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Sample records for temperature corrosion behaviour

  1. Corrosion behaviour of high temperature alloys in impure helium environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Masami; Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.

    1986-01-01

    Corrosion tests with Ni-base high temperature alloys were carried out at 900 and 950 0 C in simulated high temperature reactor helium environments. It is shown that the carburization and decarburization behaviour is strongly affected by the Cr and Ti(Al) contents of the alloys. In carburizing environments, additions of Ti, alone or in combination with Al, significantly improve the carburization resistance. In oxidizing environment, the alloys with high Cr and Al(Ti) contents are the most resistant against decarburization. In this environment alloys with additions of Ti and Al show poor oxidation resistance. The experimental results obtained are compared with a recently developed theory describing corrosion of high temperature alloys in high temperature reactor helium environments. (orig.)

  2. High temperature cyclic oxidation and hot corrosion behaviours of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    eutectic reaction below 600°C. When the temperature ... blades, consequently corrosion rate rapidly increases due ... the corrosion run. ... Figure 1. Surface macrographs of superalloys subjected to hot corrosion and oxidation .... show the oxide scales of three different chemical compo- .... Li J and Wahi R P 1995 Acta Metall.

  3. Corrosion behaviour of construction materials for high temperature steam electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey; Petrushina, Irina; Christensen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) steam electrolysers. Steady-state voltammetry was used in combination with scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to evaluate the stability of the mentioned materials. It was found that stainless steels were the least resistant...... to corrosion under strong anodic polarisation. Among alloys, Ni-based showed the highest corrosion resistance in the simulated PEM electrolyser medium. In particular, Inconel 625 was the most promising among the tested corrosion-resistant alloys for the anodic compartment in high temperature steam electrolysis...

  4. Corrosion behaviour of high temperature alloys in the cooling gas of high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.

    1989-01-01

    The reactive impurities in the primary cooling helium of advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR) can cause oxidation, carburization or decarburization of the heat exchanging metallic components. By studies of the fundamental aspects of the corrosion mechanisms it became possible to define operating conditions under which the metallic construction materials show, from the viewpoint of technical application, acceptable corrosion behaviour. By extensive test programmes with exposure times of up to 30,000 hours, a data base has been obtained which allows a reliable extrapolation of the corrosion effects up to the envisaged service lives of the heat exchanging components. (author). 6 refs, 7 figs

  5. Corrosion behaviour of construction materials for high temperature water electrolysers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, A.; Petruchina, I.; Christensen, E.; Bjerrum, N.J.; Tomas-Garcya, A.L. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Chemistry, Materials Science Group

    2010-07-01

    This presentation reported on a study in which the feasibility of using different corrosion resistant stainless steels as a possible metallic bipolar plate and construction material was evaluated in terms of corrosion resistance under conditions corresponding to the conditions in high temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolysers (HTPEMWE). PEM water electrolysis technology has been touted as an effective alternative to more conventional alkaline water electrolysis. Although the energy efficiency of this technology can be increased considerably at temperatures above 100 degrees C, this increases the demands to all the used materials with respect to corrosion stability and thermal stability. In this study, Ni-based alloys as well as titanium and tantalum samples were exposed to anodic polarization in 85 per cent phosphoric acid electrolyte solution. Tests were performed at 80 and 120 degrees C to determine the dependence of corrosion speed and working temperature. Platinum and gold plates were also tested for a comparative evaluation. Steady-state voltammetry was used along with scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Titanium showed the poorest corrosion resistance, while Ni-based alloys showed the highest corrosion resistance, with Inconel R 625 being the most promising alloy for the bipolar plate of an HTPEMWE. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  6. Effect of ageing time and temperature on corrosion behaviour of aluminum alloy 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadpale, Vikas; Banjare, Pragya N.; Manoj, Manoranjan Kumar

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of corrosion behaviour of aluminium alloy 2014 were studied by potentiodynamic polarization in 1 mole of NaCl solution of aged sample. The experimental testing results concluded that, corrosion resistance of Aluminum alloy 2014 degraded with the increasing the temperature (150°C & 200°C) and time of ageing. Corroded surface of the aged specimens was tested under optical microscopes for microstructures for phase analysis. Optical micrographs of corroded surfaces showed general corrosion and pitting corrosion. The corrosion resistance of lower ageing temperature and lower ageing time is higher because of its fine distribution of precipitates in matrix phase.

  7. High temperature corrosion behaviour of a new Ni-30Fe-10Ar-Cr-alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloewer, J.; Sauthoff, G.

    1997-01-01

    The high temperature corrosion behaviour of a new duplex nickel-base alloy containing about 30 mass% iron, 10 mass% aluminium and 8 mass% chromium was determined in both air and hot process gases containing methane/hydrogen, sulphur dioxide and hydrogen sulphide, respectively. It was found that the corrosion resistance against carburisation, sulphidation and oxidation was excellent due to the formation of a dense, protective alumina scale. The adherence of the alumina scale was increased by an addition of 0.1 mass% hafnium. The concentration of chromium was found to have a remarkable impact on the oxidation and high temperature corrosion resistance. Alloys without chromium showed increased corrosion rates in both air and sulphur-containing gas atmospheres due to the initial formation of nickel oxides. In sulphidising SO 2 -and H 2 S- containing gases at least 4 mass% chromium are required to stabilise the formation of alumina and to prevent the formation of nickel/sulphur compounds. (orig.)

  8. Corrosion behaviour of Alloy 800 in high temperature aqueous solutions: Electrochemical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmedo, A.M.; Villegas, M.; Alvarez, M.G.

    1996-01-01

    The anodic behaviour and passivity breakdown of Alloy 800 in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, sodium sulphate and sodium bicarbonate were studied by electrochemical techniques in the temperature range from 60 C to 280 C. The pitting resistance and pitting morphology of the alloy in chloride plus sulphate and chloride plus bicarbonate mixtures, at 60 C and 280 C, were also examined. Increasing bicarbonate or sulphate additions to chloride solutions shift the characteristic pitting potential of Alloy 800 to higher values, both at low and high temperatures. Changes in pitting morphology were observed in sulphate containing solutions while the morphology of the attack found in bicarbonate containing solutions was similar to that in pure chloride solutions. Finally, no localized or substantial generalized corrosion was detected in pure sulphate or bicarbonate solutions at any temperature. (orig.)

  9. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour of Alloy 600 in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.L.; Burke, M.G.

    1995-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Alloy 600 in deaerated water at 360 deg. C, as measured with statistically-loaded U-bend specimens, is dependent upon microstructure and whether the material was cold-worked and annealed (CWA) or hot-worked and annealed (HWA). All cracking was intergranular, and materials lacking grain boundary carbides were most susceptible to SCC initiation. CWA tubing materials are more susceptible to SCC initiation than HWA ring-rolled forging materials with similar microstructures, as determined by light optical metallography (LOM). In CWA tubing materials one crack dominated and grew to a large size that was observable by visual inspection. HWA materials with a low hot-working finishing temperature (below 925 deg. C) and final anneals at temperatures ranging from 1010 deg. C to 1065 deg. C developed both large cracks, similar to those found in CWA materials, and also small intergranular microcracks, which are detectable only by destructive metallographic examination. HWA materials with a high hot-working finishing temperature (above 980 deg. C) and high-temperature final anneal (above 1040 deg. C), with grain boundaries that are fully decorated, developed only microcracks, which were observed in all specimens examined. These materials developed no large, visually detectable cracks, even after more than 300 weeks exposure. A low-temperature thermal treatment (610 deg. C for 7h), which reduced or eliminates SCC in Alloy 600, did not eliminate microcrack formation in the high temperature processed HWA materials. Detailed microstructural characterization using conventional metallographic and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) techniques was performed on selected materials to identify the factors responsible for the observed differences in cracking behaviour. 11 refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs

  10. High temperature corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.

    1988-08-01

    This paper covers three main topics: 1. high temperature oxidation of metals and alloys, 2. corrosion in sulfur containing environments and 3. structural changes caused by corrosion. The following 21 subjects are discussed: Influence of implanted yttrium and lanthanum on the oxidation behaviour of beta-NiA1; influence of reactive elements on the adherence and protective properties of alumina scales; problems related to the application of very fine markers in studying the mechanism of thin scale formation; oxidation behaviour of chromia forming Co-Cr-Al alloys with or without reactive element additions; growth and properties of chromia-scales on high-temperature alloys; quantification of the depletion zone in high temperature alloys after oxidation in process gas; effects of HC1 and of N2 in the oxidation of Fe-20Cr; investigation under nuclear safety aspects of Zircaloy-4 oxidation kinetics at high temperatures in air; on the sulfide corrosion of metallic materials; high temperature sulfide corrosion of Mn, Nb and Nb-Si alloys; corrosion behaviour or NiCrAl-based alloys in air and air-SO2 gas mixtures; sulfidation of cobalt at high temperatures; preoxidation for sulfidation protection; fireside corrosion and application of additives in electric utility boilers; transport properties of scales with complex defect structures; observations of whiskers and pyramids during high temperature corrosion of iron in SO2; corrosion and creep of alloy 800H under simulated coal gasification conditions; microstructural changes of HK 40 cast alloy caused by exploitation in tubes in steam reformer installation; microstructural changes during exposure in corrosive environments and their effect on mechanical properties; coatings against carburization; mathematical modeling of carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation in Ni-Cr-based alloys. (MM)

  11. Effect of corrosion potential on the corrosion fatigue crack growth behaviour of low-alloy steels in high-temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P.

    2008-01-01

    The low-frequency corrosion fatigue (CF) crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels was characterized under simulated boiling water reactor conditions by cyclic fatigue tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens. The experiments were performed in the temperature range of 240-288 deg. C with different loading parameters at different electrochemical corrosion potentials (ECPs). Modern high-temperature water loops, on-line crack growth monitoring (DCPD) and fractographical analysis by SEM were used to quantify the cracking response. In this paper the effect of ECP on the CF crack growth behaviour is discussed and compared with the crack growth model of General Electric (GE). The ECP mainly affected the transition from fast ('high-sulphur') to slow ('low-sulphur') CF crack growth, which appeared as critical frequencies ν crit = f(ΔK, R, ECP) and ΔK-thresholds ΔK EAC f(ν, R, ECP) in the cycle-based form and as a critical air fatigue crack growth rate da/dt Air,crit in the time-domain form. The critical crack growth rates, frequencies, and ΔK EAC -thresholds were shifted to lower values with increasing ECP. The CF crack growth rates of all materials were conservatively covered by the 'high-sulphur' CF line of the GE-model for all investigated temperatures and frequencies. Under most system conditions, the model seems to reasonably well predict the experimentally observed parameter trends. Only under highly oxidizing conditions (ECP ≥ 0 mV SHE ) and slow strain rates/low loading frequencies the GE-model does not conservatively cover the experimentally gathered crack growth rate data. Based on the GE-model and the observed cracking behaviour a simple time-domain superposition-model could be used to develop improved reference CF crack growth curves for codes

  12. Materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbaud, F.; Desgranges, Clara; Martinelli, Laure; Rouillard, Fabien; Duhamel, Cecile; Marchetti, Loic; Perrin, Stephane; Molins, Regine; Chevalier, S.; Heintz, O.; David, N.; Fiorani, J.M.; Vilasi, M.; Wouters, Y.; Galerie, A.; Mangelinck, D.; Viguier, B.; Monceau, D.; Soustelle, M.; Pijolat, M.; Favergeon, J.; Brancherie, D.; Moulin, G.; Dawi, K.; Wolski, K.; Barnier, V.; Rebillat, F.; Lavigne, O.; Brossard, J.M.; Ropital, F.; Mougin, J.

    2011-01-01

    This book was made from the lectures given in 2010 at the thematic school on 'materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures'. It gathers the contributions from scientists and engineers coming from various communities and presents a state-of-the-art of the scientific and technological developments concerning the behaviour of materials at high temperature, in aggressive environments and in various domains (aerospace, nuclear, energy valorization, and chemical industries). It supplies pedagogical tools to grasp high temperature corrosion thanks to the understanding of oxidation mechanisms. It proposes some protection solutions for materials and structures. Content: 1 - corrosion costs; macro-economical and metallurgical approach; 2 - basic concepts of thermo-chemistry; 3 - introduction to the Calphad (calculation of phase diagrams) method; 4 - use of the thermodynamic tool: application to pack-cementation; 5 - elements of crystallography and of real solids description; 6 - diffusion in solids; 7 - notions of mechanics inside crystals; 8 - high temperature corrosion: phenomena, models, simulations; 9 - pseudo-stationary regime in heterogeneous kinetics; 10 - nucleation, growth and kinetic models; 11 - test experiments in heterogeneous kinetics; 12 - mechanical aspects of metal/oxide systems; 13 - coupling phenomena in high temperature oxidation; 14 - other corrosion types; 15 - methods of oxidized surfaces analysis at micro- and nano-scales; 16 - use of SIMS in the study of high temperature corrosion of metals and alloys; 17 - oxidation of ceramics and of ceramic matrix composite materials; 18 - protective coatings against corrosion and oxidation; 19 - high temperature corrosion in the 4. generation of nuclear reactor systems; 20 - heat exchangers corrosion in municipal waste energy valorization facilities; 21 - high temperature corrosion in oil refining and petrochemistry; 22 - high temperature corrosion in new energies industry. (J.S.)

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of Inconel 600 in aqueous solutions at elevated temperature. Pt. II. Effects of chloride and sulphate ions on the electrochemical behaviour of Inconel 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashour, E.A.; Schneider, F.; Mummert, K.

    1997-01-01

    For pt.I see ibid., p.151-6, 1997. The influencing effects of temperature, potential and electrolyte composition on the electrochemical behaviour of Inconel 600 in aqueous solutions are presented. Considering these effects the connection between the data have been obtained from chemo-mechanical fracture investigation on CT-samples in Part I of this paper and pitting corrosion are discussed. The results have shown that chloride ions depassivate the surfaces of cracks locally and hinder the formation of a new protective oxide layer on the fracture surfaces. Furthermore, chloride promotes the dissolution of metal and initiates the cracking, respectively. The resulting crevice corrosion promotes an increase of hydrogen absorption by the metal. The increase of the hydrogen content of the metal influences the mechanical fracture behaviour. Contrary, sulphate ions inhibit the initiation of corrosion mainly due to a hinderance of chloride ions adsorption on active sites of the fracture surfaces. The initiation of localized corrosion in the crevice region may be stimulated by chromate ions formed by oxidation of chromium from the oxide layer or the base metal in oxygen containing solutions. (orig.)

  14. Corrosion behaviour, microstructure and phase transitions of Zn ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper is aimed at investigating the corrosion behaviour, microstructure and phase transitions of Zn-based alloys with different compositions. The corrosion tests are carried out both in acidic medium using 1 N HCl solution and in temperature dependence of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In the two different media, ...

  15. Corrosion behaviour of sensitized and unsensitized Alloy 900 (UNS 1.4462) in concentrated aqueous lithium bromide solutions at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiva-Garcia, R.; Munoz-Portero, M.J.; Garcia-Anton, J.

    2010-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels can undergo microstructural changes if they are heated improperly. When that happens, duplex stainless steels are sensitized and intermetallic phases appear. The high Chromium and Molybdenum content promotes the formation of secondary phases as a consequence of the heat treatment. These secondary phases, which are rich in alloying elements, such as Cr and Mo, deplete these elements from the neighbouring phases, leading to a reduction in corrosion resistance. In order to study the influence of the secondary phases on the corrosion parameters, samples of duplex stainless steel, Alloy 900 (UNS 1.4462), have been heated in argon atmosphere at 825 deg. C for 1 h. The corrosion behaviour of sensitized and unsensitized Alloy 900 has been analyzed in a concentrated aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr) solution of 992 g/L by means of cyclic potentiodynamic curves. Secondary phase presence reduces the pitting potential value of Alloy 900. Besides, the pitting potential decreases with temperature. On the other hand, the corrosion potential and open circuit potential values increase with temperature and sensitization.

  16. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour of low alloy steels in high temperature water: Description and results from modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirbonod, B.

    2001-01-01

    The initiation and growth of a crack by stress and corrosion in the low alloy steels used for the pressure vessels of Boiling Water Reactors may affect the availability and safety of the plant. This paper presents a new model for stress corrosion cracking of the low alloy steels in high temperature water. The model, based on observations, assumes the crack growth mechanism to be based on an anodic dissolution and cleavage. The main results deal with the position of the dissolution cell found at the crack tip, and with the identification of the parameters sensitive to crack growth, among which are the electrolyte composition and the cleavage length. The model is conservative, in qualitative agreement with measurements conducted at PSI, and may be extended to other metal-environment systems. (author)

  17. Effect of Tempering Temperature and Time on the Corrosion Behaviour of 304 and 316 Austenitic Stainless Steels in Oxalic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Ayo S. Afolabi; Johannes H. Potgieter; Ambali S. Abdulkareem; Nonhlanhla Fungura

    2011-01-01

    The effect of different tempering temperatures and heat treatment times on the corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels in oxalic acid was studied in this work using conventional weight loss and electrochemical measurements. Typical 304 and 316 stainless steel samples were tempered at 150oC, 250oC and 350oC after being austenized at 1050oC for 10 minutes. These samples were then immersed in 1.0M oxalic acid and their weight losses were measured at every five days for 30 days. The r...

  18. Corrosion fatigue crack growth behaviour of low-alloy RPV steels at different temperatures and loading frequencies under BWR/NWC environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    The strain-induced corrosion cracking or low-frequency corrosion fatigue (LFCF) crack growth behaviour of different reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and of a RPV weld filler/weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) material were characterized under simulated transient boiling water reactor/normal water chemistry conditions by cyclic fatigue tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens. The experiments were performed in oxygenated high-temperature water at temperatures of either 288, 250, 200, or 150 deg. C. Modern high-temperature water loops, on-line crack growth monitoring (DCPD) and fractographic analysis by SEM were used to quantify the cracking response. Under low-flow and highly oxidising conditions (ECP > 0 mV SHE , O 2 = 0.4 ppm) the cycle-based LFCF crack growth rates (CGR) Δa/ΔN increased with decreasing loading frequency and increasing temperature with a maximum/plateau at/above 250 deg. C. Sustained environmentally-assisted crack growth could be maintained down to low frequencies of 10 -5 Hz. The LFCF CGR of low- and high-sulphur steels and of the weld filler/HAZ material were comparable over a wide range of loading conditions and conservatively covered by the 'high-sulphur line' of the General Electric-model. The 'ASME XI wet fatigue CGR curves' could be significantly exceeded in all materials by cyclic fatigue loading at low frequencies ( -2 Hz) at high and low load ratios R. (authors)

  19. Temperature and radiolytic corrosion effects on the chlorine behaviour in nuclear graphite: consequences for the disposable of irradiated graphite from UNGG reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaudey, C.E.

    2010-10-01

    This work concerns the dismantling of the UNGG reactor which have produced around 23 000 t of graphite wastes that ave to be disposed of according to the French law of June 206. These wastes contain two long-lived radionuclides ( 14 C and 36 Cl) which are the main long term dose contributors. In order to get information about their inventory and their long term behaviour in case of water ingress into the repository, it is necessary to determine their location and speciation in the irradiated graphite after the reactor shutdown. This work concerns the study of 36 Cl. The main objective is to reproduce its behaviour during reactor operation. For that purpose, we have studied the effects of temperature and radiolytic corrosion independently. Our results show a rapid release of around 20% 36 Cl during the first hours of reactor operation whereas a much slower release occurs afterwards. We have put in evidence two types of chlorine corresponding to two different chemical forms (of different thermal stabilities) or to two locations (of different accessibilities). We have also shown that the radiolytic corrosion seems to enhance chlorine release, whatever the irradiation dose. Moreover, the major chemical form of chlorine is inorganic. (author)

  20. Corrosion behaviour of cladded nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandl, W.; Ruczinski, D.; Nolde, M.; Blum, J.

    1995-01-01

    As a consequence of the high cost of nickel base alloys their use as surface layers is convenient. In this paper the properties of SA-as well as RES-cladded NiMo 16Cr16Ti and NiCr21Mo14W being produced in single and multi-layer technique are compared and discussed with respect to their corrosion behaviour. Decisive criteria describing the qualities of the claddings are the mass loss, the susceptibility against intergranular corrosion and the pitting corrosion resistance. The results prove that RES cladding is the most suitable technique to produce corrosion resistant nickel base coatings. The corrosion behaviour of a two-layer RES deposition shows a better resistance against pitting than a three layer SAW cladding. 7 refs

  1. Corrosion behaviour of Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mummert, K.; El-Aziz, A.M.; Barkleit, G.; Schultz, L.; Rodewald, W.

    2000-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of Nd-Fe-B permanent magnetic alloys as well as of single phases of these alloys have been investigated in sulphuric acid at room temperature and humid air at 150 C using mass loss and electrochemical techniques. Scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy were used to study the surface topography. The electrostatic surface potential was examined by scanning probe microscopy using tapping mode. A correlation between the electrostatic surface potential and the corrosion rate of these alloys was found. The higher the value of the electrostatic surface potential of the intergranular phases the higher is the corrosion sensitivity. The strength of the corrosion attack on the phases of sintered permanent magnetic alloys is as follows: Ferromagnetic phase < B-rich phase < Nd-rich phase. The differences in the chemical composition as well as in the preparation of these magnetic alloys have distinct influence on the corrosion resistance of the magnetic Nd-Fe-B alloys. (orig.)

