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Sample records for temperature corrosion tests

  1. Double shell slurry low-temperature corrosion tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.; McPartland, S.A.; Elmore, R.P.; Engel, D.W.

    1983-09-01

    A series of year-long tests have been completed on potential double shell slurry (DSS) compositions at temperatures up to 100 0 C. These tests have sought data on uniform corrosion, pitting, and stress-corrosion cracking. No indication of the latter two types of corrosion were observed within the test matrix. Corrosion rates after four months were generally below the 1 mpy (25 μm/y) design limit. By the end of twelve months all results were below this limit and, except for very concentrated mixtures, all were below 0.5 mpy. Prediction equations were generated from a model fitted to the data. The equations provide a rapid means of estimating the corrosion rate for proposed DSS compositions

  2. High temperature corrosion investigation in an oxyfuel combustion test rig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Bjurman, M.; Hjörnhede, A

    2014-01-01

    constructed by Brandenburg Technical University to gain understanding into oxyfuel firing. Two air‐cooled corrosion probes were exposed in this oxyfuel combustion chamber where the fuel was lignite. Gas composition was measured at the location of testing. Various alloys from a 2½ Cr steel, austenitic steels...... (perhaps carburized) zone was used as a measure of corrosion rates. The lowest alloyed steel had the highest corrosion rate, and the other austenitic and nickel alloys had much lower corrosion rates. Precipitates in the alloy adjacent the corrosion front were revealed for both Sanicro 28 and C‐276. However......Oxyfuel firing and subsequent capture of CO2 is a way to reduce CO2 emissions from coal‐fired boilers. Literature is summarized highlighting results which may contribute to understanding of the corrosion processes in an oxyfuel boiler.Tests were conducted in a 500 kWth oxyfuel test facility...

  3. Corrosion rate of copper in aqueous lithium bromide concentrated solutions at room temperature by immersion tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Portero, M.J.; Garcia-Anton, J.; Guinon-Segura, J.L.; Perez-Herranz, V. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Concentrated solutions of lithium bromide (LiBr) are widely used in absorption refrigeration and heating systems. However, LiBr solutions can cause serious corrosion problems in structural materials (copper, steels, and other metals) in an absorption plant. The aim of the present work was the study of the corrosion rate of copper in 400 and 700 g/L (4.61 and 8.06 M) LiBr solutions pre-nitrogenous or pre-oxygenated at room temperature by immersion tests. The corroded copper concentration was determined with two techniques: weight-loss method and polarographic method. The corrosion curves of copper in LiBr solutions at room temperature as a function of the exposure time showed a similar tendency, and were fitted to a power function such as: C = kt{sup b}, where C was the corroded copper quantity per unit area (mg/cm{sup 2}), t was the exposure time (h), k was the corrosion coefficient, and b was the time exponent. From the corrosion coefficient values (k) it was deduced that the corrosion rate of copper in LiBr solutions at room temperature followed the order: 400 g/L (bubble of O{sub 2}) > 400 g/L (bubble of N{sub 2}) > 700 g/L (bubble of O{sub 2}) > 700 g/L (bubble of N{sub 2}). (authors)

  4. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  5. Thermal Cycling and High-Temperature Corrosion Tests of Rare Earth Silicate Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darthout, Émilien; Gitzhofer, François

    2017-12-01

    Lutetium and yttrium silicates, enriched with an additional secondary zirconia phase, environmental barrier coatings were synthesized by the solution precursor plasma spraying process on silicon carbide substrates. A custom-made oven was designed for thermal cycling and water vapor corrosion testing. The oven can test four specimens simultaneously and allows to evaluate environmental barrier performances under similar corrosion kinetics compared to turbine engines. Coatings structural evolution has been observed by SEM on the polished cross sections, and phase composition has been analyzed by XRD. All coatings have been thermally cycled between 1300 °C and the ambient temperature, without spallation, due to their porosity and the presence of additional secondary phase which increases the thermal cycling resistance. During water vapor exposure at 1200 °C, rare earth disilicates showed a good stability, which is contradictory with the literature, due to impurities—such as Si- and Al-hydroxides—in the water vapor jets. The presence of vertical cracks allowed the water vapor to reach the substrate and then to corrode it. It has been observed that thin vertical cracks induced some spallation after 24 h of corrosion.

  6. Effects of hardness and test temperature on the stress-corrosion cracking susceptibility of carbon steel in simulated BWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Guen; Akashi, Masatsune

    1998-01-01

    Carbon steels which are used for such as water supply line, core spray line, and clean up heat exchanger in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Plant, are main structural materials as well as an austenitic stainless steels, and Ni based alloys. It has been well known that carbon steels can become susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in BWR primary coolant water environments, i.e., the high-temperature, high-purity water containing dissolved oxygen. Nevertheless, their sensitivity of SCC appears to be markedly smaller compared to that of weld-sensitized Type 304 stainless steels, whole failure has often been observed. This paper examines the critical condition, especially effects of hardness, and temperature for the initiation of SCC by means of Slow Strain Rate Tensile (SSRT) test, and Creviced Bent Beam (CBB) test as laboratory accelerated tests. It has been shown that, (1) Intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) initiates over hardness of Hv 400 for single bead weld material, simulated corner weld; (2) in middle temperature domain around 160 to 190degC range, so many stress-corrosion cracks initiate, but each crack is not so deep, on the other hand, in high temperature domain, stress-corrosion cracks initiate few in number, but each cracks is developed so deep. (author)

  7. Accelerated cyclic corrosion tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prošek T.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated corrosion testing is indispensable for material selection, quality control and both initial and residual life time prediction for bare and painted metallic, polymeric, adhesive and other materials in atmospheric exposure conditions. The best known Neutral Salt Spray (NSS test provides unrealistic conditions and poor correlation to exposures in atmosphere. Modern cyclic accelerated corrosion tests include intermittent salt spray, wet and dry phases and eventually other technical phases. They are able to predict the material performance in service more correctly as documented on several examples. The use of NSS should thus be restricted for quality control.

  8. Corrosion testing of NiCrAl(Y) coating alloys in high-temperature and supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biljan, S.; Huang, X.; Qian, Y.; Guzonas, D.

    2011-01-01

    With the development of Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear power reactors, materials capable of operating in high-temperature and supercritical water environment are essential. This study focuses on the corrosion behavior of five alloys with compositions of Ni20Cr, Ni5Al, Ni50Cr, Ni20Cr5Al and Ni20Cr10AlY above and below the critical point of water. Corrosion tests were conducted at three different pressures, while the temperature was maintained at 460 o C, in order to examine the effects of water density on the corrosion. From the preliminary test results, it was found that the binary alloys Ni20Cr and Ni50Cr showed weight loss above the critical point (23.7 MPa and 460 o C). The higher Cr content alloy Ni50Cr suffered more weight loss than Ni-20Cr under the same conditions. Accelerated weight gain was observed above the critical point for the binary alloy Ni5Al. The combination of Cr, Al and Y in Ni20Cr10AlY provides stable scale formation under all testing conditions employed in this study. (author)

  9. Corrosion testing facilities in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, R.; Subramanian, Venu

    1981-01-01

    Major types of corrosion tests, establishment of specifications on corrosion testing and scope of their application in practice are briefly described. Important organizations in the world which publish specifications/standards are listed. Indian organizations which undertake corrosion testing and test facilities available at them are also listed. Finally in an appendix, a comprehensive list of specifications relevant to corrosion testing is given. It is arranged under the headings: environmental testing, humidity tests, salt spray/fog tests, immersion tests, specification corrosion phenomena, (tests) with respect to special corrosion media, (tests) with respect to specific corrosion prevention methods, and specific corrosion tests using electrical and electrochemical methods (principles). Each entry in the list furnishes information about: nature of the test, standard number, and its specific application. (M.G.B.)

  10. High temperature corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.

    1988-08-01

    This paper covers three main topics: 1. high temperature oxidation of metals and alloys, 2. corrosion in sulfur containing environments and 3. structural changes caused by corrosion. The following 21 subjects are discussed: Influence of implanted yttrium and lanthanum on the oxidation behaviour of beta-NiA1; influence of reactive elements on the adherence and protective properties of alumina scales; problems related to the application of very fine markers in studying the mechanism of thin scale formation; oxidation behaviour of chromia forming Co-Cr-Al alloys with or without reactive element additions; growth and properties of chromia-scales on high-temperature alloys; quantification of the depletion zone in high temperature alloys after oxidation in process gas; effects of HC1 and of N2 in the oxidation of Fe-20Cr; investigation under nuclear safety aspects of Zircaloy-4 oxidation kinetics at high temperatures in air; on the sulfide corrosion of metallic materials; high temperature sulfide corrosion of Mn, Nb and Nb-Si alloys; corrosion behaviour or NiCrAl-based alloys in air and air-SO2 gas mixtures; sulfidation of cobalt at high temperatures; preoxidation for sulfidation protection; fireside corrosion and application of additives in electric utility boilers; transport properties of scales with complex defect structures; observations of whiskers and pyramids during high temperature corrosion of iron in SO2; corrosion and creep of alloy 800H under simulated coal gasification conditions; microstructural changes of HK 40 cast alloy caused by exploitation in tubes in steam reformer installation; microstructural changes during exposure in corrosive environments and their effect on mechanical properties; coatings against carburization; mathematical modeling of carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation in Ni-Cr-based alloys. (MM)

  11. High temperature corrosion in gasifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakker Wate

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several commercial scale coal gasification combined cycle power plants have been built and successfully operated during the last 5-10 years. Supporting research on materials of construction has been carried out for the last 20 years by EPRI and others. Emphasis was on metallic alloys for heat exchangers and other components in contact with hot corrosive gases at high temperatures. In this paper major high temperature corrosion mechanisms, materials performance in presently operating gasifiers and future research needs will be discussed.

  12. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80 degrees C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either open-quotes satisfactoryclose quotes (2-20 mpy) or open-quotes excellentclose quotes (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment

  13. Testing methodologies for corrosion fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    Delmotte, Edward; Micone, Nahuel; De Waele, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Offshore constructions are subjected to cyclic loading conditions. This situation is combined with the corrosive nature of the surrounding environment. It is of actual concern whether the combined effect is more damaging or not than the superposition of each effect independently. This literature review first introduces the reader to corrosion fatigue. Thereafter a critical comparison of some typical lab-scale fatigue corrosion test setups is given. Special emphasis is devoted to the instru...

  14. Tests on dynamic corrosion by water. Influence of the passage of a heat flux on the corrosion kinetics. pH measurement in water at high temperature; Essais de corrosion dynamique par l'eau. Influence du passage d'un flux thermique sur la cinetique de corrosion. Mesure du pH dans l'eau a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coriou, H.; Grall, L.; Hure, J.; Saint-James, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Berthod [Societe Grenobloise d' Etudes et d' Applications Hydrauliques, 38 (France); Le peintre [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1958-07-01

    The passage of a heat flux through the surface of a metal placed in a corrosive medium influences the rate of corrosion, these being higher than under adiabatic conditions. The apparatus developed for corrosion tests is described, it is possible to obtain with this equipment: 1) Heat fluxes greater than 200 W/cm{sup 2}, across aluminium canning, which is cooled by water (temperature 50 deg. C), circulating with flow rates of the order of 5 to 6 m/s. 2) Heat fluxes which can go up to 150 W/cm{sup 2}, across canning of zircaloy or stainless steel. The cooling fluid is pressurized water at a temperature around 280 deg. C, the flow-rate of circulation reaching 6 m/s. The results obtained on aluminium canning are studied from the viewpoint of corrosion, paying particular attention to cavitation phenomena which can cause serious damage in certain special circumstances. After developing a glass electrode system capable of supporting high pressures, the authors have investigated materials capable of functioning as a hydrogen electrode and of resisting satisfactorily corrosion by water at 200 deg. C. Various possibilities have been examined: electrodes of special glasses, quartz, metals, with a membrane etc... The results of the various tests and the practical limits of utilisation are given. (author)Fren. [French] Le passage d'un flux thermique a travers la surface d'un metal place dans un milieu corrosif influence les vitesses de corrosion, celles-ci etant plus elevees que dans des conditions adiabatiques. On decrit les appareils mis au point, pour essais de corrosion. Ils permettent d'obtenir: 1) A travers des gaine aluminium des flux thermiques depassant 200 W /cm{sup 2}. Les gaines sont refroidies par l'eau (temperature 50 deg. C), circulant a des vitesses de l'ordre de 5 a 6 m/s. 2) A travers des gaines en zircaloy ou acier inoxydable des flux thermiques pouvant s'elever a 150 W/cm{sup 2}. Le fluide de refroidissement est de l

  15. Corrosion behaviour of construction materials for high temperature steam electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey; Petrushina, Irina; Christensen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Different types of commercially available stainless steels, Ni-based alloys as well as titanium and tantalum were evaluated as possible metallic bipolar plates and construction materials. The corrosion resistance was measured under simulated conditions corresponding to the conditions in high...... to corrosion under strong anodic polarisation. Among alloys, Ni-based showed the highest corrosion resistance in the simulated PEM electrolyser medium. In particular, Inconel 625 was the most promising among the tested corrosion-resistant alloys for the anodic compartment in high temperature steam electrolysis....... Tantalum showed outstanding resistance to corrosion in selected media. On the contrary, passivation of titanium was weak, and the highest rate of corrosion among all tested materials was observed for titanium at 120 degrees C....

  16. High temperature corrosion in straw-fired power plants: Influence of steam/metal temperature on corrosion rates for TP347H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Biede, O; Larsen, OH

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion in straw-fired boilers has been investigated at various straw-fired power plants in Denmark. Water/air-cooled probes, a test superheater and test sections removed from the actual superheater have been utilised to characterise corrosion and corrosion rates. This paper describes...... the corrosion rates measured for the TP347H type steel. The corrosion morphology at high temperature consists of grain boundary attack and selective attack of chromium. The corrosion rate increases with calculated metal temperature (based on steam temperature), however there is great variation within...... these results. In individual superheaters, there are significant temperature variations i.e. higher temperature in middle banks compared to the outer banks, higher temperature in leading tubes, which have a high impact on corrosion. In a single loop the assumption that heat uptake (and heat flux) is linear...

  17. METC ceramic corrosion/erosion studies: turbine-material screening tests in high-temperature, low-Btu, coal-derived-gas combustion products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaishi, C.V.; Waltermire, D.M.; Hawkins, L.W.; Jarrett, T.L.

    1982-05-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center, through its Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Studies, has participated in the United States Department of Energy's High-Temperature Turbine Technology Program, Ceramic Technology Readiness. The program's overall objective is to advance the turbine firing temperature to a range of 2600/sup 0/ to 3000/sup 0/F (1700 to 1922K) with a reasonable service life using coal or coal-derived fuel. The Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Studies' major objective was to conduct a screening test for several ceramic materials to assess their probability of survival in turbine applications. The materials were exposed to combustion products from low heating value coal-derived gas and air at several high temperatures and velocities. The combustion product composition and temperatures simulated actual environment that may be found in stationary power generating gas turbines except for the pressure levels. The results of approximately 1000 hours of accumulative exposure time of material at the specific test conditions are presented in this report.

  18. Corrosion of titanium alloys in high temperature near anaerobic seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Jianjun; Blackwood, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • In absence of CO 2 Ti grades 2 and 5 suffer crevice corrosion at temperatures 80 °C and 200 °C. • For Ti grade 5 crevice corrosion can occur as low as 80 °C in the presence of CO 2 . • Ti grade 7 is immune to crevice corrosion in test conditions. • All grades resistant to SCC and pitting in presence of CO 2 . • Rare earth yttrium additions below 0.2 wt%. for improved mechanical properties are detrimental to corrosions performance. • Analysis of threat of hydrogen induced cracking suggest this is not a threat at a deepsea well head. - Abstract: Grades 2, 5 and Grade 7 were investigated in near anaerobic (<1 ppm oxygen) seawater up to 200 °C with and without CO 2 . All three grades were found to resist stress corrosion cracking and pitting corrosion. Grades 2 and 5 suffer crevice corrosion at temperatures 80 °C and 200 °C respectively. In the presence of CO 2 Grade 5 becomes more vulnerable to crevice corrosion, with attack starting at 80 °C with preferential dissolution of the beta phase. An analysis of the threat of hydrogen induced cracking leads to the conclusion that this was not a likely threat to any of the Ti alloys investigated.

  19. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as...

  20. General corrosion of carbon steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    This short paper seeks to provide a summary of the main knowledge about the general corrosion of carbon steels in high temperature water. In pure water or slightly alkaline deaerated water, steels develop a protective coating of magnetite in a double layer (Potter and Mann oxide) or a single layer (Bloom oxide). The morphology of the oxide layer and the kinetics of corrosion depend on the test parameters controlling the solubility of iron. The parameters exercising the greatest influence are partial hydrogen pressure and mass transfer: hydrogen favours the solubilization of the magnetite; the entrainment of the dissolved iron prevents a redeposition of magnetite on the surface of the steel. Cubic or parabolic in static conditions, the kinetics of corrosion tends to be linear in dynamic conditions. In dynamic operation, corrosion is at least one order of magnitude lower in water with a pH of 10 than in pure water with a pH of 7. The activation energy of corrosion is 130 kJ/mol (31 kcal/mol). This results in the doubling of corrosion at around 300 deg C for a temperature increase of 15 deg C. Present in small quantities (100-200 ppb), oxygen decreases general corrosion but increases the risk of pitting corrosion - even for a low chloride content - and stress corrosion cracking or corrosion-fatigue. The steel composition has probably an influence on the kinetics of corrosion in dynamic conditions; further work would be required to clarify the effect of some residual elements. (author). 31 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    cycle) AT1 0.24 AT5 2.4 k 1074 AT7 0.21 AT6 2.4 x 10-4 AT8 0.25 BIA 3.4 x 10-4 AT9 0.22 BL3 0.38 BL8 0.42 - .,14 of the specimen could be made common for...conditions in a cabi- net,79-82 and spray and fogs. 83-8 It was found35 that the data obtained in accelerated laboratory testing of metals in the presence...laboratory and outdoor exposure results. L4 29 F ,, . , • . .. -.. _.• ff’*• _, . . ._ • • • • 7 k. SALT SPRAY The salt- spray test involves exposure of

  2. Corrosion inhibitor testing in archaeological conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Faltermeier

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Metal objects from archaeological contexts often suffer serious damage by corrosion. Various methods for inhibiting corrosion have been developed, but their effects need to be evaluated. Here new research is described on how treatments to inhibit the corrosion of copper and copper-alloy artefacts may be tested.

  3. Corrosion assessment of refractory materials for high temperature waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, J.C.; Congdon, J.W.; Kielpinski, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of vitrification technologies are being evaluated to immobilize radioactive and hazardous wastes following years of nuclear materials production throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The compositions and physical forms of these wastes are diverse ranging from inorganic sludges to organic liquids to heterogeneous debris. Melt and off-gas products can be very corrosive at the high temperatures required to melt many of these waste streams. Ensuring material durability is required to develop viable treatment processes. Corrosion testing of materials in some of the anticipated severe environments is an important aspect of the materials identification and selection process. Corrosion coupon tests on typical materials used in Joule heated melters were completed using glass compositions with high salt contents. The presence of chloride in the melts caused the most severe attack. In the metal alloys, oxidation was the predominant corrosion mechanism, while in the tested refractory material enhanced dissolution of the refractory into the glass was observed. Corrosion testing of numerous different refractory materials was performed in a plasma vitrification system using a surrogate heterogeneous debris waste. Extensive corrosion was observed in all tested materials

  4. From laboratory corrosion tests to a corrosion lifetime for wood fasteners : progress and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Dominique Derome; Samuel V. Glass

    2010-01-01

    Determining a “corrosion-lifetime” for fasteners embedded in wood treated with recently adopted preservative systems depends upon successfully relating results of laboratory tests to in-service conditions. In contrast to laboratory tests where metal is embedded in wood at constant temperature and moisture content, the in-service temperature and moisture content of wood...

  5. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that

  6. Geothermal drill pipe corrosion test plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, B.C.; Copass, K.S.

    1980-12-01

    Plans are presented for conducting a field test of drill pipe corrosion, comparing air and nitrogen as drilling fluids. This test will provide data for evaluating the potential of reducing geothermal well drilling costs by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control costs. The 10-day test will take place during fall 1980 at the Baca Location in Sandoval County, New Mexico.

  7. Erosion–corrosion and corrosion properties of DLC coated low temperature Erosion–corrosion and corrosion properties of DLC coated low temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Christiansen, Thomas; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2009-01-01

    of AISI 316 as substrate for DLC coatings are investigated. Corrosion and erosion–corrosion measurements were carried out on low temperature nitrided stainless steel AISI 316 and on low temperature nitrided stainless steel AISI 316 with a top layer of DLC. The combination of DLC and low temperature...

  8. Effect of ageing time and temperature on corrosion behaviour of aluminum alloy 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadpale, Vikas; Banjare, Pragya N.; Manoj, Manoranjan Kumar

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of corrosion behaviour of aluminium alloy 2014 were studied by potentiodynamic polarization in 1 mole of NaCl solution of aged sample. The experimental testing results concluded that, corrosion resistance of Aluminum alloy 2014 degraded with the increasing the temperature (150°C & 200°C) and time of ageing. Corroded surface of the aged specimens was tested under optical microscopes for microstructures for phase analysis. Optical micrographs of corroded surfaces showed general corrosion and pitting corrosion. The corrosion resistance of lower ageing temperature and lower ageing time is higher because of its fine distribution of precipitates in matrix phase.

  9. The WR-1 corrosion test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.V.; Simmons, G.R.

    1978-07-01

    This report describes a new Corrosion Test Facility which has recently been installed in the WR-1 organic-cooled research reactor. The irradiation facility is a single insert, installed in a reactor site, which can deliver a fast neutron flux density of 2.65 x 10 17 neutrons/(m 2 .s) to specimens under irradiation. A self-contained controlled-chemistry cooling water circuit removes the gamma- and neutron-heat generated in the insert and specimens. Specimen temperatures typically vary from 245 deg C to 280 deg C across the insert core region. (author)

  10. Corrosion Inhibition in High Temperature Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-28

    nickel-based or 20 cobalt -based superalloys , or with ferric oxide from high 21 temperature steels, to produce spalling metal vanadates. 22 Similar hot...metallic 5 superalloy Rene 80, or a ceramic, such as silicon nitride or 6 silicon carbide . Rene 80 is a nickel-based superalloy used for gas 7 turbine... superalloys to form 9 nonprotective NaAlO 2 which causes catastrophic hot corrosion. High 10 temperature chromium-containing metals which rely on chromia

  11. Ambient temperature stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieradzki, K.; Isaacs, H.S.; Newman, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized Type 304 steel in low temperature borated water has been observed. The probable role of low levels of chloride ions or sulfur-containing ions is described, including the relationship of the phenomenon to polythionic acid cracking. The mechanism of the sulfur-induced cracking and its usefulness as a test for sensitization are outlined

  12. High Temperature Corrosion on Biodust Firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi

    conditions and is accelerated once the material encounters a higher temperature. For the investigated austenitic stainless steels, FeCrAl alloys and Ni-based superalloy, the formation of a protective oxide layer that suppressed corrosion attack was not observed. However, it was established that among...... the alloying elements present in these alloys, Ni exhibits a relatively greater resistance to corrosion attack. Surface modification approaches with the aim to form resistant oxides or coatings on superheater surfaces were evaluated. This included preoxidation to obtain Al2O3 and Ti-Cr-rich oxides, as well...... as formation of SiOx coating, Ni electroplating and NiAl coatings on commercial alloys. For most of the modified surfaces, in particular α-Al2O3 obtained by preoxidation, poor mechanical integrity of the oxide layer nullifies its otherwise excellent chemical integrity towards corrosion attack. Nonetheless...

  13. Electrochemical corrosion testing of metal waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, D. P.; Peterson, J. J.; Katyal, H. K.; Keiser, D. D.; Hilton, B. A.

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical corrosion tests have been conducted on simulated stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) metal waste form (MWF) samples. The uniform aqueous corrosion behavior of the samples in various test solutions was measured by the polarization resistance technique. The data show that the MWF corrosion rates are very low in groundwaters representative of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Galvanic corrosion measurements were also conducted on MWF samples that were coupled to an alloy that has been proposed for the inner lining of the high-level nuclear waste container. The experiments show that the steady-state galvanic corrosion currents are small. Galvanic corrosion will, hence, not be an important mechanism of radionuclide release from the MWF alloys

  14. Corrosion performance tests for reinforcing steel in concrete : test procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    The existing test method to assess the corrosion performance of reinforcing steel embedded in concrete, mainly : ASTM G109, is labor intensive, time consuming, slow to provide comparative results, and often expensive. : However, corrosion of reinforc...

  15. Burner rig alkali salt corrosion of several high temperature alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion of five alloys was studied in cyclic tests in a Mach 0.3 burner rig into whose combustion chamber various aqueous salt solutions were injected. Three nickel-based alloys, a cobalt-base alloy, and an iron-base alloy were studied at temperatures of 700, 800, 900, and 1000 C with various salt concentrations and compositions. The relative resistance of the alloys to hot corrosion attack was found to vary with temperature and both concentration and composition of the injected salt solution. Results indicate that the corrosion of these alloys is a function of both the presence of salt condensed as a liquid on the surface and of the composition of the gas phases present.

  16. Changes in the flexural strength of engineering ceramics after high temperature sodium corrosion test. Influence after sodium exposure for 1000 hours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kazunori; Tachi, Yoshiaki; Kano, Shigeki; Hirakawa, Yasushi; Komine, Ryuji; Yoshida, Eiichi

    1998-02-01

    Engineering ceramics have excellent properties such as high strength, high hardness and high heat resistance compared with metallic materials. To apply the ceramic in fast reactor environment, it is necessary to evaluate the sodium compatibility and the influence of sodium on the mechanical properties of ceramics. In this study, the influence of high temperature sodium on the mechanical properties of sintered ceramics of conventional and high purity Al 2 O 3 , SiC, SiAlON, AlN and unidirectional solidified ceramics of Al 2 O 3 /YAG eutectic composite were investigated by means of flexure tests. Test specimens were exposed in liquid sodium at 823K and 923K for 3.6Ms. There were no changes in the flexural strength of the conventional and high purity Al 2 O 3 , AlN and Al 2 O 3 /YAG eutectic composite after the sodium exposure at 823K. On the contrary, the decrease in the flexural strength was observed in SiC and SiAlON. After the sodium exposure at 923K, there were also no changes in the flexural strength of AlN and Al 2 O 3 /YAG eutectic composite. In the conventional and high purity Al 2 O 3 and SiC, the flexural strength decreased and signs of grain boundary corrosion were detected by surface observation. The flexural strength of SiAlON after the sodium exposure at 923K increased instead of severe corrosion. In the specimens those showed no changes in the flexural strength, further exposure in sodium is needed to verify whether the mechanical properties degrade or not. For SiAlON, it is necessary to clarify the reason for the increased strength after the sodium exposure at 923K. (author)

  17. Corrosion behaviour of construction materials for high temperature water electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey

    2010-01-01

    Different types of corrosion resistant stainless steels, Ni-based alloys as well as titanium and tantalum were evaluated as a possible metallic bipolar plate and construction material with respect to corrosion resistance under simulated conditions corresponding to the conditions in high temperature...... proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolysers (HTPEMWE). All samples were exposed to anodic polarisation in 85% phosphoric acid electrolyte solution. Platinum and gold plates were tested for the valid comparison. Steady-state voltammetry was used in combination with scanning electron microscopy...

  18. Standard Test Method for Sandwich Corrosion Test

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method defines the procedure for evaluating the corrosivity of aircraft maintenance chemicals, when present between faying surfaces (sandwich) of aluminum alloys commonly used for aircraft structures. This test method is intended to be used in the qualification and approval of compounds employed in aircraft maintenance operations. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information. 1.3 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Specific hazard statements appear in Section 9.

  19. Corrosion testing in flash tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, S.J.; Stead, N.J.

    1999-07-01

    As kraft pulp mills adopt modified cooking processes, an increasing amount of corrosion of carbon steel digester systems is being encountered. Many mills have had severe corrosion in the flash tanks, in particular, the first ({number{underscore}sign}1) flash tank. The work described in this report was aimed at characterizing the corrosion. Coupons of carbon steel, several stainless steels and titanium were exposed at two mills. At mill A, identical sets of coupons were exposed in the {number{underscore}sign}1 and {number{underscore}sign}2 flash tank. At mill B, three identical sets of coupons were placed in flash tank {number{underscore}sign}1. The results of the exposures showed that both carbon steel and titanium suffered high rates of general corrosion, while the stainless steels suffered varying degrees of localized attack. The ranking of the resistance of corrosion in the flash tank was the same ranking as would be expected in a reducing acid environment. In the light of the coupon results, organic acids is concluded to be the most likely cause of corrosion of the flash tanks.

  20. High temperature corrosion of separator materials for MCFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagida, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Kazumi; Kojima, Toshikatsu [Osaka National Research Institute (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) is one of promising high efficiency power generation devices with low emission. Molten carbonate used for its electrolyte plays an important role in MCFC. It separates between anode and cathode gas environment and provides ionic conductivity on MCFC operation. Stainless steel is conventionally used as separator/current collector materials in MCFC cathode environment. As corrosion of the components of MCFC caused by the electrolyte proceeds with the electrolyte consumption, the corrosion in the MCFC is related to its performance and life. To understand and inhibit the corrosion in the MCFC is important to realize MCFC power generation system. We have studied the effect of alkaline earth carbonate addition into carbonate on corrosion of type 316L stainless steel. In this paper, we describe the effect of the temperature on corrosion behavior of type 316L stainless steel with carbonate mixture, (Li{sub 0.62}K{sub 0.38}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}, under the cathode environment in out-of-cell test.

  1. High Temperature Corrosion in Biomass Incineration Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Maahn, Ernst emanuel; Gotthjælp, K.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the project is to study the role of ash deposits in high temperature corrosion of superheater materials in biomass and refuse fire combined heat and power plants. The project has included the two main activities: a) A chemical characterisation of ash deposits collected from a major...... number of biomass and refuse fired combined heat and power plant boilers, b) Laboratory exposures and metallurgical examinations of material specimens with ash deposits in well-defined gas environments with HCl and SO2 in a furnace....

  2. Vehicle accelerated corrosion test procedures for automotive in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar Liza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An accelerated corrosion test, known as proving ground accelerated test, is commonly performed by automotive manufacturers to evaluate the corrosion performance of a vehicle. The test combines corrosion and durability inputs to detect potential failures that may occur during in-service conditions. Currently, the test is conducted at an external test center overseas. Such test is aimed to simulate the effects of one year accelerated corrosion in severe corrosive environment of the north-east and south east of America. However, the test results obtained do not correlate with the actual corrosion conditions observed in the Malaysian market, which is likely attributed to the different test environment of the tropical climate of vehicles in service. Therefore, a vehicle accelerated corrosion test procedure that suits the Malaysian market is proposed and benchmarked with other global car manufacturers that have their own dedicated corrosion test procedure. In the present work, a test track is used as the corrosion test ground and consists of various types of roads for structural durability exposures. Corrosion related facilities like salt trough, mud trough and gravel road are constructed as addition to the existing facilities. The establishment of accelerated corrosion test facilities has contributed to the development of initial accelerated corrosion test procedure for the national car manufacturer. The corrosion exposure is monitored by fitting test coupons at the underbody of test vehicle using mass loss technique so that the desired corrosion rate capable of simulating the real time corrosion effects for its target market.

  3. Mechanical Characterization and Corrosion Testing of X608 Al Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Catalini, David; Lavender, Curt A.; Rohatgi, Aashish

    2016-02-07

    This paper describes the mechanical characterization and corrosion testing of X608 Al alloy that is being considered for A-pillar covers for heavy-duty truck applications. Recently, PNNL developed a thermo-mechanical process to stamp A-pillar covers at room temperature using this alloy, and the full-size prototype was successfully stamped by a tier-1 supplier. This study was conducted to obtain additional important information related to the newly developed forming process, and to further improve its mechanical properties. The solutionization temperature, pre-strain and paint-bake heat-treatment were found to influence the alloy’s fabricability and mechanical properties. Natural aging effect on the formability was investigated by limiting dome height (LDH) tests. Preliminary corrosion experiments showed that the employed thermo-mechanical treatments did not significantly affect the corrosion behavior of Al X608.

  4. INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE ON THE CORROSION POTENTIAL OF THE 241-AN-102 MULTI PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEM SECONDARY REFERENCE ELECTRODES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EDGEMON GL; TAYLOR TM

    2008-09-30

    A test program using 241-AN-102 waste simulants and metallic secondary reference electrodes similar to those used on the 241-AN-102 MPCMS was performed to characterize the relationship between temperature and secondary reference electrode open-circuit corrosion potential. This program showed that the secondary reference electrodes can be used to make tank and tank steel corrosion potential measurements, but that a correction factor of approximately 2 mV per degree Celsius of temperature difference must be applied, where temperature difference is defined as the difference between tank temperature at the time of measurement and 30 C, the average tank temperature during the first several months of 241-AN-102 MPCMS operation (when the corrosion potentials of the secondary reference electrodes were being recorded relative to the primary reference electrodes).

  5. Guided wave testing for touch point corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alleyne, David

    2012-01-01

    Guided wave testing (GWT) is established in the petrochemical and related industries, primarily for the detection of corrosion flaws. Touch point corrosion at support positions in pipe-work has become a significant problem within many operating gas, chemical and petro-chemical plants world-wide, particularly as a high proportion of these plants have been operational for many decades. This article demonstrates how GWT using guided waves sent axially along the pipe can be performed for the detection and accurate classification of touchpoint corrosion. The major advantage of GWT methods for the detection of touch point corrosion is its ability to examine several support positions from a single easy to access transducer position. The strategy is then to prioritize or rank the condition of the pipe at the supports by removing those with negligible wall loss from scheduling for further inspection. Guided waves are accurate at detecting and classifying corrosion patches at support positions, but deep pits within such patches are more difficult to accurately identify. Examples using data from routine inspection testing are used to support the development of the methods and testing approaches presented. Recent developments of the interpretation methods, testing procedures and calibration methods have significantly enhanced the capabilities of GWT for this important application.

  6. Effect of temperature on structure and corrosion resistance for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of plating temperatures between 60 and 90◦C on structure and corrosion resistance for elec- troless NiWP coatings on AZ91D magnesium alloy substrate was investigated. Results show that temperature has a significant influence on the surface morphology and corrosion resistance of the NiWP alloy ...

  7. Effect of temperature on structure and corrosion resistance for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of plating temperatures between 60 and 90 ∘ C on structure and corrosion resistance for electroless NiWP coatings on AZ91D magnesium alloy substrate was investigated. Results show that temperature has a significant influence on the surface morphology and corrosion resistance of the NiWP alloy coating.

  8. Stability of electroplated titanium diboride coatings in high-temperature corrosive media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybakova, N.; Souto, M. [ECHEM Centre of Competence in Applied Electrochemistry, Viktor Kaplan-Strasse 2, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Martinz, H.-P. [Plansee SE, 6600 Reutte (Austria); Andriyko, Y.; Artner, W.; Godinho, Jose [ECHEM Centre of Competence in Applied Electrochemistry, Viktor Kaplan-Strasse 2, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Nauer, G.E. [ECHEM Centre of Competence in Applied Electrochemistry, Viktor Kaplan-Strasse 2, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); University of Vienna, Faculty of Chemistry, Waehringer Strasse 42, A-1090 Wien (Austria)], E-mail: gerhard.nauer@echem.at

    2009-06-15

    The corrosion behaviour of molybdenum and steel materials, protected by electrochemically plated TiB{sub 2} coatings, in contact with liquid aluminium alloys and liquid glass in air has been studied. The corrosion performance tests followed by characterization of the treated samples by optical microscopy, SEM, elemental EDX analysis, have shown high corrosion resistance of the coatings to the liquid metal. However, the coating was not stable in contact with molten glass in an oxidative atmosphere at temperatures higher as 750-800 deg. C. Dissolution of the corrosion products in the melt facilitates the destruction of the coating.

  9. High temperature liquid metal corrosion and high temperature electrical conductivity of Y 2O 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneoka, Toshiaki; Terai, Takayuki; Takahashi, Yoichi

    1997-09-01

    Yttrium sesquioxide has been proposed as a promising candidate material for collector electrodes used in the laser enrichment system of uranium-235. For this purpose, yttria is expected to be compatible with molten uranium and electrically conductive. A corrosion test of yttria with molten lanthanum as a simulating metal for uranium and a measurement of its electrical conductivity under extremely low oxygen pressure were performed. It was shown from the corrosion test that a yttria sample was considerably corroded by the molten lanthanum at 1513 K and the maximum corrosion depth for 5 Ms was 0.162 mm. The electrical conductivity of hypo-stoichiometric yttria reduced by titanium was higher than that of pure germanium at room temperature (2.1 S/m). The oxygen pressures equilibrated with the yttria specimens were estimated to discuss the relation to measured conductivities.

  10. Electrochemical corrosion of Zircaloy-2 under PWR water chemistry but at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, Abdel-Aziz Fahmy; Kandil, Abdel-Hakim Taha; Hamed, Hani M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • There is no simple relation between the corrosion rate and LiOH concentration. • At low concentration, 100 ppm Li, an increase of the rate is due to the pH impact. • LiOH in concentrated solution led to accelerated corrosion by pH effect and porosity. • Boron abates the lithium effect by pH neutralizing and participation in the corrosion. - Abstract: Electrochemical corrosion of Zircaloy-2 was tested at room temperature in lithium hydroxide (LiOH) concentrations that ranged from 2.2 to 7000 ppm and boric acid (H 3 BO 3 ) concentrations that ranged from 50 to 4000 ppm. Following the corrosion experiments, the oxide films of specimens were examined by SEM to examine the oxide existence. LiOH concentrations as high as 1 M (7000-ppm lithium) can lead to significantly increased electrochemical corrosion rate. It is suggested that the accelerated corrosion in concentrated solution is caused by the synergetic effect of LiOH, pH and porosity generation. In solutions containing 100 ppm of lithium, the presence of boron had an ameliorating effect on the corrosion rates of Zircaloy-2. Similar to acceleration of corrosion by lithium, the inhibition by boron is due to a combined effect of pH neutralizing and its participation in the corrosion process.

  11. Corrosion behavior of construction materials for intermediate temperature steam electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey; Petrushina, Irina; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2013-01-01

    Different corrosion resistant stainless steels, nickel-based alloys, pure nickel, Ta-coated stainless steel (AISI 316L), niobium, platinum and gold rods were evaluated as possible materials for use in the intermediate temperature (200-400 °C) acidic water electrolysers. The corrosion resistance...... was measured under simulated conditions (molten KH2PO4) corresponding to the proton-conducting solid acids or transition metal phosphates as electrolytes. It was shown that, unlike at temperatures below 200 °C, gold is unstable with respect to corrosion in molten KH2PO4. Platinum demonstrated high corrosion...... resistance and the anodic and cathodic limits were for the first time found for the electrolyte. Nickel, niobium, Inconel®625, Hastelloy®C-276 and Ta-coated stainless steel (AISI 316L) demonstrated high corrosion stability and can be recommended as construction materials for bipolar plates. © (2013) Trans...

  12. Corrosion performance tests for reinforcing steel in concrete : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    The existing test method used to assess the corrosion performance of reinforcing steel embedded in : concrete, mainly ASTM G 109, is labor intensive, time consuming, slow to provide comparative results, : and can be expensive. However, with corrosion...

  13. High temperature corrosion during biomass firing: improved understanding by depth resolved characterisation of corrosion products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature corrosion of an austenitic stainless steel (TP 347H FG), widely utilised as a superheater tube material in Danish power stations, was investigated to verify the corrosion mechanisms related to biomass firing. KCl coated samples were exposed isothermally to 560 degrees C...... changes within the near surface region (covering both the deposit and the steel surface). Such cross-section analysis was further complemented by plan view investigations (additionally involving X-ray diffraction) combined with removal of the corrosion products. Improved insights into the nature...... of the corrosion products as a function of distance from the deposit surface were revealed through this comprehensive characterisation. Corrosion attack during simulated straw-firing conditions was observed to occur through both active oxidation and sulphidation mechanisms....

  14. Corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  15. Effect of high temperature corrosion in liquid lithium on mechanical properties of beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupriyanov, I.B., E-mail: igorkupr@rol.ru [A.A. Bochvar Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), Box 369, Moscow 123060 (Russian Federation); Kudryavtsev, V.N.; Kurbatova, L.A. [A.A. Bochvar Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), Box 369, Moscow 123060 (Russian Federation); Lyublinski, I.E. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise ' Red Star' , Moscow 115230 (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-15

    Recent experimental results on beryllium corrosion behavior after testing in liquid lithium at temperatures from 600 to 800 {sup o}C for 200-500 h are presented. The influences of test conditions (temperature, duration, lithium purity), beryllium characteristics (microstructure, grain size and chemical composition) and a penetration of lithium into beryllium on compressive properties of beryllium are discussed.

  16. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Calle, Luz

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as accurately and reliably as current long-term atmospheric exposure tests. This new accelerated test method will shorten the time needed to evaluate the corrosion protection performance of coatings for NASA's critical ground support structures. Lifetime prediction for spaceport structure coatings has a 5-year qualification cycle using atmospheric exposure. Current accelerated corrosion tests often provide false positives and negatives for coating performance, do not correlate to atmospheric corrosion exposure results, and do not correlate with atmospheric exposure timescales for lifetime prediction.

  17. Stress corrosion crack growth rates and general corrosion rates at crack tips of steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speidel, M.O.; Magdowski, R.

    1995-01-01

    The maximum stress corrosion crack growth rates for a number of structural materials (steels and nickel alloys) have been measured in 288 C water. Also, the general corrosion rates of these materials have been determined from weight loss experiments in simulated stress corrosion crack tip electrolytes at 288 C. It is shown that the stress corrosion crack growth rates are typically twenty times faster than the general corrosion rates. This correlation holds over five orders of magnitude. It is concluded that strategies to prevent stress corrosion cracking in high temperature aqueous environments might include alloys of higher general corrosion resistance

  18. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerone C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of metal-based structures has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites to determine corrosion resistance in marine environments. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions of the corrosive environment. Their success for correlation to atmospheric exposure is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated laboratory testing, which often focuses on the electrochemical reactions that occur during corrosion conditions, has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long term service life of a metal despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard and their use is imperative, a method that correlates timescales from atmospheric exposure to accelerated testing would be very valuable. This work uses surface chemistry to interpret the chemical changes occurring on low carbon steel during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions with the objective of finding a correlation between its accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The current results of correlating data from marine atmospheric exposure conditions at the Kennedy Space Center beachside corrosion test site, alternating seawater spray, and immersion in typical electrochemical laboratory conditions, will be presented. Key words: atmospheric exposure, accelerated corrosion testing, alternating seawater spray, marine, correlation, seawater, carbon steel, long-term corrosion performance prediction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  19. Experiences with high temperature corrosion at straw‐firing power plants in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Jensen, S. A.; Borg, U.

    2011-01-01

    to enable better lifetime prediction of vulnerable components in straw‐firing plants since the corrosion rates are so much faster than in coal firing plants. Therefore, there are continued investigations in recently commissioned plants with test tubes installed into actual superheaters. In addition...... temperature is measured on the specific tube loops where there are test tube sections. Thus a corrosion rate can be coupled to a temperature histogram. This is important since although a superheater has a defined steam outlet temperature, there is variation in the tube bundle due to variations of heat flux...

  20. Long Term Corrosion/Degradation Test Six Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. K. Adler Flitton; C. W. Bishop; M. E. Delwiche; T. S. Yoder

    2004-09-01

    The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel, nuclear reactor core components. The Long-Term Corrosion/Degradation (LTCD) Test is designed to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements to the environment. The test is using two proven, industry-standard methods—direct corrosion testing using metal coupons, and monitored corrosion testing using electrical/resistance probes—to determine corrosion rates for various metal alloys generally representing the metals of interest buried at the SDA, including Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, Beryllium S200F, Aluminum 6061, Zircaloy-4, low-carbon steel, and Ferralium 255. In the direct testing, metal coupons are retrieved for corrosion evaluation after having been buried in SDA backfill soil and exposed to natural SDA environmental conditions for times ranging from one year to as many as 32 years, depending on research needs and funding availability. In the monitored testing, electrical/resistance probes buried in SDA backfill soil will provide corrosion data for the duration of the test or until the probes fail. This report provides an update describing the current status of the test and documents results to date. Data from the one-year and three-year results are also included, for comparison and evaluation of trends. In the six-year results, most metals being tested showed extremely low measurable rates of general corrosion. For Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, and Ferralium 255, corrosion rates fell in the range of “no reportable” to 0.0002 mils per year (MPY). Corrosion rates for Zircaloy-4 ranged from no measurable corrosion to 0.0001 MPY. These rates are two orders of magnitude lower than those specified in

  1. Characterization of Corrosion Products on Carbon Steel Exposed to Natural Weathering and to Accelerated Corrosion Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Altobelli Antunes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to compare the corrosion products formed on carbon steel plates submitted to atmospheric corrosion in urban and industrial atmospheres with those formed after accelerated corrosion tests. The corrosion products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The specimens were exposed to natural weathering in both atmospheres for nine months. The morphologies of the corrosion products were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The main product found was lepidocrocite. Goethite and magnetite were also found on the corroded specimens but in lower concentrations. The results showed that the accelerated test based on the ASTM B117 procedure presented poor correlation with the atmospheric corrosion tests whereas an alternated fog/dry cycle combined with UV radiation exposure provided better correlation.

  2. High temperature and stress corrosion cracking of 310S austenitic stainless steel in wet chloride corrosive environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pornpibunsompop

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of 310S austenitic stainless steel in wet chloride environment at a high temperature was investigated. The result showed that high temperature corrosion products mostly consisted of ferrous oxides and chromium oxides. Chloride ions attacked a chromium passive film and strongly reacted with iron and chromium. As a result of metal chlorides being volatized, tunnel of pores inside corrosion layer existed. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking was observed. The oxide originated on surface could act as a crack initiator and a crack propagation would progress along grain boundaries and particularly along tunnel of pores.

  3. Corrosion Control Test Method for Avionic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-25

    IFIED S• ’ECLASSIFICATION "’O14GRAOINU SC4 EMU LE 14 JJS’f’•UUr1N S AT& ME7N ’at .efil pot) Approved for public release; distribucion unlimited 17...Battery Output Increased Gradually as Compared to Normal Fog Effect S0 On 4,4 Took 25 min fur Battery Output to Stabilize S02 Off 2.2 1.8 ’Average...produced by carrier exposure except that there were localized areas where the normally white corrosion produces had a greenish tinge. Since these test

  4. Long term corrosion tests of OFHC-coppers in simulated repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.; Varis, P.

    1993-03-01

    This research program 'long term corrosion tests of OFHC-coppers in simulated repository conditions' was planned to provide an experimental evaluation with respect to the theoretical calculations and forecasts made for the corrosion behaviour of OFHC-coppers in bentonite ground water environments at temperatures between 20-80 deg C. The aim of this study in the first place was to evaluate the effects of ground water composition, bentonite and temperature on the equilibrium and possible corrosion reactions between OFHC coppers and the simulated repository environment. The tests were started in 1987 and this final report includes the results obtained after 72 months exposure time. (orig.)

  5. Materials and coatings to resist high temperature oxidation and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Object of the given papers are the oxidation and corrosion behaviour of several materials (such as stainless steels, iron-, or nickel-, or cobalt-base alloys, Si-based ceramics) used at high temperatures and various investigations on high-temperature protective coatings. (IHoe) [de

  6. The stress corrosion resistance and the cryogenic temperature mechanical properties of annealed Nitronic 60 bar material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, J. W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Ambient and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties and the ambient temperature stress corrosion properties of annealed, straightened, and centerless ground Nitronic 60 stainless steel alloy bar material are presented. The mechanical properties of longitudinal specimens were evaluated at test temperatures from ambient to liquid hydrogen. The tensile test data indicated increasing strength with decreasing temperature to -196 C. Below liquid nitrogen temperature the smooth tensile and notched tensile strengths decreased slightly while the elongation and reduction of area decreased drastically. The Charpy V-notched impact energy decreased steadily with decreasing test temperature. Stress corrosion tests were performed on longitudinal tensile specimens and transverse C-ring specimens exposed to: alternate immersion in a 3.5% NaCl bath; humidity cabinet; and a 5% salt spray atmosphere. The longitudinal tensile specimens experienced no corrosive attack. Approximately 3/4 of the transverse C-rings exposed to alternate immersion and to salt spray experienced a pitting attack on the top and bottom ends. Additional stress corrosion tests were performed on transverse tensile specimens. No failures occurred in the 90% stressed specimens exposed for 90 days in the alternate immersion and salt spray environments

  7. Corrosion of metallic materials by uranium hexafluoride at high temperatures (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlois, G.

    1963-01-01

    The corrosion of the following metals or alloys by UF 6 : nickel, monel, Inconel, gold, platinum, stainless steel, is studied in the temperature range from 300 to 1000 deg. C. The test method, designed to avoid heating the apparatus containing the corrosive fluid to a high temperature, consists in using threadlike samples heated by the Joule effect, the rest of the apparatus being maintained close to room temperature. This technique makes it possible also to determine continuously the penetration of the corrosion by measuring the electrical resistance of the sample with a double Thomson bridge. A series of rapid comparison tests shows that stainless steel, precious metals and Inconel are attacked far too rapidly to be used above 500 deg. C; only monel and especially nickel appear capable of resisting at high temperatures. The detailed examination of the behaviour of nickel shows that the metallic fluoride is volatilized and that this influences the corrosion rate. It shows also the existence of a temperature zone situated between 550 and 700 deg. C in which occurs A strong intergranular corrosion the cause of which appears to be the presence of impurities in the metal. (author) [fr

  8. Stress corrosion cracking of nickel base alloys in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speidel, M.O.; Magdoswki, R.

    1993-01-01

    The resistance of nickel base alloys against stress corrosion cracking in high temperature water has been evaluated by measuring the crack growth rates for specific material-environment combinations. For this purpose, fracture mechanics testing techniques have been applied. The materials tested include both, precipitation hardened and solid solution hardened nickel base alloys. The effect of stress intensity on the stress corrosion crack growth rates has been established by measuring complete crack growth curves. In many cases, the effect of stress intensity on the crack growth rate is very small and thus a plateau is observed in the crack growth rate versus stress intensity curves. However, there are clear exceptions to this rule in certain materials and these are pointed out in comparison with data from the literature. The effect of yield strength on stress corrosion crack growth rates has been studied in detail. It is shown how precipitation hardening and particularly how work hardening influence stress corrosion cracking

  9. Acceptance Test Plan for Fourth-Generation Corrosion Monitoring Cabinet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the third-generation corrosion monitoring cabinet (Hiline Engineering Part No.0004-CHM-072-C01). This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer of the cabinet prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion monitoring cabinet. The test will consist of a continuity test of the cabinet wiring from the end of cable to be connected to corrosion probe, through the appropriate intrinsic safety barriers and out to the 15 pin D-shell connectors to be connected to the corrosion monitoring instrument. Additional testing will be performed using a constant current and voltage source provided by the corrosion monitoring hardware manufacturer to verify proper operation of corrosion monitoring instrumentation

  10. Effect of temperature, of oxygen content and the downstream effect on corrosion rate of structural materials in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilincev, G.

    1988-01-01

    The effects were experimentally tested of temperature and of oxygen content on the corrosion rate of structural materials in liquid sodium and on reducing the corrosion rate down the sodium stream. The results of the experiments are shown in graphs and tables and are discussed in detail. The duration of all tests was standard 1,000 hours. The test parameters were set such as to determine the effect of temperature on corrosion of a quantity of various materials in sodium with a low oxygen content (1.2 to 2 ppm) at temperatures of 500 to 800 degC and in sodium with a high oxygen content (345 ppm) at temperatures of 500 to 700 degC. More experiments served the determination of the effect of a different oxygen content varying between 1.2 and 2 ppm at a constant temperature of 600 degC. The materials being tested included main structural materials used for fast reactor construction and materials allowing to establish the effect of main alloying elements on their corrosion in liquid sodium of different temperatures and purity grades. The relationships showing the effects of temperature and oxygen content in sodium on the rate of corrosion of various structural materials in hot parts of the installation and on the reduction in the rate of corrosion downstream due to sodium saturation with corrosion products were constructed using the experimental results. (Z.M.). 15 figs., 2 tabs., 7 refs

  11. Corrosion behavior induced by LiCl-KCl in type 304 and 316 stainless steel and copper at low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee-Hyung Sim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of stainless steel (304 and 316 type and copper induced by LiCl-KCl at low temperatures in the presence of sufficient oxygen and moisture was investigated through a series of experiments (at 30°C, 40°C, 60°C, and 80°C for 24 hours, 48 hours, 72 hours, and 96 hours. The specimens not coated on one side with an aqueous solution saturated with LiCl-KCl experienced no corrosion at any temperature, not even when the test duration exceeded 96 hours. Stainless steel exposed to LiCl-KCl experienced almost no corrosion below 40°C, but pitting corrosion was observed at temperatures above 60°C. As the duration of the experiment was increased, the rate of corrosion accelerated in proportion to the temperature. The 316 type stainless steel exhibited better corrosion resistance than did the 304 type. In the case of copper, the rate of corrosion accelerated in proportion to the duration and temperature but, unlike the case of stainless steel, the corrosion was more general. As a result, the extent of copper corrosion was about three times that of stainless steel.

  12. Corrosion resistance testing of high-boron-content stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrman, I.; Safek, V.

    1994-01-01

    Boron steels, i.e. stainless steels with boron contents of 0.2 to 2.25 wt.%, are employed in nuclear engineering for the manufacture of baskets or wells in which radioactive fissile materials are stored, mostly spent nuclear fuel elements. The resistance of such steels to intergranular corrosion and uniform corrosion was examined in the Strauss solution and in boric acid; the dependence of the corrosion rate of the steels on their chemical composition was investigated, and their resistance was compared with that of AISI 304 type steel. Corrosion resistance tests in actual conditions of ''wet'' compact storage (demineralized water or a weak boric acid solution) gave evidence that boron steels undergo nearly no uniform corrosion and, as electrochemical measurements indicated, match standard corrosion-resistant steels. Corrosion resistance was confirmed to decrease slightly with increasing boron content and to increase somewhat with increasing molybdenum content. (Z.S.). 3 tabs., 4 figs., 7 refs

  13. Stress corrosion testing of irradiated cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunde, L.; Olshausen, K.D.

    1980-01-01

    Samples from two fuel rods with different cladding have been stress corrosion tested by closed-end argon-iodine pressurization at 320 0 C. The fuel rods with stress relieved and recrystallized Zircaloy-2 had received burnups of 10.000 and 20.000 MWd/ton UO 2 , respectively. It was found that the SCC failure stress was unchanged or slightly higher for the irradiated than for the unirradiated control tubes. The tubes failed consistently in the end with the lowest irradiation dose. The diameter increase of the irradiated cladding during the test was 1.1% for the stress-relieved samples and 0.24% for the recrystallized samples. SEM examination revealed no major differences between irradiated and unirradiated cladding. A ''semi-ductile'' fracture zone in recrystallized material is described in some detail. (author)

  14. Automated corrosion fatigue crack growth testing in pressurized water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceschini, L.J.; Liaw, P.K.; Rudd, G.E.; Logsdon, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes in detail a novel approach to construct a test facility for developing corrosion fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) properties in aggressive environments. The environment studied is that of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) at 288 0 C (550 0 F) and 13.8 MPa (200 psig). To expedite data generation, each chamber was designed to accommodate two test specimens. A common water recirculation and pressurization system was employed to service two test chambers. Thus, four fatigue crack propagation rate tests could be conducted simultaneously in the pressurized water environment. The data analysis was automated to minimize the typically high labor costs associated with corrosion fatigue crack propagation testing. Verification FCGR tests conducted on an ASTM A469 rotor steel in a room temperature air environment as well as actual PWR environment FCGR tests performed on an ASTM A533 Grade B Class 2 pressure vessel steel demonstrated that the dual specimen test facility is an excellent system for developing the FCGR properties of materials in adverse environments

  15. THE EFFECT OF THE ANNEALING TEMPERATURE ON THE CORROSION RESISTANCE OF WELD JOINT OF AISI 310 STEEL - SHORT COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Kovačócy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents samples of weld joint of AISI 310 austenitic steel which were subjected to solution annealing at various temperature - time exposures. The objective of the experiment was to determine the annealing temperature so that the steel should not be sensitized. Tendency to intercrystalline corrosion was analysed by means of a corrosion test in 10 % oxalic acid according to ASTM A 262. At the temperatures of 1000 and 1100°C held for 15 min. the steel was not sensitized. At the temperature of 850°C the steel was sensitized, i.e. susceptible to intercrystalline corrosion.

  16. THE EFFECT OF THE ANNEALING TEMPERATURE ON THE CORROSION RESISTANCE OF WELD JOINT OF AISI 310 STEEL - SHORT COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Nerádová

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents samples of weld joint of AISI 310 austenitic steel which were subjected to solution annealing at various temperature - time exposures. The objective of the experiment was to determine the annealing temperature so that the steel should not be sensitized. Tendency to intercrystalline corrosion was analysed by means of a corrosion test in 10 % oxalic acid according to ASTM A 262. At the temperatures of 1000 and 1100°C held for 15 min. the steel was not sensitized. At the temperature of 850°C the steel was sensitized, i.e. susceptible to intercrystalline corrosion.

  17. Effect of heat treatment conditions on stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloy X-750 in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Onimura, Kichiro; Sakamoto, Naruo; Sasaguri, Nobuya; Susukida, Hiroshi; Nakata, Hidenori.

