another contributor to brain/body hyperthermia. Therefore, although both LPS at low doses and salient sensory stimuli moderately increase brain and body temperatures, these hyperthermic responses have important qualitative differences, reflecting unique underlying mechanisms.

  6. Influence of temperature on spontaneous and radiation-induced somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nauman, C.H.; Schairer, L.A.; Sparrow, A.H.

    1978-01-01

    Three diploid clones of Tradescantia which are heterozygous or hemizygous for flower color, and which exhibit a 35-fold range in spontaneous mutation frequency, have been compared in their response to increased temperatures. The endpoint studied is the expression of pink and colorless mutations, which arise in stamen hair cells spontaneously and following exposure to ionizing radiation and chemical mutagens. Increased temperature (26.5 or 28 0 vs. 16 or 19 0 ) significantly increased the spontaneous pink mutation frequency in stamen hair cells of all three clones. Colorless mutations in clone 0106 were not increased significantly at the higher temperature. The influence of increased temperature on radiation-induced pink mutation frequency was examined in clone 02. Temperatures in the range of 16-28 0 did not influence the magnitude of mutation response after exposure to 100 rad of X-rays; however, the timing of the mutation response was altered both in time of onset and duration. (Auth.)

  7. Heat flux estimate of warm water flow in a low-temperature diffuse flow site, southern East Pacific Rise 17°25‧ S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Shusaku; Kinoshita, Masataka; Mitsuzawa, Kyohiko

    2003-09-01

    A low-temperature diffuse flow site associated with abundant vent fauna was found by submersible observations on the southern East Pacific Rise at 17°25‧ S in 1997. This site was characterized by thin sediment covered pillow and sheet lavas with collapsed pits up to ˜15 m in diameter. There were three warm water vents (temperature: 6.5 to 10.5 °C) within the site above which the vented fluids rise as plumes. To estimate heat flux of the warm water vents, a temperature logger array was deployed and the vertical temperature distribution in the water column up to 38 m above the seafloor was monitored. A stationary deep seafloor observatory system was also deployed to monitor hydrothermal activity in this site. The temperature logger array measured temperature anomalies, while the plumes from the vents passed through the array. Because the temperature anomalies were measured in only specific current directions, we identified one of the vents as the source. Heat flux from the vent was estimated by applying a plume model in crossflow in a density-stratified environment. The average heat flux from September 13 to October 18, 1997 was 39 MW. This heat flux is as same order as those of high-temperature black smokers, indicating that a large volume flux was discharged from the vent (1.9 m3/s). Previous observations found many similar warm water flow vents along the spreading axis between 17°20‧ S 30‧ S. The total heat flux was estimated to be at least a few hundred mega-watts. This venting style would contribute to form effluent hydrothermal plumes extended above the spreading axis.

  8. Thermal Discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Outfalls: Impacts on Stream Temperatures and Fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, W.K.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances

  9. Thermal discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant outfalls: Impacts on stream temperatures and fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, W.K.; Ryon, M.G.; Hinzman, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7 C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances

  10. Thermal Discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Outfalls: Impacts on Stream Temperatures and Fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, W.K.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances.

  11. Thermal discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant outfalls: Impacts on stream temperatures and fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, W.K.; Ryon, M.G.; Hinzman, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computer Science and Mathematics Div.

    1996-03-01

    The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7 C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances.

  12. Effects of non-equilibrium angle fluctuation on F1-ATPase kinetics induced by temperature increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamiya, Yuji; Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki; Li, Chun-Biu; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2018-01-17

    F 1 -ATPase (F 1 ) is an efficient rotary protein motor, whose reactivity is modulated by the rotary angle to utilize thermal fluctuation. In order to elucidate how its kinetics are affected by the change in the fluctuation, we have extended the reaction-diffusion formalism [R. Watanabe et al., Biophys. J., 2013, 105, 2385] applicable to a wider range of temperatures based on experimental data analysis of F 1 derived from thermophilic Bacillus under high ATP concentration conditions. Our simulation shows that the rotary angle distribution manifests a stronger non-equilibrium feature as the temperature increases, because ATP hydrolysis and P i release are more accelerated compared with the timescale of rotary angle relaxation. This effect causes the rate coefficient obtained from dwell time fitting to deviate from the Arrhenius relation in P i release, which has been assumed in the previous activation thermodynamic quantities estimation using linear Arrhenius fitting. Larger negative correlation is also found between hydrolysis and P i release waiting time in a catalytic dwell with the increase in temperature. This loss of independence between the two successive reactions at the catalytic dwell sheds doubt on the conventional dwell time fitting to obtain rate coefficients with a double exponential function at temperatures higher than 65 °C, which is close to the physiological temperature of the thermophilic Bacillus.

  13. In vitro evaluation of temperature changes in the root canal induced by ultrasonic scalers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, U.; Koster, T.J.G.; Feilzer, A.J.; Timmerman, M.F.; van der Weijden, G.A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate in vitro the thermal effects induced by four different ultrasonic scalers on the temperature in the root canal during ultrasonic scaling. Methods An extracted lower central incisor provided with a thermocouple in the root canal and a tube, entering the tooth incisally and

  14. Radiation-induced conductivity and high-temperature Q changes in quartz resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    While high temperature electrolysis has proven beneficial as a technique to remove interstitial impurities from quartz, reliable indices to measure the efficacy of such a processing step are still under development. The present work is directed toward providing such an index. Two techniques have been investigated - one involves measurement of the radiation induced conductivity in quartz along the optic axis, and the second involves measurement of high temperature Q changes. Both effects originate when impurity charge compensators are released from their traps, in the first case resulting in ionic conduction and in the second case resulting in increased acoustic losses. Radiation induced conductivity measurements have been carried out with a 200 kV, 14 mA x-ray machine producing 5 rads/s. With electric fields of the order of 10 4 V/cm, the noise level in the current measuring system is equivalent to an ionic current generated by quartz impurities in the 1 ppB range. The accuracy of the high temperature ( 300 to 800 0 K) Q -1 measurement technique will be determined. A number of resonators constructed of quartz material of different impurity contents have been tested and both the radiation induced conductivity and the high temperature Q -1 results compared with earlier radiation induced frequency and resonator resistance changes. 10 figures

  15. Radio frequency-induced temperature elevations in the human head considering small anatomical structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, G.; Ueberbacher, R.; Samaras, T.

    2007-01-01

    In order to enable a detailed numerical radio frequency (RF) dosimetry and the computations of RF-induced temperature elevations, high-resolution (0.1 mm) numerical models of the human eye, the inner ear organs and the pineal gland were developed and inserted into a commercially available head model. As radiation sources, generic models of handsets at 400, 900 and 1850 MHz operating in close proximity to the head were considered. The results, obtained by finite-difference time domain-based computations, showed a highly heterogeneous specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution and SAR-peaks inside the inner ear structures; however, the corresponding RF-induced temperature elevations were well below 0.1 deg. C, when considering typical output power values of hand-held devices. In case of frontal exposure, with the radiation sources ∼2.5 cm in front of the closed eye, maximum temperature elevations in the eye in the range of ∼0.2-0.6 deg. C were found for typical device output powers. A reduction in tissue perfusion mainly affected the maximum RF-induced temperature elevation of tissues deep inside the head. Similarly, worst-case considerations regarding pulsed irradiation affected temperature elevations in deep tissue significantly more than in superficial tissues. (authors)

  16. Diffusion tensor and volumetric magnetic resonance imaging using an MR-compatible hand-induced robotic device suggests training-induced neuroplasticity in patients with chronic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    LAZARIDOU, ASIMINA; ASTRAKAS, LOUKAS; MINTZOPOULOS, DIONYSSIOS; KHANICHEH, AZADEH; SINGHAL, ANEESH B.; MOSKOWITZ, MICHAEL A.; ROSEN, BRUCE; TZIKA, ARIA A.

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of mortality and a frequent cause of long-term adult impairment. Improved strategies to enhance motor function in individuals with chronic disability from stroke are thus required. Post-stroke therapy may improve rehabilitation and reduce long-term disability; however, objective methods for evaluating the specific impact of rehabilitation are rare. Brain imaging studies on patients with chronic stroke have shown evidence for reorganization of areas showing functional plasticity after a stroke. In this study, we hypothesized that brain mapping using a novel magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible hand device in conjunction with state-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can serve as a novel biomarker for brain plasticity induced by rehabilitative motor training in patients with chronic stroke. This hypothesis is based on the premises that robotic devices, by stimulating brain plasticity, can assist in restoring movement compromised by stroke-induced pathological changes in the brain and that these changes can then be monitored by advanced MRI. We serially examined 15 healthy controls and 4 patients with chronic stroke. We employed a combination of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and volumetric MRI using a 3-tesla (3T) MRI system using a 12-channel Siemens Tim coil and a novel MR-compatible hand-induced robotic device. DTI data revealed that the number of fibers and the average tract length significantly increased after 8 weeks of hand training by 110% and 64%, respectively (pneuroplasticity. Our study is an example of personalized medicine using advanced neuroimaging methods in conjunction with robotics in the molecular medicine era. PMID:23982596

  17. Si diffusion in compositional disordering of Si-implanted GaAs/AlGaAs superlattices induced by rapid thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Masashi; Yanagawa, Fumihiko

    1988-01-01

    The Si diffusion in Si-implanted GaAs/Al 0.5 Ga 0.5 As superlattices intermixed in the disrodering process induced by rapid thermal annealing (RTA), is investigated by means of secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The SIMS profiles indicate that no fast Si diffusion occurs during the disordering, and the disordering occurs when the Si concentration exceeds 1 x 10 19 cm -3 , which is about three times larger than the threshold value for the disordering by furnace annealing (FA). The number of Si atoms which are allowed to pass through the heterointerface is considered to be essential for disordering. (author)

  18. Ultrasound- and Temperature-Induced Gelation of Gluconosemicarbazide Gelator in DMSO and Water Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mothukunta Himabindu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We have developed amphiphilic supramolecular gelators carrying glucose moiety that could gel a mixture of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO and water upon heating as well as ultrasound treatment. When the suspension of gluconosemicarbazide was subjected to ultrasound treatment, gelation took place at much lower concentrations compared to thermal treatment, and the gels transformed into a solution state at higher temperatures compared to temperature-induced gels. The morphology was found to be influenced by the nature of the stimulus and presence of salts such as KCl, NaCl, CaCl2 and surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate at a concentration of 0.05 M. The gel exhibited impressive tolerance to these additives, revealing the stability and strength of the gels. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR revealed the presence of the intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions while differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and rheological studies supported better mechanical strength of ultrasound-induced (UI gels over thermally-induced (TI gels.

  19. Plasma membrane temperature gradients and multiple cell permeabilization induced by low peak power density femtosecond lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen L. Garner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Calculations indicate that selectively heating the extracellular media induces membrane temperature gradients that combine with electric fields and a temperature-induced reduction in the electropermeabilization threshold to potentially facilitate exogenous molecular delivery. Experiments by a wide-field, pulsed femtosecond laser with peak power density far below typical single cell optical delivery systems confirmed this hypothesis. Operating this laser in continuous wave mode at the same average power permeabilized many fewer cells, suggesting that bulk heating alone is insufficient and temperature gradients are crucial for permeabilization. This work suggests promising opportunities for a high throughput, low cost, contactless method for laser mediated exogenous molecule delivery without the complex optics of typical single cell optoinjection, for potential integration into microscope imaging and microfluidic systems.

  20. The heat shock protein 90 inhibitor IPI-504 induces apoptosis of AKT-dependent diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Jeremy S; Chen, Wen; Juszczynski, Przemyslaw; Takahashi, Hidenobu; Neuberg, Donna; Kutok, Jeffery L; Takeyama, Kunihiko; Shipp, Margaret A

    2009-02-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone that stabilizes critical client proteins in multiple cancers. Gene expression profiling was utilized to characterize HSP90 isoform expression in primary human diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs). HSP90 alpha and beta isoforms were differentially expressed in subsets of tumours defined by their transcriptional profiles. Thereafter, we assessed the activity of the HSP90 inhibitor, IPI-504, in an extensive panel of DLBCL cell lines. IPI-504, which interacts with the conserved ATP-binding site in both HSP90 isoforms, inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in the majority of DLBCL cell lines at low micromolar concentrations. IPI-504-sensitive cell lines expressed high levels of the HSP90 client protein, pAKT, and exhibited dose-dependent decreases in pAKT levels following IPI-504 treatment and significantly reduced proliferation following AKT RNAi. Furthermore, the combination of low-dose (IPI-504 and the AKT/Pi3K pathway inhibitor, LY24009, was synergistic in IPI-504-sensitive DLBCL cell lines. Low-dose IPI-504 was also synergistic with the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin. The HSP90 inhibitor IPI-504 warrants further investigation in DLBCL alone and in combination with identified client protein inhibitors and active chemotherapeutic agents.

  1. Correlations for damage in diffused-junction InP solar cells induced by electron and proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Takamoto, T.; Taylor, S.J.; Walters, R.J.; Summers, G.P.; Flood, D.J.; Ohmori, M.

    1997-01-01

    The damage to diffused-junction n + -p InP solar cells induced by electron and proton irradiations over a wide range of energy from 0.5 to 3 MeV and 0.015 to 20 MeV, respectively, has been examined. The experimental electron and proton damage coefficients have been analyzed in terms of displacement damage dose, which is the product of the particle fluence and the calculated nonionizing energy loss [G. P. Summers, E. A. Burke, R. Shapiro, S. R. Messenger, and R. J. Walters, IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 40, 1300 (1993).] Degradation of InP cells due to irradiation with electrons and protons with energies of more than 0.5 MeV show a single curve as a function of displacement damage dose. Based on the deep-level transient spectroscopy analysis, damage equivalence between electron and proton irradiation is discussed. InP solar cells are confirmed to be substantially more radiation resistant than Si and GaAs-on-Ge cells. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  2. Monitoring closed head injury induced changes in brain physiology with orthogonal diffuse near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abookasis, David; Shochat, Ariel; Mathews, Marlon S.

    2014-03-01

    We applied an orthogonal diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (o-DRS) to assess brain physiology following closed head injury (CHI). CHI was induced in anesthetized male mice by weight-drop device using ~50gram cylindrical metal falling from a height of 90 cm onto the intact scalp. A total of twenty-six mice were used in the experiments divided randomly into three groups as follows: Group 1 (n=11) consisted of injured mice monitored for 1 hour every 10 minutes. Group 2 (n=10) were the control mice not experience CHI. Group 3 (n=5) consisted of injured mice monitored every minute up to 20 minutes. Measurement of optical quantities of brain tissue (absorption and reduced scattering coefficients) in the near-infrared window from 650 to 1000 nm were carried out by employing different source-detector distances and locations to provide depth sensitivity. With respect to baseline, we found difference in brain hemodynamic properties following injury. In addition, o-DRS successfully evaluate the structural variations likely from evolving cerebral edema throughout exploring the scattering spectral shape.

  3. Esterification of jatropha oil via ultrasonic irradiation with auto-induced temperature-rise effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade-Tacca, Cesar Augusto; Chang, Chia-Chi; Chen, Yi-Hung; Manh, Do-Van; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Ji, Dar-Ren; Tseng, Jyi-Yeong; Shie, Je-Lueng

    2014-01-01

    Auto-induced temperature-rise effects of ultrasonic irradiation (UI) on the esterification performance of jatropha oil (JO) were studied. Comparisons with other methods of mechanical mixing (MM) and hand shaking mixing were made. Major system parameters examined include: esterification time (t E ), settling time (t S ) after esterification and temperature. Properties of acid value (AV), iodine value (IV), kinematic viscosity (KV) and density of JO and ester product were measured. The esterification conversion efficiencies (η) were determined and assessed. Sulfuric acid was used to catalyze the esterification using methyl alcohol. For esterification without temperature control, η at t E  = 10 and 30 min for UI of 56.73 and 83.23% are much higher than those for MM of 36.76 and 42.48%, respectively. At t E  = 10 min, the jatropha oil esters produced via UI and MM respectively possess AV of 15.82 and 23.12 mg KOH/g, IV of 111.49 and 113.22 g I 2 /100 g, KV of 22.41 and 22.51 mm 2 /s and density of 913.8 and 913.58 kg/m 3 , showing that UI is much better than MM in enhancing the reduction of AV. The t E exhibits more vigorous effect on AV for UI than MM. The UI offers auto-induced temperature-rise, improving the mixing and esterification extents. - Highlights: • Esterification of jatropha oil is pronounced under ultrasonic irradiation (UI). • UI can auto-induce temperature rise. • The induced temperature rise assists the mixing of UI in enhancing esterification. • UI offers better esterification than mechanical mixing with external heating. • An 83.23% reduction of FFA in jatropha-ester is achievable via UI in 30 min

  4. Internal stress-induced melting below melting temperature at high-rate laser heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Yong Seok, E-mail: yshwang@iastate.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Levitas, Valery I., E-mail: vlevitas@iastate.edu [Departments of Aerospace Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Material Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2014-06-30

    In this Letter, continuum thermodynamic and phase field approaches (PFAs) predicted internal stress-induced reduction in melting temperature for laser-irradiated heating of a nanolayer. Internal stresses appear due to thermal strain under constrained conditions and completely relax during melting, producing an additional thermodynamic driving force for melting. Thermodynamic melting temperature for Al reduces from 933.67 K for a stress-free condition down to 898.1 K for uniaxial strain and to 920.8 K for plane strain. Our PFA simulations demonstrated barrierless surface-induced melt nucleation below these temperatures and propagation of two solid-melt interfaces toward each other at the temperatures very close to the corresponding predicted thermodynamic equilibrium temperatures for the heating rate Q≤1.51×10{sup 10}K/s. At higher heating rates, kinetic superheating competes with a reduction in melting temperature and melting under uniaxial strain occurs at 902.1 K for Q = 1.51 × 10{sup 11 }K/s and 936.9 K for Q = 1.46 × 10{sup 12 }K/s.

  5. Protein synthesis during the initial phase of the temperature-induced bleaching response in Euglena gracilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, W.