  2. Effect of chlorides on the corrosion behaviour of mild steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Kazuyuki; Shimada, Minoru

    1980-01-01

    In PWR's steam generators, ''denting'' resulted from corrosion of support plate material, carbon steel is an important problem. The role of chlorides in corrosion acceleration of mild steel was studied. Corrosion tests were conducted at temperature from 100 0 C to 280 0 C in deaerated solutions of NaCl and MgCl 2 which are main content of sea water. 1) Solution of MgCl 2 was more corrosive than that of NaCl. The more increased in concentration of each chloride solution, the more corrosive in MgCl 2 soln. but the less corrosive in NaCl soln. 2) The rate of corrosion in the mixed solution of NaCl and MgCl 2 was governed by the concentration of MgCl 2 soln. The corrosion behaviour in sea water was suggested to be not controlled by NaCl but by MgCl 2 . 3) Acidification of MgCl 2 soln. could be evaluated by experiment at 100 0 C, the degree of acidification increased with increasing the concentration. However, the value of pH during corrosion was kept constant by the concentration of dissolved Fe 2+ ions. 4) The corrosion acceleration by MgCl 2 soln. was arised not only from acidification by the solution itself but from continuous supplementation of H + ions with the hydrolysis of dissolved Fe 2+ ions. This autocatalytic corrosion process not exhausting acid was characterized with the corrosion in closed system such as in crevice. In addition to acidification of MgCl 2 soln., the formation of non-protective magnetite film by Mg 2+ ion was estimated to be a reason of accelerated corrosion. (author)

  3. Examples illustrating the effects of high-temperature corrosion and protective coatings on the creep-to-rupture behaviour of materials resistant to very high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachova, E.; Hougardy, H.P.; Granacher, J.

    1989-01-01

    Assessing the creep stress, it is assumed in general that the sub-surface effects in a specimen correspond to those at the surface. Particularly in very high temperature environments, however, oxidation is an additional effect to be taken into account, and there are other operational stresses to be reckoned with, as e.g. hot gas corrosion of gas turbine blades. The reduction of the effective cross section due to corrosion for instance of the material affected by long-term creep leads to an increase in stresses and thus shortens the period up to rupture. Protective coatings will prevent or at least delay corrosion. The paper reports the performance of various protective coatings. Pt-Al coatings have have been found to remain intact even on specimens with the longest testing periods up to rupture, to an extent that there was no oxidation at the grain boundaries proceeding from the surface to the sub-surface material. The same applies to the plasma-sprayed coatings, although in some cases pores had developed in the coating. The chromium alitizations were used up irregularly over the surface of some specimens tested at 1000deg C. Chromizing layers have been found to be more strongly damaged than the other coatings tested under comparable conditions. (orig./RHM) [de

  4. High temperature corrosion in gasifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakker Wate

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several commercial scale coal gasification combined cycle power plants have been built and successfully operated during the last 5-10 years. Supporting research on materials of construction has been carried out for the last 20 years by EPRI and others. Emphasis was on metallic alloys for heat exchangers and other components in contact with hot corrosive gases at high temperatures. In this paper major high temperature corrosion mechanisms, materials performance in presently operating gasifiers and future research needs will be discussed.

  5. Corrosion, haemocompatibility and bacterial adhesion behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TiZrN coating was deposited on 316L stainless steel (SS) by the reactive magnetron co-sputtering technique. Cubic phase of TiZrN with uniform surface morphology was observed by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Bacterial adhesion, haemocompatibility and corrosion behaviour of TiZrN coating were ...

  6. Effects of sulphide ion on the corrosion behaviour of X52 steel in a carbon dioxide environment at temperature 40 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatah, M.C.; Ismail, M.C.; Ari-Wahjoedi, B.; Kurnia, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We study the effect of sulphide ion on the corrosion behaviour of X52 steel. → Increasing sulphide ion concentration will increase the corrosion rate of X52 steel. → Increasing sulphide ion concentration will increase cathodic reaction. → Less protective film, also contribute to the increasing the corrosion rate. - Abstract: The electrochemical behaviour of X52 steel in the presence of sulphide at 40 deg. C in a CO 2 environment was investigated using the methods of linear polarization resistance (LPR), potentiodynamic sweep, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). In addition, the surface of X52 steel was also studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the corrosion rate of X52 steel increased with increasing concentration of sulphide ion. Potentiodynamic curve showed that there were changes in cathodic branch due to the change in the nature of cathodic reaction in the presence of sulphide ion. EIS analysis showed the higher sulphide ion concentration, the higher adsorbed species on the steel surface that contributed in the cathodic reaction. Furthermore, SEM results showed crevices on the scale which indicated pitting tendency in sulphide ion solutions. The less protective film, probably mackinawite, also contributed to the increase of corrosion rate in the presence of sulphide ion.

  7. Electrochemical characterisation speeds up prediction of corrosion behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuring, E.W.; Hooijmans, J.W. [ECN Environment and Energy Engineering, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-04-15

    The contents of this presentation show the following elements: Introduction; Corrosion in real life; Why Electrochemical characterisation of corrosion; Applications (corrosion resistance coatings, corrosion behaviour (brazed) joints); Available electrochemical corrosion techniques; Standards; Conclusions. In the Conclusions the corrosion screening method is summarized: ECN method fast; within 1h -1 week results depending on test method; Fast pre-selection of promising materials/combinations (cost savings); Determining of corrosion initiation; Determination of corrosion mechanisms and propagation; Life time predictions possible; Strong combination with metallographic post-investigation; Ranking materials / constructions for corrosion performance.

  8. The effect of zinc bath temperature on the morphology, texture and corrosion behaviour of industrially produced hot-dip galvanized coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bakhtiari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to identify the influence of zinc bath temperature on the morphology, texture and corrosion behavior of hot-dip galvanized coatings. Hot-dip galvanized samples were prepared at temperature in the range of 450-480 °C in steps of 10 °C, which is the conventional galvanizing temperature range in the galvanizing industries. The morphology of coatings was examined with optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The composition of the coating layers was determined using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS analysis. The texture of the coatings was evaluated using X-ray diffraction. Corrosion behavior was performed using salt spray cabinet test and Tafel extrapolation test. From the experimental results, it was found that increasing the zinc bath temperature affects the morphology of the galvanized coatings provoking the appearance of cracks in the coating structure. These cracks prevent formation of a compact structure. In addition, it was concluded that (00.2 basal plane texture component was weakened by increasing the zinc bath temperature and, conversely, appearance of (10.1 prism component, (20.1 high angle pyramidal component and low angle component prevailed. Besides, coatings with strong (00.2 texture component and weaker (20.1 components have better corrosion resistance than the coatings with weak (00.2 and strong (20.1 texture components. Furthermore, corrosion resistance of the galvanized coatings was decreased by increasing the zinc bath temperature.

  9. Corrosion behaviour of laser clad stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damborenea, J.J. de; Weerasinghe, V.M.; West, D.R.F.

    1993-01-01

    The present paper is focussed in the study of the properties of a clad layer of stainless steel on a mild steel. By blowing powder of the alloy into a melt pool generated by a laser of 2 KW, an homogeneous layer of 316 stainless steel can be obtained. Structure, composition and corrosion behaviour are similar to those of a stainless steel in as-received condition. (Author)

  10. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigree. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs.

  11. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    2000-01-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigrade. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs

  12. Materials and coatings to resist high temperature oxidation and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Object of the given papers are the oxidation and corrosion behaviour of several materials (such as stainless steels, iron-, or nickel-, or cobalt-base alloys, Si-based ceramics) used at high temperatures and various investigations on high-temperature protective coatings. (IHoe) [de

  13. Effects of crystalline growth on corrosion behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion behaviours ... sity and high melting point.7,8 This compound often shows good corrosion and .... Figure 4. TEM image of as-deposited nanocrystalline NiAl coating. Figure 5.

  14. Study of corrosion-erosion behaviour of stainless alloys in industrial phosphoric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenbour, Abdellah; Hajji, Mohamed-Adil; Jallouli, El Miloudi; Bachir, Ali Ben

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion and corrosion-abrasion resistance of some stainless steels in industrial phosphoric acid 30% P 2 O 5 has been studied using electrochemical techniques. The corrosion rate of materials increases with the increase of temperature. Alloys which contain chromium, molybdenum and nitrogen in sufficient quantities present the best behaviour. In the abrasion-corrosion conditions, the experimental device set up allowed to follow continually samples electrochemical behaviour. Under dynamic conditions and without solid particles, the increase of acid projection speed has no effect on the alloys corrosion behaviour. The adding of abrasive leads to a general increase of corrosion rate and to a decrease of material resistance. Under these conditions, materials attack is controlled by synergistic effect between the abrasion and the impurities. The cast 30% Cr shows good resistance according to his high chromium content

  15. Study of corrosion-erosion behaviour of stainless alloys in industrial phosphoric acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenbour, Abdellah [Laboratory of Electrochemistry-Corrosion, Av. Ibn Batouta, BP1014-Faculty of Science, Rabat (Morocco)]. E-mail: guenbour@fsr.ac.ma; Hajji, Mohamed-Adil [Group Corrosion and Protection of Materials, ENIM, Rabat (Morocco); Jallouli, El Miloudi [Group Corrosion and Protection of Materials, ENIM, Rabat (Morocco); Bachir, Ali Ben [Laboratory of Electrochemistry-Corrosion, Av. Ibn Batouta, BP1014-Faculty of Science, Rabat (Morocco)

    2006-12-30

    The corrosion and corrosion-abrasion resistance of some stainless steels in industrial phosphoric acid 30% P{sub 2}O{sub 5} has been studied using electrochemical techniques. The corrosion rate of materials increases with the increase of temperature. Alloys which contain chromium, molybdenum and nitrogen in sufficient quantities present the best behaviour. In the abrasion-corrosion conditions, the experimental device set up allowed to follow continually samples electrochemical behaviour. Under dynamic conditions and without solid particles, the increase of acid projection speed has no effect on the alloys corrosion behaviour. The adding of abrasive leads to a general increase of corrosion rate and to a decrease of material resistance. Under these conditions, materials attack is controlled by synergistic effect between the abrasion and the impurities. The cast 30% Cr shows good resistance according to his high chromium content.

  16. Corrosion and hydriding behaviour of some Zr 2.5 wt% Nb alloys in water, steam and various gases at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalgaard, S. B.

    1962-05-15

    Fuel sheaths and pressure tubes in Canadian power reactors are at present made from Zircaloy-2. Mechanical properties of a suitably heat treated Zr 2.5 wt% Nb alloy are superior to those of Zircaloy-2, but any new alloy must have resistance to corrosion and hydriding by the coolant and by the gas that insulates the pressure tube from the cold moderator. Exposed to water at temperatures up to 325{sup o}C, the Zr 2.5 wt% Nb alloy has corrosion resistance acceptable for power reactors. Resistance to air and carbon dioxide is less favourable. Addition of tin, or iron and chromium, to the base alloy have little effect on the corrosion resistance, but the addition of copper reduces corrosion in water and steam to some extent and in air and carbon dioxide to a greater extent. Studies of the effect of heat treatment suggest that the amount of niobium in a solid-solution controls the rate of oxidation and hydriding and that concentration, size and distribution of second phase is of little importance. Initial results obtained in NRX indicate that a thermal flux of 3-7 x 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}/sec has little or no effect on oxidation and hydriding in high temperature water. (author)

  17. INTERWELD - European project to determine irradiation induced material changes in the heat affected zones of austenitic stainless steel welds that influence the stress corrosion behaviour in high-temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, A.; Schaaf, Bob van der; Castano, M.L.; Ohms, C.; Gavillet, D.; Dyck, S. van

    2003-01-01

    PWR and BWR RPV internals have experienced stress corrosion cracking in service. The objective of the INTERWELD project is to determine the radiation induced material changes that promote stress corrosion cracking in the heat affected zone of austenitic stainless steel welds. To achieve this goal, welds in austenitic stainless steel types AISI 304/347 have been fabricated, respectively. Stress-relief annealing was applied optionally. The pre-characterisation of both the as-welded and stress relieved material conditions comprises the examination of the weld residual stresses by the ring-core-technique and neutron diffraction, the degree of sensitisation by EPR, and the stress corrosion behaviour by SSRT testing in high-temperature water. The weldments will be irratiated to 2 neutron fluence levels and a postirradiation examination will determine micromechanical, microchemical and microstructural changes in the materials. In detail, the evolution of the residual stress levels and the stress corrosion behaviour after irradiation will be determined. Neutron diffraction will be utilized for the first time with respect to neutron irradiated material. In this paper, the current state of the project will be described and discussed. (orig.)

  18. High temperature corrosion behaviour of Ti-46.6Al-1.4Mn-2Mo in environments of low oxygen and high sulphur potentials at 750 and 900 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, H.L.; Datta, P.K.; Hwang, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, the oxidation and sulphidation behaviour of a TiAl-based intermetallic, Ti-46.6Al-1.4Mn-2Mo (at%) with duplex and laminar microstructures, was investigated in environments of H 2 /H 2 S/H 2 O at 750 and 900 C. The corrosion kinetics of the intermetallic were determined by means of discontinuous gravimetry and the as-received and exposed samples were characterised using SEM, EDX and XRD. The weight gain/time data in the oxygen and sulphur containing environment used indicated parabolic kinetics with Kp∝10 -12 g 2 /cm 4 /s at 750 C and cubic kinetics at 900 C. The increase in exposure temperature did not significantly change the corrosion behaviour of the materials. The material showed the development of a multilayered scale consisting of an outermost TiO 2 layer beneath which an Al 2 O 3 layer existed: the formation of MnS and Al 2 S 3 was observed to occur between the oxide layers and substrate. This paper will discuss the significance of these results and consider the mechanisms responsible for degradation of this type of intermetallics in high sulphur and low oxygen environment with reference to their limit of temperature tolerance. (orig.)

  19. Erosion–corrosion and corrosion properties of DLC coated low temperature Erosion–corrosion and corrosion properties of DLC coated low temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Christiansen, Thomas; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2009-01-01

    of AISI 316 as substrate for DLC coatings are investigated. Corrosion and erosion–corrosion measurements were carried out on low temperature nitrided stainless steel AISI 316 and on low temperature nitrided stainless steel AISI 316 with a top layer of DLC. The combination of DLC and low temperature...... nitriding dramatically reduces the amount of erosion–corrosion of stainless steel under impingement of particles in a corrosive medium....

  20. Corrosion test by low-temperature coal tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, S; Yamamoto, S

    1952-01-01

    Corrosive actions of various fractions of low-temperature coal tar against mild steel or Cr 13-steel were compared at their boiling states. Corrosions became severe when the boiling points exceeded 240/sup 0/. The acidic fractions were more corrosive. In all instances, corrosion was excessive at the beginning of immersion testing and then gradually became mild; boiling accelerated the corrosion. Cr 13-steel was corrosion-resistant to low-temperature coal-tar fractions.

  1. Synthesis of recent investigations on corrosion behaviour of radioactive waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1985-03-01

    Work which has appeared since the earlier report (EIR--477) on the corrosion behaviour of borosilicate glasses as a solidification matrix for high-level radioactive waste has been evaluated. Many works have confirmed that for a particular glass, besides temperature and pH-value, the silicate concentration of the solution exerts the strongest influence on corrosion rate. The effect of silicate can be described in terms of simple reaction kinetics models which provides a more sound basis for prediction of long-term behaviour of glasses than previously existed. Meanwhile, the effects of backfill- and canister-materials and their corrosion products have been given the attention they merit. These materials affect glass corrosion primarily through regulation of silicic acid concentration. A particular finding which is of interest is the strong inhibition of glass corrosion by lead ions. Stationary corrosion rates in the order of magnitude of 10 -5 g/cm 2 .d can be derived from long-term corrosion experiments in stagnant water at 90 0 C. At the envisaged repository temperature of 55 0 C they will be one to two orders of magnitude less. The effects of radioactive decay on corrosion rate are either very small or not detectable at all. (Auth.)

  2. Corrosion Resistant Coatings for High Temperature Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besman, T.M.; Cooley, K.M.; Haynes, J.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Vaubert, V.M.

    1998-12-01

    Efforts to increase efficiency of energy conversion devices have required their operation at ever higher temperatures. This will force the substitution of higher-temperature structural ceramics for lower temperature materials, largely metals. Yet, many of these ceramics will require protection from high temperature corrosion caused by combustion gases, atmospheric contaminants, or the operating medium. This paper discusses examples of the initial development of such coatings and materials for potential application in combustion, aluminum smelting, and other harsh environments.

  3. Laboratory Investigation of High Temperature Corrosion in Straw fired Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion in straw-fired power plants has been studied in the laboratory for Sandvik 8LR30 and Sanicro 28. The influence of HCl and SO2 was investigated at 600C metal temperature for upto 300 hours.In addition the corrosion behaviour of the same materials was examined in ash taken from a straw-fired...

  4. Corrosion Behaviour of New Zr Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolksdorf, E.

    1974-01-01

    Corrosion studies have indicated that the most promising replacements for Zicaloy-2 are ZrCrFe, ZrVFe and probably ZrNbTa, provided they are in their optimized condition. These alloys are conventionally manufactured alloys. An internally oxidized ZrMgO alloy is even superior, from the corrosion...

  5. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, N.; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya; Reddy, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na 2 SO 4 + V 2 O 5 (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound

  6. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arivazhagan, N. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)]. E-mail: arivadmt@iitr.ernet.in; Singh, Surendra [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Prakash, Satya [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Reddy, G.M. [Defense Metallurgical and Research Laboratory, Hyderabad (India)

    2006-07-25

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound.

  7. High Temperature Corrosion in Biomass Incineration Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Maahn, Ernst emanuel; Gotthjælp, K.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the project is to study the role of ash deposits in high temperature corrosion of superheater materials in biomass and refuse fire combined heat and power plants. The project has included the two main activities: a) A chemical characterisation of ash deposits collected from a major...

  8. Corrosion, haemocompatibility and bacterial adhesion behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. TiZrN coating was deposited on 316L stainless steel (SS) by the reactive magnetron co-sputtering tech- nique. .... Uncoated 316L SS exhibited poor corrosion protection ... depletion of native oxide layer present on uncoated substrate.

  9. Corrosion fatigue behaviour of ion nitrided AISI 4140 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genel, K. [Sakarya Univ., Adapazari (Turkey). Mech. Eng. Dept.; Demirkol, M.; Guelmez, T. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Istanbul Technical University, Guemuessuyu, 80191, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2000-08-31

    Machine components suffer from corrosion degradation of fatigue characteristics and improvement can be attained by the application of a nitriding treatment, particularly to low alloy steels. In the present study, the effect of ion nitriding on corrosion fatigue performance of AISI 4140 steel has been investigated by conducting a series of rotary bending corrosion fatigue tests at 95 Hz, in 3% NaCl aqueous solution. Hourglass shaped, 4 mm diameter fatigue specimens were ion nitrided at 748 K for 1, 3, 8 and 16 h prior to the tests. It was observed that distinct fatigue limit behaviour of ion nitrided steel in air completely disappeared in corrosive environment besides severe degradation in fatigue characteristics. An improvement reaching to 60% in corrosion fatigue strength can be attained by successive ion nitriding practice based on a fatigue life of 10{sup 7} cycles. An attempt was made to establish an empirical relationship between corrosion fatigue strength and relative case depth, which considers the size of the ion nitrided specimen. It was also determined that a power relationship holds between corrosion fatigue strength and fatigue life of ion nitrided steel. The presence of white layer has resulted in additional improvement in corrosion fatigue resistance, and it was observed that corrosion fatigue cracks were initiated dominantly under the white layer by pit formation mechanism. (orig.)

  10. Corrosion fatigue behaviour of ion nitrided AISI 4140 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genel, K.

    2000-01-01

    Machine components suffer from corrosion degradation of fatigue characteristics and improvement can be attained by the application of a nitriding treatment, particularly to low alloy steels. In the present study, the effect of ion nitriding on corrosion fatigue performance of AISI 4140 steel has been investigated by conducting a series of rotary bending corrosion fatigue tests at 95 Hz, in 3% NaCl aqueous solution. Hourglass shaped, 4 mm diameter fatigue specimens were ion nitrided at 748 K for 1, 3, 8 and 16 h prior to the tests. It was observed that distinct fatigue limit behaviour of ion nitrided steel in air completely disappeared in corrosive environment besides severe degradation in fatigue characteristics. An improvement reaching to 60% in corrosion fatigue strength can be attained by successive ion nitriding practice based on a fatigue life of 10 7 cycles. An attempt was made to establish an empirical relationship between corrosion fatigue strength and relative case depth, which considers the size of the ion nitrided specimen. It was also determined that a power relationship holds between corrosion fatigue strength and fatigue life of ion nitrided steel. The presence of white layer has resulted in additional improvement in corrosion fatigue resistance, and it was observed that corrosion fatigue cracks were initiated dominantly under the white layer by pit formation mechanism. (orig.)

  11. Corrosion behaviour of zirconium alloys in the autoclaves of Embalse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordoni, Roberto A.; Olmedo, Ana M.; Villegas, Marina; Miyagusuku, Marcela; Maroto, Alberto J. G.; Sainz, Ricardo A.; Fernandez, Alberto N.; Allemandi, Walter D.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of zirconium alloys coupons attached to the holders of the autoclaves located out of core in the primary circuit of Embalse nuclear power plant is described. The Zr-2.5 Nb coupons of the autoclaves at the higher temperature (305 C degrees) and the Zry-4 coupons of the autoclaves at 265 and 305 C degrees installed in 1988 had a normal corrosion behaviour, after 3500 of full power days. While, the Zr-2.5 Nb coupons, at 265 C degrees, showed the presence of white oxide nuclei and a weight gain indicating an abnormal corrosion behaviour which might be attributed to the material microstructure. Complementary tests, made in the period September 1991-April 1993, showed that the abnormal corrosion behaviour observed for the Canadian coupons installed in 1983 was due to a surface contamination of the Zry-4 coupons and due to the microstructure of the Zr-2.5 Nb coupons. The normal corrosion behaviour for both alloys installed in 1986, showed that the resin ingress to the primary circuit that occurred in 1988, do not affect the performance of these materials. (author)

  12. Corrosion behaviour of Mg/Al alloys in high humidity atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrabal, R.; Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Mohedano, M.; Casajus, P. [Facultad de Quimicas, Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Merino, S. [Departamento de Tecnologia Industrial, Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio, Villanueva de la Canada, 28691 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    The influence of relative humidity (80-90-98% RH) and temperature (25 and 50 C) on the corrosion behaviour of AZ31, AZ80 and AZ91D magnesium alloys was evaluated using gravimetric measurements. The results were compared with the data obtained for the same alloys immersed in Madrid tap water. The corrosion rates of AZ alloys increased with the RH and temperature and were influenced by the aluminium content and alloy microstructure for RH values above 90%. The initiation of corrosion was localised around the Al-Mn inclusions in the AZ31 alloy and at the centre of the {alpha}-Mg phase in the AZ80 and AZ91D alloys. The {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase acted as a barrier against corrosion. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Corrosion behaviour of metallic containers during long term interim storages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desgranges, C.; Feron, D.; Mazaudier, F.; Terlain, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two main corrosion phenomena are encountered in long term interim storage conditions: dry oxidation by the air when the temperature of high level nuclear wastes containers is high enough (roughly higher than 100 C) and corrosion phenomena as those encountered in outdoor atmospheric corrosion when the temperature of the container wall is low enough and so condensation is possible on the container walls. Results obtained with dry oxidation in air lead to predict small damages (less than 1μm on steels over 100 years at 100 C) and no drastic changes with pollutants. For atmospheric corrosion, first developments deal with a pragmatic method that gives assessments of the indoor atmospheric corrosivities. (author)

  14. Aspects of high temperature corrosion of boiler tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegel, M.; Bendick, W. [Salzgitter-Mannesmann-Forschung GmbH, Duisburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The development of new boiler steels for power generation has to consider significant creep strength as well as oxidation and corrosion resistance. High temperature corrosion of boiler materials concerns steam oxidation as well as fireside corrosion of parts, in contact with the flue gas. It will be shown that depending on the quality of the fuel, especially chlorine and sulphur are responsible for most of the fireside corrosion problems. Corrosion mechanisms will be presented for flue gas induced corrosion (HCl) and deposit induced corrosion (chlorides and sulfates). Especially for the 700 C technology, deposit induced corrosion issues have to be considered and the mechanisms of corrosion by molten sulfates 'Hot Corrosion' will be explained. Finally, an overview will be given on the selection of suitable materials in order to minimise corrosion relates failures. (orig.)