    1984-01-01

    In order to improve the resistance of the Alloy X-750 in high temperature and high purity water, the authors investigated the influence of heat treatment condition on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the alloy. This paper describes results of the stress corrosion cracking test and some discussion on the mechanism of the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water. The following results were obtained. (1) The stress corrosion cracking resistance of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water remarkably depended upon the heat treatment condition. The materials solution heat treated and aged within temperature ranges from 1065 to 1100 0 C and from 704 to 732 0 C, respectively, have a good resistance to the stress corrosion cracking in deaerated high temperature water. Especially, water cooling after the solution heat treatment gives an excellent resistance to the stress corrosion cracking in deaerated high temperature water. (2) Any correlations were not observed between the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water and grain boundary chromium depleted zones, precipitate free zones and the grain boundary segregation of impurity elements and so on. It appears that there are good correlations between the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the alloy in the environment and the kinds, morphology and coherency of precipitates along the grain boundaries. (author)

  18. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    2000-01-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigrade. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs

  19. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigree. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs.

  20. Testing and prediction of erosion-corrosion for corrosion resistant alloys used in the oil and gas production industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Hernan E.

    The corrosion behavior of CRAs has been thoroughly investigated and documented in the public literature by many researchers; however, little work has been done to investigate erosion-corrosion of such alloys. When sand particles are entrained in the flow, the degradation mechanism is different from that observed for sand-free corrosive environment. There is a need in the oil and gas industry to define safe service limits for utilization of such materials. The effects of flow conditions, sand rate, pH and temperature on the erosion-corrosion of CRAs were widely studied. An extensive experimental work was conducted using scratch tests and flow loop tests using several experimental techniques. At high erosivity conditions, a synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion was observed. Under the high sand rate conditions tested, erosivity is severe enough to damage the passive layer protecting the CRA thereby enhancing the corrosion rate. In most cases there is likely a competition between the rates of protective film removal due to mechanical erosion and protective film healing. Synergism occurs for each of the three alloys examined (13Cr and Super13Cr and 22Cr); however, the degree of synergism is quite different for the three alloys and may not be significant for 22Cr for field conditions where erosivities are typically much lower that those occurring in the small bore loop used in this research. Predictions of the corrosion component of erosion-corrosion based on scratch test data compared reasonably well to test results from flow loops for the three CRAs at high erosivity conditions. Second order behavior appears to be an appropriate and useful model for representing the repassivation process of CRAs. A framework for a procedure to predict penetration rates for erosion-corrosion conditions was developed based on the second order model behavior observed for the re-healing process of the passive film of CRAs and on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations

  1. Short-term corrosion probe testing; Korrosionsprovning med korttidsexponerade sondprovet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoegberg, Jan [Vattenfall utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden)

    2003-05-01

    A novel method for corrosion testing with short-term exposure of corrosion samples has been evaluated by trials in boilers fired fully or partly with biofuels. Sample rings of steels SS2216 and X20 were exposed in varying flue gas environments in the superheater region at the Idbaecken plant (Nykoeping) and the Sandvik 2 plant (Vaexjoe) under varying exposure times (12, 48 and 336 hours) and at three different material temperatures (400, 500 and 600 deg C). A longer trial was also performed at Idbaecken with one constant regulating temperature (500 deg C) and exposure times from 2 weeks up till 9 weeks. The thickness was measured before and after exposure in fixed positions. The rings were weighed and deposits were analysed in order to record the environment next to the corrosion samples. The method was able to detect differences in materials loss between the different samples. Increasing temperature and time gave as expected increasing materials loss. Because of widely varying weather conditions during the firing season the variations in load has from time to time had a larger effect on the flue gas composition than the additives that were injected to make the flue gas less aggressive. This has made the results from the exposures with and without additive more difficult to interpret but the dependence of the boiler load is clear. At exposure times shorter than two weeks (and at 400 deg C also at two weeks) the response in materials loss is less clear, negative values of materials loss occur, indicating that the limit of resolution is reached. The measured metal losses should be 15-20 gm or larger. The Vaexjoe samples show higher materials loss for the shorter exposure times than the ldbaecken samples, in spite of the less aggressive fuel in Vaexjoe. This is explained by a higher flue gas temperature at the testing position in the Vaexjoe plant. A higher temperature means a higher corrosion rate, but also higher vapour pressure for alkali chlorides. The highest

  2. Corrosion inhibition in drinking water: Effect of temperature. Part I. Galvanized steel. Inhibicion de la corrosion en agua potable. Efecto de la temperatura. I parte. Acero galvanizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royuela, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    The corrosivity of several drinking waters, with and without addition of sodium silicate and sodium polyphosphate as inhibitor, in contact with galvanized steel, is studied in the range 20-65 degree centigree. The corrosion rate in the course of time was followed by means of the polarization resistance method. Linearity between potential and intensity of current is observed in the range-20 to + 30 mV from corrosion potential E[sub 0]. Polarization curves were also drawn with the aim to obtain the Tafel slopes. E[sub 0] values are more active when inhibitor is present. With temperature increases corrosion rate. Inhibitor addition to the waters tested means a reduction of galvanized steel corrosion of about 40%. (Author) 30 refs.

  3. Corrosion behavior of low energy, high temperature nitrogen ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    January 2007 physics pp. 135–140. Corrosion behavior of low energy, high temperature nitrogen ion-implanted AISI 304 stainless steel. M GHORANNEVISS1, A SHOKOUHY1,∗, M M ... Ion implantation has been used to modify the physical and chemical properties of ... sources and plasma surface treatment [1,2].

  4. The corrosion rate of copper in a bentonite test package measured with electric resistance sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, Bo [Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Kosec, Tadeja; Kranjc, Andrej; Kuhar, Viljem; Legat, Andraz [Slovenian National Building and Civil Engineering Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-12-15

    LOT1 test parcel A2 was exposed for six years in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, which offers a realistic environment for the conditions that will prevail in a deep repository for high-level radioactive waste disposal in Sweden. The test parcel contained copper electrodes for real-time corrosion monitoring in bentonite ring 36, where the temperature was 24 deg C, and copper coupons in bentonite rings 22 and 30, where the temperature was higher. After retrieval of the test parcel in January 2006, a bentonite test package consisting of bentonite rings 35 - 37 was placed in a container and sealed with a thick layer of paraffin. Later the same year new copper electrodes were installed in the test package. In January 2007 electric resistance (ER) sensors of pure copper with a thickness of 35 {mu}m were also installed in the test package mainly to facilitate the interpretation of the results from the real-time corrosion monitoring with electrochemical techniques. The ER measurements have shown that the corrosion rate of pure copper exposed in an oxic bentonite/ saline groundwater environment at room temperate decreases slowly with time to low but measurable values. The corrosion rates estimated from the regularly performed EIS measurements replicate the ER data. Thus, for this oxic environment in which copper acquires corrosion potentials of the order of 200 mV (SHE) or higher, electrochemical measurements provide believable data. Comparing the recorded ER data with an estimate of the average corrosion rate based on comparing cross-sections from exposed and protected sensor elements, it is obvious that the former overestimates the actual corrosion rate, which is understandable. It seems as if electrochemical measurements can provide a better estimate of the corrosion rate; however, this is quite dependent on the use of proper measuring frequencies and evaluation methods. In this respect ER measurements are more reliable. It has been shown that real-time corrosion

  5. NASA's Beachside Corrosion Test Site and Current Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Control Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard W.; Calle, Luz Marina; Johnston, Frederick; Montgomery, Eliza L.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    NASA began corrosion studies at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term corrosion protective coatings for carbon steel. KSC's Beachside Corrosion Test Site (BCTS), which has been documented by the American Society of Materials (ASM) as one of the most corrosive, naturally occurring, environments in the world, was established at that time. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acid ic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. In the years that followed, numerous studies have identified materials, coatings, and maintenance procedures for launch hardware and equipment exposed to the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad. This paper presents a historical overview of over 45 years of corrosion and coating evaluation studies and a description of the BCTS's current capabilities. Additionally, current research and testing programs involving chromium free coatings, environmentally friendly corrosion preventative compounds, and alternates to nitric acid passivation will be discussed.

  6. Influence of temperature on corrosion rate and porosity of corrosion products of carbon steel in anoxic bentonite environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoulil, J.; Kaňok, J.; Kouřil, M.; Parschová, H.; Novák, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The corrosion rate is not significantly dependent on temperature. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures have different color. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures are more compact. •The change in corrosion products nature is reversible. -- Abstract: The study focuses on the porosity of layers of corrosion products and its impact on corrosion rate of carbon steel in moist bentonite. Measurements were performed in an aggressive Czech type of bentonite – Rokle B75 at temperatures of 90 and 40 °C. Aggressiveness of B75 bentonite consists in low content of chlorides. Presence of chlorides in pore solution allows formation of more protective magnetite. The evaluation was made by electrochemical techniques (red/ox potential, open circuit potential, linear polarization resistance, impedance spectroscopy) and resistometric sensor measurements. The result imply that the higher the temperature the more compact is the layer of corrosion products that slightly decelerates corrosion rate compared to the state at 40 °C. The state of corrosion products at both temperatures is reversible

  7. Influence of temperature on corrosion rate and porosity of corrosion products of carbon steel in anoxic bentonite environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoulil, J., E-mail: jan.stoulil@vscht.cz [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Kaňok, J.; Kouřil, M. [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Parschová, H. [Department of Power Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Novák, P. [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •The corrosion rate is not significantly dependent on temperature. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures have different color. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures are more compact. •The change in corrosion products nature is reversible. -- Abstract: The study focuses on the porosity of layers of corrosion products and its impact on corrosion rate of carbon steel in moist bentonite. Measurements were performed in an aggressive Czech type of bentonite – Rokle B75 at temperatures of 90 and 40 °C. Aggressiveness of B75 bentonite consists in low content of chlorides. Presence of chlorides in pore solution allows formation of more protective magnetite. The evaluation was made by electrochemical techniques (red/ox potential, open circuit potential, linear polarization resistance, impedance spectroscopy) and resistometric sensor measurements. The result imply that the higher the temperature the more compact is the layer of corrosion products that slightly decelerates corrosion rate compared to the state at 40 °C. The state of corrosion products at both temperatures is reversible.

  8. Gallium-cladding compatibility testing plan. Phases 1 and 2: Test plan for gallium corrosion tests. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.F.; Morris, R.N.

    1998-05-01

    This test plan is a Level-2 document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water-Reactor Mixed-Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. The plan summarizes and updates the projected Phases 1 and 2 Gallium-Cladding compatibility corrosion testing and the following post-test examination. This work will characterize the reactions and changes, if any, in mechanical properties that occur between Zircaloy clad and gallium or gallium oxide in the temperature range 30--700 C

  9. Effects of Temperature and Corrosion Potential on SCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Peter L.; Seeman, Russell A.

    This study reinforces the expectation that a consistent benefit of low corrosion potential is achievable at intermediate temperatures associated with BWR start up. Such low corrosion potentials can probably only be achieved using NobleChem™ and injection of H2 or other reductants such as hydrazine or carbohydrazide because very low residual levels of O2 can elevate the corrosion potential. The high growth rates that occur during start up merit mitigation, although this study did not find growth rates that were orders of magnitude higher than at 288 °C. However, this study did not attempt to simulate all aspects of start up, especially the sources of dynamic strain such as differential thermal expansion, which can be estimated by are not known.

  10. Materials testing and corrosion investigations at KFKI AEKI Materials Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, G.; Balog, J.; Kerner, Zs. (and others)

    2004-07-01

    The paper summarises the experimental studies started at the end of the '90s at Materials Department of KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute (AEKI) in the following research areas: high temperature oxidation kinetics of Zr alloys, high temperature reference electrode testing and stress induced ECP(electrochemical potential) changes in metals. 1. High temperature hydrothermal oxidation of Zr and the properties of Zr oxides were studied by a comparative autoclave test to further our knowledge about the mechanistic understanding of the corrosion phenomenon. The layer thicknesses were determined by weight gain measurements, Rutherford backscattering (RBS), nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Electrochemical impedance spectra were taken regularly in situ both as a function of oxidation time and temperature, whereas photoelectrochemical response was measured ex situ at room temperature, under illumination with visible light. 2. Within the frame of the LIRES project (supported by the EC within the EURATOM FP5), three high temperature reference electrodes were tested: (i) external Ag/AgCl reference electrode from NRI, Rez, Plc, (ii) Pt-Ir alloy hydrogen electrode from Studsvik Nuclear AB, (iii) Pdhydride reference electrode - Pd(Pt) double polarised active electrode - from VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. 3. The effect of mechanical stress on electrode potential was studied under zero current conditions. Silver wires in contact with silver-nitrate solutions were exposed to tensile stress and the variation of potential was measured in a two-electrode cell. The study aimed as a first step toward a more detailed theoretical and experimental work aimed to reveal the key factors of the stress corrosion cracking phenomenon. 4. The results of chemical and radiochemical analyses of the primary circuit coolant liquid, obtained between 1995 and 1999 at the four VVER-type blocks of the Paks (Hungary) nuclear power station, were

  11. Research process of nondestructive testing pitting corrosion in metal material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo ZHANG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pitting corrosion directly affects the usability and service life of metal material, so the effective nondestructive testing and evaluation on pitting corrosion is of great significance for fatigue life prediction because of data supporting. The features of pitting corrosion are elaborated, and the relation between the pitting corrosion parameters and fatigue performance is pointed out. Through introducing the fundamental principles of pitting corrosion including mainly magnetic flux leakage inspection, pulsed eddy current and guided waves, the research status of nondestructive testing technology for pitting corrosion is summarized, and the key steps of nondestructive testing technologies are compared and analyzed from the theoretical model, signal processing to industrial applications. Based on the analysis of the signal processing specificity of different nondestructive testing technologies in detecting pitting corrosion, the visualization combined with image processing and signal analysis are indicated as the critical problems of accurate extraction of pitting defect information and quantitative characterization for pitting corrosion. The study on non-contact nondestructive testing technologies is important for improving the detection precision and its application in industries.

  12. Ash deposition and high temperature corrosion at combustion of aggressive fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hede Larsen, O. [I/S Fynsvaerket, Faelleskemikerne, Odense (Denmark); Henriksen, N. [Elsamprojekt A/S, Faelleskemikerne, Fredericia (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emission, ELSAM is investigating the possibilities of using biomass - mainly straw - for combustion in high efficiency power plants. As straw has very high contents of chlorine and potassium, a fuel with high corrosion and ash deposition propensities has been introduced. ELSAM has investigated 3 ultra supercritical boiler concepts for combustion of straw alone or together with coal: (1) PF boilers with a relatively low share of straw, (2) CFB boilers with low to high share of straw and (3) vibrating grate boilers with 100% straw. These investigations has mainly been full-scale tests with straw fed into existing boilers. Corrosion tests have been performed in these boilers using temperature regulated probes and in-plant test tubes in existing superheaters. The corrosion has been determined by detailed measurements of wall thickness reduction and light optical microscopic measurements of the material degradation due to high temperature corrosion. Corrosion mechanisms have been evaluated using SEM/EDX together with thermodynamical considerations based on measurements of the chemical environment in the flue gas. Ash deposition is problematic in CFB boilers and in straw fired boilers, especially in years with high potassium and chlorine content of the straw. This ash deposition also is related to condensation of KCl and can probably only be handled by improved cleaning devices. (EG)

  13. Probability density fittings of corrosion test-data: Implications on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the use of corrosion inhibitor admixture in concrete had been identified as an easy, effective and economical ... for acceptable reduction in corrosion rate had been recommended by others. The American .... immersed, longitudinally, in plastic bowls containing respective test solution of aggressive agent. Each of the first ...

  14. Direct current testing to measure corrosiveness of wood preservatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer; Donald S. Stone; James T. Gilbertson

    2007-01-01

    A qualitative test that mimics the corrosion behaviour of metals in contact with treated wood without using wood specimens would be of great value in rapidly evaluating the corrosiveness of new wood preservatives. The objective of this study was to determine whether the linear polarisation resistance of metals immersed in a solution of preservative chemicals is related...

  15. Effect of temperature on corrosion of steels in high purity water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Takashi; Kashimura, Eiji; Ohashi, Kenya; Furutani, Yasumasa; Ohsumi, Katsumi; Aizawa, Motohiro; Matsubayashi, Hideo.

    1987-01-01

    Effect of temperature on corrosion behavior of steels was evaluated in the range of 150 - 300 deg C in high purity water containing about 200 ppb oxygen. The exposure tests were carried out in actual and simulated reactor water of BWR plants. Through X-ray diffractometry, SIMS, XPS and chemical analyses, it was clarified that the chemical composition and morphology of oxide films formed on austenitic stainless steel changed above about 250 deg C. Chromium dissolved easily through corrosion above this temperature, and the oxide films primarily consisted of spinel type oxides containing high concentration of nickel. Further, as the protectivety of oxide films increased with temperature, the corrosion rate had a peak around 250 deg C after a long exposure period. A major phase of oxide films on carbon steel was magnetite in the whole temperature range. However, as the oxide films formed at high temperatures had very compact structures, the effect of temperature on the corrosion rate was similar to that observed on stainless steel. (author)

  16. Quick corrosion cracking test methods for high strength stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurnich, L.Ya.; Shubadeeva, L.I.; Erofeeva, V.L.; Lashchevskij, V.B.

    1994-01-01

    Quicks method for testing high strength stainless steels during 10h under atmospheric and sea conditions has been developed. It is shown that (NH 4 ) 2 Se 2 O 8 - 13.5+-1 g/l, NaCl - 40+-2g/l, H 2 SO 4 -5g/l solution at 50+-2 C temperature is recommended for quick tests for tendency to corrosion cracking during. Development of steels and technologies of their treatment. Tests of steels of 08Kh15N5D2T, 07Kh16N6, 20Kh13, 40Kh13, 13Kh15N4AMD and other types can be performed in boiling solutions: H 2 SO 4 (55 ml/l)+CuSO 4 (110 g/l) or MgCl 2 (200 g/l hexahydrate)

  17. Field test corrosion experiments in Denmark with biomass fuels Part I Straw firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Karlsson, A; Larsen, OH

    2002-01-01

    to investigate corrosion: a) the exposure of metal rings on water/air cooled probes, b) the exposure of test tubes in a test superheater, and c) the exposure of test tubes in existing superheaters. Thus both austenitic steels and ferritic steels were exposed in the steam temperature range of 450-600°C...

  18. Electrochemical testing of passivity state and corrosion resistance of supermartensitic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lasek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available On low interstitial - supermartensitic stainless steels (X1CrNiMo 12-5-1, X2CrNiMo 13-6-2, X1CrNiMo 12-6-2 the electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out and the passive state stability and localized corrosion resistance were compared and evaluated. The effect of quenching and tempering as well as the changes in microstructure on polarisation curves and corrosion properties at room temperature were established. Small differences in chemical composition of steels were also registered on their corrosion parameters changes and resistance.

  19. Optimization of Oxidation Temperature for Commercially Pure Titanium to Achieve Improved Corrosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Rajesh; Singh, J. K.; Singh, Vakil; Singh, D. D. N.; Das, Parimal

    2017-03-01

    Thermal oxidation of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) was carried out at different temperatures, ranging from 200 to 900 °C to achieve optimum corrosion resistance of the thermally treated surface in simulated body fluid. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques were used to characterize the oxides and assess their protective properties exposed in the test electrolyte. Maximum resistance toward corrosion was observed for samples oxidized at 500 °C. This was attributed to the formation of a composite layer of oxides at this temperature comprising Ti2O3 (titanium sesquioxide), anatase and rutile phases of TiO2 on the surface of cp-Ti. Formation of an intact and pore-free oxide-substrate interface also improved its corrosion resistance.

  20. Evaluation of High Temperature Corrosion Resistance of Finned Tubes Made of Austenitic Steel And Nickel Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turowska A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper was to evaluate the resistance to high temperature corrosion of laser welded joints of finned tubes made of austenitic steel (304,304H and nickel alloys (Inconel 600, Inconel 625. The scope of the paper covered the performance of corrosion resistance tests in the atmosphere of simulated exhaust gases of the following chemical composition: 0.2% HCl, 0.08% SO2, 9.0% O2 and N2 in the temperature of 800°C for 1000 hours. One found out that both tubes made of austenitic steel and those made of nickel alloy displayed good resistance to corrosion and could be applied in the energy industry.

  1. Effects of metallurgical factors on stress corrosion cracking of Ni-base alloys in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.; Sasaguri, N.; Onimura, K.

    1988-01-01

    Nickel-base Alloy 600 is the principal material used for the steam generator tubes of PWRs. Generally, this alloy has been proven to be satisfactory for this application, however when it is subjected to extremely high stress level in PWR primary water, it may suffer from stress corrosion cracking. The authors have systematically studied the effects of test temperature and such metallurgical factors as cold working, chemical composition and heat treatment on the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high temperature water, and also on that of Alloy 690 which is a promising material for the tubes and may provide improved crrosion resistance for steam generators. The test materials, the stress corrosion cracking test and the test results are reported. When the test temperature was raise, the stress corrosion cracking of the nickel-base alloys was accelerated. The time of stress corrosion cracking occurrence decreased with increasing applied stress, and it occurred at the stress level higher than the 0.2 % offset proof stress of Alloy 600. In Alloy 690, stress corrosion cracking was not observed at such stress level. Cold worked Alloy 600 showed higher resistance to stress corrosion cracking than the annealed alloy. (Kako, I.)

  2. High temperature liquid metal corrosion and high temperature electrical conductivity of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneoka, Toshiaki; Terai, Takayuki [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Takahashi, Yoichi

    1996-03-01

    Yttrium sesquioxide has been proposed as a promising candidate material for collector electrodes used in the laser enrichment system of uranium-235. For this purpose yttria is expected to be compatible with molten uranium and electrically conductive. The corrosion test of yttria with molten lanthanum as a simulating metal for uranium and the measurement of its electrical conductivity under extremely low oxygen pressure were performed. It was shown from the corrosion test that a yttria sample was considerably corroded by the molten lanthanum at 1513K, and the maximum corrosion depth for 5Ms was 0.162mm. The electrical conductivity of hypo-stoichiometric yttria above 300K reduced by titanium was higher than that of pure germanium at room temperature (2.1S/m). The oxygen pressures equilibrated with the yttria specimens were estimated to discuss the relation to measured conductivities. (author)

  3. High temperature liquid metal corrosion and high temperature electrical conductivity of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneoka, T. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Quantum Eng. and Syst. Sci.; Terai, T. [Engineering Research Institute, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113 (Japan); Takahashi, Y. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Chuo University, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112 (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    Yttrium sesquioxide has been proposed as a promising candidate material for collector electrodes used in the laser enrichment system of uranium-235. For this purpose, yttria is expected to be compatible with molten uranium and electrically conductive. A corrosion test of yttria with molten lanthanum as a simulating metal for uranium and a measurement of its electrical conductivity under extremely low oxygen pressure were performed. It was shown from the corrosion test that a yttria sample was considerably corroded by the molten lanthanum at 1513 K and the maximum corrosion depth for 5 Ms was 0.162 mm. The electrical conductivity of hypo-stoichiometric yttria reduced by titanium was higher than that of pure germanium at room temperature (2.1 S/m). The oxygen pressures equilibrated with the yttria specimens were estimated to discuss the relation to measured conductivities. (orig.).

  4. Indoor accelerated corrosion test and marine field test of corrosion-resistant low-alloy steel rebars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Macrocell corrosion test and accelerated alternating wet–dry experiment combined with marine field test were employed to study the corrosion behavior of HRB400 carbon steel, 1.5Cr steel, and 5Cr steel in a simulated concrete pore solution and mortar. The macrocell current significantly decreases in samples added with Cr compared with that in HRB400 steel. The corrosion rate is decreased by Cr but increased by Cl−; as a consequence, the corrosion rates of 1.5Cr and 5Cr steel are lower than that of HRB400 steel. However, the corrosion products differ slightly in terms of the contents of α-FeOOH (goethite, γ-FeOOH (lepidocrocite, γ-Fe2O3, and Fe3O4 (maghemite or magnetite. The addition of Cr increases the content of the protective α-FeOOH and reduces the content of γ-FeOOH. Both ordinary and high-performance epoxy coatings remain intact after 1 year of marine field test. Among the bare steel rebars, HRB400 steel shows extensive localized corrosion on the surface, whereas 1.5Cr steel exhibits less severe corrosion. The scarcely visible corroded areas in 5Cr steel indicate that this rebar is in the passive state, consistent with results of the indoor accelerated test. Hence, the durability of concrete structures can be prolonged with the utilization of corrosion-resistant low-alloy rebars.

  5. Temperature effect on Zircaloy-4 stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Silvia B.; Duffo, Gustavo S.; Galvele, Jose R.

    1999-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 alloy in chloride, bromide and iodide solutions with variables as applied electrode potential, deformation rate and temperature have been studied. In those three halide solutions the susceptibility to SCC is only observed at potentials close to pitting potential, the crack propagation rate increases with the increase of deformation rate, and that the temperature has a notable effect only for iodide solutions. For chloride and bromide solutions and temperatures ranging between 20 to 90 C degrees it was not found measurable changes in crack propagation rates. (author)

  6. Electrochemical Studies of Corrosion in Liquid Electrolytes for Energy Conversion Applications at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey Valerievich; Petrushina, Irina; Bjerrum, Niels J.

    2016-01-01

    Stainless steels (AISI 316, 321 and 347), high-nickel alloys (Hasteloy®C-276 and Inconel®625), tantalum, nickel, titanium, tungsten, molybdenum, niobium, platinum, and gold were tested for corrosion resistance in molten KH2PO4 (or KH2PO4-K2H2P2O7) as a promising electrolyte for the intermediate......-temperature (200–400°C) water electrolysis. Pt, Ta, Nb, Ti, Inconel®625, and Ni demonstrated high corrosion resistance. Au and the rest of the tested materials were not corrosion resistant. It means that Ni, Ti and Inconel®625 may be used as relatively cheap construction materials for the intermediate...

  7. Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwai S [San Antonio, TX; Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry [San Antonio, TX; Liang, Wuwei [Austin, TX

    2012-07-31

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

  8. Solubility of corrosion products in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.P.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    1995-01-01

    A short review of solubility of corrosion products at high temperature in either neutral or alkaline water as encountered in BWR, PHWR and PWR primary coolant reactor circuits is presented in this report. Based on the available literature, various experimental techniques involved in the study of the solubility, theory for fitting the solubility data to the thermodynamic model and discussion of the published results with a scope for future work have been brought out. (author). 17 refs., 7 figs

  9. Materials corrosion of high temperature alloys immersed in 600C binary nitrate salt.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Thirteen high temperature alloys were immersion tested in a 60/40 binary nitrate salt. Samples were interval tested up to 3000 hours at 600ÀC with air as the ullage gas. Chemical analysis of the molten salt indicated lower nitrite concentrations present in the salt, as predicted by the equilibrium equation. Corrosion rates were generally low for all alloys. Corrosion products were identified using x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. Fe-Cr based alloys tended to form mixtures of sodium and iron oxides, while Fe-Ni/Cr alloys had similar corrosion products plus oxides of nickel and chromium. Nickel based alloys primarily formed NiO, with chromium oxides near the oxide/base alloy interface. In625 exhibited similar corrosion performance in relation to previous tests, lending confidence in comparisons between past and present experiments. HA230 exhibited internal oxidation that consisted of a nickel/chromium oxide. Alloys with significant aluminum alloying tended to exhibit superior performance, due formation of a thin alumina layer. Soluble corrosion products of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten were also formed and are thought to be a significant factor in alloy performance.

  10. High temperature corrosion performance of FeAl intermetallic alloys in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaya, M.; Espinosa-Medina, M.A.; Porcayo-Calderon, J.; Martinez, L.; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G

    2003-05-25

    The corrosion performance of FeAl base intermetallic alloys fabricated by spray-atomization and deposition during their immersion in molten sodium metavanadate (NaVO{sub 3}), 80% (wt.%) sodium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) +20% sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) and pure Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in the temperature range of 600-1000 deg. C during 200 h was investigated. The experiments were realized by the weight loss method in the intermetallic alloys of composition FeAl40(at.%), FeAl40+0.1B and FeAl40+0.1B+10Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In all cases, the FeAl40+0.1B+10Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloy showed the best corrosion resistance in the temperatures interval studied here. This behavior was discussed in terms of the formation of a protective Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer and its dissolution by vanadate phases and internal sulfidation in the case of experiments carried out in pure Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The morphology of the external layers and the corrosion products formed during the tests revealed that the corrosion rate of this type alloy depends on the corrosion compounds that are formed and the development of protective alumina scales.

  11. Corrosion of high temperature alloys in solar salt at 400, 500, and 680ÀC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-09-01

    Corrosion tests at 400, 500, and 680ÀC were performed using four high temperature alloys; 347SS, 321SS In625, and HA230. Molten salt chemistry was monitored over time through analysis of nitrite, carbonate, and dissolved metals. Metallography was performed on alloys at 500 and 680ÀC, due to the relatively thin oxide scale observed at 400ÀC. At 500ÀC, corrosion of iron based alloys took the form of chromium depletion and iron oxides, while nickel based alloys also had chromium depletion and formation of NiO. Chromium was detected in relatively low concentrations at this temperature. At 680ÀC, significant surface corrosion occurred with metal losses greater than 450microns/year after 1025hours of exposure. Iron based alloys formed complex iron, sodium, and chromium oxides. Some data suggests grain boundary chromium depletion of 321SS. Nickel alloys formed NiO and metallic nickel corrosion morphologies, with HA230 displaying significant internal oxidation in the form of chromia. Nickel alloys both exhibited worse corrosion than iron based alloys likely due to preferential dissolution of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten.

  12. Electrochemical tests for pitting and crevice corrosion susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postlethwaite, J.

    1983-01-01

    Passive metals are being considered as container materials for the disposal of nuclear waste by deep burial. Localized corrosion is a potential problem and electrochemical techniques have an important role in the assessment of the susceptibility of these container materials to crevice and pitting corrosion. This paper critically reviews both the theoretical background and the experimental details of the electrochemical test methods presently used in both industrial and scientific studies of localized corrosion in both halide and non-halide solutions and identifies those areas where theory and experimental behaviour are in agreement and those areas for which there is neither well established theory nor an experimental test method

  13. Influence of temperature on corrosion rate and porosity of corrosion products of carbon steel in anoxic bentonite environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoulil, J.; Kaňok, J.; Kouřil, M.; Parschová, H.; Novák, P.

    2013-11-01

    The study focuses on the porosity of layers of corrosion products and its impact on corrosion rate of carbon steel in moist bentonite. Measurements were performed in an aggressive Czech type of bentonite - Rokle B75 at temperatures of 90 and 40 °C. Aggressiveness of B75 bentonite consists in low content of chlorides. Presence of chlorides in pore solution allows formation of more protective magnetite. The evaluation was made by electrochemical techniques (red/ox potential, open circuit potential, linear polarization resistance, impedance spectroscopy) and resistometric sensor measurements. The result imply that the higher the temperature the more compact is the layer of corrosion products that slightly decelerates corrosion rate compared to the state at 40 °C. The state of corrosion products at both temperatures is reversible.

  14. Corrosion of cermet anodes during low temperature electrolysis of alumina. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozarek, R.L.; Ray, S.P.; Dawless, R.K.; LaCamera, A.F.

    1997-09-26

    Successful development of inert anodes to replace carbon anodes in Hall cells has the potential benefits of lower energy consumption,lower operating costs, and reduced CO{sub 2} and CO emissions. Using inert anodes at reduced current density and reduced operating temperature (800 C) has potential for decreasing the corrosion rate of inert anodes. It may also permit the use of new materials for containment and insulation. This report describes the fabrication characteristics and the corrosion performance of 5324-17% Cu Cermet anodes in 100 hour tests. Although some good results were achieved, the corrosion rate at low temperature (800 C) is varied and not significantly lower than typical results at high temperature ({approximately} 960 C). This report also describes several attempts at 200 hour tests, with one anode achieving 177 hours of continuous operation and another achieving a total of 235 hours but requiring three separate tests of the same anode. The longest run did show a lower wear rate in the last test; but a high resistance layer developed on the anode surface and forced an unacceptably low current density. It is recommended that intermediate temperatures be explored as a more optimal environment for inert anodes. Other electrolyte chemistries and anode compositions (especially high conductivity anodes) should be considered to alleviate problems associated with lower temperature operation.

  15. In-situ hot corrosion testing of candidate materials for exhaust valve spindles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bihlet, Uffe; Hoeg, Harro A.; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2011-01-01

    Cr1Nb matrix has been produced, and put into service for 2,200 hours allowing a unique in-situ corrosion test. 10 high Cr alloys have been tested this way. The corrosion appearance is found to be a factor of not only the chemical composition but also the production method. HIPd material with high Cr...... used, exhaust valve spindles in marine diesel engines are subjected to high temperatures and stresses as well as molten salt induced corrosion. To investigate candidate materials for future designs which will involve the HIP process, a spindle with Ni superalloy material samples inserted in a HIPd Ni49...... content and low content of Fe and Mo is found to be the best choice for hot corrosion resistance....

  16. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  17. Impact of iron powder pressing temperature on high-temperature corrosion of the obtained sinters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jaroń

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The work presents the results of kinetic studies of the high-temperature oxidation process of metallic iron sinters obtained by a hotpressing method in an anaerobic atmosphere. The conducted studies for a model arrangement (iron allow to determine the effect of conditions for obtaining metallic pressed materials on the course of a high-temperature corrosion process. What is more, iron oxide sinters characterized by an expanded surface disclosed by a morphological analysis of the resulting scales may be used as catalyst carriers or as input material for obtaining porous iron by reduction. Sinters intended for research were obtained in a device for one-axial hot-pressing of samples at a pressure of 8 MPa within the temperature range 600 – 900oC in vacuum. The research into the kinetics of metallic sinters oxidation was carried out in the standard apparatus for high-temperature thermogravimetric studies using a continuous method with automatic recording of measurement within the temperature range 500 – 700oC in synthetic air atmosphere. The dependence of oxidation kinetics of metallic sinters on a pressing temperature was determined. Morphology as well as the chemical and phase composition of the tested samples were described using the SEM/EDX and XRD methods.

  18. Standard Operating Procedure for Accelerated Corrosion Testing at ARL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    to scribe nonferrous materials so as to prevent contamination of the substrate during the process. The "X" scribe is made by scribing 2 intersecting...may include GMW14872 Cyclic Corrosion Testing (typically Exterior, Exposure C), ASTM B117 Neutral Salt Fog Testing, ASTM G50 Atmospheric Corrosion...using the same cleaning procedures, contamination of the substrate is minimized during the scribe process. All partners adhering to guidelines and

  19. The corrosion rate measurement of Inconel 690 on high temperature and pressure by using CMS100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyono; Satmoko, Ari; Febrianto; Hidayati, N R; Arifal; Sumarno, Ady; Handoyo, Ismu; Prasetjo, Joko

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion rate measurement of Inconel 690 on high temperature and pressure had been done. By using an Autoclave, and temperature can be simulated. For reducing the pressure on Autoclave so its can be measure by Corrosion Measurement System 100(CMS100), the electrodes placement had designed and fabrication on the cover of Autoclave. The electrodes of CMS100 are reference electrode, working electrodes and counter electrodes. The electrodes placement are made and and designed on two packages, these are Salt bridge and Counter-specimen placement. From the result of testing these both of placement are able to 90 bar (pressure) and 280 C (temperature) operation rate measurement was done on temperature variation from 150 0C, 190 0C, 200 0C, 210 0C, 220 0C and 230 0C, and the solution is 0.1 ppm chloride. The pressure experiment is the pressure, which occurred in Autoclave. From the Tafel analysis, even through very little The corrosion current increased from 150 C to 230 C it is 2,54x10-10 a/cm2 to 1,62x10-9 A/cm2, but the the corrosion rate is still zero

  20. Corrosion inhibition of stainless steel type AISI 304 by Mn coating and subsequent annealing with flow of nitrogen at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayeli-Korpi, Ali-Reza; Savaloni, Hadi; Habibi, Maryam

    2013-07-01

    This work reports the enhancement of stainless steel corrosion resistance coated with Mn and post-annealed with flow of nitrogen at different annealing temperatures. Crystallographic variation of the samples by annealing temperature is studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) while their surface morphology and surface roughness was obtained by means of atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses before and after corrosion test respectively. Elemental analysis of samples after corrosion test was investigated by energy dispersive spectroscope (EDS) analysis. The corrosion behaviour of the samples was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization test in 0.6 M NaCl solution. A critical annealing temperature is found at which the highest corrosion resistance can be achieved. Correlation between corrosion resistance, structural and surface morphology results is obtained.

  1. Crevice corrosion behavior of stainless steel in high temperature diluted seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Masahiko; Ishida, Kazushige; Wada, Yoichi; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Ota, Nobuyuki; Aizawa, Motohiro; Shigenaka, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    The crevice corrosion initiation behavior of stainless steel was experimentally examined in high temperature test seawater (simulated diluted seawater) in order to confirm the effects of chemical species contained in seawater on crevice formation. Since crevice corrosion initiation is generally related to repassivation potential, the repassivation potentials of type 304 stainless steel (304 SS) were measured in test seawater at temperatures from 323 to 553 K. The repassivation potentials were measured in a Ti-Pd lined autoclave which was connected with a circulation loop, in conformity to Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS) G 0592. Overall, for high temperatures from 373 to 553 K, the repassivation potentials decreased with increasing chloride ion concentration in the test seawater, which was the same as the behavior observed at the lower temperature of 323 K. Regarding the effect of temperature, when the chloride ion concentrations were from 10 to 1000 ppm the repassivation potentials which were obtained at high temperatures were significantly lowered compared to those at 323 K. Furthermore, two characteristic features were observed at 553 K: the crevice corrosion initiation had the highest sensitivity and it was -0.24 Vvs.SHE at constant repassivation potential when the chloride ion concentration was more than 100 ppm. Even if the potential measurement error (∼0.05 V) was included in the measured repassivation potentials, it could be concluded that at temperatures from 323 to 553 K, the crevice corrosion of 304 SS can be suppressed by maintaining the potential below approximately -0.3 Vvs.SHE. (author)

  2. Low temperature corrosion in bark fuelled, small boilers; Laagtemperaturkorrosion i barkeldade, mindre pannor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindau, Leif; Goldschmidt, Barbara [Sycon Energikonsult AB, Malmoe (Sweden)

    2002-04-01

    A number of small (3-12 MW), new biofuel boiler plants in South Sweden, and (at least) in Austria, have suffered a high (wastage of mm/yrs.) corrosion rate on the low temperature boiler side. This problem has been investigated with respect to its occurrence and its character by contacts with operators, by plant inspections, and by analysis of cold side deposits. The plants affected have low feed water temperatures (< 100 deg C ). The plants fire most types of Swedish biofuel: chips, bark, hog fuel, and 'GROT'(=twigs and tops). The results found give basis for a hypothesis that the corrosion results from the presence of an aqueous phase in the deposits, this phase being stabilized by dissolved salts having high solubility. It then follows that for each salt, there is a critical relative humidity (calculated from the flue gas water partial pressure and the cooling surface temperature as is common practice among boiler engineers) for both the presence of the aqueous phase and the corrosion. Some critical single salts, ZnC12 and CaC12 have been identified, and they give critical 'relative humidities' of 5% and 18% respectively. These figures are a lower bound. The corresponding figure, derived from the practical experience and the reported plant operational data, is between 20 and 30%. Corrosion tests have been carried out by exposing an air-cooled probe in the fluegases at a 12 MW boiler at Saevelundsverket in Alingsaas, and the material wastage at different temperatures has been measured with a profilometer. The high corrosion rates were reproduced in the tests for high relative humidities. The corrosion rate was small and not measurable (<0.1 mm/yr) for relative humidity < 22%. The work shows by means of indirect evidence that the corrosion critical components are ZnCl{sub 2} and possibly CaCl{sub 2} as well. The practical engineering design criterion derived from the work is that the relative humidity (calculated from the flue gas water partial

  3. Phase Stability Diagrams for High Temperature Corrosion Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Ramos-Hernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion phenomena of metals by fused salts depend on chemical composition of the melt and environmental conditions of the system. Detail knowledge of chemistry and thermodynamic of aggressive species formed during the corrosion process is essential for a better understanding of materials degradation exposed to high temperature. When there is a lack of kinetic data for the corrosion processes, an alternative to understand the thermodynamic behavior of chemical species is to utilize phase stability diagrams. Nowadays, there are several specialized software programs to calculate phase stability diagrams. These programs are based on thermodynamics of chemical reactions. Using a thermodynamic data base allows the calculation of different types of phase diagrams. However, sometimes it is difficult to have access to such data bases. In this work, an alternative way to calculate phase stability diagrams is presented. The work is exemplified in the Na-V-S-O and Al-Na-V-S-O systems. This system was chosen because vanadium salts is one of the more aggressive system for all engineering alloys, especially in those processes where fossil fuels are used.

  4. Development of Improved Accelerated Corrosion Qualification Test Methodology for Aerospace Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    project proposed against 2009 Strategic Environmental Research and Development (SERDP) Statement of Need “ Dynamic Accelerated Corrosion Test Protocol...Temperature and humidity cycling • Dynamic mechanical loading Four contracts awarded; final reports due ~Feb 2015: • Systems and Materials Research...Example: ASTM D7869 – ( Xenon Arc UV + water spray) 20 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited (Case

  5. High temperature corrosion in the thermochemical hydrogen production from nuclear heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coen-Porisini, F.; Imarisio, G.

    1976-01-01

    In the production of hydrogen by water decomposition utilizing nuclear heat, a multistep process has to be employed. Water and the intermediate chemical products reach in chemical cycles giving hydrogen and oxygen with regeneration of the primary products used. Three cycles are examined, characterized by the presence of halide compounds and particularly hydracids at temperatures up to 800 0 C. Corrosion tests were carried out in hydrobromic acid, hydrochloric acid, ferric chloride solutions, and hydriodic acid

  6. Material problems in high temperature corrosive environments and their solution by surface technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzai, Toshio; Shibata, Keiichi

    1992-01-01

    The materials for high temperature facilities are usually determined by the heat resistant strength except special corrosive environment. High temperature corrosion has been considered in the case of using low quality fuel which is avoided recently. Even though fuel is clean, high temperature corrosion occurs due to the rise of design temperature and the intake of sea salt particles. There is also one more high temperature corrosion problem on process side that consumes heat energy. The research on high temperature corrosion is important for realizing new energy system such as molten carbonate type fuel cell, pulverized coal-firing supercritical power generation and high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor. In this report, the examples experienced actually in a chemical plant are examined, and the possibility of material technology against high temperature corrosion is reviewed. Corrosion phenomena in high temperature environment, the examples of corrosion in the high temperature facilities in a chemical plant and the material technology as the countermeasures for corrosion prevention are reported. (K.I.)

  7. Investigation of thermally sensitised stainless steels as analogues for spent AGR fuel cladding to test a corrosion inhibitor for intergranular stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whillock, Guy O. H.; Hands, Brian J.; Majchrowski, Tom P.; Hambley, David I.

    2018-01-01

    A small proportion of irradiated Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel cladding can be susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) when stored in pond water containing low chloride concentrations, but corrosion is known to be prevented by an inhibitor at the storage temperatures that have applied so far. It may be necessary in the future to increase the storage temperature by up to ∼20 °C and to demonstrate the impact of higher temperatures for safety case purposes. Accordingly, corrosion testing is needed to establish the effect of temperature increases on the efficacy of the inhibitor. This paper presents the results of studies carried out on thermally sensitised 304 and 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steels, investigating their grain boundary compositions and their IGSCC behaviour over a range of test temperatures (30-60 °C) and chloride concentrations (0.3-10 mg/L). Monitoring of crack initiation and propagation is presented along with preliminary results as to the effect of the corrosion inhibitor. 304 stainless steel aged for 72 h at 600 °C provided a close match to the known pond storage corrosion behaviour of spent AGR fuel cladding.

  8. Study on corrosion test techniques in lead bismuth eutectic flow. Joint research report in JFY2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2003-03-01

    The evaluation of corrosion behaviors of core and structural materials in lead bismuth eutectic is one of the key issues for the utilization of lead bismuth eutectic as a coolant of the primary loops of lead bismuth cooled fast breeder reactors (FBRs) and the intermediate heat transport media of new-type steam generators of the sodium cooled FBRs. The purpose of the present study is to establish corrosion test techniques in lead bismuth eutectic flow. The techniques of steel corrosion test and oxygen control in flowing lead bismuth eutectic, and the technologies of a lead bismuth flow test at high temperature and high velocity were developed through corrosion test using a lead bismuth flow test loop of the Tokyo Institute of Technology in JFY2002. The major results are summarized as follows: (1) Techniques of fabrication, mount and rinse of corrosion specimens, measurement method of weight loss, and SEM/EDX analysis method have been established through lead bismuth corrosion test. (2) Weight losses were measured, corrosion and lead bismuth-adhered layers and eroded parts were observed in two 1000 hr-corrosion tests, and the results were compared with each other for twelve existing steels including ODS, F82H and SUH-3. (3) An oxygen sensor made of zirconia electrolyte structurally resistant to thermal stress and thermal shock was developed and tested in the lead bismuth flow loop. Good performance has been obtained. (4) An oxygen control method by injecting argon and hydrogen mixture gas containing steam into lead bismuth was applied to the lead bismuth flow loop, and technical issues for the development of the oxygen control method were extracted. (5) Technical measures for freezing and leakage of lead bismuth in the flow loop were accumulated. (6) Technical measures for flow rate decrease/blockage due to precipitation of oxide and corrosion products in a low temperature section of the lead bismuth flow loop were accumulated. (7) Electromagnetic flow meters with MI

  9. Standard Guide for Conducting Corrosion Tests in Field Applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers procedures for conducting corrosion tests in plant equipment or systems under operating conditions to evaluate the corrosion resistance of engineering materials. It does not cover electrochemical methods for determining corrosion rates. 1.1.1 While intended primarily for immersion tests, general guidelines provided can be applicable for exposure of test specimens in plant atmospheres, provided that placement and orientation of the test specimens is non-restrictive to air circulation. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. See also 10.4.2.

  10. EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOOMER KD

    2009-01-08

    The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

  11. The material corrosion under supercritical and high temperature steam conditions (short literature survey)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yongli.

    1994-03-01

    The test results from the literature, in English language, about corrosion resistance of the alloys under various steam conditions are summarized in this paper. The effect of the composition elements, the surface pre-treatment and the chemical environments on the corrosion behaviours of alloys are evaluated. The evaluation methods for the corrosion behaviours are: the weight change, the observation of the corrosion morphologies, the composition element analysis of the alloys, and the chemical analysis of the tested medium. (orig.)

  12. Effect of cerium addition on corrosion behaviour of AZ61 + XCe alloy under salt spray test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Manivannan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of Mg–6Al–1Zn + XCe (where X = 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 wt% Ce alloys, aged for 18 h at different temperatures of 180 °C, 200 °C, 220 °C and 240 °C, was studied in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. The salt spray test was conducted in accordance with ASTM-B117 standard (fog test. The corrosion morphologies, corrosion rate and the composition of the corrosion products were investigated by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Optical Microscopy (OM and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM techniques. The results show the cerium addition and ageing treatment has significantly influenced the corrosion morphologies and the corrosion rate. In AZ61 alloy, the intermetallic β (Mg17Al12 phase acts as a corrosion barrier and upon ageing the Al4Ce phase precipitates along the α grain boundaries. The precipitation modifies the β phase to form more continuous network which subsequently reduces the corrosion attack in the chlorine environment. Salt spray test result shows the AZ61 alloy with 1.5 wt% Ce aged at 220 °C exhibits the better corrosion resistance.

  13. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2 field testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blough, J.L.; Seitz, W.W.; Girshik, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1998-06-01

    In Phase 1 of this project, laboratory experiments were performed on a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings by exposing them to fireside corrosion tests which simulated a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA85H, HR3C, RA253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, Ta-modified 310, NF 709, 690 clad, 671 clad, and 800HT for up to approximately 16,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW, coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy were exposed for 4,483, 11,348, and 15,883 hours of operation. The present results are for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after the full 15,883 hours of exposure. A previous topical report has been issued for the 4,483 hours of exposure.

  14. Influence of the solution temperature on the corrosion behavior of an austenitic stainless steel in phosphoric acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanez-Ferrandiz, M.V.; Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Garcia-Garcia, D.M.; Garcia-Anton, J. [Valencia Univ. Politecnica, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. ETSI Industriales, Valencia (Spain); Guenbour, A.; Bakour, S.; Benckokroun, A. [University Mohammed V-Agdal, Lab. Corrosion-Electrochimie, Faculty of Sciences, Rabat (Morocco)

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the present work is to study the effect of the solution temperature on the corrosion resistance of a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031) used as base metal, the welded metal obtained by TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding using a Nickel-base alloy (UNS N06059) as filler metal, and the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of the base metal. The materials were tested in 5.5 M phosphoric acid solution at 25 C, 40 C, 60 C and 80 C. Open Circuit Potential tests and potentiodynamic anodic polarization curves have been carried out to obtain information about the electrochemical behavior of the materials. Corrosion potentials and corrosion current densities were obtained from Tafel analysis. The critic potentials and passivation current densities of the studied materials were also analyzed. The galvanic corrosion generated by the electrical contact between the welded metal, the base metal and the HAZ, was estimated from the polarisation diagrams according to the Mixed Potential Theory. The samples were etched to study their microstructure by Optical Microscopy. Results demonstrated that the corrosion potential values shift to more anodic potentials as temperature increases. The corrosion current densities and the passive current densities increased with temperature. Open circuit potential values were located in the passive zone of the potentiodynamic curves, which means that the materials passivated spontaneously. (authors)

  15. KCl-induced high temperature corrosion of selected commercial alloys. Part I: chromia-formers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiamehr, Saeed; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Montgomery, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory testing of selected chromia-forming alloys was performed to rank the materials and gain further knowledge on the mechanism of KCl-induced high temperature corrosion. The investigated alloys were stainless steels EN1.4021, EN1.4057, EN1.4521, TP347H (coarse-grained), TP347HFG (fine......-grained), Sanicro 28 and the nickel-based alloys 625, 263 and C276. Exposure was performed at 600 °C for 168 h in flowing N2(g)+5%O2(g)+15% H2O(g) (vol.%). Samples were covered with KCl powder prior to exposure. A salt-free exposure was also performed for comparison. Corrosion morphology and products were studied....... In the presence of solid KCl, all the alloys showed significant corrosion. Measurement of corrosion extent indicated that alloys EN1.4057, Sanicro 28 and 625 show a better performance compared to the industrial state of the art material TP347HFG under laboratory conditions. An additional test was performed...

  16. Probability density fittings of corrosion test-data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, corrosion test-data of steel-rebar in concrete were subjected to the fittings of the Normal, Gumbel and the Weibull probability distribution functions. This was done to investigate the suitability of the results of the fitted test-data, by these distributions, for modelling the effectiveness of C6H15NO3, triethanolamine ...

  17. Potential high temperature corrosion problems due to co-firing of biomass and fossil fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Vilhelmsen, T.; Jensen, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few years, considerable high temperature corrosion problems have been encountered when firing biomass in power plants due to the high content of potassium chloride in the deposits. Therefore, to combat chloride corrosion problems cofiring of biomass with a fossil fuel has been....... However, the most significant corrosion attack was sulphidation attack at the grain boundaries of 18-8 steel after 3 years exposure. The corrosion mechanisms and corrosion rates are compared with biomass firing and coal firing. Potential corrosion problems due to co-firing biomass and fossil fuels...... corrosion mechanisms appear such as sulphidation and hot corrosion due to sulphate deposits. At Studstrup power plant Unit 4, based on trials with exposure times of 3000 h using 0–20% straw co-firing with coal, the plant now runs with a fuel mix of 10% strawþcoal. Based on results from a 3 years exposure...

  18. Parameters of straining-induced corrosion cracking in low-alloy steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenz, E.; Liebert, A.; Stellwag, B.; Wieling, N.

    Tensile tests with slow deformation speed determine parameters of corrosion cracking at low strain rates of low-alloy steels in high-temperature water. Besides the strain rate the temperature and oxygen content of the water prove to be important for the deformation behaviour of the investigated steels 17MnMoV64, 20 MnMoNi55 and 15NiCuMoNb 5. Temperatures about 240 0 C, increased oxygen contents in the water and low strain rates cause a decrease of the material ductility as against the behaviour in air. Tests on the number of stress cycles until incipient cracking show that the parameters important for corrosion cracking at low strain velocities apply also to low-frequency cyclic loads with high strain amplitude. In knowledge of these influencing parameters the strain-induced corrosion cracking is counteracted by concerted measures taken in design, construction and operation of nuclear power stations. Essential aims in this matter are to avoid as far as possible inelastic strains and to fix and control suitable media conditions. (orig.) [de

  19. Corrosion of structural materials and electrochemistry in high temperature water of nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    The latest experiences with corrosion in the cooling systems of nuclear power plants are reviewed. High temperature cooling water causes corrosion of structural materials, which often leads to adverse effects in the plants, e.g., generating defects in materials of major components and fuel claddings, increasing shutdown radiation and increasing the volume of radwaste sources. Corrosion behaviors are much affected by water qualities and differ according to the values of water qualities and the materials themselves. In order to establish reliable operation, each plant requires its own unique optimal water chemistry control based on careful consideration of its system, materials and operational history. Electrochemistry is one of key issues that determine corrosion related problems but it is not the only issue. Most phenomena for corrosion related problems, e.g., flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC), intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and thinning of fuel cladding materials, can be understood based on an electrochemical index, e.g., electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), conductivities and pH. The most important electrochemical index, ECP, can be measured at elevated temperature and applied to in situ sensors of corrosion conditions to detect anomalous conditions of structural materials at their very early stages. In the paper, theoretical models based on electrochemistry to estimate wall thinning rate of carbon steel piping due to flow-accelerated corrosion and corrosive conditions determining IGSCC crack initiation and growth rate are introduced. (author)

  20. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Shen, Dejiu

    2016-08-01

    The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  1. Enhanced Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steel Carburized at Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, F. J.; Natishan, P. M.; Lemieux, E. J.; Newbauer, T. M.; Rayne, R. J.; Bayles, R. A.; Kahn, H.; Michal, G. M.; Ernst, F.; Heuer, A. H.

    2009-08-01

    The pitting corrosion resistance of surface-modified 316L austenitic stainless steel and N08367 (a “superaustenitic” stainless steel) were evaluated in 0.6 M NaCl solutions and compared to untreated samples of the same materials. The surface modification process used to treat the surfaces was a low-temperature carburization technology termed “low-temperature colossal supersaturation” (LTCSS). The process typically produces surface carbon concentrations of ~15 at. pct without the formation of carbides. The pitting potential of the LTCSS-treated 316L stainless steel in the NaCl solution substantially increased compared to untreated 316L stainless steel, while the pitting behavior of the LTCSS-treated N08367 was unchanged compared to the untreated alloy.

  2. Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 01-1-065 Accelerated Corrosion Durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-15

    the ACDT events. The corrosion mechanisms are accelerated through the use of an environmental chamber that provides a high temperature, high humidity...Scribes may be made on various surfaces of the test item. These scribes are meant to test the coating adhesion properties along with its...duplicates the rough cobblestone road found in many parts of the world. The course is useful as a standard rough road for accelerated tests of

  3. Alternate immersion stress corrosion testing of 5083 aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J.L.; Dringman, M.R.; Hausburg, D.E.; Jackson, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The stress corrosion susceptibility of Type 5083 aluminum--magnesium alloy in plate form and press-formed shapes was determined in the short transverse direction. C-ring type specimens were exposed to alternate immersion in a sodium chloride solution. The test equipment and procedure, with several innovative features, are described in detail. Statistical test results are listed for seven thermomechanical conditions. A certain processing scheme was shown to yield a work-strengthened part that is not sensitized with respect to stress corrosion cracking

  4. Laboratory testing of waste glass aqueous corrosion; effects of experimental parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.; Mazer, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    A literature survey has been performed to assess the effects of the temperature, glass surface area/leachate volume ratio, leachant composition, leachant flow rate, and glass composition (actual radioactive vs. simulated glass) used in laboratory tests on the measured glass reaction rate. The effects of these parameters must be accounted for in mechanistic models used to project glass durability over long times. Test parameters can also be utilized to highlight particular processes in laboratory tests. Waste glass corrosion results as water diffusion, ion-exchange, and hydrolysis reactions occur simultaneously to devitrify the glass and release soluble glass components into solution. The rates of these processes are interrelated by the affects of the solution chemistry and glass alteration phases on each process, and the dominant (fastest) process may change as the reaction progresses. Transport of components from the release sites into solution may also affect the observed corrosion rate. The reaction temperature will affect the rate of each process, while other parameters will affect the solution chemistry and which processes are observed during the test. The early stages of corrosion will be observed under test conditions which maintain dilute leachates and the later stages will be observed under conditions that generate more concentrated leachate solutions. Typically, water diffusion and ion-exchange reactions dominate the observed glass corrosion in dilute solutions while hydrolysis reactions dominant in more concentrated solutions. Which process(es) controls the long-term glass corrosion is not fully understood, and the long-term corrosion rate may be either transport- or reaction-limited

  5. Developing of corrosion and creep property test database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. J.; Jun, I.; Kim, J. S.; Ryu, W. S.