    1990-01-01

    Growing cultures of photoheterotrophic Euglena gracilis experience an increase in chlorophyll accumulation during the initial phase of the temperature-induced bleaching response suggesting an increase in the synthesis of plastid components at the bleaching temperature of 33 degree C. A primary goal of this work was to establish whether an increase in the synthesis of plastid proteins accompanies the observed increase in chlorophyll accumulation. In vivo pulse-labeling experiments with [ 35 S]sodium sulfate were carried out with cells grown at room temperature or at 33 degree C. The synthesis of a number of plastid polypeptides of nucleocytoplasmic origin, including some presumably novel polypeptides, increased in cultures treated for 15 hours at 33 degree C. In contrast, while synthesis of thylakoid proteins by the plastid protein synthesis machinery decreased modestly, synthesis of the large subunit of the enzyme ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase was strongly affected at the elevated temperature. Synthesis of novel plastid-encoded polypeptides was not induced at the bleaching temperature. It is concluded that protein synthesis in plastids declines during the initial phase of the temperature response in Euglena despite an overall increase in cellular protein synthesis and an increase in chlorophyll accumulation per cell

  6. Profound and rapid reduction in body temperature induced by the melanocortin receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanzhong; Kim, Eun Ran; Fan, Shengjie; Xia, Yan; Xu, Yong; Huang, Cheng; Tong, Qingchun

    2014-08-22

    The melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) plays a major role in body weight regulation and its agonist MTII has been widely used to study the role of MC4Rs in energy expenditure promotion and feeding reduction. Unexpectedly, we observed that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of MTII induced a rapid reduction in both body temperature and energy expenditure, which was independent of its effect on feeding and followed by a prolonged increase in energy expenditure. The rapid reduction was at least partly mediated by brain neurons since intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of alpha melanocyte-stimulating hormone, an endogenous melanocortin receptor agonist, produced a similar response. In addition, the body temperature-lowering effect of MTII was independent of the presence of MC4Rs, but in a similar fashion to the previously shown effect on body temperature by 5'AMP. Moreover, β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) were required for the recovery from low body temperature induced by MTII and further pharmacological studies showed that the MTII's effect on body temperature may be partially mediated by the vasopressin V1a receptors. Collectively, our results reveal a previously unappreciated role for the melanocortin pathway in rapidly lowering body temperature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mitigation of Temperature Induced Single Event Crosstalk Noise by Applying Adaptive Forward Body Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Pankaj

    Soft Errors due to Single Event (SE) Transients is one of the important reliability issues, which is becoming very prominent in advanced technology and in space applications. Increasing coupling effects among interconnects, on the other hand, can cause SE Transients to contaminate electronically unrelated circuit paths, which in turn can increase circuit sensitivity to radiation. Coupling capacitance increases due to reducing distances between interconnect lines making crosstalk noise more important. On the other hand, chips now experience higher temperatures due to environmental factors and high performance of chips. High-performance VLSI circuits consume more power and hence experience higher temperature due to high utilization factor. The increased temperature affects both interconnect resistance and driving strength of interconnect buffers. This work shows that thermal effects increase the amount of crosstalk noise observed on the victim line at nominal supply voltages. With thermally induced crosstalk contribution, total crosstalk noise may exceed the noise margin of the subsequent gate causing a wrong value to be propagated. The crosstalk prevention measures taken such as victim driver sizing may not be sufficient if thermal effects are not properly considered. This work aims to provide a mitigation method for thermally induced crosstalk noise using adaptive forward body bias. At high temperature, drain current reduces, and adaptive body biasing makes the CMOS recover the lost the drain current. A temperature sensor is proposed here to generate a necessary voltage at the CMOS body. A good temperature sensitivity is achieved with the tiny sensors that keep constant driving strength. Interconnect is modeled in using 10-pi modeling and 45nm technology was use for this simulation. Our proposed method mitigates 90% of temperature induced crosstalk contribution.

  8. Influence of the laser-induced temperature rise in photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Wolfgang; Hengst, Joachim; Sroka, Ronald; Unsoeld, Eberhard

    1991-06-01

    The influence of laser-induced temperature increase in transcutaneous PDT was examined in this study. First the subcutaneous temperature and the relative light intensity between tumor and skin were measured as a function of the applied power density in a series of studies. In a second experiment the influence of temperature on the effect of photodynamic therapy was studied. Determination of temperature and of relative light intensity was performed on three groups of mice: one group of C3H mice with macroscopically strong pigmentation, a second group of the same species with weak pigmentation and a third group of extensively unpigmented, homozygote nude mice of the NMRI family were used. For the second series of experiments the SSK2 fibrosarcoma was used as a tumor model on the C3H mouse. The photosensitized tumors from three animal groups, each with 5 animals, were irradiated subcuratively. In Group 1 the tumor surface was cooled in order to prevent laser- induced temperature effects. In Group 2 and 3 no cooling was used. Evaluation of the therapeutic effect was performed in respect to the regrowth delay time. With the use of transcutaneous PDT it could be shown that the temperature and the relative light intensity between tumor and skin depended essentially on the concentration of pigmentation of the skin above the tumor. Dependent on pigmentation and cooling, temperatures of more than 42 degree(s)C were established with irradiation at power densities starting at about 300 mW/cm2. In the second series of experiments a clear prolongation of the regrowth delay time, i.e. a better therapeutic effect, was achieved in uncooled irradiated tumors. Curative therapy was successful only in uncooled irradiated tumors. For this reason the synergistic influence of laser-induced hyperthermia on the therapeutical result of PDT could be shown on the tumor model used.

  9. Effects of temperature-gradient-induced damage of zirconia metering nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Xue, Qun-hu

    2017-09-01

    The effects of temperature-gradient-induced damage of zirconia metering nozzles were investigated through analysis of the phase composition and microstructure of nozzle samples. The analysis was carried out using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy after the samples were subjected to a heat treatment based on the temperatures of the affected, transition, and original layers of zirconia metering nozzles during the continuous casting of steel. The results showed that, after heat treatment at 1540, 1410, or 1300°C for a dwell time of 5 h, the monoclinic zirconia phase was gradually stabilized with increasing heat-treatment temperature. Moreover, a transformation to the cubic zirconia phase occurred, accompanied by grain growth, which illustrates that the temperature gradient in zirconia metering nozzles affects the mineral composition and microstructure of the nozzles and accelerates damage, thereby deteriorating the quality and service life of the nozzles.

  10. Lag time for germination of Penicillium chrysogenum conidia is induced by temperature shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalai, Safaa; Bensoussan, Maurice; Dantigny, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    In the environment, fungal conidia are subject to transient conditions. In particular, temperature is varying according to day/night periods. All predictive models for germination assume that fungal spores can adapt instantaneously to changes of temperature. The only study that supports this assumption (Gougouli and Koutsoumanis, 2012, Modelling germination of fungal spores at constant and fluctuating temperature conditions. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 152: 153-161) was carried out on Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger conidia that, in most cases, already produced germ tubes. In contrast, the present study focuses on temperature shifts applied during the first stages of germination (i.e., before the apparition of the germ tubes). Firstly, germination times were determined in steady state conditions at 10, 15, 20 and 25 °C. Secondly, temperature shifts (e.g., up-shifts and down-shifts) were applied at 1/4, 1/2, and 3/4 of germination times, with 5, 10 and 15 °C magnitudes. Experiments were carried out in triplicate on Penicillium chrysogenum conidia on Potato Dextrose Agar medium according to a full factorial design. Statistical analysis of the results clearly demonstrated that the assumption of instantaneous adaptation of the conidia should be rejected. Temperature shifts during germination led to an induced lag time or an extended germination time as compared to the experiments conducted ay steady state. The induced lag time was maximized when the amplitude of the shift was equal to 10 °C. Interaction between the instant and the direction of the shift was highlighted. A negative lag time was observed for a 15 °C down-shift applied at 1/4 of the germination time. This result suggested that at optimal temperature the rate of germination decreased with time, and that the variation of this rate with time depended on temperature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. KCl-Induced High-Temperature Corrosion Behavior of HVAF-Sprayed Ni-Based Coatings in Ambient Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Reza; Sadeghimeresht, Esmaeil; Farahani, Taghi Shahrabi; Huhtakangas, Matti; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Joshi, Shrikant

    2018-02-01

    KCl-induced high-temperature corrosion behavior of four HVAF-sprayed Ni-based coatings (Ni21Cr, Ni5Al, Ni21Cr7Al1Y and Ni21Cr9Mo) under KCl deposit has been investigated in ambient air at 600 °C up to 168 h. The coatings were deposited onto 16Mo3 steel—a widely used boiler tube material. Uncoated substrate, 304L and Sanicro 25 were used as reference materials in the test environment. SEM/EDS and XRD techniques were utilized to characterize the as-sprayed and exposed samples. The results showed that the small addition of KCl significantly accelerated degradation to the coatings. All coatings provided better corrosion resistance compared to the reference materials. The alumina-forming Ni5Al coating under KCl deposit was capable of forming a more protective oxide scale compared to the chromia-forming coatings as penetration of Cl through diffusion paths was hindered. Both active corrosion and chromate formation mechanisms were found to be responsible for the corrosion damages. The corrosion resistance of the coatings based on the microstructure analysis and kinetics had the following ranking (from the best to worst): Ni5Al > Ni21Cr > Ni21Cr7Al1Y > Ni21Cr9Mo.

  12. Heat priming induces trans-generational tolerance to high temperature stress in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao eWang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wheat plants are very sensitive to high temperature stress during grain filling. Effects of heat priming applied to the first generation on tolerance of the successive generation to post-anthesis high temperature stress were investigated. Compared with the progeny of non-heat primed plants (NH, the progeny of heat-primed plants (PH possessed higher grain yield, leaf photosynthesis and activities of antioxidant enzymes and lower cell membrane damage under high temperature stress. In the transcriptome profile, 1430 probes showed obvious difference in expression between PH and NH. These genes were related to signal transduction, transcription, energy, defense, and protein destination and storage, respectively. The gene encoding the lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1 which was involved in histone demethylation related to epigenetic modification was up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. The proteome analysis indicated that the proteins involved in photosynthesis, energy production and protein destination and storage were up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. In short, thermos-tolerance was induced through heritable epigenetic alternation and signaling transduction, both processes further triggered prompt modifications of defense related responses in anti-oxidation, transcription, energy production, and protein destination and storage in the progeny of the primed plants under high temperature stress. It was concluded that trans-generation thermo-tolerance was induced by heat priming in the first generation, and this might be an effective measure to cope with severe high-temperature stresses during key growth stages in wheat production.

  13. Heat Priming Induces Trans-generational Tolerance to High Temperature Stress in Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Xin, Caiyun; Cai, Jian; Zhou, Qin; Dai, Tingbo; Cao, Weixing; Jiang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Wheat plants are very sensitive to high temperature stress during grain filling. Effects of heat priming applied to the first generation on tolerance of the successive generation to post-anthesis high temperature stress were investigated. Compared with the progeny of non-heat primed plants (NH), the progeny of heat-primed plants (PH) possessed higher grain yield, leaf photosynthesis and activities of antioxidant enzymes and lower cell membrane damage under high temperature stress. In the transcriptome profile, 1430 probes showed obvious difference in expression between PH and NH. These genes were related to signal transduction, transcription, energy, defense, and protein destination and storage, respectively. The gene encoding the lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1) which was involved in histone demethylation related to epigenetic modification was up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. The proteome analysis indicated that the proteins involved in photosynthesis, energy production and protein destination and storage were up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. In short, thermos-tolerance was induced through heritable epigenetic alternation and signaling transduction, both processes further triggered prompt modifications of defense related responses in anti-oxidation, transcription, energy production, and protein destination and storage in the progeny of the primed plants under high temperature stress. It was concluded that trans-generation thermo-tolerance was induced by heat priming in the first generation, and this might be an effective measure to cope with severe high-temperature stresses during key growth stages in wheat production.

  14. A technique for temperature mapping in fluorocarbon plasmas using planar laser-induced fluorescence of CF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffens, Kristen L.; Sobolewski, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of CF A 2 Σ + -X 2 Π(1,0) were used to determine two-dimensional maps of rotational temperature in CF 4 plasmas. Measured rotational temperatures are expected to be in equilibrium with the gas temperature due to the long chemical lifetime of CF relative to the collision rate. Experiments were performed in the capacitively coupled Gaseous Electronics Conference rf reference cell at pressures from 26.7 Pa (200 mTorr) to 107 Pa (800 mTorr) and powers of 10 to 30 W deposited in the plasma. Temperatures, which ranged from 273±15 K to 480±15 K, were fairly axially symmetric and increased with pressure and power. All plasmas were coolest near the electrodes, which provided a substantial sink for heat in the plasma. Highest temperatures were found at a radial position near the edge of the electrodes. The strong temperature gradients observed in the plasmas can have serious effects on density measurements that probe a single rotational level, as well as on reaction rate constants and interpretation of density gradients. The effects of water-cooling the electrodes and the presence of a silicon wafer on temperature were also measured

  15. Defect-induced change of temperature-dependent elastic constants in BCC iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, N.; Setyawan, W.; Zhang, S. H.; Wang, Z. G.

    2017-07-01

    The effects of radiation-induced defects (randomly distributed vacancies, voids, and interstitial dislocation loops) on temperature-dependent elastic constants, C11, C12, and C44 in BCC iron, are studied with molecular dynamics method. The elastic constants are found to decrease with increasing temperatures for all cases containing different defects. The presence of vacancies, voids, or interstitial loops further decreases the elastic constants. For a given number of point defects, the randomly distributed vacancies show the strongest effect compared to voids or interstitial loops. All these results are expected to provide useful information to combine with experimental results for further understanding of radiation damage.

  16. Uniform alumina microspheres from temperature induced forming in a microfluidic T-junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, James; Wehking, Jonathan D.; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2013-11-01

    This Letter explores a method for the manufacture of solid microspheres of 30 μm, from liquid droplets with nanosuspensions of 20 nm alumina in a microfluidic T-junction. These droplets are heated downstream where solidification takes place due to Temperature Induced Forming (TIF). TIF occurs as temperature sensitive alumina solubility leads to weakening electrostatic double-layer dispersing forces resulting in the formation of a solid structure. Manipulation of the flow characteristics and material properties of the continuous and dispersed fluids provides control of droplet production over a range of conditions and allows for a robust manufacturing facility capable of producing particles of various sizes.

  17. Microstructure, optical characterization and light induced degradation in a-Si:H deposited at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minani, E.; Sigcau, Z.; Adgebite, O.; Ramukosi, F.L.; Ntsoane, T.P.; Harindintwari, S.; Knoesen, D.; Comrie, C.M.; Britton, D.T.; Haerting, M.

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure and optical properties of a series of hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers deposited on glass substrates at different temperature have been characterized by means of X-ray diffraction techniques and optical spectroscopy. The radial distribution function of the as-deposited samples showed an increase in the bond angle and a decrease in the radial distance indicating a relaxation of the amorphous network with increasing the deposition temperature. Light induced degradation was studied using a simulated daylight spectrum. The changes in hydrogen bonding configuration, associated with the light soaking at different stages of illumination, was monitored via the transmission bands of the vibrational wag and stretch modes of the IR spectrum

  18. Simple statistical channel model for weak temperature-induced turbulence in underwater wireless optical communication systems

    KAUST Repository

    Oubei, Hassan M.

    2017-06-16

    In this Letter, we use laser beam intensity fluctuation measurements to model and describe the statistical properties of weak temperature-induced turbulence in underwater wireless optical communication (UWOC) channels. UWOC channels with temperature gradients are modeled by the generalized gamma distribution (GGD) with an excellent goodness of fit to the measured data under all channel conditions. Meanwhile, thermally uniform channels are perfectly described by the simple gamma distribution which is a special case of GGD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first model that comprehensively describes both thermally uniform and gradient-based UWOC channels.

  19. Drought, salt, and temperature stress-induced metabolic rearrangements and regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasensky, Julia; Jonak, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Plants regularly face adverse growth conditions, such as drought, salinity, chilling, freezing, and high temperatures. These stresses can delay growth and development, reduce productivity, and, in extreme cases, cause plant death. Plant stress responses are dynamic and involve complex cross-talk between different regulatory levels, including adjustment of metabolism and gene expression for physiological and morphological adaptation. In this review, information about metabolic regulation in response to drought, extreme temperature, and salinity stress is summarized and the signalling events involved in mediating stress-induced metabolic changes are presented. PMID:22291134

  20. Drought, salt, and temperature stress-induced metabolic rearrangements and regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasensky, Julia; Jonak, Claudia

    2012-02-01

    Plants regularly face adverse growth conditions, such as drought, salinity, chilling, freezing, and high temperatures. These stresses can delay growth and development, reduce productivity, and, in extreme cases, cause plant death. Plant stress responses are dynamic and involve complex cross-talk between different regulatory levels, including adjustment of metabolism and gene expression for physiological and morphological adaptation. In this review, information about metabolic regulation in response to drought, extreme temperature, and salinity stress is summarized and the signalling events involved in mediating stress-induced metabolic changes are presented.

  1. A modeling approach for heat conduction and radiation diffusion in plasma-photon mixture in temperature nonequilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-09

    We present a simple approach for determining ion, electron, and radiation temperatures of heterogeneous plasma-photon mixtures, in which temperatures depend on both material type and morphology of the mixture. The solution technique is composed of solving ion, electron, and radiation energy equations for both mixed and pure phases of each material in zones containing random mixture and solving pure material energy equations in subdivided zones using interface reconstruction. Application of interface reconstruction is determined by the material configuration in the surrounding zones. In subdivided zones, subzonal inter-material energy exchanges are calculated by heat fluxes across the material interfaces. Inter-material energy exchange in zones with random mixtures is modeled using the length scale and contact surface area models. In those zones, inter-zonal heat flux in each material is determined using the volume fractions.

  2. An improved oxygen diffusion model to explain the effect of low-temperature baking on high field losses in niobium superconducting cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-07-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) superconducting cavities made of high purity niobium are widely used to accelerate charged particle beams in particle accelerators. The major limitation to achieve RF field values approaching the theoretical limit for niobium is represented by ''anomalous'' losses which degrade the quality factor of the cavities starting at peak surface magnetic fields of about 100 mT, in absence of field emission. These high field losses are often referred to as ''Q-drop''. It has been observed that the Q-drop is drastically reduced by baking the cavities at 120 C for about 48 h under ultrahigh vacuum. An improved oxygen diffusion model for the niobium-oxide system is proposed to explain the benefit of the low-temperature baking on the Q-drop in niobium superconducting rf cavities. The model shows that baking at 120 C for 48 h allows oxygen to diffuse away from the surface, and therefore increasing the lower critical field towards the value for pure niobium.

  3. Double-diffusive natural convection in inclined porous cavities with various aspect ratios and temperature-dependent heat source or sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamkha, Ali J.; Al-Mudhaf, Ali

    2008-04-01

    Laminar double-diffusive natural convective flow of a binary fluid mixture in inclined square and rectangular cavities filled with a uniform porous medium in the presence of temperature-difference dependent heat generation (source) or absorption (sink) is considered. Transverse gradients of heat and mass are applied on two opposing walls of the cavity while the other two walls are kept adiabatic and impermeable to mass transfer. The problem is put in terms of the stream function-vorticity formulation. A numerical solution based on the finite-difference methodology is obtained for relatively high Lewis numbers. Representative results illustrating the effects of the inclination angle of the cavity, buoyancy ratio, Darcy number, heat generation or absorption coefficient and the cavity aspect ratio on the contour maps of the streamline, temperature, and concentration as well as the profiles of velocity, temperature and concentration at mid-section of the cavity are reported. In addition, numerical results for the average Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are presented for various parametric conditions and discussed.