  15. Synthesis of recent investigations on corrosion behaviour of radioactive waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1985-03-01

    By way of a supplement to an earlier report (NTB 83-01, EIR-Report Nr. 477), work which has appeared in the meantime on the corrosion behaviour of borosilicate glasses as a solidification matrix for high-level radioactive waste has been evaluated. Many works have confirmed that for a particular glass, besides temperature and pH-value, the silicate concentration of the solution exerts the strongest influence on corrosion rate. The effect of silicate can be described in terms of simple reaction kinetic models which provides a more sound basis for prediction of longterm behaviour of glasses than previously existed. Meanwhile, the effects of backfill- and canister-materials and their corrosion products have been given the attention they merit. These materials affect glass corrosion primarily through regulation of silicic acid concentration. A particular finding which is of interest is the strong inhibition of glass corrosion by lead ions. Stationary corrosion rates in the order of magnitude of 10 -5 g/cm 2 ·d can be derived from long-term corrosion experiments in stagnant water at 90 C. At the envisaged repository temperature of 55 C they will be one to two orders of magnitude less. The effects of radioactive decay on corrosion rate are either very small or not detectable at all. No further new viewpoints have been put forward with regard to a possible thermal re-structuring of glasses under repository conditions: re-crystallisation (devitrification) is not to be feared. With regard to future experiments, further work on quantification of the effects of canister- and backfill-materials and experiments with corrosion inhibitors would be of primary interest. (author)

  16. Modelling the long-term corrosion behaviour of candidate alloys for Canadian SCWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steeves, G.; Cook, W., E-mail: wcook@unb.ca, E-mail: graham.steeves@unb.ca [University of New Brunswick, Department of Chemical Engineering, Fredericton, NB (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Corrosion behaviour of Inconel 625 and Incoloy 800H, two of the candidate fuel cladding materials for Canadian supercritical water (SCW) reactor designs, were evaluated by exposing the metals to SCW in UNB's SCW flow loop. Individual experiments were conducted over a range of 370{sup o}C and 600{sup o}C. Exposure times were typically intervals of 100, 250, and 500 hours. Experimental data was used to create an empirical kinetic equation for each material. Activation energies for the alloys were determined, and showed a distinct difference between low-temperature electrochemical corrosion mechanism and direct high-temperature chemical oxidation. (author)

  17. Interrelationship between structure and corrosion behaviour of zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, T [Bayer A.G., Leverkusen (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-05-01

    Due to plant failures caused by the break-down of zirconium grade 702 subjected to sulphuric acid the structure and corrosion behaviour of welded and as delivered specimens were tested for various heat treatments. It was shown by structure investigations and electron microprobe analysis that the corrosion behaviour of zirconium (in boiling 65 pct sulphuric acid) is strongly infuenced by the structure, which in its turn is dependent on the grade of purity and the prehistory of the material. Type, amount, and distribution of residual elements or precipitations caused by them are responsible for the corrosion resistance. This is valid particularly for the element iron. The plant failures mentioned here coincided with the examination results. Measures to improve the chemical resistance of pure zirconium subjected to extremely aggressive media were derived.

  18. Corrosion behaviour of electropolished AISI 316L austenitic biomaterial in physiological solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatkalíková, V.; Markovičová, L.; Škorvanová, M.

    2017-11-01

    Due to suitable mechanical properties, satisfactory corrosion resistance and relatively low cost, austenitic stainless steels are important biomaterials for manufacture of implants and various medical instruments and devices. Their corrosion properties and biocompatibility are significantly affected by protective passive surface film quality, which depends on used mechanical and chemical surface treatment. This article deals with corrosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel, which is the most widely used Cr-Ni-Mo austenitic biomaterial. Corrosion behaviour of five various surfaces (original, electropolished, three surfaces with combined treatment finished by electropolishing) is evaluated on the bases of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests performed in physiological solution at the temperature of 37± 0.5 °C.

  19. Corrosion behaviour of boiler tube materials during combustion of fuels containing Zn and Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bankiewicz, D.

    2012-11-01

    Many power plants burning challenging fuels such as waste-derived fuels experience failures of the superheaters and/or increased waterwall corrosion due to aggressive fuel components already at low temperatures. To minimize corrosion problems in waste-fired boilers, the steam temperature is currently kept at a relatively low level which drastically limits power production efficiency. The elements found in deposits of waste and waste-derived fuels burning boilers that are most frequently associated with high-temperature corrosion are: Cl, S, and there are also indications of Br; alkali metals, mainly K and Na, and heavy metals such as Pb and Zn. The low steam pressure and temperature in waste-fired boilers also influence the temperature of the waterwall steel which is nowadays kept in the range of 300 deg C - 400 deg C. Alkali chloride (KCl, NaCl) induced high-temperature corrosion has not been reported to be particularly relevant at such low material temperatures, but the presence of Zn and Pb compounds in the deposits have been found to induce corrosion already in the 300 deg C - 400 deg C temperature range. Upon combustion, Zn and Pb may react with Cl and S to form chlorides and sulphates in the flue gases. These specific heavy metal compounds are of special concern due to the formation of low melting salt mixtures. These low melting, gaseous or solid compounds are entrained in the flue gases and may stick or condense on colder surfaces of furnace walls and superheaters when passing the convective parts of the boiler, thereby forming an aggressive deposit. A deposit rich in heavy metal (Zn, Pb) chlorides and sulphates increases the risk for corrosion which can be additionally enhanced by the presence of a molten phase. The objective of this study was to obtain better insight into high-temperature corrosion induced by Zn and Pb and to estimate the behaviour and resistance of some boiler superheater and waterwall materials in environments rich in those heavy metals

  20. Effects of climate and corrosion on concrete behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mohammad; Egba, Ernest Ituma

    2017-11-01

    Corrosion of steel is a damaging agent that reduces the functional and structural responsibilities of reinforced concrete structures. Accordingly, reinforced concrete members in the environments that are prone to concrete carbonation or chloride attack coupled with high temperature and relative humidity suffer from accelerated corrosion of reinforcing material. Also, literature proves that climate influences corrosion of concrete, and suggests investigation of impact of corrosion on concrete based on climate zone. Therefore, this paper presents the effects of climate and corrosion on concrete behavior, using bond strength of concrete as a case study. Concrete specimens were prepared form concrete mix that was infested with 3.5 kgm-3 of sodium chloride to accelerate corrosion. The specimens were cured sodium chloride solution 3.5% by weight of water for 28 days before placing them in the exposure conditions. Pull-out tests were conducted at time intervals for one year to measure the impact of exposure condition and corrosion on bond strength of concrete. The results show reduction of bond strength of concrete by 32%, 28% and 8% after one year of subjection of the specimens to the unsheltered natural climate, sheltered natural climate, and laboratory ambient environment respectively. The findings indicate that the climate influences corrosion, which reduces the interlocking bond between the reinforcing bar and the adjacent concrete.

  1. Crack behaviour of ferritic pressure vessels steels in oxygenated high temperature water under transient loadings. Crack corrosion phase 2. Crack development and fatigue. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissenberg, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Using the example of the ferritic steels 22NiMoCr3-7 and 15MnNi6-3 representative for Nuclear Power Plants experimental data for the evaluation of the influence of the light water reactor (LWR) coolant environment and postulated chloride contaminations on crack development and fatigue have been determined in order to verify and extend the basis for a reliable estimation of the residual service life of reactor components. The aim of the research project was the investigation of the environmental effects at low strain rate conditions and the determination of the fatigue life under cyclic loading at uniaxial and multiaxial stress state. The quasi-static tensile tests (Constant Extension Rate Test, CERT) were performed using 3 low strain rates, each differing by about one order of magnitude (2.5.10 -3 , 3.1.10 -4 and 2.3.10 -5 %/s). The low cycle fatigue (LCF) experiments were conducted applying alternating tensile-compression loading with strain amplitudes of 0.3, 0.5 and 0.9 % at strain rates of 0.1 and 0.01 %/s (tests in air primarily 0.1 %/s). The cyclic notched tensile tests were carried out with a nominal axial strain in the notch root of 0.5 % at a strain rate of 0.1 %/s. The experiments in each case were performed in air, high purity water and chloride containing water at a testing temperature of 240 C, the oxygen content of the liquid medium was set to 0.4 ppm (simulated boiling water reactor coolant). In the CERT experiments chloride contents of 30, 50 and 100 ppb were applied, in the LCF tests the chloride content was 50 ppb which can be regarded as an upper realistic limit for a postulated chloride contamination of the reactor coolant. All experiments in liquid environment were preceded by a pre-autoclaving phase of at least 100 h in order to allow the formation of a stable oxide layer (magnetite). The testing material 22NiMoCr3-7 was available in form of an original reactor pressure vessel shell primarily designated for the German nuclear power plant

  2. Corrosion behaviour of the UO2 pellet in corrosive solutions using electrochemical Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taftanzani, A.; Sucipto; Lahagu, F.; Irianto, B.

    1996-01-01

    The UO 2 electrodes has been made from the local product of UO 2 pellets. The corrosion behaviour of the UO 2 pellets is affected by solution, by pH value and by concentration of salt solution. Investigation into corrosion behaviour of UO 2 electrodes have been carried out in saturated salt solutions using electrochemical technique. The saturated solutions have been made from salts NaCl, Na 2 CO 3 , Na 2 SO 4 and Na 3 PO 4 . The pH value have been done over range 1 pH 10 and the salt concentration (C) over range 0,001 mol/l C 1,0 mol/l, Na 2 CO 3 solution produced the lowest corrosion rates of UO 2 pellets. Those rates were relative constant in the range of pH = 4 - 8. The results indicate an influence of the Na 2 CO 3 concentrations on the corrosions on the corrosion rate, and the lowest rates occur in 0,10 mol/l Na 2 CO 3 . The lowest corrosion rate was 0.3388 mil/year in 0.10 mol/l Na 2 CO 3 by pH = 4. (author)

  3. Aqueous corrosion behaviour of Zr-1 Nb and Zr-20 Nb with different heat treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaime Solis, F.; Bordoni, Roberto; Olmedo, Ana M.; Villegas, Marina; Miyagusuku, Marcela

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of Zr-1 Nb and Zr-20 Nb coupons annealed at 850 C degrees during 1 hour and afterwards aged at different temperatures and time periods was studied. The Zr-1 Nb samples were aged at 400 and 500 C degrees and the Zr-20 Nb samples at 265 and 550 C degrees. The results have shown that ageing increases the corrosion resistance because the aged microstructure is somewhat closer to the equilibrium one. This was not the case of Zr-1 Nb aged 72 hs at 400 C degrees. The presence of the ω-phase does not have a deleterious effect in the corrosion behaviour of Zr-20 Nb. Also, an ageing of 2200 h at 265 C degrees induced a relevant decrease in the corrosion rate of Zr-20 Nb indicating a decomposition of the β- Zr phase. This effect was observed at the inlet of pressure tubes in CANDU reactors. The results obtained will be used to establish the relative importance of the α-Zr and β-Zr phases in the corrosion behaviour of pressure tubes. (author)

  4. Corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in the Tournemire clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foct, F.; Dridi, W.; Cabrera, J.; Savoye, S.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon steels are possible materials for the fabrication of nuclear waste containers for long term geological disposal in argillaceous environments. Experimental studies of the corrosion behaviour of such materials has been conducted in various conditions. Concerning the numerous laboratory experiments, these conditions (water and clay mixture or compacted clay) mainly concern the bentonite clay that would be used for the engineered barrier. On the opposite, only few in-situ experiments has been conducted directly in the local clay of the repository site (such as Boom clay, etc.). In order to better estimate the corrosion behaviour of carbon steels in natural clay site conditions, an experimental study has been conducted jointly by EDF and IRSN in the argillaceous French site of Tournemire. In this study, A42 carbon steel specimens have been exposed in 3 different zones of the Tournemire clay formation. The first type of environmental conditions concerns a zone where the clay has not been affected by the excavation (EDZ) of the main tunnel neither by the main fracture zone of the clay formation. The second and third ones are located in the EDZ of the tunnel. In the second zone, an additional aerated water flows from the tunnel, whereas it does not in the third place. Some carbon steel specimens have been extracted after several years of exposure to these conditions. The average corrosion rate has been measured by the weight loss technique and the pitting corrosion depth has been evaluated under an optical microscope. Corrosion products have also been characterised by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction technique. Results are then discussed regarding the surrounding environmental conditions. Calculations of the oxygen transport from the tunnel through the clay and of the clay re-saturation can explain, in a first approach, the corrosion behaviour of the carbon steel in the different tested zones. (authors)

  5. Corrosion behaviour of sintered duplex stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utrilla, M. Victoria; Urena, Alejandro; Otero, Enrique; Munez, Claudio Jose [Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/ Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Duplex austenite-ferrite stainless steels were prepared by mixing austenitic (316L) and ferritic (434L) atomized powders. Although different 316L/434L ratios were prepared, present work centred its study on 50% ferrite - 50% austenite sintered steel. The powders were mixed and pressed at 700 MPa and sintered at 1250 deg. C for 30 min in vacuum. The cooling rate was 5 deg. C/min. Solution treatment was carried out to homogenize the microstructure at 1100 deg. C during 20 min. A microstructural study of the material in solution was performed, evaluating the microstructure, proportion and shape of porosity, and ferrite percentage. This last was measured by two methods, quantitative metallography and Fischer ferrito-metry. The materials were heat treated in the range of 700 to 1000 deg. C, for 10, 30 and 60 min and water quenched, to study the microstructural changes and the influence on the intergranular corrosion resistance. The method used to evaluate the sensitization to the intergranular corrosion was the electrochemical potentio-kinetic reactivation procedure (EPR). The test solution was 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0,01 M KSCN at 30 deg. C. The criterion used to evaluate the sensitization was the ratio between the maximum reactivation density (Ir) and the maximum activation density (Ia). The results of the electrochemical tests were discussed in relation with the microstructures observed at the different heat treatments. (authors)

  6. Corrosion behaviour of high chromium ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiesheyer, H.; Lennartz, G.; Brandis, H.

    1976-01-01

    Ferritic steels developed for seawater desalination and containing 20 to 28% chromium, up to 5% Mo and additions of nickel and copper have been tested with respect to their corrosion behaviour, in particular in chloride containing media. The materials in the sensibilized state were tested for intercrystalline corrosion susceptibility in the Strauss-, Streicher-, nitric acid hydrofluoric acid- and Huey-Tests. No intercrystalline corrosion was encountered in the case of the steels with 28% Cr and 2% Mo. The resistance to pitting was assessed on the basis of rupture potentials determined by potentiokinetic tests. The resistance of the steels with 20% Cr and 5% Mo or 28% Cr and 2% Mo is superior to that of the molybdenum containing austenitic types. Addition of nickel yields a significant increase in crevice corrosion resistance; the same applies to resistance in sulfuric acid. In boiling seawater all the materials tested are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. No sign of any type of corrosion was found on nickel containing steels after about 6,000 hours exposure to boiling 50% seawater brine even under salt deposits. (orig.) [de

  7. Corrosion behaviour and biocorrosion of galvanized steel water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunois, F; Tosar, F; Vitry, V

    2014-06-01

    Galvanized steel tubes are a popular mean for water distribution systems but suffer from corrosion despite their zinc or zinc alloy coatings. First, the quality of hot-dip galvanized (HDG) coatings was studied. Their microstructure, defects, and common types of corrosion were observed. It was shown that many manufactured tubes do not reach European standard (NBN EN 10240), which is the cause of several corrosion problems. The average thickness of zinc layer was found at 41μm against 55μm prescribed by the European standard. However, lack of quality, together with the usual corrosion types known for HDG steel tubes was not sufficient to explain the high corrosion rate (reaching 20μm per year versus 10μm/y for common corrosion types). Electrochemical tests were also performed to understand the corrosion behaviours occurring in galvanized steel tubes. Results have shown that the limiting step was oxygen diffusion, favouring the growth of anaerobic bacteria in steel tubes. EDS analysis was carried out on corroded coatings and has shown the presence of sulphur inside deposits, suggesting the likely bacterial activity. Therefore biocorrosion effects have been investigated. Actually sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) can reduce sulphate contained in water to hydrogen sulphide (H2S), causing the formation of metal sulphides. Although microbial corrosion is well-known in sea water, it is less investigated in supply water. Thus, an experimental water main was kept in operation for 6months. SRB were detected by BART tests in the test water main. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Microstructure and corrosion behaviour of pulsed plasma-nitrided AISI H13 tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basso, Rodrigo L.O.; Pastore, Heloise O.; Schmidt, Vanessa; Baumvol, Israel J.R.; Abarca, Silvia A.C.; Souza, Fernando S. de; Spinelli, Almir; Figueroa, Carlos A.; Giacomelli, Cristiano

    2010-01-01

    The effect of pulsed plasma nitriding temperature and time on the pitting corrosion behaviour of AISI H13 tool steel in 0.9% NaCl solutions was investigated by cyclic polarization. The pitting potential (E pit ) was found to be dependent on the composition, microstructure and morphology of the surface layers, whose properties were determined by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The best corrosion protection was observed for samples nitrided at 480 o C and 520 o C. Under such experimental conditions the E pit -values shifted up to 1.25 V in the positive direction.

  9. High temperature aqueous stress corrosion testing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornstein, A.N.; Indig, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a device for stressing tensile samples contained within a high temperature, high pressure aqueous environment, thereby permitting determination of stress corrosion susceptibility of materials in a simple way. The stressing device couples an external piston to an internal tensile sample via a pull rod, with stresses being applied to the sample by pressurizing the piston. The device contains a fitting/seal arrangement including Teflon and weld seals which allow sealing of the internal system pressure and the external piston pressure. The fitting/seal arrangement allows free movement of the pull rod and the piston

  10. The corrosion behaviour of Zr3Al-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.V.; Wieler, R.

    1977-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of several zirconium-aluminum alloys with aluminum contents ranging from 7.6 to 9.6 wt% was examined in 300 deg C and 325 deg C water, 350 deg C and 400 deg C steam and in air and wet CO 2 at 325 deg C and 400 deg C. In the transformed alloys there are three phases present, αZr, Zr 2 Al and Zr 3 Al of which the αZr phase is the least corrosion resistant. The most important factor controlling the corrosion behaviour of these alloys was found to be the size, distribution and amount of the αZr phase in the transformed alloys, which in turn was dependent upon the microstructural scale of the untransformed alloys

  11. Corrosion behaviour of aluminium plates in aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.F. de; Gaio, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    The process of corrosion concerning the aluminium 1050 plate was studied at room temperatures, 45 and 60 0 C in deionized water, the same Argonauta Reactor Water. Beyond the temperature influence, it was verified the effect of chloride ion and oxygen. It ws found that the amount of oxyde formed at room temperatures is almost negligible; at 45 and 60 0 C the samples were covered with bayerita, the quantity of oxide formed at 45 0 C being higher than at 60 0 C. It was observed that there will be risk of corrosion in the case of Reactor Water to undergo contamination with chloride ions. The results have shown that the material can be used since the medium don't be strongly oxidizing. At potentials higher than - 900M sup(V) ess (-280 m sup(V) sub(H)), the material will undergo pitting corrosion. (Author) [pt

  12. Corrosion of titanium alloys in concentrated chloride solutions at temperature up to 160 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruskol, Yu.S.; Viter, L.I.; Balakin, A.I.; Fokin, M.N.

    1982-01-01

    Resistance of VT1-0 titanium and 4200, 4207 titanium alloys to pitting and total corrosion in chlorides of cadmium, potassium, nickel, ammonium, barium, calcium, lithium, magnesium in respect to pH value and temperature (120,140,160 deg C) is determined. The results obtained are presented as nomograms of stability. Possible reasons for corrosion behaviour of titanium in each of the chlorides are discussed

  13. Corrosion behaviour of nickel during anodic polarization in chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, S.A.; Isani, A.A.; Memon, A.N.

    1998-01-01

    This research presents the effect of oxygen and nitrogen on the corrosion behaviour of nickel in the chloride solution, at the steady state polarized and unpolarized potentials. The additives were selected from those, which are used for bright nickel plating. It was observed that the agitation of electrolyte in a particular pH-(Cl)' range increase the potentials in comparison of the potentials to the un-agitated electrolytes. (author)

  14. Corrosion behaviour of zirconium alloys out or under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomazet, J.; Billot, P.