    2004-01-01

    The corrosion and creep characteristics database systems were constructed using the data produced from corrosion and creep test and designed to hold in common the data and programs of tensile, impact, fatigue characteristics database that was constructed since 2001 and others characteristics databases that will be constructed in future. We can easily get the basic data from the corrosion and creep characteristics database systems when we prepare the new experiment and can produce high quality result by compare the previous test result. The development part must be analysis and design more specific to construct the database and after that, we can offer the best quality to customers various requirements. In this thesis, we describe the procedure about analysis, design and development of the impact and fatigue characteristics database systems developed by internet method using jsp(Java Server pages) tool

  6. Effect of the deposition temperature on corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of the hydroxyapatite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladescu, A., E-mail: alinava@inoe.ro [National Institute for Optoelectronics, 409 Atomistilor Str., Magurele (Romania); Braic, M. [National Institute for Optoelectronics, 409 Atomistilor Str., Magurele (Romania); Azem, F. Ak [Dokuz Eylul University, Engineering Faculty, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Buca-Izmir (Turkey); Titorencu, I. [Institute of Cellular Biology and Pathology Nicolae Simionescu of the Romanian Academy, 8 B.P.Hasdeu, Bucharest (Romania); Braic, V. [National Institute for Optoelectronics, 409 Atomistilor Str., Magurele (Romania); Pruna, V. [Institute of Cellular Biology and Pathology Nicolae Simionescu of the Romanian Academy, 8 B.P.Hasdeu, Bucharest (Romania); Kiss, A. [National Institute for Optoelectronics, 409 Atomistilor Str., Magurele (Romania); Parau, A.C.; Birlik, I. [Dokuz Eylul University, Engineering Faculty, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Buca-Izmir (Turkey)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite has been produced at temperature from 400 to 800 °C by magnetron sputtering. • Hydroxyapatite crystallinity is improved by increasing substrate temperature. • The increase of substrate temperature resulted in corrosion resistance increasing. • The coating shows high growth of the osteosarcoma cells over a wide temperature range. - Abstract: Hydroxyapatite (HAP) ceramics belong to a class of calcium phosphate-based materials, which have been widely used as coatings on titanium medical implants in order to improve bone fixation and thus to increase the lifetime of the implant. In this study, HAP coatings were deposited from pure HAP targets on Ti6Al4V substrates using the radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique at substrate temperatures ranging from 400 to 800 °C. The surface morphology and the crystallographic structure of the films were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion resistance of the coatings in saliva solution at 37 °C was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization. Additionally, the human osteosarcoma cell line (MG-63) was used to test the biocompatibility of the coatings. The results showed that all of the coatings grown uniformly and that the increasing substrate temperature induced an increase in their crystallinity. Corrosion performance of the coatings was improved with the increase of the substrate temperature from 400 °C to 800 °C. Furthermore, all the coatings support the attachment and growth of the osteosarcoma cells with regard to the in vitro test findings.

  7. High Temperature Corrosion under Laboratory Conditions Simulating Biomass-Firing: A Comprehensive Characterization of Corrosion Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    characterization of the corrosion products. The corrosion products consisted of three layers: i) the outermost layer consisting of a mixed layer of K2SO4 and FexOy on a partly molten layer of the initial deposit, ii) the middle layer consists of spinel (FeCr2O4) and Fe2O3, and iii) the innermost layer is a sponge......-like Ni3S2 containing layer. At the corrosion front, Cl-rich protrusions were observed. Results indicate that selective corrosion of Fe and Cr by Cl, active oxidation and sulphidation attack of Ni are possible corrosion mechanisms....

  8. Task 20 - Prevention of Chloride Corrosion in High-Temperature Waste Treatment Systems (Corrosives Removals from Vitrification Slurries)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timpe, R.C.; Aulich, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    GTS Duratek is working with BNFL Incorporated on a US Department of Energy (DOE) contract to develop a facility to treat and immobilize radioactive waste at the Hanford site in southeast Washington. Development of the 10-ton/day Hanford facility will be based on findings from work at Duratek's 3.3-ton/day pilot plant in Columbia, Maryland, which is in the final stage of construction and scheduled for shakedown testing in early 1999. In prior work with the Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory, Duratek has found that slurrying is the most efficient way to introduce low-level radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes into vitrification melters. However, many of the Hanford tank wastes to be vitrified contain species (primarily chloride and sulfate) that are corrosive to the vitrifier or the downstream air pollution control equipment, especially under the elevated temperature conditions existent in these components. Removal of these corrosives presents a significant challenge because most tank wastes contain high (up to 10-molar) concentrations of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) along with significant levels of nitrate, nitrite, and other anions, which render standard ion-exchange, membrane filtration, and other separation technologies relatively ineffective. In Task 20, the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) will work with Duratek to develop and optimize a vitrification pretreatment process for consistent, quantitative removal of chloride and sulfate prior to vitrifier injection

  9. High temperature and pressure electrochemical test station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Allebrod, Frank; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    An electrochemical test station capable of operating at pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures up to 400 ◦C has been established. It enables control of the partial pressures and mass flow of O2, N2, H2, CO2, and H2O in a single or dual environment arrangement, measurements with highly corrosive......, to the electrochemical characterization of high temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis cells and the use of pseudo-reference electrodes for the separation of each electrode contribution. A future perspective of various electrochemical processes and devices that can be developed with the use of the established...

  10. Review of SiCf/SiCm corrosion, erosion and erosion-corrosion in high temperature helium relevant to GFR conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Kerr; Shepherd, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    The good thermal, mechanical and nuclear properties of silicon carbide composites (SiCf/SiCm) has led to their proposal as a gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) fuel cladding material. Accordingly, previous studies on the corrosion, erosion and erosion-corrosion of SiCf/SiCm have been reviewed. A significant amount of corrosion data was compared for various SiCf/SiCm types tested under different conditions, which suggested that it may be suitable for use in a GFR. However some issues remain, specifically the potential for removal by oxidation of the pyrolytic carbon (PyC) interphase below 900 °C and highly damaging active oxidation at temperatures above 1200 °C. Few relevant papers were found on the erosion and erosion-corrosion behaviour of SiCf/SiCm, though those that were did indicate improved erosion resistance compared to metals. However, most data concerned particulate rather than gas erosion, and at relatively low temperatures. Exacerbation of erosion by corrosion (and vice versa) is hypothesised due to both phenomena potentially causing and being worsened by increased composite porosity. The possibility for this to be further exacerbated mechanically was also identified e.g. by surface damage or by crack formation and growth. The potential impact of irradiation in fast reactor conditions also needs to be better understood. Overall, limited data was found that is representative of anticipated GFR conditions and only in the form of separate effect corrosion tests, thus highlighting the need for erosion and combined effect experiments to progress SiCf/SiCm towards qualification as GFR fuel cladding. Finally, some potential means for improving performance have been identified including environmental adjustment and/or alternative composite design.

  11. Improved corrosion protection of aluminum alloys by low-temperature plasma interface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Chandra Mudupu

    The System Approach Interface Engineering (SAIE) concept was employed to develop corrosion protection processes for aluminum (Al) alloys by application of a low temperature plasma interface engineering technique with a cathodic electrocoat (E-coat) as the primary layer coating. The SAIE concept emphasizes that the corrosion protection property of the coated system for Al alloys depends on the total system rather than any good corrosion protection component of the system. The cathodic E-coated SAIE plasma pretreatments on Alclad 2024-T3, 2024-T3 bare and 7075-T6 bare alloys showed excellent corrosion resistance property when tested by SO2 and Prohesion salt spray tests. These systems out performed the conventional conversion coated controls, chromate conversion coated then Deft primer coated (CC Deft) and chromate conversion coated then cathodic E-coated (CC E-coat) in both the corrosion testes. The corrosion protection by SAIE systems depends on three major factors; (1) improved barrier characteristics of E-coat, (2) water insensitive adhesion of E-coat to plasma polymers deposited in a DC discharge and (3) creating a stable surface oxide layer by plasma treatment or chemical cleaning. Different chemical pretreatments were employed to create a stable barrier type aluminum oxide layer on the surfaces of the substrates prior to plasma polymer deposition. The surface analysis showed that these pretreatments depend on the type of alloy and surface chemistry. As received surfaces with acetone wipe and plasma cleaning of the organic contaminants was found to be best for Alclad 2024-T3 alloy. Chemical alkaline cleaning for 2024-T3 bare and alkaline cleaning followed by deoxidization for 7075-T6 bare alloy were necessary. The adhesion of the cathodic E-coat was improved by surface energy matching techniques by deposition of various plasma polymer films of trimethylsilane (TMS) and mixtures of TMS with O2, H2, and N2. The adhesion performance evaluated by the N

  12. Experimental Investigation of the Corrosion Behavior of Friction Stir Welded AZ61A Magnesium Alloy Welds under Salt Spray Corrosion Test and Galvanic Corrosion Test Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dhanapal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extruded Mg alloy plates of 6 mm thick of AZ61A grade were butt welded using advanced welding process and friction stir welding (FSW processes. The specimens were exposed to salt spray conditions and immersion conditions to characterize their corrosion rates on the effect of pH value, chloride ion concentration, and corrosion time. In addition, an attempt was made to develop an empirical relationship to predict the corrosion rate of FSW welds in salt spray corrosion test and galvanic corrosion test using design of experiments. The corrosion morphology and the pit morphology were analyzed by optical microscopy, and the corrosion products were examined using scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction analysis. From this research work, it is found that, in both corrosion tests, the corrosion rate decreases with the increase in pH value, the decrease in chloride ion concentration, and a higher corrosion time. The results show the usage of the magnesium alloy for best environments and suitable applications from the aforementioned conditions. Also, it is found that AZ61A magnesium alloy welds possess low-corrosion rate and higher-corrosion resistance in the galvanic corrosion test than in the salt spray corrosion test.

  13. Comparative Stress Corrosion Cracking and General Corrosion Resistance of Annealed and Hardened 440 C Stainless Steel - New Techniques in Stress Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendreck, M. J.; Hurless, B. E.; Torres, P. D.; Danford, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) characteristics of annealed and hardened 440C stainless steel were evaluated in high humidity and 3.5-percent NaCl solution. Corrosion testing consisted of an evaluation of flat plates, with and without grease, in high humidity, as well as electrochemical testing in 3.5-percent NaCl. Stress corrosion testing consisted of conventional, constant strain, smooth bar testing in high humidity in addition to two relatively new techniques under evaluation at MSFC. These techniques involve either incremental or constant rate increases in the load applied to a precracked SE(B) specimen, monitoring the crack-opening-displacement response for indications of crack growth. The electrochemical corrosion testing demonstrated an order of magnitude greater general corrosion rate in the annealed 440C. All techniques for stress corrosion testing showed substantially better SCC resistance in the annealed material. The efficacy of the new techniques for stress corrosion testing was demonstrated both by the savings in time and the ability to better quantify SCC data.

  14. KCl-induced high temperature corrosion of selected commercial alloys. Part II: alumina and silica-formers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiamehr, Saeed; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Montgomery, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory testing on selected alumina and silica-forming alloys was performed to evaluate their performance against high temperature corrosion induced by potassium chloride (KCl). The alloys studied were FeCrAlY, Kanthal APM, Nimonic 80A, 214, 153MA and HR160. Exposure was conducted at 600 °C......-chromium-silicon-oxygen containing layer forms as the innermost corrosion product. The layer was uniformly distributed over the surface and appears to render some protection as this alloy exhibited the best performance among the investigated alloys. To reveal further aspects of the corrosion mechanism, Nimonic 80A was exposed...... for 168 h in flowing N2(g)+5%O2(g)+15%H2O(g) (vol.%) with samples covered under KCl powder. A KCl-free exposure was also performed for comparison.Corrosion morphology and products were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD...

  15. Study of the corrosion of metallic coatings and alloys containing aluminum in a mixed atmosphere - sulphur, oxygen - at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellmann, Daniel

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is the development of materials for a sulphur experimental loop allowing the thermodynamic properties of such an energy cycle to be checked. As solutions must comply with industrial methods, rare materials are excluded as they are too expensive or difficult to implement. Iron-based materials have been tested but could not have at the same time a good corrosion resistance and high temperature forming and mechanical toughness properties. Therefore, metallic coatings have been chosen, specifically alumina. After having reported a bibliographical study on corrosion by sulphur vapour and by oxygen and by sulphur-oxygen, the author presents the experimental materials and methods. Then, the author reports the study of mixed corrosion (by sulphur and oxygen together) of metallic alloys (ferritic and austeno-ferritic alloys, aluminium and titanium alloys), and of the corrosion of FeAlx coatings, of AlTix alloys [fr

  16. Development of new corrosion inhibitor tested on mild steel supported by electrochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeeb, Hussein Jwad; Luaibi, Hasan Mohammed; Dakhil, Rifaat Mohammed; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A.; Gaaz, Tayser Sumer

    2018-03-01

    Mild steel is a metal which is commonly used in industrials and manufacturing of equipment for most industries round the world. It is cheaper cost compared with the other metals and its durable, hard and easy-to-wear physical properties make it a major choice in the manufacture of equipment parts. The main problem through the uses of mild steel in industry is its resistance against corrosion, especially in acidic solutions. This case led to raise the cost of maintenance of equipment that used mild steel and as a result increased costs for the company. Organic corrosive inhibitors that also act as green chemicals, 4-hydroxybenzylideneaminomethyl-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol have been synthesized. This inhibitor is tested as corrosion inhibitor on a mild steel sample MS in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution (HCl) using electrochemical measurements test includes PD (Potentiodynamic), EIS (Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy), OCP (Open circuit potential) and EFM (electrochemical frequency modulation). The obtained results indicate that 4-hydroxybenzylideneaminomethyl-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol acts as a good corrosion inhibitor for mild steel sample in HCl solution with efficiency above 90%. Changes in the impedance parameters postulated adsorption on the mild steel specimens' surfaces of, which it going to the formation of protective coating layer. It also shows that 4-hydroxybenzylideneaminomethyl-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol corrosion inhibitors are effective in helping to reduce and slow down the corrosion process that occurs on mild steel surface in hydrochloric acid solution. Increase of corrosion inhibitor concentration provides a protective layer of mild steel. However, this protective layer becomes weak when the temperature of the solution increases.

  17. Development of new corrosion inhibitor tested on mild steel supported by electrochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Jwad Habeeb

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mild steel is a metal which is commonly used in industrials and manufacturing of equipment for most industries round the world. It is cheaper cost compared with the other metals and its durable, hard and easy-to-wear physical properties make it a major choice in the manufacture of equipment parts. The main problem through the uses of mild steel in industry is its resistance against corrosion, especially in acidic solutions. This case led to raise the cost of maintenance of equipment that used mild steel and as a result increased costs for the company. Organic corrosive inhibitors that also act as green chemicals, 4-hydroxybenzylideneaminomethyl-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol have been synthesized. This inhibitor is tested as corrosion inhibitor on a mild steel sample MS in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution (HCl using electrochemical measurements test includes PD (Potentiodynamic, EIS (Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, OCP (Open circuit potential and EFM (electrochemical frequency modulation. The obtained results indicate that 4-hydroxybenzylideneaminomethyl-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol acts as a good corrosion inhibitor for mild steel sample in HCl solution with efficiency above 90%. Changes in the impedance parameters postulated adsorption on the mild steel specimens' surfaces of, which it going to the formation of protective coating layer. It also shows that 4-hydroxybenzylideneaminomethyl-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol corrosion inhibitors are effective in helping to reduce and slow down the corrosion process that occurs on mild steel surface in hydrochloric acid solution. Increase of corrosion inhibitor concentration provides a protective layer of mild steel. However, this protective layer becomes weak when the temperature of the solution increases. Keywords: Hydroxybenzylideneaminomethy, Potentiodynamic, Electrochemical frequency modulation, Impedance

  18. Preparation and testing of corrosion and spallation-resistant coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, John P. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Cavalli, Matthew N. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2016-06-30

    The goal of this project was to take a recently developed method of bonding oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl plating to nickel superalloys closer to commercial use in syngas-fired turbines. The project was designed to better understand and develop the bonding process and to determine if plating APMT®, a specific highly oxidation-resistant ODS FeCrAl alloy made by Kanthal, onto nickel-based superalloy turbine parts is a viable method for substantially improving the lifetimes and maximum use temperatures of the parts. The superalloys investigated for protection were CM247LC and Rene® 80, both alumina scale-forming alloys. The method for bonding the APMT plate to the superalloys is called evaporative metal bonding, which involves placing a thin foil of zinc between the plate and the superalloy, clamping them together, and heating in an atmosphere-controlled furnace. Upon heating, the zinc melts and dissolves the oxide skins of the alloys at the bond line, allowing the two alloys to diffuse into each other. The zinc then diffuses through the alloys and evaporates from their surfaces, creating a bond between the APMT and the superalloy that is stronger than the APMT itself. Testing showed that the diffusivity of zinc in both APMT and CM247LC is quite similar at 700°C but 15 times higher in the APMT at 1214°C. Coefficients of thermal expansion were determined for each of the alloys as a function of temperature. This information was entered into a finite-element model using ANSYS, which was used to design a clamping jig for pressing the APMT to the superalloys at the bonding temperature. Scanning electron microscopy analyses of representative joints showed that no zinc remained in the alloys after bonding Unfortunately, the analyses also showed some small pieces of broken aluminum oxide scale near the bond lines, indicating that its scale was not sufficiently removed during prebonding cleaning. Samples from each of the bonded blocks were sent to Siemens for

  19. Potential high temperature corrosion problems due to co-firing of biomass and fossil fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Vilhelmsen, T.; Jensen, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past years, considerable high temperature corrosion problems have been encountered when firing biomass in power plants due to the high content of potassium chloride in the deposits. Therefore to combat chloride corrosion problems co-firing of biomass with a fossil fuel has been undertaken...... significant corrosion attack was due to sulphidation attack at the grain boundaries of 18-8 steel after 3 years exposure. The corrosion mechanisms and corrosion rates are compared with biomass firing and coal firing. Potential corrosion problems due to co-firing biomass and fossil fuels are discussed....... appear such as sulphidation and hot corrosion due to sulphate deposits. At Studstrup power plant Unit 4, based on trials with exposure times of 3000 hours using 0-20% straw co-firing with coal, the plant now runs with a fuel of 10% straw + coal. After three years exposure in this environment...

  20. The synergy of corrosion and fretting wear process on Inconel 690 in the high temperature high pressure water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zihao; Xu, Jian; Li, Jie; Xin, Long; Lu, Yonghao; Shoji, Tetsuo; Takeda, Yoichi; Otsuka, Yuichi; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2018-04-01

    The synergistic effect of corrosion and fretting process of the steam generator (SG) tube was investigated by using a self-designed high temperature test rig in this paper. The experiments were performed at 100°C , 200°C and 288°C , respectively. The fretting corrosion damage was studied by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), Raman spectroscopy and auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The results demonstrated that the corrosion process in high temperature high pressure (HTHP) water environment had a distinct interaction with the fretting process of Inconel 690. With the increment of temperature, the damage mechanism changed from a simple mechanical process to a mechanochemical process.

  1. Corrosion studies of UNS N08031 in a heavy brine LiBr solution at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Garcia, D.M.; Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Igual-Munoz, A.; Garcia-Anton, J. [Valencia Univ. Politecnica, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. ETSI Industriales, Valencia (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    Lithium Bromide heavy brine solutions are used as absorbent in LiBr absorption machines. These machines are an alternative to refrigeration compression systems. The double effect absorption machines are more efficient than those of single effect, but they reach higher temperatures and they use higher LiBr concentrations. These conditions aggravate the corrosion problems on the metallic components of these systems. Therefore, it is necessary to study the corrosion resistance of the construction materials of the LiBr absorption machines, like UNS N08031, under these aggressive conditions. The objective of the present work is to study the pitting corrosion resistance and the re-passivation behaviour of a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (N08031) in a 1080 g/l heavy brine LiBr solution at 75 C, 100 C, 125 C and 150 C. Open Circuit Potential tests and Potentiodynamic Cyclic curves were carried out to obtain information about the electrochemical behaviour of UNS N08031 alloy. Corrosion potentials and corrosion current densities were obtained from the Tafel Analysis. The pitting corrosion resistance was evaluated from the passivation current density and the pitting potential values. The re-passivation potential and the re-passivation current density provided information about the re-passivation behaviour of UNS N08031. The samples were etched to study the microstructure by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the potentiodynamic curves were typical of a passive material at all temperatures. Pitting corrosion resistance decreased with temperature, as the decrease in pitting potential and the increase in passivation current density evidenced. However, the re-passivation capability increased with temperature, since the width of the hysteresis loop diminished as temperature increased. (authors)

  2. Testing the permeability and corrosion resistance of micro-mechanically interlocked joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byskov-Nielsen, Jeppe; Holm, Allan H.; Højsholt, Rune; Sá, Pedro; Balling, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Micro-mechanical interlocking (MMI) can be applied to create new and interesting composite materials. We have employed laser structuring to achieve MMI between stainless steel and plastic with extremely high joint strength. However, the water permeability and corrosion resistance of the joint must be examined. For many industrially relevant applications it is important to keep water away from certain parts and to prevent the sample from corroding. A thorough study of the permeability of the interconnected samples at different temperatures and after employing different laser-structuring techniques is conducted. The permeability seems to be consistent with the Hagen-Poiseuille equation independent of the laser structuring technique and is orders of magnitudes larger than the diffusion rate through the plastic. Two different types of corrosion tests have been undertaken, and we show that care must be taken in order not to degrade the corrosion resistance of the sample to an unacceptable level.

  3. Corrosion behavior of low energy, high temperature nitrogen ion-implanted AISI 304 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoranneviss, M.; Shokouhy, A.; Larijani, M. M.; Haji Hosseini, S. H.; Yari, M.; Anvari, A.; Gholipur Shahraki, M.; Sari, A. H.; Hantehzadeh, M. R.

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the results of a low-energy nitrogen ion implantation of AISI 304 type stainless steel (SS) at a moderate temperature of about 500°C. The nitrogen ions are extracted from a Kauffman-type ion source at an energy of 30 keV, and ion current density of 100 μA cm^{-2}. Nitrogen ion concentration of 6 × 10^{17}, 8 × 10^{17} and 10^{18} ions cm^{-2}, were selected for our study. The X-ray diffraction results show the formation of CrN polycrystalline phase after nitrogen bombardment and a change of crystallinity due to the change in nitrogen ion concentration. The secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) results show the formation of CrN phases too. Corrosion test has shown that corrosion resistance is enhanced by increasing nitrogen ion concentration.

  4. Corrosion Testing in Support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, G.

    2000-11-07

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium Project is part of the United States Department of Energy strategy to meet the nation's tritium needs. The project involves the design of a proton beam accelerator, which will produce tritium through neutron/proton interaction with helium-3. Design, construction and operation of this one-of-a-kind facility will involve the utilization of a wide variety of materials exposed to unique conditions, including elevated temperature and high-energy mixed-proton and -neutron spectra. A comprehensive materials test program was established by the APT project which includes the irradiation of structural materials by exposure to high-energy protons and neutrons at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Real-time corrosion measurements were performed on specially designed corrosion probes in water irradiated by an 800 MeV proton beam. The water test system provided a means for measuring water chemistry, dissolved hydroge n concentration, and the effects of water radiolysis and water quality on corrosion rate. The corrosion probes were constructed of candidate APT materials alloy 718, 316L stainless steel, 304L stainless steel, and 6061 Aluminum (T6 heat treatment), and alternate materials 5052 aluminum alloy, alloy 625, and C276. Real-time corrosion rates during proton irradiation increased with proton beam current. Efforts are continuing to determine the effect of proton beam characteristics and mixed-particle flux on the corrosion rate of materials located directly in the proton beam. This paper focuses on the real-time corrosion measurements of materials located in the supply stream and return stream of the water flow line to evaluate effects of long-lived radiolysis products and water chemistry on the corrosion rates of materials. In general, the corrosion rates for the out-of-beam probes were low and were affected mainly by water conductivity. The data indicate a water conductivity threshold e

  5. Durability Tests of a Fiber Optic Corrosion Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher K.Y. Leung

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Steel corrosion is a major cause of degradation in reinforced concrete structures, and there is a need to develop cost-effective methods to detect the initiation of corrosion in such structures. This paper presents a low cost, easy to use fiber optic corrosion sensor for practical application. Thin iron film is deposited on the end surface of a cleaved optical fiber by sputtering. When light is sent into the fiber, most of it is reflected by the coating. If the surrounding environment is corrosive, the film is corroded and the intensity of the reflected signal drops significantly. In previous work, the sensing principle was verified by various experiments in laboratory and a packaging method was introduced. In this paper, the method of multiplexing several sensors by optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR and optical splitter is introduced, together with the interpretation of OTDR results. The practical applicability of the proposed sensors is demonstrated in a three-year field trial with the sensors installed in an aggressive marine environment. The durability of the sensor against chemical degradation and physical degradation is also verified by accelerated life test and freeze-thaw cycling test, respectively.

  6. Optimization of Arc-Sprayed Ni-Cr-Ti Coatings for High Temperature Corrosion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S.; Schweizer, M.

    2013-04-01

    High Cr content Ni-Cr-Ti arc-spray coatings have proven successful in resisting the high temperature sulfidizing conditions found in black liquor recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry. The corrosion resistance of the coatings is dependent upon the coating composition, to form chromium sulfides and oxides to seal the coating, and on the coating microstructure. Selection of the arc-spray parameters influences the size, temperature and velocity of the molten droplets generated during spraying, which in turn dictates the coating composition and formation of the critical coating microstructural features—splat size, porosity and oxide content. Hence it is critical to optimize the arc-spray parameters in order to maximize the corrosion resistance of the coating. In this work the effect of key spray parameters (current, voltage, spray distance and gas atomizing pressure) on the coating splat thickness, porosity content, oxide content, microhardness, thickness, and surface profile were investigated using a full factorial design of experiment. Based on these results a set of oxidized, porous and optimized coatings were prepared and characterized in detail for follow-up corrosion testing.

  7. Corrosion of structural materials and electrochemistry in high temperature water of nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke

    2008-01-01

    The latest experiences with corrosion in the cooling systems of nuclear power plants are reviewed. High temperature cooling water causes corrosion of structural materials, which often leads to adverse effects in the plants, e.g., increased shutdown radiation, generation of defects in materials of major components and fuel claddings, and increased volume of radwaste sources. Corrosion behavior is greatly affected by water quality and differs according to the water quality values and the materials themselves. In order to establish reliable operation, each plant requires its own unique optimal water chemistry control based on careful consideration of its system, materials and operational history. Electrochemistry is one of the key issues that determine corrosion-related problems, but it is not the only issue. Most corrosion-related phenomena, e.g., flow accelerated corrosion (FAC), intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and thinning of fuel cladding materials, can be understood based on an electrochemical index, e.g., the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), conductivities and pH. The most important electrochemical index, the ECP, can be measured at elevated temperature and applied to in situ sensors of corrosion conditions to detect anomalous conditions of structural materials at their very early stages. (orig.)

  8. Modelling of zircaloy-4 corrosion in nitrogen and oxygen mixtures at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasserre, M.; Peres, V.; Pijolat, M.; Coindreau, O.; Duriez, C.; Mardon, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of zircaloy-4 corrosion in air have shown accelerated corrosion in the 600-1000 Celsius degrees temperature range with Zr nitrides precipitating near the metal/oxide surface. The aim of this series of slides is to assess the influence of N 2 and O 2 partial pressures on the kinetic rate of growth of a new phase and to propose a kinetic modelling of zircaloy-4 corrosion

  9. Corrosion research from the practical view - 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, D.; Rahmel, A.; Baselt, J.P.

    1987-09-01

    This volume contains brief descriptions of R+D projects in corrosion research, including those just terminated, those still going on, and those due to begin soon. On the whole, the brief accounts cover 133 individual projects. The topics of the nine project groups are: Hydrogen-induced material damage; stress-cracking corrosion; fatigue cracking corrosion and local corrosion; fluid-flow-induced corrosion; high-temperature corrosion; material behaviour in waters and soils; corrosion in special media; material behaviour in seawater; corrosion protection by means of coatings and coverings; testing procedures for detecting material damage due to corrosion. (orig./MM) [de

  10. A non-destructive test method to monitor corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cement based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Peterova, Adela

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a non-destructive test method to monitor the development of corrosion products as well as the corrosion-induced formation and propagation of cracks in cementitious materials. A parametric experimental investigation (utilizing x-ray attenuation measurement technique...

  11. Corrosion Testing of Thermal Spray Coatings in a Biomass Co-Firing Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Oksa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale use of biomass and recycled fuel is increasing in energy production due to climate and energy targets. A 40% cut in greenhouse gas emission compared to 1990 levels and at least a 27% share of renewable energy consumption are set in EU Energy Strategy 2030. Burning fuels with high content of corrosive species such as chlorine and heavy metals causes deterioration of boiler components, shortened lifetime, limited availability of a plant and hence higher maintenance and investment costs and lower thermal and economic efficiency. Coatings can be applied to protect the critical boiler components against high temperature corrosion. In this study, five thermal spray coatings were tested in an actual biomass co-firing boiler for 1300 h with a measurement probe. The coatings were analyzed after the exposure by metallographic means and scanning electron microscope/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscope (SEM/EDX. The deposits formed on the specimens were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence. At 550 °C, the coatings showed excellent corrosion performance compared to reference material ferritic steel T92. At 750 °C, tube material A263 together with NiCr and NiCrTi had the highest corrosion resistance. To conclude, thermal spray coatings can offer substantial corrosion protection in biomass and recycled fuel burning power plants.

  12. The probability distribution of intergranular stress corrosion cracking life for sensitized 304 stainless steels in high temperature, high purity water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Masatsune; Kenjyo, Takao; Matsukura, Shinji; Kawamoto, Teruaki

    1984-01-01

    In order to discuss the probability distribution of intergranular stress corrsion carcking life for sensitized 304 stainless steels, a series of the creviced bent beem (CBB) and the uni-axial constant load tests were carried out in oxygenated high temperature, high purity water. The following concludions were resulted; (1) The initiation process of intergranular stress corrosion cracking has been assumed to be approximated by the Poisson stochastic process, based on the CBB test results. (2) The probability distribution of intergranular stress corrosion cracking life may consequently be approximated by the exponential probability distribution. (3) The experimental data could be fitted to the exponential probability distribution. (author)

  13. Corrosion Behavior of Nickel-Plated Alloy 600 in High Temperature Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Hwang, Il Soon

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, electrochemical and microstructural characteristics of nickel-plated Alloy 600 wee investigated in order to identify the performance of electroless Ni-plating on Alloy 600 in high-temperature aqueous condition with the comparison of electrolytic nickel-plating. For high temperature corrosion test of nickel-plated Alloy 600, specimens were exposed for 770 hours to typical PWR primary water condition. During the test, open circuit potentials (OCP's) of all specimens were measured using a reference electrode. Also, resistance to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) test was examined in order to check the durability of plated layers in high-velocity flow environment at high temperature. After exposures to high flow rate aqueous condition, the integrity of surfaces was confirmed by using both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). For the field application, a remote process for electroless nickel-plating was demonstrated using a plate specimen with narrow gap on a laboratory scale. Finally, a practical seal design was suggested for more convenient application

  14. Corrosion test of coated steel sheets using hem model. Hem model wo mochiita kakushu hyomen shori koban no fushoku shiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, S.; Sakai, H.; Iwai, M.; Arimura, M. (Kobe Steel, Ltd., Kobe (Japan))

    1993-10-01

    The outdoor exposure corrosion test results of the hem model attached inside an automotive door for two years (May, 1986 - May, 1988) were reported as well as the cyclic corrosion test results of the hem model including cyclic salt spray, drying and wetting repeated 200 times. The hem models were made of some kinds of surface treated steel sheets such as electrogalvanizing one, and coated by dipping phosphating and cation electrodeposition like practical automotive coating. As a result, the corrosion depth of the hem models showed the largest value around the top of lapped panel portions, and under-film corrosion conditions of the hem models and temperature/humidity measurement results suggested a cyclic dry/wet condition inside a door. In the exposure test, the corrosion depth decreased with an increase in Zn coating weight indicating the clear effect of a coating weight on a corrosion depth resistance, however, in the cyclic corrosion test, no clear protective effect of Zn coating was obtained. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  15. The stress corrosion resistance and the cryogenic temperature mechanical properties of hot rolled Nitronic 32 bar material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, J. W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The ambient and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties and the ambient temperature stress corrosion properties of hot rolled and centerless ground Nitronic 32 stainless steel bar material are presented. The mechanical properties of longitudinal specimens were evaluated at test temperatures from ambient to liquid hydrogen. The tensile test data indicated increasing smooth tensile strength with decreasing temperature to liquid hydrogen temperature. However, below -200 F (-129.0 C) the notched tensile strength decreased slightly and below -320 F (-196.0 C) the decrease was significant. The elongation and reduction of area decreased drastically at temperatures below -200 F (-129.0 C). The Charpy V-notched impact energy decreased steadily with decreasing test temperature. Stress corrosion tests were performed on longitudinal tensile specimens stressed to 0, 75, and 90 percent of the 0.2 percent yield strength and on transverse 'C'-ring specimens stressed to 75 and 90 percent of the yield strength and exposed to: alternate immersion in a 3.5 percent NaCl bath, humidity cabinet environment, and a 5 percent salt spray atmosphere. The longitudinal tensile specimens experienced no corrosive attack; however, the 'C'-rings exposed to the alternate immersion and to the salt spray experienced some shallow etching and pitting, respectively. Small cracks appeared in two of the 'C'-rings after one month exposure to the salt spray.

  16. Low Temperature Curing of Hydrogen Silsesquioxane Surface Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lampert, Felix; Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Møller, Per

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) has shown to be a promising precursor for corrosion protective glass coatings for metallic substrates due to the excellent barrier properties of the films, especially in the application of protective coatings for aluminum in the automotive industry where high chemical...... stability in alkaline environments is required. The coatings have been successfully applied to stainless steel substrates. However the traditional thermal curing of HSQ involves heating to elevated temperatures, which are beyond those applicable for most industrial applications of aluminum. In this study...... low temperature processes are tested and evaluated as possible alternatives to the traditional high temperature cure. Thin HSQ films are deposited onsilicon wafers to model the degree of curing induced by the low temperature methods in comparison to thermal curing.Furthermore, the coatings are applied...

  17. Summary of INCO corrosion tests in power plant flue gas scrubbing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoxie, E.C.; Tuffnell, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    Corrosion tests in a number of flue-gas desulfurization units have shown that carbon steel, low alloy steels, and Type 304L stainless steel are inadequate in the wet portions of the scrubbers. Type 316L stainless steel is sometimes subject to localized corrosive attack in scrubber environments with certain combinations of pH and chloride content. A corollary is that corrosion of Type 316L stainless steel might be controlled by control of scrubbing media pH and chloride content. Although an attempt was made to correlate the pitting and crevice corrosion obtained on the Type 316 stainless steel test samples with chloride and pH measurements, relatively wide scatter in the data indicated only a modest correlation. This is attributed to variations in local conditions, especially beneath deposits, that differ from the liquor samples obtained for analysis, to processing upsets, to temperature differences, and to some extent to inaccuracies in measurement of pH and chloride levels. The data do show, however, that molybdenum as an alloying element in stainless steels and high nickel alloys was very beneficial in conferring resistance to localized attack in scrubber environments. High nickel alloys containing appreciable amounts of molybdenum such as Hastelloy alloy C-276 and Inconel alloy 625 can be used for critical components. Chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steels has generally not been a problem in FGD scrubbers, apparently because operating temperatures are comparatively low. An exception is reheater tubing where some failures have occurred because of elevated temperatures in conjunction with condensate that forms during shut-down periods or carryover of chloride laden mist from the scrubber. This problem can be overcome by proper alloy selection or maintaining dry conditions

  18. Effect of Temperature and Chloride Ion Concentration on Corrosion of Passive Films on Nano/Ultrafine Grained Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinlong, Lv; Hongyun, Luo

    2014-12-01

    The effects of solution temperature, concentration of chloride ions, and grain refinement on the corrosion resistance of the passive film formed on 304 stainless steels in borate buffer solution were investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and Mott-Schottky measurements. The results showed that the passive films formed on the surface of 304 stainless steels possessed n- and p-type semiconductor characteristics. With the increase of solution temperature, the corrosion resistance of the passive film of coarse and nano/ultrafine grained stainless steels decreased. However, the corrosion resistance of the passive film in nano/ultrafine grained stainless steel was higher than that in the coarse grained one. Moreover, in cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests, chloride ions changed semiconductor characteristics of the passive film formed on the surface of stainless steel.

  19. Laboratory Investigation of High Temperature Corrosion in Straw fired Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion in straw-fired power plants has been studied in the laboratory for Sandvik 8LR30 and Sanicro 28. The influence of HCl and SO2 was investigated at 600C metal temperature for upto 300 hours.In addition the corrosion behaviour of the same materials was examined in ash taken from a straw-fi...

  20. High temperature corrosion under conditions simulating biomass firing: depth-resolved phase identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Both cross-sectional and plan view, ‘top-down’ characterization methods were employed , for a depth-resolved characterization of corrosion products resulting from high temperature corrosion under laboratory conditions simulating biomass firing. Samples of an austenitic stainless steel (TP 347H FG......) were coated with KCl and is o-thermally exposed at 560 o C for 168 h under a flue gas corresponding to straw firing. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) characterization techniques were employed for comprehensive characterization...... of the corrosion product. Results from this comprehensive characterization revealed more details on the morphology and composition of the corrosion product....

  1. Monitoring corrosion and corrosion control of iron in HCl by non-ionic surfactants of the TRITON-X series - Part II. Temperature effect, activation energies and thermodynamics of adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Mohammed A.; Ahmed, M.A.; Arida, H.A.; Arslan, Taner; Saracoglu, Murat; Kandemirli, Fatma

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → TX-305 exhibits inhibiting properties for iron corrosion more than TX-165 and TX 100. → Inhibition efficiency increases with temperature, suggesting chemical adsorption. → The three tested surfactants act as mixed-type inhibitors with cathodic predominance. → Validation of corrosion rates measured by Tafel extrapolation method is confirmed. - Abstract: The inhibition characteristics of non-ionic surfactants of the TRITON-X series, namely TRITON-X-100 (TX-100), TRITON-X-165 (TX-165) and TRITON-X-305 (TX-305), on the corrosion of iron was studied in 1.0 M HCl solutions as a function of inhibitor concentration (0.005-0.075 g L -1 ) and solution temperature (278-338 K). Measurements were conducted based on Tafel extrapolation method. Electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM), a non-destructive corrosion measurement technique that can directly give values of corrosion current without prior knowledge of Tafel constants, is also presented. Experimental corrosion rates determined by the Tafel extrapolation method were compared with corrosion rates obtained by the EFM technique and an independent method of chemical analysis. The chemical method of confirmation of the corrosion rates involved determination of the dissolved cation, using ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry). The aim was to confirm validation of corrosion rates measured by the Tafel extrapolation method. Results obtained showed that, in all cases, the inhibition efficiency increased with increase in temperature, suggesting that chemical adsorption occurs. The adsorptive behaviour of the three surfactants followed Temkin-type isotherm. The standard free energies of adsorption decreased with temperature, reflecting better inhibition performance. These findings confirm chemisorption of the tested inhibitors. Thermodynamic activation functions of the dissolution process were also calculated as a function of each inhibitor concentration. All the results

  2. Research and development on is process components for hydrogen production. (2) Corrosion resistance of glass lining in high temperature sulfuric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Iwatsuki, Jin; Kubo, Shinji; Terada, Atsuhiko; Onuki, Kaoru

    2009-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been conducting a research and development on hydrogen production system using High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. As a part of this effort, thermochemical water-splitting cycle featuring iodine- and sulfur-compounds (IS process) is under development considering its potential of large-scale economical hydrogen production. The IS process constitutes very severe environments on the materials of construction because of the corrosive nature of process chemicals, especially of the high temperature acidic solution of sulfuric acid and hydriodic acid dissolving iodine. Therefore, selection of the corrosion-resistant materials and development of the components has been studied as a crucial subject of the process development. This paper discusses corrosion resistance of commercially available glass-lining material in high temperature sulfuric acid. Corrosion resistance of a soda glass used for glass-lining was examined by immersion tests. The experiments were performed in 47-90wt% sulfuric acids at temperatures of up to 400degC and for the maximum immersion time of 100 hours using an autoclave designed for the concerned tests. In every condition tested, no indication of localized corrosion such as defect formation or pitting corrosion was observed. Also, the corrosion rates decreased with the progress of immersion, and were low enough (≅0.1 mm/year) after 60-90 hours of immersion probably due to formation of a silica rich surface. (author)

  3. Effect of the deposition temperature on corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of the hydroxyapatite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladescu, A.; Braic, M.; Azem, F. Ak; Titorencu, I.; Braic, V.; Pruna, V.; Kiss, A.; Parau, A. C.; Birlik, I.

    2015-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) ceramics belong to a class of calcium phosphate-based materials, which have been widely used as coatings on titanium medical implants in order to improve bone fixation and thus to increase the lifetime of the implant. In this study, HAP coatings were deposited from pure HAP targets on Ti6Al4V substrates using the radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique at substrate temperatures ranging from 400 to 800 °C. The surface morphology and the crystallographic structure of the films were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion resistance of the coatings in saliva solution at 37 °C was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization. Additionally, the human osteosarcoma cell line (MG-63) was used to test the biocompatibility of the coatings. The results showed that all of the coatings grown uniformly and that the increasing substrate temperature induced an increase in their crystallinity. Corrosion performance of the coatings was improved with the increase of the substrate temperature from 400 °C to 800 °C. Furthermore, all the coatings support the attachment and growth of the osteosarcoma cells with regard to the in vitro test findings.

  4. Erosion-corrosion resistance of engineering materials in various test conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Rajahram, S.S; Harvey, T.J.; Wood, R.J.K.

    2009-01-01

    Erosion–corrosion is a complex phenomenon which involves the interaction between the mechanical processes of solid particle erosion and the electrochemical processes of corrosion. A whole range of issues is faced by a designer when trying to obtain relevant information on erosion–corrosion performance of a material. Amongst the constraints are the dispersed test conditions and test rigs available in the literature making comparisons and quantifying erosion–corrosion wear rates of different ma...

  5. Temperature factors effect on occurrence of stress corrosion cracking of main gas pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarova, M. N.; Akhmetov, R. R.; Krainov, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the article is to analyze and compare the data in order to contribute to the formation of an objective opinion on the issue of the growth of stress corrosion defects of the main gas pipeline. According to available data, a histogram of the dependence of defects due to stress corrosion on the distance from the compressor station was constructed, and graphs of the dependence of the accident density due to stress corrosion in the winter and summer were also plotted. Data on activation energy were collected and analyzed in which occurrence of stress corrosion is most likely constructed, a plot of activation energy versus temperature is plotted, and the process of occurrence of stress corrosion by the example of two different grades of steels under the action of different temperatures was analyzed.

  6. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Zircaloy-4 in Halide Solutions: Effect of Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farina S.B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Zircaloy-4 was found to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in 1 M NaCl, 1 M KBr and 1 M KI aqueous solutions at potentials above the pitting potential. In all the solutions tested crack propagation was initially intergranular and then changed to transgranular. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the SCC propagation was investigated. An increase in the strain rate was found to lead to an increase in the crack propagation rate. The crack propagation rate increases in the three solutions tested as the temperatures increases between 20 and 90 °C. The Surface-Mobility SCC mechanism accounts for the observation made in the present work, and the activation energy predicted in iodide solutions is similar to that found in the literature.

  7. Material Solutions to Mitigate the Alkali Chloride-Induced High Temperature Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiamehr, Saeed

    High temperature corrosion induced by potassium chloride (KCl) is a major challenge for biomass-based power plants. The current study aims at identification or development of alloys or coatings that can yield a better performance at a target metal temperature of 600oC compared to austenitic...... of metals. This was aimed at identifying the constituent elements of a corrosion resistant alloy. Calculations suggested Al, Si, Cr, Ti, Y, Ce, Ta, Hf and Zr as suitable oxide-forming elements as well as Mo, Ni and Co as suitable matrix-forming elements. However, the presence of potassium in the environment...... further knowledge on the mechanism of high temperature corrosion induced by KCl, a wide range of commercial and model alloys were exposed under conditions relevant to high temperature corrosion in biomass-firing power plants. The exposures were conducted at 600oC for 168h in flowing N2(g)+5%O2(g)+15%H2O...

  8. Mechanism of Corrosion by Naphthenic Acids and Organosulfur Compounds at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng

    Due to the law of supply and demand, the last decade has witnessed a skyrocketing in the price of light sweet crude oil. Therefore, refineries are increasingly interested in "opportunity crudes", characterized by their discounted price and relative ease of procurement. However, the attractive economics of opportunity crudes come with the disadvantage of high acid/organosulfur compound content, which could lead to corrosion and even failure of facilities in refineries. However, it is generally accepted that organosulfur compounds may form protective iron sulfide layers on the metal surface and decrease the corrosion rate. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the corrosive property of crudes at high temperatures, the mechanism of corrosion by acids (naphthenic acids) in the presence of organosulfur compounds, and methods to mitigate its corrosive effect. In 2004, an industrial project was initiated at the Institute for Corrosion and Multiphase Technology to investigate the corrosion by naphthenic acids and organosulfur compounds. In this project, for each experiment there were two experimentation phases: pretreatment and challenge. In the first pretreatment phase, a stirred autoclave was filled with a real crude oil fraction or model oil of different acidity and organosulfur compound concentration. Then, the stirred autoclave was heated to high temperatures to examine the corrosivity of the oil to different materials (specimens made from CS and 5% Cr containing steel were used). During the pretreatment, corrosion product layers were formed on the metal surface. In the second challenge phase, the steel specimens pretreated in the first phase were inserted into a rotating cylinder autoclave, called High Velocity Rig (HVR). The HVR was fed with a high-temperature oil solution of naphthenic acids to attack the iron sulfide layers. Based on the difference of specimen weight loss between the two steps, the net corrosion rate could be calculated and the protectiveness

  9. Low temperature tensile properties and stress corrosion cracking resistance in the super duplex stainless steels weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeung Woo; Sung, Jang Hyun; Lee, Sung Keun

    1998-01-01

    Low temperature tensile properties and SCC resistances of super duplex stainless steels and their weldments are investigated. Tensile strengths increase remarkably with decreasing test temperature, while elongations decrease steeply at -196 .deg. C after showing peak or constant value down to -100 .deg. C. Owing to the low tensile deformation of weld region, elongations of welded specimen decrease in comparison to those of unwelded specimen. The welded tensile specimen is fractured through weld region at -196 .deg. C due to the fact that the finely dispersed ferrite phase in the austenite matrix increases an opportunity to supply the crack propagation path through the brittle ferrite phase at low temperature. The stress corrosion cracking initiates preferentially at the surface ferrite phase of base metal region and propagates through ferrite phase. When the corrosion crack meets with the fibrously aligned austenite phase to the tensile direction, the ferrite phase around austenite continues to corrode. Eventually, fracture of the austenite phase begins without enduring the tensile load. The addition of Cu+W to the super duplex stainless steel deteriorates the SCC resistance in boiling MgCl 2 solution, possibly due to the increment of pits in the ferrite phase and reduction of N content in the austenite phase

  10. Effect of thermal stabilization on the low-temperature stress-corrosion cracking of Inconel 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1983-01-01

    The propensity to low-temperature stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of thermally stabilized Inconel 600 in sulfur-bearing environments has been investigated using U-bends and slow-strain-rate testing. The results have been compared with those of sensitized Inconel 600. The potential dependence of crack-propagation rate has been established in a single test by using several U-bends held at different potentials, by choosing an appropriate electrical circuitry. The difference in SCC susceptibility of the sensitized and stabilized materials is discussed in terms of the grain-boundary chromium depletion and resulting intergranular attack in boiling ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid tests, and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) tests. 10 figures

  11. Influence of yttria surface modification on high temperature corrosion of porous Ni22Cr alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karczewski, Jakub; Dunst, Katarzyna; Jasinski, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Protective coatings for porous alloys for high temperature use are relatively new materials. Their main drawback is high temperature corrosion. In this work protective coatings based the on Y-precursor infiltrated into the sintered Ni22Cr alloys are studied at 700°C. Effects of the amount...... of the protective phase on the resulting corrosion properties are evaluated in air and humidified hydrogen. Weight gain of the samples, their open porosities and microstructures are analyzed and compared. Results show, that by the addition of even a minor amount of the Y-precursor corrosion rates can be decreased...

  12. Influence of temperature and lithium purity on corrosion of ferrous alloys in a flowing lithium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Smith, D.L.

    1986-03-01

    Corrosion data have been obtained on ferritic HT-9 and Fe-9Cr-1Mo steel and austenitic Type 316 stainless steel in a flowing lithium environment at temperatures between 372 and 538 0 C. The corrosion behavior is evaluated by measurements of weight loss as a function of time and temperature. A metallographic characterization of materials exposed to a flowing lithium environment is presented

  13. High temperature solution-nitriding and low-temperature nitriding of AISI 316: Effect on pitting potential and crevice corrosion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2018-01-01

    in a 0.1M NaCl solution and crevice corrosion immersion tests in 3wt% FeCl3 solution were studied before and after the bulk and surface treatments.Nitrogen addition in the bulk proved to have a beneficial effect on the pitting resistance of the alloy. The formation of a zone of expanded austenite...... at the material surface through low-temperature nitriding resulted in a considerable improvement of the pitting potential and the crevice corrosion performance of the steels....

  14. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing - Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerome C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of metals to predict service life of metal-based structures in corrosive environments has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions similar to those of the corrosive environment. Their reliability to correlate to atmospheric exposure test results is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated corrosion testing has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long-term service life of a metal, despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard, and their use is crucial, a method that correlates timescales from accelerated testing to atmospheric exposure would be very valuable. This paper presents work that began with the characterization of the atmospheric environment at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Beachside Corrosion Test Site. The chemical changes that occur on low carbon steel, during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions, were investigated using surface chemistry analytical methods. The corrosion rates and behaviors of panels subjected to long-term and accelerated corrosion conditions, involving neutral salt fog and alternating seawater spray, were compared to identify possible timescale correlations between accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The results, as well as preliminary findings on the correlation investigation, are presented.

  15. LIQUID AIR INTERFACE CORROSION TESTING FOR FY2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapp, P.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to investigate the corrosivity to carbon steel of the liquid-air interface of dilute simulated radioactive waste solutions. Open-circuit potentials were measured on ASTM A537 carbon steel specimens located slightly above, at, and below the liquid-air interface of simulated waste solutions. The 0.12-inch-diameter specimens used in the study were sized to respond to the assumed distinctive chemical environment of the liquid-air interface, where localized corrosion in poorly inhibited solutions may frequently be observed. The practical inhibition of such localized corrosion in liquid radioactive waste storage tanks is based on empirical testing and a model of a liquid-air interface environment that is made more corrosive than the underlying bulk liquid due to chemical changes brought about by absorbed atmospheric carbon dioxide. The chemical changes were assumed to create a more corrosive open-circuit potential in carbon in contact with the liquid-air interface. Arrays of 4 small specimens spaced about 0.3 in. apart were partially immersed so that one specimen contacted the top of the meniscus of the test solution. Two specimens contacted the bulk liquid below the meniscus and one specimen was positioned in the vapor space above the meniscus. Measurements were carried out for up to 16 hours to ensure steady-state had been obtained. The results showed that there was no significant difference in open-circuit potentials between the meniscus-contact specimens and the bulk-liquid-contact specimens. With the measurement technique employed, no difference was detected between the electrochemical conditions of the meniscus versus the bulk liquid. Stable open-circuit potentials were measured on the specimen located in the vapor space above the meniscus, showing that there existed an electrochemical connection through a thin film of solution extending up from the meniscus. This observation supports the Hobbs-Wallace model of the development

  16. High temperature corrosion of nickel-base alloys in environments containing alkali sulphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Rachel; Flyg, Jesper; Caddeo, Sophie [Corrosion and Metals Research Institute, KIMAB, Stockholm (Sweden); Karlsson, Fredrik [Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery, Finspong (Sweden)

    2007-02-15

    This work is directed towards producing data to assist in lifetime assessment of components in gas turbines run in severely polluted industrial environments where the main corrosive species is SO{sub 2}, which can condense to form alkali sulphates. Corrosion rates have been measured for the base materials, in order to assess the worst-case scenario, in which cracks or other damage has occurred to the protective coating. The information is expected to be of value to manufacturers, owners and inspectors of gas turbines. Six nickel-base superalloys were subject to thermal cycles of 160 hours duration, and 0.8mg/cm{sup 2} of 20 mol % Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 80mol% K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was applied before each cycle. The test temperatures were 850 deg C and 900 deg C, with maximum test durations of 24 cycles and 12 cycles respectively. The metal loss was assessed by metallography of cross sections and the sulphidation attack was found to be very uneven. Mass change data indicated that the corrosion process was largely linear in character, and probability plots and estimations of the propagation rate of corrosion based on the linear growth assumption were produced. The performance of the alloys increased with increasing chromium content. The single crystal materials CMSX4 and MD2 showed such high corrosion rates that their use in severely contaminated industrial environments is considered inadvisable. The best performance was shown by Inconel 939 and Inconel 6203, so that even if cracks occur in the protective coating, a reasonable remaining lifetime can be expected for these materials. Sulphide formation occurred at the reaction front in all cases and mixed sulphides such as Ta-Ni or Ti-Nb sulphides were often present. The work has news value since very little long-term data is currently available for materials performance in severely sulphidising environments. The project goals in terms of exposures and metrology have been fully realised. Contributions have been made to the

  17. High Temperature Corrosion Problem of Boiler Components in presence of Sulfur and Alkali based Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debashis; Mitra, Swapan Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Material degradation and ageing is of particular concern for fossil fuel fired power plant components. New techniques/approaches have been explored in recent years for Residual Life assessment of aged components and material degradation due to different damage mechanism like creep, fatigue, corrosion and erosion etc. Apart from the creep, the high temperature corrosion problem in a fossil fuel fired boiler is a matter of great concern if the fuel contains sulfur, chlorine sodium, potassium and vanadium etc. This paper discusses the material degradation due to high temperature corrosion in different critical components of boiler like water wall, superheater and reheater tubes and also remedial measures to avoid the premature failure. This paper also high lights the Residual Life Assessment (RLA) methodology of the components based on high temperature fireside corrosion. of different critical components of boiler.

  18. Test Plan: Sludge Treatment Project Corrosion Process Chemistry Follow-on Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Poloski, Adam P.

    2007-08-17

    This test plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with Fluor Hanford (FH). The test plan describes the scope and conditions to be used to perform laboratory-scale testing of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) hydrothermal treatment of K Basin sludge. The STP, managed for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) by FH, was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from the sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by using high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. The proposed testing builds on the approach and laboratory test findings for both K Basin sludge and simulated sludge garnered during prior testing from September 2006 to March 2007. The outlined testing in this plan is designed to yield further understanding of the nature of the chemical reactions, the effects of compositional and process variations and the effectiveness of various strategies to mitigate the observed high shear strength phenomenon observed during the prior testing. These tests are designed to provide process validation and refinement vs. process development and design input. The expected outcome is to establish a level of understanding of the chemistry such that successful operating strategies and parameters can be implemented within the confines of the existing STP corrosion vessel design. In July 2007, the DOE provided direction to FH regarding significant changes to the scope of the overall STP. As a result of the changes, FH directed PNNL to stop work on most of the planned activities covered in this test plan. Therefore, it is unlikely the testing described here will be performed. However, to preserve the test strategy and details developed to date, the test plan has been published.

  19. Manufacturing method for intragranular stress corrosion cracking-induced test specimen for stainless steel pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futagawa, Kiyoshi.

    1994-01-01

    In a manufacturing step for intragranular stress corrosion cracking-induced for stainless steel pipelines, pipe are abutted against with each other and welded, and a heat affected portion is applied with a sensitizing heat treatment. Further, a crevice jig is attached near the heat affected portion at the inner surface of the pipe and kept in a chlorine ion added water under high temperature and high pressure at a predetermined period of time. If tap water is used instead of purified water for C.P.T. test in a step of forming sample of IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracking), since the chlorine ion concentration in the tap water is relatively high, TGSCC (intragranular stress corrosion crackings caused in all of the samples. A heat input and an interlayer temperature are determined for the material of stainless pipe having a carbon content of more than 0.05% so that the welding residual stress on the inner surface is applied as tension. The condition for the heat treatment is determined as, for example, 500degC x 24hr, and the samples are kept under water at high temperature and high pressure applied with chlorine ions for 500 to 200hours. As a result, since samples of TGSCC can be formed by utilizing the manufacturing step for IGSCC, there is no requirement for providing devices for applying environmental factors separately. (N.H.)