  4. Electron-induced dry reforming of methane in a temperature-controlled dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xuming

    2013-09-23

    Dry reforming of methane has the potential to reduce the greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide and to generate hydrogen-rich syngas. In reforming methane, plasma-assisted reforming processes may have advantages over catalytic processes because they are free from coking and their response time for mobile applications is quick. Although plasma-assisted reforming techniques have seen recent developments, systematic studies that clarify the roles that electron-induced chemistry and thermo-chemistry play are needed for a full understanding of the mechanisms of plasma-assisted reformation. Here, we developed a temperature-controlled coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) apparatus to investigate the relative importance of electron-induced chemistry and thermo-chemistry in dry reforming of methane. In the tested background temperature range 297-773 K, electron-induced chemistry, as characterized by the physical properties of micro-discharges, was found to govern the conversions of CH4 and CO2, while thermo-chemistry influenced the product selectivities because they were found to depend on the background temperature. Comparisons with results from arc-jet reformation indicated that thermo-chemistry is an efficient conversion method. Our findings may improve designs of plasma-assisted reformers by using relatively hotter plasma sources. However, detailed chemical kinetic studies are needed. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  5. [Emission spectrum temperature sensitivity of Mg4FGeO6 : mn induced by laser].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Liu, Jing-Ru; Shao, Jun; Hu, Zhi-Yun; Tao, Bo; Huang, Mei-Sheng

    2013-08-01

    In order to develop a new sort of thermally sensitive phosphor coating, the emission spectrum thermally sensitivity of Mg4FGeO6 : Mn induced by laser was studied. The spectrum measurement system with heating function was set up, and the emission spectrum of Mg4FGeO6 : Mn at various temperatures were measured. Absorption spectrum was measured, and the mechanism of formation of the structure of double peak was analyzed with the perturbation theory of crystal lattice. The group of peaks around 630 nm is represented by the transitions 4F"2 to 4A2, whereas the group of peaks around 660 nm is due to the transitions 4F'2 to 4A2. The occupancy of both excited states 4F'2 and 4F"2 is in thermal equilibrium. Thus increasing temperature causes the intensity of the emission in the group around 630 nm to increase at the expense of the emission intensity of the group around 660 nm. The various spectral regions in emission differ with temperature, which could be used to support the intensity-ratio measurement method. The intensity-ratio change curve as a function of temperature was fitted, which shows that the range of temperature measurement is between room temperature and 800 K.

  6. Martensitic transition near room temperature and the temperature- and magnetic-field-induced multifunctional properties of Ni49CuMn34In16 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V. K.; Chattopadhyay, M. K.; Khandelwal, A.; Roy, S. B.

    2010-11-01

    A near room-temperature martensitic transition is observed in the ferromagnetic austenite state of Ni50Mn34In16 alloy with 2% Cu substitution at the Ni site. Application of magnetic field in the martensite state induces a reverse martensitic transition in this alloy. dc magnetization, magnetoresistance and strain measurements in this alloy reveal that associated with this martensitic transition there exist a large magnetocaloric effect, a large magnetoresitance and a magnetic-field temperature-induced strain. This NiMnIn alloy system thus is an example of an emerging class of magnetic materials whose physical properties can be tuned by suitable chemical substitutions, to achieve magnetic-field and temperature-induced multifunctional properties at and around room temperature

  7. Experimental and numerical study of temperature fields and flows in flame during the diffusion combustion of certain liquid fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loboda, E. L.; Matvienko, O. V.; Agafontsev, M. V.; Reyno, V. V.

    2017-11-01

    The paper represents experimental studying the pulsations of temperature fields and the structure of a flow in the flame formed during the combustion of certain fuels. Also, the paper provides the mathematical modeling of a flow in the flame formed during the combustion of diesel fuels, as well as the comparison with experimental data and the estimation of the scale for turbulent vortices in flame. The experimental results are in satisfactory agreement with numerical modeling, which confirms the hypothesis of similarity for the pulsations of hydrodynamic and thermodynamic parameters.

  8. Thermophilic anaerobes in arctic marine sediments induced to mineralize complex organic matter at high temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, Casey; Arnosti, Carol; Brüchert, Volker

    2010-01-01

    temperature-induced food chain mirrors sediment microbial processes occurring at cold in situ temperatures (near 0°C), yet it is catalysed by a completely different set of microorganisms. Using sulfate reduction rates (SRR) as a proxy for organic matter mineralization showed that differences in organic matter......Marine sediments harbour diverse populations of dormant thermophilic bacterial spores that become active in sediment incubation experiments at much higher than in situ temperature. This response was investigated in the presence of natural complex organic matter in sediments of two Arctic fjords...... enzymatic capacities for organic polymer degradation could allow specific heterotrophic populations like these to play a role in sustaining microbial metabolism in the deep, warm, marine biosphere....

  9. Low temperature annealing of electron irradiation induced defects in 4H-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaldini, Antonio; Cavallini, Anna; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Nava, Filippo

    2004-01-01

    Low temperature annealing of electron irradiation-induced deep levels in 4H-SiC is reported. The major deep level transient spectroscopy peak S2 associated with the energy level at E c -0.39 eV disappears in the temperature range 360-400 K, and some rearrangement of the peak S3, associated with the defect Z 1 /Z 2 with energy level at E c -0.5/E c -0.65 eV occurs in the temperature interval 400-470 K. A net free charge carrier concentration increase goes along with the disappearance of peak S2 at E c -0.39 eV, whereas the charge collection efficiency of the diode does not experience any significant change. An interpretation of the annealing of peak S2 on a microscopic scale is given

  10. Attribution of surface temperature anomalies induced by land use and land cover changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigden, Angela J.; Li, Dan

    2017-07-01

    Land use/land cover changes (LULCC) directly impact the surface temperature by modifying the radiative, physiological, and aerodynamic properties controlling the surface energy and water balances. In this study, we propose a new method to attribute changes in the surface temperature induced by LULCC to changes in radiative and turbulent heat fluxes, with the partition of turbulent fluxes controlled by aerodynamic and surface resistances. We demonstrate that previous attribution studies have overestimated the contribution of aerodynamic resistance by assuming independence between the aerodynamic resistance and the Bowen ratio. Our results further demonstrate that acceptable agreement between modeled and observed temperature anomalies does not guarantee correct attribution by the model. When performing an attribution analysis, the covariance among attributing variables needs to be taken into consideration in order to accurately interpret the results.

  11. Fiber-optic temperature sensor using a liquid crystal film for laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bong-Soo; Tack, Gye-Rae; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Yi, Jeong-Han [Konkuk University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sin [Cheju National University, Cheju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyo-Sung [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    In this paper, we describe the feasibility of developing a new fiber-optic temperature sensor using a thermo-sensitive liquid crystal (LC) film for laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT). The temperature change in the tissue or the tumor causes the color of the LC film in contacted with the tissue to change, and that change alters the reflectivity of the LC film. The light with a selected wavelength that is transmitted to the LC film and the optical power of the reflected light are measured using transmitting and receiving optical fibers, respectively. Also, the relationship between the temperature and the optical power of reflected light is determined using the characteristics of the LC films.

  12. Electric field and temperature in a target induced by a plasma jet imaged using Mueller polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slikboer, Elmar; Sobota, Ana; Guaitella, Olivier; Garcia-Caurel, Enric

    2018-01-01

    Mueller polarimetry is used to investigate the behavior of an electro optic target (BSO crystal) under exposure of guided ionization waves produced by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet. For the first time, this optical technique is time resolved to obtain the complete Mueller matrix of the sample right before and after the impact of the discharges. By analyzing the induced birefringence, the spatial profiles and local values are obtained of both the electric field and temperature in the sample. Electric fields are generated due to deposited surface charges and a temperature profile is present, due to the heat transferred by the plasma jet. The study of electric field dynamics and local temperature increase at the target, due to the plasma jet is important for biomedical applications, as well as surface functionalization. This work shows how Mueller polarimetry can be used as a novel diagnostic to simultaneously acquire the spatial distribution and local values of both the electric field and temperature, by coupling the external source of anisotropy to the measured induced birefringence via the symmetry point group of the examined material.

  13. Oxygen diffusion in monazite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Nakamura, M.; Watson, E. B.

    2004-09-01

    We report measurements of oxygen diffusion in natural monazites under both dry, 1-atm conditions and hydrothermal conditions. For dry experiments, 18O-enriched CePO4 powder and monazite crystals were sealed in Ag-Pd capsules with a solid buffer (to buffer at NNO) and annealed in 1-atm furnaces. Hydrothermal runs were conducted in cold-seal pressure vessels, where monazite grains were encapsulated with 18O-enriched water. Following the diffusion anneals, oxygen concentration profiles were measured with Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) using the reaction 18O(p,α)15N. Over the temperature range 850-1100 °C, the Arrhenius relation determined for dry diffusion experiments on monazite is given by: Under wet conditions at 100 MPa water pressure, over the temperature range 700-880 °C, oxygen diffusion can be described by the Arrhenius relationship: Oxygen diffusion under hydrothermal conditions has a significantly lower activation energy for diffusion than under dry conditions, as has been found the case for many other minerals, both silicate and nonsilicate. Given these differences in activation energies, the differences between dry and wet diffusion rates increase with lower temperatures; for example, at 600 °C, dry diffusion will be more than 4 orders of magnitude slower than diffusion under hydrothermal conditions. These disparate diffusivities will result in pronounced differences in the degree of retentivity of oxygen isotope signatures. For instance, under dry conditions (presumably rare in the crust) and high lower-crustal temperatures (∼800 °C), monazite cores of 70-μm radii will preserve O isotope ratios for about 500,000 years; by comparison, they would be retained at this temperature under wet conditions for about 15,000 years.

  14. Inducing triploids and tetraploids with high temperatures in Populus sect. Tacamahaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liqin; Xu, Wenting; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Jinfeng; Wei, Zunzheng

    2017-02-01

    This study is the first to report that triploids and tetraploids have been successfully produced through embryo sac and zygotic embryo chromosome doubling with high temperatures in P. simonii Carr. and its hybrid. A new synthetic polyploid induced by hybridization with unreduced gametes and heterozygotic embryo chromosome doubling can effectively combine polyploidy and heterosis, which can provide two major breeding advantages. In Populus, successfully creating and cultivating new polyploid varieties have economic and ecological production value. This was the first successful study in which embryo sac and zygotic embryo chromosome doubling was induced using high temperatures to produce triploids and tetraploids in Populus simonii Carr. and its hybrid, P. simonii × P. nigra var. Italica, of Populus sect. Tacamahaca. The relationship between flower bud morphological characteristics (time after pollination) and female meiotic stage (embryo sac and zygotic embryo development) was established to guide the induction treatment period. In the resulting progeny, 37 triploids and 12 tetraploids were obtained and identified using flow cytometry. The optimal temperatures for embryo sac and zygotic embryo chromosome doubling were 38 and 41 °C, respectively. Cytogenetic analysis revealed that 66-72 h after pollination (HAP), a period characterized by a high proportion of one-nucleate and two-nucleate embryo sacs, was the optimal period for embryo sac chromosome doubling. For zygotic embryo chromosome doubling, 168 HAP was the optimal induction period, as there was a high proportion of two-cell and four-cell proembryos. The results indicate that inducing embryo sac and zygotic embryo chromosome doubling is an ideal method for producing polyploids. The methods for inducing polyploids and for evaluating ploidy and offspring with different ploidies and heterozygosity in this study will be useful for genetic research and Populus breeding programmes.

  15. Identification of the Temperature Induced Larvicidal Efficacy of Agave angustifolia against Aedes, Culex, and Anopheles Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajla, Mithilesh; Bhattacharya, Kurchi; Gupta, Kuldeep; Banerjee, Ujjwal; Kakani, Parik; Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic insecticides are generally employed to control the mosquito population. However, their injudicious over usage and non-biodegradability are associated with many adverse effects on the environment and mosquitoes. The application of environment-friendly mosquitocidals might be an alternate to overcome these issues. In this study, we found that organic or aqueous extracts of Agave angustifolia leaves exhibited a strong larvicidal activity (LD50 28.27 μg/ml) against Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Anopheles stephensi larvae within a short exposure of 12 h. The larvicidal activity of A. angustifolia is inherited and independent of the plants vegetative growth. Interestingly, the plant larvicidal activity was observed exclusively during the summer season (April–August, when outside temperature is between 30 and 50°C) and it was significantly reduced during winter season (December–February, when the outside temperature falls to ~4°C or lower). Thus, we hypothesized that the larvicidal components of A. angustifolia might be induced by the manipulation of environmental temperature and should be resistant to the hot conditions. We found that the larvicidal activity of A. angustifolia was induced when plants were maintained at 37°C in a semi-natural environment against the controls that were growing outside in cold weather. Pre-incubation of A. angustifolia extract at 100°C for 1 h killed 60% larvae in 12 h, which gradually increased to 100% mortality after 24 h. In addition, the dry powder formulation of A. angustifolia, also displayed a strong larvicidal activity after a long shelf life. Together, these findings revealed that A. angustifolia is an excellent source of temperature induced bioactive metabolites that may assist the preparedness for vector control programs competently. PMID:26793700

  16. Significant modulation of the hepatic proteome induced by exposure to low temperature in Xenopus laevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumichi Nagasawa

    2013-08-01

    The African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, is an ectothermic vertebrate that can survive at low environmental temperatures. To gain insight into the molecular events induced by low body temperature, liver proteins were evaluated at the standard laboratory rearing temperature (22°C, control and a low environmental temperature (5°C, cold exposure. Using nano-flow liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, we identified 58 proteins that differed in abundance. A subsequent Gene Ontology analysis revealed that the tyrosine and phenylalanine catabolic processes were modulated by cold exposure, which resulted in decreases in hepatic tyrosine and phenylalanine, respectively. Similarly, levels of pyruvate kinase and enolase, which are involved in glycolysis and glycogen synthesis, were also decreased, whereas levels of glycogen phosphorylase, which participates in glycogenolysis, were increased. Therefore, we measured metabolites in the respective pathways and found that levels of hepatic glycogen and glucose were decreased. Although the liver was under oxidative stress because of iron accumulation caused by hepatic erythrocyte destruction, the hepatic NADPH/NADP ratio was not changed. Thus, glycogen is probably utilized mainly for NADPH supply rather than for energy or glucose production. In conclusion, X. laevis responds to low body temperature by modulating its hepatic proteome, which results in altered carbohydrate metabolism.

  17. Analysis of low temperature-induced genes (LTIG) in wine yeast during alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiva, Rosana; López-Malo, Maria; Salvadó, Zoel; Mas, Albert; Guillamón, Jósé Manuel

    2012-11-01

    Fermentations carried out at low temperatures, that is, 10-15 °C, not only enhance the production and retention of flavor volatiles, but also increase the chances of slowing or arresting the process. In this study, we determined the transcriptional activity of 10 genes that were previously reported as induced by low temperatures and involved in cold adaptation, during fermentation with the commercial wine yeast strain QA23. Mutant and overexpressing strains of these genes were constructed in a haploid derivative of this strain to determine the importance of these genes in growth and fermentation at low temperature. In general, the deletion and overexpression of these genes did affect fermentation performance at low temperature. Most of the mutants were unable to complete fermentation, while overexpression of CSF1, HSP104, and TIR2 decreased the lag phase, increased the fermentation rate, and reached higher populations than that of the control strain. Another set of overexpressing strains were constructed by integrating copies of these genes in the delta regions of the commercial wine strain QA23. These new stable overexpressing strains again showed improved fermentation performance at low temperature, especially during the lag and exponential phases. Our results demonstrate the convenience of carrying out functional analysis in commercial strains and in an experimental set-up close to industrial conditions. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prediction of Climate Change Induced Temperature & Precipitation: The Case of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samireh Saymohammadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Concern about the effects of climatic change on numerous aspects of human life in general and on agricultural production in particular is growing. The utility of HadCM3 as a tool in climate change predictions in cross cultural studies is scarce. Therefore, this study sought to investigate and predict climate change induced temperature and precipitation in Iran. The calibration and validation using the HadCM3 was performed during 1961–2001, using daily temperatures and precipitation. The data on temperature and precipitation from 1961 to 1990 were used for calibration, and, for model validation, data from 1991 to 2001 were used. Moreover, in order to downscale general circulation models to station scales, SDSM version 4.2 was utilized. The least difference between observed data and simulation data during calibration and validation showed that the parameter was precisely modeled for most of the year. Simulation under the A2 scenario was performed for three time periods (2020, 2050, and 2080. According to our simulated model, precipitation showed a decreasing trend whereas temperature showed an increasing trend. The result of this research paper makes a significant contribution to climate smart agriculture in Iran. For example, rural development practitioners can devise effective policies and programs in order to reduce the vulnerability of local communities to climate change impacts. Moreover, the result of this study can be used as an optimal model for land allocation in agriculture. Moreover, a shortage of rainfall and decreased temperatures also have implications for agricultural land allocation.

  19. Spin-diffusions and diffusive molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Brittan; Luskin, Mitchell; Plecháč, Petr; Simpson, Gideon

    2017-12-01

    Metastable configurations in condensed matter typically fluctuate about local energy minima at the femtosecond time scale before transitioning between local minima after nanoseconds or microseconds. This vast scale separation limits the applicability of classical molecular dynamics (MD) methods and has spurned the development of a host of approximate algorithms. One recently proposed method is diffusive MD which aims at integrating a system of ordinary differential equations describing the likelihood of occupancy by one of two species, in the case of a binary alloy, while quasistatically evolving the locations of the atoms. While diffusive MD has shown itself to be efficient and provide agreement with observations, it is fundamentally a model, with unclear connections to classical MD. In this work, we formulate a spin-diffusion stochastic process and show how it can be connected to diffusive MD. The spin-diffusion model couples a classical overdamped Langevin equation to a kinetic Monte Carlo model for exchange amongst the species of a binary alloy. Under suitable assumptions and approximations, spin-diffusion can be shown to lead to diffusive MD type models. The key assumptions and approximations include a well-defined time scale separation, a choice of spin-exchange rates, a low temperature approximation, and a mean field type approximation. We derive several models from different assumptions and show their relationship to diffusive MD. Differences and similarities amongst the models are explored in a simple test problem.

  20. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature on the soil profile methane distribution and diffusion in rice-wheat rotation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Zhaozhi; Zhang, Man; Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Xuhui; Pan, Genxing; Zou, Jianwen; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this experiment was to determine the impacts of climate change on soil profile concentrations and diffusion effluxes of methane in a rice-wheat annual rotation ecosystem in Southeastern China. We initiated a field experiment with four treatments: ambient conditions (CKs), CO2 concentration elevated to ~500 μmol/mol (FACE), temperature elevated by ca. 2°C (T) and combined elevation of CO2 concentration and temperature (FACE+T). A multilevel sampling probe was designed to collect the soil gas at four different depths, namely, 7 cm, 15 cm, 30 cm and 50 cm. Methane concentrations were higher during the rice season and decreased with depth, while lower during the wheat season and increased with depth. Compared to CK, mean methane concentration was increased by 42%, 57% and 71% under the FACE, FACE+T and T treatments, respectively, at the 7 cm depth during the rice season (ptemperature could significantly increase soil profile methane concentrations and their effluxes from a rice-wheat field annual rotation ecosystem (p<0.05). Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Self diffusion in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundy, J.N.; Rothman, S.J.; Lam, N.Q.; Nowicki, L.J.; Hoff, H.A.

    1978-01-01

    The lack of understanding of self-diffusion in Group VI metals together with the wide scatter in the measured values of tungsten self-diffusion has prompted the present measurements to be made over a wide temperature range (1/2Tsub(m) to Tsub(m)). The diffusion coefficients have been measured in the temperature range 1430-2630 0 C. The present measurements show non-linear Arrhenius behavior but a reliable two-exponential fit of the data should await further measurements. (Auth.)