    1997-01-01

    This article describes and compares the results obtained after studies carried out in autoclaves, in loops and in reactor in power on the behaviour of some products. Inversions of behaviour are observed between results of studies in autoclaves and after irradiation. On the contrary, a study in loop under thermal flux reproduces the classifying of tested products without however ensure a reliable quantification. Studies in autoclave are nevertheless useful for a first analysis of effects of modifications of manufacturing range. Nevertheless, a deep analysis of involved phenomena requires a better knowledge of corrosion mechanisms. (O.M.)

  15. Corrosion behaviour of materials selected for FMIT lithium system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazinet, G.D.; Brehm, W.F.

    1983-09-01

    The corrosion behavior of selected materials in a liquid lithium environment was studied in support of system and component designs for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Testing conditions ranged from about 3700 to about6500 hours of exposure to flowing lithium at temperatures from 230/sup 0/ to 270/sup 0/C and static lithium at temperatures from 200/sup 0/ to 500/sup 0/C. Principal areas of investigation included lithium corrosion/erosion effects on FMIT lithium system baseline and candidate materials. Material coupons and full-size prototypic components were evaluated to determine corrosion rates, fatigue crack growth rates, structural compatibility, and component acceptability for the lithium system. Based on the results of these studies, concerns regarding system materials and component designs were satisfactorily resolved to support a 20-year design life requirement for the FMIT lithium system.

  16. Corrosion behaviour of materials selected for FMIT lithium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazinet, G.D.; Brehm, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of selected materials in a liquid lithium environment was studied in support of system and component designs for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Testing conditions ranged from about 3700 to about6500 hours of exposure to flowing lithium at temperatures from 230 0 to 270 0 C and static lithium at temperatures from 200 0 to 500 0 C. Principal areas of investigation included lithium corrosion/erosion effects on FMIT lithium system baseline and candidate materials. Material coupons and full-size prototypic components were evaluated to determine corrosion rates, fatigue crack growth rates, structural compatibility, and component acceptability for the lithium system. Based on the results of these studies, concerns regarding system materials and component designs were satisfactorily resolved to support a 20-year design life requirement for the FMIT lithium system

  17. High Temperature Corrosion of Superheater Materials for Power Production through Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Maahn, Ernst emanuel; Nielsen, Karsten agersted

    The aim of the present study has been to establish a fundamental knowledge of the corrosion mechanisms acting on materials for use in biomass fired power plants. The knowledge is created based on laboratory exposures on selected materials in well-defined corrosive gas environments. An experimental...... facility has been established wherein the planned exposures are completed. Specimens were exposed in combined synthetic flue gas at temperatures up to 900C. The specimens could be cooled to 300C below the gas temperature. Gas flow and gas mixture can be varied according to the conditions found in a power......) on the corrosion progress has been investigated.In addition the corrosion behaviour of the same materials was investigated after having been exposed under a cover of ash in air in a furnace at temperatures of 525C, 600C and 700C. The ashes utilised are from a straw-fired power plant and a synthetic ash composed...

  18. High Temperature Corrosion in Biomass-Fired Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels; Montgomery, Melanie; Hede Larsen, Ole

    2002-01-01

    condense on superheater components. This gives rise to specific corrosion problems not previously encountered in coal-fired power plants. The type of corrosion attack can be directly ascribed to the composition of the deposit and the metal surface temperature. To avoid such high corrosion rates, woodchip...... has also been utilised as a fuel. Combustion of woodchip results in a smaller amount of ash, and potassium and chlorine are present in lesser amounts. However, significant corrosion rates were still seen. A case study of a woodchip fired boiler is described. The corrosion mechanisms in both straw-fired...... and woodchip fired boilers are discussed....

  19. Corrosion behaviour of 6063 aluminium alloy in acidic and in alkaline media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu Deepa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of 6063 aluminium alloy was investigated in different concentrations of phosphoric acid medium and sodium hydroxide medium at different temperatures. The study was done by electrochemical method, using Tafel polarization technique and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS technique. The surface morphology was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM with Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. The results showed that the 6063 aluminium alloy undergoes severe corrosion in sodium hydroxide medium than in phosphoric acid medium. The corrosion rate of 6063 aluminium alloy increased with an increase in the concentration of acid as well as with alkali. The corrosion rate was increased with an increase in temperature. The kinetic parameters and thermodynamic parameters were calculated using Arrhenius theory and transition state theory. Suitable mechanism was proposed for the corrosion of 6063 aluminium alloy in phosphoric acid medium and sodium hydroxide medium. The results obtained by Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS techniques were in good agreement with each other.

  20. Corrosion resistance of zirconium: general mechanisms, behaviour in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard Legry, G.

    1990-01-01

    Corrosion resistance of zirconium results from the strong affinity of this metal for oxygen; as a result a thin protective oxide film is spontaneously formed in air or aqueous media, its thickness and properties depending on the physicochemical conditions at the interface. This film passivates the underlying metal but obviously if the passive film is partially or completely removed, localised or generalised corrosion phenomena will occur. In nitric acid, this depassivation may be chemical (fluorides) or mechanical (straining, creep, fretting). In these cases it is useful to determine the physicochemical conditions (concentration, temperature, potential, stress) which will have to be observed to use safely zirconium and its alloys in nitric acid solutions [fr

  1. Corrosion behaviour of stainless steels by internal friction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postnikov, V.S.; Kovalevskij, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    Corrosion of austenite chromium-nickel stainless steels 12 Kh18N9, 12Kh18N9T, 12Kh18N10 and 12Kh18N10T is investigated. Wire samples 0.7...0.8 mm in diameter before tests were subjected to quenching in water from the temperature of 1050...1100 deg C and part of them - to tempering at 650 deg C for 2 h. Pitting corrosion was brought about by different concentration of iron chloride solutions (C FeCl 3 ). Total corrosion has a slight effect on the character of IF (internal friction) variation that increases without the whole test period up to the moment when mechanical strength of the sample

  2. Corrosion of metallic materials by uranium hexafluoride at high temperatures (1963); Corrosion de materiaux metalliques par l'hexafluorure d'uranium a haute temperature (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlois, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The corrosion of the following metals or alloys by UF{sub 6}: nickel, monel, Inconel, gold, platinum, stainless steel, is studied in the temperature range from 300 to 1000 deg. C. The test method, designed to avoid heating the apparatus containing the corrosive fluid to a high temperature, consists in using threadlike samples heated by the Joule effect, the rest of the apparatus being maintained close to room temperature. This technique makes it possible also to determine continuously the penetration of the corrosion by measuring the electrical resistance of the sample with a double Thomson bridge. A series of rapid comparison tests shows that stainless steel, precious metals and Inconel are attacked far too rapidly to be used above 500 deg. C; only monel and especially nickel appear capable of resisting at high temperatures. The detailed examination of the behaviour of nickel shows that the metallic fluoride is volatilized and that this influences the corrosion rate. It shows also the existence of a temperature zone situated between 550 and 700 deg. C in which occurs A strong intergranular corrosion the cause of which appears to be the presence of impurities in the metal. (author) [French] La corrosion par l'UF{sub 6} des metaux ou alliages suivants: lickel, monel, inconel, or, platine, acier inoxydable, est etudiee dans le un domaine de temperature compris entre 300 et 1000 deg. C. La methode d'essai, destinee a eviter le chauffage de l'enceinte contenant le fluide corrosif a temperature elevee, consiste a utiliser des eprouvettes filiformes, echauffees par effet Joule, le reste de l'appareillage etant maintenu a une temperature proche de l'ambiance. Cette technique permet en outre de determiner en continu la penetration de la corrosion, par mesure de la resistance electrique de l'eprouvette, au moyen d'un pont double de Thomson. Une serie d'essais comparatifs, assez sommaires, montre que l'acier inoxydable, les metaux precieux et l'inconel sont attaques beaucoup

  3. Corrosion of metallic materials by uranium hexafluoride at high temperatures (1963); Corrosion de materiaux metalliques par l'hexafluorure d'uranium a haute temperature (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlois, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The corrosion of the following metals or alloys by UF{sub 6}: nickel, monel, Inconel, gold, platinum, stainless steel, is studied in the temperature range from 300 to 1000 deg. C. The test method, designed to avoid heating the apparatus containing the corrosive fluid to a high temperature, consists in using threadlike samples heated by the Joule effect, the rest of the apparatus being maintained close to room temperature. This technique makes it possible also to determine continuously the penetration of the corrosion by measuring the electrical resistance of the sample with a double Thomson bridge. A series of rapid comparison tests shows that stainless steel, precious metals and Inconel are attacked far too rapidly to be used above 500 deg. C; only monel and especially nickel appear capable of resisting at high temperatures. The detailed examination of the behaviour of nickel shows that the metallic fluoride is volatilized and that this influences the corrosion rate. It shows also the existence of a temperature zone situated between 550 and 700 deg. C in which occurs A strong intergranular corrosion the cause of which appears to be the presence of impurities in the metal. (author) [French] La corrosion par l'UF{sub 6} des metaux ou alliages suivants: lickel, monel, inconel, or, platine, acier inoxydable, est etudiee dans le un domaine de temperature compris entre 300 et 1000 deg. C. La methode d'essai, destinee a eviter le chauffage de l'enceinte contenant le fluide corrosif a temperature elevee, consiste a utiliser des eprouvettes filiformes, echauffees par effet Joule, le reste de l'appareillage etant maintenu a une temperature proche de l'ambiance. Cette technique permet en outre de determiner en continu la penetration de la corrosion, par mesure de la resistance electrique de l'eprouvette, au moyen d'un pont double de Thomson. Une serie d'essais comparatifs, assez sommaires, montre que l'acier inoxydable, les metaux

  4. HIGH TEMPERATURE CORROSION RESISTANCE OF METALLIC MATERIALS IN HARSH CONDITIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Novello, Frederic; Dedry, Olivier; De Noose, Vincent; Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient energy recovery from renewable sources and from waste incineration causes new problems of corrosion at high temperature. A similar situation exists for new recycling processes and new energy storage units. These corrosions are generally considered to be caused by ashes or molten salts, the composition of which differs considerably from one plant to another. Therefore, for the assessment of corrosion-resistance of advanced materials, it is essential to precisely evaluate the c...

  5. Corrosion behavior of construction materials for intermediate temperature steam electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey; Petrushina, Irina; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2013-01-01

    Different corrosion resistant stainless steels, nickel-based alloys, pure nickel, Ta-coated stainless steel (AISI 316L), niobium, platinum and gold rods were evaluated as possible materials for use in the intermediate temperature (200-400 °C) acidic water electrolysers. The corrosion resistance w...

  6. High Temperature Corrosion on Biodust Firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi

    The high content of alkali metals and chlorine in biomass gives rise to fouling/slagging and corrosion of heat exchange components, such as superheaters, in biomass fired power plants. Increasing the lifetime of these components, and in addition, preventing unwarranted plant shutdowns due...... to their failure, requires understanding of the complex corrosion mechanisms, as well as development of materials that are resistant to corrosion under biomass firing conditions, thereby motivating the current work. To understand the mechanisms of corrosion attack, comprehensive analysis of corrosion products...... by the combined use of complementary information from microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and various X-ray diffraction characterization techniques. In light of the wide variation in operating conditions in biomass fired power plants, systematic and well-controlled, but realistic laboratory scale...

  7. Corrosion behaviour of hyper duplex stainless steel in various metallurgical conditions for sea water cooled condensers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Umesh Pratap; Kain, Vivekanand; Chandra, Kamlesh

    2011-01-01

    The sea water cooled condensers have to resist severe corrosion as marine environment is the most corrosive natural environment. Copper alloys are being phased out due to difficulties in water chemistry control and Titanium base alloys are extremely expensive. Austenitic stainless steels (SS) remain prone to localized corrosion in marine environments hence not suitable. These heat exchangers operate at temperatures not exceeding 50 deg C and at very low pressures. The tubes of these heat exchangers are joined to the carbon steel tube sheets by roll expansion or by roll expansion followed by seam welding. These conditions are expected to affect the localized corrosion resistance of the tube in roll joined region due to cold working and in the tube-tube sheet welded joint due to thermal effects of welding. In this study, the localized corrosion behaviour of a Hyper Duplex Stainless Steel (HDSS) has been evaluated, and compared with other materials e.g. types 304L SS, 316L SS, Duplex SS 2205, Titanium grade - 2, and Al Brass. The evaluation is done in three metallurgical conditions (a) as received, (b) cold rolled and (c) welded condition in synthetic sea water at room temperature and at 50 deg C to assess the resistance to crevice, pitting and stress corrosion cracking using standard ASTM exposure and electrochemical techniques. The results provide comparative assessment of these alloys and show their susceptibility in the three metallurgical conditions as encountered in condensers. Hyper-duplex SS has been shown to be highly resistant in sea water for the condenser tubing application. (author)

  8. Corrosion behaviour of the AlSi6Cu4 alloy and cast AlSi6Cu4-graphite particles composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Holecek

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of the AlSi6Cu4 alloy as a composite matrix and of composites with 8% vol. of graphite particles was investigated. The corrosion experiments were performed over a range of elevated temperatures and were carried out in sea water (3.5%NaCl solution. We have focused our attention to the determination of the mode of corrosion attack and to the determination of the rate ofcorrosion and other corrosion characteristics. Both as-cast and annealed matrix and composite specimens were tested, as well as the99.9% as-cast aluminium for comparison. Corrosion behaviour of the materials was assessed by the corrosion potential (Ec and bypotentiodynamic (polarization curves. As expected, composite is less corrosion resistant than the matrix alloy. In addition to pitting,a severe galvanic corrosion occurs as a result of galvanic couple aluminium/graphite formation. Corrosion potentials imply that examinedmaterials would be sufficiently resistant in non or slightly oxidizing solutions without dissolved oxygen. All studied materials corrode very slowly at potentials negative to corrosion potential, while at potentials positive to corrosion potential the corrosion rate goes up by 1 or 2 orders.

  9. The corrosion behaviour of nanograined metals and alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrasti, P.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available There has been considerable interest in the properties of nanocrystalline materials over the last decade. Such materials include metals and alloys with a crystal size within the order of 1 to 100 nm. The interest arises due to the substantial differences in electrical, optical and magnetic properties and also due to their high adsorption capability and chemical reactivity compared to their larger grained counterparts. In this paper, the corrosion of nanocrystalline metals and alloys is investigated and compared to the corrosion of microcrystalline materials having a similar composition. The focus is on the corrosion of nickel, copper, cobalt and iron alloys. Key aspects of different corrosion behaviour such grain boundaries and size are identified.

    En la última década ha habido un gran interes en las propiedades de materiales nanocristalinos. Estos materiales incluyen metales y aleaciones con un tamaño de cristal del orden de 1 a 100 nm. El interes por estos materiales es debido a las grandes diferencias en cuanto a sus propiedades electricas, opticas y magneticas, asi como a su alta capacidad de adsorción y reactividad química en relación a los mismos materiales con tamaños de grano mayores. En este trabajo se ha investigado y comparado la corrosión de materiales nano y microcristalinos de similar composición química. Principalmente se ha centrado en la corrosión de metales tales como niquel, cobre, cobalto y aleaciones de hierro. Se ha comprobado que los diferentes comportamientos frente al proceso de corrosión están intimamente ligados con los bordes de grano y el tamaño de dichos granos.

  10. Comparison of corrosion behaviour of friction stir processed and laser melted AA 2219 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surekha, K.; Murty, B.S.; Prasad Rao, K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Poor corrosion resistance of AA 2219 can be improved by surface treatments. → FSP and LM leads to dissolution of second phase particles. → No literature available on comparison of corrosion behaviour after FSP and LM. → The study implies FSP is as good as LM in improving the corrosion resistance of AA 2219. -- Abstract: Dissolution of second phase particles (CuAl 2 ) present in AA 2219 aluminium improves the corrosion resistance of the alloy. Two surface treatment techniques, viz., solid state friction stir processing and fusion based laser melting lead to the reduction in CuAl 2 content and the effect of these processes on the corrosion behaviour of the alloy is compared in this study. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests were carried out to compare corrosion behaviour. The corrosion resistance achieved by friction stir processing is comparable to that obtained by the laser melting technique.

  11. Temperature and humidity effects on the corrosion of aluminium-base reactor fuel cladding materials during dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, H.B.; Sindelar, R.L.; Lam, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of temperature and relative humidity on the high temperature (up to 200 deg. C) corrosion of aluminum cladding alloys was investigated for dry storage of spent nuclear fuels. A dependency on alloy type and temperature was determined for saturated water vapor conditions. Models were developed to allow prediction of cladding behaviour of 1100, 5052, and 6061 aluminum alloys for up to 50+ years at 100% relative humidity. Calculations show that for a closed system, corrosion stops after all moisture and oxygen is used up during corrosion reactions with aluminum alloys. (author)

  12. Critical analyses on the localized corrosion behaviour in materials of energetic interests: Inconcel 600 CSM and Deltacogne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borello, A.; Frangini, S.; Masci, D.

    1989-06-01

    Concerning the two commonly observed phenomena of localized corrosion of Inconel 600 in high temperature caustic environments normally encountered in steam generators of PWR nuclear reactors, the aim of this work is to investigate the intergranular and the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of two heats of Alloy 600, having different origin. In fact one heat was produced by Centro Sviluppo Materiali (CSM) in laboratory scale; the other one was manufactured by Deltacogne following conventional industrial practices. The evaluation of intergranular corrosion susceptibility has been performed by means of the modified Huey test and the Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR). The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility was determined by the slow strain rate technique. The results of the present study show that the CSM heat has a better behaviour than the Deltacogne one as for the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. On the contrary, concerning the intergranular corrosion resistance, both used tests point out that the Deltacogne material has a lower susceptibility to this type of localized corrosion. The sensitization areas in the TTS diagram, depend, even for the same heat, on the type of the test used for the evaluation. (author)

  13. The corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel in cooling tower water containing a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnoş, Bihter; Ilhan-Sungur, Esra; Çotuk, Ayşın; Güngör, Nihal Doğruöz; Cansever, Nurhan

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel in cooling tower water containing a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor was investigated over a 10-month period in a hotel. Planktonic and sessile numbers of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) and heterotrophic bacteria were monitored. The corrosion rate was determined by the weight loss method. The corrosion products were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. A mineralized, heterogeneous biofilm was observed on the coupons. Although a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor were regularly added to the cooling water, the results showed that microorganisms, such as SRB in the mixed species biofilm, caused corrosion of galvanized steel. It was observed that Zn layers on the test coupons were completely depleted after 3 months. The Fe concentrations in the biofilm showed significant correlations with the weight loss and carbohydrate concentration (respectively, p < 0.01 and p < 0.01).

  14. General corrosion of carbon steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    This short paper seeks to provide a summary of the main knowledge about the general corrosion of carbon steels in high temperature water. In pure water or slightly alkaline deaerated water, steels develop a protective coating of magnetite in a double layer (Potter and Mann oxide) or a single layer (Bloom oxide). The morphology of the oxide layer and the kinetics of corrosion depend on the test parameters controlling the solubility of iron. The parameters exercising the greatest influence are partial hydrogen pressure and mass transfer: hydrogen favours the solubilization of the magnetite; the entrainment of the dissolved iron prevents a redeposition of magnetite on the surface of the steel. Cubic or parabolic in static conditions, the kinetics of corrosion tends to be linear in dynamic conditions. In dynamic operation, corrosion is at least one order of magnitude lower in water with a pH of 10 than in pure water with a pH of 7. The activation energy of corrosion is 130 kJ/mol (31 kcal/mol). This results in the doubling of corrosion at around 300 deg C for a temperature increase of 15 deg C. Present in small quantities (100-200 ppb), oxygen decreases general corrosion but increases the risk of pitting corrosion - even for a low chloride content - and stress corrosion cracking or corrosion-fatigue. The steel composition has probably an influence on the kinetics of corrosion in dynamic conditions; further work would be required to clarify the effect of some residual elements. (author). 31 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Corrosion of metallic materials by uranium hexafluoride at high temperatures (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlois, G.

    1963-01-01

    The corrosion of the following metals or alloys by UF 6 : nickel, monel, Inconel, gold, platinum, stainless steel, is studied in the temperature range from 300 to 1000 deg. C. The test method, designed to avoid heating the apparatus containing the corrosive fluid to a high temperature, consists in using threadlike samples heated by the Joule effect, the rest of the apparatus being maintained close to room temperature. This technique makes it possible also to determine continuously the penetration of the corrosion by measuring the electrical resistance of the sample with a double Thomson bridge. A series of rapid comparison tests shows that stainless steel, precious metals and Inconel are attacked far too rapidly to be used above 500 deg. C; only monel and especially nickel appear capable of resisting at high temperatures. The detailed examination of the behaviour of nickel shows that the metallic fluoride is volatilized and that this influences the corrosion rate. It shows also the existence of a temperature zone situated between 550 and 700 deg. C in which occurs A strong intergranular corrosion the cause of which appears to be the presence of impurities in the metal. (author) [fr

  16. Corrosion of titanium alloys in high temperature near anaerobic seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Jianjun; Blackwood, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • In absence of CO 2 Ti grades 2 and 5 suffer crevice corrosion at temperatures 80 °C and 200 °C. • For Ti grade 5 crevice corrosion can occur as low as 80 °C in the presence of CO 2 . • Ti grade 7 is immune to crevice corrosion in test conditions. • All grades resistant to SCC and pitting in presence of CO 2 . • Rare earth yttrium additions below 0.2 wt%. for improved mechanical properties are detrimental to corrosions performance. • Analysis of threat of hydrogen induced cracking suggest this is not a threat at a deepsea well head. - Abstract: Grades 2, 5 and Grade 7 were investigated in near anaerobic (<1 ppm oxygen) seawater up to 200 °C with and without CO 2 . All three grades were found to resist stress corrosion cracking and pitting corrosion. Grades 2 and 5 suffer crevice corrosion at temperatures 80 °C and 200 °C respectively. In the presence of CO 2 Grade 5 becomes more vulnerable to crevice corrosion, with attack starting at 80 °C with preferential dissolution of the beta phase. An analysis of the threat of hydrogen induced cracking leads to the conclusion that this was not a likely threat to any of the Ti alloys investigated.