  20. Burst tests on pipeline containing short uniform depth corrosion defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, Adilson C. [PETROBRAS R and D Center, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Freire, Jose Luiz de F.; Domingues, Ronaldo D.; Diniz, Jorge L.C. [Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper the burst tests of three tubular specimens are presented. In these tests the tubular specimens were loaded with internal pressure only. The specimens were cut from a longitudinal welded tube made of API 5L X80 steel with a nominal outside diameter of 457.2 mm (18 in) and a nominal wall thickness of 7.93 mm (0.312 in). Each of the three specimens had one external short uniform depth corrosion defect, machined using spark erosion. Measurements were carried out in order to determine the actual dimensions of each tubular specimen and its respective defect. Tensile specimens and impact test specimens were tested to determine material properties. The failure pressures measured in the laboratory tests are compared with those predicted by four assessments methods, namely: the ASME B31G method, the RSTRENG 085dL method, the DNV RP-F101 method for single defects and the RPA method. (author)

  1. Nondestructive testing diagnosis for corrosion and welding by means of hydrostatic test and gamma ray tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Alex E.; Dantas, Carlos C.; Nery, Marcelo S.; Barbosa, Jose Maria A.; Rolim, Tiago L.; Melo, Silvio B.; Lima, Emerson A.O., E-mail: alex.emoura@ufpe.be, E-mail: ccd@ufpe.br, E-mail: tlr@ufpe.br, E-mail: sbm@ufpe.br, E-mail: eal@poli.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Diagnoses of light and severe corrosion process in steel tubes are carried out and results are presented. The material discontinuity in metallic pieces was investigated and signals from gamma source detection shown defect present or no defect present. Samples taken from street illumination posts were placed in computerized gamma ray scan to investigate corrosion effect. Scanning at three angles 0 deg, 60 deg and 120 deg degrees with five repetitions provide data set sufficient to a statistical analysis. Samples taken from small diameter steel tubes with light corrosion were analyzed too. Comparing corrosion-free samples detection of transmission gamma ray shows that along with diameter reduction a random density distribution takes place with severe corrosive process. The asymmetry induced in sample density provided to be effective for diagnosis of light corrosion by means of straight-line slope obtained in gamma profile. Structural integrity of steel pipes affected by welding process and defect propagation due to Hydrostatic Testing - HT was simulated by numerical finite element method and data comparison with experimental gamma tomography was carried out. Samples of pipes with preexisting defect on the welding region were submitted to hydrostatic tests over working pressure and a correlation between defect degree and structural resistance was evaluated. (author)

  2. Testing of intergranular and pitting corrosion in sensitized welded joints of austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bore V. Jegdic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pitting corrosion resistance and intergranular corrosion of the austenitic stainless steel X5Cr Ni18-10 were tested on the base metal, heat affected zone and weld metal. Testing of pitting corrosion was performed by the potentiodynamic polarization method, while testing of intergranular corrosion was performed by the method of electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation with double loop. The base metal was completely resistant to intergranular corrosion, while the heat affected zone showed a slight susceptibility to intergranular corrosion. Indicators of pitting corrosion resistance for the weld metal and the base metal were very similar, but their values are significantly higher than the values for the heat affected zone. This was caused by reduction of the chromium concentration in the grain boundary areas in the heat affected zone, even though the carbon content in the examined stainless steel is low (0.04 wt. % C.

  3. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Formed Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Simulated service testing (SST) development was required to help qualify a new 2195 aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloy spin forming dome fabrication process for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Development Technology Program. The application for the technology is to produce high strength low weight tank components for NASA s next generation launch vehicles. Since plate material is not currently manufactured large enough to fabricate these domes, two plates are joined by means of friction stir welding. The plates are then pre-contour machined to near final thicknesses allowing for a thicker weld land and anticipating the level of stretch induced by the spin forming process. The welded plates are then placed in a spin forming tool and hot stretched using a trace method producing incremental contours. Finally the dome receives a room temperature contour stretch to final dimensions, heat treatment, quenching, and artificial aging to emulate a T-8 condition of temper. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were also performed by alternate immersion in a sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using the typical double beam assembly and with 4-point loaded specimens and use of bent-beam stress-corrosion test specimens under alternate immersion conditions. In addition, experiments were conducted to determine the threshold stress intensity factor for SCC (K(sub ISCC)) which to our knowledge has not been determined previously for Al-Li 2195 alloy. The successful simulated service and stress corrosion testing helped to provide confidence to continue to Ares 1 scale dome fabrication

  4. 9% Cr steel high temperature oxidation. Solutions investigated for improving corrosion resistance of the steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evin, Harold Nicolas; Heintz, Olivier; Chevalier, Sebastien [UMR 5209 CNRS-Bourgogne Univ. (France). Lab. Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne; Foejer, Cecilia; Jakani, Saad; Dhont, Annick; Claessens, Serge [OCAS N.V. ArcelorMittal Global R and D, Gent (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    The improvement of high temperature oxidation resistance of low chromium content steels, such as T/P91, is of great interest in regards with their application in thermal power generating plants. Indeed, they possess good creep properties, but are facing their limits of use at temperature higher than 600 C, due to accelerated corrosion phenomena. Good knowledge of the mechanisms involved during their oxidation process is needed to prevent the degradation of the materials and to extend life time of the power plants components. Oxide layers thermally grown, on 9% Cr steels (provided by OCAS N.V), during isothermal tests between 600 C and 750 C in laboratory air under atmospheric pressure were investigated, by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The oxidation behaviour appeared very limited at 750 C, due to the presence of a breakaway, which can be linked to iron porous oxide grown over the surface of the samples. ''In situ'' X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses were performed in air at 600 C after short exposures (between 5 min and 25 h). A complex mixture of iron oxide, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cr (VI) species were characterized in the scales. The in-situ analyses were compared and related to XPS analyses performed on thick oxide scales formed on samples oxidized in air at 600 C for 100h. An oxidation mechanism is then proposed to understand the oxide scale growth in the temperature range 600 - 750 C. The second step of this study consists in improving the high temperature corrosion resistance of these steels without modifying their mechanical properties. Thus several solutions were investigated such as MOCVD coatings, pack cementation coatings, and tested in cycle conditions prior. (orig.)

  5. The growing rate and the type of corrosion products of aluminium alloy AA 5052 in deionized water at temperature up to 3000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, E.G.

    1980-01-01

    The process of corrosion concerning the aluminum alloy AA5052 in deionized water at temperatures of 40 0 C, 80 0 C, 90 0 C, 140 0 C, 200 0 C and 280 0 C is studied. The following methods are used: periodic weighting of the test samples; analysis by neutronic activation of the corrosion products dissolved in water; thermogravimetric and thermodiferential analysis; analysis through X-ray diffraction and from metalografic observations of the crystals produced in the corrosion process; an optical microscope using polarized and normal light and a scanning electronic microscope. The activation energies are calculated for the corrosion film formation, and for the dissolution of the corrosion products in the deionized water. (ARHC) [pt

  6. KCl-Induced High-Temperature Corrosion Behavior of HVAF-Sprayed Ni-Based Coatings in Ambient Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Reza; Sadeghimeresht, Esmaeil; Farahani, Taghi Shahrabi; Huhtakangas, Matti; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Joshi, Shrikant

    2018-02-01

    KCl-induced high-temperature corrosion behavior of four HVAF-sprayed Ni-based coatings (Ni21Cr, Ni5Al, Ni21Cr7Al1Y and Ni21Cr9Mo) under KCl deposit has been investigated in ambient air at 600 °C up to 168 h. The coatings were deposited onto 16Mo3 steel—a widely used boiler tube material. Uncoated substrate, 304L and Sanicro 25 were used as reference materials in the test environment. SEM/EDS and XRD techniques were utilized to characterize the as-sprayed and exposed samples. The results showed that the small addition of KCl significantly accelerated degradation to the coatings. All coatings provided better corrosion resistance compared to the reference materials. The alumina-forming Ni5Al coating under KCl deposit was capable of forming a more protective oxide scale compared to the chromia-forming coatings as penetration of Cl through diffusion paths was hindered. Both active corrosion and chromate formation mechanisms were found to be responsible for the corrosion damages. The corrosion resistance of the coatings based on the microstructure analysis and kinetics had the following ranking (from the best to worst): Ni5Al > Ni21Cr > Ni21Cr7Al1Y > Ni21Cr9Mo.

  7. Simulation of Mechanical Stress on Stainless Steel for Pb-Bi Corrosion Test by Using ABAQUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwanto, D.; Mustari, A. P. A.; Budiman, B. A.

    2017-03-01

    Pb-Bi eutectic with its advantageous is proposed to be utilized as a coolant in the GEN IV type of rSeactor. However, high temperature corrosion when contact with stainless steels is one of the issues of Pb-Bi eutectic utilization. It is known that in the environment of high temperature Pb-Bi, mechanical strength of stainless steel may decrease. Thus, simulation of mechanical stress working on stainless steel during in-situ bending test by using ABAQUS was conducted. Several bending degrees were simulated at high temperature to obtain the mechanical stress information. Temperature condition was strongly affect the stress vs. displacement profile. The reported mechanical strength reduction percentage was used to draw predicted mechanical stress under high temperature Pb-Bi environment.

  8. Evaluations of corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr plated and Zn-plated Fe Substrates Using an Electrolytic Corrosion Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaebong; Kim, Kyungwook; Park, Minwoo; Song, Taejun; Lee, Chaeseung; Lee, Euijong; Kim, Sangyeol

    2013-01-01

    An Eectrolytic Corrosion(EC) test method was evaluated by the comparison with Copper Accelerated Acetic Salt Spray(CASS) and Neutral Salt Spray(SS) tests. Those methods were applied in order to evaluate corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr plated and Zn-plated Fe substrates. The correlations between results obtained by different test methods were investigated. Results showed that the electrochemical method such as the EC test method was superior to the conventional methods such as CASS and SS, in terms of the quantitative accuracy and the test-time span. Furthermore, the EC test method provided the useful means to estimate the initiation of corrosion of each layer by monitoring the rest potentials of the coated layers such as Ni, Cr, and Zn on Fe substrate. With regard to test time spans, the EC test provided the 78 times and 182 times faster results than the CASS test in cases of Fe + 5μm Ni + 0.5 μm Cr and Fe + 20 μm Ni + 0.5 μm Cr respectively, while the EC test was 85 times faster results than the Salt Spray test in the case of Fe + 20 g/m 2 Zn. Therefore, the EC test can be the better method to evaluate the resistance to corrosion of coated layers than the conventional methods such as the SS test and the CASS

  9. Standard test method for measuring pH of soil for use in corrosion testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1995-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for determining the pH of a soil in corrosion testing. The principle use of the test is to supplement soil resistivity measurements and thereby identify conditions under which the corrosion of metals in soil may be accentuated (see G 57 - 78 (1984)). 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  10. Influence of Temperature on Corrosion Behavior of 2A02 Al Alloy in Marine Atmospheric Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Min; Liu, Li; Fan, Lei; Yu, Zhongfen; Li, Ying; Oguzie, Emeka E.; Wang, Fuhui

    2018-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 2A02 Al alloy under 4 mg/cm2 NaCl deposition at different temperatures (from 30 to 80 °C) has been studied. This corrosion behavior was researched using mass-gain, scanning electron microscopy-SEM, laser scanning confocal microscopy-LSCM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy-XPS and other techniques. The results showed and revealed that the corrosion was maximal at 60 °C after 200 h of exposure. The increase of temperature not only affected the solubility of oxygen gas in the thin film, but also promoted the transport of ions (such as Cl−), and the formation of protective AlO(OH), which further affects the corrosion speed. PMID:29401690

  11. Peculiar high temperature corrosion of martensite alloy under impact of Estonian oil shale fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallermo, H.; Klevtsov, I. [Thermal Engineering Department of Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The superheaters` surfaces of oil shale steam boiler made of pearlitic and austenitic alloys, are subject to intensive corrosion, mainly due to presence of chlorine in external deposits. The applicability of martensitic alloys X1OCrMoVNb91 and X20CrMoV121 for superheaters is examined here and empirical equations allowing to predict alloys` corrosion resistance in the range of operational temperatures are established. Alloy X1OCrMoVNb91 is found been most perspective for superheaters of boilers firing fossil fuel that contain alkaline metals and chlorine. The abnormal dependence of corrosion resistance of martensitic alloys on temperature is revealed, namely, corrosion at 580 deg C in presence of oil shale fly ash is more intensive than at 620 deg C. (orig.) 2 refs.

  12. Influence of Temperature on Corrosion Behavior of 2A02 Al Alloy in Marine Atmospheric Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Cao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of 2A02 Al alloy under 4 mg/cm2 NaCl deposition at different temperatures (from 30 to 80 °C has been studied. This corrosion behavior was researched using mass-gain, scanning electron microscopy-SEM, laser scanning confocal microscopy-LSCM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy-XPS and other techniques. The results showed and revealed that the corrosion was maximal at 60 °C after 200 h of exposure. The increase of temperature not only affected the solubility of oxygen gas in the thin film, but also promoted the transport of ions (such as Cl−, and the formation of protective AlO(OH, which further affects the corrosion speed.

  13. Development of an Accelerated Test Method for the Determination of Susceptibility to Atmospheric Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical rationale is presented for use of a repetitive cyclic current reversal voltammetric technique for characterization of localized corrosion processes, including atmospheric corrosion. Applicability of this proposed experimental protocol is applied to characterization of susceptibility to crevice and pitting corrosion, atmospheric corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Criteria upon which relative susceptibility is based were determined and tested using two iron based alloys commonly in use at NASA-Kennedy; A36 (a low carbon steel) and 4130 (a low alloy steel). Practicality of the procedure was demonstrated by measuring changes in anodic polarization behavior during high frequency current reversal cycles of 25 cycles per second with 1 mA/sq cm current density amplitude in solutions containing Cl anions. The results demonstrated that, due to excessive polarization which affects conductivity of barrier corrosion product layers, A36 was less resistant to atmospheric corrosion than its 4130 counterpart; behavior which was also demonstrated during exposure tests.

  14. Modification and upgradation of corrosion fatigue testing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, A.; Qamar, R.

    2006-08-01

    Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and Corrosion Fatigue (CF) are important tests which are performed to check the integrity of structural materials operating in different environments, such as nuclear power system, steam and gas turbines, aircraft marine structure, pipelines and bridges. To establish the environmental testing facility on laboratory scale, NMD acquired a computerized (286 Based PC) electromechanical testing machine from M/S CorTest, USA. This machine was commissioned at NMD in 1989. Since then it has been utilized to test and qualify the materials provided by different establishments of PAEC for SCC and CF behavior. However, in October 2004, computer attached to the machine was corrupted and became out of order. Users were handicapped because there was no any alternate system i.e. Manual control tower to operate the machine. Then users approached to Computer Division to investigate the malfunctioning at the computer. Therefore, upon complete checkup of system, it was diagnosed that there was a serious problem in the hard disk and mother board of the computer. Much difficulty was faced in retrieving the application software from the obsolete 286 computer system. Then the basic aim was to replace the old computer with Pentium System. But with Pentium system application software was not working. Since we have already recovered full application software package including source programs, so all the seventeen programs has been thoroughly studied. Four programs had to be modified according to the new hardware. Now the new Pentium system with modified software has been interfaced with the machine. Machine was tested for the both types of above mentioned tests and compared with previous results. The performance of machine was confirmed satisfactory on the new setup. (author)

  15. High temperature cyclic oxidation and hot corrosion behaviours of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    based superalloys have been investigated at 900°C in air with or without. Na2SO4–60% V2O5 coatings on the superalloy specimens in the present work. The kinetics of corrosion of super- alloy substrates was determined from the weight change.

  16. Effect of temperature on structure and corrosion resistance for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    electroless nickel plating, etc. It is well known that electroless plating is an effective cor- rosion resistance method [5–7]. In recent years, NiWP alloy coatings prepared by electroless plating have been widely used to provide some excellent properties like high corrosion resistance and wear resistance, and to obtain uniform ...

  17. Corrosion of high temperature resisting alloys exposed to heavy fuel ash; Corrosion de aleaciones resistentes a altas temperaturas expuestas a ceniza de combustoleo pesado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong Moreno, Adriana del Carmen

    1998-03-01

    The objective of the performed research was to study the degradation process by high temperature corrosion of alloys exposed to heavy fuel oil ashes through a comparative experimental evaluation of its performance that allowed to establish the mechanisms involved in the phenomenon. The experimentation carried out involved the determination of the resistance to the corrosion of 14 alloys of different type (low and medium alloy steels, ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, nickel base alloys and a FeCrAl alloy of type ODS) exposed to high temperatures (580 Celsius degrees - 900 Celsius degrees) in 15 ash deposits with different corrosive potential, which were collected in the high temperature zone of boilers of thermoelectric power stations. The later studies to the corrosion tests consisted of the analysis by sweeping electron microscopy supported by microanalysis of the corroded probes, with the purpose of determining the effect of Na, V and S on the corrosivity of the ash deposits and the effect of the main alloying elements on the corrosion resistance of the alloys. Such effects are widely documented to support the proposed mechanisms of degradation that are occurring. The global analysis of the generated results has allowed to propose a model to explain the global mechanism of corrosion of alloys exposed to the high temperatures of ash deposits. The proposed model, complements the processed one by Wilson, widely accepted for fused vanadates, as far as on one hand, it considers the effect of the sodium sulfate presence (in addition to the vanadium compounds) in the deposits, and on the other hand, it extends it to temperatures higher than the point of fusion of constituent vanadium compounds of the deposits. Both aspects involve considering the roll that the process of diffusion of species has on the degradation and the capacity of protection of the alloy. The research performed allowed to confirm what the Wilson model had established for deposits with high

  18. Standard practice for conducting atmospheric corrosion tests on metals

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers and defines conditions for exposure of metals and alloys to the weather. It sets forth the general procedures that should be followed in any atmospheric test. It is presented as an aid in conducting atmospheric corrosion tests so that some of the pitfalls of such testing may be avoided. As such, it is concerned mainly with panel exposures to obtain data for comparison purposes. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of whoever uses this standard to consult and establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  19. Demonstration through EPR tests of the sensitivity of austeno-ferritic steels to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Nathalie

    1997-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels can be sensitised to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under some conditions (heat treatments, welding). The aim of this work is to contribute to the validation of the EPR (Electrochemical Potentiodynamic Reactivation) test in order to determine conditions for normalisation. This method, based on the dissolution of chromium depleted areas due to precipitation of σ-phase, provides a degree of sensitisation to intergranular corrosion. The test is broaden considering the mechanical stress by the way of slow strain rate tests, performed in chloride magnesium and in a solution similar to the EPR solution. A metallurgical study puts on the precipitates and the structural modifications due to welding and heat treatments, in order to make a critical analysis of the EPR test. (author) [fr

  20. A study on the corrosion test of equipment material handling hot molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Seung Gy; Jeong, M.S.; Hong, S.S.; Cho, S.H.; Shin, Y.J.; Park, H.S.; Zhang, J.S.

    1999-02-01

    On this technical report, corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels of SUS 316L and SUS 304L in molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O has been investigated in the temperature range of 650 - 850 dg C. Corrosion products of SUS 316L in molten salt consisted of two layers, an outer layer of LiCrO 2 and inner layer of Cr 2 O 3 .The corrosion layer was uniform in molten salt of LiCl, but the intergranular corrosion occurred in addition to the uniform corrosion in mixed molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O. The corrosion rate increased slowly with the increase of temperature up to 750 dg C, but above 750 dg C rapid increase in corrosion rate observed. SUS 316L stainless steel showed slower corrosion rate and higher activation energy for corrosion than SUS 304L, exhibiting higher corrosion resistance in the molten salt. In heat-resistant alloy, dense protective oxide scale of LiCrO 2 was formed in molten salt of LiCl. Whereas in mixed molten salt of LiCl-Li 2 O, porous non-protective scale of Li(Cr, Ni, Fe)O 2 was formed. (Author). 44 refs., 4 tabs., 16 figs

  1. Effect of temperature on the application of Myrmecodia Pendans extract for environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradityana, Atria; Sulistijono, Winarto, Widiyono, Eddy; Luwar, Budi; Mursid, Mahirul

    2017-05-01

    One of the efforts to control the corrosion rate used is to add inhibitors. Corrosion is a a decrease in the quality of a material (metal) caused by a chemical reaction between the metal and its environment. The purpose of this study is to analyze the effect of temperature on the corrosive medium in the presence of plant, Myrmecodia Pendans extracts as an organic inhibitor. This study used a type of carbon steel APT 5L Grade B with temperature 30°C, 40°C, 50°C. Corrosive medium used was 1M HCl with varying concentrations of plant extracts Myrmecodia Pendans 100 to 500 mg I L. Maceration method is a method used for extracting plants, Myrmecodia Pendans. The effectiveness of the use of organic inhibitors Myrmecodia Pendans in acid known by some measurements. There are ETS and FTTR. From the results of of measurements carried out, the Myrmecodia Pendans extract able to reduce corrosion rate. The resulting best inhibition efficiency of 82,88% at 30°C temperature conditions and extract the addition of 500 mg I L. Protection system that occurs is an Myrmecodia Pendans extract form a passive film on the surface of the material so as to reduce the corrosive attack.

  2. Intergranular corrosion testing of austenitic stainless steels in nitric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whillock, G.O.H.; Dunnett, B. F. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, BNFL, B170, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    In hot strong nitric acid solutions, stainless steels exhibit intergranular corrosion. Corrosion rates are often measured from immersion testing of specimens manufactured from the relevant material (e.g. plate or pipe). The corrosion rates, measured from weight loss, are found to increase with time prior to reaching steady state, which can take thousands of hours to achieve. The apparent increase in corrosion rate as a function of time was found to be an artefact due to the surface area of the specimen's being used in the corrosion rate calculations, rather than that of the true area undergoing active corrosion i.e. the grain boundaries. The steady state corrosion rate coincided with the onset of stable grain dropping, where the use of the surface area of the specimen to convert the weight loss measurements to corrosion rates was found to be appropriate. This was confirmed by sectioning of the specimens and measuring the penetration depths. The rate of penetration was found to be independent of time and no induction period was observed. A method was developed to shorten considerably the testing time to reach the steady state corrosion rate by use of a pre-treatment that induces grain dropping. The long-term corrosion rates from specimens which were pre-treated was similar to that achieved after prolonged testing of untreated (i.e. initially ground) specimens. The presence of cut surfaces is generally unavoidable in the simple immersion testing of specimens in test solutions. However, inaccuracy in the results may occur as the measured corrosion rate is often influenced by the orientation of the microstructure, the highest rates typically being observed on the cut surfaces. Two methods are presented which allow deconvolution of the corrosion rates from immersion testing of specimens containing cut surfaces, thus allowing reliable prediction of the long-term corrosion rate of plate surfaces. (authors)

  3. High-Temperature Oxidation and Smelt Deposit Corrosion of Ni-Cr-Ti Arc-Sprayed Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S.; Schweizer, M.

    2013-08-01

    High Cr content Ni-Cr-Ti arc-sprayed coatings have been extensively applied to mitigate corrosion in black liquor recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry. In a previous article, the effects of key spray parameters on the coating's microstructure and its composition were investigated. Three coating microstructures were selected from that previous study to produce a dense, oxidized coating (coating A), a porous, low oxide content coating (coating B), and an optimized coating (coating C) for corrosion testing. Isothermal oxidation trials were performed in air at 550 and 900 °C for 30 days. Additional trials were performed under industrial smelt deposits at 400 and 800 °C for 30 days. The effect of the variation in coating microstructure on the oxidation and smelt's corrosion response was investigated through the characterization of the surface corrosion products, and the internal coating microstructural developments with time at high temperature. The effect of long-term, high-temperature exposure on the interaction between the coating and substrate was characterized, and the mechanism of interdiffusion was discussed.

  4. Exposure testing of fasteners in preservative treated wood : gravimetric corrosion rates and corrosion product analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Rebecca J. Sichel; Donald S. Stone

    2010-01-01

    Research was conducted to determine the corrosion rates of metals in preservative treated wood and also understand the mechanism of metal corrosion in treated wood. Steel and hot-dip galvanized steel fasteners were embedded in wood treated with one of six preservative treatments and exposed to 27oC at 100% relative humidity for 1 year. The...

  5. Relationships between stress corrosion cracking tests and utility operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Allen

    1999-10-22

    Several utility steam generator and stress corrosion cracking databases are synthesized with the view of identifying the crevice chemistry that is most consistent with the plant cracking data. Superheated steam and neutral solution environments are found to be inconsistent with the large variations in the observed SCC between different plants, different support plates within a plant, and different crevice locations. While the eddy current response of laboratory tests performed with caustic chemistries approximates the response of the most extensively affected steam generator tubes, the crack propagation kinetics in these tests differ horn plant experience. The observations suggest that there is a gradual conversion of the environment responsible for most steam generator ODSCC from a concentrated, alkaline-forming solution to a progressively more steam-enriched environment.

  6. Investigation and analysis of high temperature corrosion and degradation of marine boiler combustion swirler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdi, R. S.; Thakur, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    The present paper investigated and analyzed swirler material consisting of mild steel which was subjected to service for the period of one year in a 30 MW marine boiler. Due to the presence of high temperatures in the furnace coupled with the corrosive marine environment swirler material showed accelerated degradation and material wastage. An investigation into the feasibility of manufacturing the existing swirler with an alternate material or coating the swirler material with a thermal barrier coating was undertaken. Based on their properties and performance, SS 304 and SS 316 were proposed as the replacement materials for the swirler. The other alternative of coating the existing swirlers with a form thermal barrier coating to observe for any improvement in their performance at elevated temperatures was also tested. Stellite, which is a Ni-Co based coating, was carried out on the MS samples and the same were exposed to same temperatures mentioned above. The performance of the available options was evaluated with respect to the grain structure of the material, the hardness value of the materials and deterioration at elevated temperatures. Investigation showed the proposed materials/coatings like SS 304, SS 316 and Stellite coating revealed that SS 316 is the material best suited for high temperature application.

  7. Corrosion test on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Curtis, P.G.

    1996-01-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials in order to assist in selecting materials for package design and to help in designing longer-term corrosion tests. The corrosion solution was buffered near pH4, was in contact with air, and contained chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel-, and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron absorber elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron absorber elements were studied

  8. Laboratory Study of High Temperature Corrosion in Straw-fired Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Maahn, Ernst emanuel

    1997-01-01

    The components contributing to corrosion, HCl(g)SO2(g), KCl and K2SO4 were studied in the laboratory for Sandvik 8LR30 and Sanicro 28. The influence of HCl and SO2 was investigated at 600C material temperature and 600/800C flue gas temperature at time intervals up to 300 hours. The influence of a...

  9. Experimental investigation on the short-term impact of temperature and moisture on reinforcement corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, A.; Nygaard, P.V.; Geiker, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, reinforced concrete specimens with and without mixed-in chlorides were conditioned at different relative humidities and subsequently subjected to varying temperatures. Results of the study confirmed that neither temperature nor moisture content have a major impact on the corrosion...

  10. Corrosion of Zircaloy-clad fuel rods in high-temperature PWRs: Measurement of waterside corrosion in North Anna Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balfour, M.G.; Kilp, G.R.; Comstock, R.J.; McAtee, K.R.; Thornburg, D.R.

    1992-03-01

    Twenty-four peripheral rods and two interior rods from North Anna Unit 1, End-of-Cycle 7, were measured at poolside for waterside corrosion on four-cycle Region 6 assemblies F35 and F66, with rod average burnups of 60 GWD/MTU. Similar measurements were obtained on 24 two-cycle fuel rods from Region 8A assemblies H02 and H10 with average burnups of about 40 GWD/MTU. The Region 6 peripheral rods had been corrosion measured previously after three cycles, at 45 GWD/MTU average burnup. The four-cycle Region 6 fuel rods showed high corrosion, compared to only intermediate corrosion level after three cycles. The accelerated corrosion rate in the fourth cycle was accompanied by extensive laminar cracking and spalling of the oxide film in the thickest regions. The peak corrosion of the two-cycle region 8A rods was 32 μm to 53 μm, with some isolated incipient oxide spalling. In conjunction with the in-reactor corrosion measurements, extensive characterization tests plus long-term autoclave corrosion tests were performed on archive samples of the three major tubing lots represented in the North Anna measurements. The autoclave tests generally showed the same ordering of corrosion by tubing lot as in the reactor; the chief difference between the archive tubing samples was a lower tin content (1.38 percent) for the lot with the lowest corrosion rate compared with a higher tin content (1.58) for the lot with the highest corrosion rate. There was no indication in the autoclave tests of an accelerated rate of corrosion as observed in the reactor

  11. Intermediate Temperature Fluids Life Tests — Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarau, Calin; Sarraf, David B.; Locci, Ivan E.; Anderson, William G.

    2007-01-01

    There are a number of different applications that could use heat pipes or loop heat pipes (LHPs) in the intermediate temperature range of 450 to 750 K, including space nuclear power system radiators, and high temperature electronics cooling. Potential working fluids include organic fluids, elements, and halides, with halides being the least understood, with only a few life tests conducted. Potential envelope materials for halide working fluids include pure aluminum, aluminum alloys, commercially pure (CP) titanium, titanium alloys, and corrosion resistant superalloys. Life tests were conducted with three halides (AlBr3, SbBr3, and TiCl4) and water in three different envelopes: two aluminum alloys (Al-5052, Al-6061) and CP-2 titanium. The AlBr3 attacked the grain boundaries in the aluminum envelopes, and formed TiAl compounds in the titanium. The SbBr3 was incompatible with the only envelope material that it was tested with, Al-6061. TiCl4 and water were both compatible with CP2-titanium. A theoretical model was developed that uses electromotive force differences to predict the compatibility of halide working fluids with envelope materials. This theory predicts that iron, nickel, and molybdenum are good envelope materials, while aluminum and titanium halides are good working fluids. The model is in good agreement with results from previous life tests, as well as the current life tests.

  12. Intermediate Temperature Fluids Life Tests - Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarau, Calin; Sarraf, David B.; Locci, Ivan E.; Anderson, William G.

    2008-01-01

    There are a number of different applications that could use heat pipes or loop heat pipes (LHPs) in the intermediate temperature range of 450 to 750 K, including space nuclear power system radiators, and high temperature electronics cooling. Potential working fluids include organic fluids, elements, and halides, with halides being the least understood, with only a few life tests conducted. Potential envelope materials for halide working fluids include pure aluminum, aluminum alloys, commercially pure (CP) titanium, titanium alloys, and corrosion resistant superalloys. Life tests were conducted with three halides (AlBr3, SbBr3, and TiCl4) and water in three different envelopes: two aluminum alloys (Al-5052, Al-6061) and Cp-2 titanium. The AlBr3 attacked the grain boundaries in the aluminum envelopes, and formed TiAl compounds in the titanium. The SbBr3 was incompatible with the only envelope material that it was tested with, Al-6061. TiCl4 and water were both compatible with CP2-titanium. A theoretical model was developed that uses electromotive force differences to predict the compatibility of halide working fluids with envelope materials. This theory predicts that iron, nickel, and molybdenum are good envelope materials, while aluminum and titanium halides are good working fluids. The model is in good agreement with results form previous life tests, as well as the current life tests.

  13. The role of outlet temperature of flue gas in organic Rankine cycle considering low temperature corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shuang Ying; Li, Chun; Xiao, Lan; Li, You Rong; Liu, Chao [Chongqing University, Chongqing (China)

    2014-12-15

    This paper gives a special focus on the role of outlet temperature of flue gas (T{sub go}) in organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system for low temperature flue gas waste heat recovery. The variations of performance indicators: net work (W{sub net}), exergy efficiency (η{sub ex}) and levelized energy cost (LEC) versus T{sub go} are discussed. Considering the corrosion of low temperature flue gas, the necessity and reasonability of limiting T{sub go} at its minimum allowed discharge temperature (355.15 K) are analyzed. Results show that there exist optimal T{sub go} (T{sub go,opt}) for W{sub net} and LEC, while T{sub go,opt} for η{sub ex} does not appear under the investigated range of T{sub go}. Moreover, the T{sub go,opt} for W{sub net} is always lower than 355.15 K, the T{sub go,opt} for LEC, despite being greater than the one for W{sub net}, is just slightly higher than 355.15 K when the inlet temperature of flue gas varies from 408.15 K to 463.15 K. For the waste heat recovery of low temperature flue gas, it is reasonable to fix T{sub go} at 355.15K if W{sub net} or LEC is selected as primary performance indicator under the pinch point temperature difference of evaporator (ΔT{sub e}) below 20K.

  14. Report on Electrochemcial Corrosion Testing of 241-SY-102 Grab Samples from the 2012 Grab Sampling Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, Richard B.; Lamothe, Margaret E.

    2013-05-30

    This report describes the results of the electrochemical testing performed on tank 241-SY-102 (SY-102) grab samples that were collected in support of corrosion mitigation. The objective of the work presented here was to determine corrosion resistance of tank SY-102 to the grab samples collected using electrochemical methods up to 50°C as well as to satisfy data quality objectives. Grab samples were collected at multiple elevations from Riser 003. The electrochemical corrosion testing was planned to consist of linear polarization resistance testing (LPR) and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) testing at 50°C. The temperature would be lowered to 40 °C and the test repeated if the CPP curve indicated pitting corrosion at 50°C. Ifno pitting was indicated by the CPP curve, then a duplicate scan would be repeated at 50°C to confirm the first result. The testing would be complete if the duplicate CPP scan was consistent with the first. This report contains the CPP results of the testing of grab sample 2SY-12-03 and 2SY-12-03DUP composite sample tested under these conditions. There was no indication of pitting at 50°C, and the duplicate scan was in agreement with the first scan. Since no further testing was required, a third scan with a shorter rest time was performed and is present in this report.

  15. Corrosion evaluation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Uh Chul; Han, Jeong Ho; Nho, Kye Ho; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo

    1997-09-01

    A multifrequency ACPD system was assembled which can measure very small crack. Stress corrosion cracking test system with SSRT operating high temperature was installed. Stress corrosion cracking test of newly developed alloy 600 and existing alloy 600 was carried out in steam atmosphere of 400 deg C. No crack was observed in both materials within a test period of 2,000 hrs. Corrosion fatigue test system operating at high temperature was installed in which fatigue crack was measured by CDPD. Lead enhanced the SCC of the Alloy 600 in high temperature water, had a tendency to modify a cracking morphology from intergranular to transgranular. Pit initiation preferentially occurred at Ti-rich carbide. Resistance to pit initiation decreased with increasing temperature up to 300 deg C. Test loop for erosion corrosion was designed and fabricated. Thin layer activation technique was very effective in measuring erosion corrosion. Erosion corrosion of a part of secondary side pipe was evaluated by the Check Family Codes of EPRI. Calculated values of pipe thickness by Check Family Codes coincided with the pipe thickness measured by UT with an error of {+-} 20%. Literature review on turbine failure showed that failure usually occurred in low pressure turbine rotor disc and causes of failure are stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. (author). 12 refs., 20 tabs., 77 figs.

  16. Stress corrosion cracking test with slow strain rate and constant current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1976-01-01

    A rapid electrochemical tensile test was developed for evaluating stress corrosion crack initiation in carbon steel. Constant anodic current was imposed on smooth-bar tensile specimens as the specimens were slowly strained to fracture at cross-head speeds of 1.3 x 10 -6 /sec. Equivalent response results were obtained for all ductility properties measured; uniform elongation, total elongation and reduction of area. Total elongation was chosen as the index for stress corrosion crack initiation. An equation was developed that allowed calculation of total elongation of specimens in electrolytes (test solutions) with composition ranges of 1.5 to 5.5 M nitrate, 0 to 3.5 M nitrite, and 0 to 5.0 M hydroxide, and a temperature range of 50 0 C to 100 0 C. A minimum of 13 percent total elongation was selected to indicate the possible initiation of cracking in A 285-B steel alloy. The test was used to evaluate relative aggressiveness of synthetic nuclear wastes on A 285-B carbon steel and the relative resistances of several steels to given solution compositions. Test results formed one of the bases for setting temperature limits and concentration limits for several ions in nuclear wastes that are stored in carbon steel tanks at the Savannah River Plant

  17. Screening of soil corrosivity by field testing: Results and design of an electrochemical soil corrosion probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars vendelbo; Bruun, Niels Kåre

    1996-01-01

    The corrosivity of different types of soil have been assessed by exposing carbon-steel plates at 50 different locations in Denmark for an extended period of time. The investigations included weight loss measurements and analysis of the chemical compositions of the corrosion products formed on the...... and hydrogen absorption rates. In addition, traditional carbon-steel 3-electrode arrangements allow for performance of any kind of electrochemical meaurement (EIS, polarisation curves, LPR-measurements, galvanostatic pulse etc.).......The corrosivity of different types of soil have been assessed by exposing carbon-steel plates at 50 different locations in Denmark for an extended period of time. The investigations included weight loss measurements and analysis of the chemical compositions of the corrosion products formed...... on the plates during exposure. An electrochemical soil corrosion probe has been designed and manufactured allowing for simultaneous measurements of several qauntities to predict corrosion. The probe consists of individual sections capable of measuring redox-potential, corrosion potential, soil resistivity...

  18. High temperature corrosion of superheater materials for power production through biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotthjaelp, K.; Broendsted, P. [Forskningscenter Risoe (Denmark); Jansen, P. [FORCE Institute (Denmark); Montgomery, M.; Nielsen, K.; Maahn, E. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Corrosion and Surface Techn. Inst. of Manufacturing Engineering (Denmark)

    1996-08-01

    The aim of the present study has been to establish a fundamental knowledge of the corrosion mechanisms acting on materials for use in biomass fired power plants. The knowledge is created based on laboratory exposures of selected materials in well-defined corrosive gas environments. The experiments using this facility includes corrosion studies of two types of high temperature resistant steels, Sanvik 8LR30 (18Cr 10Ni Ti) and Sanicro 28 (27Cr 31Ni 4Mo), investigated at 600 deg. C in time intervals up to 300 hours. The influence of HCl (200 ppm) and of SO{sub 2} (300 ppm) on the corrosion progress has been investigated. In addition the corrosion behaviour of the same materials was investigated after having been exposed under a cover of ash in air in a furnace at temperatures of 525 deg. C, 600 deg. C, and 700 deg. C. The ashes utilised are from a straw fired power plant and a synthetic ash composed of potassium chloride (KCl) and potassium sulphate (K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}). Different analysis techniques to characterise the composition of the ash coatings have been investigated in order to judge the reliability and accuracy of the SEM-EDX method. The results are considered as an important step towards a better understanding of the high temperature corrosion under the conditions found in biomass fired power plants. One of the problems to solve in a suggested subsequent project is to combine the effect of the aggressive gases (SO{sub 2} and HCl) and the active ash coatings on high temperature corrosion of materials. (EG) 20 refs.

  19. Improvement of corrosion resistance of vanadium alloys in high-temperature pressurized water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Mitsuhiro; Sakamoto, Toshiya; Satou, Manabu; Hasegawa, Akira; Abe, Katsunori; Kaiuchi, Kazuo; Furuya, Takemi

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion tests in pressurized and vaporized water were conducted for V-based high Cr and Ti alloys and V-4Cr-4Ti type alloys containing minor elements such as Si, Al and Y. Weight losses were observed for every alloy after corrosion tests in pressurized water. It was apparent that addition of Cr effectively reduced the weight change in pressurized water. The weight loss of V-4Cr-4Ti type alloys in corrosion tests in vaporized water was also reduced as Cr content increased. The V-20Cr-4Ti alloy had a slight weight gain, almost same as that of SUS316, which had the best corrosion properties in the tested alloys. The elongation of alloys with in excess of 10% Cr was reduced as Cr content increased. The elongations of the V-12Cr-4Ti and the V-15Cr-4Ti alloys were significantly reduced by corrosion and cleavage fracture was observed reflecting hydrogen embrittlement. The reduced elongations of the alloys of the alloys were recovered to the same level of as annealed conditions after hydrogen degassing. After corrosion, the V-15Cr-4Ti-0.5Y alloy still kept enough elongation, suggesting that the addition of Y is effective to reduce the hydrogen embrittlement. (author)

  20. Certification testing at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noss, P.W.; Ammerman, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Regulations governing the transport of radioactive materials require that most hypothetical accident condition tests or analyses consider the effects of the environmental temperature that most challenges package performance. For many packages, the most challenging temperature environment is the cold condition (-29 C according to U.S. regulations), primarily because the low temperature causes the highest free drop impact forces due to the higher strength of many energy-absorbing materials at this temperature. If it is decided to perform low temperature testing, it is only necessary that the relevant parts of the package have the required temperature prior to the drop. However, the details of performing a drop at low temperature can have a large influence on testing cost and technical effectiveness. The selection of the test site, the chamber and type of chilling equipment, instrumentation, and even the time of year are all important. Control of seemingly minor details such as the effect on internal pressure, placement of monitoring thermocouples, the thermal time constant of the test article, and icing of equipment are necessary to ensure a successful low temperature test. This paper will discuss these issues and offer suggestions based on recent experience

  1. Annual report, spring 2015. Alternative chemical cleaning methods for high level waste tanks-corrosion test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-06

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel when interacted with the chemical cleaning solution composed of 0.18 M nitric acid and 0.5 wt. % oxalic acid. This solution has been proposed as a dissolution solution that would be used to remove the remaining hard heel portion of the sludge in the waste tanks. This solution was combined with the HM and PUREX simulated sludge with dilution ratios that represent the bulk oxalic cleaning process (20:1 ratio, acid solution to simulant) and the cumulative volume associated with multiple acid strikes (50:1 ratio). The testing was conducted over 28 days at 50°C and deployed two methods to invest the corrosion conditions; passive weight loss coupon and an active electrochemical probe were used to collect data on the corrosion rate and material performance. In addition to investigating the chemical cleaning solutions, electrochemical corrosion testing was performed on acidic and basic solutions containing sodium permanganate at room temperature to explore the corrosion impacts if these solutions were to be implemented to retrieve remaining actinides that are currently in the sludge of the tank.

  2. The corrosion resistance of Zr-Nb and Zr-Nb-Sn alloys in high-temperature water and steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalgaard, S.B.

    1960-03-01

    An alloy of reactor-grade sponge zirconium-2.5 wt. % niobium was exposed to water and steam at high temperature. The corrosion was twice that of Zircaloy-2 while hydrogen pickup was found to be equal to that of Zircaloy-2. Ternary additions of tin to this alloy in the range 0.5-1.5 had no effect on the corrosion resistance in water at 315 o C up to 100 days. At higher temperatures, tin increased the corrosion, the effect varying with temperature. Heat treatment of the alloys was shown to affect corrosion resistance. (author)

  3. Effect of Carbide Dissolution on Chlorine Induced High Temperature Corrosion of HVOF and HVAF Sprayed Cr3C2-NiCrMoNb Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantozzi, D.; Matikainen, V.; Uusitalo, M.; Koivuluoto, H.; Vuoristo, P.

    2018-01-01

    Highly corrosion- and wear-resistant thermally sprayed chromium carbide (Cr3C2)-based cermet coatings are nowadays a potential highly durable solution to allow traditional fluidized bed combustors (FBC) to be operated with ecological waste and biomass fuels. However, the heat input of thermal spray causes carbide dissolution in the metal binder. This results in the formation of carbon saturated metastable phases, which can affect the behavior of the materials during exposure. This study analyses the effect of carbide dissolution in the metal matrix of Cr3C2-50NiCrMoNb coatings and its effect on chlorine-induced high-temperature corrosion. Four coatings were thermally sprayed with HVAF and HVOF techniques in order to obtain microstructures with increasing amount of carbide dissolution in the metal matrix. The coatings were heat-treated in an inert argon atmosphere to induce secondary carbide precipitation. As-sprayed and heat-treated self-standing coatings were covered with KCl, and their corrosion resistance was investigated with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and ordinary high-temperature corrosion test at 550 °C for 4 and 72 h, respectively. High carbon dissolution in the metal matrix appeared to be detrimental against chlorine-induced high-temperature corrosion. The microstructural changes induced by the heat treatment hindered the corrosion onset in the coatings.

  4. Oxygen sensor development and low temperature corrosion study in lead-alloy coolant loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Il Soon; Bahn, Chi Bum; Lee, Seung Gi; Jeong, Seung Ho; Nam, Hyo On; Lim, Jun

    2007-07-01

    Oxygen sensor to measure dissolved oxygen concentration at liquid lead-bismuth eutectic environments have been developed. Developed oxygen sensor for application in lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) system was based on the oxygen ion conductor made of YSZ ceramic having Bi/Bi2O3 reference joined by electro-magnetic swaging. Leakage problem, which was major problem of existing sensors, can be solved by using electro-magnetic swaging method. A new calibration strategy combining the oxygen titration with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was performed to increase the reliability of sensor. Another calibration was also conducted by controlling the oxygen concentration using OCS (oxygen control system). Materials corrosion tests of various metals (SS316, EP823, T91 and HT9) were conducted for up to 1,000 hours with specimen inspection after every 333hours at 450 .deg. C in HELIOS. Oxygen concentration was controlled at 10 -6 wt% by using the direct gas bubbling of Ar+4%H 2 , Ar+5%O 2 and pure Ar. The dissolved oxygen concentration in LBE was also monitored by two calibrated YSZ oxygen sensors located at different places under different temperatures within HELIOS. It shows a good performance during 1000 hours. Liquid metal embrittlement (LME) test of SS316L specimen in the LBE was performed at various temperature and strain rate. The result shows that the liquid metal embrittlement effect is not crucial at tested conditions

  5. High temperature and pressure electrochemical test station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzichristodoulou, C.; Allebrod, F.; Mogensen, M.

    2013-05-01

    An electrochemical test station capable of operating at pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures up to 400 °C has been established. It enables control of the partial pressures and mass flow of O2, N2, H2, CO2, and H2O in a single or dual environment arrangement, measurements with highly corrosive media, as well as localized sampling of gas evolved at the electrodes for gas analysis. A number of safety and engineering design challenges have been addressed. Furthermore, we present a series of electrochemical cell holders that have been constructed in order to accommodate different types of cells and facilitate different types of electrochemical measurements. Selected examples of materials and electrochemical cells examined in the test station are provided, ranging from the evaluation of the ionic conductivity of liquid electrolytic solutions immobilized in mesoporous ceramic structures, to the electrochemical characterization of high temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis cells and the use of pseudo-reference electrodes for the separation of each electrode contribution. A future perspective of various electrochemical processes and devices that can be developed with the use of the established test station is provided.

  6. Coal-fired power plants and the causes of high temperature corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oakey, J.E.; Simms, N.J. [British Coal Corporation, Coal Technology Development Div., Cheltenham, Glos (United Kingdom); Tomkings, A.B. [ERA Technology Ltd., Leatherhead, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-01

    The heat exchangers in all types of coal-fired power plant operate in aggressive, high temperature environments where high temperature corrosion can severely limit their service lives. The extent of this corrosion is governed by the combined effects of the operating conditions of the heat exchanger and the presence of corrosive species released from the coal during operation. This paper reviews the coal-related factors, such as ash deposition, which influence the operating environments of heat exchangers in three types of coal-fired power plant - conventional pulverized coal boilers, fluidized bed boilers and coal gasification systems. The effects on the performance of the materials used for these heat exchangers are then compared. (au) 35 refs.

  7. High Temperature Corrosion of Superheater Materials for Power Production through Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Maahn, Ernst emanuel; Nielsen, Karsten agersted

    plant boiler. The experiments using this facility includes corrosion studies of two types of high temperature resistant steels, Sandvik 8LR30 (18Cr 10Ni Ti) and Sanicro 28 (27Cr 31Ni 4Mo)investigated at 600Cin time intervals up to 300 hours. The influence of HCl (200ppm) and of SO2 (300 ppm......The aim of the present study has been to establish a fundamental knowledge of the corrosion mechanisms acting on materials for use in biomass fired power plants. The knowledge is created based on laboratory exposures on selected materials in well-defined corrosive gas environments. An experimental......) on the corrosion progress has been investigated.In addition the corrosion behaviour of the same materials was investigated after having been exposed under a cover of ash in air in a furnace at temperatures of 525C, 600C and 700C. The ashes utilised are from a straw-fired power plant and a synthetic ash composed...

  8. Automated-process gas-chromatograph system for use in accelerated corrosion testing of HTGR core-support posts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, R.E.; Herndon, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    An automated-process gas chromatograph is the heart of a gaseous-impurities-analysis system developed for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Core Support Performance Test, at which graphite core-support posts for high-temperature gas-cooled fission reactors are being subjected to accelerated corrosion tests under tightly controlled conditions of atmosphere and temperature. Realistic estimation of in-core corrosion rates is critically dependent upon the accurate measurement of low concentrations of CO, CO 2 , CH 4 , H 2 , and O 2 in the predominantly helium atmosphere. In addition, the capital and labor investment associated with each test puts a premium upon the reliability of the analytical system, as excessive downtime or failure to obtain accurate data would result in unacceptable costs and schedule delays. After an extensive survey of available measurement techniques, gas chromatography was chosen for reasons of accuracy, flexibility, good-performance record, and cost

  9. In situ corrosion tests on HLW glass as part of a larger approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Iseghem, P. [Waste and Disposal Research Unit, SCK.CEN, Mol (Belgium)

    1997-07-01

    In-situ corrosion tests were performed on various candidate high-level waste glasses in the underground laboratory in clay underneath SCK x CEN. The tests exposed the glass samples directly to the Boom clay rock, for maximum durations of 7.5 years. We succeeded to interpret the corrosion data at 90 deg C in terms of dissolution mechanisms, and we concluded that the glass composition has a determining effect on the corrosion stability. The data from our in-situ tests were of high relevance for estimating the long-term behaviour of the glasses. The long-term in-situ tests provide corrosion data which show different trends than other corrosion tests, e.g. shorter duration tests in Boom clay, or tests in deionized water. The initial dissolution rate using MCC1 test at 90 deg C is about the same for the three glasses discussed, but the longest duration in Boom clay at 90 deg C shows a difference in mass loss of about 25 times. We finally present some ideas on how the corrosion tests can meet the needs, such as the modelling of the glass corrosion or providing input in the performance assessment. (author)

  10. In situ corrosion tests on HLW glass as part of a larger approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Iseghem, P.

    1997-01-01

    In-situ corrosion tests were performed on various candidate high-level waste glasses in the underground laboratory in clay underneath SCK x CEN. The tests exposed the glass samples directly to the Boom clay rock, for maximum durations of 7.5 years. We succeeded to interpret the corrosion data at 90 deg C in terms of dissolution mechanisms, and we concluded that the glass composition has a determining effect on the corrosion stability. The data from our in-situ tests were of high relevance for estimating the long-term behaviour of the glasses. The long-term in-situ tests provide corrosion data which show different trends than other corrosion tests, e.g. shorter duration tests in Boom clay, or tests in deionized water. The initial dissolution rate using MCC1 test at 90 deg C is about the same for the three glasses discussed, but the longest duration in Boom clay at 90 deg C shows a difference in mass loss of about 25 times. We finally present some ideas on how the corrosion tests can meet the needs, such as the modelling of the glass corrosion or providing input in the performance assessment. (author)

  11. High temperature corrosion control and monitoring for processing acidic crudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, C. [Betz/GE Water and Process Technologies, Woodlands, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The challenge of processing heavy crudes and bitumen in a reliable and economical way was discussed. Many refiners use a conservative approach regarding the rate at which they use discounted crudes or depend upon capital-intensive upgrades to equipment. New strategies based on data-driven decisions are needed in order to obtain the greatest benefit from heavy feedstock. The feasibility of successfully processing more challenging feed can be estimated more accurately by better understanding the interactions between a particular feed and a particular crude unit. This presentation reviewed newly developed techniques that refiners can use to determine the feeds corrosion potential and the probability for this potential to manifest itself in a given crude unit. tabs., figs.

  12. Effect of Water Vapor on High-Temperature Corrosion under Conditions Mimicking Biomass Firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    The variable flue gas composition in biomass-fired plants, among other parameters, contributes to the complexityof high-temperature corrosion of materials. Systematic parameter studies are thus necessary to understand the underlyingcorrosion mechanisms. This paper investigates the effect of water...

  13. Effect of Temperature on the Corrosion Behavior of API X120 Pipeline Steel in H2S Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonkwo, Paul C.; Sliem, Mostafa H.; Shakoor, R. A.; Mohamed, A. M. A.; Abdullah, Aboubakr M.

    2017-08-01

    The corrosion behavior of newly developed API X120 C-steel that is commenced to be used for oil pipelines was studied in a H2S saturated 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution between 20 and 60 °C using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. The corrosion products formed on the surface of the alloy were characterized using x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. It has been noticed that the formation of corrosion product layer takes place at both lower and higher temperatures which is mainly comprised of iron oxides and sulfides. The electrochemical results confirmed that the corrosion rate decreases with increasing temperature up to 60 °C. This decrease in corrosion rate with increasing temperature can be attributed to the formation of a protective layer of mackinawite layer. However, cracking in the formed mackinawite layer may not be responsible for the increase in the corrosion rate. More specifically, developed pourbaix diagrams at different temperatures showed that the formed protective layer belongs to mackinawite (FeS), a group of classified polymorphous iron sulfide, which is in good agreement with the experimental results. It is also noticed that the thickness of corrosion products layer increases significantly with decrease in the corrosion rate of API X120 steel exposed to H2S environment. These findings indicate that API X120 C-steel is susceptible to sour corrosion under the above stated experimental conditions.

  14. The effect of zinc bath temperature on the morphology, texture and corrosion behaviour of industrially produced hot-dip galvanized coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bakhtiari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to identify the influence of zinc bath temperature on the morphology, texture and corrosion behavior of hot-dip galvanized coatings. Hot-dip galvanized samples were prepared at temperature in the range of 450-480 °C in steps of 10 °C, which is the conventional galvanizing temperature range in the galvanizing industries. The morphology of coatings was examined with optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The composition of the coating layers was determined using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS analysis. The texture of the coatings was evaluated using X-ray diffraction. Corrosion behavior was performed using salt spray cabinet test and Tafel extrapolation test. From the experimental results, it was found that increasing the zinc bath temperature affects the morphology of the galvanized coatings provoking the appearance of cracks in the coating structure. These cracks prevent formation of a compact structure. In addition, it was concluded that (00.2 basal plane texture component was weakened by increasing the zinc bath temperature and, conversely, appearance of (10.1 prism component, (20.1 high angle pyramidal component and low angle component prevailed. Besides, coatings with strong (00.2 texture component and weaker (20.1 components have better corrosion resistance than the coatings with weak (00.2 and strong (20.1 texture components. Furthermore, corrosion resistance of the galvanized coatings was decreased by increasing the zinc bath temperature.

  15. Standard Test Method for Stress-Corrosion of Titanium Alloys by Aircraft Engine Cleaning Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method establishes a test procedure for determining the propensity of aircraft turbine engine cleaning and maintenance materials for causing stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloy parts. 1.2 The evaluation is conducted on representative titanium alloys by determining the effect of contact with cleaning and maintenance materials on tendency of prestressed titanium alloys to crack when subsequently heated to elevated temperatures. 1.3 Test conditions are based upon manufacturer's maximum recommended operating solution concentration. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see and .

  16. Study on the correlation between long-term exposure tests and accelerated corrosion tests by the combined damage of salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Soon; Lee, Min Woo [Sangmyung University, Chunan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Interest in the durability assessment and structural performance has increased according to an increase of concrete structures in salt damage environment recent years. Reliable way ensuring the most accelerated corrosion test is a method of performing the rebar corrosion monitoring as exposed directly to the marine test site exposure. However, long-term exposure test has a disadvantage because of a long period of time. Therefore, many studies on reinforced concrete in salt damage environments have been developed as alternatives to replace this. However, accelerated corrosion test is appropriate to evaluate the critical chlorine concentration in the short term, but only accelerated test method, is not easy to get correct answer. Accuracy of correlation acceleration test depends on the period of the degree of exposure environments. Therefore, in this study, depending on the concrete mix material, by the test was performed on the basis of the composite degradation of the salt damage, and investigate the difference of corrosion initiation time of the rebar, and indoor corrosion time of the structure, of the marine environment of the actual environments were investigated. The correlation coefficient was derived in the experiment. Long-term exposure test was actually conducted in consideration of the exposure conditions submerged zone, splash zone and tidal zone. The accelerated corrosion tests were carried out by immersion conditions, and by the combined deterioration due to the carbonation and accelerated corrosion due to wet and dry condition.

  17. Study on the correlation between long-term exposure tests and accelerated corrosion tests by the combined damage of salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Soon; Lee, Min Woo

    2014-01-01

    Interest in the durability assessment and structural performance has increased according to an increase of concrete structures in salt damage environment recent years. Reliable way ensuring the most accelerated corrosion test is a method of performing the rebar corrosion monitoring as exposed directly to the marine test site exposure. However, long-term exposure test has a disadvantage because of a long period of time. Therefore, many studies on reinforced concrete in salt damage environments have been developed as alternatives to replace this. However, accelerated corrosion test is appropriate to evaluate the critical chlorine concentration in the short term, but only accelerated test method, is not easy to get correct answer. Accuracy of correlation acceleration test depends on the period of the degree of exposure environments. Therefore, in this study, depending on the concrete mix material, by the test was performed on the basis of the composite degradation of the salt damage, and investigate the difference of corrosion initiation time of the rebar, and indoor corrosion time of the structure, of the marine environment of the actual environments were investigated. The correlation coefficient was derived in the experiment. Long-term exposure test was actually conducted in consideration of the exposure conditions submerged zone, splash zone and tidal zone. The accelerated corrosion tests were carried out by immersion conditions, and by the combined deterioration due to the carbonation and accelerated corrosion due to wet and dry condition

  18. Estimating the gas permeability of commercial volatile corrosion inhibitors at elevated temperatures with thermo-gravimetry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pieterse, N

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available and the diffusion coefficient: SA = PADAB. The gas permeability of commercial VCIs was estimated at elevated temperatures from vaporisation rates measured using a simple thermo-gravimetric method (TG). C211 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: B. Weight... loss; C. Corrosion inhibitor; C. Atmospheric corrosion 0010-938X/$ - see front matter C211 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.corsci.2005.05.026 * Corresponding author. Tel.: +27 12 4202588; fax: +27 12 4202516. E-mail address: walter...