  2. Low temperature induces embryonic diapause in the spider mite, Eotetranychus smithi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Tetsuo; Kameyama, Yasunobu

    2014-05-15

    The spider mite, Eotetranychus smithi Pritchard & Baker (Acari: Tetranychidae), exhibits a facultative diapause that occurs at the egg stage. Diapause was induced by low temperatures alone (≤ 17.5°C) and averted by high temperatures (≥ 20°C). Photoperiod had little effect on diapause induction. This is the first example of temperature-induced diapause in spider mites. The diapause eggs became larger and darker (orange) than non- diapause eggs (white to pale yellow), suggesting that egg size and egg color are associated with diapause. When mites that were reared from eggs at 25°C and 16:8 L:D were transferred to 15°C and 16:8 L:D just after the start of the teleiochrysalis stage (the final molting stage before adulthood), all females laid non-diapause eggs during the first 30 days and then switched over to laying diapause eggs. The switch to diapause may be caused by the aging of mothers. This is an open access paper. We use the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license that permits unrestricted use, provided that the paper is properly attributed.

  3. Room Temperature Ion-Beam-Induced Recrystallization and Large Scale Nanopatterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpati, Biswarup; Ghosh, Tanmay

    2015-02-01

    We have studied ion-induced effects in the near-surface region of two eutectic systems. Gold and Silver nanodots on Silicon (100) substrate were prepared by thermal evaporation under high vacuum condition at room temperature (RT) and irradiated with 1.5 MeV Au2+ ions at flux ~1.25 x 10(11) ions cm-2 s-1 also at RT. These samples were characterized using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) and associated techniques. We have observed that gold act as catalysis in the recrystallization process of ion-beam-induced amorphous Si at room temperature and also large mass transport up to a distance of about 60 nm into the substrate. Mass transport is much beyond the size (~ 6-20 nm) of these Au nanodots. Ag nanoparticles with diameter 15-45 nm are half-way embedded into the Si substrate and does not stimulate in recrystallization. In case of Au nanoparticles upon ion irradiation, mixed phase formed only when the local composition and transient temperature during irradiation is sufficient to cause mixing in accordance with the Au-Si stable phase diagram. Spectroscopic imaging in the scanning TEM using spatially resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy provides one of the few ways to measure the real-space nanoscale mixing.

  4. Determination of thermal diffusivity of cement-stabilized laterite by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge of thermo-physical properties of local building materials are necessary for thermal comfort design and construction of residential accommodation. Thermal diffusivity of cement-stabilized laterites were measured under conditions of transient thermal field and induced surface stress, assuming constant temperature ...

  5. Effect of strain rate on sooting limits in counterflow diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels: Sooting temperature index and sooting sensitivity index

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yu

    2014-05-01

    The effect of the strain rate on the sooting limits in counterflow diffusion flames was investigated in various gaseous hydrocarbon fuels by varying the nitrogen dilution in the fuel and oxidizer streams. The sooting limit was defined as the critical fuel and oxygen mole fraction at which soot started to appear in the elastic light scattering signal. The sooting region for normal alkane fuels at a specified strain rate, in terms of the fuel and oxygen mole fraction, expanded as the number of carbon atoms increased. The alkene fuels (ethylene, propene) tested had a higher propensity for sooting as compared with alkane fuels with the same carbon numbers (ethane, propane). Branched iso-butane had a higher propensity for sooting than did n-butane. An increase in the strain rate reduced the tendency for sooting in all the fuels tested. The sensitivity of the sooting limit to the strain rate was more pronounced for less sooting fuels. When plotted in terms of calculated flame temperature, the critical oxygen mole fraction exhibited an Arrhenius form under sooting limit conditions, which can be utilized to significantly reduce the effort required to determine sooting limits at different strain rates. We found that the limiting temperatures of soot formation flames are viable sooting metrics for quantitatively rating the sooting tendency of various fuels, based on comparisons with threshold soot index and normalized smoke point data. We also introduce a sooting temperature index and a sooting sensitivity index, two quantitative measures to describe sooting propensity and its dependence on strain rate. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  6. Resting State and Diffusion Neuroimaging Predictors of Clinical Improvements Following Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy in Children With Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Kathryn Y; Fehlings, Darcy; Mesterman, Ronit; Gorter, Jan Willem; Switzer, Lauren; Campbell, Craig; Menon, Ravi S

    2015-10-01

    The aim was to identify neuroimaging predictors of clinical improvements following constraint-induced movement therapy. Resting state functional magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor imaging data was acquired in 7 children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were acquired at baseline and 1 month later following a 3-week constraint therapy regimen. A more negative baseline laterality index characterizing an atypical unilateral sensorimotor resting state network significantly correlated with an improvement in the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure score (r = -0.81, P = .03). A more unilateral network with decreased activity in the affected hemisphere was associated with greater improvements in clinical scores. Higher mean diffusivity in the posterior limb of the internal capsule of the affect tract correlated significantly with improvements in the Jebsen-Taylor score (r = -0.83, P = .02). Children with more compromised networks and tracts improved the most following constraint therapy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Normal-Appearing White Matter as Biomarker for Radiation-Induced Late Delayed Cognitive Decline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Christopher H., E-mail: chchap@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Nagesh, Vijaya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sundgren, Pia C. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiology, Skane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Buchtel, Henry [Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chenevert, Thomas L. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Junck, Larry [Department of Neurology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Cao, Yue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether early assessment of cerebral white matter degradation can predict late delayed cognitive decline after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Ten patients undergoing conformal fractionated brain RT participated in a prospective diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging study. Magnetic resonance imaging studies were acquired before RT, at 3 and 6 weeks during RT, and 10, 30, and 78 weeks after starting RT. The diffusivity variables in the parahippocampal cingulum bundle and temporal lobe white matter were computed. A quality-of-life survey and neurocognitive function tests were administered before and after RT at the magnetic resonance imaging follow-up visits. Results: In both structures, longitudinal diffusivity ({lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line }) decreased and perpendicular diffusivity ({lambda}{sub Up-Tack }) increased after RT, with early changes correlating to later changes (p < .05). The radiation dose correlated with an increase in cingulum {lambda}{sub Up-Tack} at 3 weeks, and patients with >50% of cingula volume receiving >12 Gy had a greater increase in {lambda}{sub Up-Tack} at 3 and 6 weeks (p < .05). The post-RT changes in verbal recall scores correlated linearly with the late changes in cingulum {lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line} (30 weeks, p < .02). Using receiver operating characteristic curves, early cingulum {lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line} changes predicted for post-RT changes in verbal recall scores (3 and 6 weeks, p < .05). The neurocognitive test scores correlated significantly with the quality-of-life survey results. Conclusions: The correlation between early diffusivity changes in the parahippocampal cingulum and the late decline in verbal recall suggests that diffusion tensor imaging might be useful as a biomarker for predicting late delayed cognitive decline.

  8. Three-dimensionality of field-induced magnetism in a high-temperature superconductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lake, B.; Lefmann, K.; Christensen, N.B.

    2005-01-01

    Many physical properties of high-temperature superconductors are two-dimensional phenomena derived from their square-planar CuO(2) building blocks. This is especially true of the magnetism from the copper ions. As mobile charge carriers enter the CuO(2) layers, the antiferromagnetism of the parent...... insulators, where each copper spin is antiparallel to its nearest neighbours(1), evolves into a fluctuating state where the spins show tendencies towards magnetic order of a longer periodicity. For certain charge-carrier densities, quantum fluctuations are sufficiently suppressed to yield static long......-period order(2-6), and external magnetic fields also induce such order(7-12). Here we show that, in contrast to the chemically controlled order in superconducting samples, the field-induced order in these same samples is actually three-dimensional, implying significant magnetic linkage between the CuO(2...

  9. Surface induces different crystal structures in a room temperature switchable spin crossover compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Denis; Liscio, Fabiola; Demitri, Nicola; Schäfer, Bernhard; Borgatti, Francesco; Torelli, Piero; Gobaut, Benoit; Panaccione, Giancarlo; Rossi, Giorgio; Degli Esposti, Alessandra; Gazzano, Massimo; Milita, Silvia; Bergenti, Ilaria; Ruani, Giampiero; Šalitroš, Ivan; Ruben, Mario; Cavallini, Massimiliano

    2016-01-07

    We investigated the influence of surfaces in the formation of different crystal structures of a spin crossover compound, namely [Fe(L)2] (LH: (2-(pyrazol-1-yl)-6-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)pyridine), which is a neutral compound thermally switchable around room temperature. We observed that the surface induces the formation of two different crystal structures, which exhibit opposite spin transitions, i.e. on heating them up to the transition temperature, one polymorph switches from high spin to low spin and the second polymorph switches irreversibly from low spin to high spin. We attributed this inversion to the presence of water molecules H-bonded to the complex tetrazolyl moieties in the crystals. Thin deposits were investigated by means of polarized optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and micro Raman spectroscopy; moreover the analysis of the Raman spectra and the interpretation of spin inversion were supported by DFT calculations.

  10. Behavioral temperature regulation in humans during mild narcosis induced by inhalation of 30% nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogev, Daniel; Mekjavi, Igor B

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of mild narcosis on temperature perception, thermal comfort, and behavioral temperature regulation in humans. Twelve subjects (six males and six females) participated in two trials, during which they wore a water-perfused suit (WPS). The temperature of the WPS (TWPS) fluctuated sinusoidally from 27 degrees to 42 degrees C, at a heating and cooling rate of 1.2 degrees C x min(-1). In the first trial, the subjects had no control over TWPS: They determined their thermal comfort zone (TCZ) by providing a subjective response whenever they perceived the temperature changing from a comfortable to an uncomfortable level and vice versa; in addition, they provided subjective ratings of temperature perception and thermal comfort on a 7-point and 4-point scale, respectively, at each 3 degrees C change in TWPS. In the second trial, subjects could change the direction of TWPS whenever it became uncomfortable by depressing a button on a manual control. The protocols were conducted with subjects breathing either room air (AIR), or a normoxic breathing mixture containing 30% N2O. Subjects perceived increasing TWPS as equally warm and the decreasing TWPS as equally cold with AIR or N2O. However, equal changes in TWPS were perceived as significantly less discomforting (Pnarcosis did not alter thermal sensation, but it significantly changed the perception of comfort. These changes were not reflected in the behavioral response. Subjects produced similar TWPS damped-oscillation patterns in the AIR and N2O trials. We conclude that the narcosis-induced alteration in the perception of thermal comfort does not change the preferred temperature, or the ability to behaviorally maintain thermal comfort.

  11. Monitoring an Induced Permafrost Warming Experiment Using ERT, Temperature, and NMR in Fairbanks, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, C.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Ekblaw, I.; Lindsey, N.; Wagner, A. M.; Saari, S.; Daley, T. M.; Freifeld, B. M.

    2016-12-01

    As global temperatures continue to rise, permafrost landscapes will experience more rapid changes than other global climate zones. Permafrost thaw is a result of increased temperatures in arctic settings resulting in surface deformation and subsurface hydrology changes. From an engineering perspective, surface deformation poses a threat to the stability of existing infrastructure such as roads, utility piping, and building structures. Preemptively detecting or monitoring subsurface thaw dynamics presents a difficult challenge due to the long time scales as deformation occurs. Increased subsurface moisture content results from permafrost thaw of which electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), soil temperature, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are directly sensitive. In this experiment we evaluate spatial and temporal changes in subsurface permafrost conditions (moisture content and temperature) at a experimental heating plot in Fairbanks, AK. This study focuses on monitoring thaw signatures using multiple collocated electrical resistivity (ERT), borehole temperature, and borehole nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. Timelapse ERT (sensitive to changes in moisture content) was inverted using collocated temperature and NMR to constrain ERT inversions. Subsurface thermal state was monitored with timelapse thermistors, sensitive to soil ice content. NMR was collected in multiple boreholes and is sensitive to changes in moisture content and pore scale distribution. As permafrost thaws more hydrogen, in the form of water, is available resulting in a changing NMR response. NMR requires the availability of liquid water in order to induce spin of the hydrogen molecule, hence, if frozen water molecules will be undetectable. In this study, the permafrost is poised close to 0oC and is mainly silt with small pore dimensions; this combination makes NMR particularly useful due to the possibility of sub-zero thaw conditions within the soil column. Overall this

  12. temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Polt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In-situ X-ray diffraction was applied to isotactic polypropylene with a high volume fraction of α-phase (α-iPP while it has been compressed at temperatures below and above its glass transition temperature Tg. The diffraction patterns were evaluated by the Multi-reflection X-ray Profile Analysis (MXPA method, revealing microstructural parameters such as the density of dislocations and the size of coherently scattering domains (CSD-size. A significant difference in the development of the dislocation density was found compared to compression at temperatures above Tg, pointing at a different plastic deformation mechanism at these temperatures. Based on the individual evolutions of the dislocation density and CSD-size observed as a function of compressive strain, suggestions for the deformation mechanisms occurring below and above Tg are made.

  13. Influence of rearing water temperature on induced gonadal development and spawning behaviour of tropical green mussel, Perna viridis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parathattil Rathan Sreedevi

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: According to the present study temperature induced spawning method is very simple and cost effective and can accelerate the production of mussel seeds in hatchery units and further stock improvement through genetic manipulation.

  14. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy at high temperatures in industrial boilers and furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Linda G.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Sickafoose, Shane M.; Walsh, Peter M.

    2003-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied (1) near the superheater of an electric power generation boiler burning biomass, coal, or both; (2) at the exit of a glass-melting furnace burning natural gas and oxygen; and (3) near the nose arches of two paper mill recovery boilers burning black liquor. Difficulties associated with the high temperatures and high particle loadings in these environments were surmounted by use of novel LIBS probes. Echelle and linear spectrometers coupled to intensified CCD cameras were used individually and sometimes simultaneously. Elements detected include Na, K, Ca, Mg, C, B, Si, Mn, Al, Fe, Rb, Cl, and Ti.

  15. A temperature induced ferrocene–ferrocenium interconversion in a ferrocene functionalized μ3-O chromium carboxylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mereacre, Valeriu; Schlageter, Martin; Powell, Annie K.

    2015-01-01

    The infrared spectra and 57 Fe Mössbauer measurements of a ferrocenecarboxylate functionalized {Cr 3 O} complex in solid state are reported. It was established that conjugation of ferrocene Cp orbitals with the π orbitals of the adjacent carboxylic group stabilizes the trapped mixed-valence state leading to an intriguing coexistence of ferrocene and ferrocenium species giving rise to a new type of compound showing valence tautomerism in the solid state. - Highlights: • A stabilized ferrocene trapped mixed-valence state is reported. • New type of compound showing valence tautomerism in solid state. • A thermally induced electron transfer and a mixed-valence state near room temperature

  16. Cryotherapy-Induced Persistent Vasoconstriction After Cutaneous Cooling: Hysteresis Between Skin Temperature and Blood Perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnevis, Sepideh; Craik, Natalie K.; Matthew Brothers, R.; Diller, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the persistence of cold-induced vasoconstriction following cessation of active skin-surface cooling. This study demonstrates a hysteresis effect that develops between skin temperature and blood perfusion during the cooling and subsequent rewarming period. An Arctic Ice cryotherapy unit (CTU) was applied to the knee region of six healthy subjects for 60 min of active cooling followed by 120 min of passive rewarming. Multiple laser Doppler flowmetry perfusion probes were used to measure skin blood flow (expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC)). Skin surface cooling produced a significant reduction in CVC (P cryotherapy. PMID:26632263

  17. Temperature-Dependence of the Mechanical Responses for Two Types of Twinning-Induced Plasticity Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. K.; Tian, Y. Z.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2018-03-01

    Tensile tests and microstructure observations were conducted for two types of twinning-induced plasticity steels, Fe-22Mn-0.6C and Fe-30Mn-3Si-3Al (wt pct), from 293 K to 443 K. With increasing temperature, Fe-22Mn-0.6C steel exhibited enhanced mechanical properties and stable twinning capability, but Fe-30Mn-3Si-3Al steel displayed a decline on its mechanical properties and twinning capability. Mechanisms for the different mechanical responses were analyzed by assessing the dynamic strain aging effect.

  18. Temperature induced Spin Switching in SmFeO3 Single Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shixun; Zhao, Huazhi; Kang, Baojuan; Zhang, Jincang; Ren, Wei

    2014-08-01

    The prospect of controlling the magnetization (M) of a material is of great importance from the viewpoints of fundamental physics and future applications of emerging spintronics. A class of rare-earth orthoferrites RFeO3 (R is rare-earth element) materials exhibit striking physical properties of spin switching and magnetization reversal induced by temperature and/or applied magnetic field. Furthermore, due to the novel magnetic, magneto-optic and multiferroic properties etc., RFeO3 materials are attracting more and more interests in recent years. We have prepared and investigated a prototype of RFeO3 materials, namely SmFeO3 single-crystal. And we report magnetic measurements upon both field cooling (FC) and zero-field cooling (ZFC) of the sample, as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field. The central findings of this study include that the magnetization of single-crystal SmFeO3 can be switched by temperature, and tuning the magnitude of applied magnetic field allows us to realize such spin switching even at room temperature.

  19. Temperature-induced phase transitions during ion-beam irradiation of the perovskite-structure oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meldrum, A.; Boatner, L.A.; Ewing, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    Several perovskite-structure oxide compounds, including CaTiO 3 , SrTiO 3 , BaTiO 3 , KNbO 3 , and KTaO 3 were irradiated by 800 keV Kr + ions in order to investigate and compare their response to heavy-ion irradiation. The critical amorphization temperature T c , above which amorphization temperature T c , above which amorphization could not be induced, was found to increase in the order SrTiO 3 → CaTiO 3 → BaTiO 3 → KNbO 3 → KTaO 3 . No single physical parameter explains the observed sequence, although T c correlates well with the melting temperatures. The well-known temperature-driven phase transformations in these materials did not have a significant effect on the dose required for amorphization. Domain boundaries were observed in the pristine samples; however, after only a low dose, the boundaries became poorly defined and, with increasing dose, eventually disappeared. Dislocation loops were observed to aggregate at the domain boundaries

  20. Influence of Energy and Temperature in Cluster Coalescence Induced by Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Jiménez-Sáez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coalescence induced by deposition of different Cu clusters on an epitaxial Co cluster supported on a Cu(001 substrate is studied by constant-temperature molecular dynamics simulations. The degree of epitaxy of the final system increases with increasing separation between the centres of mass of the projectile and target clusters during the collision. Structure, roughness, and epitaxial order of the supported cluster also influence the degree of epitaxy. The effect of energy and temperature is determinant on the epitaxial condition of the coalesced cluster, especially both factors modify the generation, growth and interaction among grains. A higher temperature favours the epitaxial growth for low impact parameters. A higher energy contributes to the epitaxial coalescence for any initial separation between the projectile and target clusters. The influence of projectile energy is notably greater than the influence of temperature since higher energies allow greater and instantaneous atomic reorganizations, so that the number of arisen grains just after the collision becomes smaller. The appearance of grain boundary dislocations is, therefore, a decisive factor in the epitaxial growth of the coalesced cluster.