  17. High temperature corrosion during biomass firing: improved understanding by depth resolved characterisation of corrosion products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    changes within the near surface region (covering both the deposit and the steel surface). Such cross-section analysis was further complemented by plan view investigations (additionally involving X-ray diffraction) combined with removal of the corrosion products. Improved insights into the nature......The high temperature corrosion of an austenitic stainless steel (TP 347H FG), widely utilised as a superheater tube material in Danish power stations, was investigated to verify the corrosion mechanisms related to biomass firing. KCl coated samples were exposed isothermally to 560 degrees C...... of the corrosion products as a function of distance from the deposit surface were revealed through this comprehensive characterisation. Corrosion attack during simulated straw-firing conditions was observed to occur through both active oxidation and sulphidation mechanisms....

  18. Corrosion kinetic of 2 and 4 zircaloys in air at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, A.C.; Goncalves, Z.C.

    1986-01-01

    The corrosion results of 2 and 4 zircaloys obtained in a thermal balance between 500 and 850 0 C are discussed based on the model of 'reduction of diffusion path'. The behaviour of both alloys has shown almost similar in this interval of temperature, proving that the corrosion is processed by an identical kinetic mechanism. It is still analysed the formation of superposed layer of porous oxide and the possible influence of the oxygen partial pressure in inversion velocities between 750 and 800 0 C. (Author) [pt

  19. Double shell slurry low-temperature corrosion tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.; McPartland, S.A.; Elmore, R.P.; Engel, D.W.

    1983-09-01

    A series of year-long tests have been completed on potential double shell slurry (DSS) compositions at temperatures up to 100 0 C. These tests have sought data on uniform corrosion, pitting, and stress-corrosion cracking. No indication of the latter two types of corrosion were observed within the test matrix. Corrosion rates after four months were generally below the 1 mpy (25 μm/y) design limit. By the end of twelve months all results were below this limit and, except for very concentrated mixtures, all were below 0.5 mpy. Prediction equations were generated from a model fitted to the data. The equations provide a rapid means of estimating the corrosion rate for proposed DSS compositions

  20. Deposition and high temperature corrosion in a 10 MW straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Hanne Philbert; Frandsen, Flemming; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1998-01-01

    Deposition and corrosion measurements were conducted at a 10 MW wheat straw fired stoker boiler used for combined power and heat production. The plant experiences major problems with deposits on the heat transfer surfaces, and test probes have shown enhanced corrosion due to selective corrosion...... for metal temperatures above 520 C. Deposition measurements carried out at a position equal to the secondary superheater showed deposits rich in potassium and chlorine and to a lesser extent in silicon, calcium, and sulfur. Potassium and chlorine make up 40-80 wt% of the deposits. Mechanisms of deposit...

  1. Corrosion of Ferritic-Martensitic steels in high temperature water: A literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    2001-01-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steel in high temperature water as reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) including stress corrosion cracking (SCC), corrosion fatigue and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS). Are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. (Author)

  2. Evaluation of corrosion inhibitors for high temperature decontamination applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyaseelan, V.S.; Rufus, A.L.; Velmurugan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Normally, chemical decontamination of coolant systems of nuclear power reactors is carried out at temperatures less than 90 °C. At these temperatures, though magnetite dissolves effectively, the rate of dissolution of chromium and nickel containing oxides formed over stainless steel and other non-carbon steel coolant system surfaces is not that appreciable. A high temperature dissolution process using 5 mM NTA at 160 °C developed earlier by us was very effective in dissolving the oxides such as ferrites and chromites. However, the corrosion of structural materials such as carbon steel (CS) and stainless steel (SS) also increased beyond the acceptable limits at elevated temperatures. Hence, the control of base metal corrosion during the high temperature decontamination process is very important. In view of this, it was felt essential to investigate and develop a suitable inhibitor to reduce the corrosion that can take place on coolant structural material surfaces during the high temperature decontamination applications with weak organic acids. Three commercial inhibitors viz., Philmplus 5K655, Prosel PC 2116 and Ferroqest were evaluated at ambient and at 160 °C temperature in NTA formulation. Preliminary evaluation of these corrosion inhibitors carried out using electrochemical techniques showed maximum corrosion inhibition efficiency for Philmplus. Hence, it was used for high temperature applications. A concentration of 500 ppm was found to be optimum at 160 °C and at this concentration it showed an inhibition efficiency of 62% for CS. High temperature dissolution of oxides such as Fe 3 O 4 and NiFe 2 O 4 , which are relevant to nuclear reactors, was also carried out and the rate of dissolution observed was less in the presence of Philmplus. Studies were also carried out to evaluate hydrazine as a corrosion inhibitor for high temperature applications. The results revealed that for CS inhibition efficiency of hydrazine is comparable to that of Philmplus, while

  3. Long-term corrosion behaviour of low-/medium-level waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jendras, M.; Bach, F.W.; Behrens, S.; Birr, Ch.; Hassel, Th.

    2009-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Storage of low- and medium-level radioactive waste requires safe packages. This means that all materials used for the manufacturing of such packages have to show a sufficient resistance especially against corrosive attacks. Since these packages are generally made from carbon steel an additional coating for corrosion protection - mainly solvent-based polymers - is necessary. However, it is not enough to consider the selection and combination of the materials. Regarding the construction and manufacturing of corrosion-resistant drums for low- and medium-level radioactive waste there also has to be paid closer attention to the joining technologies such as welding. For lifetime prediction of low-/medium-level waste packages reliable experimental data concerning the long-term corrosion behaviour of each material as well as of the components is needed. Therefore sheet metals from carbon steel were galvanized or coated with different solvent-based and water-based corrosion protection materials (epoxy as well as silicone resins). After damaging the anti-corrosion coating of some of these sheets with predefined scratches sets of these samples were stored at higher temperatures in climatic chamber, in simulated waste or aged according to standard DIN EN ISO 9227. All corrosion damages were analyzed by means of metallography (light microscopy as well as scanning electron microscopy of micro-sections). The quantitative influence of the corrosive attacks on the mechanical properties of the materials was examined by mechanical testing according to DIN EN 10002. Besides reduction of tensile strength drastic reduction of percentage of elongation after fracture (from 30 % to 10 %) was found. Further experiments were carried out using components or scaled-down drums joined by means of innovative welding techniques such as Cold Arc or Force Arc. The relevant welding parameters (e.g. welding current, proper volume of shielding gas or wire feed) were

  4. Corrosion behaviour of martensitic and austenitic steels in flowing lead-bismuth eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Munoz, F.J.; Soler-Crespo, L.; Gomez-Briceno, D.

    2011-01-01

    The LINCE loop is a forced convection loop designed for long-term corrosion tests in lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at CIEMAT. The LBE volume of in the loop is 250 l and the maximum flow velocity in the region of specimens is approximately 1 m s -1 . An oxygen control system has been implemented in the loop. The corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L and T91 steels was investigated in flowing LBE at temperatures of 575 and 725 K for exposure times of 2000, 5000 and 10,000 h. At 575 K, the results showed a good response, with no weight loss detected in any of the materials after exposure to the flowing LBE up to 10,000 h. A similar behaviour was observed for the specimens tested at 725 K during 2000 and 10,000 h. Specimens extracted at intermediate time (5000 h) showed an anomalous behaviour with important weight loss. These specimens were placed at the bottom of the hot test section, and this position probably made them to suffer an accused process of cavitation-erosion.

  5. Corrosion behaviour of non-ferrous metals in sea water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birn, Jerzy; Skalski, Igor [Ship Design and Research Centre, Al. Rzeczypospolitej 8, 80-369 Gdansk (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    The most typical kinds of corrosion of brasses are selective corrosion (dezincification) and stress corrosion. Prevention against these kinds of corrosion lies in application of arsenic alloy addition and appropriate heat treatment removing internal stresses as well as in maintaining the arsenic and phosphorus contents on a proper level. The most typical corrosion of cupronickels is the local corrosion. Selective corrosion occurs less often and corrosion cracking caused by stress corrosion in sea water does not usually occur. Crevice corrosion is found especially in places of an heterogeneous oxidation of the surface under inorganic deposits or under bio-film. Common corrosive phenomena for brasses and cupronickels are the effects caused by sea water flow and most often the impingement attack. Alloy additions improve resistance to the action of intensive sea water flow but situation in this field requires further improvement, especially if the cheaper kinds of alloys are concerned. Contaminants of sea water such as ammonia and hydrogen sulphide are also the cause of common corrosion processes for all copper alloys. Corrosion of copper alloys may be caused also by sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB). Galvanic corrosion caused by a contact with titanium alloys e.g. in plate heat exchangers may cause corrosion of both kinds copper alloys. Bronzes belong to copper alloys of the highest corrosion resistance. Failures that sometimes occur are caused most often by the cavitation erosion, by an incorrect chemical composition of alloys or at last by their inadequate structure. The main problems of aluminium alloys service in sea water are following phenomena: local corrosion (pitting and crevice corrosion), galvanic corrosion, exfoliation and corrosion in the presence of OH- ions. The cause of local corrosion are caused by presence of passive film on the alloy's surface and presence of chlorides in sea water which are able to damage the passive film. Galvanic corrosion is

  6. High temperature corrosion of superheater materials for power production through biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotthjaelp, K.; Broendsted, P. [Forskningscenter Risoe (Denmark); Jansen, P. [FORCE Institute (Denmark); Montgomery, M.; Nielsen, K.; Maahn, E. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Corrosion and Surface Techn. Inst. of Manufacturing Engineering (Denmark)

    1996-08-01

    The aim of the present study has been to establish a fundamental knowledge of the corrosion mechanisms acting on materials for use in biomass fired power plants. The knowledge is created based on laboratory exposures of selected materials in well-defined corrosive gas environments. The experiments using this facility includes corrosion studies of two types of high temperature resistant steels, Sanvik 8LR30 (18Cr 10Ni Ti) and Sanicro 28 (27Cr 31Ni 4Mo), investigated at 600 deg. C in time intervals up to 300 hours. The influence of HCl (200 ppm) and of SO{sub 2} (300 ppm) on the corrosion progress has been investigated. In addition the corrosion behaviour of the same materials was investigated after having been exposed under a cover of ash in air in a furnace at temperatures of 525 deg. C, 600 deg. C, and 700 deg. C. The ashes utilised are from a straw fired power plant and a synthetic ash composed of potassium chloride (KCl) and potassium sulphate (K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}). Different analysis techniques to characterise the composition of the ash coatings have been investigated in order to judge the reliability and accuracy of the SEM-EDX method. The results are considered as an important step towards a better understanding of the high temperature corrosion under the conditions found in biomass fired power plants. One of the problems to solve in a suggested subsequent project is to combine the effect of the aggressive gases (SO{sub 2} and HCl) and the active ash coatings on high temperature corrosion of materials. (EG) 20 refs.

  7. Effect of water chemistry on corrosion of stainless steel and deposition of corrosion products in high temperature pressurised water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Jonathan; Cooper, Christopher; Ponton, Clive; Connolly, Brian; Banks, Andrew

    2012-09-01

    In any water-cooled nuclear reactor, the corrosion of the structural materials in contact with the coolant and the deposition of the resulting oxidised species has long been an operational concern within the power generation industry. Corrosion of the structural materials at all points in the reactor leads to low concentrations of oxidised metal species in the coolant water. The oxidised metal species can subsequently be deposited out as CRUD deposits at various points around the reactor's primary and secondary loops. The deposition of soluble oxidised material at any location in the reactor cooling system is undesirable due to several effects; deposits have a porous structure, capable of incorporating radiologically active material (forming out of core radiation fields) and concentrating aggressively corrosive chemicals, which exacerbate environmental degradation of structural and fuel-cladding materials. Deposits on heat transfer surfaces also limit efficiency of the system as a whole. The work in this programme is an attempt to determine and understand the fundamental corrosion and deposition behaviour under controlled, simulated reactor conditions. The rates of corrosion of structural materials within pressurised water reactors are heavily dependent on the condition of the exposed surface. The effect of mechanical grinding and of electropolishing on the corrosion rate and structure of the resultant oxide film formed on grade 316L stainless steel exposed to high purity water, modified to pH 9.5 and 10.5 at temperatures between 200 and 300 deg. C and pressures of up to 100 bar will be investigated. The corrosion of stainless steel in water via electrochemical oxidation leads to the formation of surface iron, nickel and chromium based spinels. Low concentrations of these spinels can be found dissolved in the coolant water. The solubility of magnetite, stainless steels' major corrosion product, in high purity water will be studied at pH 9.5 to 10.5 at

  8. Zircaloy behaviour in high temperature irradiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanic, V.F.

    1982-04-01

    The corrosion and hydriding of Zircaloy during irradiation in high temperature water is strongly dependent on the oxygen concentration of the water. Corrosion tests in the NRX and NRU research reactors using small samples have demonstrated the importance of water chemistry in maintaining Zircaloy corrosion and hydriding within acceptable limits. Zircaloy fuel cladding develops non-uniform, patch-type oxides during irradiation in hich temperature water containing dissolved oxygen. Results from examinations of prototype fuel cladding irradiated in the research reactors are presented to show how local variations in coolant flow, fast neutron flux, metallurgical structure and surface condition can influence the onset of non-uniform corrosion under these conditions. Destructive examinations of CANDU-PHW reactor fuel cladding have emphasized the importance of good chemistry control, especially the dissolved oxygen concentration of the water. When reactor coolants are maintained under normal reducing conditions at high pH (5 to 10 cm 3 D 2 /kg D 2 O; 2 /kg D 2 O; pH > 10 with LiOD), Zircaloy cladding develops non-uniform, patch-type oxides. These patch-type oxides tend to coalesce with time to form a thick, uniform oxide layer after extended exposure. Under reducing coolant conditions, Zircaloy cladding absorbs less than 200 mg D/kg Zr (approximately 2.5 mg/dm 2 equivalent hydrogen) in about 500 days. With oxygen in the coolant, deuterium absorption is considerably less despite the significant increase in corrosion under such conditions

  9. Effect of pH on the corrosion behaviour of SUS321 in the ammonia aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Yoon; Jeong, Y. H.; Baek, J. H.; Choi, B. K.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. S.; Yoon, J. H.; Lee, D. J.

    2003-02-01

    The corrosion characteristics of SUS321 for pressure vessel of SMART in pure water, ammonia aqueous solutions of pH 8.5 ∼ 11.5 at 300 .deg. C were evaluated by using static autoclaves. SUS321 specimen in the high temperature ammonia aqueous solution has weight gain or loss by the 4 reactions. And it depends on the refreshing period of the aqueous solution. So additional experiments by recirculating loop system were required to evaluate the corrosion behaviour of SUS321 in the ammonia aqueous solution

  10. Corrosion behaviour of 2124 aluminium alloy-silicon carbide metal matrix composites in sodium chloride environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Nirbhay; Vadera, K.K.; Ramesh Kumar, A.V.; Singh, R.S.; Monga, S.S.; Mathur, G.N.

    1999-01-01

    Aluminium alloy based particle reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) are being considered for a range of applications. Their mechanical properties have been investigated in detail, but more information about their corrosion resistance is needed. In this investigation, the corrosion behaviour of silicon carbide particulates (SiC p )-2124 aluminium metal matrix composites was studied in 3 wt% sodium chloride solution by means of electrochemical technique and optical microscope. The effects of weight percentages and particle size of silicon carbide particulates on corrosion behaviour of the composite were studied in NaCl and it was observed that corrosion rate increases linearly with the increasing weight percentage of SiC p . The corrosion rate of the MMC increases by increasing the size of SiC particles. Anodization improved corrosion resistance of the composites. (author)

  11. Corrosion behaviour of Nd-Fe-B magnets containing Co and Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlowska, G.; Bala, H.; Szymura, S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of partial substitution of iron by Co and Cr on corrosion behaviour of Nd 16 Fe 76 B 8 permanent magnets has been investigated. Small additions of Cr (1 to 4%at) are enough to ensure maximal corrosion inhibition. Greater amount of Cr into Nd-Fe-B alloy (>8%at), against expectations, practically do not affect the corrosion behaviour and additionally, considerably worsen its magnetic properties. Corrosion tests have shown a distinct effect of cobalt addition on the inhibition of both acid corrosion and the abnormal dissolution process of the Nd-Fe-Co-B magnets. Cobalt additions inhibit the atmosphere corrosion of Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets, especially a salt-spray environment. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  12. Corrosion Behaviour of Steels in Nigerian Food Processing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    quality regulatory agencies and food processing equipment fabricators. It is our desire that ... poisoning. ... corrosive effect under two special conditions; in solution with ..... Loto C.A and Atanda P.O (1998) Corrosion of Mild ... Health Paper. No.

  13. Corrosion behaviour of the WAK-HLW glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grambow, B.; Luckscheiter, B.; Nesovic, M.

    1997-01-01

    Sorption studies were performed on corrosion products from the glass GP WAK1 formed over a period of 40 days in deionized water at 80 C and S/V=1000 m -1 . After 40 days the pH of the solution was adjusted to various preselected values in the pH range 2-10. The pH was kept constant during the experiments by daily addition of either HNO 3 or NaOH. The sorption experiments were run at ambient temperature and 80 C for up to 10 days using various starting concentrations of Eu, Th and U. Sorption isotherms of Eu, Th and U(VI) on corrosion products were determined in deionized water, in NaCl-rich and MgCl 2 -rich solution. Presently, data of the sorption studies in deionized water are available.Furthermore the investigations of the pH dependence of saturation concentration of silica and of the release of various glass constituent of the glass GP WAK1 were continued with studies in the MgCl 2 -rich solution 1 at 80 C. Results of these studies (30 days) are given in terms of normalized elemental mass losses. (MM)

  14. Corrosion of silicon nitride in high temperature alkaline solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Liyan, E-mail: liyan.qiu@cnl.ca; Guzonas, Dave A.; Qian, Jing

    2016-08-01

    The corrosion of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) in alkaline solutions was studied at temperatures from 60 to 300 °C. Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} experienced significant corrosion above 100 °C. The release rates of silicon and nitrogen follow zero order reaction kinetics and increase with increasing temperature. The molar ratio of dissolved silicon and nitrogen species in the high temperature solutions is the same as that in the solid phase (congruent dissolution). The activation energy for silicon and nitrogen release rates is 75 kJ/mol which agrees well with that of silica dissolution. At 300 °C, the release of aluminum is observed and follows first order reaction kinetics while other minor constituents including Ti and Y are highly enriched on the corrosion films due to the low solubility of their oxides.

  15. Corrosion behaviour of Fe-Mn-Si based shape memory steels trained by cold rolling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederberg, O.; Liu, X.W.; Ullakko, K.; Lindroos, V.K.

    1999-01-01

    Fe-Mn-Si based high nitrogen steels have been studied in recent years for potential industrial applications. These steels show good shape memory properties, high strength and excellent ductility. In the present study, the effects of training history on the corrosion properties of Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni based high nitrogen steels were investigated. The corrosion behaviour of shape memory alloys was analyzed by implementing anodic polarisation measurements and immersion tests. The shape memory steels in annealed, deformed and recovered conditions were studied to examine the training effect on their corrosion behaviour. The features of the anodic polarisation curves indicated a general corrosion type of these steels. The experimental results showed that Cr and Mn had a marked influence on the corrosion behaviour of the steels, followed by Ni, N and V. It was also apparent that the deformation during the shape memory training by cold rolling decreased the corrosion stability, and the recovery heating reduced further their corrosion resistance. However, further studies are needed in order to better understand the corrosion behaviour of the investigated alloys. (orig.)

  16. Corrosion behaviour of Ni–Co alloy coatings at Kish Island

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, the corrosion behaviour of Ni-Co alloys with low Co content, electroplated on steel substrate in sulphate bath, was investigated. The morphology of coatings was studied by optical and SEM microscopy. The corrosion products were analyzed using EDX. The results showed that Ni–1% Co coatings had a better ...

  17. Corrosion behaviour of electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni-W and Ni-Fe-W alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriraman, K.R.; Ganesh Sundara Raman, S.; Seshadri, S.K.

    2007-01-01

    The present work deals with evaluation of corrosion behaviour of electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni-W and Ni-Fe-W alloys. Corrosion behaviour of the coatings deposited on steel substrates was studied using polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques in 3.5% NaCl solution while their passivation behaviour was studied in 1N sulphuric acid solution. The corrosion resistance of Ni-W alloys increased with tungsten content up to 7.54 at.% and then decreased. In case of Ni-Fe-W alloys it increased with tungsten content up to 9.20 at.% and then decreased. The ternary alloy coatings exhibited poor corrosion resistance compared to binary alloy coatings due to preferential dissolution of iron from the matrix. Regardless of composition all the alloys exhibited passivation behaviour over a wide range of potentials due to the formation of tungsten rich film on the surface

  18. Influence of LMFBR fuel pin temperature profiles on corrosion rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiels, S.A.; Bagnall, C.; Schrock, S.L.; Orbon, S.J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes the sodium corrosion behavior of 20 percent cold worked Type 316 stainless steel fuel pin cladding under a simulated reactor thermal environment. A temperature gradient, typical of a fuel pin, was generated in a 0.9 m long heater section by direct resistance heating. Specimens were located in an isothermal test section immediately downstream of the heater. A comparison of the measured corrosion rates with available data showed an enhancement factor of between 1.5 and 2 which was attributed to the severe axial temperature gradient through the heater. Differences in structure and surface chemistry were also noted

  19. High temperature corrosion in straw-fired power plants: Influence of steam/metal temperature on corrosion rates for TP347H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Biede, O; Larsen, OH

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion in straw-fired boilers has been investigated at various straw-fired power plants in Denmark. Water/air-cooled probes, a test superheater and test sections removed from the actual superheater have been utilised to characterise corrosion and corrosion rates. This paper describes...... the corrosion rates measured for the TP347H type steel. The corrosion morphology at high temperature consists of grain boundary attack and selective attack of chromium. The corrosion rate increases with calculated metal temperature (based on steam temperature), however there is great variation within....... The difference in the results could be traced back to a lower flue gas temperature on one side of the boiler. Although metal temperature is the most important parameter with respect to corrosion rate, flue gas temperature also plays an important role. Efforts to quantify the effect of flue gas temperature...