  19. Passivation and corrosion of the high performance materials alloy 33, alloy 31 and nickel in LiBr solution at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igual Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Guinon, J.L.; Perez Herranz, V. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. E.T.S. Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Aqueous solutions containing high concentrations of Lithium Bromide are employed as absorbent solutions for almost all types of heating and refrigerating absorption systems that use natural gas or steam as energy sources. LiBr solutions can cause serious corrosion problems in common metallic components. The objective of the present work was to study the corrosion resistance of new high alloyed materials in commercial LiBr heavy brine solution (which contains chromate as inhibitor), at different temperatures (25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 deg. C). The materials tested were stainless steels Alloy 33 (UNS R20033), a new corrosion resistant austenitic material alloyed with nominally (wt%) 33 Cr, 32 Fe, 31 Ni; Nicrofer 3127 hMo-alloy 31 (UNS N08031), an iron-nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy with nitrogen; and pure Nickel. Corrosion resistance was estimated from the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curves, comparing OCP values, calculating corrosion potentials and current rates from Tafel analysis; in order to characterize the passivating behaviour of the alloys the study was completed with the analysis of the pitting potentials, passivating current and re-passivating properties at the temperatures under study. Passivating properties are well observed in all the samples in commercial LiBr solution at all temperatures. In these cases, passivation properties decrease with temperature. (authors)

  20. Effect of electropolishing on corrosion of nuclear grade 316L stainless steel in deaerated high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Yaolei; Mei, Jinna; Peng, Qunjia; Han, En-Hou; Ke, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Electropolished surface (EPS) of 316L stainless steel contains an amount of hydroxide. • Few hydroxide on the compared colloidal silica slurry polished surface (CPS). • Higher corrosion rate of EPS than CPS in deaerated high temperature water. • Higher corrosion rate of EPS attributed to the role of hydroxide in corrosion. - Abstract: Effect of change in surface composition and microstructure by electropolishing on corrosion of nuclear grade 316L stainless steel in deaerated high temperature water was investigated. The investigation was conducted by comparing the corrosion of electropolished surface (EPS) with that of the 40 nm-colloidal silica slurry polished surface (CPS), which has few composition change as well as few surface residual strain. The result revealed that the EPS had a higher corrosion rate than the CPS, which is attributed to formation of an amount of hydroxide at the EPS.

  1. High temperature corrosion in biomass- and waste fired boilers. A status report; Kunskapslaeget betraeffande hoegtemperaturkorrosion i aangpannor foer biobraensle och avfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, P.; Ifwer, K.; Staalenheim, A.; Montgomery, M.; Hoegberg, J.; Hjoernhede, A.

    2006-12-15

    Many biomass- or waste-fired plants have problems with high temperature corrosion on the furnace walls or at the superheaters, especially if the steam temperature is greater than 500 deg C. An increase in the combustion of waste fuels means that an increasing number of boilers have had problems. Therefore, there is great interest from plant owners to reduce the costs associated with high temperature corrosion. At the same time there exists a considerable driving force towards improving the electrical efficiency of a plant by the use of more advanced steam data. The purpose of the work presented here was to answer three main questions: What can be done to reduce high temperature corrosion with current fuel blends and steam temperatures? How can more waste fuels be burnt without an increased risk for corrosion? What needs to be done to reach higher steam temperatures in the future? The level of knowledge of high temperature corrosion in biomass- and waste-fired boilers has been described and summarised. The following measures are recommended to reduce corrosion in existing plant: Make sure that the fuel is well mixed and improve fuel feeding to obtain a more even spread of the fuel over the cross-section of the boiler. Use combustion technology methods to stabilize the oxygen content of the flue gases near the membrane walls and other heat transfer surfaces. Experiment with additives and/or supplementary fuels which contain sulphur in some form, for example peat. Reduce the flue gas temperature at the superheaters. Review soot-blowing procedures or protect heat transfer surfaces from soot blowers. Evaluate coated membrane wall panels in parts of the furnace that experience the worst corrosion. Test more highly alloyed steels suitable for superheaters and when replacing a superheater change to a more highly alloyed steel. For the future, the following should be considered: The role of sulphur needs to be investigated more and other additives should be investigated

  2. Corrosion testing in flash tanks of kraft pulp mills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, S.J.; Stead, N.J.

    1999-11-01

    The corrosion observed in the first flash tanks in kraft pulp mills with modified cooking practices was characterized. Coupons of carbon steel (CS), several stainless steels (SS), and Ti were exposed at two mills. At one mill, identical sets of coupons were exposed in the No. 1 and No. 2 flash tank. At the other mill, three identical sets of coupons were placed in flash tank No. 1. The results of the exposures showed that both CS and Ti suffered high rates of general corrosion, while the SS suffered varying degrees of localized attack. The ranking of the corrosion resistance in the flash tank was the same that would be expected in a reducing acid environment. Attack by organic acids was concluded to be the most likely cause of corrosion of the flash tanks.

  3. The Coupled Effect of Temperature and Carbonation on the Corrosion of Rebars in the Simulated Concrete Pore Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiezhen Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The reinforced concrete structures have to survive high temperature and carbonation at low latitude region. The research on the effect of temperature and the effect of carbonation are vital to the corrosion of the rebars in concrete structures. The coupled effect of temperature and carbonation on the corrosion of rebars was researched by using the open circuit potential (OCP, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, and the potentiodynamic polarization (PP measurement in the simulated concrete pore solutions (SPSs. The high temperature environment is conducive to the formation of passivated surface of rebars in SPSs, but the dissolution velocity of passivated surface is higher. The rebars have the greater capacity of passivity at lower temperature. The corrosion rate of rebars at higher temperature is smaller in moderate pH value (10.6 SPSs. The rebars suffer from serious corrosion in the pH = 9.6 SPSs at 318 K temperature.

  4. Effect of phosphating time and temperature on microstructure and corrosion behavior of magnesium phosphate coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouladi, M.; Amadeh, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel phosphate coating “magnesium phosphate” was applied on carbon steel. • Effect of phosphating temperature on morphological and corrosion behavior of the coating was studied. • Effect of phosphating time on morphological and corrosion behavior of the coating was studied. • Optimum condition for application of the coating was achieved. -- Abstract: In this study a novel phosphate coating, magnesium phosphate, was developed on steel surface. The formation of the coating was confirmed by X-ray diffraction method. Morphological evolution of the coating, as a function of phosphating time and temperature, was examined by scanning electron microscope. Magnetic thickness gauge was used to determine the thickness of the coating and the bath sludge weight was specified to determine the bath efficiency. Corrosion behavior of the samples was studied using potentiodynamic polarization curves. The results indicated that increasing the phosphating temperature facilitated the precipitation of coating and increased its thickness. Furthermore the best corrosion behavior was observed at 80 °C. Also increasing the phosphating time, enhanced both thickness and uniformity of the coating. The best results were observed after 20 min of phosphating

  5. Test methods for microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, B.; Wagner, P.; Mansfeld, F.

    1992-01-01

    Electrochemical techniques such as measurements of corrosion and redox potentials, polarization curves, polarization resistance, electrochemical impedance and electrochemical noise have been used to evaluate the impact of marine microorganisms on corrosion processes. Surface analytical techniques including microbiological culturing, scanning electron microscopy, microprobes and microelectrodes have been used to characterize metal surfaces after exposure to marine waters. A combination of electrochemical, surface analytical and microbiological techniques is the most promising approach for determining mechanisms of MIC

  6. Influence of pre-deformation, sensitization and oxidation in high temperature water on corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Jinlong, E-mail: ljltsinghua@126.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liang, Tongxiang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Luo, Hongyun [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Xueyuan Road 37, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • The pre-strain accelerated desensitization and sensitization for austenitic stainless steels. • Low temperature sensitization (carbide precipitation) induced α′-martensite. • The sensitization level could affect directly corrosion resistance of the oxide film. - Abstract: The effects of pre-deformation on sensitization of AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated by the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test. The effects of pre-deformation and sensitization on high temperature oxidized film formed in high temperature water were analyzed by a XRD and SEM. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at room temperature was used to study corrosion resistance of oxidized film. The point defect density of oxidized film was calculated by Mott–Schottky plots. The results showed that the value of the degree of sensitization first decreased and then slight increased with the increasing of engineering strain. Moreover, low temperature promoted to form sensitization induced “secondary” α′-martensite. The sample with 20% engineering strain had higher impedance value than other samples. The result was supported by further Mott–Schottky experiments. Considering increased α′-martensite with the increasing of strain, the results of the impedance were more consistent with values of the degree of sensitization.

  7. Results of water corrosion in static cell tests representing multi-metal assemblies in the hydraulic circuits of Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipa, M.; Blanchet, J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tore supra (TS) has used from the beginning of operation in 1989 actively cooled plasma facing components. Since the operation and baking temperature of all in vessel components has been defined to be up to 230 deg. C at 40 bars, a special water chemistry of the cooling water plant was suggested in order to avoid eventual water leaks due to corrosion (general corrosion, galvanic corrosion, stress corrosion, etc.) at relative high temperatures and pressures in tubes, pipes, bellows, water boxes, coils, etc. From the beginning of TS operation, in vessel components (e.g. wall protection panels, limiters, ergodic divertor coils, neutralisers and diagnostics) represented a unique combination of metals in the hydraulic circuit mainly such as stainless steel, Inconel, CuCrZr, Nickel and Copper. These different materials were joined together by welding (St to St, Inconel to Inconel, CuCrZr to CuCrZr and CuCrZr to St-St via a Ni sleeve adapter), brazing (St-St to Cu and Cu-LSTP), friction (CuCrZr and Cu to St-St), explosion (CuCrZr to St-St) and memory metal junction (Cryo-fit to Cu - only test sample). Following experiences obtained with steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants, a cooling water quality of AVT (all volatile treatment) has been defined based on demineralized water with adjustment of the pH value to about 9.0/ 7.0 (25 deg. C/ 200 deg. C) by addiction of ammoniac, and hydrazine in order to absorb oxygen dissolved in water. At that time, a simplified water corrosion test program has been performed using static (no circulation) test cell samples made of above mentioned TS metal combinations. All test cell samples, prepared and filled with AVT water, were performed at 280 deg. C and 65 bars in an autoclave during 3000 hours. The test cell water temperature has been chosen to be sufficient above the TS component working temperature, in order to accelerate an eventual corrosion process. Generally all above mentioned metal

  8. Results of water corrosion in static cell tests representing multi-metal assemblies in the hydraulic circuits of Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipa, M.; Blanchet, J. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Cellier, F. [Framatome, Centre Technique, 71 - Saint Marcel (France)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tore supra (TS) has used from the beginning of operation in 1989 actively cooled plasma facing components. Since the operation and baking temperature of all in vessel components has been defined to be up to 230 deg. C at 40 bars, a special water chemistry of the cooling water plant was suggested in order to avoid eventual water leaks due to corrosion (general corrosion, galvanic corrosion, stress corrosion, etc.) at relative high temperatures and pressures in tubes, pipes, bellows, water boxes, coils, etc. From the beginning of TS operation, in vessel components (e.g. wall protection panels, limiters, ergodic divertor coils, neutralisers and diagnostics) represented a unique combination of metals in the hydraulic circuit mainly such as stainless steel, Inconel, CuCrZr, Nickel and Copper. These different materials were joined together by welding (St to St, Inconel to Inconel, CuCrZr to CuCrZr and CuCrZr to St-St via a Ni sleeve adapter), brazing (St-St to Cu and Cu-LSTP), friction (CuCrZr and Cu to St-St), explosion (CuCrZr to St-St) and memory metal junction (Cryo-fit to Cu - only test sample). Following experiences obtained with steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants, a cooling water quality of AVT (all volatile treatment) has been defined based on demineralized water with adjustment of the pH value to about 9.0/ 7.0 (25 deg. C/ 200 deg. C) by addiction of ammoniac, and hydrazine in order to absorb oxygen dissolved in water. At that time, a simplified water corrosion test program has been performed using static (no circulation) test cell samples made of above mentioned TS metal combinations. All test cell samples, prepared and filled with AVT water, were performed at 280 deg. C and 65 bars in an autoclave during 3000 hours. The test cell water temperature has been chosen to be sufficient above the TS component working temperature, in order to accelerate an eventual corrosion process. Generally all above mentioned metal

  9. Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Corrosion Test Report (Phase 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos, W. C.; Fritz, R. L.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the results of the corrosion tests that were performed to aid in the selection of the construction materials for multi-function waste tanks to be built in the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. Two alloys were tested: 304L and Alloy 20 austenitic stainless steel. The test media were aqueous solutions formulated to represent the extreme of the chemical compositions of waste to be stored in the tanks. The results summerized by alloy are as follows: For 304L the tests showed no stress-corrosion cracking in any of the nine test solutions. The tests showed pitting in on of the solutions. There were no indications of any weld heat-tint corrosion, nor any sign of preferential corrosion in the welded areas. For Alloy 20 the tests showed no general, pitting, or stress-corrosion cracking. One crevice corrosion coupon cracked at the web between a hole and the edge of the coupon in one of the solutions. Mechanical tests showed some possible crack extension in the same solution. Because of the failure of both alloys to meet test acceptance criteria, the tank waste chemistry will have to be restricted or an alternative alloy tested

  10. Corrosion of fuel assembly materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noe, M.; Frejaville, G.; Beslu, P.

    1985-08-01

    Corrosion of zircaloy-4 is reviewed in relation with previsions of improvement in PWRs performance: higher fuel burnup; increase coolant temperature, implying nucleate boiling on the hot clad surfaces; increase duration of the cycle due to load-follow operation. Actual knowledge on corrosion rates, based partly on laboratory tests, is insufficient to insure that external clad corrosion will not constitute a limitation to these improvements. Therefore, additional testing within representative conditions is felt necessary [fr

  11. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Form Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Damage tolerance testing development was required to help qualify a new spin forming dome fabrication process for the Ares 1 program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). One challenge of the testing was due to the compound curvature of the dome. The testing was developed on a sub-scale dome with a diameter of approximately 40 inches. The simulated service testing performed was based on the EQTP1102 Rev L 2195 Aluminum Lot Acceptance Simulated Service Test and Analysis Procedure generated by Lockheed Martin for the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank. This testing is performed on a specimen with an induced flaw of elliptical shape generated by Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) and subsequent fatigue cycling for crack propagation to a predetermined length and depth. The specimen is then loaded in tension at a constant rate of displacement at room temperature until fracture occurs while recording load and strain. An identical specimen with a similar flaw is then proof tested at room temperature to imminent failure based on the critical offset strain achieved by the previous fracture test. If the specimen survives the proof, it is then subjected to cryogenic cycling with loads that are a percentage of the proof load performed at room temperature. If all cryogenic cycles are successful, the specimen is loaded in tension to failure at the end of the test. This standard was generated for flat plate, so a method of translating this to a specimen of compound curvature was required. This was accomplished by fabricating a fixture that maintained the curvature of the specimen rigidly with the exception of approximately one-half inch in the center of the specimen containing the induced flaw. This in conjunction with placing the center of the specimen in the center of the load train allowed for successful testing with a minimal amount of bending introduced into the system. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were performed using the typical double beam assembly and with 4

  12. Determining the long-term effects of H₂S concentration, relative humidity and air temperature on concrete sewer corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guangming; Keller, Jurg; Bond, Philip L

    2014-11-15

    Many studies of sewer corrosion are performed in accelerated conditions that are not representing the actual corrosion processes. This study investigated the effects of various factors over 3.5 years under controlled conditions simulating the sewer environment. Concrete coupons prepared from precorroded sewers were exposed, both in the gas phase and partially submerged in wastewater, in laboratory controlled corrosion chambers. Over the 45 month exposure period, three environmental factors of H2S concentration, relative humidity and air temperature were controlled at different levels in the corrosion chambers. A total of 36 exposure conditions were investigated to determine the long term effects of these factors by regular retrieval of concrete coupons for detailed analysis of surface pH, corrosion layer sulfate levels and concrete loss. Corrosion rates were also determined for different exposure periods. It was found that the corrosion rate of both gas-phase and partially-submerged coupons was positively correlated with the H2S concentration in the gas phase. Relative humidity played also a role for the corrosion activity of the gas-phase coupons. However, the partially-submerged coupons were not affected by humidity as the surfaces of these coupons were saturated due to capillary suction of sewage on the coupon surface. The effect of temperature on corrosion activity varied and possibly the acclimation of corrosion-inducing microbes to temperature mitigated effects of that factor. It was apparent that biological sulfide oxidation was not the limiting step of the overall corrosion process. These findings provide real insights into the long-term effects of these key environmental factors on the sewer corrosion processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigation of the cut-edge corrosion of organically-coated galvanized steel after accelerated atmospheric corrosion test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reşit Yıldız

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The cut edge corrosion of organically coated (epoxy, polyurethane and polyester galvanized steel was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. Measurements were performed on specimens that had been tested in an accelerated atmospheric corrosion test. The samples were subjected to 10 s fogging and 1 h awaiting cycles in an exposure cabinet (120 and 180 days with artificial acid rain solution. According to the investigation, the coatings were damaged from the cut edge into the sheet, this distance was about 0.8 cm. These defects were more pronounced at after 180 days in proportion to after 120 days.

  14. Room temperature cryogenic test interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, S. M.; Davidson, A.; Moskowitz, P. A.; Sai-Halasz, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    This interface permits the testing of high speed semiconductor devices (room-temperature chips) by a Josephson junction sampling device (cryogenic chip) without intolerable loss of resolution. The interface comprises a quartz pass-through plug which includes a planar transmission line interconnecting a first chip station, where the cryogenic chip is mounted, and a second chip station, where the semiconductor chip to be tested is temporarily mounted. The pass-through plug has a cemented long half-cylindrical portion and short half-cylindrical portion. The long portion carries the planar transmission line, the ends of which form the first and second chip mounting stations. The short portion completes the cylinder with the long portion for part of its length, where a seal can be achieved, but does not extend over the chip mounting stations. Sealing is by epoxy cement. The pass-through plug is sealed in place in a flange mounted to the chamber wall. The first chip station, with the cryogenic chip attached, extends into the liquid helium reservoir. The second chip station is in the room temperature environment required for semiconductor operation. Proper semiconductor operating temperature is achieved by a heater wire and control thermocouple in the vicinity of each other and the second chip mounting station. Thermal isolation is maintained by vacuum and seals. Connections for power and control, for test result signals, for temperature control and heating, and for vacuum complete the test apparatus

  15. An assessment of thermal spray coating technologies for high temperature corrosion protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, G.R.; Heimgartner, P.; Gustafsson, S.; Irons, G.; Miller, R.

    1997-01-01

    The use of thermally sprayed coatings in combating high temperature corrosion continues to grow in the major industries of chemical, waste incineration, power generation and pulp and paper. This has been driven partially by the development of corrosion resistant alloys, improved knowledge and quality in the thermal spray industry and continued innovation in thermal spray equipment. There exists today an extensive range of thermal spray process options, often with the same alloy solution. In demanding corrosion applications it is not sufficient to just specify alloy and coating method. For the production of reliable coatings the whole coating production envelope needs to be considered, including alloy selection, spray parameters, surface preparation, base metal properties, heat input etc. Combustion, arc-wire, plasma, HVOF and spray+fuse techniques are reviewed and compared in terms of their strengths and limitations to provide cost-effective solutions for high temperature corrosion protection. Arc wire spraying, HP/HVOF and spray+fuse are emerging as the most promising techniques to optimise both coating properties and economic/practical aspects. (orig.)

  16. Effect of temperature on the corrosion inhibition of iron in liquid lead using oxygen inhibitor: studied by MD simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkundato, Artoto; Monado, Fiber; Su'ud, Zaki

    2017-05-01

    For corrosion mitigation of steels used in a fast nuclear reactor power plant, oxygen gas is one of promising candidates of inhibitors. Many experiments have been conducted to reveal the mechanism of corrosion and mechanism of how to overcome the corrosion. In the previous work, we had shown computationally that the oxygen atom can be used to reduce the corrosion and we had predicted the oxygen contents. In the current work, not only to explore deeeper the ability of oxygen gas to reduce the corrosion, but also to include the variation of used temperature. We still used iron material to represent a real steels. Using MD (molecular dynamics) simulation based on the Lennard-Jones interaction potential, we sought to understand the concentration of oxygen gas as variation of temperature used in the reactor for the best corrosion mitigation. From this work, we conclude that the temperature does not give effect in related with how concentration of injected oxygen. The temparature merely affects to rise the diffusion coefficient of iron in liquid lead, yet it does not influence how much oxygen needed for corrosion mitigation. In this work, all simulations on different series of temperatures (1023°K, 1073°K, 1123°K, 1173°K) reveals that oxygen content of 0.1151wt% will cause the lowest corrosion level of iron in liquid lead.

  17. Sputter-ion plating of coatings for protection of gas-turbine blades against high-temperature oxidation and corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, J. P.; Restall, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Considerable effort is being devoted to the development of overlay coatings for protecting critical components such as turbine blades against high-temperature oxidation, corrosion, and erosion damage in service. The most commercially advanced methods for depositing coatings are electron-beam evaporation and plasma spraying. Sputter-ion plating (SIP) offers a potentially cheaper and simpler alternative method for depositing overlays. Experimental work on SIP of Co-Cr-Al-Y and Ni-Cr-Al-Ti alloy coatings is described. Results are presented of metallographic assessment of these coatings, and of the results obtained from high-velocity testing using a gas-turbine simulator rig.

  18. Design and testing of corrosion damaged prestressed concrete joists: the Pescara Benchmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Evangelista, A.; De Leonardis, A.; Valente, C.; Zuccarino, L.

    2011-07-01

    An experimental campaign named the Pescara benchmark and devoted to study the dynamic behaviour of corroded p.c. joists has been conducted. The steel corrosion reduces the area of the reinforcement and causes cracking of concrete so that r/c members are subjected to loss of strength and stiffness. It is of interest to evaluate the corrosion level at which the damage can be detected through signal processing procedures and how close such level is to the r/c member safety limits. Joists of current industrial production having different steel to concrete ratios are tested in different laboratory conditions. Dynamic tests involve either free vibrations and forced vibrations due to a moving mass simulating actual traffic loads in railway bridges. The paper discusses the rationale of the tests including the set up of the artificial corrosion, the static characterization of the joist and the dynamic tests in the different stages of corrosion experienced.

  19. Effect of Temperature on the Galvanic Corrosion of Cu-Ni Alloy/High Strength Steel in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The galvanic corrosion behavior of Cu-Ni Alloy(B10/high strength steel (921A has been studied using a zero-resistance ammeter (ZRA in seawater at different temperatures. As well as it was systemically investigated by weight loss measurements, electrochemical methods and scanning electron microscope.Results showed 921A acts as the anode and B10 act as the cathodes. The effect of temperature on the galvanic corrosion is important, the corrosion rate became higher with the temperature increased.

  20. Temperature and humidity effects on the corrosion of aluminium-base reactor fuel cladding materials during dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, H.B.; Sindelar, R.L.; Lam, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of temperature and relative humidity on the high temperature (up to 200 deg. C) corrosion of aluminum cladding alloys was investigated for dry storage of spent nuclear fuels. A dependency on alloy type and temperature was determined for saturated water vapor conditions. Models were developed to allow prediction of cladding behaviour of 1100, 5052, and 6061 aluminum alloys for up to 50+ years at 100% relative humidity. Calculations show that for a closed system, corrosion stops after all moisture and oxygen is used up during corrosion reactions with aluminum alloys. (author)

  1. Effect of temperature on the corrosion resistance and pitting behaviour of Alloy 31 in LiBr solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Igual-Munoz, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Anton, J. Garcia [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: jgarciaa@iqn.upv.es; Garcia-Garcia, D. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    The corrosion resistance and pitting behaviour of Alloy 31, a high-alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031), is studied in two heavy brine LiBr solutions (850 g/l) with and without corrosion inhibitor (lithium chromate) at different temperatures (25 deg. C, 50 deg. C, 75 deg. C and 100 deg. C) using electrochemical techniques. Cyclic potentiodynamic curves indicate that UNS N08031 is less pitting corrosion resistant and it reduces its repassivation properties as temperature increases. Comparison between the results obtained in LiBr solutions with and without inhibitor suggested a decrease in the inhibitor efficiency of lithium chromate at high temperatures.

  2. Study of alloy 600'S stress corrosion cracking mechanisms in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, R.

    1994-06-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600's stress corrosion cracking in PWR environment, laboratory tests were performed. The influence of parameters pertinent to the mechanisms was studies : hydrogen and oxygen overpressures, local chemical composition, microstructure. The results show that neither hydrogen nor dissolution/oxidation, despite their respective roles in the process, are sufficient to account for experimental facts. SEM observation of micro-cleavage facets on specimens' fracture surfaces leads to pay attention to a new mechanism of corrosion/plasticity interactions. (author). 113 refs., 73 figs., 15 tabs., 4 annexes

  3. Study of alloy 600 (NC15Fe) stress corrosion cracking mechanisms in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, Richard

    1993-01-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600's stress corrosion cracking in PWR environment, laboratory tests were performed. The influence of parameters pertinent to the mechanisms was studies: hydrogen and oxygen overpressures, local chemical composition, microstructure. The results show that neither hydrogen nor dissolution/oxidation, despite their respective roles in the process, are sufficient to account for experimental facts. SEM observation of micro-cleavage facets on specimens' fracture surfaces leads to pay attention to a new mechanism of corrosion/plasticity interactions. (author) [fr

  4. KSC lubricant testing program. [lubrication characteristics and corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, B. J.; Bryan, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    A program was conducted to evaluate the performance of various lubricants in use and considered for use at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The overall objectives of the program were to: (1) determine the lubrication characteristics and relative corrosion resistance of lubricants in use and proposed for use at KSC; (2) identify materials which may be equivalent to or better than KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC greases; and (3) identify or develop an improved lubricating oil suitable for use in liquid oxygen (LOX) pumps at KSC. It was concluded that: (1) earth gel thickened greases are very poor corrosion preventive materials in the KSC environment; (2) Halocarbon 25-5S and Braycote 656 were suitable substiutes for KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC respectively; and (3) none of the oils evaluated possessed the necessary inertness, lubricity, and corrosion prevention characteristics for the KSC LOX pumping systems in their present configuration.

  5. Corrosion behaviour of low energy, high temperature nitrogen ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    temperature nitrogen ion-implanted AISI 304 stainless steel”. S FLEGE. Technische Universität Darmstadt, Materials Science, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany. E-mail: flege@ca.tu-darmstadt.de. Ghoranneviss et al [1] have reported on nitrogen implantation into stainless steel and presented a secondary ion ...

  6. A study on structural analysis of highly corrosive melts at high temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtori, N

    2002-01-01

    When sodium is burned at high temperature in the atmosphere, it reacts simultaneously with H sub 2 O in the atmosphere so that it can produce high temperature melt of sodium hydroxide as a solvent. If this melt includes peroxide ion (O sub 2 sup 2 sup -), it will be a considerably active and corrosive for iron so that several sodium iron double oxides will be produced as corrosion products after the reaction with steel structures. The present study was carried out in order to investigate the ability of presence of peroxide ion in sodium hydroxide solvent at high temperature and that of identification of the several corrosion products using laser Raman spectroscopy. The measurement system with ultraviolet laser was developed simultaneously in the present work to improve the ability of the measurement at high temperature. As results from the measurements, the possibility of the presence of peroxide ion was shown up to 823K in sodium peroxide and 823K in the melt of sodium hydroxide mixed with sodium peroxide. A...

  7. Lifetime evaluation of superheater tubes exposed to steam oxidation, high temperature corrosion and creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, N. [Elsamprojekt A/S, Faelleskemikerne, Fredericia (Denmark); Hede Larsen, O.; Blum, R. [I/S Fynsvaerket, Faelleskemikerne, Odense (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    Advanced fossil fired plants operating at high steam temperatures require careful design of the superheaters. The German TRD design code normally used in Denmark is not precise enough for the design of superheaters with long lifetimes. The authors have developed a computer program to be used in the evaluation of superheater tube lifetime based on input related to tube dimensions, material, pressure, steam temperature, mass flux, heat flux and estimated corrosion rates. The program is described in the paper. As far as practically feasible, the model seems to give a true picture of the reality. For superheaters exposed to high heat fluxes or low internal heat transfer coefficients as is the case for superheaters located in fluidized bed environments or radiant environments, the program has been extremely useful for evaluation of surface temperature, oxide formation and lifetime. The total uncertainty of the method is mainly influenced by the uncertainty of the determination of the corrosion rate. More precise models describing the corrosion rate as a function of tube surface temperature, fuel parameters and boiler parameters need to be developed. (au) 21 refs.

  8. Temperature Effect on the Corrosion Behaviour of Alloy 31 in polluted H3PO4 and Analysis of the Corrosion Products by Laser Raman Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Escrivá Cerdán, Clara; Blasco-Tamarit, E.; García-García, D.M.; Garcia-Anton, Jose; Ben-Bachir, A.

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical behaviour of Alloy 31, a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031), in a 40 wt.% H3PO4 solution polluted with 2 wt.% H2SO4, 0.06 wt.% KCl and 0.6 wt.% HF was evaluated by cyclic potentiodinamic curves at different temperatures (20, 40, 60 and 80 degrees C). Temperature was found to favour both cathodic and anodic reactions. The corrosion products forming on the surface of Alloy 31 were indentified in situ by Laser Raman microscope. Corrosion products were mainly i...

  9. Literature Survey on the Stress Corrosion Cracking of Low-Alloy Steels in High Temperature Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, H.P.

    2002-02-01

    The present report is a summary of a literature survey on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour/ mechanisms in low-alloy steels (LAS) in high-temperature water with special emphasis to primary-pressure-boundary components of boiling water reactors (BWR). A brief overview on the current state of knowledge concerning SCC of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel and piping steels under BWR conditions is given. After a short introduction on general aspects of SCC, the main influence parameter and available quantitative literature data concerning SCC of LAS in high-temperature water are discussed on a phenomenological basis followed by a summary of the most popular SCC models for this corrosion system. The BWR operating experience and service cracking incidents are discussed with respect to the existing laboratory data and background knowledge. Finally, the most important open questions and topics for further experimental investigations are outlined. (author)

  10. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steels treated with inhibitive chemicals in high temperature pure water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, T.K. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing-Hua Univ. Taiwan (China); Lee, M.Y.; Tsai, C.H. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua Univ. Taiwan (China)

    2002-07-01

    Electrochemical potentiodynamic polarizations, electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) measurements and slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted to investigate the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics of Type 304 stainless steels treated with inhibitive chemicals in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) environments. A number of thermally sensitized specimens were prepared and were pre-oxidized in a 288 C environment with the presence of 300 ppb dissolved oxygen for 360 hours. Most of the specimens were then treated with various chemicals including powdered zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}), powdered titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}), and zirconyl nitrate [ZrO(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}] via static immersion at 90 C, 150 C, and 200 C. Test environments were specifically designed in a circulation loop to create a dissolved oxygen concentration of 300 ppb. Test results showed that the corrosion current densities of all treated specimens were lower than that of the untreated, pre-oxidized specimen at ambient temperature in a solution mixed with 1 mM K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} and 1 mM K{sub 4}Fe(CN){sub 6}. The ECPs of the treated specimens could be lower or higher than that of the pre-oxidized one at 288 C, depending upon the type of treating chemical and the treating temperature. In addition, IGSCC was observed on all specimens (treated or untreated) in the same environment. However, the untreated specimen exhibited lower elongation, shorter failure time, and more secondary cracks on the side surfaces. It was therefore suggested that inhibitive chemicals such as ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, and ZrO(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} did provide a certain degree of enhancement in improving the mechanical behavior of the treated specimens and in prolonging the IGSCC initiation time. (authors)

  11. Corrosion-erosion of steels in high temperature water and wet steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, P.; Khan, F.

    1984-01-01

    This paper summarizes, and concludes specialists' meeting held at Les Renardieres. The corrosion-erosion phenomena of steel in water and wet steam find their origin in an essentially chemical phenomenon, requiring the presence of a permanently renewed liquid phase flowing in contact with the steel. The most frequently encountered temperature range for the corrosion-erosion phenomenon is 150-250 0 C. The estimation of mass transfer coefficient which is necessary to predict the corrosion-erosion rate is often difficult. The suggested mechanism enables to predict the expected variations of kinetics by a modification of the chemical conditions (pH, H 2 , N 2 H 4 , O 2 ). An incubation period due to the preoxidation of the specimen is possible. An addition of chromium and molybdenum (such as in 2 1/4Cr, 1 Mo steels) imparts a corrosion-erosion resistance to steel as compared to the unalloyed steels. The behaviour of these steels is strongly affected by the presence of Cu, Cr and Mo even in trace quantities. (5 tables and 32 references are given) [fr

  12. Stress Corrosion Cracking of alloy 600 in high temperature water: a study of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boursier, J.M.; Bouvier, O. de; Gras, J.M.; Noel, D.; Vaillant, F.; Rios, R.

    1992-12-01

    Investigations of the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of Alloy 600 tubing in high temperature water were performed in order to get a precise knowledge of the different stages of the cracking and their dependence on various parameters. The compatibility of the results with the main mechanisms to be considered was examined. Results showed three stages in the cracking: a true incubation time, a slow-rate propagation period followed by a rapid-propagation stage. Tests separating stress and strain rate contributions show that the strain rate is the main parameter which controls the crack propagation. The hydrogen overpressure was found to increase the crack growth rate up to 1-4 bar, but a strong decrease is observed from 4 to 20 bar. Analysis of the hydrogen ingress in the metal showed that it is neither correlated to the hydrogen overpressure nor to the severity of cracking; so cracking resulting from an hydrogen-model is unlikely. No detrimental effect of oxygen (4 bar) was noticed both in the mill-annealed and the sensitized conditions. Finally, none of the classical mechanisms, neither hydrogen-assisted cracking nor slip-step dissolution, can correctly describe the observed behaviour. Some fractographic examinations, and an influence of primary water on the creep rate of Alloy 600, lead to consider that other recent mechanisms, involving an interaction between dissolution and plasticity, have to be considered

  13. Testing the permeability and corrosion resistance of micro-mechanically interlocked joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byskov-Nielsen, Jeppe; Holm, Allan Hjarbæk; Højsholt, Rune

    2011-01-01

    Micro-mechanical interlocking (MMI) can be applied to create new and interesting composite materials. We have employed laser structuring to achieve MMI between stainless steel and plastic with extremely high joint strength. However, the water permeability and corrosion resistance of the joint must...... be taken in order not to degrade the corrosion resistance of the sample to an unacceptable level....... is conducted. The permeability seems to be consistent with the Hagen–Poiseuille equation independent of the laser structuring technique and is orders of magnitudes larger than the diffusion rate through the plastic. Two different types of corrosion tests have been undertaken, and we show that care must...

  14. Operation corrosion test of austenitic steel bends for supercritical coal boilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cizner J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion tests of both annealed and not annealed bends of HR3C and S304H steels in operation conditions of black and brown coal combustion boilers in EPRU and EDE. After a long-term exposure, the samples were assessed gravimetrically and metallographically. The comparison of annealed and unannealed states showed higher corrosion rates in the annealed state; corrosion of the sample surface did not essentially differ for compression and tensile parts of the beams. Detailed assessment of both steels is described in detail in this study.

  15. Corrosion Testing of Stainless Steel Fuel Cell Hardware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1998-11-01

    Metal hardware is gaining increasing interest in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) development as a possible alternative to machined graphite hardware because of its potential for low-cost manufacturing combined with its intrinsic high conductivity, minimal permeability and advantageous mechanical properties. A major barrier to more widespread use of metal hardware has been the susceptibility of various metals to corrosion. Few pure metals can withstand the relatively aggressive environment of a fuel cell and thus the choices for hardware are quite limited. Precious metals such as platinum or gold are prohibitively expensive and so tend to be utilized as coatings on inexpensive substrates such as aluminum or stainless steel. The main challenge with coatings has been to achieve pin-hole free surfaces that will remain so after years of use. Titanium has been used to some extent and though it is very corrosion-resistant, it is also relatively expensive and often still requires some manner of surface coating to prevent the formation of a poorly conducting oxide layer. In contrast, metal alloys may hold promise as potentially low-cost, corrosion-resistant materials for bipolar plates. The dozens of commercially available stainless steel and nickel based alloys have been specifically formulated to offer a particular advantage depending upon their application. In the case of austenitic stainless steels, for example, 316 SS contains molybdenum and a higher chromium content than its more common counterpart, 304 SS, that makes it more noble and increases its corrosion resistance. Likewise, 316L SS contains less carbon than 316 SS to make it easier to weld. A number of promising corrosion-resistant, highly noble alloys such as Hastelloy{trademark} or Duplex{trademark} (a stainless steel developed for seawater service) are available commercially, but are expensive and difficult to obtain in various forms (i.e. wire screen, foil, etc.) or in small amounts for R and D

  16. Effect of temperature on corrosion behavior of 3003 aluminum alloy in ethylene glycol–water solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of temperature on the corrosion behavior of 3003 aluminum alloy in ethylene glycol–water solution was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS techniques. The surface characterization was observed and determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS. The results demonstrate that the anodic aluminum dissolution and the cathodic oxygen reduction were accelerated by the increased temperature. However, as temperature was over 60 °C, the solubility and concentration of oxygen decreased, resulting in the inhibition of cathodic reaction. The cathodic reaction rate of 3003 aluminum alloy rose to the maximum at 60 °C. The Warburg impedance in Nyquist diagram diminished and then was replaced by a negative capacitance caused by the absorption of intermediate corrosion product on electrode. On the other hand, after potentiodynamic measurements, 3003 aluminum alloy suffered pitting corrosion. The dissolution of aluminum alloy around secondary phase particles expanded both horizontally and vertically.

  17. NF ISO 10270. Corrosion of metals and alloys. Aqueous corrosion tests of zirconium alloys used in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    This international standard prescribes the determination of the mass gain and the superficial control of zirconium and zirconium alloy products after a corrosion test performed in water at 360 deg. C and in steam at 400 deg. C or more. A pressure of 10.3 MPa (1500 psi) is applied during the tests performed in vapor. This standard applies to welded and molded products, to powder metallurgy products and to filler metals for welding application. The method has been widely used in the development of new alloys and new techniques of thermal treatment and in the evaluation of welding techniques. (J.S.)

  18. Hot corrosion testing of Ni-based alloys and coatings in a modified Dean rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Jason Reid

    Gas turbine blades are designed to withstand a variety of harsh operating conditions. Although material and coating improvements are constantly administered to increase the mean time before turbine refurbishment or replacement, hot corrosion is still considered as the major life-limiting factor in many industrial and marine gas turbines. A modified Dean rig was designed and manufactured at Tennessee Technological University to simulate the accelerated hot corrosion conditions and to conduct screening tests on the new coatings on Ni-based superalloys. Uncoated Ni-based superalloys, Rene 142 and Rene 80, were tested in the modified Dean rig to establish a testing procedure for Type I hot corrosion. The influence of surface treatments on the hot corrosion resistance was then investigated. It was found that grit-blasted specimens showed inferior hot corrosion resistance than that of the polished counterpart. The Dean rig was also used to test model MCrAlY alloys, pack cementation NiAl coatings, and electro-codeposited MCrAlY coatings. Furthermore, the hot corrosion attack on the coated-specimens were also assessed using a statistical analysis approach.

  19. Thermal stability and microstructural changes of some Ni-Cr-Mo alloys as detected by corrosion testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, M.; Agarwal, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    Wrought Ni-Cr-Mo alloys of the C-family show a sensitivity to intercrystalline attack especially after exposure in the temperature range of 650 C to 950 C. Nevertheless, microstructural changes due to precipitation of intermetallic phases can occur up to a temperature level of 1050 C and this can affect the localized corrosion resistance. Thermal stability of wrought Alloy C-276 is a lot lower in comparison to Alloy 59. Sensitized at 870 C for only 1 hour, Alloy C-276 fails in the ASTM-G 28 B test due to rapid intercrystalline penetration and pitting whereas Alloy 59 can be aged up to 3 hours without any increase of the corrosion rate or any pitting attack. The same ranking applies during polythermal cooling cycles. Alloy C-276 requires a cooling rate of 150 C/min. between the solution annealing temperature and 600 C to avoid any sensitization whereas for Alloy 59 a relative slow cooling rate of 25 C/min. is acceptable. The critical pitting temperature of Alloy 59 when tested in the Green Death solution had been determined to be > 125 C. The temperature was not lowered during aging up to 3 hours at 1050 C or if a cooling speed of 25 C/min. was applied. However, cooling rates of 50 C/min. or less reduced the critical pitting temperature of Alloy C-276 from 115 C in the solution annealed and water quenched condition to only 105 C

  20. Inhibitive effect of N,N'-Dimethylaminoethanol on carbon steel corrosion in neutral sodium chloride solution, at different temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Hassoune Mohammed; Bezzar Abdelillah; Sail Latéfa; Ghomari Fouad

    2018-01-01

    The inhibition of carbon steel corrosion in neutral sodium chloride solution by N,N'- Dimethylaminoethanol (DMEA), at different temperatures, was investigated using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The results obtained confirm that DMEA is a good organic corrosion inhibitor for carbon steel in 0.5M of NaCl (concentration encountered in the Mediterranean seawater), over the whole range of temperatures studied. The inhibition...

  1. Results of water corrosion in static cell tests representing multi-metal assemblies in the hydraulic circuits of Tore supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipa, M.; Blanchet, J.; Cellier, F.

    2007-01-01

    Following experiences obtained with steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants, a cooling water quality of AVT (all volatile treatment) has been defined based on demineralised water with adjustment of the pH value to about 9.0/7.0 (25 C/200 C) by addiction of ammoniac, and hydrazine in order to absorb oxygen dissolved in water. At that time, a simplified water corrosion test program has been performed using static (no circulation) test cell samples made of above mentioned TS metal combinations. All test cell samples, prepared and filled with AVT water, were performed at 280 C and 65 bars in an autoclave during 3000 hours. The test cell water temperature has been chosen to be sufficient above the TS component working temperature, in order to accelerate an eventual corrosion process. Generally all above mentioned metal combinations survived the test campaign without stress corrosion cracking, with the exception of the memory metal junction (creep in Cu) and the bellows made of St-St 316L and Inconel 625 while 316 Ti bellows survived. In contrary to the vacuum brazed Cu-LSTP to St-St samples, some of flame brazed Cu to St-St samples failed either in the braze joint or in the copper structure itself. For comparison, a spot weld of an inflated 316L panel sample, filled voluntary with a caustic solution of pH 11.5 (25 C), failed after 90 h of testing (intergranular cracking at the spot weld), while an identical sample containing AVT water of pH 9.0 (25 C) survived without damage. The results of these tests, performed during 1986 and 1997, have never been published and therefore are presented more in detail in this paper since corrosion in hydraulic circuits is also an issue of ITER. Up to day, the TS cooling water plant operates with an above mentioned water treatment and no water leaks have been detected on in-vessel components originating from water corrosion at high temperature and high pressure. (orig.)

  2. Results of water corrosion in static cell tests representing multi-metal assemblies in the hydraulic circuits of Tore supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipa, M. [CEA/DSM/DRFC Centre de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul lez Durance (France); Blanchet, J.; Cellier, F. [Framatome, 71 - Saint Marcel (France). Centre Technique

    2007-07-01

    Following experiences obtained with steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants, a cooling water quality of AVT (all volatile treatment) has been defined based on demineralised water with adjustment of the pH value to about 9.0/7.0 (25 C/200 C) by addiction of ammoniac, and hydrazine in order to absorb oxygen dissolved in water. At that time, a simplified water corrosion test program has been performed using static (no circulation) test cell samples made of above mentioned TS metal combinations. All test cell samples, prepared and filled with AVT water, were performed at 280 C and 65 bars in an autoclave during 3000 hours. The test cell water temperature has been chosen to be sufficient above the TS component working temperature, in order to accelerate an eventual corrosion process. Generally all above mentioned metal combinations survived the test campaign without stress corrosion cracking, with the exception of the memory metal junction (creep in Cu) and the bellows made of St-St 316L and Inconel 625 while 316 Ti bellows survived. In contrary to the vacuum brazed Cu-LSTP to St-St samples, some of flame brazed Cu to St-St samples failed either in the braze joint or in the copper structure itself. For comparison, a spot weld of an inflated 316L panel sample, filled voluntary with a caustic solution of pH 11.5 (25 C), failed after 90 h of testing (intergranular cracking at the spot weld), while an identical sample containing AVT water of pH 9.0 (25 C) survived without damage. The results of these tests, performed during 1986 and 1997, have never been published and therefore are presented more in detail in this paper since corrosion in hydraulic circuits is also an issue of ITER. Up to day, the TS cooling water plant operates with an above mentioned water treatment and no water leaks have been detected on in-vessel components originating from water corrosion at high temperature and high pressure. (orig.)

  3. Application of Corrosion Test for Austenitic SS 304 in PWR with Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance (EQCM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Seok; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jong Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2011-01-01

    and coolant water. Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance is a new electrochemical technique developed in recent years able to be applied to study the filming kinetics of corrosion phenomena using piezoelectric effect. The high sensitivity of EQCM is the basis for its applications in thin film studies. In addition, interfacial process can be measured with the exact time scale depending on the frequency counter used. The purpose of this study is to understand the corrosion inhibition mechanisms of pitting corrosion for stainless steel 304 using inhibitor based on phosphoric acid and to contribute the application of corrosion test by EQCM techniques for corrosion research of steam condenser tube exposed of seawater coolant in the secondary system of NPP

  4. Review of test methods used to determine the corrosion rate of metals in contact with treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to give an overview of test methods previously used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood. This article reviews the test methods used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood by breaking the experiments into three groups: exposure tests, accelerated exposure tests, and electrochemical tests....

  5. Model tests for corrosion influence of electrode surface on electroosmosis in marine sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lingwei; Li, Jinzhu; Shi, Hanru

    2017-11-01

    The corrosion of metal electrodes is inevitable on electroosmosis in soil. Surface corrosion of electrodes is also one of the reasons for increasing energy consumption in electroosmosis treatment. A series of laboratory tests were conducted employing three kinds of materials, aluminium, steel, and brass. To explore the impact of surface corrosion degree on electroosmosis, metal electrodes were pretreated with durations 0 h, 12 h, 24 h, and 36 h. After the pretreatment, corroded electrodes are used as anodes on electroosmosis. Water discharge, current, voltage potential were measured during the tests; water content was also tested at three points after the electroosmosis. The results showed that aluminium was better than steel in electroosmotic drainage while brass provided the worst dewatering performance. Surface corrosion did not influence the aluminium and steel on electroosmosis in marine sludge, but brass did. In the pretreatment of brass electrodes, corrosion rate had started to slow down at later periods, with the deterioration rate of dewatering reduced afterwards. As the results showed, it is not recommended to employ those easily deteriorated electrode materials from surface corrosion in practical engineering, such as brass; electrode material with higher electroosmosis exchange rate is recommended, such as aluminium.

  6. Lithuanian Quarry Aggregates Concrete Effects of Alkaline Corrosion Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurimas Rutkauskas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate alkaline corrosion of cement in concrete is going to respond in sodium and potassium hydroxide (lye with active SiO2 found in some aggregates. During this reaction, the concrete has resulted in significant internal stresses which cause deformation of the concrete, cracking and disintegration. The reaction is slow and concrete signs of decomposition appear only after a few months or years. The study used two different aggregates quarries. Studies show that Lithuania gravel contaminated with reactive particles having amorphous silicon dioxide reacting with cement in sodium and potassium hydroxide and the resulting alkaline concrete corrosion. It was found that, according to AAR 2 large aggregates include Group II – potentially reactive because of their expansion after 14 days, higher than 0.1%.

  7. The effect of temperature in high temperature SHPB test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyoung Joon; Yang, Hyun Mo; Min, Oak Key

    2001-01-01

    The split Hopkinson pressure bar has used for a high strain rate impact test. Also, it has been developed and modified for compression, shear, tension, elevated temperature and subzero tests. In this paper, SHPB compression tests have been performed with pure titanium at elevated temperatures. The range of temperature is from room temperature to 1000 deg. C with interval of 200 .deg. C. To raise temperature of the specimen, a radiant heater which is composed of a pair of ellipsoidal cavities and halogen lamps is developed at high temperature SHPB test. There are some difficulties in a high temperature test such as temperature gradient, lubrication and prevention of oxidation of specimen. The temperature gradient of specimen is affected by the variation of temperature. Barreling occurred at not properly lubricated specimen. Stress-strain relations of pure titanium have been obtained in the range of strain rate at 1900/sec∼2000/sec and temperature at 25 .deg. C∼1000 .deg. C

  8. Moessbauer Characterization of Rust Obtained in an Accelerated Corrosion Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, K. E.; Morales, A. L.; Arroyave, C. E.; Barrero, C. A.; Cook, D. C.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed drying-humectation cyclical processes (CEBELCOR) on eight A36 low carbon steel coupons in NaCl solutions containing 1x10 -2 M and 1x10 -1 M concentrations. The main purpose of these experiments is to contribute to the understanding of the conditions for akaganeite formation. Additionally, and with the idea to perform a complete characterization of the rust, this work also considers the formation of other iron oxide phases. The corrosion products were characterized by Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Gravimetric analysis demonstrates that the coupons presented high corrosion rates. Magnetite/maghemite was common in the rust stuck to the steel surface, whereas akaganeite was present only in traces. In the rust collected from the solutions, i.e., the rust that goes away from the metal surface easily, a magnetite/maghemite was not present and akaganeite showed up in larger quantities. These results support the idea that high concentrations of Cl - ions are required for the akaganeite formation. We concluded that akaganeite is not easily bonded to the rust layer; this may lead to the formation of a less protective rust layer and to higher corrosion rates.

  9. Electrochemical Behavior of Bilayer Thermal-Spray Coatings in Low-Temperature Corrosion Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Sadeghimeresht

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cr3C2-NiCr coatings are greatly used to protect critical components in corrosive environments and to extend their lifetime and/or improve functional performance. However, the pores formed during spraying restrict the coating’s applicability area for many corrosion protection applications. To overcome this technical challenge, bilayer coatings have been developed, in which an additional layer (the so-called “intermediate layer” is deposited on the substrate before spraying the Cr3C2-NiCr coating (the so-called “top layer”. The corrosion behavior of the bilayer coating depends on the composition and microstructure of each layer. In the present work, different single-layer coatings (i.e., Cr3C2-NiCr, Fe- and Ni-based coatings were initially sprayed by a high-velocity air fuel (HVAF process. Microstructure analysis, as well as electrochemical tests, for example, open-circuit potential (OCP and polarization tests, were performed. The potential difference (ΔE had a great influence on galvanic corrosion between the top and intermediate layers, and thus, the coatings were ranked based on the OCP values (from high to low as follows: NiCoCrAlY > NiCr > Cr3C2-NiCr > NiAl > Fe-based coatings (alloyed with Cr > pure Ni. The Ni-based coatings were chosen to be further used as intermediate layers with the Cr3C2-NiCr top layer due to their capabilities to show high OCP. The corrosion resistance (Rp of the bilayer coatings was ranked (from high to low as follows: NiCoCrAlY/Cr3C2-NiCr > NiCr/Cr3C2-NiCr > NiAl/Cr3C2-NiCr > Ni/Cr3C2-NiCr. It was shown that splat boundaries and interconnected pores are detrimental for corrosion resistance, however, a sufficient reservoir of protective scale-forming elements (such as Cr or/and Al in the intermediate layer can significantly improve the corrosion resistance.

  10. The Corrosion Rate Measurement of Inconel 690 on High Temperature andPressure by Using CMS100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyono; Febrianto

    2000-01-01

    The corrosion rate measurement of Inconel 690 on high temperature andpressure had been done. By using an Autoclave, pressure and temperature canbe simulated. The environment of this experiment is 0.1 ppm of chloridesolution, which permit to dissolved in secondary cooling of steam generator.The corrosion rate measurement was done on temperature between 150 o C and230 o C with step 10 o C. Pressure experiment is the pressure, which occurredin Autoclave. Corrosion rate is measured by CMS100. From the Tafel analysis,corrosion rate of Inconel 690 linearity increased from 6.548 x 10 -5 mpy to4.331 x 10 -4 mpy. It concludes that Inconel 690 is resist on corrosionenvironment, so it's most using on the fabrication of steam generator tubeson the advanced power plant. (author)

  11. Stress Corrosion Behavior of Low-temperature Liquid-Nitrided 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel in a Sour Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangfeng; Wang, Jun; Fan, Hongyuan; Yan, Jing; Duan, Lian; Gu, Tan; Xian, Guang; Sun, Lan; Wang, Danqi

    2018-01-01

    Low-temperature nitridation is a widely used surface heat treatment. Low-temperature liquid nitridation was applied to 316 austenitic stainless steel and an S-phase (expanded austenite) layer was achieved on the alloy surface. The effect of the S-phase layer on corrosion resistance and stress corrosion cracking was investigated in a sour environment. When a bending stress of 164 MPa (80 pct yield stress, YS) was applied, no macroscopic corrosion cracking and pits were observed on the nitrided samples and the S-phase layer stayed intact. Although no macroscopic corrosion cracking was observed on the non-nitrided samples under 205 MPa (100 pct YS), some pits were formed on the alloy surface. This could be attributed to the high stresses and hardness, and the excellent corrosion resistance of the S-phase layer introduced by low-temperature nitridation. Supersaturated nitrogen atoms in the S-phase layer can effectively prevent the decrease in pH of the corrosive medium and accelerate the alloy repassivation kinetics. However, when the bending stress was increased to 205 and 246 MPa (100 pct YS, 120 pct YS), macroscopic cracks were observed in the presence of both tensile stress and a corrosive medium.

  12. A Corrosion Investigation of Solder Candidates for High-Temperature Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chidambaram, Vivek; Hald, John; Ambat, Rajan

    2009-01-01

    , corrosion investigation was carried out on potential ternary lead-free candidate alloys based on these binary alloys for high temperature applications. These promising ternary candidate alloys were determined by the CALPHAD approach based on the solidification criterion and the nature of the phases...... predicted in the bulk solder. This work reveals that the Au-Sn based candidate alloys close to the eutectic composition (20 wt. % Sn) are more corrosion resistant than the Au-Ge based ones.......The step soldering approach is being employed in the Multi-Chip module (MCM) technology. High lead containing alloys is one of the solders currently being used in this approach. Au-Sn and Au-Ge based candidate alloys have been proposed as alternative solders for this application. In this work...

  13. Composition and corrosion properties of high-temperature oxide films on steel type 18-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakulenko, B.F.; Morozov, O.N.; Chernysheva, M.V.

    1985-01-01

    The composition and propeties of oxide films, formed in the process of tube production of steel type 18-10, as well as the behaviour of the steels coated with oxide films under operating conditions of NPP heat-exchange equipment at the 20-300 deg C temperatures are determined. It is found, that the films have a good adhesion to the steel surface and repeat the metal structure without interfering with, the surface defect determination. Introduction of the NaNO 2 corrosion inhibitor decreases the film destruction rate to the level of the base metal corrosion. It is found acceptable to use tubes of steel 18-10 coated with dense oxide films in the heat-exchange and water supply systems of NPP

  14. A new architecture for a factual materials database on coatings and high temperature corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streiff, R.; Vaugelade, S. [Univ. de Provence, Marseille (France); Komornicki, S. [Akademia Gorniczo-Hutnicza, Cracow (Poland); Boone, D.H. [Boone and Associates, Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    C and HTC-DATA a data bank on coatings and high temperature corrosion, has been created to help in choosing coatings for specific applications, knowing their fabrication process characteristics and their protectivity characteristics. This relational data bank will include five databases, viz. (1) a bibliographic reference data base, (2) a directory of addresses of companies and researchers involved in the field, (3) a numerical database on alloy composition, (4) a factual coatings database, and (5) a factual corrosion database. Building of these factual databases first followed the classical MERISE analytical treatment for data organisation. However, the variety of coating characteristics has resulted in a very complex database structure with a very large number of tables and fields. Therefore, a new approach for the architecture of the coating database based upon a thesaurus to describe the data has been perfected which is presented in this paper. (orig.) 13 refs.

  15. The Fatigue in Aircraft Corrosion Testing (FACT) Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    environments were lruoratory air and 5 . ,.ueuus NaCi salt spray acidified with H2S04 to pH 4, hot’ oL a nominal temperature o- 295 K. The salt spray tests...conditions under which failures initiate in areas where primer is more or less continuously present and there is plenty of time for chromate to leach out...sufficient duration to allow time for chromate to leach out of chromate-containing primers into the corrodent. 9.8 References i. R.J.. Wanhill and J.J

  16. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION TESTING OF TANKS 241-AN-102 & 241-AP-107 & 241-AP-108 IN SUPPORT OF ULTRASONIC TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WYRWAS RB; DUNCAN JB

    2008-11-20

    This report presents the results of the corrosion rates that were measured using electrochemical methods for tanks 241-AN-102 (AN-102), 241-AP-107 (AP 107), and 241-AP-108 (AP-108) performed under test plant RPP-PLAN-38215. The steel used as materials of construction for AN and AP tank farms was A537 Class 1. Test coupons of A537 Class 1 carbon steel were used for corrosion testing in the AN-107, AP-107, and AP-108 tank waste. Supernate will be tested from AN-102, AP-107, and Ap-108. Saltcake testing was performed on AP-108 only.

  17. Effects of aging temperature and time on the corrosion protection provided by trivalent chromium process coatings on AA2024-T3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liangliang; Swain, Greg M

    2013-08-28

    The effects of aging temperature and time on the physical structure of and corrosion protection provided by trivalent chromium process (TCP) coatings on AA2024-T3 are reported. The TCP coating forms a partially blocking barrier layer on the alloy surface that consists of hydrated channels and or defects. It is through these channels and defects that ions and dissolved O2 can be transported to small areas of the underlying alloy. Reactions initiate at these sites, which can ultimately lead to undercutting of the coating and localized corrosion. We tested the hypothesis that collapsing the channels and or reducing the number of defects in the coating might be possible through post-deposition heat treatment, and that this would enhance the corrosion protection provided by the coating. This was tested by aging the TCP-coated AA2024 alloys in air overnight at room temperature (RT), 55, 100, or 150 °C. The TCP coating became dehydrated and thinner at the high temperatures (55 and 100 °C). This improved the corrosion protection as evidenced by a 2× increase in the charge transfer resistance. Aging at 150 °C caused excessive coating dehydration and shrinkage. This led to severe cracking and detachment of the coating from the surface. The TCP-coated AA2024 samples were also aged in air at RT from 1 to 7 days. There was no thinning of the coating, but the corrosion protection was enhanced with a longer aging period as evidenced by a 4× increase in the charge transfer resistance. The coating became more hydrophobic after aging at elevated temperature (up to 100 °C) and with aging time at RT as evidenced by an increased water contact angle from 7 to 100 °C.