  1. Temperature-induced structural changes in the myosin thick filament of skinned rabbit psoas muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinchik, S; Xu, S; Yu, L C

    1997-11-01

    By using synchrotron radiation and an imaging plate for recording diffraction patterns, we have obtained high-resolution x-ray patterns from relaxed rabbit psoas muscle at temperatures ranging from 1 degree C to 30 degrees C. This allowed us to obtain intensity profiles of the first six myosin layer lines and apply a model-building approach for structural analysis. At temperatures 20 degrees C and higher, the layer lines are sharp with clearly defined maxima. Modeling based on the data obtained at 20 degrees C reveals that the average center of the cross-bridges is at 135 A from the center of the thick filament and both of the myosin heads appear to wrap around the backbone. At 10 degrees C and lower, the layer lines become very weak and diffuse scattering increases considerably. At 4 degrees C, the peak of the first layer line shifts toward the meridian from 0.0047 to 0.0038 A(-1) and decreases in intensity approximately by a factor of four compared to that at 20 degrees C, although the intensities of higher-order layer lines remain approximately 10-15% of the first layer line. Our modeling suggests that as the temperature is lowered from 20 degrees C to 4 degrees C the center of cross-bridges extends radially away from the center of the filament (135 A to 175 A). Furthermore, the fraction of helically ordered cross-bridges decreases at least by a factor of two, while the isotropic disorder (the temperature factor) remains approximately unchanged. Our results on the order/disordering effects of temperature are in general agreement with earlier results of Wray [Wray, J. 1987. Structure of relaxed myosin filaments in relation to nucleotide state in vertebrate skeletal muscle. J. Muscle Res. Cell Motil. 8:62a (Abstr.)] and Lowy et al. (Lowy, J., D. Popp, and A. A. Stewart. 1991. X-ray studies of order-disorder transitions in the myosin heads of skinned rabbit psoas muscles. Biophys. J. 60:812-824). and support Poulsen and Lowy's hypothesis of coexistence of ordered

  2. Resveratrol suppresses constitutive activation of AKT via generation of ROS and induces apoptosis in diffuse large B cell lymphoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhar R Hussain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have recently shown that deregulation PI3-kinase/AKT survival pathway plays an important role in pathogenesis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL. In an attempt to identify newer therapeutic agents, we investigated the role of Resveratrol (trans-3,4', 5-trihydroxystilbene, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound on a panel of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL cells in causing inhibition of cell viability and inducing apoptosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the action of Resveratrol on DLBCL cells and found that Resveratrol inhibited cell viability and induced apoptosis by inhibition of constitutively activated AKT and its downstream targets via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Simultaneously, Resveratrol treatment of DLBCL cell lines also caused ROS dependent upregulation of DR5; and interestingly, co-treatment of DLBCL with sub-toxic doses of TRAIL and Resveratrol synergistically induced apoptosis via utilizing DR5, on the other hand, gene silencing of DR5 abolished this effect. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether, these data suggest that Resveratrol acts as a suppressor of AKT/PKB pathway leading to apoptosis via generation of ROS and at the same time primes DLBCL cells via up-regulation of DR5 to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. These data raise the possibility that Resveratrol may have a future therapeutic role in DLBCL and possibly other malignancies with constitutive activation of the AKT/PKB pathway.

  3. Highlighting a variety of unusual characteristics of adsorption and diffusion in microporous materials induced by clustering of guest molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.; van Baten, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we highlight several unusual characteristics of adsorption and diffusion of a variety of guest molecules, such as linear and branched alkalies with a number of C atoms in the 1-6 range, CO2, and Ar in microporous structures such as zeolites (FAU, NaY) and metal organic frameworks

  4. Hyaluronan Protects Bovine Articular Chondrocytes against Cell Death Induced by Bupivacaine under Supraphysiologic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sen; Zhang, Qing-Song; Hester, William; O’Brien, Michael J.; Savoie, Felix H.; You, Zongbing

    2013-01-01

    Background Bupivacaine and supraphysiologic temperature can independently reduce cell viability of articular chondrocytes. In combination these two deleterious factors could further impair cell viability. Hypothesis Hyaluronan may protect chondrocytes from death induced by bupivacaine at supraphysiologic temperatures. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Bovine articular chondrocytes were treated with hyaluronan at physiologic (37°C) and supraphysiologic temperatures (45°C and 50°C) for one hour, and then exposed to bupivacaine for one hour at room temperature. Cell viability was assessed at three time points: immediately after treatment, six hours later, and twenty-four hours later using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. The effects of hyaluronan on the levels of sulfated glycosaminoglycan in the chondrocytes were determined using Alcian blue staining. Results (1) Bupivacaine alone did not induce noticeable chondrocyte death at 37°C; (2) bupivacaine and temperature synergistically increased chondrocyte death, that is, when the chondrocytes were conditioned to 45°C and 50°C, 0.25% and 0.5% bupivacaine increased the cell death rate by 131% to 383% in comparison to the phosphate-buffered saline control group; and, (3) addition of hyaluronan reduced chondrocyte death rates to approximately 14% and 25% at 45°C and 50°C, respectively. Hyaluronan’s protective effects were still observed at six and twenty-four hours after bupivacaine treatment at 45°C. However, at 50°C, hyaluronan delayed but did not prevent the cell death caused by bupivacaine. One-hour treatment with hyaluronan significantly increased sulfated glycosaminoglycan levels in the chondrocytes. Conclusions Bupivacaine and supraphysiologic temperature synergistically increase chondrocyte death and hyaluronan may protect articular chondrocytes from death caused by bupivacaine. Clinical Relevance This study provides a rationale to perform pre-clinical and clinical studies to

  5. Acoustically assisted diffusion through membranes and biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floros, J.D.; Liang, H.

    1994-01-01

    Part of a special section on the symposium ''Ultrasonic Applications in the Food Industry.'' The use of high-intensity ultrasound in food processing is reviewed. Acoustic radiation, or sound, can be used to monitor various operations or products or to alter a process or product; however, the direct use of sound to improve food processes is not very popular. High-intensity acoustic radiation induces various changes as it passes through a medium, largely as a result of heating, cavitation, agitation and shear stresses, compression and rarefaction, and turbulence. The diffusion of sound through a medium is influenced by factors such as the temperature, acoustic intensity, acoustic frequency, direction of the acoustic wave, pulsation of the acoustic wave, and properties of the medium. Some potential applications of acoustic energy in food processes are increased drying efficiency, acceleration of diffusion through polymeric and biological membranes, and enhanced diffusion through porous materials

  6. Effect of mixing rate and temperature on primary Si phase of hypereutectic Al-20Si alloy during controlled diffusion solidification (CDS process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-dong Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Controlled Diffusion Solidification (CDS is a promising process relied on mixing two liquid alloys of precisely controlled chemistry and temperature in order to produce a predetermined alloy composition. In this study, the CDS was employed to prepare hypereutectic Al-20%Si (mass fraction alloy using Al-30%Si and pure Al of different temperatures. The mixing rate was controlled using three small crucibles with a hole of different diameters in their bottom. The effect of mixing rate and temperature on the microstructure of the primary Si-phase during the mixing of molten Al and Al-30%Si was studied. The results showed that when the diameter of the small crucible bottom hole is 16 mm, a higher mass mixing rate 0.217 kg·s-1 would results in a lower stream velocity 0.414 m·s-1. Conversely a lower mass mixing rate 0.114 kg·s-1 (the diameter of the small crucible bottom hole is 8 mm would result in a higher fluid stream velocity 0.879 m·s-1. A lower mass mixing rate would be better to refine the primary Si than a higher mass mixing rate. Meanwhile, the morphology and distribution of primary Si could also be improved. Especially, when Al-30%Si alloy at 820 °C was mixed with pure Al at 670 °C in the case of a mass mixing rate of 0.114 kg·s-1 and a pouring temperature of 680 °C, the average size of the primary Si phase would be only 18.2 μm. Its morphology would mostly be octahedral and the primary Si would distribute uniformly in the matrix microstructure. The lower mass mixing rate (0.114 kg·s-1 will enhance the broken tendency of Al-30%Si steam and the mixing agitation of resultant melt, so the primary Si phase can be better refined.

  7. Stress- and Magnetic Field-Induced Martensitic Transformation at Cryogenic Temperatures in Fe-Mn-Al-Ni Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ji; Xu, Xiao; Miyake, Atsushi; Kimura, Yuta; Omori, Toshihiro; Tokunaga, Masashi; Kainuma, Ryosuke

    2017-12-01

    Stress-induced and magnetic-field-induced martensitic transformation behaviors at low temperatures were investigated for Fe-Mn-Al-Ni alloys. The magnetic-field-induced reverse martensitic transformation was directly observed by in situ optical microscopy. Magnetization measurements under pulsed magnetic fields up to 50 T were carried out at temperatures between 4.2 and 125 K on a single-crystal sample; full magnetic-field-induced reverse martensitic transformation was confirmed at all tested temperatures. Compression tests from 10 to 100 K were conducted on a single-crystal sample; full shape recovery was obtained at all tested temperatures. It was found that the temperature dependence of both the critical stress and critical magnetic field is small and that the transformation hysteresis is less sensitive to temperature even at cryogenic temperatures. The temperature dependence of entropy change during martensitic transformation up to 100 K was then derived using the Clausius-Clapeyron relation with critical stresses and magnetic fields.

  8. The Impact of Central and Peripheral Cyclooxygenase Enzyme Inhibition on Exercise-Induced Elevations in Core Body Temperature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltmeijer, M.T.W.; Veeneman, D.; Bongers, C.C.W.G.; Netea, M.G.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Eijsvogels, T.M.H.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Exercise increases core body temperature (TC) due to metabolic heat production. However, the exercise-induced release of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6) may also contribute to the rise in TC by increasing the hypothalamic temperature set point. This study investigated

  9. Spectroscopic Temperature and Number Density of Nitric Oxide in Laser-Induced Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Josef P.; Swafford, Lauren D.; Witte, Michael J.; Surmick, David M.; Woods, Alexander C.; Behery, Sultan A.; Parigger, Christian G.; Hornkohl, James O.

    2014-03-01

    We report measurements of nitric oxide emission spectra subsequent to infra-red Nd:YAG laser-induced breakdown in air. Plasma is generated by focusing 160 mJ energy per pulse, 13 ns pulse-width, laser radiation at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The NO emissions are recorded for time delays of 25, 50, and 75 μs after plasma generation, utilizing a 0.64 meter Czerny-Turner type spectrometer with a 3600 grooves/mm grating, and an intensified linear diode array. The analysis utilizes accurate line strengths for selected bands in the ultraviolet region of 205 to 300 nm. Temperatures on the order of 6000 to 7000 Kelvin are inferred from the emission spectra. Comparisons are included with previous experimental studies in 1:1 mixture of N2:O2, where we deduced temperature and species densities using plasma predictions for various conditions and a so-called non-equilibrium air radiation code. The current work elaborates on details of two specific NO bands to evaluate as well accuracy of our line strength data. While the presented spectra, recorded in laser-induced plasma in air, are due to recombination processes following optical breakdown, results of our work on diatomic nitric oxide emissions are expected to be also applicable in chemical physics investigations of combustion.

  10. Anisotropic Constitutive Model of Strain-Induced Phenomena in Stainless Steels at Cryogenic Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garion, C.; Skoczen, B.

    2004-01-01

    A majority of the thin-walled components subjected to intensive plastic straining at cryogenic temperatures are made of stainless steels. The examples of such components can be found in the interconnections of particle accelerators, containing the superconducting magnets, where the thermal contraction is absorbed by thin-walled, axisymmetric shells called bellows expansion joints. The stainless steels show three main phenomena induced by plastic strains at cryogenic temperatures: serrated (discontinuous) yielding, γ→α' phase transformation and anisotropic ductile damage. In the present paper, a coupled constitutive model of γ→α' phase transformation and orthotropic ductile damage is presented. A kinetic law of phase transformation, and a kinetic law of evolution of orthotropic damage are presented. The model is extended to anisotropic plasticity comprising a constant anisotropy (texture effect), which can be classically taken into account by the Hill yield surface, and plastic strain induced anisotropy. For such a model the shape of the yield surface in the stress space varies as a function of the plastic strains. The constitutive model creates a bridge between material science (experiments) and structural analysis. It has been used to predict the response of beam vacuum and cryogenic bellows to monotonic and cyclic loads developed in the interconnections of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

  11. Intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid temperature analysis using MR diffusion-weighted imaging thermometry in Parkinson's disease patients, multiple system atrophy patients, and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Kaoru; Sato, Noriko; Ota, Miho; Sakai, Koji; Nippashi, Yasumasa; Sone, Daichi; Yokoyama, Kota; Ito, Kimiteru; Maikusa, Norihide; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Yamada, Kei; Murata, Miho; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2015-06-01

    We examined the temperature of the intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid (Tv) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and those with multiple system atrophy (MSA) in comparison with healthy subjects, and we examined normal changes in this temperature with aging. Tv was estimated by magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) thermometry in 36 PD patients (19 males, 17 females), 34 MSA patients (17 males, 17 females), 64 age-matched controls (27 men, 37 women), and 114 all-age adult controls (47 men, 67 women; 28-89 years old). The volume of lateral ventricles was also estimated using FreeSurfer in all subjects. Tv and ventricular volume data were compared among the PD and MSA patients and age-matched controls. We also evaluated the relationship between Tv and age in the 114 all-age controls, controlling for ventricular volume. Men and women were analyzed separately. The male PD and MSA patients had significantly higher Tv values compared to the male controls, with no significant difference in ventricular volume among them. There was no significant difference in Tv between the female patients and controls. In the all-age male controls, there was a significant negative correlation between Tv and age controlling for ventricular volume, and this was not observed in the women. DWI thermometry is a useful and easy method for demonstrating an altered intracranial environment in male patients and healthy controls, but not in females. DWI thermometry can thus be used to help to explore the pathophysiology of Parkinsonian syndromes and to differentiate individuals affected by neurodegenerative disease with autonomic dysfunction from those without it.

  12. Modulation of cadmium-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and volume changes by temperature in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onukwufor, John O.; Kibenge, Fred; Stevens, Don; Kamunde, Collins

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Interactions of Cd and temperature exacerbate mitochondrial dysfunction and enhance Cd accumulation. • Cd uptake by mitochondria occurs through the Ca uniporter. • Temperature exacerbates Cd-induced mitochondrial volume changes. • Low concentrations of Cd inhibit mitochondrial swelling. - Abstract: We investigated how temperature modulates cadmium (Cd)-induced mitochondrial bioenergetic disturbances, metal accumulation and volume changes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the first set of experiments, rainbow trout liver mitochondrial function and Cd content were measured in the presence of complex I substrates, malate and glutamate, following exposure to Cd (0–100 μM) at three (5, 13 and 25 °C) temperatures. The second set of experiments assessed the effect of temperature on Cd-induced mitochondrial volume changes, including the underlying mechanisms, at 15 and 25 °C. Although temperature stimulated both state 3 and 4 rates of respiration, the coupling efficiency was reduced at temperature extremes due to greater inhibition of state 3 at low temperature and greater stimulation of state 4 at the high temperature. Cadmium exposure reduced the stimulatory effect of temperature on state 3 respiration but increased that on state 4, consequently exacerbating mitochondrial uncoupling. The interaction of Cd and temperature yielded different responses on thermal sensitivity of state 3 and 4 respiration; the Q 10 values for state 3 respiration increased at low temperature (5–13 °C) while those for state 4 increased at high temperature (13–25 °C). Importantly, the mitochondria accumulated more Cd at high temperature suggesting that the observed greater impairment of oxidative phosphorylation with temperature was due, at least in part, to a higher metal burden. Cadmium-induced mitochondrial volume changes were characterized by an early phase of contraction followed by swelling, with temperature changing the kinetics and intensifying

  13. Modulation of cadmium-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and volume changes by temperature in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onukwufor, John O. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Interactions of Cd and temperature exacerbate mitochondrial dysfunction and enhance Cd accumulation. • Cd uptake by mitochondria occurs through the Ca uniporter. • Temperature exacerbates Cd-induced mitochondrial volume changes. • Low concentrations of Cd inhibit mitochondrial swelling. - Abstract: We investigated how temperature modulates cadmium (Cd)-induced mitochondrial bioenergetic disturbances, metal accumulation and volume changes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the first set of experiments, rainbow trout liver mitochondrial function and Cd content were measured in the presence of complex I substrates, malate and glutamate, following exposure to Cd (0–100 μM) at three (5, 13 and 25 °C) temperatures. The second set of experiments assessed the effect of temperature on Cd-induced mitochondrial volume changes, including the underlying mechanisms, at 15 and 25 °C. Although temperature stimulated both state 3 and 4 rates of respiration, the coupling efficiency was reduced at temperature extremes due to greater inhibition of state 3 at low temperature and greater stimulation of state 4 at the high temperature. Cadmium exposure reduced the stimulatory effect of temperature on state 3 respiration but increased that on state 4, consequently exacerbating mitochondrial uncoupling. The interaction of Cd and temperature yielded different responses on thermal sensitivity of state 3 and 4 respiration; the Q{sub 10} values for state 3 respiration increased at low temperature (5–13 °C) while those for state 4 increased at high temperature (13–25 °C). Importantly, the mitochondria accumulated more Cd at high temperature suggesting that the observed greater impairment of oxidative phosphorylation with temperature was due, at least in part, to a higher metal burden. Cadmium-induced mitochondrial volume changes were characterized by an early phase of contraction followed by swelling, with temperature changing the kinetics and

  14. Immobilized glucose oxidase by radiation induced polymerization of HEMA at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Jin; Su Zongxian

    1988-01-01

    The immobilized glucose oxidase (GOD) by 60 Co-γ induced polymerization of hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) at -78 deg C was studied. From the experiment results, it was found that the irradation dose until 1 x 10 4 Gy had not a significant effect on the native GOD activity. When the carrier (HEMA) concentration was 50% and the entrapped amount was 1.0 ml GOD/10 ml phosphoric acid buffer solution, the immobilized GOD had not only elastic, but also had high remaining activity. The native GOD was less sensitive to pH value than the immobilized GOD, but both the proper pH values didn't change. The kinetic reaction results showed, Michaelis constant k'm=1.42 x 10 -2 mol (native GOD km=1.0 x 10 -2 mol). This value indicated that diffuse velocity of substitue was restricted. The activation energies of the immobilized GOD were found to be 13.7kJ/mol

  15. Adsorption and diffusion of fluorine on Cr-doped Ni(111) surface: Fluorine-induced initial corrosion of non-passivated Ni-based alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Cui-Lan, E-mail: rencuilan@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Han, Han [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Gong, Wen-Bin [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 215123 (China); Wang, Cheng-Bin; Zhang, Wei [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Cheng, Cheng [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Huai, Ping, E-mail: huaiping@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhu, Zhi-Yuan [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Adsorption and diffusion behaviors of fluorine on Cr-doped Ni(111) surface are investigated by using first-principles simulation. It shows that the Cr in the Cr-doped Ni(111) surface serve a trap site for fluorine with adsorption energy 3.52 eV, which is 1.04 eV higher than that on Ni(111) surface. Moreover, the Cr atom is pulled out the surface for 0.41 Å after the fluorine adsorption, much higher than that on Ni(111) surface. Further diffusion behaviors analysis confirms the conclusion because the fluorine diffusion from neighbored sites onto the Cr top site is an energy barrierless process. Detailed electronic structure analysis shows that a deeper hybrid state of F 2 p-Cr 3 d indicates a strong F−Cr interaction. The Ni−Cr bond is elongated and weakened due to the new formed F−Cr bonding. Our results help to understanding the basic fluorine-induced initial corrosion mechanism for Ni-based alloy in molten salt environment.