  20. Corrosion assessment of refractory materials for high temperature waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, J.C.; Congdon, J.W.; Kielpinski, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    A variety of vitrification technologies are being evaluated to immobilize radioactive and hazardous wastes following years of nuclear materials production throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The compositions and physical forms of these wastes are diverse ranging from inorganic sludges to organic liquids to heterogeneous debris. Melt and off-gas products can be very corrosive at the high temperatures required to melt many of these waste streams. Ensuring material durability is required to develop viable treatment processes. Corrosion testing of materials in some of the anticipated severe environments is an important aspect of the materials identification and selection process. Corrosion coupon tests on typical materials used in Joule heated melters were completed using glass compositions with high salt contents. The presence of chloride in the melts caused the most severe attack. In the metal alloys, oxidation was the predominant corrosion mechanism, while in the tested refractory material enhanced dissolution of the refractory into the glass was observed. Corrosion testing of numerous different refractory materials was performed in a plasma vitrification system using a surrogate heterogeneous debris waste. Extensive corrosion was observed in all tested materials

  1. Progress in the understanding of the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper canisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Fraser; Lilja, Christina; Vähänen, Marjut

    2013-07-01

    Copper has been proposed as a canister material for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geologic repository in a number of countries worldwide. Since it was first proposed for this purpose in 1978, a significant number of studies have been performed to assess the corrosion performance of copper under repository conditions. These studies are critically reviewed and the suitability of copper as a canister material for nuclear waste is re-assessed. Over the past 30-35 years there has been considerable progress in our understanding of the expected corrosion behaviour of copper canisters. Crucial to this progress has been the improvement in the understanding of the nature of the repository environment and how it will evolve over time. With this improved understanding, it has been possible to predict the evolution of the corrosion behaviour from the initial period of warm, aerobic conditions in the repository to the long-term phase of cool, anoxic conditions dominated by the presence of sulphide. An historical review of the treatment of the corrosion behaviour of copper canisters is presented, from the initial corrosion assessment in 1978, through a major review of the corrosion behaviour in 2001, through to the current level of understanding based on the results of on-going studies. Compared with the initial corrosion assessment, there has been considerable progress in the treatment of localised corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and microbiologically influenced corrosion of the canisters. Progress in the mechanistic modelling of the evolution of the corrosion behaviour of the canister is also reviewed, as is the continuing debate about the thermodynamic stability of copper in pure water. The overall conclusion of this critical review is that copper is a suitable material for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and offers the prospect of containment of the waste for an extended period of time. The corrosion behaviour is influenced by the presence of the

  2. Burner rig alkali salt corrosion of several high temperature alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion of five alloys was studied in cyclic tests in a Mach 0.3 burner rig into whose combustion chamber various aqueous salt solutions were injected. Three nickel-based alloys, a cobalt-base alloy, and an iron-base alloy were studied at temperatures of 700, 800, 900, and 1000 C with various salt concentrations and compositions. The relative resistance of the alloys to hot corrosion attack was found to vary with temperature and both concentration and composition of the injected salt solution. Results indicate that the corrosion of these alloys is a function of both the presence of salt condensed as a liquid on the surface and of the composition of the gas phases present.

  3. Influence of coatings on the corrosion fatigue behaviour on 13% chromium steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt-Thomas, K G; Meisel, H; Sessler, W

    1986-01-01

    The influence of coatings on the corrosion fatigue behaviour of 13% chromium steel has been studied. There have been selected different coating systems: Barrier coating (enamel), diffusion coatings, (aluminizing, chromizing) and anodic coating, (aluminium, zinc, tin, cadmium). The corrosion fatigue limits of coated with uncoated specimens in neutral NaCl-solution are compared. Salt-concentrations were 0,01 and 22% (=0,38 M) NaCl at 80/sup 0/C and 150/sup 0/C. The tests were carried out with alternating tensions and a constant frequency of 50 Hz. Only the use of anodic coatings improved the corrosion fatigue behaviour of the chromium steel.

  4. Corrosion mechanisms and behaviour of actinides in the 'R7T7' nuclear glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillet, Sylvie

    1987-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of aqueous corrosion of the R7T7 nuclear glass and of the identified corrosion mechanisms in conditions of static lixiviation which are close to that expected during long term storage in a geological environment. More specifically, this work aims at assessing the durability of this glass which has been selected for the vitrification of solutions from pressurized water reactors. The main glass alteration phenomena have been studied. The first part addresses the study of the alteration of the glassy matrix, and aims at identifying corrosion mechanisms in various lixiviation conditions (high temperature, saturation). The second part addresses the action of different materials present in the environment on the glassy matrix by simulating as well as possible a storage case. Based on the obtained results, a mathematical model is developed to predict the glass behaviour on the long term. Finally, the glass confinement power with respect to actinides is studied [fr

  5. Behaviour of steel corrosion products under neutral-oxidizing water conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynova, O.I.; Petrova, T.I.; Samojlov, Yu.F.; Kharitonova, N.L.

    1985-01-01

    Results of laboratory experiments on studying the solubility of iron and cobalt corrosion products are given. It is established that oxygen dosage doesn't influence practically on the iron corrosion product solubility but cobalt corrosion product solubility decreases, the presence of hydrogen peroxide in an initial solution leads to increase of the iron corrosion product solubility especially at 125 deg C. It is shown that hydrogen peroxide affects unambiguously the cobalt corrosion product solubility: at hydrogen peroxide concentration of about 400 μg/l at 50-275 deg C temperature their solubility is minimum

  6. Corrosion behavior of low energy, high temperature nitrogen ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Corrosion behavior of low energy, high temperature nitrogen ion-implanted AISI 304 stainless steel. M GHORANNEVISS1, A SHOKOUHY1,∗, M M LARIJANI1,2,. S H HAJI HOSSEINI 1, M YARI1, A ANVARI4, M GHOLIPUR SHAHRAKI1,3,. A H SARI1 and M R HANTEHZADEH1. 1Plasma Physics Research Center, Science ...

  7. Effect of temperature on structure and corrosion resistance for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of plating temperatures between 60 and 90◦C on structure and corrosion resistance for elec- troless NiWP coatings ..... which helps to form fine grain. At 80 .... [23] Zhang W X, Jiang Z H, Li G Y and Jiang Q 2008 Surf. Coat. Technol.

  8. Parameters of straining-induced corrosion cracking in low-alloy steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenz, E.; Liebert, A.; Stellwag, B.; Wieling, N.

    Tensile tests with slow deformation speed determine parameters of corrosion cracking at low strain rates of low-alloy steels in high-temperature water. Besides the strain rate the temperature and oxygen content of the water prove to be important for the deformation behaviour of the investigated steels 17MnMoV64, 20 MnMoNi55 and 15NiCuMoNb 5. Temperatures about 240 0 C, increased oxygen contents in the water and low strain rates cause a decrease of the material ductility as against the behaviour in air. Tests on the number of stress cycles until incipient cracking show that the parameters important for corrosion cracking at low strain velocities apply also to low-frequency cyclic loads with high strain amplitude. In knowledge of these influencing parameters the strain-induced corrosion cracking is counteracted by concerted measures taken in design, construction and operation of nuclear power stations. Essential aims in this matter are to avoid as far as possible inelastic strains and to fix and control suitable media conditions. (orig.) [de

  9. Multi-secular corrosion behaviour of low carbon steel in anoxic soils: Characterisation of corrosion system on archaeological artefacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saheb, M.; Neff, D.; Dillmann, P.; Foy, E.; Saheb, M.; Dillmann, P.; Matthiesen, H.; Bellot-Gurlet, L.

    2009-01-01

    In the context of the prediction of materials behaviour used in the nuclear waste storage, the understanding of iron corrosion mechanisms in anoxic environment is of great importance. Information can be obtained using complementary analytical tools. Interactions between burial soil and archaeological artefacts are studied by performing on site soil measurements. Moreover, archaeological artefacts are studied on transverse sections using a combination of microbeam techniques. The specific interest of this project lies in the study of ferrous thick corrosion layers formed in anoxic environment. (authors)

  10. Effect of coating mild steel with CNTs on its mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour in acidic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmalik Abdulrahaman, Mahmud; Kamaldeeen Abubakre, Oladiran; Ambali Abdulkareem, Saka; Oladejo Tijani, Jimoh; Aliyu, Ahmed; Afolabi, Ayo Samuel

    2017-03-01

    The study investigated the mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of mild steel coated with carbon nanotubes at different coating conditions. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized via the conventional chemical vapour deposition reaction using bimetallic Fe-Ni catalyst supported on kaolin, with acetylene gas as a carbon source. The HRSEM/HRTEM analysis of the purified carbon materials revealed significant reduction in the diameters of the purified MWCNT bundles from 50 nm to 2 nm and was attributed to the ultrasonication assisted dispersion with surfactant (gum arabic) employed in purification process. The network of the dispersed MWCNTs was coated onto the surfaces of mild steel samples, and as the coating temperature and holding time increased, the coating thickness reduced. The mechanical properties (tensile strength, yield strength, hardness value) of the coated steel samples increased with increase in coating temperature and holding time. Comparing the different coating conditions, coated mild steels at the temperature of 950 °C for 90 min holding time exhibited high hardness, yield strength and tensile strength values compared to others. The corrosion current and corrosion rate of the coated mild steel samples decreased with increase in holding time and coating temperature. The lowest corrosion rate was observed on sample coated at 950 °C for 90 min.

  11. Microstructure formation and corrosion behaviour in HVOF-sprayed Inconel 625 coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D.; Harris, S.J.; McCartney, D.G.

    2003-01-01

    The nickel-based alloy Inconel 625 was thermally sprayed by two different variants of the high velocity oxy-fuel process. In this study, coatings deposited by a liquid-fuelled gun were compared with those produced by a gas-fuelled system; in general, the former generates higher particle velocities but lower particle temperatures. Investigations into the microstructural evolution of the coatings, using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, are presented along with results on their aqueous corrosion behaviour, obtained from salt spray and potentiodynamic tests. It is inferred from coating microstructures that, during spraying, powder particles generally comprised three separate zones as follows: fully melted regions; partially melted zones; and an unmelted core. However, the relative proportions formed in an individual powder particle depended on its size, trajectory through the gun, the gas dynamics (velocity/temperature) of the thermal spray gun and the type of gun employed. Cr 2 O 3 was the principal oxide phase formed during spraying and the quantity appeared to be directly related to the degree to which particles were melted. The salt spray test provides a sensitive means of determining the presence of interconnected porosity in coatings and those produced with the liquid-fuelled gun exhibited reduced interconnected porosity and increased corrosion resistance compared with deposits obtained from the gas-fuelled system. In addition, potentiodynamic tests revealed that passive current densities are 10-20 times lower in liquid-fuel coatings than in those sprayed with the gas-fuelled gun

  12. Corrosion behaviour of mooring chain steel in seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Noel, N.; Ferrari, G.; Hoogland, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    Failures of mooring lines on floating production, storage and offloading systems (FPSOs) raise concern to the offshore industry. Localized corrosion of mooring chain is regarded as one of main failure mechanisms. The project of Localized Mooring Chain Corrosion (LMCC) is aiming at studying the

  13. The crevice corrosion behaviour of stainless steel in sodium chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Qian; Zhang Guoan; Qiu Yubin; Guo Xingpeng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → There are three stages in crevice corrosion of 13Cr stainless steel in NaCl solution. → The decrease of crevice thickness shortens the incubation period of crevice corrosion. → The incubation period of crevice corrosion prolongs as the increase of the area ratio. → Corrosion develops preferentially at crevice bottom and hydrogen reduction occurs inside the crevice. → Crevice corrosion of 13Cr stainless steel in NaCl solution follows the passive dissolution mechanism. - Abstract: The crevice corrosion behaviour of 13Cr stainless steel in NaCl solution was investigated mainly by electrochemical noise measurements, considering the influences of the crevice opening dimension (a) and the area ratio of the electrode outside the crevice to the one inside the crevice (r). Results show that the increase of r value prolongs the incubation period of crevice corrosion, but crevice corrosion develops rapidly once the crevice corrosion occurs. The crevice corrosion develops preferentially at the crevice bottom and then spreads to the whole electrode surface. Proton could reduce on the uncorroded area and hydrogen bubbles form inside the crevice.

  14. Literature Survey on the Stress Corrosion Cracking of Low-Alloy Steels in High Temperature Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P

    2002-02-01

    The present report is a summary of a literature survey on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour/ mechanisms in low-alloy steels (LAS) in high-temperature water with special emphasis to primary-pressure-boundary components of boiling water reactors (BWR). A brief overview on the current state of knowledge concerning SCC of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel and piping steels under BWR conditions is given. After a short introduction on general aspects of SCC, the main influence parameter and available quantitative literature data concerning SCC of LAS in high-temperature water are discussed on a phenomenological basis followed by a summary of the most popular SCC models for this corrosion system. The BWR operating experience and service cracking incidents are discussed with respect to the existing laboratory data and background knowledge. Finally, the most important open questions and topics for further experimental investigations are outlined. (author)

  15. High temperature corrosion in the service environments of a nuclear process heat plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    In a nuclear process heat plant the heat-exchanging components fabricated from nickel- and Fe-Ni-based alloys are subjected to corrosive service environments at temperatures up to 950 0 C for service lives of up to 140 000 h. In this paper the corrosion behaviour of the high temperature alloys in the different service environments will be described. It is shown that the degree of protection provided by Cr 2 O 3 -based surface oxide scales against carburization and decarburization of the alloys is primarily determined not by the oxidation potential of the atmospheres but by a dynamic process involving, on the one hand, the oxidizing gas species and the metal and, on the other hand, the carbon in the alloy and the oxide scale. (orig.)

  16. Corrosion and deposition behaviour of 60Co and 54Mn in the SNR mockup loop for the primary sodium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menken, G.; Reichel, H.

    1976-01-01

    The SNR corrosion mockup loop, simulating the SNR primary system is described. The influence of hydraulic conditions and temperature on the deposition behaviour is studied. γ-spectroscopy measurements at the pipe-work and removable samples allowed to determine the distribution of radioactive corrosion products in the loop and by-pass system. The release rate of Mn 54 could be reduced by a factor of 3 by decreasing the cold trap temperature from 165 0 C to 105 0 C while the Co 60 release rate could be reduced by a factor of 14, respectively. High temperature loop sections (873K) representing 13% of the loop surface absorbed 50-60% of the released Co 60 and only 8 - 18% of the Mn 54. The cold trap absorbed not more than 1% of the Co 60 and 10% of the Mn 54 inventory. (author)

  17. Influence of temperature on corrosion rate and porosity of corrosion products of carbon steel in anoxic bentonite environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoulil, J.; Kaňok, J.; Kouřil, M.; Parschová, H.; Novák, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The corrosion rate is not significantly dependent on temperature. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures have different color. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures are more compact. •The change in corrosion products nature is reversible. -- Abstract: The study focuses on the porosity of layers of corrosion products and its impact on corrosion rate of carbon steel in moist bentonite. Measurements were performed in an aggressive Czech type of bentonite – Rokle B75 at temperatures of 90 and 40 °C. Aggressiveness of B75 bentonite consists in low content of chlorides. Presence of chlorides in pore solution allows formation of more protective magnetite. The evaluation was made by electrochemical techniques (red/ox potential, open circuit potential, linear polarization resistance, impedance spectroscopy) and resistometric sensor measurements. The result imply that the higher the temperature the more compact is the layer of corrosion products that slightly decelerates corrosion rate compared to the state at 40 °C. The state of corrosion products at both temperatures is reversible

  18. Influence of temperature on corrosion rate and porosity of corrosion products of carbon steel in anoxic bentonite environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoulil, J., E-mail: jan.stoulil@vscht.cz [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Kaňok, J.; Kouřil, M. [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Parschová, H. [Department of Power Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Novák, P. [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •The corrosion rate is not significantly dependent on temperature. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures have different color. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures are more compact. •The change in corrosion products nature is reversible. -- Abstract: The study focuses on the porosity of layers of corrosion products and its impact on corrosion rate of carbon steel in moist bentonite. Measurements were performed in an aggressive Czech type of bentonite – Rokle B75 at temperatures of 90 and 40 °C. Aggressiveness of B75 bentonite consists in low content of chlorides. Presence of chlorides in pore solution allows formation of more protective magnetite. The evaluation was made by electrochemical techniques (red/ox potential, open circuit potential, linear polarization resistance, impedance spectroscopy) and resistometric sensor measurements. The result imply that the higher the temperature the more compact is the layer of corrosion products that slightly decelerates corrosion rate compared to the state at 40 °C. The state of corrosion products at both temperatures is reversible.

  19. High temperature corrosion of separator materials for MCFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagida, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Kazumi; Kojima, Toshikatsu [Osaka National Research Institute (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) is one of promising high efficiency power generation devices with low emission. Molten carbonate used for its electrolyte plays an important role in MCFC. It separates between anode and cathode gas environment and provides ionic conductivity on MCFC operation. Stainless steel is conventionally used as separator/current collector materials in MCFC cathode environment. As corrosion of the components of MCFC caused by the electrolyte proceeds with the electrolyte consumption, the corrosion in the MCFC is related to its performance and life. To understand and inhibit the corrosion in the MCFC is important to realize MCFC power generation system. We have studied the effect of alkaline earth carbonate addition into carbonate on corrosion of type 316L stainless steel. In this paper, we describe the effect of the temperature on corrosion behavior of type 316L stainless steel with carbonate mixture, (Li{sub 0.62}K{sub 0.38}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}, under the cathode environment in out-of-cell test.

  20. Low temperature corrosion in bark fuelled, small boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindau, Leif; Goldschmidt, Barbara

    2008-05-15

    A number of small (3-12 MW), new biofuel boiler plants in southern Sweden, and (at least) in Austria, have suffered a high (wastage of mm/yrs) corrosion rate on the low temperature boiler side. This problem has been investigated with respect to its occurrence and its character by contacts with operators, by plant inspections, and by analysis of cold-side deposits. The plants affected have low feed water temperatures (< 100 deg C). The plants fire most types of Swedish biofuel: chips, bark, hog fuel, and 'GROT' (=twigs and tops). The results found give basis for a hypothesis that the corrosion results from the presence of an aqueous phase in the deposits, this phase being stabilized by dissolved salts having high solubility. It then follows that for each salt, there is a critical relative humidity (calculated from the flue gas water partial pressure and the cooling surface temperature as is common practice among boiler engineers) for both the presence of the aqueous phase and the corrosion. Some critical single salts, ZnCl{sub 2} and CaCl{sub 2} have been identified, and they give critical 'relative humidities' of 5% and 18% respectively. These figures are a lower bound. The corresponding figure, derived from the practical experience and the reported plant operational data, is between 20 and 30%. Corrosion tests have been carried out by exposing an air-cooled probe in the flue gases at a 12 MW boiler at Saevelundsverket in Alingsaas, and the material wastage at different temperatures has been measured with a profilometer. The high corrosion rates were reproduced in the tests for high relative humidities. The corrosion rate was small and not measurable (<0.1 mm/year) for relative humidity <22%. The work shows by means of indirect evidence that the corrosion critical components are ZnCl{sub 2} and possibly CaCl{sub 2} as well. The practical engineering design criterion derived from the work is that the relative humidity (calculated from the flue

  1. Study of corrosive-erosive wear behaviour of Al6061/albite composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.C.; Krishna, M.; Murthy, H.N. Narasimha; Tarachandra, R.; Satyamoorthy, M.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2006-01-01

    This investigation analyses the influence of dispersed alumina particles on the wear behaviour of the Al/albite composites in a corrosive environment. The composites were prepared by modified pressure die-casting technique. The corrosive-erosive wear experiments were carried out on a proprietary corrosion-erosion wear tester to study the wear characteristics of the composites. The slurry was made up of water and alumina (size: 90-150 μm, proportion: 0-30 wt.%), while H 2 SO 4 (0.01, 0.1 and 1N) was added to create the corrosive conditions. Experiments were arranged to test the relationships among the corrosive-erosive wear rate, concentrations of H 2 SO 4 and alumina in the slurry, weight percent of albite in the composite, erosion speed and distance. Wear rate varies marginally at low speeds but sharply increases at higher speeds. The corrosive wear rate logarithmically increased with the increasing concentration of the corrosive medium. The effect of abrasive particles and corrosion medium on the wear behaviour of the composite is explained experimentally, theoretically and using scanning electron microscopy

  2. Thermal behaviour and corrosion resistance of nano-ZnO/polyurethane film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgawati, E.; Soegijono, B.

    2018-03-01

    Hybrid materials Nano-ZnO/polyurethane film was prepared with different zinc oxide (ZnO) content in polyurethane as a matrix. The film was deposited on low carbon steel plate using high volume low pressure (HVLP) method. To observe thermal behaviour of the film, the sample was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to see whether any chemical reaction of ZnO in polyurethane occured. TGA and FTIR results showed that the decomposition temperature shifted to a higher point and the chemical reaction of zinc oxide in polyurethane occurred. The surface morphology changed and the corrosion resistance increased with an increase of ZnO content

  3. Influence of alloying elements and density on aqueous corrosion behaviour of some sintered low alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandavel, T.K.; Chandramouli, R.; Karthikeyan, P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion of low alloy P/M steels under HCl acid pickling environment has been studied. ► Influence of density, strain and alloying elements on the rate of corrosion of the steels has been investigated. ► Residual porosity has significant effect on acid corrosion. ► Addition of the alloying elements Cu, Mo and Ti reduces the corrosion rate significantly. ► Carbide forming elements Mo and Ti improve further the resistance of the steels to aqueous corrosion. -- Abstract: Low alloy steels produced through powder metallurgy route of sintering followed by forging are promising candidate materials for high strength small components. Porosity in such steels poses a real challenge during acid pickling treatment, which is one of the processing steps during manufacturing. The present research work attempts to investigate the mechanism underlying the acid corrosion behaviour of some sintered low alloy steels under induced acid pickling conditions. Sintered-forged low alloy steel samples containing molybdenum (Mo), copper (Cu) and titanium (Ti) were subjected to aqueous corrosion attack by immersing the samples in 18% HCl (Hydrochloric acid) solution for 25 h. Sample weight loss and Fe (Iron) loss were estimated for the corroded samples. The morphology of the corroded surfaces was studied through metallography and scanning electron microscopy. Higher porosity alloys underwent enhanced corrosion rates. Both corrosion rate and iron loss are found to decrease linearly with reduction in porosity in all cases of the alloys. The alloying elements Mo, Ti and Cu, when added in combination, have played a complementary role in the reduction of corrosion rate by almost one order of magnitude compared to unalloyed steel. Presence of carbides of the carbide forming elements Mo and Ti played a positive role on the corrosion behaviour of the low alloy steels.