  18. Mass transfer of corrosion products in high temperature, high pressure water circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodd, J.T.; Nicholson, F.D.

    1976-01-01

    The CWL-3 loop is used to study the mass transfer of corrosion products in water at 270 0 C for pressures up to 6.9 MPa. Two parallel Zircaloy-2 test sections are heated directly by a low voltage a.c. electrical current to give a heat flux up to 500 W cm -2 and a heat rating up to 1500 W cm -1 . Coolant flow rates can be varied up to 0.4 kg cm -2 s -1 with or without boiling. A tracer technique has been developed to monitor continuously the deposition of corrosion products in the test sections during operation of the loop. Magnetite deposits 2.6 nm thick can be readily detected. (author)

  19. Cooperative tests on crack initiation and crack propagation in stress corrosion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Takao; Iwadate, Tadao; Ebara, Ryuichiro; Umeyama, Yoshio; Yokobori, Takeo.

    1992-01-01

    In order to ensure the safety of machinery and structures in corrosive environment, the development of corrosion resistant materials and the research on the techniques of evaluating materials in corrosive environment have been carried out. At present, the life due to crack development is discussed by fracture mechanics, and the evaluation of life in corrosive environment can be done with a certain degree of accuracy. In order to collect the unified data which become the base of life evaluation, the standardization of the testing method is desirable. This cooperative tests were carried out for the purpose of collecting the information on the life evaluation techniques in stress corrosion environment. As the object, the large LP turbine rotors for nuclear power generation were taken up, and the tests on the crack initiation and crack propagation were carried out. As the test environment, the accelerated test in 38% NaOH + 0.01% CuO aqueous solution on ASTM A470 3% Ni-Cr-Mo-V steel was carried out. The results are reported. (K.I.)

  20. Stress Corrosion Cracking Sensitivity of High Purity Fe-Cr Alloys in High Temperature Water

    OpenAIRE

    Takaku, H.; Kato, S.; Tani, J.; Abiko, K.

    1995-01-01

    Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) sensitivities of high purity Fe-Cr alloys were investigated in simulated Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and primary Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) cooling waters, by constant extension rate tests (CERT) at a strain rate of 4x10-7s-1. No high purity Fe-Cr alloy showed any SCC sensitivity in either simulated BWR and PWR primary water environment.

  1. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing: Part II. Precipitates by in situ aluminum alloy corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahn, Chi Bum; Kasza, Ken E.; Shack, William J.; Natesan, Ken; Klein, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: → Sump strainer head loss testing to evaluate chemical effects. → Aluminum hydroxide precipitates by in situ Al alloy corrosion caused head loss. → Intermetallic particles released from Al alloy can also cause significant head loss. → When evaluating Al effect on head loss, intermetallics should be considered. - Abstract: Vertical loop head loss tests were performed with 6061 and 1100 aluminum (Al) alloy plates immersed in borated solution at pH = 9.3 at room temperature and 60 o C. The results suggest that the potential for corrosion of an Al alloy to result in increased head loss across a glass fiber bed may depend on its microstructure, i.e., the size distribution and number density of intermetallic particles that are present in Al matrix and FeSiAl ternary compounds, as well as its Al release rate. Per unit mass of Al removed from solution, the WCAP-16530 aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH) 3 ) surrogate was more effective in increasing head loss than the Al(OH) 3 precipitates formed in situ by corrosion of Al alloy. However, in choosing a representative amount of surrogate for plant specific testing, consideration should be given to the potential for additional head losses due to intermetallic particles and the apparent reduction in the effective solubility of Al(OH) 3 when intermetallic particles are present.

  2. Moessbauer Studies of Corrosion Products Developed in Prohesion Test over Galvanized Steel Sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapponi, M.; Perez, T.; Ramos, C.; Saragovi, C.

    2003-01-01

    Precoated galvanized steel sheets were submitted to Prohesion test (PT) and to outdoor marine exposure test (OT). The corrosion products were different in both cases. Goethite, lepidocrocite, pyrite and magnetite were found in the Prohesion test samples; the presence of akaganeite cannot be discarded. Surprisingly greigite was detected in these samples, suggesting in addition a located microbiological corrosion process. On the other hand, goethite, lepidocrocite, magnetite, akaganeite and silicates were found in outdoor exposure samples. This study allows the conclusion that in the Prohesion G-85 test the corrosion mechanism is different from that in the marine atmosphere for the analyzed samples and could not be used to predict the performance of this type of outdoor exposed materials.

  3. Corrosion '98: 53. annual conference and exposition, proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    This conference was divided into the following sections: Corrosion in Gas Treating; Problems and Solutions in Commercial Building Water Systems; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibitors; Atmospheric Corrosion; AIRPOL Update/98; Rubber Lining--Answers to Many Problems; Interference Problems; Environmental Assisted Cracking: Fundamental Research and Industrial Applications; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; New Developments in Scale and Deposit Control; Corrosion and Corrosion Protection in the Transportation Industries; What's All the Noise About--Electrochemical That Is; Refining Industry Corrosion; Corrosion Problems in Military Hardware: Case Histories, Fixes and Lessons Learned; Cathodic Protection Test Methods and Instrumentation for Underground and On-grade Pipelines and Tanks; Recent Developments in Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion in Supercritical Fluids; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Understanding and Controlling CO 2 Corrosion; Managing Corrosion with Plastics; Material Developments for Use in Exploration and Production Environments; Corrosion in Cold Regions; The Effect of Downsizing and Outsourcing on Cooling System Monitoring and Control Practices; New Developments in Mechanical and Chemical Industrial Cleaning; Mineral Scale Deposit Control in Oilfield Related Operations; Biocides in Cooling Water; Corrosion and Corrosion Control of Reinforced Concrete Structures; Materials Performance for Fossil Energy Conversion Systems; Marine corrosion; Thermal Spray--Coating and Corrosion Control; Flow Effects on Corrosion in Oil and Gas Production; Corrosion Measurement Technologies; Internal Pipeline Monitoring--Corrosion Monitoring, Intelligent Pigging and Leak Detection; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems; On-line Hydrogen Permeation Monitoring Equipment and Techniques, State of the Art; Water Reuse and Recovery; Performance of Materials in High Temperature Environments; Advances in Motor

  4. Performance Analysis of Retrofitted Tribo-Corrosion Test Rig for Monitoring In Situ Oil Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpith Siddaiah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Oils and lubricants, once extracted after use from a mechanical system, can hardly be reused, and should be refurbished or replaced in most applications. New methods of in situ oil and lubricant efficiency monitoring systems have been introduced for a wide variety of mechanical systems, such as automobiles, aerospace aircrafts, ships, offshore wind turbines, and deep sea oil drilling rigs. These methods utilize electronic sensors to monitor the “byproduct effects” in a mechanical system that are not indicative of the actual remaining lifecycle and reliability of the oils. A reliable oil monitoring system should be able to monitor the wear rate and the corrosion rate of the tribo-pairs due to the inclusion of contaminants. The current study addresses this technological gap, and presents a novel design of a tribo-corrosion test rig for oils used in a dynamic system. A pin-on-disk tribometer test rig retrofitted with a three electrode-potentiostat corrosion monitoring system was used to analyze the corrosion and wear rate of a steel tribo-pair in industrial grade transmission oil. The effectiveness of the retrofitted test rig was analyzed by introducing various concentrations of contaminants in an oil medium that usually leads to a corrosive working environment. The results indicate that the retrofitted test rig can effectively monitor the in situ tribological performance of the oil in a controlled dynamic corrosive environment. It is a useful method to understand the wear–corrosion synergies for further experimental work, and to develop accurate predictive lifecycle assessment and prognostic models. The application of this system is expected to have economic benefits and help reduce the ecological oil waste footprint.

  5. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking considerations at temperatures below 288 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, E.P.; Jones, R.H.; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1995-03-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) occurs above a critical neutron fluence in light-water reactor (LWR) water environments at 288 C, but very little information exists to indicate susceptibility as temperatures are reduced. Potential low-temperature behavior is assessed based on the temperature dependencies of intergranular (IG) SCC in the absence of irradiation, radiation-induced segregation (RIS) at grain boundaries and micromechanical deformation mechanisms. IGSCC of sensitized SS in the absence of irradiation exhibits high growth rates at temperatures down to 200 C under conditions of anodic dissolution control, while analysis of hydrogen-induced cracking suggests a peak crack growth rate near 100 C. Hence from environmental considerations, IASCC susceptibility appears to remain likely as water temperatures are decreased. Irradiation experiments and model predictions indicate that RIS also persists to low temperatures. Chromium depletion may be significant at temperatures below 100C for irradiation doses greater than 10 displacements per atom (dpa). Macromechanical effects of irradiation on strength and ductility are not strongly dependent on temperature below 288 C. However, temperature does significantly affect radiation effects on SS microstructure and micromechanical deformation mechanisms. The critical conditions for material susceptibility to IASCC at low temperatures may be controlled by radiation-induced grain boundary microchemistry, strain localization due to irradiation microstructure and irradiation creep processes. 39 refs

  6. Magnesium alloys: predicting in vivo corrosion with in vitro immersion testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jemimah; Shadanbaz, Shaylin; Kirkland, Nicholas T; Stace, Edward; Woodfield, Tim; Staiger, Mark P; Dias, George J

    2012-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have been proposed as degradable replacements to commonly used orthopedic biomaterials such as titanium alloys and stainless steel. However, the corrosion of Mg in a physiological environment remains a difficult characteristic to accurately assess with in vitro methods. The aim of this study was to identify a simple in vitro immersion test that could provide corrosion rates similar to those observed in vivo. Pure Mg and five alloys (AZ31, Mg-0.8Ca, Mg-1Zn, Mg-1Mn, Mg-1.34Ca-3Zn) were immersed in either Earle's balanced salt solution (EBSS), minimum essential medium (MEM), or MEM-containing 40 g/L bovine serum albumin (MEMp) for 7, 14, or 21 days before removal and assessment of corrosion by weight loss. This in vitro data was compared to in vivo corrosion rates of the same materials implanted in a subcutaneous environment in Lewis rats for equivalent time points. The results suggested that, for the alloys investigated, the EBSS buffered with sodium bicarbonate provides a rate of degradation comparable to those observed in vivo. In contrast, the addition of components such as (4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid) (HEPES), vitamins, amino acids, and albumin significantly increased corrosion rates. Based on these findings, it is proposed that with this in vitro protocol, immersion of Mg alloys in EBSS can be used as a predictor of in vivo corrosion. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. In-reactor corrosion behavior of stainless steel in high temperature sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    Sodium-cladding chemical interaction has been studied on fuel pins clad with 20 percent cold worked type 316 stainless steel and irradiated in the EBR-II at temperatures up to 705 0 C and for exposures to 5300 hours. The measured corrosion rate of the cladding surface immediately above the top of the fuel column was 12.5 μm per year at 690 0 C. The loss of Ni at 700 0 C resulted in the formation of a ferrite layer approximately 5 μm thick. A zone depleted in Ni and Cr extends into the austenite from the ferrite-austenite interface an additional distance of approximately 15 μm. No large changes in volumetric average carbon or nitrogen were observed. The results suggest a slight increase in carbon during the first 2300 hours followed by a slow decrease for longer exposure times. A 25 to 30 percent decrease in bulk nitrogen was observed in cladding with an initial nitrogen content of 225 ppM. Cladding with a lower initial nitrogen content of 63 ppM showed essentially no change. Fuel pin cladding corrosion behavior agrees well with that predicted using out-of-reactor Na loop data, thus providing confidence that out-of-reactor corrosion data can be reliably used in predicting in-reactor fuel cladding performance

  8. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of weldments of ferritic stainless steels in high temperature pure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kazuo; Tomari, Haruo; Shimogori, Kazutoshi

    1985-01-01

    Considering the application of a ferritic stainless steel as heat exchanger tubing for a moisture separator reheater of light water reactors, stress corrosion cracking behavior at the weldment of commercial ferritic stainless steels in high temperature pure water was studied. Double U-bend method was used for the study and the relationship with microstructure was discussed. Welded joint of Type 439SS containing 0.021% C, 0.025% N and 0.27% Ti with In-82 type filler metal was susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking if a tight crevice was provided by inserting a teflon sheet between the inner and outer specimens of double U-bend. This was attributable to the formation of chromium depleted zone due to the precipitation of chromium carbides/nitrides along ferrite grain boundaries. On the other hand welded joint of Type 444SS with 0.007% C, 0.010% N and 0.26% Nb was immune to stress corrosion cracking, and this might be attributed to the higher ratio of Nb/(C+N) content. (author)

  9. Corrosion of carbon steel in oxidizing caustic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.

    1984-01-01

    A series of tests have been completed on a range of proposed waste compositions at temperatures up to 100 0 C. These tests have sought data on uniform corrosion, pitting, and stress corrosion cracking. No indication of the latter two types of corrosion was observed within the test matrix. Corrosion rates after four months were generally below 25μm/y. By the end of twelve months all results, except for very concentrated mixtures, were below 13 μm/y. Prediction equations were generated from a model fitted to the data. The equations provide a rapid means of estimating the corrosion rate for waste compositions and temperatures within the test limits

  10. Vapor Space Corrosion Testing Simulating The Environment Of Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gray, J. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Garcia-Diaz, B. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Murphy, T. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hicks, K. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-30

    As part of an integrated program to better understand corrosion in the high level waste tanks, Hanford has been investigating corrosion at the liquid/air interface (LAI) and at higher areas in the tank vapor space. This current research evaluated localized corrosion in the vapor space over Hanford double shell tank simulants to assess the impact of ammonia and new minimum nitrite concentration limits, which are part of the broader corrosion chemistry limits. The findings from this study showed that the presence of ammonia gas (550 ppm) in the vapor space is sufficient to reduce corrosion over the short-term (i.e. four months) for a Hanford waste chemistry (SY102 High Nitrate). These findings are in agreement with previous studies at both Hanford and SRS which showed ammonia gas in the vapor space to be inhibitive. The presence of ammonia in electrochemical test solution, however, was insufficient to inhibit against pitting corrosion. The effect of the ammonia appears to be a function of the waste chemistry and may have more significant effects in waste with low nitrite concentrations. Since high levels of ammonia were found beneficial in previous studies, additional testing is recommended to assess the necessary minimum concentration for protection of carbon steel. The new minimum R value of 0.15 was found to be insufficient to prevent pitting corrosion in the vapor space. The pitting that occurred, however, did not progress over the four-month test. Pits appeared to stop growing, which would indicate that pitting might not progress through wall.

  11. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...... temperature (CPT) test as corrosion test. The following welding parameters are varied: Welding speed, lsser power, focus point position and laser operation mode (CW or pulsed)....

  12. Field Testing of Rapid Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Control of Steel in Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Henry E.; Alexander, Joshua B.; Kupwade-Patil,Kunal; Calle, Luz Marina

    2009-01-01

    This work field tested the use of electrokinetics for delivery of concrete sealing nanoparticles concurrent with the extraction of chlorides. Several cylinders of concrete were batched and placed in immersion at the Kennedy Space Center Beach Corrosion Test Site. The specimens were batched with steel reinforcement and a 4.5 wt.% (weight percent) content of sodium chloride. Upon arrival at Kennedy Space Center, the specimens were placed in the saltwater immersion pool at the Beach Corrosion Test Site. Following 30 days of saltwater exposure, the specimens were subjected to rapid chloride extraction concurrent with electrokinetic nanoparticle treatment. The treatments were operated at up to eight times the typical current density in order to complete the treatment in 7 days. The findings indicated that the short-term corrosion resistance of the concrete specimens was significantly enhanced as was the strength of the concrete.

  13. Shadow corrosion testing in the INCA facility in the Studsvik R2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystrand, A.C.; Lassing, A.

    1999-01-01

    Shadow corrosion is a phenomenon which occurs when zirconium alloys are in contact with or in proximity to other metallic objects in a boiling water reactor environment (BWR, RBMK, SGHWR etc.). An enhanced corrosion occurs on the zirconium alloy with the appearance of a 'shadow' of the metallic object. The magnitude of the shadow corrosion can be significant, and is potentially limiting for the lifetime of certain zirconium alloy components in BWRs and other reactors with a similar water chemistry. In order to evaluate the suitability of the In-Core Autoclave (INCA) in the Studsvik R2 materials testing reactor as an experimental facility for studying shadow corrosion, a demonstration test has been performed. A number of test specimens consisting of Zircaloy-2 tubing in contact with Inconel were exposed in an oxidising water chemistry. Some of the specimens were placed within the reactor core and some above the core. The conclusion of this experiment after post irradiation examination is that it is possible to use the INCA facility in the Studsvik R2 reactor to develop a significant level of shadow corrosion after only 800 hours of irradiation. (author)

  14. High temperature corrosion resistance of candidate nickel-based weld overlay alloys in a low NOx environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deacon, R.M.; Du Pont, J.N.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Changes in environmental regulations have led many fossil fuel-fired boiler operators to alter their combustion practices (low NOx, burning), thereby lowering plant emissions. This change has led to unacceptable wastage of carbon and low alloy steel waterwall tubes and expensive shutdowns due to severe corrosion. One favored solution is to weld overlay a more corrosion resistant alloy on top of existing tubes. Two nickel-based alloys developed for such applications were tested alongside the commercially available alloy 622 in a simulated low NOx, environment. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) examination of the weld overlays and corrosion scales demonstrated that microsegregation of molybdenum occurred in one of the candidate alloys and alloy 622. This microsegregation had a detrimental effect on the corrosion resistance of these alloys. The candidate alloy with higher chromium concentration, low nominal molybdenum concentration, and corresponding minimum molybdenum segregation, exhibited the best corrosion resistance of the examined alloys.

  15. High temperature corrosion resistance of candidate nickel-based weld overlay alloys in a low NO {sub x} environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deacon, R.M. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States)], E-mail: rmd3@lehigh.edu; DuPont, J.N. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Marder, A.R. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Changes in environmental regulations have led many fossil fuel-fired boiler operators to alter their combustion practices (low NO {sub x} burning), thereby lowering plant emissions. This change has led to unacceptable wastage of carbon and low alloy steel waterwall tubes and expensive shutdowns due to severe corrosion. One favored solution is to weld overlay a more corrosion resistant alloy on top of existing tubes. Two nickel-based alloys developed for such applications were tested alongside the commercially available alloy 622 in a simulated low NO {sub x} environment. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) examination of the weld overlays and corrosion scales demonstrated that microsegregation of molybdenum occurred in one of the candidate alloys and alloy 622. This microsegregation had a detrimental effect on the corrosion resistance of these alloys. The candidate alloy with higher chromium concentration, low nominal molybdenum concentration, and corresponding minimum molybdenum segregation, exhibited the best corrosion resistance of the examined alloys.

  16. The development of an adsorbent for corrosion products in high-temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Ik; Sung, Ki Woung; Kim, Kwang Rag; Kim, Yu Hwan; Koo, Jae Hyoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-01

    In order to use as adsorbent for removal of the soluble corrosion products, mainly Co{sup 60} under PWR reactor coolant conditions (300 deg C, 160 kg/cm{sup 2}), stable ZrO{sub 2} adsorbent was prepared using sol-gel process from zirconyl nitrate, AlO adsorbent was prepared by hydrolysis of aluminum isopropoxide, and titanium tetraisopropoxide, respectively. The prepared adsorbents were calcined at various temperature and analyzed by physical properties and the Co{sup 2+} adsorption capacity. And it was shown that the Co{sup 2+} adsorption capacity of the TiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} adsorbents were found to have larger than that of ZrO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} adsorbents in high-temperature water. ZrO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} adsorbents were found to be suitable high-temperature adsorbents for the removal of dissolved corrosion products, mainly Co in PWR reactor coolant conditions. 15 tabs., 51 figs., 55 refs. (Author).

  17. The development of an adsorbent for corrosion products in high-temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Ik; Sung, Ki Woung; Kim, Kwang Rag; Kim, Yu Hwan; Koo, Jae Hyoo

    1996-08-01

    In order to use as adsorbent for removal of the soluble corrosion products, mainly Co 60 under PWR reactor coolant conditions (300 deg C, 160 kg/cm 2 ), stable ZrO 2 adsorbent was prepared using sol-gel process from zirconyl nitrate, AlO adsorbent was prepared by hydrolysis of aluminum isopropoxide, and titanium tetraisopropoxide, respectively. The prepared adsorbents were calcined at various temperature and analyzed by physical properties and the Co 2+ adsorption capacity. And it was shown that the Co 2+ adsorption capacity of the TiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 adsorbents were found to have larger than that of ZrO 2 and Al 2 O 3 adsorbents in high-temperature water. ZrO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and TiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 adsorbents were found to be suitable high-temperature adsorbents for the removal of dissolved corrosion products, mainly Co in PWR reactor coolant conditions. 15 tabs., 51 figs., 55 refs. (Author)

  18. The effect lead impurities on the corrosion resistance of alloy 600 and alloy 690 in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, T.; Nakagomi, N.; Kikuchi, T.; Aoki, K.; Nakayasu, F.; Yamakawa, K.

    1998-01-01

    Degradation of nickel-based alloy steam generator (SG) tubing caused by lead-induced corrosion has been reported recently in some PWR plants. Several laboratory studies also have shown that lead causes intergranular or transgranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC or TGSCC) of the tubing materials. Information from previous studies suggests two possible explanations for the mechanism of lead-induced corrosion. One is selective dissolution of tube metal elements, resulting in formation of a lead-containing nickel-depleted oxide film as observed in mildly acidic environments. The other explanation is an increase in potential, as has been observed in lead-contaminated caustic environments, although not in all volatile treatment (AVT) water such as the ammonium-hydrazine water chemistry. These observation suggest that an electrochemical reaction between metal elements and dissolved lead might be the cause of lead-induced corrosion. The present work was undertaken to clarify the lead-induced corrosion mechanism of nickel-based alloys from an electrochemical viewpoint, focusing on mildly acidic and basic environments. These are the probable pH conditions in the crevice region between the tube and tube support plate of the SG where corrosion damage could occur. Measurements of corrosion potential and electrochemical polarization of nickel-based alloys were performed to investigate the effect of lead on electrochemical behavior of the alloys. Then, constant extension rate tests (CERT) were carried out to determine the corrosion susceptibility of the alloys in a lead-contaminated environment. (J.P.N.)

  19. Inspection of piping wall loss with flow accelerated corrosion accelerated simulation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Kyung Ha; Kim, Ji Hak; Hwang, Il Soon; Lee, Na Young; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) has become a hot issue for aging of passive components. Ultrasonic Technique (UT) has been adopted to inspect the secondary piping of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). UT, however, uses point detection method, which results in numerous detecting points and thus takes time. We developed an Equipotential Switching Direct Current Potential Drop (ES-DCPD) method to monitor the thickness of piping that covers wide range of piping at once time. Since the ES-DCPD method covers area, not a point, it needs less monitoring time. This can be a good approach to broad carbon steel piping system such as secondary piping of NPPs. In this paper, FAC accelerated simulation test results is described. We realized accelerated FAC phenomenon by 2 times test: 23.7% thinning in 216.7 hours and 51% thinning in 795 hours. These were monitored by ES-DCPD and traditional UT. Some parameters of water chemistry are monitored and controlled to accelerate FAC process. As sensitive factors on FAC, temperature and pH was changed during the test. The wall loss monitored results reflected these changes of water chemistry successfully. Developed electrodes are also applied to simulation loop to monitor water chemistry. (author)

  20. Corrosion behaviour of Alloy 800 in high temperature aqueous solutions: Electrochemical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmedo, A.M.; Villegas, M.; Alvarez, M.G.

    1996-01-01

    The anodic behaviour and passivity breakdown of Alloy 800 in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, sodium sulphate and sodium bicarbonate were studied by electrochemical techniques in the temperature range from 60 C to 280 C. The pitting resistance and pitting morphology of the alloy in chloride plus sulphate and chloride plus bicarbonate mixtures, at 60 C and 280 C, were also examined. Increasing bicarbonate or sulphate additions to chloride solutions shift the characteristic pitting potential of Alloy 800 to higher values, both at low and high temperatures. Changes in pitting morphology were observed in sulphate containing solutions while the morphology of the attack found in bicarbonate containing solutions was similar to that in pure chloride solutions. Finally, no localized or substantial generalized corrosion was detected in pure sulphate or bicarbonate solutions at any temperature. (orig.)

  1. Corrosion tests of 316L and Hastelloy C-22 in simulated tank waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, M.J.; Pitman, S.G.

    2000-01-01

    Both the 316L stainless steel and Hastelloy C-22 gave satisfactory corrosion performance in the simulated test environments. They were subjected to 100 day weight loss corrosion tests and electrochemical potentiodynamic evaluation. This activity supports confirmation of the design basis for the materials of construction of process vessels and equipment used to handle the feed to the LAW-melter evaporator. BNFL process and mechanical engineering will use the information derived from this task to select material of construction for process vessels and equipment

  2. Surface preparation for residual stress measurement of an accelerated corrosion tested welded marine steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Bilal; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Residual stress measurement is often required for the assessment of structural integrity of components. Measurement of residual stress in corrosion tested specimens is challenging owing to the difficulty of accessing the surface because of the rust layer. This study explored the potential methods for the surface preparation of an ultrasonically-peened and accelerated corrosion tested DH36 marine steel fillet welded specimen to ease the way for subsequent residual stress measurement using neutron diffraction and the contour method. We find that hydroblasting introduces compressive residual stress at the surface that will alter the surface stress to be measured

  3. Skin corrosion and irritation test of sunscreen nanoparticles using reconstructed 3D human skin model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghye Choi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Effects of nanoparticles including zinc oxide nanoparticles, titanium oxide nanoparticles, and their mixtures on skin corrosion and irritation were investigated by using in vitro 3D human skin models (KeraSkinTM and the results were compared to those of an in vivo animal test. Methods Skin models were incubated with nanoparticles for a definite time period and cell viability was measured by the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2.5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method. Skin corrosion and irritation were identified by the decreased viability based on the pre-determined threshold. Results Cell viability after exposure to nanomaterial was not decreased to the pre-determined threshold level, which was 15% after 60 minutes exposure in corrosion test and 50% after 45 minutes exposure in the irritation test. IL-1α release and histopathological findings support the results of cell viability test. In vivo test using rabbits also showed non-corrosive and non-irritant results. Conclusions The findings provide the evidence that zinc oxide nanoparticles, titanium oxide nanoparticles and their mixture are ‘non corrosive’ and ‘non-irritant’ to the human skin by a globally harmonized classification system. In vivo test using animals can be replaced by an alternative in vitro test.

  4. Temperature buffer test. Dismantling operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakesson, Mattias

    2010-12-01

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modelling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aespoe HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by bentonite in the usual way, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a ring of sand. The test was dismantled and sampled during a period from the end of October 2009 to the end of April 2010, and this report describes this operation. Different types of samples have been obtained during this operation. A large number of diameter 50 mm bentonite cores have been taken for analysis of water content and density. Large pieces, so-called big sectors, have been taken for hydro-mechanical and chemical characterizations. Finally, there has been an interest to obtain different types of interface samples in which bentonite were in contact with sand, iron or concrete. One goal has been to investigate the retrievability of the upper heater, given the possibility to remove the surrounding sand shield, and a retrieval test has therefore been performed. The sand in the shield was first removed with an industrial vacuum cleaner after loosening the material through mechanical means (with hammer drill and core machine). A front loader was subsequently used for applying a sufficient lifting force to release the heater from the bentonite underneath. The experiment has been documented in different aspects: measurements of the coordinate (height or radius) of different interfaces (between bentonite blocks and between bentonite and sand); verification of sensor positions and retrieval of sensors for subsequent

  5. Temperature buffer test. Dismantling operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2010-12-15

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modelling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aespoe HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by bentonite in the usual way, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a ring of sand. The test was dismantled and sampled during a period from the end of October 2009 to the end of April 2010, and this report describes this operation. Different types of samples have been obtained during this operation. A large number of diameter 50 mm bentonite cores have been taken for analysis of water content and density. Large pieces, so-called big sectors, have been taken for hydro-mechanical and chemical characterizations. Finally, there has been an interest to obtain different types of interface samples in which bentonite were in contact with sand, iron or concrete. One goal has been to investigate the retrievability of the upper heater, given the possibility to remove the surrounding sand shield, and a retrieval test has therefore been performed. The sand in the shield was first removed with an industrial vacuum cleaner after loosening the material through mechanical means (with hammer drill and core machine). A front loader was subsequently used for applying a sufficient lifting force to release the heater from the bentonite underneath. The experiment has been documented in different aspects: measurements of the coordinate (height or radius) of different interfaces (between bentonite blocks and between bentonite and sand); verification of sensor positions and retrieval of sensors for subsequent

  6. Experiments on 18-8 stainless steels exposed to liquid lithium. I. 1,100-hour corrosion tests in lithium of 400, 500 and 6000C in natural circulation type testing apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nihei, I.; Sumiya, I.; Fukaya, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has planned and started to carry out a series of experiments concerning fusion reactor materials. This report gives the results of the first experiments. The first test materials selected were 18-8 stainless steels, and the experiments were designed to test their behavior when exposed to liquid lithium. Natural circulation type corrosion testing devices (pots) were used as the testing apparatus, and the tests were conducted with lithium temperatures up to 600 0 C

  7. An accurately controllable imitative stress corrosion cracking for electromagnetic nondestructive testing and evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusa, Noritaka; Uchimoto, Tetsuya; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Hashizume, Hidetoshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We propose a method to simulate stress corrosion cracking. ► The method offers nondestructive signals similar to those of actual cracking. ► Visual and eddy current examinations validate the method. - Abstract: This study proposes a simple and cost-effective approach to fabricate an artificial flaw that is identical to stress corrosion cracking especially from the viewpoint of electromagnetic nondestructive evaluations. The key idea of the approach is to embed a partially-bonded region inside a material by bonding together surfaces that have grooves. The region is regarded as an area of uniform non-zero conductivity from an electromagnetic nondestructive point of view, and thus simulates the characteristics of stress corrosion cracking. Since the grooves are introduced using electro-discharge machining, one can control the profile of the imitative stress corrosion cracking accurately. After numerical simulation to evaluate the spatial resolution of conventional eddy current testing, six specimens made of type 316L austenitic stainless steel were fabricated on the basis of the results of the simulations. Visual and eddy current examinations were carried out to demonstrate that the artificial flaws well simulated the characteristics of actual stress corrosion cracking. Subsequent destructive test confirmed that the bonding did not change the depth profiles of the artificial flaw.

  8. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konynenburg, R.A. van; Curtis, P.G.; Summers, T.S.E.

    1998-03-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel- and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron-absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. The stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on its chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high-chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. The results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility

  9. Accelerated corrosion testing, evaluation and durability design of bonded post-tensioned concrete tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Pereira, Ruben Mario

    2003-06-01

    In the last few years, the effectiveness of cement grout in galvanized or polyethylene ducts, the most widely used corrosion protection system for multistrand bonded post-tensioned concrete tendons, has been under debate, due to significant tendon corrosion damage, several reported failures of individual tendons as well as a few collapses of non-typical structures. While experience in the USA has been generally good, some foreign experience has been less than satisfactory. This dissertation is part of a comprehensive research program started in 1993, which has the objectives to examine the use of post-tensioning in bridge substructures, identify durability concerns and existing technology, develop and carry out an experimental testing program, and conclude with durability design guidelines. Three experimental programs were developed: A long term macrocell corrosion test series, to investigate corrosion protection for internal tendons in precast segmental construction; a long term beam corrosion test series, to examine the effects of post-tensioning on corrosion protection as affected by crack width; and, a long term column corrosion test series, to examine corrosion protection in vertical elements. Preliminary design guidelines were developed previously in the overall study by the initial researchers, after an extensive literature review. This dissertation scope includes continuation of exposure testing of the macrocell, beam and column specimens, performing comprehensive autopsies of selected specimens and updating the durability design guidelines based on the exposure testing and autopsy results. After autopsies were performed, overall findings indicate negative durability effects due to the use of mixed reinforcement, small concrete covers, galvanized steel ducts, and industry standard or heat-shrink galvanized duct splices. The width of cracks was shown to have a direct negative effect on specimen performance. Grout voids were found to be detrimental to the

  10. Corrosion investigations of high-alloyed steels carried out in different marine area organized by European Federation of Corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birn, J.; Skalski, I.

    1999-01-01

    Research works arranged by EFC Working Party on Marine Corrosion are described. The research was performed in sea areas of Norway, Finland, Sweden, France, Italy, Poland and Netherlands. Subjected to test were three corrosion resistant steel grades; 316, 904 and UNS S 31524. Two corrosion tests were carried out in the years 1993 and 1994 each of min. 6 month duration. The results show that chemical composition of water at salinity level of more than 0.7% has not great effect on corrosion aggressivity in relation to corrosion resistant steels. On the other hand temperature of sea water has great influence on corrosion process. (author)

  11. Diagnostic of corrosion defects in steam generator tubes using advanced signal processing from Eddy current testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formigoni, Andre L.; Lopez, Luiz A.N.M.; Ting, Daniel K.S.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the Brazilian Angra I PWR nuclear power plant went into a programmed shutdown for substitution of its Steam Generator (SG) which life was shortened due to stress corrosion in its tubes. The total cost of investment were around R$724 million. The signals generated during an Eddy-current Testing (ECT) inspection in SG tubes of nuclear plant allows for the localization and dimensioning of defects in the tubes. The defects related with corrosion generate complex signals that are difficult to analyze and are the most common cause in SG replacement in nuclear power plants around the world. The objective of this paper is the development of a methodology that allows for the characterization of corrosion signals by ECT inspections applied in the heat exchangers tubes of SG of a nuclear power plant. In this present work, the aim is to investigate distributed type defects by inducing controlled corrosion in sample tubes of different materials The ECT signals obtained from these samples tubes with corrosion implanted, will be analyzed using Zetec ECT equipment, the MIZ-17ET and its probes. The data acquisition will use a NI PC A/D CARD 700 card and the LabVIEW program. Subsequently, we will apply mathematical tools for signal processing like time windowed Fast Fourier transforms and Wavelets transforms, in MATLAB platform, which will allow effectiveness to remove the noises and to extract representative characteristics for the defect being analyzed. Previously obtained results as well as the proposal for the future work will be presented. (author)

  12. High temperature oxidation and corrosion behavior of Ni-base superalloy in He environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gyoeng Geun; Park, Ji Yeon; Jung, Su jin

    2010-11-01

    Ni-base superalloy is considered as a IHX (Intermediate Heat Exchanger) material for VHTR (Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor). The helium environment in VHTR contains small amounts of impure gases, which cause oxidation, carburization, and decarburization. In this report, we conducted the literature survey about the high temperature behavior of Ni-base superalloys in air and He environments. The basic information of Ni-base superalloy and the basic metal-oxidation theory were briefly stated. The He effect on the corrosion of Ni-base superalloy was also summarized. This works would provide a brief suggestion for the next research topic for the application of Ni-base superalloy to VHTR

  13. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge

  14. Field test corrosion experiences when co-firing straw and coal: 10 year status within Elsam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rasmus Berg; Montgomery, Melanie; Larsen, Ole Hede

    2007-01-01

    In Denmark, straw is utilised for the generation of energy and district heating in power plants. Combustion of straw gives rise to high contents of potassium chloride and some sulphur dioxide in the flue gas. These compounds can lead to deposits with high content of potassium chloride and potassium...... sulphate on superheater tubes resulting in increased corrosion rates. From field experimental results this paper show, that by co-firing straw with coal, corrosion rates can be brought down to an acceptable level. This paper firstly deals with the results from a demonstration program co-firing coal...... and straw at the 150 MW pulverized coal fired boiler Studstrup unit 1. Two exposure series lasting 3000 hours each were performed for co-firing 10 and 20% of straw (% energy basis) with coal. Using built in test tubes in the hot end of the actual superheaters and air/water cooled corrosion probes...

  15. In situ corrosion testing of various nickel alloys at Måbjerg waste incineration plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Hansson, A. N.; Jensen, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of waste in Denmark is disposed via waste to energy (WTE) incineration plants which are fabricated from carbon steel. However, due to the increasing corrosiveness of waste over the years, more corrosion resistant alloys are required. In Denmark, Inconel 625 (UNSN06625) is the weld...... overlay material currently being used to give improved corrosion resistance. In order to assess the use of alternative nickel alloys, test panels have been manufactured and inserted into Måbjerg waste incineration plant. Inconel 625 as a 50% weld overlay, two layered weld overlay and as a spiral weld...... overlay was exposed. Other nickel materials exposed were weld overlay Alloy 686, Alloy 50 and Sumitomo Super 625 coextruded tube. Exposure has been undertaken from 2003 to 2009 in the first pass and 2005–2009 in the second pass, and sections have been removed and investigated during this period...

  16. Matching marine corrosion: new accelerated test gives good correlation with outdoor exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeflaak, M.

    2004-01-01

    An extensive study of the corrosion resistance of a large number and a large variety of coatings systems for steel protection has been carried out. With these, three types of accelerated tests have been correlated with observerations from two years of outdoor exposure in a marine environment, and a

  17. Fretting corrosion tests on orthopedic plates and screws made of ASTM F138 stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Teodoro dos Santos

    Full Text Available Introduction Although there has been significant progress in the design of implants for osteosynthesis, the occurrence of failures in these medical devices are still frequent. These implants are prone to suffer from fretting corrosion due to micromotion that takes place between the screw heads and plate holes. Consequently, fretting corrosion has been the subject of research in order to understand its influence on the structural integrity of osteosynthesis implants. The aim of this paper is to correlate the surface finish characteristics of bone plate-screw systems with fretting corrosion. Methods The surface finish (machined and polished of five specimens taken from three commercial dynamic compression plates (DCP were evaluated. For testing, the specimens were fixed with bone screws, immersed in a solution of 0.90% NaCl and subjected to a rocking motion with an amplitude of 1.70 mm and frequency of 1.0 Hz for 1.0 × 106 cycles, according to the ASTM F897 standard. Both, plate and screws were manufactured in Brazil with ASTM F138 stainless steel. Results Flaws on the hole countersink area and on the screw thread of some specimens were identified stereoscopically. At the end of the test all the specimens showed evidence of fretting corrosion with an average metal loss of 4.80 mg/million cycles. Conclusion An inadequate surface finish in some areas of the plates and screws may have favored the incidence of damage to the passive film, accelerating the fretting corrosion at the interfaces between the plate hole countersink and the screw head. Keywords Osteosynthesis, DCP, Bone plate, Screw, Fretting corrosion, Stainless steel.

  18. Preparation and testing of corrosion and spallation-resistant coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, John

    2012-09-30

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project is designed to determine if plating APMT, a specific highly oxidation-resistant oxide dispersion-strengthened FeCrAl alloy made by Kanthal, onto nickel-based superalloy turbine parts is a viable method for substantially improving the lifetimes and maximum use temperatures of the parts. The method for joining the APMT plate to the superalloys is called evaporative metal bonding. It involves placing a thin foil of zinc (Zn) between the plate and the superalloy, clamping them together, and heating in an atmosphere-controlled furnace. Upon heating, the Zn melts and dissolves the oxide skins of the alloys at the bond line, allowing the two alloys to diffuse into each other. The Zn then diffuses through the alloys and evaporates from their surfaces. Laboratory testing has shown that the diffusion rate of Zn through the FeCrAl alloy is much faster than through the nickel superalloys. This means that the FeCrAl will serve as a sink for the Zn bonding alloy during the evaporative metal bonding process. Also, the testing has shown that the Zn diffusion mechanism is bulk diffusion, and not intergranular. This is a surprise. However, it means that quantification of the Zn diffusivities in these samples will be significantly simpler than would have been the case if grain boundary diffusion dominated. In addition to the laboratory testing, gas impinger and particulate samples are being collected from a combustor firing syngas and natural gas to determine what types of microcontaminants may reach a turbine firing syngas. The syngas is created in one of two different pilot-scale pressurized coal gasifiers. The initial analysis of the impinger solutions was for standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 29 determination of hazardous metals and did not include major element analysis. When syngas is fired, the amount of Mn in the combustor gas increases substantially. Halogens (Br2 and Cl2) and hydrogen

  19. Hydrogen Sulphide Corrosion of Carbon and Stainless Steel Alloys Immersed in Mixtures of Renewable Fuel Sources and Tested Under Co-processing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely András

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with modern regulations and directives, the use of renewable biomass materials as precursors for the production of fuels for transportation purposes is to be strictly followed. Even though, there are problems related to processing, storage and handling in wide range of subsequent uses, since there must be a limit to the ratio of biofuels mixed with mineral raw materials. As a key factor with regards to these biomass sources pose a great risk of causing multiple forms of corrosion both to metallic and non-metallic structural materials. To assess the degree of corrosion risk to a variety of engineering alloys like low-carbon and stainless steels widely used as structural metals, this work is dedicated to investigating corrosion rates of economically reasonable engineering steel alloys in mixtures of raw gas oil and renewable biomass fuel sources under typical co-processing conditions. To model a desulphurising refining process, corrosion tests were carried out with raw mineral gasoline and its mixture with used cooking oil and animal waste lard in relative quantities of 10% (g/g. Co-processing was simulated by batch-reactor laboratory experiments. Experiments were performed at temperatures between 200 and 300ºC and a pressure in the gas phase of 90 bar containing 2% (m3/m3 hydrogen sulphide. The time span of individual tests were varied between 1 and 21 days so that we can conclude about changes in the reaction rates against time exposure of and extrapolate for longer periods of exposure. Initial and integral corrosion rates were defined by a weight loss method on standard size of coupons of all sorts of steel alloys. Corrosion rates of carbon steels indicated a linear increase with temperature and little variation with composition of the biomass fuel sources. Apparent activation energies over the first 24-hour period remained moderate, varying between 35.5 and 50.3 kJ mol−1. Scales developed on carbon steels at higher

  20. Application of the thin electrolyte layer technique to corrosion testing of dental materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledvina, Martin

    Proper simulation of the oral environment for the corrosion testing of dental materials is crucial for determining corrosion rates and mechanisms correctly. In this study, the thin electrolyte layer technique (TET) was characterized and employed to investigate the importance of the chemical composition of the testing environment on the outcome of electrochemical tests. The thickness of the electrolyte layer in TET is only 0.5 mm and contains only 20 muL of electrolyte. This arrangement simulates the physical characteristics of the oral environment and facilitates testing in human saliva. Oxygen availability for reduction on the sample surface was determined, using cathodic polarization of Pt in borate buffer, to be lower in TET than in traditional (bulk electrolyte) techniques. Appreciable differences were found during polarization experiments on 316 L SS in saline and artificial saliva. Oxygen content was found to play a significant role in the corrosivity of various species contained in artificial saliva. Potentiodynamic polarization employing human saliva in TET on 316L SS proved to be very different from tests performed in artificial saliva. This was believed to be due to the presence of organic species, specifically proteins, contained in human saliva. This was further confirmed by cyclic polarization and corrosion current measurements of four commercial nickel-chromium (NiCr) alloys with varying amounts of Be. For this phase of the experiment, artificial saliva (AS), AS with 1% albumin, AS with 1% of mucin and parotid human saliva were employed as electrolytes. The results obtained in the various electrolytes depended on the composition, microstructure, stability of passive film, and the presence of casting porosity of the alloys tested. Proteins had insignificant effect on alloys with highly stable passive films, whereas, corrosion rates increased substantially in those alloys with compromised passive film formation. Proteins, especially mucin, lowered the

  1. Very high temperature measurements: Applications to nuclear reactor safety tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parga, Clemente-Jose

    2013-01-01

    This PhD dissertation focuses on the improvement of very high temperature thermometry (1100 deg. C to 2480 deg. C), with special emphasis on the application to the field of nuclear reactor safety and severe accident research. Two main projects were undertaken to achieve this objective: - The development, testing and transposition of high-temperature fixed point (HTFP) metal-carbon eutectic cells, from metrology laboratory precision (±0.001 deg. C) to applied research with a reasonable degradation of uncertainties (±3-5 deg. C). - The corrosion study and metallurgical characterization of Type-C thermocouple (service temp. 2300 deg. C) prospective sheath material was undertaken to extend the survivability of TCs used for molten metallic/oxide corium thermometry (below 2000 deg. C)

  2. Standard Practice for Making and Using U-Bend Stress-Corrosion Test Specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for making and using U-bend specimens for the evaluation of stress-corrosion cracking in metals. The U-bend specimen is generally a rectangular strip which is bent 180° around a predetermined radius and maintained in this constant strain condition during the stress-corrosion test. Bends slightly less than or greater than 180° are sometimes used. Typical U-bend configurations showing several different methods of maintaining the applied stress are shown in Fig. 1. 1.2 U-bend specimens usually contain both elastic and plastic strain. In some cases (for example, very thin sheet or small diameter wire) it is possible to form a U-bend and produce only elastic strain. However, bent-beam (Practice G 39 or direct tension (Practice G 49)) specimens are normally used to study stress-corrosion cracking of strip or sheet under elastic strain only. 1.3 This practice is concerned only with the test specimen and not the environmental aspects of stress-corrosion testing which are discus...

  3. The Effect of Temperature and Acid Concentration on Corrosion of Low Carbon Steel in Hydrochloric Acid Media

    OpenAIRE

    Anees A. Khadom; Aprael S. Yaro; Abdul A.H. Kadum; Ahmed S. AlTaie; Ahmed Y. Musa

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: The effect of different temperatures and acid concentrations on the corrosion of low carbon steel in hydrochloric acid were addressed in this study. Approach: The effect of temperature was explained by application of Arrhenius equation and transition state theory, while the acid concentration effect was explained using reaction kinetic equations. The combined effect of temperature and acid concentration then modeled using a nonlinear regression method. Results: A detail of ...

  4. Development of Self-Powered Wireless-Ready High Temperature Electrochemical Sensors for In-Situ Corrosion Monitoring for Boiler Tubes in Next Generation Coal-based Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xingbo [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The key innovation of this project is the synergy of the high temperature sensor technology based on the science of electrochemical measurement and state-of-the-art wireless communication technology. A novel self-powered wireless high temperature electrochemical sensor system has been developed for coal-fired boilers used for power generation. An initial prototype of the in-situ sensor demonstrated the capability of the wireless communication system in the laboratory and in a pilot plant (Industrial USC Boiler Setting) environment to acquire electrochemical potential and current signals during the corrosion process. Uniform and localized under-coal ash deposit corrosion behavior of Inconel 740 superalloy has been studied at different simulated coal ash hot corrosion environments using the developed sensor. Two typical potential noise patterns were found to correlate with the oxidation and sulfidation stages in the hot coal ash corrosion process. Two characteristic current noise patterns indicate the extent of the corrosion. There was a good correlation between the responses of electrochemical test data and the results from corroded surface analysis. Wireless electrochemical potential and current noise signals from a simulated coal ash hot corrosion process were concurrently transmitted and recorded. The results from the performance evaluation of the sensor confirm a high accuracy in the thermodynamic and kinetic response represented by the electrochemical noise and impedance test data.

  5. Tailoring a High Temperature Corrosion Resistant FeNiCrAl for Oxy-Combustion Application by Thermal Spray Coating and HIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarkko Metsäjoki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxy-fuel combustion combined with CCS (carbon capture and storage aims to decrease CO2 emissions in energy production using fossil fuels. Oxygen firing changes power plant boiler conditions compared to conventional firing. Higher material temperatures and harsher and more variable environmental conditions cause new degradation processes that are inadequately understood at the moment. In this study, an Fe-Ni-Cr-Al alloy was developed based on thermodynamic simulations. The chosen composition was manufactured as powder by gas atomization. The powder was sieved into two fractions: The finer was used to produce thermal spray coatings by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF and the coarser to manufacture bulk specimens by hot isostatic pressing (HIP. The high temperature corrosion properties of the manufactured FeNiCrAl coating and bulk material were tested in laboratory conditions simulating oxy-combustion. The manufacturing methods and the results of high temperature corrosion performance are presented. The corrosion performance of the coating was on average between the bulk steel references Sanicro 25 and TP347HFG.

  6. Importance of temperature, pH, and boric acid concentration on rates of hydrogen production from galvanized steel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyola, V.M.

    1982-01-01

    One of the known sources of hydrogen gas within a nuclear plant containment building during a LOCA is the high temperature corrosion of galvanized steel yielding hydrogen gas. The importance of this source of hydrogen will vary depending on the severity of the accident. In an accident which resulted in core degradation, for example, the major source of hydrogen would probably be the metal-water reaction of the zircaloy cladding, and the corrosion of galvanized steel would then become a relatively minor source of hydrogen. However, in an accident in which core degradation is avoided or limited to minor damage, the corrosion of galvanized steel, and presumably of other materials as well, would then become a major contributor to the buildup of hydrogen within containment. The purpose of this paper is to present the overall effects of temperature, pH, and boric acid concentration on the rate of hydrogen generation over a broad range of each parameter

  7. Corrosion resistance of materials of construction for high temperature sulfuric acid service in thermochemical IS process. Alloy 800, Alloy 600, SUSXM15J1 and SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Onuki, Kaoru; Shimizu, Saburo; Yamaguchi, Akihisa

    2006-01-01

    Exposure tests of candidate materials were carried out up to 1000 hr in the sulfuric acid environments of thermochemical hydrogen production IS process, focusing on the corrosion of welded portion and of crevice area. In the gas phase sulfuric acid decomposition condition at 850degC, welded samples of Alloy 800 and of Alloy 600 showed the same good corrosion resistance as the base materials. In the boiling condition of 95 wt% sulfuric acid solution, test sample of SiC showed the same good corrosion resistance. Also negligible corrosion was observed in crevice corrosion. (author)

  8. Superheater corrosion in biomass boiler - theories and tests in Vaestermalmsverket, Falun; Oeverhettarkorrosion i bioeldad panna - teorier och prov i Vaestermalmsverket, Falun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roennquist, Eva-Marie

    2000-10-01

    It has lately been evident that a number of biomass-fired plants are experiencing major problems with corrosion of their superheaters. The major aim with this project is to contribute with increased knowledge in this area. The efforts to build up experience around different materials applicable for superheaters with high steam data is of great importance for future plants in Sweden. The main objective for 'Vaermeforsk' has been to transfer the experiences from this investigation to other boilers or plants with different types of fuel. This investigation has therefore been focused on the verification of SYCON's assumptions regarding the roles of chloride and alkali and the possibility of influencing/minimising superheater corrosion by optimisation of the fuel mix. Another important part was to verify that the boiler design, as such, does not create an unfavourable environment for the superheaters by producing reducing zones due to plume formation. Based on the above, the investigation has been divided into three loosely connected parts. (1) The role and reaction by chlorides in the deposits on a superheater, (2) Reducing environment - plume formation of non-combusted fuel, and (3) Choice of materials in the superheater. Serious corrosion has been detected in the superheater tubes of 'Vaestermalmsverket' in Falun. The material temperature was below 530 deg C. No serious inhomogeneous combustion problems or areas with reducing environments have been detected. The corrosion was therefore judged to be caused by alkali chlorides which condense on the superheater tubes. Tests with minor amounts of sulphur added to the biomass fuel have been shown to suppress the generation of alkali chlorides and their condensation on the superheater surfaces. A good correlation between calculated and measured values have been achieved. Very low corrosion rates have been measured on the test probes, constructed with different superheater material and placed in the

  9. Stress corrosion cracking tests for low carbon stainless steels with work hardened layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Junichi; Kikuchi, Masahiko; Tsukada, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    To avoid introduction of Cr depletion at grain boundaries by welding process, low carbon stainless steels (SSs) were used in corrosive environment as one of countermeasures for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). Recently, it is reported that SCCs were introduced at portion with work hardened layer although low carbon SSs had been used at core shrouds and primary loop recirculation piping in Boiling Water Reactors. To simulate and examine the phenomenon, mechanical working, metallographic observation, hardness test and SCC tests in chloride solutions were conducted for low carbon SSs. From the results of metallographic observation and hardness test, it was confirmed that slip bands were observed around the surface and hardened layer was introduced by mechanical working. From the results of SCC tests, it was noticed that cracks which introduced from the surface, had grown into the matrix. It is thought that low carbon SSs with work hardened layer have susceptibility to SCC from the above. (author)

  10. Some important considerations in the development of stress corrosion cracking test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, R. P.; Novak, S. R.; Williams, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of some of the precaution needs the development of fracture-mechanics based test methods for studying stress corrosion cracking involves. Following a review of pertinent analytical fracture mechanics considerations and of basic test methods, the implications for test corrosion cracking studies of the time-to-failure determining kinetics of crack growth and life are examined. It is shown that the basic assumption of the linear-elastic fracture mechanics analyses must be clearly recognized and satisfied in experimentation and that the effects of incubation and nonsteady-state crack growth must also be properly taken into account in determining the crack growth kinetics, if valid data are to be obtained from fracture-mechanics based test methods.

  11. Evaluation of corrosion degradation of amalgams by immersion and fracture test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horasawa, Noriko; Takahashi, Shigeo; Marek, Miroslav

    2003-12-01

    In this study an immersion and fracture test was used to evaluate the susceptibility of dental amalgams to degradation of their mechanical strength by corrosion. Specimens of each of the six types of high-copper amalgams and one type of low-copper amalgam were prepared and tested. Cylindrical specimens were grooved using a diamond cutoff blade and immersed in 1% NaCl to which H2O2 was added to increase the oxidation power. After two weeks of exposure the specimens and controls were fractured and the loss of strength was calculated. Two amalgams showed a significant loss of strength. The test procedure is relatively simple and does not require sophisticated electrochemical or analytical instrumentation. A higher resolution power might be achieved by increasing the severity of corrosion or the number of replicate tests.

  12. Structural analysis and intergranular corrosion tests of AISI 316L steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonawská, Z; Svoboda, M; Sozańska, M; Krístková, M; Sojka, J; Dagbert, C; Hyspecká, L

    2006-10-01

    Pure AISI 316L steel is investigated after solution heat treatment (1050 degrees C/H(2)O) and structural sensitization (650 degrees C). Two quite different intergranular corrosion tests are used to determine the degree of structural sensitization due to the precipitation of secondary phases along the grain boundaries (mainly the M(23)C(6) and sigma-phase): the oxalic acid etch test and the electrochemical potentio-kinetic reactivation test. Generally, the dissolution of chromium-rich carbides (M(23)C(6)) is provoked by oxalic acid etch tests, whereas the chromium-depleted zones, in the vicinity of chromium-rich carbides (M(23)C(6)), are attacked by electrochemical potentio-kinetic reactivation tests. Both intergranular corrosion tests are used to determine the maximum degree of structural sensitization. Thus structural analysis by carbon replicas reveals the Laves phase, and both the M(23)C(6) and (Cr,Mo)(x)(Fe,Ni)(y) phases. The results of intergranular corrosion tests are related to the findings of the structural analysis.

  13. Standard practice for conducting wire-on-bolt test for atmospheric galvanic corrosion

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the evaluation of atmospheric galvanic corrosion of any anodic material that can be made into a wire when in contact with a cathodic material that can be made into a threaded rod. 1.2 When certain materials are used for the anode and cathode, this practice has been used to rate the corrosivity of atmospheres. 1.3 The wire-on-bolt test was first described in 1955 (1), and has since been used extensively with standard materials to determine corrosivity of atmospheres under the names CLIMAT Test (CLassify Industrial and Marine ATmospheres) (2-5) and ATCORR (ATmospheric CORRosivity) (6-9). 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations p...

  14. Brief description of out-of-pile test facilities for study in corrosion and fission product behaviour in flowing sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizawa, K.; Sekiguchi, N.; Atsumo, H.

    1976-01-01

    The experimental methods to perform tests for study in corrosion and fission products behaviour in flowing sodium are outlined. Flow diagrams for the activated materials and fission products behaviour test loop are given

  15. Microstructural stability of zirconia-alumina composite coatings during hot corrosion test at 1050 {sup o}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyvani, A., E-mail: akeyvani@ut.ac.i [School of Metallurgy and Materials, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saremi, M., E-mail: saremi@ut.ac.i [School of Metallurgy and Materials, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Heydarzadeh Sohi, M., E-mail: mhsohi@ut.ac.i [School of Metallurgy and Materials, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-09-10

    In the present work hot corrosion behavior of plasma sprayed zirconia-alumina coatings on Ni-base, IN-738, super alloy substrate was studied compared with normal zirconia. Hot corrosion resistance of the coatings was measured at 1050 {sup o}C using an atmospheric electrical furnace and a fused mixture of vanadium pentoxide and sodium sulfate salt. The hot corrosion test duration was 4 h in each cycle, while the specimens were cooled in the furnace. The general and peripheral conditions of the specimens were inspected. If there were any cracks or spallation in coating wedge the test was stopped, the time was recorded and coating microstructure was studied. Composite coatings of zirconia-alumina having alumina as a top coat or a mixed zirconia-alumina layer, showed better resistance in hot corrosion tests. It was concluded that alumina overlay on zirconia has promoted the hot corrosion resistance of the coatings.