  16. Regulation of the peripheral body temperature by foods: a temperature decrease induced by the Japanese persimmon (kaki, Diospyros kaki).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Gaku; Nadamoto, Tomonori; Fujisawa, Fumiko; Fushiki, Tohru

    2003-01-01

    We investigated whether the ingestion of the Japanese persimmon (kaki, Diospyros kaki) could lower the human peripheral body temperature. It was found that the temperatures recorded at the foot and wrist were depressed after kaki consumption compared to after the same amount of water consumption. The effects of ingesting freeze-dried kaki and eating a cookie (as its nutritional counterpart) containing the same amount of carbohydrate, protein, fat, and water were compared. A similar temperature-reducing effect of kaki was observed. The recovery of finger temperature after soaking the finger in ice-cooled water was also studied. The temperature recovery was delayed after kaki consumption. It was thus quantitatively demonstrated that ingesting kaki indeed had the effect of lowering (or repressing the rise) of the peripheral human body temperature, as has been traditionally believed in China for many hundreds of years.

  17. Parameters of straining-induced corrosion cracking in low-alloy steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenz, E.; Liebert, A.; Stellwag, B.; Wieling, N.

    Tensile tests with slow deformation speed determine parameters of corrosion cracking at low strain rates of low-alloy steels in high-temperature water. Besides the strain rate the temperature and oxygen content of the water prove to be important for the deformation behaviour of the investigated steels 17MnMoV64, 20 MnMoNi55 and 15NiCuMoNb 5. Temperatures about 240 0 C, increased oxygen contents in the water and low strain rates cause a decrease of the material ductility as against the behaviour in air. Tests on the number of stress cycles until incipient cracking show that the parameters important for corrosion cracking at low strain velocities apply also to low-frequency cyclic loads with high strain amplitude. In knowledge of these influencing parameters the strain-induced corrosion cracking is counteracted by concerted measures taken in design, construction and operation of nuclear power stations. Essential aims in this matter are to avoid as far as possible inelastic strains and to fix and control suitable media conditions. (orig.) [de

  18. Vibration amplitude and induced temperature limitation of high power air-borne ultrasonic transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffar, Saber; Abdullah, Amir

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic impedances of matching layers, their internal loss and vibration amplitude are the most important and influential parameters in the performance of high power airborne ultrasonic transducers. In this paper, the optimum acoustic impedances of the transducer matching layers were determined by using a genetic algorithm, the powerful tool for optimizating domain. The analytical results showed that the vibration amplitude increases significantly for low acoustic impedance matching layers. This enhancement is maximum and approximately 200 times higher for the last matching layer where it has the same interface with the air than the vibration amplitude of the source, lead zirconate titanate-pizo electric while transferring the 1 kW is desirable. This large amplitude increases both mechanical failure and temperature of the matching layers due to the internal loss of the matching layers. It has analytically shown that the temperature in last matching layer with having the maximum vibration amplitude is high enough to melt or burn the matching layers. To verify suggested approach, the effect of the amplitude of vibration on the induced temperature has been investigated experimentally. The experimental results displayed good agreement with the theoretical predictions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Strain-induced extrinsic high-temperature ferromagnetism in the Fe-doped hexagonal barium titanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorko, A; Pregelj, M; Gomilšek, M; Jagličić, Z; Pajić, D; Telling, M; Arčon, I; Mikulska, I; Valant, M

    2015-01-09

    Diluted magnetic semiconductors possessing intrinsic static magnetism at high temperatures represent a promising class of multifunctional materials with high application potential in spintronics and magneto-optics. In the hexagonal Fe-doped diluted magnetic oxide, 6H-BaTiO3-δ, room-temperature ferromagnetism has been previously reported. Ferromagnetism is broadly accepted as an intrinsic property of this material, despite its unusual dependence on doping concentration and processing conditions. However, the here reported combination of bulk magnetization and complementary in-depth local-probe electron spin resonance and muon spin relaxation measurements, challenges this conjecture. While a ferromagnetic transition occurs around 700 K, it does so only in additionally annealed samples and is accompanied by an extremely small average value of the ordered magnetic moment. Furthermore, several additional magnetic instabilities are detected at lower temperatures. These coincide with electronic instabilities of the Fe-doped 3C-BaTiO3-δ pseudocubic polymorph. Moreover, the distribution of iron dopants with frozen magnetic moments is found to be non-uniform. Our results demonstrate that the intricate static magnetism of the hexagonal phase is not intrinsic, but rather stems from sparse strain-induced pseudocubic regions. We point out the vital role of internal strain in establishing defect ferromagnetism in systems with competing structural phases.

  20. Impact of Sowing Date Induced Temperature and Management Practices on Development Events and Yield of Mustard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSA Khan, MA Aziz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted at the research field of the Agronomy Division, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI, Joydebpur, Gazipur, during rabi season of 2014-2015 to find out the relationship between different development events of mustard crop and sowing dates induced temperature as well as to minimize the yield reduction of the crop by adopting appropriate management practices. The mustard var. BARI Sarisha-15 was sown on 06, 25 November and 14 December 2014. Crop accumulated lower growing degree days (GDD i.e., 72.15, 521.10 and 1070 to 1154 °C were observed for the events of emergence, 50 % flowering and maturity on 14 December sowing. Late sown plants took minimum time from flowering to maturity (36 days due to increased temperature and high variability in both maximum and minimum temperature. The highest seed yield (1569 kg ha-1 was recorded from 06 November sowing with high management practices while the lowest seed yield (435 kg ha-1 from 14 December sowing with low management practices. At high management practices the crop yielded 1183 kg ha-1 at 14 December sowing. Yield reduction at late sowing condition was reduced to some extent with high management practices. The seed yield reductions at 14 December sowing as compared to high management practices at 06 November sowing were 72, 43 and 25% under low, medium and high management, respectively.

  1. Temperature induced stress influence on biodiesel productivity during mixotrophic microalgae cultivation with wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Subhash, G; Rohit, M V; Devi, M Prathima; Swamy, Y V; Venkata Mohan, S

    2014-10-01

    The role of operating temperature as a physical stress factor for enhancing lipid induction during microalgae cultivation with domestic wastewater was evaluated. Experiments were designed with dual mode microalgae cultivation viz., growth phase (GP) and temperature induced stress phase (25 °C, 30 °C and 35 °C). GP showed enhancement in biomass growth and carbohydrate accumulation while stress phase (SP) operation at 30 °C showed noticeable improvement in lipid productivities (total/neutral lipid, 24.5/10.2%). Maximum carbohydrate utilization was observed during SP at 30 °C operation (57.8%) compared to 25 °C (50.6%) and 35 °C (26.9%) correlating well with the lipid synthesis. Interestingly the neutral lipid content documented five-fold increment illustrating feasibility towards good biodiesel properties. Biodiesel profile at 30 °C temperature is well supported by higher saturated fatty acids (SFA) to unsaturated fatty acids (USFA) ratio. GP operation showed good COD and nutrient removal concomitant to the biomass growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cooling profiles of laser induced temperature fields for superconducting vanadium nitrate products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emetere, Moses Eterigho

    2016-01-01

    The flexibility of vanadium nitrate makes it a good constituent for emerging superconductors. Its thermal instability engenders a disordered structure when doped by insulating constituents. The physics of the heat source i.e. the probe laser was theoretical derived to avoid deficiency of the superconducting material at low laser energy density. The mathematical experimentation was accomplished by queering the energy balance and heat conductivity of the individual constituents of the reagent. In-depth analysis of the layered distribution of laser induced temperature fields was carried out by cooling the compound via the forced convective cooling technique to about 150 °C. The material was gradual heated via the laser probe to its superconducting state. The structural defect which explained different state of the thermal outcomes were explained and proven to correspond with experimental outcomes. The temperature distribution under the irradiating laser intensity (0.45 W) shows an effective decay rate probability density function which is peculiar to the concept of photoluminescence. The dynamics of the electronic structure of thermally-excited superconducting materials is hinged on the complementary stoichiometry signatures, thermal properties amongst others. The maximum possible critical temperatures of the inter-layer were calculated to be about 206 K.

  3. Diffusion of interstitial atoms in FCC metals after irradiation with 2 MeV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornmann, H.

    1980-01-01

    Selfdiffusion in nickel after electron irradiation has been restudied. The diffusion velocity near the surface and the diffusion constant in the interior of the crystal have been determined as a function of radiation flux and temperature. A special method for the measurement of diffusion has been improved, which is based on radioactive tracer atoms for indication and on ion etching for the removal of thin films. To improve additionally the accuracy of the technique tracer atoms are induced into the crystal by thermal diffusion and then irradiated with 2 MeV electrons. (orig./GSCH) [de

  4. Live-monitoring of Te inclusions laser-induced thermo-diffusion and annealing in CdZnTe crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zappettini, A.; Zambelli, N.; Benassi, G.; Calestani, D.; Pavesi, M.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of Te inclusions is one of the main factors limiting performances of CdZnTe crystals as X-ray detectors. We show that by means of infrared laser radiation it is possible to move and anneal tellurium inclusions exploiting a thermo-diffusion mechanism. The process is studied live during irradiation by means of an optical microscope equipment. Experimental conditions, and, in particular, energy laser fluence, for annealing inclusions of different dimensions are determined.

  5. Live-monitoring of Te inclusions laser-induced thermo-diffusion and annealing in CdZnTe crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zappettini, A.; Zambelli, N.; Benassi, G.; Calestani, D. [Istituto Materiali Elettronica e Magnetismo – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Parma (Italy); Pavesi, M. [Istituto Materiali Elettronica e Magnetismo – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Parma (Italy); Istituto di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Parma, Parma (Italy)

    2014-06-23

    The presence of Te inclusions is one of the main factors limiting performances of CdZnTe crystals as X-ray detectors. We show that by means of infrared laser radiation it is possible to move and anneal tellurium inclusions exploiting a thermo-diffusion mechanism. The process is studied live during irradiation by means of an optical microscope equipment. Experimental conditions, and, in particular, energy laser fluence, for annealing inclusions of different dimensions are determined.

  6. Submergence-induced morphological, anatomical, and biochemical responses in a terrestrial species affect gas diffusion resistance and photosynthetic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommer, Liesje; Pons, Thijs L; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Venema, Jan Henk; Visser, Eric J W

    2005-09-01

    Gas exchange between the plant and the environment is severely hampered when plants are submerged, leading to oxygen and energy deficits. A straightforward way to reduce these shortages of oxygen and carbohydrates would be continued photosynthesis under water, but this possibility has received only little attention. Here, we combine several techniques to investigate the consequences of anatomical and biochemical responses of the terrestrial species Rumex palustris to submergence for different aspects of photosynthesis under water. The orientation of the chloroplasts in submergence-acclimated leaves was toward the epidermis instead of the intercellular spaces, indicating that underwater CO(2) diffuses through the cuticle and epidermis. Interestingly, both the cuticle thickness and the epidermal cell wall thickness were significantly reduced upon submergence, suggesting a considerable decrease in diffusion resistance. This decrease in diffusion resistance greatly facilitated underwater photosynthesis, as indicated by higher underwater photosynthesis rates in submergence-acclimated leaves at all CO(2) concentrations investigated. The increased availability of internal CO(2) in these "aquatic" leaves reduced photorespiration, and furthermore reduced excitation pressure of the electron transport system and, thus, the risk of photodamage. Acclimation to submergence also altered photosynthesis biochemistry as reduced Rubisco contents were observed in aquatic leaves, indicating a lower carboxylation capacity. Electron transport capacity was also reduced in these leaves but not as strongly as the reduction in Rubisco, indicating a substantial increase of the ratio between electron transport and carboxylation capacity upon submergence. This novel finding suggests that this ratio may be less conservative than previously thought.

  7. Oxygen Diffusion in Titanite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. Y.; Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.

    2004-05-01

    Oxygen diffusion in natural and synthetic single-crystal titanite was characterized under both dry and water-present conditions. For the dry experiments, pre-polished titanite samples were packed in 18O-enriched quartz powder inside Ag-Pd capsules, along with an FMQ buffer assemblage maintained physically separate by Ag-Pd strips. The sealed Ag-Pd capsules were themselves sealed inside evacuated silica glass tubes and run at 700-1050° C and atmospheric pressure for durations ranging from 1 hour to several weeks. The hydrothermal experiments were conducted by encapsulating polished titanite crystals with 18O enriched water and running them at 700-900° C and 10-160MPa in standard cold-seal pressure vessels for durations of 1 day to several weeks. Diffusive uptake profiles of 18O were measured in all cases by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) using the 18O (p,α ) 15N reaction. For the experiments on natural crystals, under both dry and hydrothermal conditions, two mechanisms could be recognized responsible for oxygen diffusion. The diffusion profiles showed two segments: a steep one close to the initial surface attributed to self-diffusion in the titanite lattice; and a "tail" reaching deeper into the sample attributable to diffusion in a "fast path" such as sub-grain boundaries or dislocations. For the dry experiments, the following Arrhenius relation was obtained: D{dry lattice} = 2.6×10-8exp (-275 kJmol-1/RT) m2/s Under wet conditions at PH2O = 100MPa, Oxygen diffusion conforms to the following Arrehenius relation: D{wet lattice} = 9.7× 10-13exp (-174 kJmol-1/RT) m2/s Oxygen diffusivity shows only a slight dependence on water pressure at the following conditions we explored: temperatures 800° C, PH2O = 10-160MPa, and 880° C, PH2O =10-100MPa. For diffusive anisotropy, we explored it only at hydrothermal conditions, and no diffusive anisotropy was observed. Like many other silicates, titanite shows lower activation energy for oxygen diffusion in the presence of

  8. Intraseasonal Variations in Tropical Deep Convection, Tropospheric Mean Temperature and Cloud-Induced Radiative Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Holly S.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2009-01-01

    Intraseasonal variability of deep convection represents a fundamental mode of variability in the organization of tropical convection. While most studies of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) have focused on the spatial propagation and dynamics of convectively coupled circulations, we examine the projection of ISOs on the tropically-averaged temperature and energy budget. The area of interest is the global oceans between 20oN/S. Our analysis then focuses on these questions: (i) How is tropospheric temperature related to tropical deep convection and the associated ice cloud fractional amount (ICF) and ice water path (IWP)? (ii) What is the source of moisture sustaining the convection and what role does deep convection play in mediating the PBL - free atmospheric temperature equilibration? (iii) What affect do convectively generated upper-tropospheric clouds have on the TOA radiation budget? Our methodology is similar to that of Spencer et al., (2007) with some modifications and some additional diagnostics of both clouds and boundary layer thermodynamics. A composite ISO time series of cloud, precipitation and radiation quantities built from nearly 40 events during a six-year period is referenced to the atmospheric temperature signal. The increase of convective precipitation cannot be sustained by evaporation within the domain, implying strong moisture transports into the tropical ocean area. While there is a decrease in net TOA radiation that develops after the peak in deep convective rainfall, there seems little evidence that an "Infrared Iris"- like mechanism is dominant. Rather, the cloud-induced OLR increase seems largely produced by weakened convection with warmer cloud tops. Tropical ISO events offer an accessible target for studying ISOs not just in terms of propagation mechanisms, but on their global signals of heat, moisture and radiative flux feedback processes.

  9. Atoms diffusion-induced phase engineering of platinum-gold alloy nanocrystals with high electrocatalytic performance for the formic acid oxidation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fu-Min; Kang, Yong-Qiang; Liu, Hui-Min; Zhai, Ya-Nan; Hu, Man-Cheng; Chen, Yu

    2018-03-15

    Bimetallic noble metal nanocrystals have been widely applied in many fields, which generally are synthesized by the wet-chemistry reduction method. This work presents a purposely designed atoms diffusion induced phase engineering of PtAu alloy nanocrystals on platy Au substrate (PtAu-on-Au nanostructures) through simple hydrothermal treatment. Benefitting from the synergistic effects of component and structure, PtAu-on-Au nanostructures remarkably enhance the dehydrogenation pathway of the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR), and thus exhibit much higher FAOR activity and durability compared with Pt nanocrystals on platy Au substrate (Pt-on-Au nanostructures) and commercial Pd black due to an excellent stability of platy Au substrate and a high oxidation resistance of PtAu alloy nanocrystals. The atoms diffusion-induced phase engineering demonstrated in this work builds a bridge between the traditional metallurgy and modern nanotechnologies, which also provides some useful insights in developing noble metals based alloyed nanostructures for the energy and environmental applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Diffusion of HTO, {sup 36}Cl{sup -}, {sup 125}I{sup -} and {sup 22}Na{sup +} in Opalinus Clay: Effect of Confining Pressure, Sample Orientation, Sample Depth and Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Loon, L.R.; Soler, J.M

    2004-02-01

    respect to {sup 36}Cl{sup -}. This is caused by a weak sorption of {sup 125}I{sup -} on the Opalinus Clay. The distribution coefficients, calculated from the rock capacity factor {sup 36}Cl{sup -}. The effective diffusion coefficients of {sup 125}I{sup -} are comparable with those of {sup 36}Cl{sup -}. Out-diffusion data of HTO, {sup 36}Cl{sup -} and {sup 22}Na{sup +} are in good agreement with the through-diffusion data. In the case of {sup 125}I{sup -} the agreement is less. The flux calculated with D{sub e} and {alpha} derived from through-diffusion measurements is smaller than the observed flux. This indicates that other (unknown) processes are taking place. The diffusion coefficients measured in this study on Mont Terri samples are in good agreement with recent measurements of three other laboratories, within the framework of a laboratory comparison exercise. The values of the diffusion-accessible porosities, however, show a larger degree of scatter, indicating that through-diffusion is not the Lyer is method of choice for obtaining reliable porosity values. Diffusion parallel to the bedding is higher than diffusion perpendicular to the bedding. The effective diffusion coefficient for diffusion parallel to bedding is a factor of 4 - 6 larger than for diffusion perpendicular to the bedding. This is due to the layered structure of the Opalinus Clay, resulting in a smaller tortuosity factor for diffusion along the bedding planes. The observed effect was similar for HTO, {sup 36}Cl{sup -} and {sup 22}Na{sup +}. This anisotropy is more pronounced for the Opalinus Clay from Benken than for Mont Terri, indicating that the clay platelets are more preferentially oriented in the case of Benken OPA. The temperature dependence of diffusion of HTO in OPA is of an Arrhenius type. The activation energy (22 kJomol{sup -1}), however, is larger than for diffusion in bulk water (18 kJomol{sup -1}). This indicates that confined water in the narrow pores of the Opalinus Clay has partly a

  11. Macroscopically flat and smooth superhydrophobic surfaces: heating induced wetting transitions up to the Leidenfrost temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangming; Craig, Vincent S J