  4. Corrosion Behaviour of Mg Alloys in Various Basic Media: Application of Waste Encapsulation of Fuel Decanning from UNGG Nuclear Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertin, David; Frizon, Fabien; Blachere, Adrien; Bart, Florence

    The dismantling of UNGG nuclear reactor generates a large volume of fuel decanning. These materials are based on Mg-Zr alloy. The dismantling strategy could be to encapsulate these wastes into an ordinary Portland cement (OPC) or geopolymer (aluminosilicate material) in a form suitable for storage. Studies have been performed on Mg or Mg-Al alloy in basic media but no data are available on Mg-Zr behaviour. The influence of representative pore solution of both OPC and geopolymer with Mg-Zr alloy has been studied on corrosion behaviour. Electrochemical methods have been used to determine the corrosion densities at room temperature. Results show that the corrosion densities of Mg-Zr alloy in OPC solution is one order of magnitude more important than in a geopolymer solution environment and the effect of an inhibiting agent has been undertaken with Mg-Zr alloy. Evaluation of corrosion hydrogen production during the encapsulation of Mg-Zr alloy in both OPC and geopolymer has also been done.

  5. Aluminium alloy containing iron and nickel. Influence of structure and composition on the corrosion behaviour in high temperature water; Alliages d'aluminium contenant du fer et du nickel. Influence de la structure et de la teneur sur la resistance a la corrosion par l'eau a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coriou, H; Grall, L; Hure, J; Roux, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    The corrosion structures are determined on a series of aluminium (A{sub 9}) base alloys which contain a total Fe + Ni not superior to 3%. The tests are carried out to 5,000 hours in 350 deg. C deionized water in autoclave. The principal results were as follows: - For iron and nickel contents superior to 0,5%, the first factor is the distribution structure of insoluble intermetallic compounds: the particles must be as fine and randomly dispersed as possible. - The corrosion products developed on the surface may be subdivided in three distinct layers which total thickness tends rapidly towards a limit and stabilises itself. (author) [French] On a determine les structures de corrosion d'une gamme d'alliages a base d'aluminium A{sub 9} ayant une teneur Fe + Ni ne depassant pas 3%. Les essais ont ete effectues jusqu'a 5000 heures en autoclave a 350 deg. C dans l'eau demineralisee. Les resultats principaux sont les suivants: - Pour les teneurs superieures a 0,5 % en fer et en nickel, le facteur preponderant est la structure de repartition des composes intermetalliques en phase separee, qui doivent etre en particules aussi fines et uniformement reparties que possible. - Les produits de corrosion developpes en surface se subdivisent en trois couches distinctes dont l'epaisseur totale tend rapidement vers une limite et se stabilise. (auteur)

  6. Corrosion behaviour and galvanic coupling with steel of Al-based coating alternatives to electroplated cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasuba, O.A.; Yerokhin, A., E-mail: A.Yerokhin@sheffield.ac.uk; Matthews, A.; Leyland, A.

    2013-08-15

    The galvanic corrosion behaviour of bare steel coupled to steel with an Al–Zn flake inorganic spin coating, an Al-based slurry sprayed coating, an arc sprayed Al coating and electroplated cadmium has been investigated. The sacrificial and galvanic behaviour of the coatings was studied in 3.5 wt. % NaCl solution using open-circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical noise measurements. The coatings were characterised by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Experimental results showed that the Al-based slurry sprayed coating exhibited an open-circuit potential closer to the steel substrate than other coatings, as well as a low corrosion current density and a more positive corrosion potential. In terms of the galvanic suitability of the investigated coatings for the steel substrate, both the Al–Zn flake inorganic spin coating and the Al-based slurry sprayed coating show low galvanic current, in comparison with the arc sprayed Al coating and electroplated cadmium. This behaviour confirms their superior cathodic protection capability and galvanic compatibility over other coatings tested. Electrochemical noise measurements provide accurate information on the coatings' galvanic behaviour, which can be complimented by the data obtained from superposition of potentiodynamic corrosion scans of the coating and bare steel, provided that the corrosion potential difference between the two materials does not exceed 300 mV. - Highlights: • Al-based slurry coating has best galvanic compatibility with steel. • Mg, Cr, P in Al-based slurry coating reinforce its corrosion resistance. • Ennoblement of Al–Zn flake coating compromises its cathodic protection. • Poor corrosion behaviour of arc sprayed Al coating caused by rough morphology. • Electrochemical noise provides adequate estimates of galvanic behaviour.

  7. The Influence of Corrosion Attack on Grey Cast Iron Brittle‑Fracture Behaviour and Its Impact on the Material Life Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Švarc

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned with brittle‑fracture behaviour of grey cast iron attacked by corrosion and its impact on the life cycle of a spare part made of grey cast iron. In a corrosion chamber, outdoor climatic conditions (temperature and relative air humidity were simulated in which degradation processes, induced by material corrosion, degrading mechanical properties of a material and possibly leading to irreversible damage of a machine component, occur in the material of maintenance vehicles that are out of operation for the period of one year. The corrosion degradation of grey cast iron, which the spare parts constituting functional parts of an engine are made of grey cast iron, is described with regard to brittle‑fracture behaviour of the material. For the description of corrosion impact on grey cast iron, an instrumented impact test was employed. A corrosion degradation effect on grey cast iron was identified based on measured values of total energy, macro plastic deformation limit, initiation force of unstable crack propagation and force exerted on unstable crack arrest. In the first part of the experiment, a corrosion test of the material concerned was simulated in a condensation chamber; in the second part of the experiment, research results are provided for the measured quantities describing the material brittle‑fracture behaviour; this part is supplemented with a table of results and figures showing the changes in the values of the measured quantities in relation to test temperatures. In the discussion part, the influence of corrosion on the values of unstable crack initiation and arrest forces is interpreted. In the conclusion, an overview of the most significant research findings concerning the impact of corrosion on the life cycle of grey cast iron material is provided.

  8. Electrodeposition, characterization and corrosion behaviour of tin-20 wt.% zinc coatings electroplated from a non-cyanide alkaline bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubent, S.; Mertens, M.L.A.D.; Saurat, M.

    2010-01-01

    Tin-zinc alloy electroplated coatings are recognized as a potential alternative to toxic cadmium as corrosion resistant deposits because they combine the barrier protection of tin with the cathodic protection afforded by zinc. The coatings containing 20 wt.% zinc, balance tin, offer excellent corrosion protection for steel and do not form gross voluminous white corrosion products like pure zinc or high zinc alloy deposits. In this study, the effects of variables of the process (i.e. cathodic current density, pH and temperature) on deposit composition have been evaluated using a Hull cell to obtain 20 wt.% zinc alloy coatings. The tin-20 wt.% zinc deposits, produced with electroplating optimized conditions, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) and glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES). On the other hand, the corrosion behaviour of tin-zinc alloy electroplated coatings on steel has been investigated using electrochemical methods in a 3 wt.% NaCl solution and the salt spray test. The performance of the deposits was compared with cadmium and zinc-nickel electrodeposited coatings. The results show that the corrosion resistance of tin-20 wt.% zinc alloy coating is superior to that of cadmium and zinc-12 wt.% nickel coatings. Finally, sliding friction tests were conducted.

  9. Influence of surface roughness on the corrosion behaviour of magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, R.; Kannan, M. Bobby

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Surface roughness of AZ91 magnesium alloy plays a critical role in the passivation behaviour of the alloy. → The passivation behaviour of the alloy influences the pitting tendency. → Increase in surface roughness of AZ91 magnesium alloy increases the pitting tendency of the alloy. -- Abstract: In this study, the influence of surface roughness on the passivation and pitting corrosion behaviour of AZ91 magnesium alloy in chloride-containing environment was examined using electrochemical techniques. Potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests suggested that the passivation behaviour of the alloy was affected by increasing the surface roughness. Consequently, the corrosion current and the pitting tendency of the alloy also increased with increase in the surface roughness. Scanning electron micrographs of 24 h immersion test samples clearly revealed pitting corrosion in the highest surface roughness (Sa 430) alloy, whereas in the lowest surface roughness (Sa 80) alloy no evidence of pitting corrosion was observed. Interestingly, when the passivity of the alloy was disturbed by galvanostatically holding the sample at anodic current for 1 h, the alloy underwent high pitting corrosion irrespective of their surface roughness. Thus the study suggests that the surface roughness plays a critical role in the passivation behaviour of the alloy and hence the pitting tendency.

  10. The Effect of Fly Ash on the Corrosion Behaviour of Galvanised Steel Rebarsin Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittarelli, Francesca; Mobili, Alessandra; Bellezze, Tiziano

    2017-08-01

    The effect of fly ash on the corrosion behaviour of galvanised steel rebars in cracked concrete specimens exposed to wet-dry cycles in a chloride solution has been investigated. The obtained results show that the use of fly ash, replacing either cement or aggregate, always improves the corrosion behaviour of galvanised steel reinforcements. In particular, the addition of fly ash, even in the presence of concrete cracks, decreases the corrosion rate monitored in very porous concretes, as those with w/c = 0.80, to values comparable with those obtained in good quality concretes, as those with w/c = 0.45. Therefore, fly ash cancels the negative effect, at least from the corrosion point of view, of a great porosity of the cement matrix.

  11. Electrochemical and corrosion behaviour of ion and laser-beam modified metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonora, P.L.

    1989-01-01

    Ion implantation may improve the resistance of metals to wear and corrosion both: by the formation of stable or metastable chemical compounds localized in a thin external layer; or by the so-called 'radiation damage' which is mainly active in lowering the potential gradients between different grains and between grain and grain boundaries as an effect of subdivision into substructures, up to a quasi-amorphous inert surface. The changes in the corrosion fatigue behaviour of iron as well as in its catalytic properties as a consequence of ion implantation are considered. The electrochemical behaviour of laser irradiated and ion mixed metals in terms of changed corrosion rate, corrosion morphology, passivability or breakdown of passivity is also explained. 27 refs.; 12 figs.; 5 tabs

  12. Temperature effect on Zircaloy-4 stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Silvia B.; Duffo, Gustavo S.; Galvele, Jose R.

    1999-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 alloy in chloride, bromide and iodide solutions with variables as applied electrode potential, deformation rate and temperature have been studied. In those three halide solutions the susceptibility to SCC is only observed at potentials close to pitting potential, the crack propagation rate increases with the increase of deformation rate, and that the temperature has a notable effect only for iodide solutions. For chloride and bromide solutions and temperatures ranging between 20 to 90 C degrees it was not found measurable changes in crack propagation rates. (author)

  13. The corrosion behaviour of rare-earth containing magnesium alloys in borate buffer solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, R. [ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Ferreira, M.G.S. [ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); CICECO, Universidade de Aveiro (Portugal); Carmezim, M.J. [ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto Politecnico de Setubal, ESTSetubal, DEM (Portugal); Montemor, M.F., E-mail: mfmontemor@ist.utl.p [ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal)

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the corrosion behaviour of magnesium alloys ZK31, EZ33 and WE54 was studied in sodium borate buffer solution at pH 9.2. The electrochemical processes were studied by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The composition and morphology of the alloys and corrosion products formed were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The experimental findings highlighted the differences in the corrosion mechanisms of the different alloys tested. The results showed that the presence of rare-earth elements (RE) only increases the corrosion resistance when present in solid solution, as is the case of the WE54 alloy. At pH 9.2, an amorphous yttrium oxide/hydroxide thick film was formed, which possesses greater stability when compared to magnesium oxide/hydroxide. The role of RE in the corrosion mechanism was discussed.

  14. Electrochemical corrosion potential and noise measurement in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, Clinton; Chen, Yaw-Ming; Chu, Fang; Huang, Chia-Shen

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) is one of the most important methods in boiling water reactor(BWR) system to mitigate and prevent stress corrosion cracking (SCC) problems of stainless steel components. Currently, the effectiveness of HWC in each BWR is mainly evaluated by the measurement of electrochemical corrosion potentials (ECP) and on-line monitoring of SCC behaviors of stainless steels. The objective of this work was to evaluate the characteristics and performance of commercially available high temperature reference electrodes. In addition, SCC monitoring technique based on electrochemical noise analysis (ECN) was also tested to examine its crack detection capability. The experimental work on electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) measurements reveals that high temperature external Ag/AgCl reference electrode of highly dilute KCl electrolyte can adequately function in both NWC and HWC environments. The high dilution external Ag/AgCl electrode can work in conjunction with internal Ag/AgCl reference electrode, and Pt electrode to ensure the ECP measurement reliability. In simulated BWR environment, the electrochemical noise tests of SCC were carried out with both actively and passively loaded specimens of type 304 stainless steel with various electrode arrangements. From the coupling current and corrosion potential behaviors of the passive loading tests during immersion test, it is difficult to interpret the general state of stress corrosion cracking based on the analytical results of overall current and potential variations, local pulse patterns, statistical characteristics, or power spectral density of electrochemical noise signals. However, more positive SCC indication was observed in the power spectral density analysis. For aqueous environments of high solution impedance, successful application of electrochemical noise technique for SCC monitoring may require further improvement in specimen designs and analytical methods to enhance detection sensitivity

  15. Corrosion tests of high temperature alloys in impure helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berka, Jan; Kalivodova, Jana; Vilemova, Monika; Skoumalova, Zuzana; Brabec, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Czech research organizations take part several projects concerning technologies and materials for advanced gas cooled reactors, as an example international project ARCHER supported by EU within FP7, also several national projects supported by Technology Agency of the Czech Republic are solved in cooperation with industrial and research organization. Within these projects the material testing program is performed. The results presented in these paper concerning high temperature corrosion and degradation of alloys (800 H, SS 316 and P91) in helium containing minor impurities (H_2, CO, CH_4, HZO) at temperatures up to 760°C. After corrosion tests (up to 1500 hours) the specimens was investigated by several methods (gravimetry, SEM-EDX, optical microscopy, hardness and micro-hardness testing etc. (author)

  16. Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwai S [San Antonio, TX; Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry [San Antonio, TX; Liang, Wuwei [Austin, TX

    2012-07-31

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

  17. Solubility of corrosion products in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.P.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    1995-01-01

    A short review of solubility of corrosion products at high temperature in either neutral or alkaline water as encountered in BWR, PHWR and PWR primary coolant reactor circuits is presented in this report. Based on the available literature, various experimental techniques involved in the study of the solubility, theory for fitting the solubility data to the thermodynamic model and discussion of the published results with a scope for future work have been brought out. (author). 17 refs., 7 figs

  18. An experimental study of crevice corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel in artificial seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Baoping [School of Electromechanical Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Dongying, Shandong 257061 (China); Liu Yonghong, E-mail: liuyhupc@126.co [School of Electromechanical Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Dongying, Shandong 257061 (China); Tian Xiaojie; Wang Fei; Li Hang; Ji Renjie [School of Electromechanical Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Dongying, Shandong 257061 (China)

    2010-10-15

    The effects of applied torque on corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel with crevices were investigated using the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization method. Three kinds of crevices (316L-to-polytetrafluoroethylene, 316L-to-fluoroelastomeric and 316L-to-316L) were tested in artificial seawater at 50 {sup o}C. Corroded surface morphology was also investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate similar trends in crevice corrosion susceptibility with increasing applied torque. Among the three crevices, the 316L stainless steel specimen, coupled to the 316L stainless steel crevice former, is the most susceptible to crevice corrosion.

  19. An experimental study of crevice corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel in artificial seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Baoping; Liu Yonghong; Tian Xiaojie; Wang Fei; Li Hang; Ji Renjie

    2010-01-01

    The effects of applied torque on corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel with crevices were investigated using the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization method. Three kinds of crevices (316L-to-polytetrafluoroethylene, 316L-to-fluoroelastomeric and 316L-to-316L) were tested in artificial seawater at 50 o C. Corroded surface morphology was also investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate similar trends in crevice corrosion susceptibility with increasing applied torque. Among the three crevices, the 316L stainless steel specimen, coupled to the 316L stainless steel crevice former, is the most susceptible to crevice corrosion.

  20. Evaluation of microstructural effects on the corrosion behaviour of AZ91D magnesium alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Aung, Naing Naing; Zhou, W.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of microconstituents on the corrosion and electrochemical behaviour of AZ91D alloy prepared by die-casting and ingot casting route has been investigated in 3.5% NaCl solution at pH 7.25. The experimental techniques used include constant immersion technique, in-situ corrosion monitoring....... The corrosion products for ingot consisted of Mg(OH)(2) with small amounts beta phase, magnesium-aluminum oxide and MgH2 while for die-cast, the product showed a highly amorphous structure. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  1. Composition and corrosion properties of high-temperature oxide films on steel type 18-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakulenko, B.F.; Morozov, O.N.; Chernysheva, M.V.

    1985-01-01

    The composition and propeties of oxide films, formed in the process of tube production of steel type 18-10, as well as the behaviour of the steels coated with oxide films under operating conditions of NPP heat-exchange equipment at the 20-300 deg C temperatures are determined. It is found, that the films have a good adhesion to the steel surface and repeat the metal structure without interfering with, the surface defect determination. Introduction of the NaNO 2 corrosion inhibitor decreases the film destruction rate to the level of the base metal corrosion. It is found acceptable to use tubes of steel 18-10 coated with dense oxide films in the heat-exchange and water supply systems of NPP

  2. Brief description of out-of-pile test facilities for study in corrosion and fission product behaviour in flowing sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizawa, K.; Sekiguchi, N.; Atsumo, H.

    1976-01-01

    The experimental methods to perform tests for study in corrosion and fission products behaviour in flowing sodium are outlined. Flow diagrams for the activated materials and fission products behaviour test loop are given

  3. Reactive-transport model for the prediction of the uniform corrosion behaviour of copper used fuel containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Kolar, M.; Maak, P.

    2008-01-01

    Used fuel containers in a deep geological repository will be subject to various forms of corrosion. For containers made from oxygen-free, phosphorus-doped copper, the most likely corrosion processes are uniform corrosion, underdeposit corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and microbiologically influenced corrosion. The environmental conditions within the repository are expected to evolve with time, changing from warm and oxidizing initially to cool and anoxic in the long-term. In response, the corrosion behaviour of the containers will also change with time as the repository environment evolve. A reactive-transport model has been developed to predict the time-dependent uniform corrosion behaviour of the container. The model is based on an experimentally-based reaction scheme that accounts for the various chemical, microbiological, electrochemical, precipitation/dissolution, adsorption/desorption, redox, and mass-transport processes at the container surface and in the compacted bentonite-based sealing materials within the repository. Coupling of the electrochemical interfacial reactions with processes in the bentonite buffer material allows the effect of the evolution of the repository environment on the corrosion behaviour of the container to be taken into account. The Copper Corrosion Model for Uniform Corrosion predicts the time-dependent corrosion rate and corrosion potential of the container, as well as the evolution of the near-field environment

  4. Effects of microplasma arc AISI 316L welds on the corrosion behaviour of pipelines in LiBr cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez-Tovar, R.; Montañés, M.T.; García-Antón, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •SECM tests reveal differences in electrochemical activity of base and welded alloys. •The highest electrochemical activity is obtained for the welded alloy. •Microplasma arc welding process hinders passivation in lithium bromide. •Microplasma arc welding increases corrosion rate and susceptibility to pitting. •The galvanic pair between base and welded alloys in LiBr is weak. -- Abstract: The effect of microplasma arc welding (MPAW) on the electrochemical and corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L stainless steel tubes has been studied. Scanning electrochemical measurements were performed in sodium chloride to evaluate the difference in the electrochemical activity of base (non-welded) and welded samples. Oxygen reduction rates increase in AISI 316L due to the heat treatment effect induced by welding, indicating a higher electrochemical activity in the welded samples. Additionally, the use of MPA weldments in lithium bromide (LiBr) absorption machines was also analysed at typical operating temperatures and Reynolds numbers. The welding process increases corrosion rates, hinders passivation and increases the susceptibility to pitting attack in LiBr. However, zero-resistance ammeter and localization index measurements show that the galvanic pair generated between the base and welded alloys is weak, both electrodes being in their passive state. Temperature greatly affects the corrosion process

  5. Corrosion behaviour of unalloyed steel in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1988-04-01

    The production of hydrogen can cause problems in a repository for low and intermediate level waste. Since the production of gas is mainly due to the corrosion of unalloyed steel, it is important to have as reliable data as possible for the corrosion rate in anaerobic cement. A review of the literature shows that the corrosion current densities are in the range of 0.01 to 0.1 μA/cm 2 (corresponding to corrosion rates between 0.1 and 1.2 μm/a). This implies hydrogen production rates between 0.022 and 0.22 mol/(m 2 a). Corrosion rates of the abovementioned order of magnitude are technically irrelevant, so that there is little interest in determining them accurately. Furthermore, their determination entails problems of measurement technique. In the present situation it would therefore appear risky to accept the lower value as proven. Experiments are proposed to reduce the present uncertainty. (author) 35 refs., 10 figs

  6. Corrosion behaviour of unalloyed steel in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1988-01-01

    The production of hydrogen can cause problems in a repository for low and intermediate level waste. Since the production of gas is mainly due to the corrosion of unalloyed steel, it is important to have as reliable data as possible for the corrosion rate in anaerobic cement. A review of the literature shows that the corrosion current densities are in the range of 0.01 to 0.1 μA/cm 2 (corresponding to corrosion rates between 0.1 and 1.2 μm/a). This implies hydrogen production rates between 0.022 and 0.22 mol/(m 2 xa). Corrosion rates of the abovementioned order of magnitude are technically irrelevant, so that there is little interest in determining them accurately. Furthermore, their determination entails problems of measurement technique. In the present situation it would therefore appear risky to accept the lower value as proven. Experiments are proposed to reduce the present uncertainty. (author) 35 refs., 10 figs

  7. The corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1988-01-01

    The production of hydrogen can cause problems in a repository for low- and intermediate-level waste. Since gas production is mainly due to the corrosion of carbon steel, it is important to have as reliable data as possible on the corrosion rate of steel in anaerobic cement. A review of the literature shows that the corrosion current densities lie in the range 0.01 to 0.1 μA/cm 2 (corresponding to corrosion rates between 0.1 and 1.2 μm/a). This implies hydrogen production rates between 0.022 and 0.22 mol/(m 2 .a). Corrosion rates of this order of magnitude are technically irrelevant, with the result that there is very little interest in determining them accurately. Furthermore, their determination entails problems of measurement technique. Given the current situation, it would appear somewhat risky to accept the lower value for hydrogen production as proven. Proposals are made for experiments which would reduce this element of uncertainty. (author) 10 figs., 35 refs

  8. Behaviour of polar crystals at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozhdin, S.N.; Novik, V.K.; Gavrilova, N.D.; Koptsik, V.A.; Popova, T.V.