  16. Corrosion behavior of Al-Fe-sputtering-coated steel, high chromium steels, refractory metals and ceramics in high temperature Pb-Bi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Khalid, Rivai; Minoru, Takahashi

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion tests of Al-Fe-coated steel, high chromium steels, refractory metals and ceramics were carried out in high temperature Pb-Bi at 700 C degrees. Oxygen concentrations in this experiment were 6.8*10 -7 wt.% for Al-Fe-coated steels and 5*10 -6 wt.% for high chromium steels, refractory metals and ceramics. All specimens were immersed in molten Pb-Bi in a corrosion test pot for 1.000 hours. Coating was done with using the unbalanced magnetron sputtering (UBMS) technique to protect the steel from corrosion. Sputtering targets were Al and SUS-304. Al-Fe alloy was coated on STBA26 samples. The Al-Fe alloy-coated layer could be a good protection layer on the surface of steel. The whole of the Al-Fe-coated layer still remained on the base surface of specimen. No penetration of Pb-Bi into this layer and the matrix of the specimen. For high chromium steels i.e. SUS430 and Recloy10, the oxide layer formed in the early time could not prevent the penetration of Pb-Bi into the base of the steels. Refractory metals of tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) had high corrosion resistance with no penetration of Pb-Bi into their matrix. Penetration of Pb-Bi into the matrix of niobium (Nb) was observed. Ceramic materials were SiC and Ti 3 SiC 2 . The ceramic materials of SiC and Ti 3 SiC 2 had high corrosion resistance with no penetration of Pb-Bi into their matrix. (authors)

  17. Probability density fittings of corrosion test-data: Implications on C 6 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This was done to investigate the suitability of the results of the fitted test-data, by these distributions, for modelling the effectiveness of C6H15NO3, triethanolamine (TEA), admixtures on the corrosion of steel-rebar in concrete in NaCl and in H2SO4 test-media. For this, six different concentrations of TEA were admixed in ...

  18. Field Testing of High Current Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Mitigation in Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Henry; Alexander, Joshua; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal; Calle, Luz marina

    2010-01-01

    Electrokinetic Nanoparticle (EN) treatment was used as a rapid repair measure to mitigate chloride induced corrosion of reinforced concrete in the field. EN treatment uses an electric field to transport positively charged nanoparticles to the reinforcement through the concrete capillary pores. Cylindrical reinforced concrete specimens were batched with 4.5 wt % salt content (based on cement mass). Three distinct electrokinetic treatments were conducted using high current density (up to 5 A/m2) to form a chloride penetration barrier that was established in 5 days, as opposed to the traditional 6-8 weeks, generally required for electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE). These treatments included basic EN treatment, EN with additional calcium treatment, and basic ECE treatment. Field exposures were conducted at the NASA Beachside Corrosion Test Site, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA. The specimens were subjected to sea water immersion at the test site as a posttreatment exposure. Following a 30-day post-treatment exposure period, the specimens were subjected to indirect tensile testing to evaluate treatment impact. The EN treated specimens exhibited 60% and 30% increases in tensile strength as compared to the untreated controls and ECE treated specimens respectively. The surfaces of the reinforcement bars of the control specimens were 67% covered by corrosion products. In contrast, the EN treated specimens exhibited corrosion coverage of only 4%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a dense concrete microstructure adjacent to the bars of the treated specimens as compared to the control and ECE specimens. Energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analysis of the polished EN treated specimens showed a reduction in chloride content by a factor of 20 adjacent to the bars. This study demonstrated that EN treatment was successful in forming a chloride penetration barrier rapidly. This work also showed that the chloride barrier was effective when samples were exposed to

  19. Effect of temperature on the level of corrosion caused by heavy petroleum on AISI 304 and AISI 444 stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Sampaio Eufrásio Machado

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a study on the influence of national heavy petroleum in the corrosion of the AISI 444 and AISI 304 stainless steels in simulated refining operation conditions. The petroleum was first characterized through physicochemical analysis (density, fluidity point, viscosity, sulfur concentration. In an attempt to understand the corrosion effect of temperature and of the type of heating the referred types of steel thermal treatments were carried out at three levels of temperature (200, 300 and 400 °C. The procedure was done in conditions close to those in the distillation column. Heat was gradually increased from room temperature, and directly heated to working temperature. Each treatment took 4 hours to be completed. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM and the analysis of X rays dispersive energy (EDX were used after the trials to characterize the samples. The results show that treatment temperature, as well as the type of heating, has distinct influences on each type of steel.

  20. In-reactor corrosion behavior of stainless steel cladding in high temperature sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, J.W.

    1976-04-01

    Sodium-cladding chemical interaction has been studied on fuel pins clad with 20% cold worked type 316 stainless steel and irradiated in the EBR-II at temperatures up to 705/sup 0/C and for exposures to 5300 hours. The measured corrosion rate of the cladding surface immediately above the top of the fuel column was 12.5 ..mu..m per year at 690/sup 0/C. The loss of Ni at 700/sup 0/C resulted in the formation of a ferrite layer approximately 5 ..mu..m thick. A zone depleted in Ni and Cr extends into the austenite from the ferrite-austenite interface an additional distance of approximately 15 ..mu..m. No large changes in volumetric average carbon or nitrogen were observed.

  1. Corrosion kinetics at high pressure and temperature of Zr-2.5 Nb with different heat treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaime Solis, F.; Bordoni, Roberto; Olmedo, Ana M.; Villegas, Marina; Miyagusuku, Marcela

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of Zr-2.5 Nb pressure tube (PT) specimens, with ageing treatments at 400 and 500 C degrees for different times, was studied. The results were analyzed using the corrosion behavior of Zr-20 Nb and Zr-1 Nb samples heat treated during 1 hour at 850 C degrees, cooled in air and aged at the same temperature and times than the PT specimens. The comparison between the corrosion behaviour of Zr-1 Nb and Zr-20 Nb aged coupons with the aged pressure tube specimens, together with the metal/oxide interface morphology of Zr-2.5 Nb specimens, suggest that the increase in the corrosion resistance in the latter coupons is associated with the decomposition of the β-Zr phase. There is also a contribution of α-Zr phase when the ageing temperatures are high enough or the ageing times are long enough, due to a decrease in the Nb content of this phase. This last contribution is associated with an increase in the corrosion resistance of the central zone of pressure tube in the reactor. (author)

  2. Synthesis of published and unpublished corrosion data from long term tests of fasteners embedded in wood : calculation of corrosion rates and the effect of corrosion on lateral joint strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2011-01-01

    In the past 5 years, several accelerated test methods have been developed to measure the corrosion of metals in contact with wood. It is desirable to contrast these accelerated results against those of long term exposure tests. While there have been several published long-term exposure tests performed on metals in treated wood, the data from these studies could not be...

  3. Stress corrosion crack initiation of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in an iodine vapor environment during creep, relaxation, and constant strain rate tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezequel, T.; Auzoux, Q.; Le Boulch, D.; Bono, M.; Andrieu, E.; Blanc, C.; Chabretou, V.; Mozzani, N.; Rautenberg, M.

    2018-02-01

    During accidental power transient conditions with Pellet Cladding Interaction (PCI), the synergistic effect of the stress and strain imposed on the cladding by thermal expansion of the fuel, and corrosion by iodine released as a fission product, may lead to cladding failure by Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). In this study, internal pressure tests were conducted on unirradiated cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in an iodine vapor environment. The goal was to investigate the influence of loading type (constant pressure tests, constant circumferential strain rate tests, or constant circumferential strain tests) and test temperature (320, 350, or 380 °C) on iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC). The experimental results obtained with different loading types were consistent with each other. The apparent threshold hoop stress for I-SCC was found to be independent of the test temperature. SEM micrographs of the tested samples showed many pits distributed over the inner surface, which tended to coalesce into large pits in which a microcrack could initiate. A model for the time-to-failure of a cladding tube was developed using finite element simulations of the viscoplastic mechanical behavior of the material and a modified Kachanov's damage growth model. The times-to-failure predicted by this model are consistent with the experimental data.

  4. Accelerated corrosion test for metal drainage pipes : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    This study represents an attempt to develop an accelerated test which would assist the highway engineer in evaluating the usefulness of a new type of coated steel culvert. The test method was to be short in duration (in the order of days), and the re...

  5. Standard practice for preparation and use of direct tension stress-corrosion test specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1985-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing, preparing, and using ASTM standard tension test specimens for investigating susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking. Axially loaded specimens may be stressed quantitatively with equipment for application of either a constant load, constant strain, or with a continuously increasing strain. 1.2 Tension test specimens are adaptable for testing a wide variety of product forms as well as parts joined by welding, riveting, or various other methods. 1.3 The exposure of specimens in a corrosive environment is treated only briefly because other standards are being prepared to deal with this aspect. Meanwhile, the investigator is referred to Practices G35, G36, G37, and G44, and to ASTM Special Technical Publication 425 (1).

  6. Development of self-powered wireless high temperature electrochemical sensor for in situ corrosion monitoring of coal-fired power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Naing Naing; Crowe, Edward; Liu, Xingbo

    2015-03-01

    Reliable wireless high temperature electrochemical sensor technology is needed to provide in situ corrosion information for optimal predictive maintenance to ensure a high level of operational effectiveness under the harsh conditions present in coal-fired power generation systems. This research highlights the effectiveness of our novel high temperature electrochemical sensor for in situ coal ash hot corrosion monitoring in combination with the application of wireless communication and an energy harvesting thermoelectric generator (TEG). This self-powered sensor demonstrates the successful wireless transmission of both corrosion potential and corrosion current signals to a simulated control room environment. Copyright © 2014 ISA. All rights reserved.

  7. AGR steel corrosion monitoring schemes: progress on off-site testing of coupon specimens to end of 1985: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittle, I.; Meredith, M.E.

    1988-03-01

    Off-site Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor steel corrosion monitoring through experiments on mild steel coupon specimens is reported. The appearance of all mild steel coupons oxidised over the temperature range 375 to 450 0 C is consistent with what is expected for the appropriate silicon content, temperature and in the gas mixes used. Likewise, weight gain data from the tests is as expected and where linear (breakaway) oxidation kinetics are in evidence, measured rates are within one standard deviation of the mean oxidation rates predicted by the 1/R model. Also, data relating mean breakaway oxide thickness to weight gain is in good agreement with the currently recommended relationship of 1 mg cm -2 weight gain = 6.72 μm oxide thickness. The observed oxidation behaviour of the off-site mild steel coupons is consistent with the most recent design data. (author)

  8. Atomic Layer Deposited Coatings on Nanowires for High Temperature Water Corrosion Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yersak, Alexander S; Lewis, Ryan J; Liew, Li-Anne; Wen, Rongfu; Yang, Ronggui; Lee, Yung-Cheng

    2016-11-30

    Two-phase liquid-cooling technologies incorporating micro/nanostructured copper or silicon surfaces have been established as a promising thermal management solution to keep up with the increasing power demands of high power electronics. However, the reliability of nanometer-scale features of copper and silicon in these devices has not been well investigated. In this work, accelerated corrosion testing reveals that copper nanowires are not immune to corrosion in deaerated pure hot water. To solve this problem, we investigate atomic layer deposition (ALD) TiO 2 coatings grown at 150 and 175 °C. We measured no difference in coating thickness for a duration of 12 days. Using a core/shell approach, we grow ALD TiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 protective coatings on copper nanowires and demonstrate a preservation of nanoengineered copper features. These studies have identified a critical reliability problem of nanoscale copper and silicon surfaces in deaerated, pure, hot water and have successfully demonstrated a reliable solution using ALD TiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 protective coatings.

  9. High-Temperature Test Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    F33615-84-C-3213 Sc. ADDRESS (City. State and ZIP Code) 10. SOURCE OF: FUNDING NOBI . AFWVAL/FIBT PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK UNIT Wright-Patterson AFB OH...fly at speeds in excess of Mach 20. Aerodynamic heating "rom these hypersonic speeds will pro - duce vehicle surface temperatures as high as 3000*F. In...We believe that two former suppliers, Pyro-Metrics and lunar Infrared, are no longer in business. In addition, the Hi-Shear product line is now

  10. Corrosion Testing of Low-Activity Waste Glasses Fiscal Year 1998 Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BP McGrail; CW Lindenmeier; HT Schaef; PF Martin

    1998-11-25

    Analytical results are presented on the chemical composition and other physical properties of a glass, given the identification BNFL-A-S98, made at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory' that is representative of the low-activity waste glass composition proposed by BNFL, Inc.* for immobilization of envelope A double-shell tank wastes at the Hanford Site. This glass was prepared for use in a testing program to be conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and at Argonne National Laboratory for the purpose of characterizing its long-term corrosion behavior. Detailed examination of the glass microstructure using transmission electron microscopy showed structural features indicative of amorphous phase separation. A remelt was performed on a smaller batch (100 g) to ensure rapid cooling. The glass microstructure was reexamined and showed no evidence of phase separation. Selected long-term (some to 860 d) product consistency tests were terminated, and the leachates were analyzed on tests with three other representative low-activity waste glass formulations (L8- 1, L8-3, and L8-7). The results showed no evidence of corrosion rate acceleration at three times the duration of tests where another well-studied glass, LD6-5412, had been completely altered under identical test conditions. These tests (and others not discussed in this report) provide clear evidence that low-activity waste glasses with at least 20 mass% Na20 can be made that have excellent long-term corrosion resistance. However, glass composition has a large impact on long-term behavior and so careful experiments with several different techniques are essential to ensuring that a particular glass will have good long-term corrosion resistance.

  11. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters. Topical report for part 1 of high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spear, K.E.; Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Tressler, R.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-11

    This program consists of two separate research areas. Part 1, for which this report is written, studied the high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic hot gas filters, while Part 2 studied the long-term durability of ceramic heat exchangers to coal combustion environments. The objectives of Part 1 were to select two candidate ceramic filter materials for flow-through hot corrosion studies and subsequent corrosion and mechanical properties characterization. In addition, a thermodynamic database was developed so that thermochemical modeling studies could be performed to simulate operating conditions of laboratory reactors and existing coal combustion power plants, and to predict the reactions of new filter materials with coal combustion environments. The latter would make it possible to gain insight into problems that could develop during actual operation of filters in coal combustion power plants so that potential problems could be addressed before they arise.

  12. 49 CFR 192.471 - External corrosion control: Test leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... attached to the pipeline so as to minimize stress concentration on the pipe. (c) Each bared test lead wire and bared metallic area at point of connection to the pipeline must be coated with an electrical...

  13. Standard guide for conducting exfoliation corrosion tests in aluminum alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1992-01-01

    1.1 This guide differs from the usual ASTM standard in that it does not address a specific test. Rather, it is an introductory guide for new users of other standard exfoliation test methods, (see Terminology G 15 for definition of exfoliation). 1.2 This guide covers aspects of specimen preparation, exposure, inspection, and evaluation for conducting exfoliation tests on aluminum alloys in both laboratory accelerated environments and in natural, outdoor atmospheres. The intent is to clarify any gaps in existent test methods. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The inch-pound units given in parentheses are for information only. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  14. Effects of temperature on the corrosion behavior of coated carbon steel in 1 wt.% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Khalil Abdul; Fuad, Mohd Fazril Irfan Ahmad; Alias, Nur Hashimah; Othman, Nur Hidayati; Zahari, Muhammad Imran

    2017-12-01

    Special attention has been paid in the past decade on the use of metal corrosion protection to conserve natural resources and to improve the performance of engine, build structures and other equipment. Coating is considered as one of the promising methods that can be used to protect the metal against corrosion. However, not many attentions have been given on the evaluation of coating mechanism towards corrosion protection. In this work, the performance of zinc-rich paint (ZRP) was investigated under saltwater environment as to simulate the nature of corrosion in seawater. The adhesion of the coated steel was also studied to determine the adherence of the coatings to the metal substrate. Results obtained from the immersion test was then used to determine the corrosion rate of the coatings. The mechanisms and the function of ZRP as a protection layer were also investigated. By using 3 coated system of ZRP, the corrosion rate of the steel was observed to decrease thus provide better protection in seawater environment.

  15. Mechanical characteristics of heterogeneous structures obtained by high-temperature brazing of corrosion-resistant steels with rapidly quenched non-boron nickel-based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalin, B.; Penyaz, M.; Ivannikov, A.; Sevryukov, O.; Bachurina, D.; Fedotov, I.; Voennov, A.; Abramov, E.

    2018-01-01

    Recently, the use rapidly quenched boron-containing nickel filler metals for high temperature brazing corrosion resistance steels different classes is perspective. The use of these alloys leads to the formation of a complex heterogeneous structure in the diffusion zone that contains separations of intermediate phases such as silicides and borides. This structure negatively affects the strength characteristics of the joint, especially under dynamic loads and in corrosive environment. The use of non-boron filler metals based on the Ni-Si-Be system is proposed to eliminate this structure in the brazed seam. Widely used austenitic 12Cr18Ni10Ti and ferrite-martensitic 16Cr12MoSiWNiVNb reactor steels were selected for research and brazing was carried out. The mechanical characteristics of brazed joints were determined using uniaxial tensile and impact toughness tests, and fractography was investigated by electron microscopy.

  16. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour of Alloy 600 in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.L.; Burke, M.G.

    1995-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Alloy 600 in deaerated water at 360 deg. C, as measured with statistically-loaded U-bend specimens, is dependent upon microstructure and whether the material was cold-worked and annealed (CWA) or hot-worked and annealed (HWA). All cracking was intergranular, and materials lacking grain boundary carbides were most susceptible to SCC initiation. CWA tubing materials are more susceptible to SCC initiation than HWA ring-rolled forging materials with similar microstructures, as determined by light optical metallography (LOM). In CWA tubing materials one crack dominated and grew to a large size that was observable by visual inspection. HWA materials with a low hot-working finishing temperature (below 925 deg. C) and final anneals at temperatures ranging from 1010 deg. C to 1065 deg. C developed both large cracks, similar to those found in CWA materials, and also small intergranular microcracks, which are detectable only by destructive metallographic examination. HWA materials with a high hot-working finishing temperature (above 980 deg. C) and high-temperature final anneal (above 1040 deg. C), with grain boundaries that are fully decorated, developed only microcracks, which were observed in all specimens examined. These materials developed no large, visually detectable cracks, even after more than 300 weeks exposure. A low-temperature thermal treatment (610 deg. C for 7h), which reduced or eliminates SCC in Alloy 600, did not eliminate microcrack formation in the high temperature processed HWA materials. Detailed microstructural characterization using conventional metallographic and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) techniques was performed on selected materials to identify the factors responsible for the observed differences in cracking behaviour. 11 refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs

  17. Study of the corrosion behavior of magnesium alloy weddings in NaCl solutions by gravimetric tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segarra, J. A.; Calderon, B.; Portoles, A.

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the corrosion behavior of commercial AZ31 welded plates in aqueous chloride media was investigated by means of gravimetric techniques and Neutral Salt Spray tests (NSS). The AZ31 samples tested were welded using Gas Tugsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and different filler materials. Material microstructures were investigated by optical microscopy to stablish the influence of those microstructures in the corrosion behavior. Gravimetric and NSS tests indicate that the use of more noble filler alloys for the sample welding, preventing the reduction of aluminum content in weld beads, does not imply a better corrosion behavior. (Author)

  18. Identification of commercially available alloys for corrosion-resistant metallic reinforcement and test methods for evaluating corrosion-resistant reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A literature review was conducted with the goal of identifying alternative low-cost corrosion-resistant steel reinforcement materials. The most promising alternate reinforcing materials seen to date that are less expensive than 300 series stainless s...

  19. Evaluation of the IGSCC(Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking) resistance of inconel alloys by static potential method in high temperature and high pressure environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeng, Wan Young; Nam, Tae Woon

    1997-01-01

    Inconel alloys which have good high temperature mechanical properties and corrosion resistance have been used extensively as steam generator tube of nuclear power plants. There have been some reports on the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) failure problems in steam generator tubes of nuclear reactors. In order to evaluate the effects of heat treatment and composition on the IGSCC behavior of inconel alloys in simulated nuclear reactor environment, four different specimens (inconel 600 MA, 600 TT, 690 MA and 690 TT) were prepared and tested by eletrochemical method. Static potential tests for stressed C-ring type inconel specimens were carried out in 10% NaOH solution at 300 deg C (75 atm). It was found that IGSCC was initiated in inconel 600 MA specimen, but the other three specimens were not cracked. Based on the gradients of corrosion current density of the four specimens as a function of test time, thermally treated alloys show better IGSCC resistance than mull-annealed alloys, and inconel 690 TT has better passivation characteristic than inconel 600 MA. Inconel 690 TT shows clear periodic passivation that indicates good SCC resistance. The good IGSCC resistance of inconel 690 TT is due to periodic passivation characteristics of surface layer. (author)

  20. Thermohydraulic design of saturated temperature capsule for IASCC irradiation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Matsui, Yoshinori; Itabashi, Yukio

    2002-10-01

    An advanced water chemistry controlled irradiation research device is being developed in JAERI, to perform irradiation tests for irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) research concerned with aging of LWR. This device enables the irradiation tests under the water chemistry condition and the temperature, which simulate the conditions for BWR core internals. The advanced water chemistry controlled irradiation research device is composed of saturated temperature capsule inserted into the JMTR core and the water chemistry control unit installed in the reactor building. Regarding the saturated temperature capsule, the Thermohydraulic design of capsule structure was done, aimed at controlling the specimen's temperature, feeding water velocity on specimen's surface to the environment of BWR nearer. As the result of adopting the new capsule structure based on the design study, it was found out that feeding water velocity at the surface of specimen's is increased to about 10 times as much as before, and nuclear heat generated in the capsule components can be removed safely even in the abnormal event such as the case of loss of feeding water. (author)

  1. Thermohydraulic design of saturated temperature capsule for IASCC irradiation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Matsui, Yoshinori; Itabashi, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    2002-10-01

    An advanced water chemistry controlled irradiation research device is being developed in JAERI, to perform irradiation tests for irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) research concerned with aging of LWR. This device enables the irradiation tests under the water chemistry condition and the temperature, which simulate the conditions for BWR core internals. The advanced water chemistry controlled irradiation research device is composed of saturated temperature capsule inserted into the JMTR core and the water chemistry control unit installed in the reactor building. Regarding the saturated temperature capsule, the Thermohydraulic design of capsule structure was done, aimed at controlling the specimen's temperature, feeding water velocity on specimen's surface to the environment of BWR nearer. As the result of adopting the new capsule structure based on the design study, it was found out that feeding water velocity at the surface of specimen's is increased to about 10 times as much as before, and nuclear heat generated in the capsule components can be removed safely even in the abnormal event such as the case of loss of feeding water. (author)

  2. Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Corrosion Protection of Hot Swaged Ti-54M Alloy in 2 M HCl Pickling Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Sayed M. Sherif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion of Ti-54M titanium alloy processed by hot rotary swaging and post-annealed to yield different grain sizes, in 2 M HCl solutions is reported. Two annealing temperatures of 800 °C and 940 °C, followed by air cooling and furnace cooling were used to give homogeneous grain structures of 1.5 and 5 μm, respectively. It has been found that annealing the alloy at 800 °C decreased the corrosion of the alloy, with respect to the hot swaged condition, through increasing its corrosion resistance and decreasing the corrosion current and corrosion rate. Increasing the annealing temperature to 940 °C further decreased the corrosion of the alloy.

  3. Standard guide for conducting and evaluating galvanic corrosion tests in electrolytes

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1981-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers conducting and evaluating galvanic corrosion tests to characterize the behavior of two dissimilar metals in electrical contact in an electrolyte under low-flow conditions. It can be adapted to wrought or cast metals and alloys. 1.2 This guide covers the selection of materials, specimen preparation, test environment, method of exposure, and method for evaluating the results to characterize the behavior of galvanic couples in an electrolyte. Note 1—Additional information on galvanic corrosion testing and examples of the conduct and evaluation of galvanic corrosion tests in electrolytes are given in Refs (1) through (7). 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicabil...

  4. Study of the corrosion behavior of magnesium alloy weldings in NaCl solutions by gravimetric tests

    OpenAIRE

    Segarra, José A.; Calderón, Borja; Portolés, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the corrosion behavior of commercial AZ31 welded plates in aqueous chloride media was investigated by means of gravimetric techniques and Neutral Salt Spray tests (NSS). The AZ31 samples tested were welded using Gas Tugsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and different filler materials. Material microstructures were investigated by optical microscopy to stablish the influence of those microstructures in the corrosion behavior. Gravimetric and NSS tests indicate that the use of more noble ...

  5. Probability density fittings of corrosion test-data: Implications on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    half-circuit potential test data of other inhibitors in reported studies that had been submitted else- where (Okeniyi et al .... with the concrete to prevent leaching of the admixture solution into the wooden mould. Each of ... this connection, the instrument, through a true potentiostatic circuit, null any residual poten- tial difference ...

  6. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel and zirconium in nitric acid containing highly oxidizing species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, Masami; Fujita, Tomonari

    1994-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of 304ELC, 310Nb stainless steels and Zirconium was investigated in the simulated dissolver solution of a reprocessing plant to obtain fundamental data for life prediction. Corrosion of heat transfer surface was also investigated in nitric acid solutions containing Ce ion. The results obtained are as follows: (1) Stainless steels showed intergranular corrosion in the simulated dissolver solution. The corrosion rate increased with time and reached to a constant value after several hundred hours of immersing time. The constant corrosion rate changed depending on potential suggesting that corrosion potential dominates the corrosion process. 310Nb showed superior corrosion resistance to 304ELC. (2) Corrosion rate of stainless steels increased in the heat transfer condition. The causes of corrosion enhancement are estimated to be higher corrosion potential and higher temperature of heat transfer surface. (3) Zirconium showed perfect passivity in all the test conditions employed. (author)

  7. Effects of water chemistry and fluid dynamics on wall thinning behavior. Part 2. Evaluation of influential factors by flow accelerated corrosion tests and prediction of corrosion potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Domae, Masafumi; Yoneda, Kimitoshi; Inada, Fumio

    2010-01-01

    Understanding of mechanism of Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) phenomenon is desired for the rational wall thickness management and the prevention of FAC. In the previous study, we proposed a FAC model by considering the diffusion of dissolved species. The FAC model reproduced qualitatively well-known effect of major water chemistry parameters on FAC rate. The quantitative prediction was a subject of the FAC model. The FAC model is necessary to be verified and modified by the experimental study. The corrosion-potential measurement of the carbon steel is promising technique to monitor the effectiveness of the water chemical countermeasure against FAC of carbon steel piping at feed water system in power plant. It is required to evaluate the correlation between FAC rate and the corrosion potential. In this study, the effects of the water chemistry and fluid dynamics on FAC rates are evaluated by the FAC test of carbon steel. FAC rates are decreased remarkably with the increase in pH more than 10 and the increase in Cr content more than 0.8 wt%. The FAC rate is decreased with the increase in dissolved oxygen concentration, and ECP of specimen increases corresponding to the decrease of FAC rate. Moreover, the electrochemical model, which can predict the corrosion potential of carbon steel, is developed. The calculated corrosion potential of carbonsteel in deaerated nutral solution at 140degC is -0.6 V (SHE), which is close to the experimental result. (author)

  8. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Steel and Aluminum in Sodium Hydroxide: Field Failure and Laboratory Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Prawoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Through an investigation of the field failure analysis and laboratory experiment, a study on (stress corrosion cracking SCC behavior of steel and aluminum was performed. All samples were extracted from known operating conditions from the field failures. Similar but accelerated laboratory test was subsequently conducted in such a way as to mimic the field failures. The crack depth and behavior of the SCC were then analyzed after the laboratory test and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking was studied. The results show that for the same given stress relative to ultimate tensile strength, the susceptibility to SCC is greatly influenced by heat treatment. Furthermore, it was also concluded that when expressed relative to the (ultimate tensile strength UTS, aluminum has similar level of SCC susceptibility to that of steel, although with respect to the same absolute value of applied stress, aluminum is more susceptible to SCC in sodium hydroxide environment than steel.

  9. Corrosion and Deterioration Testing in the Humid Tropic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-21

    SAMPLE TEST INSPECTION DATA SHEET ................... B-1 C. IMPORTANCE OF ENVIRONMENTAL PARAMETERS C-1 D. DESCRIPTION OF EXPOSURE SITES...increase the chances of detecting material/materiel degradation. Environmental parameters normally considered for site selection include the...sample of data presented in narrative form is provided below: “The acetate samples in the compost pile showed an immediate and significant weight loss

  10. Standard test method for electrochemical critical pitting temperature testing of stainless steels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for the evaluation of the resistance of stainless steel and related alloys to pitting corrosion based on the concept of the determination of a potential independent critical pitting temperature (CPT). 1.2 This test methods applies to wrought and cast products including but not restricted to plate, sheet, tubing, bar, forgings, and welds, (see Note 1). Note 1—Examples of CPT measurements on sheet, plate, tubing, and welded specimens for various stainless steels can be found in Ref (1). See the research reports (Section 14). 1.3 The standard parameters recommended in this test method are suitable for characterizing the CPT of austenitic stainless steels and other related alloys with a corrosion resistance ranging from that corresponding to solution annealed UNS S31600 (Type 316 stainless steel) to solution annealed UNS S31254 (6 % Mo stainless steel). 1.4 This test method may be extended to stainless steels and other alloys related to stainless steel that have a CPT...

  11. Simulation of natural corrosion by vapor hydration test: seven-year results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, J.S.; Ebert, W.L.; Mazer, J.J.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the alteration behavior of synthetic basalt and SRL 165 borosilicate waste glasses that had been reacted in water vapor at 70 degrees C for time periods up to seven years. The nature and extent of corrosion of glasses have been determined by characterizing the reacted glass surface with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Alteration in 70 degrees C laboratory tests was compared to that which occurs at 150-200 degrees C and also with Hawaiian basaltic glasses of 480 to 750 year old subaerially altered in nature. Synthetic basalt and waste glasses, both containing about 50 percent wt SiO 2 were found to react with water vapor to form an amorphous hydrated gel that contained small amounts of clay, nearly identical to palagonite layers formed on naturally altered basaltic glass. This result implies that the corrosion reaction in nature can be simulated with a vapor hydration test. These tests also provide a means for measuring the corrosion kinetics, which are difficult to determine by studying natural samples because alteration layers have often spelled off the samples and we have only limited knowledge of the conditions under which alteration occurred

  12. Corrosion of dissimilar metal crevices in simulated concentrated ground water solutions at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, B.M.; Quinn, M.J

    2003-01-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear waste in the Yucca Mountain, Nevada is under consideration by the US Department of Energy. The proposed facility will be located in the unsaturated zone approximately 300 m below the surface and 300 m above the water table. The proposed waste container consists of an outer corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 shell surrounding a 316 NG stainless steel structural inner container that encapsulates the used nuclear fuel waste. A titanium drip shield is proposed to protect the waste container from ground water seepage arid rock-fail. A cycle of dripping/evaporation could result in the generation of concentrated aggressive solutions, which could contact the waste container. The waste container material could be susceptible to crevice corrosion from such solutions. The experiments described in this report support the modeling of waste package degradation processes. The intent was to provide parameter values that are required to model crevice corrosion chemistry, as it relates to hydrogen pick-up, and stress corrosion cracking for selected candidate waste package materials. The purpose of the experiments was to study the crevice corrosion behavior of various candidate materials under near freely corroding conditions and to determine the pH developed in crevice solutions. Experimental results of crevice corrosion of dissimilar metal pairs (Alloy 22, Grade-7 and -16 titanium and 316 stainless steel) immersed in a simulated concentrated ground water at {approx}90{sup o}C are reported. The corrosion potential was measured during exposure periods of between 330 and 630 h. Following the experiments, the pH of the crevice solution was measured. The results indicate that a limited degree of crevice acidification occurred during the experiment. The values for corrosion potential suggest that crevice corrosion may have initiated. The total corrosion was limited, with little visible evidence for crevice corrosion being observed on the sample coupon faces

  13. Standard test methods for pitting and crevice corrosion resistance of stainless steels and related alloys by use of ferric Chloride solution

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the determination of the resistance of stainless steels and related alloys to pitting and crevice corrosion (see Terminology G 15) when exposed to oxidizing chloride environments. Six procedures are described and identified as Methods A, B, C, D, E, and F. 1.1.1 Method A—Ferric chloride pitting test. 1.1.2 Method B—Ferric chloride crevice test. 1.1.3 Method C—Critical pitting temperature test for nickel-base and chromium-bearing alloys. 1.1.4 Method D—Critical crevice temperature test for nickel-base and chromium-bearing alloys. 1.1.5 Method E—Critical pitting temperature test for stainless steels. 1.1.6 Method F—Critical crevice temperature test for stainless steels. 1.2 Method A is designed to determine the relative pitting resistance of stainless steels and nickel-base, chromium-bearing alloys, whereas Method B can be used for determining both the pitting and crevice corrosion resistance of these alloys. Methods C, D, E and F allow for a rankin...

  14. Straining electrode behavior and corrosion resistance of nickel base alloys in high temperature acidic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Kazuo

    1992-01-01

    Repassivation behavior and IGA resistance of nickel base alloys containing 0∼30 wt% chromium was investigated in high temperature acid sulfate solution. (1) The repassivation rate was increased with increasing chromium content. And so the amounts of charge caused by the metal dissolution were decreased with increasing chromium content. (2) Mill-annealed Alloy 600 suffered IGA at low pH environment below about 3.5 at the fixed potentials above the corrosion potential in 10%Na 2 SO 4 +H 2 SO 4 solution at 598K. On the other hand, thermally-treated Alloy 690 was hard to occur IGA at low pH environments which mill-annealed Alloy 600 occurred IGA. (3) It was considered that the reason, why nickel base alloys containing high chromium content such as Alloy 690 (60%Ni-30%Cr-10%Fe) had high IGA/SCC resistance in high temperature acidic solution containing sulfate ion, is due to both the promotion of the repassivation and the suppression of the film dissolution by the formation of the dense chromium oxide film

  15. Firing technology in practice - temperature, residence time, corrosion; Feuerungstechnik in der Praxis - Temperatur, Verweilzeit, Korrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freimann, P.; Holl, D. [Muellheizkraftwerk Betriebsgesellschaft mbH, Burgkirchen/Alz (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    In a circular dated 1st Sept. 1994, i.e., after the issue of the pertinent planning decision, the Federal Environmental Ministry, BMU, laid down uniform standards on measurements and the parameterisation of the evaluation system for different operation states and loads. Subsequently, TUeV, the German Technical Control Board, prepared the parameterisation curves on the basis of these specifications. The implementation of the BMU paper of 1st Sept. 1994 did not result in any advantage, nor did it lead to a reduction of plant emissions, nor to advantages in the operation of the waste-fuelled cogeneration plant. On the contrary, elevated gas consumption and operating trouble due to frequent feed stops worsened the operating state of the plant. Elevated crude gas temperature in the boiler reduced the lifetime of the two boilers to a critical degree. An operating temperature of 850 C and a residence time of approx. 1 sec. in Burgkirchen waste-fuelled cogeneration plant have not worsened emission values while rendering the plant operable again. [Deutsch] Durch Rundschreiben d. BMU vom 01.09.1994 - also nach Erlass des Planfeststellungsbeschlusses - wurden einheitliche Vorgaben ueber Messungen und Parametrierung des Auswertesystems fuer die verschiedenen Betriebs- bzw. Lastzustaende erlassen. Unter Beruecksichtigung dieser Vorgaben wurden vom TUeV die Parametrierungskurven erstellt. Die Umsetzung des BMU-Papieres vom 01.09.1994 ergab keinerlei Vorteile, weder gab es eine Verringerung der anlagenbedingten Emissionen noch Vorteile fuer den Betrieb des MHKW`s. Im Gegenteil, erhoehte Gasverbraeuche und Betriebsstoerungen durch oftmalige Beschickungsstops verschlechterten den Betriebszustand. Erhoehte Rohgastemperatur im Kessel reduzierten die Lebensdauer der beiden Kessel kritisch. Der Betrieb mit 850 C und mit einer Verweilzeit von ca. 1 sec. fuehrt im MHKW Burgkirchen zu keiner Verschlechterung der Emissionswerte, macht aber die Anlagen wieder betreibbar. (orig./SR)

  16. Stress corrosion test of Al- Zn- Mg alloys with and without Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.C.; Garlipp, W.

    1982-01-01

    Two aluminium alloys 1 and 2 with the respectives compositions 6,10 wt% Zn; 1,58 wt% Mg; 0,24 wt% Cu and 6,25 wt% Zn; 2,03 wt% Mg; 0,24 wt% Cu; 0,078 wt% Nb, was cast, annealed, extruded and cold rolled to 10% of the initial area. Samples was made for tensile testing and stress corrosion cracking in accord with the recommended standard test. After quench from 460 0 C they was preaged at 100 0 C, 6 hours and aged again at 160 0 C in different times. The tests revealed better properties for the alloys 2. (Author) [pt

  17. Influence of Step Annealing Temperature on the Microstructure and Pitting Corrosion Resistance of SDSS UNS S32760 Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefieh, M.; Shamanian, M.; Saatchi, A.

    2011-12-01

    In the present work, the influence of step annealing heat treatment on the microstructure and pitting corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steel UNS S32760 welds have been investigated. The pitting corrosion resistance in chloride solution was evaluated by potentiostatic measurements. The results showed that step annealing treatments in the temperature ranging from 550 to 1000 °C resulted in a precipitation of sigma phase and Cr2N along the ferrite/austenite and ferrite/ferrite boundaries. At this temperature range, the metastable pits mainly nucleated around the precipitates formed in the grain boundary and ferrite phase. Above 1050 °C, the microstructure contains only austenite and ferrite phases. At this condition, the critical pitting temperature of samples successfully arrived to the highest value obtained in this study.

  18. Detection and evaluation of corrosion zones at high temperature in steam generators; Deteccion y evaluacion de zonas de corrosion en alta temperatura de generadoras de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez Villafane, Alberto; Chacon Nava, Jose G.; Huerta Espino, Mario; Mojica Calderon, Cecilio; Castillo Viveros, Antonio [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1990-12-31

    This paper presents the methodology for the detection and evaluation of high corrosion zones at high temperature. The results found up to now, show a critical zone in the Babcock Hitachi design, specifically in the high temperature reheater in the zone nearby the outlet header. In the normalized design CE (Mitsubishi) of 300 MW and CE (Canada) of 300 MW, the results found in recent years show small thickness reduction, therefore a good operation of these steam generators is recognized. [Espanol] En este trabajo se presenta la metodologia para la deteccion y evaluacion de zonas de corrosion en alta temperatura. Los resultados encontrados hasta el momento muestran una zona critica en el diseno Babcock Hitachi, especificamente en el recalentador de alta temperatura en la zona cercana al cabezal de salida. En el diseno normalizado CE (Mitsubishi) de 300 MW y CE (Canada) de 300 MW, los resultados encontrados en anos recientes muestran poca disminucion de espesor, por lo que se considera una buena operacion de estos generadores de vapor.

  19. Standard practice for preparation and use of Bent-Beam stress-corrosion test specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing, preparing, and using bent-beam stress-corrosion specimens. 1.2 Different specimen configurations are given for use with different product forms, such as sheet or plate. This practice applicable to specimens of any metal that are stressed to levels less than the elastic limit of the material, and therefore, the applied stress can be accurately calculated or measured (see Note 1). Stress calculations by this practice are not applicable to plastically stressed specimens. Note 1—It is the nature of these practices that only the applied stress can be calculated. Since stress-corrosion cracking is a function of the total stress, for critical applications and proper interpretation of results, the residual stress (before applying external stress) or the total elastic stress (after applying external stress) should be determined by appropriate nondestructive methods, such as X-ray diffraction (1). 1.3 Test procedures are given for stress-corrosion testing by ex...

  20. Standard test method for measurement of corrosion potentials of Aluminum alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for measurement of the corrosion potential (see Note 1) of an aluminum alloy in an aqueous solution of sodium chloride with enough hydrogen peroxide added to provide an ample supply of cathodic reactant. Note 1—The corrosion potential is sometimes referred to as the open-circuit solution or rest potential. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  1. See laser testing at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Anatolievich Novikov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The main problem for laser SEE testing at different temperatures is to determine correlation between laser pulse energy and LET. In the first approximation, LET values with the same laser pulse energy and different temperatures are directly proportional to the absorption coefficient of laser light in a semiconductor. Use of tabulated values could lead to errors and absorption coefficient should be determined for each sensitive volume of device under test (DUT. Temperature dependence of absorption coefficient could be determined using ionization response of DUT in power supply circuit under local laser irradiation. Using this approach a satisfactory correlation of ion and laser SEE test result was observed.

  2. Test plans of the high temperature test operation at HTTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakaba, Nariaki; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Takada, Eiji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-03-01

    HTTR plans a high temperature test operation as the fifth step of the rise-to-power tests to achieve a reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950 degrees centigrade in the 2003 fiscal year. Since HTTR is the first HTGR in Japan which uses coated particle fuel as its fuel and helium gas as its coolant, it is necessary that the plan of the high temperature test operation is based on the previous rise-to-power tests with a thermal power of 30 MW and a reactor outlet coolant temperature at 850 degrees centigrade. During the high temperature test operation, reactor characteristics, reactor performances and reactor operations are confirmed for the safety and stability of operations. This report describes the evaluation result of the safety confirmations of the fuel, the control rods and the intermediate heat exchanger for the high temperature test operation. Also, problems which were identified during the previous operations are shown with their solution methods. Additionally, there is a discussion on the contents of the high temperature test operation. As a result of this study, it is shown that the HTTR can safely achieve a thermal power of 30 MW with the reactor outlet coolant temperature at 950 degrees centigrade. (author)

  3. Time-temperature influence on the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr-Nb superalloys in contact with Na2SO4-V2O5 molten mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero, E.; Pardo, A.; Hernaez, J.; Hierro, P.

    1990-01-01

    Corrosion rate data obtained by the polarization resistance method in nickel-base superalloys in contact with Na 2 SO 4 -V 2 O 5 molten mixtures are presented. The instrumental technique is also described. Time-temperature influence on the corrosion kinetics in the described conditions is discussed (Author)

  4. High-temperature corrosion of alloyed steels in molten sodium tetraborate under atmosphere of air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochergin, V.P.; Zvegintseva, G.E.; Vinyarskaya, I.N.; Demidenko, O.V.; Sazonova, N.A.

    1993-01-01

    Results of corrosion process investigation at 1123-1223 K in molten sodium tetraborate on the surface of samples produced of steels alloyed by 1-6 mas.% of Mn, chromium-nickel steels containing 0.35 mas.% of C, 1-3 mas.% of Cr and Ni, as well as of a group of corrosion resistant steels are generalized

  5. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pyatina, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  6. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pyatina, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-14

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  7. Voltage, Temperature, Frequency Margin Test Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denver, Troelz

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the tests is to establish the camera functionality when it is exposed to an extreme environment for prolonged periods, thus simulating the end of life performance. This environment covers temperature, input clock frequency and supply voltage variation...

  8. Temperature Profile of the Duracell Test Strip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viiri, Jouni; Kettunen, Lasse

    1996-01-01

    Presents the temperature profile of the Duracell Test Strip obtained using a Inframetrics 740 thermal imaging radiometer and ThermaGRAM95 software and compares this to the theoretical profile derived by Clark and Bonicamp. (JRH)

  9. Responses of Microbial Community Composition to Temperature Gradient and Carbon Steel Corrosion in Production Water of Petroleum Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xiao Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil reservoir production systems are usually associated with a temperature gradient and oil production facilities frequently suffer from pipeline corrosion failures. Both bacteria and archaea potentially contribute to biocorrosion of the oil production equipment. Here the response of microbial populations from the petroleum reservoir to temperature gradient and corrosion of carbon steel coupons were investigated under laboratory condition. Carbon steel coupons were exposed to production water from a depth of 1809 m of Jiangsu petroleum reservoir (China and incubated for periods of 160 and 300 days. The incubation temperatures were set at 37, 55, and 65°C to monitoring mesophilic, thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms associated with anaerobic carbon steel corrosion. The results showed that corrosion rate at 55°C (0.162 ± 0.013 mm year-1 and 37°C (0.138 ± 0.008 mm year-1 were higher than that at 65°C (0.105 ± 0.007 mm year-1, and a dense biofilm was observed on the surface of coupons under all biotic incubations. The microbial community analysis suggests a high frequency of bacterial taxa associated with families Porphyromonadaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, and Spirochaetaceae at all three temperatures. While the majority of known sulfate-reducing bacteria, in particular Desulfotignum, Desulfobulbus and Desulfovibrio spp., were predominantly observed at 37°C; Desulfotomaculum spp., Thermotoga spp. and Thermanaeromonas spp. as well as archaeal members closely related to Thermococcus and Archaeoglobus spp. were substantially enriched at 65°C. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens of the family Methanobacteriaceae were dominant at both 37 and 55°C; acetoclastic Methanosaeta spp. and methyltrophic Methanolobus spp. were enriched at 37°C. These observations show that temperature changes significantly alter the microbial community structure in production fluids and also affected the biocorrosion of carbon steel under anaerobic conditions.

  10. Evaluation of taper joints with combined fatigue and crevice corrosion testing: Comparison to human explanted modular prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reclaru, L., E-mail: lucien.reclaru@pxgroup.com [PX Group S.A., Dep R and D Corrosion and Biocompatibility Group, Bd. des Eplatures 42, CH-2304 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Brooks, R.A. [Orthopaedic Research, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, University of Cambridge, Box 180 Hills Road, CB2 0QQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Zuberbühler, M. [Smith and Nephew Orthopaedics AG, Schachenalle 29, 5001 Aarau (Switzerland); Eschler, P.-Y.; Constantin, F. [PX Group S.A., Dep R and D Corrosion and Biocompatibility Group, Bd. des Eplatures 42, CH-2304 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Tomoaia, G. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iuliu Hateganu of Cluj-Napoca, Dept. of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2014-01-01

    The requirement for revision surgery of total joint replacements is increasing and modular joint replacement implants have been developed to provide adjustable prosthetic revision systems with improved intra-operative flexibility. An electrochemical study of the corrosion resistance of the interface between the distal and proximal modules of a modular prosthesis was performed in combination with a cyclic fatigue test. The complexity resides in the existence of interfaces between the distal part, the proximal part, and the dynamometric screw. A new technique for evaluating the resistance to cyclic dynamic corrosion with crevice stimulation was used and the method is presented. In addition, two components of the proximal module of explanted Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb prostheses were investigated by optical and electron microscopy. Our results reveal that: The electrolyte penetrates into the interface between the distal and proximal modules during cyclic dynamic fatigue tests, the distal module undergoes cracking and corrosion was generated at the interface between the two models; The comparison of the explanted proximal parts with the similar prostheses evaluated following cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion testing showed that there were significant similarities indicating that this method is suitable for evaluating materials used in the fabrication of modular prostheses. - Highlights: • Electrochemical crevice corrosion testing combined with fatigue test conducted on Ti6Al7Nb and Ti6Al4V modular prostheses • Cations released from integral prostheses • Comparison of human explanted modular prostheses with the similar prostheses evaluated in cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion.

  11. Evaluation of taper joints with combined fatigue and crevice corrosion testing: Comparison to human explanted modular prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reclaru, L.; Brooks, R.A.; Zuberbühler, M.; Eschler, P.-Y.; Constantin, F.; Tomoaia, G.

    2014-01-01

    The requirement for revision surgery of total joint replacements is increasing and modular joint replacement implants have been developed to provide adjustable prosthetic revision systems with improved intra-operative flexibility. An electrochemical study of the corrosion resistance of the interface between the distal and proximal modules of a modular prosthesis was performed in combination with a cyclic fatigue test. The complexity resides in the existence of interfaces between the distal part, the proximal part, and the dynamometric screw. A new technique for evaluating the resistance to cyclic dynamic corrosion with crevice stimulation was used and the method is presented. In addition, two components of the proximal module of explanted Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb prostheses were investigated by optical and electron microscopy. Our results reveal that: The electrolyte penetrates into the interface between the distal and proximal modules during cyclic dynamic fatigue tests, the distal module undergoes cracking and corrosion was generated at the interface between the two models; The comparison of the explanted proximal parts with the similar prostheses evaluated following cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion testing showed that there were significant similarities indicating that this method is suitable for evaluating materials used in the fabrication of modular prostheses. - Highlights: • Electrochemical crevice corrosion testing combined with fatigue test conducted on Ti6Al7Nb and Ti6Al4V modular prostheses • Cations released from integral prostheses • Comparison of human explanted modular prostheses with the similar prostheses evaluated in cyclic dynamic crevice corrosion

  12. Temperature Effects on Stainless Steel 316L Corrosion in the Environment of Sulphuric Acid (H2SO4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayu Arwati, I. G.; Herianto Majlan, Edy; Daud, Wan Ramli Wan; Shyuan, Loh Kee; Arifin, Khuzaimah Binti; Husaini, Teuku; Alfa, Sagir; Ashidiq, Fakhruddien

    2018-03-01

    In its application, metal is always in contact with its environment whether air, vapor, water, and other chemicals. During contact, chemical interactions emerge between metals and their respective environments such that the metal surface corrodes. This study aims to determine the corrosion rate of 316L stainless steel sulphuric acid environment (H2SO4) with weight loss and electrochemical methods. The corrosion rate (CR) is value of 316L stainless steel by weight loss method with sulfuric acid (H2SO4) with concentration of 0.5 M. The result obtained in conjunction with the increase of temperature the rate of erosion obtained appears to be larger, with a consecutive 3 hour the temperature of 50°C is 0.27 mg/cm2h, temperature 70°C 0.38 mg/cm2h, and temperature 90 °C 0.52 mg/cm2h. With the electrochemical method, the current value increases by using a C350 potentiostal tool. The higher the current, the longer the time the corrosion rate increases, where the current is at 90 °C with a 10-minute treatment time of 0.0014736 A. The 316L stainless steel in surface metal morphology is shown by using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).

  13. A study on stress corrosion cracking of explosive plugged part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaga, Seiichi; Fujii, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiaki; Sakuma, Koosuke; Hibi, Seiji; Morimoto, Hiroyoshi.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on the stress corrosion cracking of explosive plugged part are conducted. SUS 304 stainless steel is used as testing material. The distribution of residual stress in plug and tube plate after plugging is obtained. The effect of residual stress on the stress corrosion cracking is studied. Residual stress in tube plate near the plug is compressive and stress corrosion cracking dose not occur in the tube plate there, and it occurs on the inner surface of plug because of residual tensile stress in axial direction of the plug. Stress corrosion test in MgCl 2 solution under constant load is conducted. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of the explosive bonded boundary is lower than that of base metal because of greater resistance to plastic deformation. Stress corrosion test in high temperature and high pressure pure water is also conducted by means of static type of autoclave but stress corrosion cracking does not occur under the testing condition used. (author)

  14. Effect of Chromium on Corrosion Behavior of P110 Steels in CO2-H2S Environment with High Pressure and High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianbo; Sun, Chong; Lin, Xueqiang; Cheng, Xiangkun; Liu, Huifeng

    2016-01-01

    The novel Cr-containing low alloy steels have exhibited good corrosion resistance in CO2 environment, mainly owing to the formation of Cr-enriched corrosion film. In order to evaluate whether it is applicable to the CO2 and H2S coexistence conditions, the corrosion behavior of low-chromium steels in CO2-H2S environment with high pressure and high temperature was investigated using weight loss measurement and surface characterization. The results showed that P110 steel suffered localized corrosion and both 3Cr-P110 and 5Cr-P110 steels exhibited general corrosion. However, the corrosion rate of 5Cr-P110 was the highest among them. The corrosion process of the steels was simultaneously governed by CO2 and H2S. The outer scales on the three steels mainly consisted of FeS1−x crystals, whereas the inner scales on Cr-containing steels comprised of amorphous FeS1−x, Cr(OH)3 and FeCO3, in contrast with the amorphous FeS1−x and FeCO3 mixture film of P110 steel. The more chromium the steel contains, the more chromium compounds the corrosion products contain. The addition of chromium in steels increases the uniformity of the Cr-enriched corrosion scales, eliminates the localized corrosion, but cannot decrease the general corrosion rates. The formation of FeS1−x may interfere with Cr-enriched corrosion scales and lowering the corrosion performance of 3Cr-P110 and 5Cr-P110 steels. PMID:28773328

  15. Effect of Chromium on Corrosion Behavior of P110 Steels in CO₂-H₂S Environment with High Pressure and High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianbo; Sun, Chong; Lin, Xueqiang; Cheng, Xiangkun; Liu, Huifeng

    2016-03-16

    The novel Cr-containing low alloy steels have exhibited good corrosion resistance in CO₂ environment, mainly owing to the formation of Cr-enriched corrosion film. In order to evaluate whether it is applicable to the CO₂ and H₂S coexistence conditions, the corrosion behavior of low-chromium steels in CO₂-H₂S environment with high pressure and high temperature was investigated using weight loss measurement and surface characterization. The results showed that P110 steel suffered localized corrosion and both 3Cr-P110 and 5Cr-P110 steels exhibited general corrosion. However, the corrosion rate of 5Cr-P110 was the highest among them. The corrosion process of the steels was simultaneously governed by CO₂ and H₂S. The outer scales on the three steels mainly consisted of FeS 1- x crystals, whereas the inner scales on Cr-containing steels comprised of amorphous FeS 1- x , Cr(OH)₃ and FeCO₃, in contrast with the amorphous FeS 1- x and FeCO₃ mixture film of P110 steel. The more chromium the steel contains, the more chromium compounds the corrosion products contain. The addition of chromium in steels increases the uniformity of the Cr-enriched corrosion scales, eliminates the localized corrosion, but cannot decrease the general corrosion rates. The formation of FeS 1- x may interfere with Cr-enriched corrosion scales and lowering the corrosion performance of 3Cr-P110 and 5Cr-P110 steels.

  16. Effect of Chromium on Corrosion Behavior of P110 Steels in CO2-H2S Environment with High Pressure and High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The novel Cr-containing low alloy steels have exhibited good corrosion resistance in CO2 environment, mainly owing to the formation of Cr-enriched corrosion film. In order to evaluate whether it is applicable to the CO2 and H2S coexistence conditions, the corrosion behavior of low-chromium steels in CO2-H2S environment with high pressure and high temperature was investigated using weight loss measurement and surface characterization. The results showed that P110 steel suffered localized corrosion and both 3Cr-P110 and 5Cr-P110 steels exhibited general corrosion. However, the corrosion rate of 5Cr-P110 was the highest among them. The corrosion process of the steels was simultaneously governed by CO2 and H2S. The outer scales on the three steels mainly consisted of FeS1−x crystals, whereas the inner scales on Cr-containing steels comprised of amorphous FeS1−x, Cr(OH3 and FeCO3, in contrast with the amorphous FeS1−x and FeCO3 mixture film of P110 steel. The more chromium the steel contains, the more chromium compounds the corrosion products contain. The addition of chromium in steels increases the uniformity of the Cr-enriched corrosion scales, eliminates the localized corrosion, but cannot decrease the general corrosion rates. The formation of FeS1−x may interfere with Cr-enriched corrosion scales and lowering the corrosion performance of 3Cr-P110 and 5Cr-P110 steels.

  17. Temperature influence on corrosion rate of armco iron in acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perboni, G.; Rocchini, G.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study of the behaviour of Armco iron and several steels in acid solutions (HCl, H 2 SO 4 , H 3 PO 4 ) has been undertaken to determine the temperature effect on dissolution rate. The test temperatures were 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 deg C. The activation heat was determined by application of the Arrhenius law from colorimetric and electrochemical data. Investigation results obtained by both methods were represented diagrammatically and showed a good agreement, though the discrepancy in the data increased with test temperature

  18. Mechanical, Corrosion and Biological Properties of Room-Temperature Sputtered Aluminum Nitride Films with Dissimilar Nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besleaga, Cristina; Dumitru, Viorel; Trinca, Liliana Marinela; Popa, Adrian-Claudiu; Negrila, Constantin-Catalin; Kołodziejczyk, Łukasz; Luculescu, Catalin-Romeo; Ionescu, Gabriela-Cristina; Ripeanu, Razvan-George; Vladescu, Alina; Stan, George E

    2017-11-17

    Aluminum Nitride (AlN) has been long time being regarded as highly interesting material for developing sensing applications (including biosensors and implantable sensors). AlN, due to its appealing electronic properties, is envisaged lately to serve as a multi-functional biosensing platform. Although generally exploited for its intrinsic piezoelectricity, its surface morphology and mechanical performance (elastic modulus, hardness, wear, scratch and tensile resistance to delamination, adherence to the substrate), corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility are also essential features for high performance sustainable biosensor devices. However, information about AlN suitability for such applications is rather scarce or at best scattered and incomplete. Here, we aim to deliver a comprehensive evaluation of the morpho-structural, compositional, mechanical, electrochemical and biological properties of reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtered AlN nanostructured thin films with various degrees of c -axis texturing, deposited at a low temperature (~50 °C) on Si (100) substrates. The inter-conditionality elicited between the base pressure level attained in the reactor chamber and crystalline quality of AlN films is highlighted. The potential suitability of nanostructured AlN (in form of thin films) for the realization of various type of sensors (with emphasis on bio-sensors) is thoroughly probed, thus unveiling its advantages and limitations, as well as suggesting paths to safely exploit the remarkable prospects of this type of materials.

  19. Mechanical, Corrosion and Biological Properties of Room-Temperature Sputtered Aluminum Nitride Films with Dissimilar Nanostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Besleaga

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum Nitride (AlN has been long time being regarded as highly interesting material for developing sensing applications (including biosensors and implantable sensors. AlN, due to its appealing electronic properties, is envisaged lately to serve as a multi-functional biosensing platform. Although generally exploited for its intrinsic piezoelectricity, its surface morphology and mechanical performance (elastic modulus, hardness, wear, scratch and tensile resistance to delamination, adherence to the substrate, corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility are also essential features for high performance sustainable biosensor devices. However, information about AlN suitability for such applications is rather scarce or at best scattered and incomplete. Here, we aim to deliver a comprehensive evaluation of the morpho-structural, compositional, mechanical, electrochemical and biological properties of reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtered AlN nanostructured thin films with various degrees of c-axis texturing, deposited at a low temperature (~50 °C on Si (100 substrates. The inter-conditionality elicited between the base pressure level attained in the reactor chamber and crystalline quality of AlN films is highlighted. The potential suitability of nanostructured AlN (in form of thin films for the realization of various type of sensors (with emphasis on bio-sensors is thoroughly probed, thus unveiling its advantages and limitations, as well as suggesting paths to safely exploit the remarkable prospects of this type of materials.

  20. Modelling of the Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviour for Low Alloy Steels in High Temperature Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirbonod, B.