    2010-01-01

    We present an investigation of the change in wettability of water droplets on 3 different flat, smooth substrates with an elevation in temperature. Two methods were employed. In the first method the droplet was placed on the substrate before it was heated and in the second method the droplets were induced to fall onto a preheated substrate. We find that the intrinsic wettability of the surface is important and that fundamentally different behavior is observed on a hydrophobic surface relative to hydrophilic surfaces. For the hydrophobic surface and employing the first method, we have observed three different regimes over the temperature range of 65 degrees C to 270 degrees C. In regime I (65 degrees C to 110 degrees C), the contact angle of water droplets exhibit a slight decrease from 108 degrees to 105 degrees and an accompanying significant decrease in droplet lifetime (tau) from approximately 111 s to approximately 30 s is observed. In regime II (120 degrees C to 190 degrees C), tau remains constant at approximately 20 s however the contact angle significantly increases from 127 degrees to 158 degrees--that is we enter a superhydrophobic regime on a flat surface. In this regime the droplet remains stationary on the surface. Regime III (210 degrees C to 270 degrees C), is the Leidenfrost regime in which the water droplet exhibits a rapid motion on the solid surface with a contact angle higher than 160 degrees. In comparison, the wetting behavior of a water droplet on two relatively hydrophilic surfaces (Au and GaAs) have also been investigated as a function of temperature. Here no wetting transition is observed from 65 degrees C up to 365 degrees C. In the second method, the wetting behavior on the hydrophobic surface is similar to that observed in the first method for temperatures below the Leidenfrost temperature and the water droplet rebounds from the solid surface at higher temperatures. Additionally, the Leidenfrost phenomenon can be observed above 280

  12. High ambient temperature increases 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy")-induced Fos expression in a region-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, G A; Hunt, G E; Cornish, J L; McGregor, I S

    2007-03-16

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") is a popular drug that is often taken under hot conditions at dance clubs. High ambient temperature increases MDMA-induced hyperthermia and recent studies suggest that high temperatures may also enhance the rewarding and prosocial effects of MDMA in rats. The present study investigated whether ambient temperature influences MDMA-induced expression of Fos, a marker of neural activation. Male Wistar rats received either MDMA (10 mg/kg i.p.) or saline, and were placed in test chambers for 2 h at either 19 or 30 degrees C. MDMA caused significant hyperthermia at 30 degrees C and a modest hypothermia at 19 degrees C. The 30 degrees C ambient temperature had little effect on Fos expression in vehicle-treated rats. However MDMA-induced Fos expression was augmented in 15 of 30 brain regions at the high temperature. These regions included (1) sites associated with thermoregulation such as the median preoptic nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamus and raphe pallidus, (2) the supraoptic nucleus, a region important for osmoregulation and a key mediator of oxytocin and vasopressin release, (3) the medial and central nuclei of the amygdala, important in the regulation of social and emotional behaviors, and (4) the shell of the nucleus accumbens and (anterior) ventral tegmental area, regions associated with the reinforcing effects of MDMA. MDMA-induced Fos expression was unaffected by ambient temperature at many other sites, and was diminished at high temperature at one site (the islands of Calleja), suggesting that the effect of temperature on MDMA-induced Fos expression was not a general pharmacokinetic effect. Overall, these results indicate that high temperatures accentuate key neural effects of MDMA and this may help explain the widespread use of the drug under hot conditions at dance parties as well as the more hazardous nature of MDMA taken under such conditions.

  13. Method for measuring temperatures and densities in hypersonic wind tunnel air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.; Fletcher, Douglas G.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence in oxygen, in combination with Raman scattering, is shown to be an accurate means by which temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence can be measured in air flows associated with high-speed wind tunnels. For temperatures above 60 K and densities above 0.01 amagat, the uncertainties in the temperature and density measurements can be less than 2 percent, if the signal uncertainties are dominated by photon statistical noise. The measurements are unaffected by collisional quenching and can be achieved with laser fluences for which nonlinear effects are insignificant. Temperature measurements using laser-induced fluorescence alone have been demonstrated at known densities in the range of low temperatures and densities which are expected in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  14. A method for measuring temperatures and densities in hypersonic wind tunnel air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Fletcher, Douglas G.; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence in oxygen, in combination with Raman scattering, is shown to be an accurate means by which temperature, density, and their fluctuations due to turbulence can be measured in air flows associated with high-speed wind tunnels. For temperatures above 60 K and densities above 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature and density measurements can be less than 2 and 3 percent, respectively, if the signal uncertainties are dominated by photon-statistical noise. The measurements are unaffected by collisional quenching and can be achieved with laser fluences for which nonlinear effects are insignificant. Temperature measurements using laser-induced fluorescence alone have been demonstrated at known densities in the range of low temperatures and densities which are expected in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  15. Diffusion of terbium in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazyrov, D.Eh.

    2006-01-01

    The diffusion of terbium in silicon is studied by tracer technique in the temperature range 1100-1250 deg C. The diffusion coefficient of terbium, D Tb , is shown to increase with temperature from 4 x 10 -14 to 10 -12 cm 2 /s. The temperature dependence of D Tb at temperatures studied obeys the Arrhenius law according to: D Tb [cm 2 /s] = 5 x 10 -2 exp(-3.3 eV/kT). Experimental data on D Tb and activation energy (E a = 3.3 eV) suggest that terbium dopant diffuses in silicon along the crystal lattice nodes [ru

  16. Spin diffusion in Fermi gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Georg

    2011-01-01

    We examine spin diffusion in a two-component homogeneous Fermi gas in the normal phase. Using a variational approach, analytical results are presented for the spin diffusion coefficient and the related spin relaxation time as a function of temperature and interaction strength. For low temperatures......, strong correlation effects are included through the Landau parameters which we extract from Monte Carlo results. We show that the spin diffusion coefficient has a minimum for a temperature somewhat below the Fermi temperature with a value that approaches the quantum limit ~/m in the unitarity regime...

  17. Stress induced martensite transformation in Co–28Cr–6Mo alloy during room temperature deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, S., E-mail: song_cai@fwmetals.com [Fort Wayne Metals Research Products Corporation, 9609 Ardmore Avenue, Fort Wayne, IN 46809 (United States); Daymond, M.R. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Nicol Hall, 60 Union Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Ren, Y. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S. Cass Avenue, 433/D008, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    The phase transformation and texture change of two Co–28Cr–6Mo alloys during room temperature deformation were studied by using the in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. It is found that a slight difference in chemical compositions can significantly change the phase constitutions and the mechanical properties. For the material with less Ni, C and N (lower α-phase stability), increasing the grain size promotes the athermal martensite transformation during cooling. The kinetics of the Stress Induced Martensite (SIM) phase transformation may be more affected by the athermal martensite instead of the grain size of the α-phase. After deformation, similar textures are produced in samples regardless the differences in the initial structures such as the phase constitution and the grain size; while a relatively strong {111} texture and a weak {100} texture are produced in the α-phase, a {101"¯1} fiber texture is gradually developed in the ε-phase during uniaxial tension.

  18. Piezoresistive polysilicon film obtained by low-temperature aluminum-induced crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, Suraj Kumar [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Texas at Arlington, P.O. Box 19031, Arlington, TX-76019 (United States); Nanotechnology Research and Teaching Facility, University of Texas at Arlington, 500 S. Cooper Street, Arlington, TX-76019 (United States); Celik-Butler, Zeynep, E-mail: zbutler@uta.ed [Nanotechnology Research and Teaching Facility, University of Texas at Arlington, 500 S. Cooper Street, Arlington, TX-76019 (United States); Electrical Engineering Department, University of Texas at Arlington, P.O. Box 19072, Arlington, TX-76019 (United States); Butler, Donald P. [Nanotechnology Research and Teaching Facility, University of Texas at Arlington, 500 S. Cooper Street, Arlington, TX-76019 (United States); Electrical Engineering Department, University of Texas at Arlington, P.O. Box 19072, Arlington, TX-76019 (United States)

    2010-10-29

    A low-temperature deposition process employing aluminum-induced crystallization has been developed for fabrication of piezoresistive polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) films on low cost and flexible polyimide substrates for force and pressure sensing applications. To test the piezoresistive properties of the polysilicon films, prototype pressure sensors were fabricated on surface-micromachined silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) diaphragms, in a half-Wheatstone bridge configuration. Characterization of the pressure sensor was performed using atomic force microscope in contact mode with a specially modified probe-tip. Low pressure values ranging from 5 kPa to 45 kPa were achieved by this method. The resistance change was found to be - 0.1% to 0.5% and 0.07% to 0.3% for polysilicon films obtained at 500 {sup o}C and 400 {sup o}C, respectively, for the applied pressure range.

  19. Differential effects of environment-induced changes in body temperature on modafinil’s actions against methamphetamine-induced striatal toxicity in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raineri, Mariana; González, Betina; Echeto, Celeste Rivero; Muñiz, Javier A.; Gutierrez, María Laura; Ghanem, Carolina I.; Cadet, Jean Lud; García-Rill, Edgar; Urbano, Francisco J.; Veronica, Bisagno

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) exposure can produce hyperthermia that might lead to toxicity and death. Modafinil is a wake-promoting compound that is also been prescribed off-label to treat METH dependence. Modafinil has shown neuroprotective properties against METH harmful effects in animal models. The goal of the present study was to test if the prevention of hyperthermia might play a role on the neuroprotective actions of modafinil against METH toxicity using various ambient temperatures. METH was administered to female C57BL/6 mice in a binge regimen: 4 × 5 mg/kg , 2h apart; modafinil (90mg/kg) was injected twice, 1h before first and fourth METH injections. Drugs were given at cold ambient temperature (14 °C) or hot ambient temperature (29 °C). Body temperature was measured during treatments. Brains were dissected out six days after treatments and processed for TH, DAT, GFAP and c-Fos immunohistochemistry. Exposure to hot ambient temperature exacerbated METH toxicity evidenced by sriatal reductions in TH and DAT and increased GFAP immmunoreactivity. Modafinil counteracted reductions in TH and DAT, but failed to block astroglial activation. At both ambient temperatures tested modafinil did induce increments in GFAP, but the magnitude was significantly lower than the one induced by METH. Both drugs induced increases in c-Fos positive nuclei; modafinil did not block this effect. Our results suggest that protective effects of modafinil against METH-induced neurotoxicity may be dependent, in part, to its hypothermic effects. Nevertheless, modafinil maintained some protective properties on METH-induced alterations in the striatum at different ambient temperatures. PMID:25261212

  20. Brain mechanisms of abnormal temperature perception in cold allodynia induced by ciguatoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenblätter, Anneka; Lewis, Richard; Dörfler, Arnd; Forster, Clemens; Zimmermann, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    Cold allodynia occurs as a major symptom of neuropathic pain states. It remains poorly treated with current analgesics. Ciguatoxins (CTXs), ichthyosarcotoxins that cause ciguatera, produce a large peripheral sensitization to dynamic cold stimuli in Aδ-fibers by activating sodium channels without producing heat or mechanical allodynia. We used CTXs as a surrogate model of cold allodynia to dissect the framework of cold allodynia-activated central pain pathways. Reversible cold allodynia was induced in healthy male volunteers by shallow intracutaneous injection of low millimolar concentrations of CTX into the dorsal skin of the forefoot. Cold and warm stimuli were delivered to the treated and the control site using a Peltier-driven thermotest device. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans were acquired with a 3T MRI scanner using a blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) protocol. The CTX-induced substantial peripheral sensitization to cooling stimuli in Aδ-fibers is particularly retrieved in BOLD changes due to dynamic temperature changes and less during constant cooling. Brain areas that responded during cold allodynia were almost always located bilaterally and appeared in the medial insula, medial cingulate cortex, secondary somatosensory cortex, frontal areas, and cerebellum. Whereas these areas also produced changes in BOLD signal during the dynamic warming stimulus on the control site, they remained silent during the warming stimuli on the injected site. We describe the defining feature of the cold allodynia pain percept in the human brain and illustrate why ciguatera sufferers often report a perceptual temperature reversal. ANN NEUROL 2017;81:104-116. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  1. Effect of crowding, temperature and age on glia activation and dopaminergic neurotoxicity induced by MDMA in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frau, Lucia; Simola, Nicola; Porceddu, Pier Francesca; Morelli, Micaela

    2016-09-01

    3,4-methylenedyoxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy"), a recreational drug of abuse, can induce glia activation and dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Since MDMA is often consumed in crowded environments featuring high temperatures, we studied how these factors influenced glia activation and dopaminergic neurotoxicity induced by MDMA. C57BL/6J adolescent (4 weeks old) and adult (12 weeks old) mice received MDMA (4×20mg/kg) in different conditions: 1) while kept 1, 5, or 10×cage at room temperature (21°C); 2) while kept 5×cage at either room (21°C) or high (27°C) temperature. After the last MDMA administration, immunohistochemistry was performed in the caudate-putamen for CD11b and GFAP, to mark microglia and astroglia, and in the substantia nigra pars compacta for tyrosine hydroxylase, to mark dopaminergic neurons. MDMA induced glia activation and dopaminergic neurotoxicity, compared with vehicle administration. Crowding (5 or 10 mice×cage) amplified MDMA-induced glia activation (in adult and adolescent mice) and dopaminergic neurotoxicity (in adolescent mice). Conversely, exposure to a high environmental temperature (27°C) potentiated MDMA-induced glia activation in adult and adolescent mice kept 5×cage, but not dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Crowding and exposure to a high environmental temperature amplified MDMA-induced hyperthermia, and a positive correlation between body temperature and activation of either microglia or astroglia was found in adult and adolescent mice. These results provide further evidence that the administration setting influences the noxious effects of MDMA in the mouse brain. However, while crowding amplifies both glia activation and dopaminergic neurotoxicity, a high environmental temperature exacerbates glia activation only. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. In situ correction of field errors induced by temperature gradient in cryogenic undulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Tanaka

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A new technique of undulator field correction for cryogenic permanent magnet undulators (CPMUs is proposed to correct the phase error induced by temperature gradient. This technique takes advantage of two important instruments: one is the in-vacuum self-aligned field analyzer with laser instrumentation system to precisely measure the distribution of the magnetic field generated by the permanent magnet arrays placed in vacuum, and the other is the differential adjuster to correct the local variation of the magnet gap. The details of the two instruments are described together with the method of how to analyze the field measurement data and deduce the gap variation along the undulator axis. The correction technique was applied to the CPMU with a length of 1.7 m and a magnetic period of 14 mm. It was found that the phase error induced during the cooling process was attributable to local gap variations of around 30  μm, which were then corrected by the differential adjuster.

  3. Femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of silver within surrogate high temperature gas reactor fuel coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, D.E.; Plessis, A. du; Steyn, J.; Botha, L.R.; Strydom, C.A.; Rooyen, I.J. van

    2010-01-01

    The detection of metallic silver on Chemical Vapour Deposited (CVD) grown silicon carbide and in Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) supplied tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles (with 500 μm diameter zirconium oxide surrogate kernel) has been studied with femtosecond Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (femto-LIBS). The SiC layer of the TRISO coated particle is the main barrier to metallic and gaseous fission products of which 110m Ag is of particular interest for direct cycle high temperature reactors. This work is a feasibility study for diagnosing and profiling silver transport through the silicon carbide layer of fuel particles for a high temperature gas reactor in out-of-reactor experimentation. The zirconium oxide is a surrogate for the enriched uranium oxide fuel. The conclusion reached in this study was that femto-LIBS can achieve good surface spatial resolution and good depth resolution for studies of silver in experimental coated particles. The LIBS technique also offers a good alternative for a remote analytical technique.

  4. Temperature-induced labelling of Fluo-3 AM selectively yields brighter nucleus in adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guixian; Pan, Leiting; Li, Cunbo; Hu, Fen; Shi, Xuechen; Lee, Imshik; Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena; Zhang, Xinzheng; Xu, Jingjun

    2014-01-17

    Fluo-3 is widely used to study cell calcium. Two traditional approaches: (1) direct injection and (2) Fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester (AM) loading, often bring conflicting results in cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca(2+)]c) and nuclear calcium ([Ca(2+)]n) imaging. AM loading usually yields a darker nucleus than in cytoplasm, while direct injection always induces a brighter nucleus which is more responsive to [Ca(2+)]n detection. In this work, we detailedly investigated the effects of loading and de-esterification temperatures on the fluorescence intensity of Fluo-3 in response to [Ca(2+)]n and [Ca(2+)]c in adherent cells, including osteoblast, HeLa and BV2 cells. Interestingly, it showed that fluorescence intensity of nucleus in osteoblast cells was about two times larger than that of cytoplasm when cells were loaded with Fluo-3 AM at 4 °C and allowed a subsequent step for de-esterification at 20 °C. Brighter nuclei were also acquired in HeLa and BV2 cells using the same experimental condition. Furthermore, loading time and adhesion quality of cells had effect on fluorescence intensity. Taken together, cold loading and room temperature de-esterification treatment of Fluo-3 AM selectively yielded brighter nucleus in adherent cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Origin of temperature-induced low friction of sputtered Si-containing amorphous carbon coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantschner, O.; Field, S.K.; Holec, D.; Fian, A.; Music, D.; Schneider, J.M.; Zorn, K.; Mitterer, C.

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on a tribological study of magnetron-sputtered silicon-containing amorphous carbon thin films vs. their alumina counterparts. Temperature cycling during ball-on-disk tests in humid air revealed a decrease in the coefficient of friction from 0.3 to <0.02 beyond 240 ± 15 °C. Systematic variation of the environment confirmed oxygen to be responsible for the low friction. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the wear tracks indicates oxidation of Si-C bonds and formation of Si-O-C bonds, followed by further oxidation to SiO 2 above 450 °C. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of gas interactions with the a-C surface revealed dissociation of O 2 and the formation of oxides. Additional density functional theory calculations of Si incorporation into a graphene layer, resembling the surface of the film, showed preferential attraction of gaseous species (H, O, -OH, H 2 O), to Si-sites as compared to C-sites. Hence, the temperature- and atmosphere-induced changes in friction coefficient can be understood based on correlative X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio data: the formation of Si-O-C bonds stemming from a reaction of the as-deposited coating with atmosphere in the tribological contact is observed by theory and experiment

  6. Temperature field measurement research in high-speed diesel engine using laser induced fluorescence technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Zhang, You-tong; Gou, Chenhua; Tian, Hongsen

    2008-12-01

    Temperature laser- induced- fluorescence (LIF) 2-D imaging measurements using a new multi-spectral detection strategy are reported for high pressure flames in high-speed diesel engine. Schematic of the experimental set-up is outlined and the experimental data on the diesel engine is summarized. Experiment injection system is a third generation Bosch high-pressure common rail featuring a maximum pressure of 160 MPa. The injector is equipped with a six-hole nozzle, where each hole has a diameter of 0.124 mm. and slightly offset (by 1.0 mm) to the center of the cylinder axis to allow a better cooling of the narrow bridge between the exhaust valves. The measurement system includes a blower, which supplied the intake flow rate, and a prototype single-valve direct injection diesel engine head modified to lay down the swirled-type injector. 14-bit digital CCD cameras are employed to achieve a greater level of accuracy in comparison to the results of previous measurements. The temperature field spatial distributions in the cylinder for different crank angle degrees are carried out in a single direct-injection diesel engine.