    2000-11-01

    The goal of the model is to calculate the crack growth and to determine the parameters of relevance for the stress corrosion cracking of the low alloy steels in high temperature water for reactor safety purposes. The model assumes for the crack growth mechanism an anodic dissolution initiated by the rupture of the oxide film by creep at the crack tip, a repassivation, and, for representing other possible crack growth mechanisms, a cleavage. The model for the dissolution considers all the parameters of relevance for the dissolution and well accepted laws of physics. The creep is calculated by a constitutive law of Chaboche with the finite element method. The dissolution cell is found to be situated in the region of the crack tip with a length up to a few hundred micrometers. Sensitive parameters for the crack growth are the strain to film rupture, the composition of the electrolyte, the exchange current densities, and the cleavage length. The model is in qualitative agreement with measurements. It is discussed with particular attention to the geometry and dimensions of the dissolution cell and to the species transport in the dissolution cell and along the crack. Further work should be devoted to the comparison of the model to experiments. (author)

  1. Application of aluminum diffusion coatings to mitigate the KCl-induced high-temperature corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiamehr, Saeed; Lomholt, T. N.; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2017-01-01

    Pack cementation was used to produce Fe1−xAl and Fe2Al5 diffusion coatings on ferritic-martensitic steel P91 and a Ni2Al3 diffusion coating on pure nickel. The performance of diffusion coatings against high-temperature corrosion induced by potassium chloride (KCl) was evaluated by exposing...... the samples at 600 °C for 168 h in static lab air under KCl deposit. In addition, a salt-free experiment was performed for comparison. Microstructure, chemical and phase composition of the samples were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X......-ray diffractometry (XRD) before and after the exposures. It was found that all the diffusion coatings formed protective oxides under salt-free exposure in air. Under the salt deposit, Fe1−xAl showed local failure while on large parts of the sample a protective layer had formed. Fe2Al5 was attacked over the entire...

  2. The Stress Corrosion Resistance and the Cryogenic Temperature Mechanical Behavior of 18-3 Mn (Nitronic 33) Stainless Steel Parent and Welded Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The ambient and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties and the ambient temperature stress corrosion results of 18-3 Mn (Nitronic 33)stainless steel, longitudinal and transverse, as received and as welded (TIG) material specimens manufactured from 0.063 inch thick sheet material, were described. The tensile test results indicate an increase in ultimate tensile and yield strengths with decreasing temperature. The elongation remained fairly constant to -200 F, but below that temperature the elongation decreased to less than 6.0% at liquid hydrogen temperature. The notched tensile strength (NTS) for the parent metal increased with decreasing temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature. Below -320 F the NTS decreased rapidly. The notched/unnotched (N/U) tensile ratio of the parent material specimens remained above 0.9 from ambient to -200 F, and decreased to approximately 0.65 and 0.62, respectively, for the longitudinal and transverse directions at liquid hydrogen temperature. After 180 days of testing, only those specimens exposed to the salt spray indicated pitting and some degradation of mechanical properties.

  3. Corrosion testing of selected packaging materials for disposal of high-level waste glass in rock-salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailos, E.; Schwarzkopf, W.; Koester, R.; Fiehn, B.; Halm, G.

    1991-01-01

    In previous corrosion studies performed in salt brines, unalloyed steels, Ti 99.8-Pd and Hastelloy C4 have proved to be the most promising materials for long-term resistant packagings to be used in heat-generating waste (vitrified HLW, spent fuel) disposal in rock-salt formations. Investigations of the iron-base materials Ni-Resist D2 and D4, cast iron and Si-cast iron have also been carried out in order to complete the results available to date. The three steels (fine-grained steel, low-carbon steel, cast steel) investigated and Ti 99.8-Pd resisted pitting and crevice corrosion as well as stress-corrosion cracking under all test conditions. Gamma dose-rates of 1 Gy/h - 100 Gy/h or H 2 S concentrations in the brines as well as welding and explosion plating did not influence noticeably the corrosion behaviour of the materials. Furthermore, the determined corrosion rates of the steels (50 μm/a-250 μm/a, depending on the test conditions) are intercomparable and imply technically acceptable corrosion allowances for the thick-walled containers discussed. For Ti 99.8-Pd no detectable corrosion was observed. By contrast, Hastelloy C4 proved susceptible to pitting and crevice corrosion at gamme dose-rates higher than 1 Gy/h and in the presence of H 2 S (25 mg/l) in Q-brine. The materials Ni Resist D2 and D4, cast iron and Si-cast iron corroded at negligible rates in the in-situ experiments performed in rock salt/limited amounts of NaCI-brine. Nevertheless, these materials must be ruled out as container materials because they have proved to be susceptible to pitting and intergranular corrosion in previous laboratory studies conducted with MgCI 2 -rich brine (Q-brine) in excess. 15 refs.; 29 figs.; 7 tabs

  4. Connection Temperatures during the Mokrsko Fire Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chlouba

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mokrsko fire test focused on the overall behaviour of the structure, which cannot be observed on the separate elements, and also on the temperature of connections with improved fire resistance. During the test, measurements were made of the temperature of the gas and of the elements, the overall and relative deformations, gas pressure, humidity, the radiation of the compartment to structural element and the external steel column, transport of the moisture through the walls, and also the climatic conditions. The results of the test show the differences between the behaviour of the element and the behaviour of the structure exposed to high temperatures during a fire. The collapse of the composite slab was reached. The results of the numerical simulations using the SAFIR program compared well with the measured temperature values in the structure and also in the connections. 

  5. Biofouling and microbial corrosion problem in the thermo-fluid heat exchanger and cooling water system of a nuclear test reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, T S; Kora, Aruna Jyothi; Chandramohan, P; Panigrahi, B S; Narasimhan, S V

    2009-10-01

    This article discusses aspects of biofouling and corrosion in the thermo-fluid heat exchanger (TFHX) and in the cooling water system of a nuclear test reactor. During inspection, it was observed that >90% of the TFHX tube bundle was clogged with thick fouling deposits. Both X-ray diffraction and Mossbauer analyses of the fouling deposit demonstrated iron corrosion products. The exterior of the tubercle showed the presence of a calcium and magnesium carbonate mixture along with iron oxides. Raman spectroscopy analysis confirmed the presence of calcium carbonate scale in the calcite phase. The interior of the tubercle contained significant iron sulphide, magnetite and iron-oxy-hydroxide. A microbiological assay showed a considerable population of iron oxidizing bacteria and sulphate reducing bacteria (10(5) to 10(6) cfu g(-1) of deposit). As the temperature of the TFHX is in the range of 45-50 degrees C, the microbiota isolated/assayed from the fouling deposit are designated as thermo-tolerant bacteria. The mean corrosion rate of the CS coupons exposed online was approximately 2.0 mpy and the microbial counts of various corrosion causing bacteria were in the range 10(3) to 10(5) cfu ml(-1) in the cooling water and 10(6) to 10(8) cfu ml(-1) in the biofilm.

  6. Influence of sulfates on chloride diffusion and chloride-induced reinforcement corrosion in limestone cement materials at low temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sotiriadis, Konstantinos; Rakanta, E.; Mitzithra, M. E.; Batis, G.; Tsivilis, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 8 (2017), č. článku 04017060. ISSN 0899-1561 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : limestone cement * chloride diffusion * reinforcement corrosion * sulfate attack * low temperature Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 1.644, year: 2016 http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/%28ASCE%29MT.1943-5533.0001895

  7. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Songjie; Zhang Zuogui; Akiyama, Eiji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki; Zhang Boping

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  8. An integrated model of tritium transport and corrosion in Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs) – Part I: Theory and benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stempien, John D., E-mail: john.stempien@inl.gov; Ballinger, Ronald G., E-mail: hvymet@mit.edu; Forsberg, Charles W., E-mail: cforsber@mit.edu

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A model was developed for use with FHRs and benchmarked with experimental data. • Model results match results of tritium diffusion experiments. • Corrosion simulations show reasonable agreement with molten salt loop experiments. • This is the only existing model of tritium transport and corrosion in FHRs. • Model enables proposing and evaluating tritium control options in FHRs. - Abstract: The Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) is a pebble bed nuclear reactor concept cooled by a liquid fluoride salt known as “flibe” ({sup 7}LiF-BeF{sub 2}). A model of TRITium Diffusion EvolutioN and Transport (TRIDENT) was developed for use with FHRs and benchmarked with experimental data. TRIDENT is the first model to integrate the effects of tritium production in the salt via neutron transmutation, with the effects of the chemical redox potential, tritium mass transfer, tritium diffusion through pipe walls, tritium uptake by graphite, selective chromium attack by tritium fluoride, and corrosion product mass transfer. While data from a forced-convection polythermal loop of molten salt containing tritium did not exist for comparison, TRIDENT calculations were compared to data from static salt diffusion tests in flibe and flinak (0.465LiF-0.115NaF-0.42KF) salts. In each case, TRIDENT matched the transient and steady-state behavior of these tritium diffusion experiments. The corrosion model in TRIDENT was compared against the natural convection flow-loop experiments at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from the 1960s and early 1970s which used Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel-salt containing UF{sub 4}. Despite the lack of data required by TRIDENT for modeling the loops, some reasonable results were obtained. The TRIDENT corrosion rates follow the experimentally observed dependence on the square root of the product of the chromium solid-state diffusion coefficient with time. Additionally the TRIDENT model predicts mass

  9. New corrosion issues in gas sweetening plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G. (CLI International and Asperger Technologies, Houston, TX (United States))

    Gas treating plants are experiencing corrosion problems which impact on efficiency and safety. While general corrosion is not particularly hazardous in the gas processing industry, local corrosion is very dangerous since it has several different mechanisms, all of which have dangerously high rates, and it occurs at locations which are hard to find and hard to predict. A newly discovered, velocity-dependent type of corrosion is reported. It is related to yet-undefined species which cause excessively high corrosion in areas of turbulence. This accelerated corrosion is not due to erosion or cavitation, but to a diffusion-limited reaction accelerated by turbulence. A full-flow test loop was built to evaluate the corrosiveness of gas plant solutions at their normal temperature and flow rates. Test runs were conducted with Co[sub 2]-loaded amine solutions for periods of 12 days. Carbon steel specimens mounted in the test loop were examined and corrosion rates calculated. Chromium alloys were shown to be attacked by corrodents in the low-velocity part of the loop and very aggressively attacked in the high-velocity part. The tests demonstrate the need for rigorous monitoring of corrosion in areas of higher velocity such as piping elbows and other points of turbulence. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. High temperature corrosion of cold worked YUS409D bellows of bellow-sealed valve in LBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustari1, A. P. A.; Irwanto1, D.; Takahashi, M.

    2017-01-01

    Lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) loop test is highly contributes to the lead-alloy-cooled fast breeder reactor (LFR) and accelerator driven system (ADS) research and development by providing comprehensive results of both corrosion and erosion phenomenon. Bellows-sealed valve is a crucial part in the LBE loop test apparatus, due to its capability of preventing corrosion on valve spring, thus improves the operation time of the system. LBE is very corrosive to stainless steel by formation of oxide layer or elemental dissolution, e.g. Ni. Thus, new type of bellows for bellows-sealed valve made of nickel free material, i.e. YUS409D, is proposed to be used in the LBE. Bellows material undergo heat treatments for mechanical improvement including cold working and annealing. The thickness reduction by the heat treatments is about 90% of initial condition. Corrosion behavior of the bellows has been studied in stagnant LBE at 500 and 600 °C for 500 hours. The oxygen concentration was controlled at about 10-7 wt%. Typical oxide layers were developed on the surface. Oxidation rate was sharply increased at 600°C.

  11. Room temperature corrosion of museum glass: an investigation using low-energy SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fearn, Sarah; McPhail, David S.; Oakley, Victoria

    2004-06-15

    Glass is often regarded as a stable durable material and the wide range of contemporary applications of glass reinforces this belief. There is nothing inherent in the glassy state, however, that confers stability, and the problem of glass corrosion has been well documented since the 17th century. Glass corrosion still affects commercial float glass production and glasses used to contain high level nuclear waste, but one area in particular where glass corrosion is very common is in the museum environment. In order to conserve these artefacts it is essential to understand fully both the composition of the corroded glass and the corrosion mechanism. In this study, the application of low-energy SIMS for the depth profiling of corroded glass is studied with the aim of finding a suitable environment for the safe storage of glass objects in a museum.

  12. Anti-corrosive Conversion Coating on Aluminium Alloys Using High Temperature Steam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    Aluminium is extensively used as a structural material due to its excellent strength to weight ratio and corrosion resistance properties. The surface of aluminium under normal conditions has a thin oxide film (1-10nm) which provides corrosion resistance. However due to lower thickness, flaws...... and heterogeneity of native oxide layer does not provide long time corrosion resistance and adhesion of organic coating for a particular function in different environments. In order to enhance the corrosion resistance and adhesion of organic coating, the aluminium native oxide layer is treated to transform...... or convert to a functional conversion coating. In the last several decades chromate conversion coating (CrCCs) have been the most common conversion coatings used for aluminium alloys. Due to the toxicity of the hexavalent chrome, however, environmental friendly alternatives to CrCCs have been investigated...

  13. Automated Methods Of Corrosion Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Reeve, John Ch

    1997-01-01

    The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell.......The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell....

  14. Study of Temperature Effect on the Corrosion Inhibition of C38 Carbon Steel Using Amino-tris(Methylenephosphonic Acid in Hydrochloric Acid Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najoua Labjar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tafel polarization method was used to assess the corrosion inhibitive and adsorption behaviours of amino-tris(methylenephosphonic acid (ATMP for C38 carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution in the temperature range from 30 to 60∘C. It was shown that the corrosion inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increase in ATMP concentration but decreased with temperature, which is suggestive of physical adsorption mechanism. The adsorption of the ATMP onto the C38 steel surface was found to follow Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The corrosion inhibition mechanism was further corroborated by the values of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters obtained from the experimental data.

  15. The effect of treatment temperature on corrosion resistance and hydrophilicity of an ionic liquid coating for Mg-based stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yafei; Forsyth, Maria; Hinton, Bruce R W

    2014-01-01

    Mg alloys are attractive candidate materials for biodegradable stents. However, there are few commercially available Mg-based stents in clinical use because Mg alloys generally undergo rapid localized corrosion in the body. In this study, we report a new surface coating for Mg alloy AZ31 based on a low-toxicity ionic liquid (IL), tributyl(methyl)phosphonium diphenyl phosphate (P1,4,4,4 dpp), to control its corrosion rate. Emphasis is placed on the effect of treatment temperature. We showed that enhancing the treatment temperature provided remarkable improvements in the performances of both corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Increasing treatment temperature resulted in a thicker (although still nanometer scale) and more homogeneous IL film on the surface. Scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry observations showed that there were many large, deep pits formed on the surface of bare AZ31 after 2 h of immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The IL coating (particularly when formed at 100 °C for 1 h) significantly suppressed the formation of these pits on the surface, making corrosion occur more uniformly. The P1,4,4,4 dpp IL film formed at 100 °C was more hydrophilic than the bare AZ31 surface, which was believed to be beneficial for avoiding the deposition of the proteins and cells on the surface and therefore improving the biocompatibility of AZ31 in blood. The interaction mechanism between this IL and AZ31 was also investigated using ATR-FTIR, which showed that both anion and cation of this IL were present in the film, and there was a chemical interaction between dpp(-) anion and the surface of AZ31 during the film formation.

  16. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of various stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Masatsune; Kawamoto, Teruaki

    1978-01-01

    In order to evaluate new plant materials for their future applications to boiling water reactors (BWRs), the creviced bent beam SCC tests (CBB tests) were conducted on various sensitized stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water. The results obtained are as follows. 1. Field SCC can be easily reproduced by the CBB test using the specimens taken from the 304 stainless steel pipe weld joints. 2. The SCC susceptibility of 18Cr-11Ni stainless steel in oxygenated high temperature water decreases markedly with the reduction of the carbon content. 3. The SCC susceptibility of low carbon stainless steels (304L, 316L) and stabilized stainless steels (321, 347) is significantly lower than that of the 304 and 316 stainless steels. 4. The addition of molybdenum causes the sensitization of stainless steels to delay at lower temperatures, improving the SCC resistance of the weld joints of BWR pipe materials. (auth.)

  17. High temperature corrosion of metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastidas, D. M.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Research and development has made it possible to use metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC instead of ceramic materials. The use of metallic interconnects was formerly hindered by the high operating temperature, which made the interconnect degrade too much and too fast to be an efficient alternative. When the operating temperature was lowered, the use of metallic interconnects proved to be favourable since they are easier and cheaper to produce than ceramic interconnects. However, metallic interconnects continue to be degraded despite the lowered temperature, and their corrosion products contribute to electrical degradation in the fuel cell. Coatings of nickel, chromium, aluminium, zinc, manganese, yttrium or lanthanum between the interconnect and the electrodes reduce this degradation during operation

    El uso de interconectores metálicos en pilas de combustible de óxido sólido (SOFC en sustitución de materiales cerámicos ha sido posible gracias a la investigación y desarrollo de nuevos materiales metálicos. Inicialmente, el uso de interconectores metálicos fue limitado, debido a la elevada temperatura de trabajo, ocasionando de forma rápida la degradación del material, lo que impedía que fuesen una alternativa. A medida que la temperatura de trabajo de las SOFC descendió, el uso de interconectores metálicos demostró ser una buena alternativa, dado que son más fáciles de fabricar y más baratos que los interconectores cerámicos. Sin embargo, los interconectores metálicos continúan degradándose a pesar de descender la temperatura a la que operan las SOFC y, asimismo, los productos de corrosión favorecen las pérdidas eléctricas de la pila de combustible. Recubrimientos de níquel, cromo, aluminio, zinc, manganeso, itrio y lantano entre el interconector y los electrodos reduce dichas pérdidas eléctricas.

  18. Array-type sensor to determine corrosive conditions in high temperature water under gamma rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, T.; Tsukada, T.; Uchida, S.; Katoh, C.

    2010-01-01

    One of the problems to determine electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) in high temperature water under irradiation is to apply long-lived and reliable reference electrodes. In order to avoid troubles due to the reference electrode, a new concept to determine ECP without the reference electrode has been proposed. Several metal plates are applied as working electrodes and at the same time as the reference electrodes. Potential of the metal plates with stable oxide films on their surfaces show stable values in high temperature water. As a result of the combination of their potential values, ECP of each metal can be determined without any specific reference electrode. Array-type sensors consisting of several metal plates, e.g., Fe, Ni, Cr, Zr, Pt, Pd, Re, Ir, with well developed oxide films on their surface were prepared for ECP measurement in high temperature water under neutron/gamma ray irradiations. In order to confirm the feasibility of this concept, responses of the redox potentials of the pure metals to changes in the simulated BWR reactor water conditions were measured and the ECP was determined by the differences in potentials between a couple of metal plates. Major conclusions of the study are as follows: 1) The redox potentials of the Fe, Pt, Zr, Ir, Pd, and Re electrodes showed the different dependences on the changes in O 2 and H 2 O 2 concentrations. The redox potentials of the electrodes increased as the oxidant concentrations increased except for Zr electrode. The potential of the Zr electrode was kept the very low potential at the wide range of O 2 and H 2 O 2 concentrations differed form the other electrodes. 2) It was estimated that the redox potential of highly soluble metal may be increased, while that of low soluble metal may be decreased by an oxide film. The stable oxide film would cause the stable potential response of the electrode with oxide film. 3) The relationship between the oxidant concentrations and the redox potentials of the

  19. Corrosion testing of filter papers made with J-M 475 and J-M 753 glass fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, G.S.; Wiggins, F.N.; Weber, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    Results of static tests conducted on the fibers, and dynamic tests conducted on the papers are reported. The tests were conducted using H 2 O, HNO 3 , H 2 So 4 , HCl, NaOH, and NH 4 OH as the corrosive media. (U.S.)

  20. Effect of heat treatments and pre-irradiation on the corrosion at high pressure and temperature of pressure tube Zr-2.5Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmedo, A.M; Bordoni, R

    2006-01-01

    Zr and its alloys are widely used in the nuclear industry. The pressure tubes (PT) of CANDU reactors are made using the alloy Zr-2.5Nb because of its high mechanical resistance and its good behavior under aqueous corrosion at high pressure and temperature. The resulting microstructure after the production process consists of elongated grains of Zr-α with hcp structure (≤ 1%Nb) , approximately 0.3-0.5 μ thick, surrounded by a metastable β Zr bcc phase rich in Nb (≅20%). Temperatures of less than 600 C produce an evolution of the β Zr phase towards an equilibrium structure consisting of β Nb (≅85% of Nb) and α Zr phases. The conditions for the evolution of this phase may involve a Nb-poor intermediate phase called ω and the enrichment of Nb for the rest. The radiation, particularly the flow of rapid neutrons (E ≥1Mev), modifies the microstructure of the material inducing β-Nb precipitates in the grains of the α-Zr phase. The temperature and radiation induced changes in the microstructure modify the resistance to the corrosion of the Zr-2.5Nb of the PT. This work studies the behavior to corrosion of Zr-2.5Nb coupons of (PT) with aging heat treatments (HT) of (PT) at 400 o C for 72 and 1000 hours and at 500 o C for 2.6 and 10 hours. The results indicated that the corrosion speed of the test pieces with HT is less than for those without HT and that the decrement of the corrosion speed is much more pronounced in the first 2.6 h of aging at 500 o C and in the first 72 h at 400 o C. Also the greater the duration of the HT, the better the behavior to corrosion. This decreased corrosion speed is associated with the modifications produced in the microstructure of the PT material due to the effect of the HT, which cause the decomposition of the βZr phase and lead to a microstructure that is much closer to one of equilibrium. That is, the closer the material's microstructure is to equilibrium the greater will be the resistance to its corrosion. This effect

  1. Evaluation of the corrosion inhibition potentials of green-tip forest lily ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant extracts are excellent alternatives as corrosion inhibitors because of availability, low toxicity, biodegradability and low cost. In this study, corrosion tests were performed on mild steel to evaluate the effect of concentration of inhibitor, varying immersion period and temperature on the corrosion inhibition properties of ...

  2. Corrosion Inhibition of Titanium in Acidic Media Containing Fluoride with Bixin

    OpenAIRE

    Jinendra Singh Chauhan; D. K. Gupta

    2009-01-01

    The bixin in acidic media were tested for corrosion inhibition of Ti in 0.5 N sulphuric acid and 0.1 N HCl solution at 30 to 40 °C temperature range by electrochemical methods. It reveals that bixin works as a corrosion inhibitor in halide media and protect the metals from the corrosion with great efficiency

  3. Corrosion Inhibition of Titanium in Acidic Media Containing Fluoride with Bixin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinendra Singh Chauhan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The bixin in acidic media were tested for corrosion inhibition of Ti in 0.5 N sulphuric acid and 0.1 N HCl solution at 30 to 40 °C temperature range by electrochemical methods. It reveals that bixin works as a corrosion inhibitor in halide media and protect the metals from the corrosion with great efficiency

  4. Inhibitive effect of N,N'-Dimethylaminoethanol on carbon steel corrosion in neutral sodium chloride solution, at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassoune Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition of carbon steel corrosion in neutral sodium chloride solution by N,N'- Dimethylaminoethanol (DMEA, at different temperatures, was investigated using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS techniques. The results obtained confirm that DMEA is a good organic corrosion inhibitor for carbon steel in 0.5M of NaCl (concentration encountered in the Mediterranean seawater, over the whole range of temperatures studied. The inhibition efficiency (IE% increases with increasing DMEA concentration; it reaches highest value for a concentration around 0.125 mol.L-1. Potentiodynamic polarization data show that, the compound studied in this research predominantly act as anodic-type inhibitor. The EIS study reveals that the addition of DMEA decreases the corrosion rate of carbon steel in neutral sodium chloride solution, due to the fact that the inhibitor molecules are strongly adsorbed on the active sites following Langmuir isotherm, thus leading to the formation of a stable protective film on the steel surface which is able to keep the metal/solution interface in a passive state. Furthermore, the values of the activation parameters, i.e. ΔHa and Ea obtained in this study indicate that the adsorption process of DMEA is endothermic and could be mainly attributed to chemisorption, respectively.

  5. High-Temperature Corrosion of AlCrSiN Film in Ar-1%SO2 Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Yadav

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AlCrSiN film with a composition of 29.1Al-17.1Cr-2.1Si-51.7N in at. % was deposited on a steel substrate by cathodic arc ion plating at a thickness of 1.8 μm. It consisted of nanocrystalline hcp-AlN and fcc-CrN, where a small amount of Si was dissolved. Corrosion tests were carried out at 800 °C for 5–200 h in Ar-1%SO2 gas. The major corrosion reaction was oxidation owing to the high oxygen affinity of Al and Cr in the film. The formed oxide scale consisted primarily of (Al,Cr2O3, within which Fe, Si, and S were dissolved. Even after corrosion for 200 h, the thickness of the scale was about 0.7–1.2 μm, indicating that the film had good corrosion resistance in the SO2-containing atmosphere.

  6. Corrosion behavior in high-temperature pressurized water of Zircaloy-4 joints brazed with Zr-Cu-based amorphous filler alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Gu; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Park, Jin-Ju; Lee, Min-Ku

    2017-01-01

    The compositional effects of ternary Zr-Cu-X (X: Al, Fe) amorphous filler alloys on galvanic corrosion susceptibility in high-temperature pressurized water were investigated for Zircaloy-4 brazed joints. Through an Al-induced microgalvanic reaction that deteriorated the overall nobility of the joint, application of the Zr-Cu-Al filler alloy caused galvanic coupling to develop readily between the Al-bearing joint and the Al-free base metal, finally leading to massive localized corrosion of the joint. Contrastingly, joints prepared with a Zr-Cu-Fe filler alloy showed excellent corrosion resistance comparable to that of the Zircaloy-4 base metal, since the Cu and Fe elements forming fine intermetallic particles with Zr did not influence the electrochemical stability of the resultant joints. The present results demonstrate that Fe is a more suitable alloying element than Al for brazing filler alloys subjected to high-temperature corrosive environments. - Highlights: •Corrosion of Zircaloy-4 joints brazed with Zr-Cu-X filler alloys was investigated. •Alloyed Al deteriorated the overall nobility of joints by microgalvanic reaction. •Compositional gradient of Al in joints was the driving force for galvanic corrosion. •Cu and Fe did not influence the electrochemical stability of joints. •Zr-Cu-Fe filler alloy yielded excellent high-temperature corrosion resistance.

  7. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour of low alloy steels in high temperature water: Description and results from modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirbonod, B.

    2001-01-01

    The initiation and growth of a crack by stress and corrosion in the low alloy steels used for the pressure vessels of Boiling Water Reactors may affect the availability and safety of the plant. This paper presents a new model for stress corrosion cracking of the low alloy steels in high temperature water. The model, based on observations, assumes the crack growth mechanism to be based on an anodic dissolution and cleavage. The main results deal with the position of the dissolution cell found at the crack tip, and with the identification of the parameters sensitive to crack growth, among which are the electrolyte composition and the cleavage length. The model is conservative, in qualitative agreement with measurements conducted at PSI, and may be extended to other metal-environment systems. (author)

  8. Dresden 1 Radiation Level Reduction Program. Intergranular corrosion tests of sensitized Type-304 stainless steel in Dow NS-1, and stress corrosion cracking tests of Type-304 stainless steel and carbon and low alloy steels in Dow copper rinse solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, W.L.

    1978-09-01

    Corrosion tests were performed to evaluate the extent of intergranular attack on sensitized Type-304 stainless steel by a proprietary Dow Chemical solvent, NS-1, which is to be used in the chemical cleaning of the Dresden 1 primary system. In addition, tests were performed to evaluate stress corrosion cracking of sensitized Type-304 stainless steel and post-weld heat-treated ASTM A336-F1, A302-B, and A106-B carbon and low alloy steels in a solution to be used to remove residual metallic copper from the Dresden 1 primary system surfaces following the chemical cleaning. No evidence of deleterious corrosion was observed in either set of tests

  9. Effects of Solution Annealing Temperature on the Galvanic Corrosion Behavior of the Super Duplex Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Seob; Jeon, Soon-Hyeok; Park, Yong-Soo

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the active dissolution of super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) at various solution annealing temperatures. The active dissolutions of the α-phase and γ-phase were compared, and the effects of the surface area ratio on the active dissolutions of both phases were investigated. There were two peaks in the active-passive transition region in the potentiodynamic test in the modified green-death solution. The two peaks changed as the solution annealing temperature was increased from 1050 to 1150 °C. The solution annealing temperature difference affected the critical anodic current densities. This provides useful information for determining the appropriate solution annealing temperature in the modified green-death solution for SDSS.

  10. High-temperature Corrosion Resistance of Composite Coating Prepared by Micro-arc Oxidation Combined with Pack Cementation Aluminizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Zu-jiang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Al2O3 ceramic film was obtained by micro-arc oxidation (MAO process on Al/C103 specimen, which was prepared by pack cementation aluminizing technology on C103 niobium alloy. With the aid of XRD and SEM equipped with EDS, chemical compositions and microstructures of the composite coatings before and after high-temperature corrosion were analyzed. The behavior and mechanism of the composite coatings in high-temperature oxidation and hot corrosion were also investigated. The results indicate that oxidation mass gain at 1000℃ for 10h of the Al/C103 specimen is 6.98mg/cm2, and it is 2.89mg/cm2 of the MAO/Al/C103 specimen. However, the mass gain of MAO/Al/C103 specimen (57.52mg/cm2 is higher than that of Al/C103 specimen (28.08mg/cm2 after oxidation 20h. After hot corrosion in 75%Na2SO4 and 25%NaCl at 900℃ for 50h, the mass gain of Al/C103 and MAO/Al/C103 specimens are 70.54mg/cm2 and 55.71mg/cm2 respectively, Al2O3 and perovskite NaNbO3 phases are formed on the surface; the diffusion of molten salt is suppressed, due to part of NaNbO3 accumulated in the MAO micropores. Therefore, MAO/Al/C103 specimen exhibits better hot corrosion resistance.

  11. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-01

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids

  12. Laboratory Investigations of the High Temperature Corrosion of Various Materials in Simulated oxy-fuel and Conventional Coal Firing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folkeson, N.; Pettersson, J.; Svensson, J.E.; Hjornhede, A.; Montgomery, M.; Bjurman, M.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory exposures in horizontal tube furnaces were conducted to test various materials for corrosion resistance in simulated oxy-fuel firing and conventional coal firing environments. Two different exposures were done at 630 C for 672 hours. The reaction atmosphere, consisting of CO 2 , H 2 O, O 2 , N 2 and SO 2 , was mixed to resemble that of oxy-fuel firing in the first exposure and that of conventional coal firing in the second exposure (N 2 was added during the second exposure only). Four different materials were tested in the first exposure; Sanicro 63, Alloy 800HT, 304L and 304HCu. In the second exposure four different materials were tested; 304L, Alloy 800HT, Kanthal APMT and NiCrAl. Apart from cleaned sample coupons, some samples pre-exposed in a test rig under oxy-fuel conditions with lignite as fuel and some pre-exposed with bituminous coal as fuel were investigated in the first exposure. In the second exposure some samples were pre-exposed in a rig under conventional firing conditions with lignite as fuel. The corrosion attack on the investigated samples was analysed by gravimetry, x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive x-ray (EDX). The SEM/EDX analysis was made on both the sample envelope and metallographic cross sections of the samples. The results show that there is small difference in the corrosion attack between the two environments. There was also little difference in oxide morphology and composition between cleaned samples and pre-exposed samples of the same material. The austenitic chromia former 304HCu suffered the most extensive corrosion attack in the oxy-fuel environment. In the conventional air firing environment 304L showed the highest mass gain. Chromia formers with higher chromium concentrations performed better, especially the super austenitic Alloy 800HT, with its high chromium concentration, formed a thin and protective corundum type oxide. The nickel based Sanicro 63 showed very low

  13. High temperature corrosion of silicon carbide and silicon nitride in the presence of chloride compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNallan, M.

    1993-01-01

    Silicon carbide and silicon nitride are resistant to oxidation because a protective silicon dioxide films on their surfaces in most oxidizing environments. Chloride compounds can attack the surface in two ways: 1) chlorine can attack the silicon directly to form a volatile silicon chloride compound or 2) alkali compounds combined with the chlorine can be transported to the surface where they flux the silica layer by forming stable alkali silicates. Alkali halides have enough vapor pressure that a sufficient quantity of alkali species to cause accelerated corrosion can be transported to the ceramic surface without the formation of a chloride deposit. When silicon carbide is attacked simultaneously by chlorine and oxygen, the corrosion products include both volatile and condensed spices. Silicon nitride is much more resistance to this type of attack than silicon carbide. Silicon based ceramics are exposed to oxidizing gases in the presence of alkali chloride vapors, the rate of corrosion is controlled primarily by the driving force for the formation of alkali silicate, which can be quantified as the activity of the alkali oxide in equilibrium with the corrosive gas mixture. In a gas mixture containing a fixed partial pressure of KCl, the rate of corrosion is accelerated by increasing the concentration of water vapor and inhibited by increasing the concentration of HCl. Similar results have been obtained for mixtures containing other alkalis and halogens. (Orig./A.B.)

  14. Standard Test Methods for Detecting Susceptibility to Intergranular Corrosion in Wrought, Nickel-Rich, Chromium-Bearing Alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover two tests as follows: 1.1.1 Method A, Ferric Sulfate-Sulfuric Acid Test (Sections 3-10, inclusive)—This test method describes the procedure for conducting the boiling ferric sulfate—50 % sulfuric acid test which measures the susceptibility of certain nickel-rich, chromium-bearing alloys to intergranular corrosion (see Terminology G 15), which may be encountered in certain service environments. The uniform corrosion rate obtained by this test method, which is a function of minor variations in alloy composition, may easily mask the intergranular corrosion components of the overall corrosion rate on alloys N10276, N06022, N06059, and N06455. 1.1.2 Method B, Mixed Acid-Oxidizing Salt Test (Sections 11-18, inclusive)—This test method describes the procedure for conducting a boiling 23 % sulfuric + 1.2 % hydrochloric + 1 % ferric chloride + 1 % cupric chloride test which measures the susceptibility of certain nickel-rich, chromium-bearing alloys to display a step function increa...

  15. Corrosion rate of construction materials in hot phosphoric acid with the contribution of anodic polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouril, M.; Christensen, Erik; Eriksen, S.

    2011-01-01

    ). Several grades of stainless steels were tested as well as tantalum, niobium, titanium, nickel alloys and silicon carbide. The corrosion rate was evaluated by means of mass loss at free corrosion potential as well as under various levels of polarization. The only corrosion resistant material in 85...... to tantalum, titanium is free of any corrosion resistance in hot phosphoric acid. Its corrosion rate ranges from tens of millimetres to metres per year depending on temperature of the acid. Alloy bonded tantalum coating was recognized as an effective corrosion protection for both titanium and stainless steel...

  16. Measurements of the corrosion of low-carbon steel drums under environmental conditions at Hanford: One-year test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.R.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes the methods used to expose low-carbon steel drums to atmospheric and soil corrosion and describes the methods used to examine specimens retrieved from both types of tests. These drums are being tested to meet requirements of radioactive waste storage for both low-level radioactive wastes and transuranic wastes

  17. Critical study of test methods in stress corrosion cracking. Application to stainless steels in chloride environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajana, Lotfi

    1985-01-01

    The transposition of results obtained in laboratory to the prediction of in-service material resistance is a crucial problem in the case of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The search for a SCC test which allows a reliable and realistic classification of stainless steels in chloride environments requires a choice of adequate electrolytes and of mechanical solicitation mode. In this research, the author first justifies the choice of an environment which could be representative of actual service conditions in the case of 5 grades of austenitic steels and 1 grade of austeno-ferric steel. Using a computerized data acquisition and processing system, the author compares the information obtained with two types of test: under constant load and under slow strain rate [fr

  18. Annual Report, Fall 2016: Alternative Chemical Cleaning of Radioactive High Level Waste Tanks - Corrosion Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel exposed to two proposed chemical cleaning solutions: acidic permanganate (0.18 M nitric acid and 0.05M sodium permanganate) and caustic permanganate. (10 M sodium hydroxide and 0.05M sodium permanganate). These solutions have been proposed as a chemical cleaning solution for the retrieval of actinides in the sludge in the waste tanks, and were tested with both HM and PUREX sludge simulants at a 20:1 ratio.

  19. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO 2 corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  20. Examination of the 1970 National Bureau of Standards Underground Corrosion Test Welded Stainless STeel Coupons from Site D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. R. Zirker; M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder; T. L. Trowbridge

    2008-01-01

    A 1970 study initiated by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), now known as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), buried over 6000 corrosion coupons or specimens of stainless steel Types 201, 202, 301, 304, 316, 409, 410, 430, and 434. The coupons were configured as sheet metal plates, coated plates, cross-welded plates, U-bend samples, sandwiched materials, and welded tubes. All coupons were of various heat-treatments and cold worked conditions and were buried at six distinctive soil-type sites throughout the United States. The NBS scientists dug five sets of two trenches at each of the six sites. In each pair of trenches, they buried duplicate sets of stainless steel coupons. The NBS study was designed to retrieve coupons after one year, two years, four years, eight years, and x years in the soil. During the first eight years of the study, four of five planned removals were completed. After the fourth retrieval, the NBS study was abandoned, and the fifth and final set of specimens remained undisturbed for over 33 years. In 2003, an interdisciplinary research team of industrial, university, and national laboratory investigators were funded under the United States Department of Energy’s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP; Project Number 86803) to extract part of the remaining set of coupons at one of the test sites, characterize the stainless steel underground corrosion rates, and examine the fate and transport of metal ions into the soil. Extraction of one trench at one of the test sites occurred in April 2004. This report details only the characterization of corrosion found on the 14 welded coupons–two cross welded plates, six U-bends, and six welded tubes–that were retrieved from Site D, located near Wildwood, NJ. The welded coupons included Type 301, 304, 316, and 409 stainless steels. After 33 years in the soil, corrosion on the coupons varied according to alloy. This report discusses the stress corrosion cracking and

  1. Field Testing of High Current Electrokinetic Nanoparticle Treatment for Corrosion Mitigation in Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Alexander, Joshua B.; Cardenas, Henry E.; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal

    2008-01-01

    This work examines field performance of nanoscale pozzolan treatments delivered el ctrokinetically to suppress chloride induced corrosion of concrete reinforcement. The particles are 20 nm silica spheres coated with 2 nm alumina particles that carry a net positive charge. Earlier work demonstrated that the alumina particles were stripped from the silica carriers and formed a dense phase with an interparticle spacing that is small enough to inhibit the transport of solvated chlorides. A D.C. field was used to inject the particles into the pores of concrete specimens, directly toward the mild steel bars that were embedded within each 3 inch diameter by 6 inch length concrete specimen. The voltage was held constant at 25 v per inch of concrete cover for a period of 7 days. These voltages permitted current densities as high as 3 A/sq m. During the final 3 days, a 1 molar solution of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate was used to provide a source of calcium to facilitate stronger and more densified phase formation within the pores. In a departure from prior work the particle treatments were started concurrent with chloride extraction in order to determine if particle delivery would inhibit chloride transport. Following treatment the specimens were immersed in seawater for 4 weeks. After this posttreatment exposure, the specimens were tested for tensile strength and the steel reinforcement was examined for evidence of corrosion. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted to assess impact on microstructure.

  2. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-01-01

    The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed

  3. Corrosion study in molten fluoride salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keny, S.J.; Kumbhar, A.G.; Rangarajan, S.; Gupta, V.K.; Maheshwari, N.K.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion behaviors of two alloys viz. Inconel 625 and Inconel 617 were tested in molten fluoride salts of lithium, sodium and potassium (FLiNaK) in the temperature range of 550-750 ℃ in a nickel lined Inconel vessel. Electrochemical polarization (Tafel plot) technique was used for this purpose. For both alloys, the corrosion rate was found to increase sharply beyond 650 ℃ . At 600 ℃ , Inconel 625 showed a decreasing trend in the corrosion rate over a period of 24 hours, probably due to changes in the surface conditions. After fifteen days, re-testing of Inconel 625 in the same melt showed an increase in the corrosion rate. Inconel 625 was found to be more corrosion resistant than Inconel 617. (author)

  4. Test of Taylor's Hypothesis with Distributed Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y.; Gentine, P.; Sayde, C.; Tanner, E.; Ochsner, T. E.; Dong, J.

    2016-12-01

    Taylor's hypothesis[Taylor, 1938] assumes that mean wind speed carries the spatial pattern of turbulent motion past a fixed point in a "frozen" way, which has been widely used to relate streamwise wavenumber and angular frequency . Experiments[Fisher, 1964; Tong, 1996] have shown some deviation from Taylor's hypothesis at highly turbulent intensity flows and at high wavenumbers. However, the velocity or scalar measurements have always been fixed at a few spatial points rather than distributed in space. This experiment was designed for the first time to directly compare the time and spatial spectrum of temperature to test Taylor's hypothesis, measuring temperature with high resolution in both time and space by Distributed Temperature Sensing utilizing the attenuation difference of Raman scattering in the optic fiber at the MOISST site Oklahoma. The length of transact is 233 meters along the dominant wind direction. The temperature sampling distance is 0.127m and sampling time frequency is 1 Hz. The heights of the 4 fiber cables parallel to ground are 1m, 1.254m, 1.508m and 1.762m respectively. Also, eddy covariance instrument was set up near the Distributed Temperature Sensing as comparison for temperature data. The temperature spatial spectrum could be obtained with one fixed time point, while the temperature time spectrum could be obtained with one fixed spatial point in the middle of transact. The preliminary results would be presented in the AGU fall meeting. Reference Fisher, M. J., and Davies, P.O.A.L (1964), Correlation measurements in a non-frozen pattern of turbulence, Journal of fluid mechanics, 18(1), 97-116. Taylor, G. I. (1938), The spectrum of turbulence, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, 164(919), 476-490. Tong, C. (1996), Taylor's Hypothesis and Two-point Coherence Measurements, Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 81(3), 399-410.

  5. Effect of Chromium on Corrosion Behavior of P110 Steels in CO2-H2S Environment with High Pressure and High Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Jianbo; Sun, Chong; Lin, Xueqiang; Cheng, Xiangkun; Liu, Huifeng

    2016-01-01

    The novel Cr-containing low alloy steels have exhibited good corrosion resistance in CO2 environment, mainly owing to the formation of Cr-enriched corrosion film. In order to evaluate whether it is applicable to the CO2 and H2S coexistence conditions, the corrosion behavior of low-chromium steels in CO2-H2S environment with high pressure and high temperature was investigated using weight loss measurement and surface characterization. The results showed that P110 steel suffered localized corro...

  6. Improved PFB operations: 400-hour turbine test results. [coal combustion products and hot corrosion in gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollbuhler, R. J.; Benford, S. M.; Zellars, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    A pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) coal-burning reactor was used to provide hot effluent gases for operation of a small gas turbine. Preliminary tests determined the optimum operating conditions that would result in minimum bed particle carryover in the combustion gases. Solids were removed from the gases before they could be transported into the test turbine by use of a modified two stage cyclone separator. Design changes and refined operation procedures resulted in a significant decrease in particle carryover, from 2800 to 93 ppm (1.5 to 0.05 grains/std cu ft), with minimal drop in gas temperature and pressure. The achievement of stable burn conditions and low solids loadings made possible a 400 hr test of small superalloy rotor, 15 cm (6 in.) in diameter, operating in the effluent. Blades removed and examined metallographically after 200 hr exhibited accelerated oxidation over most of the blade surface, with subsurface alumina penetration to 20 micron m. After 400 hours, average erosion loss was about 25 micron m (1 mil). Sulfide particles, indicating hot corrosion, were present in depletion zones, and their presence corresponded in general to the areas of adherent solids deposit. Sulfidation appears to be a materials problem equal in importance to erosion.

  7. Effect of temperature and dissolved oxygen on stress corrosion cracking behavior of P92 ferritic-martensitic steel in supercritical water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Hu, Z. F.; Zhang, L. F.; Chen, K.; Singh, P. M.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of P92 martensitic steel in supercritical water (SCW) was investigated using slow strain rate test (SSRT) and fractography analysis. The SSRT was carried out at temperatures of 400, 500, 600 °C in deaerated supercritical water and at DO contents of 0, 200, 500 ppb at the temperature of 600 °C, respectively. The results of SSRT show that the decrease of ductility at the temperature of 400 °C may be related to the dynamic strain aging (DSA) of P92 steel. The degradation of the mechanical properties in SCW is the joint effect of temperature and SCC. Compared with the effect of temperature, DO in SCW has no significant effect on the SCC susceptibility of P92 steel. The observation of oxide layer shows that large numbers of pores are nucleated in the oxide layer, which is related to vacancy accumulation and hydrogen generated in the oxide layer. Under the combined action of the growth stress and tensile stress, micro cracks, nucleated from the pores in the oxide layer, are easily propagated intergranularly outward to the surface of specimen, and fewer cracks can extend inward along the intrinsic pores to the inner oxide/metal interface, which is the reason for the exfoliation of oxide films.

  8. The effect of Co-firing with Straw and Coal on High Temperature Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Frandsen, Flemming; Larsen, OH

    2001-01-01

    As a part of ELSAMS development programme into alternative energy sources, various concepts of straw-firing have been investigated. This paper concerns co-firing of straw with coal to reduce the corrosion rate observed in straw-fired power plants. Co-firing with coal reduces the amount of potassi...

  9. Corrosion Protection of Phenolic-Epoxy/Tetraglycidyl Metaxylediamine Composite Coatings in a Temperature-Controlled Borax Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhua; Wang, Zhenyu; Han, En-Hou; Liu, Chunbo

    2017-12-01

    The failure behavior for two kinds of phenolic-epoxy/tetraglycidyl metaxylediamine composite coatings in 60 °C borax aqueous solution was evaluated using electrochemical methods (EIS) combined with scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscope, water immersion test, and Raman spectrum. The main focus was on the effect of curing agent on the corrosion protection of coatings. Results revealed that the coating cured by phenolic modified aromatic amine possessed more compact cross-linked structure, better wet adhesion, lower water absorption (0.064 mg h-1 cm-2) and its impedance values was closed to 108 Ω cm2 after immersion for 576 h, while the coating cured by modified aromatic ring aliphatic amine was lower than 105 Ω cm2. The corrosion mechanism of the two coatings is discussed.

  10. Application of gamma-ray radiography and gravimetric measurements after accelerated corrosion tests of steel embedded in mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffó, Gustavo, E-mail: duffo@cnea.gov.ar [Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Gerencia Materiales, Depto. Corrosión, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gaillard, Natalia [Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Mariscotti, Mario; Ruffolo, Marcelo [Tomografía de Hormigón Armado S.A. (THASA), Reclus 2017, 1609 Boulogne, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-08-15

    The accelerated corrosion by the impressed current technique is widely used in studies of concrete durability since it has the advantage that tests can be carried out within reasonable periods of time. In the present work the relationship between the applied current density and the resulting damage on the reinforcing steel, by applying optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, gamma-ray radiography and gravimetric measurements, was studied by means of the implementation of accelerated corrosion tests on reinforced mortar. The results show that the efficiency of the applied current is between 1 and 77%, regardless of the applied current density, the water/cement ratio and the mortar cover depth of the specimens. The results show the applicability of the gamma-ray radiography technique to detect localized corrosion of steel rebars in laboratory specimens.

  11. Fabrication of imitative stress corrosion cracking using diffusion bonding for the development of nondestructive testing and evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusa, Noritaka; Hashizume, Hidetoshi

    2011-01-01

    This study reports a method to fabricate imitative stress corrosion cracking suitable for the development of nondestructive testing and evaluation methods. The method is to embed a partially-bonded region, which simulates the characteristics of stress corrosion cracking, inside a material by bonding together surfaces having artificial grooves. Since the sizes of the grooves are smaller than the spatial resolution of nondestructive testing method applied, the material property realized can be regarded as uniform as the actual stress corrosion cracking. The grooves are introduced using mechanical machining, which enables one to control the characteristics of the simulated flaw. Four specimens made of type 316L austenitic stainless steel are fabricated. The method is demonstrated by visual and eddy current examinations. (author)

  12. The effect of low-temperature isothermal heat treatments on the intergranular corrosion of AISI 316 stainless steel simulated weld heat-affected zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhas, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Type 316 stainless steel (ss) is a candidate all for containment of high-level nuclear waste. If the containers are sealed by welding, the heat affected zones (HAZs) of the welds may be susceptible to sensitization to concurrent nucleation and growth of chromium-rich M 23 C 6 carbides. Prior to the present study, it was suspected that the carbides which nucleated during welding could grow during the containment life of the nuclear waste. In this investigation, type 316 ss containing systematic variations in carbon and nitrogen have been exposed to thermal cycles simulating a single-pass weld HAZ, followed by long-term (∼2,000 hours) isothermal heat treatments in the range 300 degree-400 degree C. Sensitization was detected using two corrosion methods; (1) double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test and (2) ferric sulfate weight loss (Streicher) test. Optical metallography and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) were employed to identify grain boundary carbides and composition of grain boundaries, respectively. The corrosion tests indicated that chromium depletion did not occur in any of the heat treatments in all of the alloys. The Streicher tests showed that the grain boundaries were selectively attacked only after the HAZ simulation, however the ensuing low temperature exposure did not enhance the susceptibility. Discrete grain boundary carbides were observed on 15-25% of the boundaries in the high carbon alloys (0.08 wt.%). The AEM results showed that when carbides were present, the chromium level at the grain boundaries was slightly depressed with respect to the matrix, however the minimum level was never less than ∼ 16 wt.%. The conclusions of this study are that carbides which formed during HAZ simulation in high-carbon type 316 ss did not significantly grow or change the nature of the grain boundaries at low temperatures

  13. Electrochemical, Polarization, and Crevice Corrosion Testing of Nitinol 60, A Supplement to the ECLSS Sustaining Materials Compatibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    In earlier trials, electrochemical test results were presented for six noble metals evaluated in test solutions representative of waste liquids processed in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Subsequently, a seventh metal, Nitinol 60, was added for evaluation and subjected to the same test routines, data analysis, and theoretical methodologies. The previous six test metals included three titanium grades, (commercially pure, 6Al-4V alloy and 6Al-4V low interstitial alloy), two nickel-chromium alloys (Inconel(RegisteredTrademark) 625 and Hastelloy(RegisteredTrademark) C276), and one high-tier stainless steel (Cronidur(RegisteredTrademark) 30). The three titanium alloys gave the best results of all the metals, indicating superior corrosive nobility and galvanic protection properties. For this current effort, the results have clearly shown that Nitinol 60 is almost as noble as titanium, being very corrosion-resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals electrochemically and during long-term exposure. is also quite noble as it is very corrosion resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals from both an electrochemical perspective and long-term crevice corrosion scenario. This was clearly demonstrated utilizing the same techniques for linear, Tafel and cyclic polarization, and galvanic coupling of the metal candidate as was done for the previous study. The high nobility and low corrosion susceptibility for Nitinol 60 appear to be intermediate to the nickel/chromium alloys and the titanium metals with indications that are more reflective of the titanium metals in terms of general corrosion and pitting behavior.

  14. NOVEL CORROSION SENSOR FOR VISION 21 SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heng Ban

    2004-12-01

    Advanced sensor technology is identified as a key component for advanced power systems for future energy plants that would have virtually no environmental impact. This project intends to develop a novel high temperature corrosion sensor and subsequent measurement system for advanced power systems. Fireside corrosion is the metal loss caused by chemical reactions on surfaces exposed to the combustion environment. Such corrosion is the leading mechanism for boiler tube failures and has emerged to be a significant concern for current and future energy plants due to the introduction of technologies targeting emissions reduction, efficiency improvement, or fuel/oxidant flexibility. Corrosion damage can lead to catastrophic equipment failure, explosions, and forced outages. Proper management of corrosion requires real-time indication of corrosion rate. However, short-term, on-line corrosion monitoring systems for fireside corrosion remain a technical challenge to date due to the extremely harsh combustion environment. The overall objective of this proposed project is to develop a technology for on-line corrosion monitoring based on a new concept. This report describes the initial results from the first-year effort of the three-year study that include laboratory development and experiment, and pilot combustor testing.

  15. The stress-corrosion behavior of Al-Li-Cu alloys: A comparison of test methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1982-01-01

    Two powder metallurgy processed (Al-Li-Cu) alloys with and without Mg addition were studied in aqueous 3.5% NaCl solution during the alternate immersion testing of tuning fork specimens, slow crack growth tests using fracture mechanics specimens, and the slow strain rate testing of straining electrode specimens. Scanning electron microscopy and optical metallography were used to demonstrate the character of the interaction between the Al-Li-Cu alloys and the selected environment. Both alloys are susceptible to SC in an aqueous 3.5% NaCl solution under the right electrochemical and microstructural conditions. Each test method yields important information on the character of the SC behavior. Under all conditions investigated, second phase particles strung out in rows along the extrusion direction in the alloys were rapidly attacked, and played principal role in the SC process. With time, larger pits developed from these rows of smaller pits and under certain electrochemical conditions surface cracks initiated from the larger pits and contributed directly to the fracture process. Evidence to support slow crack growth was observed in both the slow strain rate tests and the sustained immersion tests of precracked fracture mechanics specimens. The possible role of H2 in the stress corrosion cracking process is suggested.

  16. Corrosion test plan to guide canister material selection and design for a tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCright, R.D.; van Konynenburg, R.A.; Ballou, L.B.

    1983-11-01

    Corrosion rates and the mode of corrosion attack form a most important basis for selection of canister materials and design of a nuclear waste package. Type 304L stainless steel was selected as the reference material for canister fabrication because of its generally excellent corrosion resistance in water, steam and air. However, 304L may be susceptible to localized and stress-assisted forms of corrosion under certain conditions. Alternative alloys are also investigated; these alloys were chosen because of their improved resistance to these forms of corrosion. The fabrication and welding processes, as well as the glass pouring operation for defense and commercial high-level wastes, may influence the susceptibility of the canister to localized and stress forms of corrosion. 12 references, 2 figures, 4 tables

  17. Investigation of corrosion resistance of graphite under electron irradiation in the oxygen flow at the temperatures 600...800 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenskij, V.F.; Odejchuk, N.P.; Ryzhov, V.P.; Borisenko, V.N.; Gamov, V.O.; Lyashchenko, A.N.; Ulybkin, A.L.; Yakovlev, V.K.

    2013-01-01

    In work results of researches of corrosion resistance of graphite samples by grades MPG, ARV and GSP (graphite bonded pyrocarbon) in oxygen flow at the temperatures of ∼ 600 and ∼ 800 deg C under the influence of electron irradiation at the accelerator ELIAS. Established that the oxidation process of graphite with the increasing temperature goes significantly more intensively and the oxidation rate increases in 6...8 times. It is shown that the best corrosion resistance under irradiation in the investigated temperature range has graphite GSP with density 1.77...1.9 g/cm 3 manufacturing of NSC KIPT

  18. Corrosion Resistance of Some Stainless Steels in Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasprzyk D.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work compares corrosion behaviour of four types of S30403, S31603, S32615 austenitic and S32404 austenitic-ferritic stainless steels in chloride solutions (1%, 3% NaCl and in Ringer solution, at 37°C temperature. Corrosion resistance was determined by potentiodynamic polarization measurements and a thirty day immersion test conducted in Ringer solution. The immersion test was performed in term of biomedical application. These alloy were spontaneously passivated in all electrolytes, wherein S30403, S31603 and S32404 undergo pitting corrosion. Only S32615 containing 5.5% Si shows resistance to pitting corrosion.

  19. Utilization of coal mining wastes a filling material in reinforced earth structures: reinforcement corrosion tests; Utilizacion de los esteriles del carbon como material de relleno en estructuras de tierra reforzada: pruebas de corrosion de armaduras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Canibano, J.; Pardo, F.; Sopena, L.; Torres, M.; Perez, J.J.; Martinez, C.; Gonzlaez, M.R. [Laboratorio Geotecnia CEDEX (Spain)

    1996-09-01

    In this article are summarized the tests carried out with different types of reinforcing elements and several coal mining wastes in order to determine the occurrence or not of corrosion processes caused by mine stones in the reinforcing elements. (Author)

  20. Use of high temperature thermogravimetry for the determination of oxidation, reduction, corrosion-type reactions kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoist, Luc; Bancel, Fabrice; Setaram

    2002-01-01

    Full text.Thermogravimetry is a very powerful technique for the investigation of gas-solid interactions, by measuring the amount of gas adsorbed on the sample or desorbed from the sample. According to the type of interaction, this amount of gas can be very small, that means that the detection of the mass variation can be very difficult to achieve. This is especially the case for certain types of oxidation, reduction and corrosion reactions in the field of metallic and ceramic materials. The good configuration for such kinetic studies is a hanged up sample, to get every face of the sample in contact with the atmosphere. In order to improve the thermogravimetric measurement, two ways can be used: increase the sample mass and especially its area, second use a symmetrical balance. As the gas-solid interaction is adsorption or desorption-type, the area of the sample is one very important parameter. For such a determination, it is important to increase as much as possible this area, that means increasing the sample size and mass. By increasing the contact area for the gas interaction, the accuracy of such a thermogravimetric measurement is largely improved. This design is very convenient for any metallic or ceramic sample that can be directly hung to the balance, without using any container. The second way of improving the test is to use a symmetrical thermogravimetric design. If the variation of mass is too weak to be measured (some micrograms for example), a symmetrical design has to be used. In such a system, a sample and a reference are hung at each beam of the balance, in two identical furnaces. Such a symmetrical technique allows to compensate the buoyancy effect that is identical on both sides. The limit of detection of the thermogravimetric measure is largely improved, allowing accurate measurements on very small variations of mass for long term basis experiments. An example of oxidation of a plate of steel at 500 celsius degree, with a slow mass gain of 1.5