  7. Room Temperature Stable PspA-Based Nanovaccine Induces Protective Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle A. Wagner-Muñiz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major causative agent of pneumonia, a debilitating disease particularly in young and elderly populations, and is the leading worldwide cause of death in children under the age of five. While there are existing vaccines against S. pneumoniae, none are protective across all serotypes. Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA, a key virulence factor of S. pneumoniae, is an antigen that may be incorporated into future vaccines to address the immunological challenges presented by the diversity of capsular antigens. PspA has been shown to be immunogenic and capable of initiating a humoral immune response that is reactive across approximately 94% of pneumococcal strains. Biodegradable polyanhydrides have been studied as a nanoparticle-based vaccine (i.e., nanovaccine platform to stabilize labile proteins, to provide adjuvanticity, and enhance patient compliance by providing protective immunity in a single dose. In this study, we designed a room temperature stable PspA-based polyanhydride nanovaccine that eliminated the need for a free protein component (i.e., 100% encapsulated within the nanoparticles. Mice were immunized once with the lead nanovaccine and upon challenge, presented significantly higher survival rates than animals immunized with soluble protein alone, even with a 25-fold reduction in protein dose. This lead nanovaccine formulation performed similarly to protein adjuvanted with Alum, however, with much less tissue reactogenicity at the site of immunization. By eliminating the free PspA from the nanovaccine formulation, the lead nanovaccine was efficacious after being stored dry for 60 days at room temperature, breaking the need for maintaining the cold chain. Altogether, this study demonstrated that a single dose PspA-based nanovaccine against S. pneumoniae induced protective immunity and provided thermal stability when stored at room temperature for at least 60 days.

  8. Effect of temperature on oxidative stress induced by lead in the leaves of Plantago major L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakhnina, Tamara I.; Borkowska, Aneta; Nosalewicz, Magdalena; Nosalewicz, Artur; Włodarczyk, Teresa M.; Kosobryukhov, Anatoly A.; Fomina, Irina R.

    2016-07-01

    Fluctuation of the summer day-time temperatures in the mid-latitudes in a range from 16 to 30°C should not have irreversible negative effects on plants, but may influence metabolic processes including the oxidative stress. To test the effect of moderately high temperature on oxidative stress induced by lead in the leaves of Plantago major L.; the plants were incubated in a water solution of 0, 150, 450, and 900 μM Pb (NO3)2 at 20 and 28°C. Plant reactions were evaluated by the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities in leaves after 2, 24, 48, and 72 h. The Pb concentration in the leaves rose with the increase in the Pb content and was higher at 20°C. The increase in stomatal resistance caused by Pb was higher at 28°C. The contents of TBARS increased after 2 h of plant exposure to Pb and the increase was the highest at 900 μM Pb, 28°C. The AsP activity increased up to 50% after 24 h of Pb-treatment at 28°C; the highest increase in glutathione reductase activity was observed after 72 h at 20°C. Thus, the moderately high temperature 28°C compared with optimal 20°C caused a decrease in Pb accumulation in Plantago leaves but amplified the negative effects of lead, especially in the beginning of stress development.

  9. Spectral Dependent Degradation of the Solar Diffuser on Suomi-NPP VIIRS Due to Surface Roughness-Induced Rayleigh Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Shao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS onboard Suomi National Polar Orbiting Partnership (SNPP uses a solar diffuser (SD as its radiometric calibrator for the reflective solar band calibration. The SD is made of Spectralon™ (one type of fluoropolymer and was chosen because of its controlled reflectance in the Visible/Near-Infrared/Shortwave-Infrared region and its near-Lambertian reflectance property. On-orbit changes in VIIRS SD reflectance as monitored by the Solar Diffuser Stability Monitor showed faster degradation of SD reflectance for 0.4 to 0.6 µm channels than the longer wavelength channels. Analysis of VIIRS SD reflectance data show that the spectral dependent degradation of SD reflectance in short wavelength can be explained with a SD Surface Roughness (length scale << wavelength based Rayleigh Scattering (SRRS model due to exposure to solar UV radiation and energetic particles. The characteristic length parameter of the SD surface roughness is derived from the long term reflectance data of the VIIRS SD and it changes at approximately the tens of nanometers level over the operational period of VIIRS. This estimated roughness length scale is consistent with the experimental result from radiation exposure of a fluoropolymer sample and validates the applicability of the Rayleigh scattering-based model. The model is also applicable to explaining the spectral dependent degradation of the SDs on other satellites. This novel approach allows us to better understand the physical processes of the SD degradation, and is complementary to previous mathematics based models.

  10. High Temperature-Induced Expression of Rice α-Amylases in Developing Endosperm Produces Chalky Grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Nakata

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Global warming impairs grain filling in rice and reduces starch accumulation in the endosperm, leading to chalky-appearing grains, which damages their market value. We found previously that high temperature-induced expression of starch-lytic α-amylases during ripening is crucial for grain chalkiness. Because the rice genome carries at least eight functional α-amylase genes, identification of the α-amylase(s that contribute most strongly to the production of chalky grains could accelerate efficient breeding. To identify α-amylase genes responsible for the production of chalky grains, we characterized the histological expression pattern of eight α-amylase genes and the influences of their overexpression on grain appearance and carbohydrate components through a series of experiments with transgenic rice plants. The promoter activity of most α-amylase genes was elevated to various extents at high temperature. Among them, the expression of Amy1A and Amy3C was induced in the internal, especially basal to dorsal, region of developing endosperm, whereas that of Amy3D was confined near the ventral aleurone. These regions coincided with the site of occurrence of chalkiness, which was in clear contrast to conventionally known expression patterns of the enzyme in the scutellum and aleurone during seed germination. Furthermore, overexpression of α-amylase genes, except for Amy3E, in developing endosperm produced various degrees of chalky grains without heat exposure, whereas that of Amy3E yielded normal translucent grains, as was the case in the vector control, even though Amy3E-overexpressing grains contained enhanced α-amylase activities. The weight of the chalky grains was decreased due to reduced amounts of starch, and microscopic observation of the chalky part of these grains revealed that their endosperm consisted of loosely packed round starch granules that had numerous pits on their surface, confirming the hydrolysis of the starch reserve by

  11. Diapause pupal color diphenism induced by temperature and humidity conditions in Byasa alcinous (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kazuaki; Tsujimura, Yuki; Kometani, Miwako; Kitazawa, Chisato; Islam, Abu Taher Md Fayezul; Yamanaka, Akira

    2011-07-01

    We investigated whether diapause pupae of Byasa alcinous exhibit pupal color diphenism (or polyphenism) similar to the diapause pupal color polyphenism shown by Papilio xuthus. All diapause pupae of B. alcinous observed in the field during winter showed pupal coloration of a dark-brown type. When larvae were reared and allowed to reach pupation under short-day conditions at 18°C under a 60±5% relative humidity, diapause pupae exhibited pupal color types of brown (33%), light-brown (25%), yellowish-brown (21%), diapause light-yellow (14%) and diapause yellow (7%). When mature larvae reared at 18°C were transferred and allowed to reach pupation at 10°C and 25°C under a 60±5% relative humidity after a gut purge, the developmental ratio of brown and light-brown, yellowish-brown, and diapause light-yellow and diapause yellow types was 91.2, 8.8 and 0.0% at 10°C, and 12.2, 48.8 and 39.0% at 25°C, respectively. On the other hand, when mature larvae reared at 18°C were transferred and allowed to reach pupation at 10°C, 18°C and 25°C under an over 90% relative humidity after a gut purge, the developmental ratio of brown and light-brown, yellowish-brown, and diapause light-yellow and diapause yellow types was 79.8, 16.9 and 3.3% at 10°C, 14.5, 26.9 and 58.6% at 18°C, and 8.3, 21.2 and 70.5% at 25°C, respectively. These results indicate that diapause pupae of brown types are induced by lower temperature and humidity conditions, whereas yellow types are induced by higher temperature and humidity conditions. The findings of this study show that diapause pupae of B. alcinous exhibit pupal color diphenism comprising brown and diapause yellow types, and suggest that temperature and humidity experienced after a gut purge are the main factors that affect the diapause pupal coloration of B. alcinous as environmental cues. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High Temperature-Induced Expression of Rice α-Amylases in Developing Endosperm Produces Chalky Grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Masaru; Fukamatsu, Yosuke; Miyashita, Tomomi; Hakata, Makoto; Kimura, Rieko; Nakata, Yuriko; Kuroda, Masaharu; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Hiromoto

    2017-01-01

    Global warming impairs grain filling in rice and reduces starch accumulation in the endosperm, leading to chalky-appearing grains, which damages their market value. We found previously that high temperature-induced expression of starch-lytic α-amylases during ripening is crucial for grain chalkiness. Because the rice genome carries at least eight functional α-amylase genes, identification of the α-amylase(s) that contribute most strongly to the production of chalky grains could accelerate efficient breeding. To identify α-amylase genes responsible for the production of chalky grains, we characterized the histological expression pattern of eight α-amylase genes and the influences of their overexpression on grain appearance and carbohydrate components through a series of experiments with transgenic rice plants. The promoter activity of most α - amylase genes was elevated to various extents at high temperature. Among them, the expression of Amy1A and Amy3C was induced in the internal, especially basal to dorsal, region of developing endosperm, whereas that of Amy3D was confined near the ventral aleurone. These regions coincided with the site of occurrence of chalkiness, which was in clear contrast to conventionally known expression patterns of the enzyme in the scutellum and aleurone during seed germination. Furthermore, overexpression of α-amylase genes, except for Amy3E , in developing endosperm produced various degrees of chalky grains without heat exposure, whereas that of Amy3E yielded normal translucent grains, as was the case in the vector control, even though Amy3E -overexpressing grains contained enhanced α-amylase activities. The weight of the chalky grains was decreased due to reduced amounts of starch, and microscopic observation of the chalky part of these grains revealed that their endosperm consisted of loosely packed round starch granules that had numerous pits on their surface, confirming the hydrolysis of the starch reserve by

  13. Finite volume analysis of temperature effects induced by active MRI implants: 2. Defects on active MRI implants causing hot spots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grönemeyer Dietrich HW

    2006-05-01

    investigations. The finite volume analysis calculates the time developing temperature maps for the model of a broken linear metallic wire embedded in tissue. Half of the total hot spot power loss is assumed to diffuse into both wire parts at the location of a defect. The energy is distributed from there by heat conduction. Additionally the effect of blood perfusion and blood flow is respected in some simulations because the simultaneous appearance of all worst case conditions, especially the absence of blood perfusion and blood flow near the hot spot, is very unlikely for vessel implants. Results The analytical solution as worst case scenario as well as the finite volume analysis for near worst case situations show not negligible volumes with critical temperature increases for part of the modeled hot spot situations. MR investigations with a high rf-pulse density lasting below a minute can establish volumes of several cubic millimeters with temperature increases high enough to start cell destruction. Longer exposure times can involve volumes larger than 100 mm3. Even temperature increases in the range of thermal ablation are reached for substantial volumes. MR sequence exposure time and hot spot power loss are the primary factors influencing the volume with critical temperature increases. Wire radius, wire material as well as the physiological parameters blood perfusion and blood flow inside larger vessels reduce the volume with critical temperature increases, but do not exclude a volume with critical tissue heating for resonators with a large product of resonator volume and quality factor. Conclusion The worst case scenario assumes thermal equilibrium for a hot spot embedded in homogeneous tissue without any cooling due to blood perfusion or flow. The finite volume analysis can calculate the results for near and not close to worst case conditions. For both cases a substantial volume can reach a critical temperature increase in a short time. The analytical solution, as absolute

  14. Intrinsic vs. extrinsic influences on life history expression: metabolism and parentally induced temperature influences on embryo development rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Thomas E.; Ton, Riccardo; Nikilson, Alina

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic processes are assumed to underlie life history expression and trade-offs, but extrinsic inputs are theorised to shift trait expression and mask trade-offs within species. Here, we explore application of this theory across species. We do this based on parentally induced embryo temperature as an extrinsic input, and mass-specific embryo metabolism as an intrinsic process, underlying embryonic development rate. We found that embryonic metabolism followed intrinsic allometry rules among 49 songbird species from temperate and tropical sites. Extrinsic inputs via parentally induced temperatures explained the majority of variation in development rates and masked a relationship with metabolism; metabolism explained a minor proportion of the variation in development rates among species, and only after accounting for temperature effects. We discuss evidence that temperature further obscures the expected interspecific trade-off between development rate and offspring quality. These results demonstrate the importance of considering extrinsic inputs to trait expression and trade-offs across species.

  15. Physical exercise-induced changes in the core body temperature of mice depend more on ambient temperature than on exercise protocol or intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Samuel Penna; Costa, Kátia Anunciação; Soares, Anne Danieli Nascimento; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento; Coimbra, Cândido Celso

    2014-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying physical exercise-induced hyperthermia may be species specific. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of exercise intensity and ambient temperature on the core body temperature ( T core) of running mice, which provide an important experimental model for advancing the understanding of thermal physiology. We evaluated the influence of different protocols (constant- or incremental-speed exercises), treadmill speeds and ambient temperatures ( T a) on the magnitude of exercise-induced hyperthermia. To measure T core, a telemetric sensor was implanted in the abdominal cavity of male adult Swiss mice under anesthesia. After recovering from the surgery, the animals were familiarized to running on a treadmill and then subjected to the different running protocols and speeds at two T a: 24 °C or 34 °C. All of the experimental trials resulted in marked increases in T core. As expected, the higher-temperature environment increased the magnitude of running-induced hyperthermia. For example, during incremental exercise at 34 °C, the maximal T core achieved was increased by 1.2 °C relative to the value reached at 24 °C. However, at the same T a, neither treadmill speed nor exercise protocol altered the magnitude of exercise-induced hyperthermia. We conclude that T core of running mice is influenced greatly by T a, but not by the exercise protocols or intensities examined in the present report. These findings suggest that the magnitude of hyperthermia in running mice may be regulated centrally, independently of exercise intensity.

  16. Caffeine potentiates or protects against radiation-induced DNA and chromosomal damage in human lymphocytes depending on temperature and concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoilov, L.M.; Mullenders, L.H.F.; Natarajan, A.T.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of caffeine on radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations and DNA strand breaks in unstimulated human lymphocytes was investigated. When present prior to and during the radiation exposure, caffeine treatment was found to cause either potentiation or protection against induction of chromosomal aberrations depending on the concentration and temperature. When the nucleoid sedimentation technique was applied, enhancement or reduction of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks by caffeine was also found to be dependent on temperature and caffeine concentration. It is proposed that caffeine, in addition to its suspected ability to influence DNA repair, can also influence the induction of DNA damage, leading to alterations in the yield of chromosomal aberrations

  17. Enhanced green fluorescent protein in optofluidic Fabry-Perot microcavity to detect laser induced temperature changes in a bacterial culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz, F.; Martín, I. R.; Walo, D.; Freire, R.; Gil-Rostra, J.; Yubero, F.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A. R.

    2017-09-01

    Thermal therapy using laser sources can be used in combination with other cancer therapies to eliminate tumors. However, high precision temperature control is required to avoid damage in healthy surrounding tissues. Therefore, in order to detect laser induced temperature changes, we have used the fluorescence signal of the enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP) over-expressed in an E. coli bacterial culture. For that purpose, the bacteria expressing eGFP are injected in a Fabry-Perot (FP) optofluidic planar microcavity. In order to locally heat the bacterial culture, external infrared or ultraviolet lasers were used. Shifts in the wavelengths of the resonant FP modes are used to determine the temperature increase as a function of the heating laser pump power. Laser induced local temperature increments up to 6-7 °C were measured. These results show a relatively easy way to measure laser induced local temperature changes using a FP microcavity and using eGFP as a molecular probe instead of external nanoparticles, which could damage/alter the cell. Therefore, we believe that this approach can be of interest for the study of thermal effects in laser induced thermal therapies.

  18. High Temperature Characteristics of Pt/TaSi2/Pt/W and Pt/Ti/W Diffusion Barrier Systems for Ohmic Contacts to 4H-SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Lukco, Dorothy

    2017-01-01

    The degradation of ohmic contacts to 4H-SiC pressure sensors over time at high temperature is primarily due to two failure mechanisms: migrating bond pad Au and atmospheric O toward the ohmic contact SiC interface and the inter-metallic mixing between diffusion barrier systems (DBS) and the underlying ohmic contact metallization. We investigated the effectiveness of Pt/TaSi2/Pt/W (DBS-A) and Pt/Ti/W (DBS-B) in preventing Au and O diffusion through the underlying binary Ti/W or alloyed W50:Ni50 ohmic contacts to 4H-SiC and the DBS ohmic contact intermixing at temperature up to 700 C.

  19. The effect of temperature on eccentric contraction-induced isometric force loss in isolated perfused rat medial gastrocnemius muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Vasaghi Gharamaleki B; Keshavarz M; Gharibzadeh Sh; Marvi H; Mosayebnejad J; Ebrahimi Takamjani E

    2008-01-01

    "nBackground: The typical features of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage are delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and prolonged loss of muscle strength. It has been shown that passive warmth is effective in reducing muscle injury. Due to the interaction of different systems in vivo, we used isolated perfused medial gastrocnemius skeletal muscle to study the direct effect of temperature on the eccentric contraction-induced force loss. "nMethods: After femoral artery cannulation...

  20. Endocrine mechanisms mediating temperature-induced reproductive behavior in red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutterschmidt, Deborah I; Mason, Robert T

    2009-10-01

    We investigated the mechanisms by which temperature induces seasonal reproductive behavior in red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis). Specifically, we addressed whether elevated temperatures during winter dormancy influence (1) diel melatonin and corticosterone rhythms; (2) sex steroid hormone and corticosterone profiles; and (3) the expression of reproductive behavior following emergence. Elevated hibernation temperatures (i.e. 10 degrees C versus 5 degrees C) significantly increased overall melatonin and decreased corticosterone concentrations of snakes. The temperature-induced differences in melatonin rhythms between the 5 degrees C and 10 degrees C treatment groups persisted even after both groups were again acclimated to 10 degrees C, indicating that cold temperature exposure has a lasting influence on melatonin rhythms. Elevated hibernation temperatures also significantly altered androgen and corticosterone profiles of snakes, providing a potential mechanism to explain reported annual variation in steroid hormones. Although previous studies indicate that male red-sided garter snakes exhibit a dissociated reproductive strategy, we demonstrate the presence of intersexual variation in sex steroid hormone profiles, as estradiol concentrations of female snakes increased significantly prior to spring mating activity. Importantly, the percentage change in body mass did not differ significantly between snakes in the hibernation treatments, indicating that the observed changes in hormone profiles are indeed temperature induced and not simply an indirect result of significant changes in the energy balance of snakes. Finally, in males maintained at 10 degrees C during winter dormancy the onset of courtship behavior following emergence was delayed. Our results suggest that environmental temperatures induce reproductive behavior, in part, via changes in diel melatonin and/or corticosterone rhythms in this seasonally breeding reptile.