    1975-01-01

    Temperature dependencies of pyrocoefficient for a wide class of various pyroactive crystals in the temperature range from 4,2 to 300 deg K were investigated. The problems to be solved were: to confirm a conclusion on the pyrocoefficient γsup(sigma) tending to zero at T → 0; to compare experimental data with conclusions of existing theories; to reveal specific features in the behaviour of both linear pyroelectrics and segnetoelectrics at low temperatures. The behaviour of the total pyrocoefficient for all crystals obeys the regularity γsup(sigma) → 0 at T → O. In the range of low temperatures the pyrocoefficient varies by the power law: γsup(sigma) approximately Tsup(α). For the majority of crystals studied α is close to 3. CdS, BeO, ZiNbO 3 and other crystals were studied

  9. ASSET, An Information System for Alloy Corrosion in High Temperature Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. C. John; A. D. Pelton; A. L. Young; W. T. Thompson; I. G. Wright

    2001-01-01

    A large database for corrosion data and a corrosion prediction information system for metals and alloys corroding in high-temperature gases have been created. Corrosion data for about 75 commercial alloys, 4600 corrosion data measurements, and six million exposure hours have been compiled into an information system, ASSET. ASSET allows prediction of sound metal thickness losses for metals and alloys corroding by several common corrosion mechanisms at high-temperatures as functions of gas composition, temperature, time, and alloy. This paper presents examples of predicted metal losses of alloys corroding in standard conditions for several corrosion mechanisms expected in high-temperature gases. ASSET also provides a comprehensive capability to analyze the thermochemical interactions between alloys, corrosion products and exposure conditions. Some of the uses of the data compilation and the corrosion prediction feature are illustrated for oxidizing, sulfidizing, sulfidizing/oxidizing , and carburizing conditions

  10. Corrosion Resistance and Pitting Behaviour of Low-Carbon High-Mn Steels in Chloride Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grajcar A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion resistance of the X4MnSiAlNbTi27-4-2 and X6MnSiAlNbTi26-3-3 type austenitic steels, after hot deformation as well as after cold rolling, were evaluated in 3.5% NaCl solution using potentiodynamic polarization tests. A type of nonmetallic inclusions and their pitting corrosion behaviour were investigated. Additionally, the effect of cold deformation on the corrosion resistance of high-Mn steels was studied. The SEM micrographs revealed that corrosion damage formed in both investigated steels is characterized by various shapes and an irregular distribution at the metallic matrix, independently on the steel state (thermomechanically treated or cold worked. Corrosion pits are generated both in grain interiors, grain boundaries and along the deformation bands. Moreover, corrosion damage is stronger in cold deformed steels in comparison to the thermomechanically treated specimens. EDS analysis revealed that corrosion pits preferentially nucleated on MnS and AlN inclusions or complex oxysulphides. The morphology of corrosion damage in 3.5% NaCl supports the data registered in potentiodynamic tests.

  11. Corrosion behaviour of AISI 304 stainless steel subjected to massive laser shock peening impacts with different pulse energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, J.Z.; Qi, H.; Luo, K.Y.; Luo, M.; Cheng, X.N.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Laser shock peening caused an obvious increase of corrosion resistance of 304 steel. •Corrosion resistance of stainless steel increased with increasing pulse energy. •Mechanism of laser shock peening on corrosion behaviour was also entirely determined. -- Abstract: Effects of massive laser shock peening (LSP) impacts with different pulse energies on ultimate tensile strength (UTS), stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility, fracture appearance and electrochemical corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated by slow strain rate test, potentiodynamic polarisation test and scanning electron microscope observation. The influence mechanism of massive LSP impacts with different pulse energies on corrosion behaviour was also determined. Results showed that massive LSP impacts effectively caused a significant improvement on UTS, SCC resistance, and electrochemical corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel. Increased pulse energy can also gradually improve its corrosion resistance

  12. Corrosion behaviour of some conventional stainless steels in electrolyzing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal NASSAR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, attempts were made to increase the amount of hydrogen generated from the water electrolysis process. Some conventional stainless steels (316; 409; 410 and 430 were used as anode and cathode in electrolysis process. Further study was carried out on the corrosion trend in all the investigated metals. It is observed that the electrode material can effect on the amount of hydrogen generate by electrolyzing process and metal composition of the stainless steels effects on the rate of corrosion.

  13. Corrosion kinetics at high pressure and temperature of Zr-2.5 Nb with different heat treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaime Solis, F.; Bordoni, Roberto; Olmedo, Ana M.; Villegas, Marina; Miyagusuku, Marcela

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of Zr-2.5 Nb pressure tube (PT) specimens, with ageing treatments at 400 and 500 C degrees for different times, was studied. The results were analyzed using the corrosion behavior of Zr-20 Nb and Zr-1 Nb samples heat treated during 1 hour at 850 C degrees, cooled in air and aged at the same temperature and times than the PT specimens. The comparison between the corrosion behaviour of Zr-1 Nb and Zr-20 Nb aged coupons with the aged pressure tube specimens, together with the metal/oxide interface morphology of Zr-2.5 Nb specimens, suggest that the increase in the corrosion resistance in the latter coupons is associated with the decomposition of the β-Zr phase. There is also a contribution of α-Zr phase when the ageing temperatures are high enough or the ageing times are long enough, due to a decrease in the Nb content of this phase. This last contribution is associated with an increase in the corrosion resistance of the central zone of pressure tube in the reactor. (author)

  14. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  15. High temperature corrosion investigation in an oxyfuel combustion test rig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Bjurman, M.; Hjörnhede, A

    2014-01-01

    Oxyfuel firing and subsequent capture of CO2 is a way to reduce CO2 emissions from coal‐fired boilers. Literature is summarized highlighting results which may contribute to understanding of the corrosion processes in an oxyfuel boiler.Tests were conducted in a 500 kWth oxyfuel test facility...... constructed by Brandenburg Technical University to gain understanding into oxyfuel firing. Two air‐cooled corrosion probes were exposed in this oxyfuel combustion chamber where the fuel was lignite. Gas composition was measured at the location of testing. Various alloys from a 2½ Cr steel, austenitic steels...... to nickel alloys were exposed at set metal temperatures of 570 and 630 °C for 287 h. The specimens were investigated using light optical and scanning electron microscopy and X‐ray diffraction.The deposit on the probe contained predominantly CaSO4 and Fe2O3. Oxide thickness and depth of the precipitated...

  16. Corrosion behaviour of pure iron implanted with Pd ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sang, J.M.; Lin, W.L.; Wu, Z.D.; Wang, H.S.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of pure iron implanted with Pd ions up to doses in the range 1x10 16 -1x10 18 ions/cm 2 at an extracting voltage 45kV by using MEVVA source ion implanter has been investigated. The concentration profiles and valence states of elements at the near surface of Pd implanted iron specimens were analyzed by AES and XPS respectively. The Anodic dissolution process of Pd implanted pure iron was measured by means of potentiokinetic sweep in a 0.5 mol/1 NaAc/Hac buffer solution with pH5.0. The open circuit corrosion potential as a function of immersion time was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of Pd implanted iron specimens. The experimental results show that Pd ion implantation decreases the critical passive current of iron and maintains a better passivity in acetate buffer solution with pH5.0. It is interesting that the active corrosion rate of Pd implanted iron is even higher than that of unimplanted one, when the oxide layer on the surface of iron has been damaged. (author)

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of zircaloy. The use of laboratory data to predict in-reactor behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.K.; Ocken, H.

    1981-01-01

    Pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) can lead to failure of the Zircaloy tubing used as cladding in water-cooled reactors. Many investigations have shown that the mechanism directly responsible for such fuel rod failures is stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Zircaloy tubing. Laboratory studies have yielded extensive data on the time-to-failure (tsub(f)) behaviour of Zircaloy tubing specimens as a function of such important variables as the applied hoop stress (σ sub(h)), the iodine concentration (I 2 ), the temperature (T) and the fluence (F). These data have been used to predict the response of Zircaloy tubing exposed in-reactor. A typical approach is to fit laboratory data to obtain an empirical equation for tsub(f) in terms of the variables identified above. The question can then be posed as to whether it is appropriate to use such an empirical expression for predicting in-reactor behaviour. This paper describes the approach which has been taken in modelling the SCC process. It first reviews the experimental observations upon which the model is based. A summary of the key features of the model is then presented. The model's capabilities, emphasizing those predictions that are independent of data used to evaluate empirical constants, are briefly discussed. Finally, it is shown how the model can be used to predict important differences between the response of tubing specimens exposed in the laboratory and the response of large quantities of tubing exposed in-reactor

  18. Corrosion studies of austenitic and duplex stainless steels in aqueous lithium bromide solution at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igual Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Lopez Nuevalos, S.; Guinon, J.L.; Perez Herranz, V.

    2004-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of three stainless steels EN 14311, EN 14429 (austenitic stainless steels) and EN 14462 (duplex stainless steel) was studied in a commercial LiBr solution (850 g/l LiBr solution containing chromate as inhibitor) at different temperatures (25, 50, 75 and 85 deg C) by electrochemical methods. Open circuit potentials shifted towards more active values as temperature increased, while corrosion potentials presented the opposite tendency. The most resistant alloys to general corrosion were EN 14429 and EN 14462 because they had the lowest corrosion current for all temperatures. In all the cases corrosion current increases with temperature. Pitting corrosion resistance is improved by the EN 14462, which presented the highest pitting potential, and the lowest passivation current for the whole range of temperatures studied. The duplex alloy also presents the worst repassivation behavior (in terms of the narrowest difference between corrosion potential and pitting potential); it does not repassivate from 50 deg C

  19. Study of Temperature Effect on the Corrosion Inhibition of C38 Carbon Steel Using Amino-tris(Methylenephosphonic Acid in Hydrochloric Acid Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najoua Labjar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tafel polarization method was used to assess the corrosion inhibitive and adsorption behaviours of amino-tris(methylenephosphonic acid (ATMP for C38 carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution in the temperature range from 30 to 60∘C. It was shown that the corrosion inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increase in ATMP concentration but decreased with temperature, which is suggestive of physical adsorption mechanism. The adsorption of the ATMP onto the C38 steel surface was found to follow Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The corrosion inhibition mechanism was further corroborated by the values of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters obtained from the experimental data.

  20. Electrochemical corrosion behaviour of nickel chromium-chromium carbide coating by HVOF process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amudha, A.; Nagaraja, H. S.; Shashikala, H. D.

    2018-04-01

    To overcome the corrosion problem in marine industry, coatings are one of the most economical solutions. In this paper, the corrosion behaviour of 25(NiCr)-75Cr3C2 cermet coating on low carbon steel substrate by HVOF process is studied. Different phases such as Cr7C3 and Cr3C2, along with Ni and chromium oxide(Cr3O2) constituents present in the coating were revealed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis. The morphology of the coating obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM) gave confirmation for the XRD analysis. Electrochemical corrosion techniques such as Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were used to study the corrosion behaviour of the cermet in 3.5wt% NaCl electrolyte solution. The corrosion current density of the coated sample and substrate were found to be 6.878µA/cm-2 and 21.091µA/cm-2 respectively. The Nyquist Impedance spectra were used to derive an equivalent circuit to analyze the interaction between the coating and electrolyte. The Bode Impedance plots obtained by EIS for the coating showed a typical passive material capacitive behaviour, indicated by medium to low frequency with phase angle approaching -60o, suggesting that a stable film is formed on the tested material in the electrolyte used.

  1. Effect of flow velocity on erosion-corrosion behaviour of QSn6 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weijiu; Zhou, Yongtao; Wang, Zhenguo; Li, Zhijun; Zheng, Ziqing

    2018-05-01

    The erosion-corrosion behaviour of QSn6 alloy used as propellers in marine environment was evaluated by erosion-corrosion experiments with/without cathodic protection, electrochemical tests and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations. The analysis was focused on the effect of flow velocity. The dynamic polarization curves showed that the corrosion rate of the QSn6 alloy increased as the flow velocity increased, due to the protective surface film removal at higher velocities. The lowest corrosion current densities of 1.26 × 10‑4 A cm‑2 was obtained at the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1. Because of the higher particle kinetic energies at higher flow velocity, the mass loss rate of the QSn6 alloy increased as the flow velocity increased. The mass loss rate with cathodic protection was lower than that without cathodic protection under the same conditions. Also, the lowest mass loss rate of 0.7 g m‑2 · h‑1 was acquired at the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1 with cathodic protection. However, the increase rate of corrosion rate and mass loss were decreased with increasing the flow velocity. Through observation the SEM morphologies of the worn surfaces, the main wear mechanism was ploughing with/without cathodic protection. The removal rates of the QSn6 alloy increased as the flow velocity increased in both pure erosion and erosion-corrosion, whereas the erosion and corrosion intensified each other. At the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1, the synergy rate (ΔW) exceeded by 5 times the erosion rate (Wwear). Through establishment and observation the erosion-corrosion mechanism map, the erosion-corrosion was the dominant regime in the study due to the contribution of erosion on the mass loss rate exceeded the corrosion contribution. The QSn6 alloy with cathodic protection is feasible as propellers, there are higher security at lower flow velocity, such as the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1 in the paper.

  2. Stainless steel corrosion in conditions simulating WWER-1000 primary coolant. Corrosion behaviour in mixed core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnorutskij, V.S.; Petel'guzov, I.A.; Gritsina, V.M.; Zuek, V.A.; Tret'yakov, M.V.; Rud', R.A.; Svichkar', N.V.; Slabospitskaya, E.A.; Ishchenko, N.I.

    2011-01-01

    Research into corrosion kinetics of austenitic stainless steels (06Cr18Ni10Ti, 08Cr18Ni10Ti, 12Cr18Ni10Ti) in medium which corresponds to composition and parameters of WWER-1000 primary coolant with different pH values in autoclave out-pile conditions during 14000 hours is given. Surface of oxide films on stainless steels is investigated. Visual inspection of Westinghouse and TVEL fuel was carried out after 4 cycles in WWER-1000 primary water chemistry conditions at South Ukraine NPP. Westinghouse and TVEL fuel cladding materials possess high corrosion resistance. Blushing of weldments was observed. No visual corrosion defects or deposits were observed on fuel rods.

  3. Report on the studies on the corrosion behaviour of the constructional materials for the gate cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elayathu, N.S.D.; Balachandra, J.

    1974-01-01

    The gate cooling system of the Trombay R-5 reactor, now under construction, is proposed to be a laminated gate designed to operate with 50 % KBO 2 solution within the temperature limits 30 deg C and 50 deg C. With a view to find suitable constructional materials for the gate, the corrosion behaviour of stainless steel 304 L(ASTM 240-69), lead (ASTM B-29), aluminium (as Boral), neoprene, perspex and carbon steel (ASTM A 302 grade B) has been investigated in 50 % KBO 2 solution at 45 deg C. After definite periods of exposure, their coupons were examined metallographically at different magnifications to assess the nature and extent of sub-surface attack. The results show that out of the materials studied, carbon steel, lead and aluminium are more liable to corrosion in the borate solution and hence their use should be avoided. (M.G.B.)

  4. Mechanistic modelling of the corrosion behaviour of copper nuclear fuel waste containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F; Kolar, M

    1996-10-01

    A mechanistic model has been developed to predict the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper nuclear fuel waste containers in a Canadian disposal vault. The model is based on a detailed description of the electrochemical, chemical, adsorption and mass-transport processes involved in the uniform corrosion of copper, developed from the results of an extensive experimental program. Predictions from the model are compared with the results of some of these experiments and with observations from a bronze cannon submerged in seawater saturated clay sediments. Quantitative comparisons are made between the observed and predicted corrosion potential, corrosion rate and copper concentration profiles adjacent to the corroding surface, as a way of validating the long-term model predictions. (author). 12 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Effect of cerium on the corrosion behaviour of sintered (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lijing; Bi, Mengxue; Jiang, Jianjun; Ding, Xuefeng; Zhu, Minggang; Li, Wei; Lv, Zhongshan; Song, Zhenlun

    2017-06-01

    For the balanced consumption of rare-earth elements, cerium (Ce) was partially used for NdFeB magnets instead of Nd. The corrosion behaviour of the (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet with different Ce contents in 3.5% NaCl solution was investigated by SEM, XRD, EDS and electrochemical tests. After immersion, the weight loss was calculated and the magnetic properties of the samples were measured. Results showed that Ce affected the corrosion of the (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet. Compared with the NdFeB magnet without Ce but of the same grade as the magnetic energy product, (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet showed better corrosion resistance. With increased Ce content, the corrosion resistances and magnetic properties of (Nd,Ce)FeB magnets were investigated.

  6. Corrosion behaviour of container materials for the disposal of high-level wastes in rock salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailos, E.; Schwarzkopf, W.; Koester, R.

    1986-01-01

    In 1983-84 extensive laboratory-scale experiments (immersion tests) to evaluate the long-term corrosion behaviour of selected materials in salt brines and first in situ experiments were performed. In the laboratory experiments the materials Ti 99.8-Pd, Hastelloy C4 and hot-rolled low carbon steel (reference materials in the joint European corrosion programme) as well as cast steel, spheoroidal cast iron, Si-cast iron and the Ni-Resists type D2 and D4 were investigated. The investigated parameters were: temperature (90 0 C; 170 0 C, 200 0 C), gamma-radiation (10 5 rad/h) and different compositions of salt brines. The results obtained show that, in addition to Ti 99.8-Pd, also Hastelloy C4 and unalloyed steels are in principle suitable for being used for long-term stable HLW-containers if the gamma dose rate is reduced by suitable shielding. Furthermore, the susceptibility of Hastelloy C4 to crevice corrosion must be taken into account. Further studies will be necessary to provide final evidence of the suitability of the materials examined. These will mainly involve clarification of questions related to hydrogen embrittlement (Ti 99.8-Pd, unalloyed steels) and to the influence of pressure and saline impurities (e.g. antiJ, antiBr) on corrosion

  7. Effect of cerium on the corrosion behaviour of sintered (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lijing [CAS Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Application Technology, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Bi, Mengxue [CAS Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Application Technology, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Nano Science and Technology Institute, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Jiang, Jianjun; Ding, Xuefeng [CAS Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Application Technology, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Zhu, Minggang; Li, Wei [Functional Materials Research Institute, Central Iron & Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Lv, Zhongshan [Ningbo Shuo Teng new material Co., Ltd., Cixi 315301 (China); Song, Zhenlun, E-mail: songzhenlun@nimte.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Application Technology, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • A little Ce could promote the magnets for a better corrosion resistance. • With increased Ce contents, the corrosion resistances of magnets decrease. • As the corrosion developed, the magnetic properties decreased. - Abstract: For the balanced consumption of rare-earth elements, cerium (Ce) was partially used for NdFeB magnets instead of Nd. The corrosion behaviour of the (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet with different Ce contents in 3.5% NaCl solution was investigated by SEM, XRD, EDS and electrochemical tests. After immersion, the weight loss was calculated and the magnetic properties of the samples were measured. Results showed that Ce affected the corrosion of the (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet. Compared with the NdFeB magnet without Ce but of the same grade as the magnetic energy product, (Nd,Ce)FeB magnet showed better corrosion resistance. With increased Ce content, the corrosion resistances and magnetic properties of (Nd,Ce)FeB magnets were investigated.

  8. Corrosion products behaviour under VVER primary coolant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grygar, T.; Zmitko, M.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work was to collect data on thermodynamic stability of Cr, Fe, and Ni oxides, mechanisms of hydrothermal corrosion of stainless steels and to compare the real observation with the theory. We found that the electrochemical potential and pH in PWR and VVER are close to the thermodynamic boundary between two fields of stable spinel type oxides. The ways of degradation of the passivating layers due to changes in water chemistry were considered and PWR and VVER systems were found to be potentially endangered by reductive attack. In certain VVER systems the characteristics of the passivating layer on steels and also concentration of soluble corrosion products seem to be in contradiction with the theoretical expectations. (author)

  9. Corrosion behaviour of dimensionally stable anodes in chlorine electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evdokimov, S.V.

    2000-01-01

    Dependence of ruthenium anodic dissolution rate in active coating of oxide ruthenium-titanium anodes on time both in chloride and perchlorate solutions was studied using radiometric methods. It is shown that i chloride solutions effect of a high and long-term decrease in ruthenium dissolution rate takes place. The data confirm the previously made conclusion that adsorbed chlorine produces inhibiting effect on anodic dissolution of a precious metal. Influence of pH on steady-state rate of the anode corrosion is considered. Effect of abrupt increase in corrosion rate with pH increase from 2 to 4 with its subsequent slow decrease to the values characteristic of the process rate in solutions with pH 2 is revealed [ru

  10. Corrosion behaviour of container materials for the disposal of high-level waste forms in rock salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailos, E.; Schwarzkopf, W.; Koester, R.

    1987-05-01

    Extensive laboratory-scale experiments to evaluate the long-term corrosion behaviour of selected materials in brines and first in situ experiments were performed. In the laboratory experiments the materials Ti 99.8-Pd, Hastelloy C4 and hot-rolled low carbon steel as well cast steel, spheroidal cast iron, Si-cast iron and the Ni-Resists type D2 and D4 were investigated. The investigated parameters were: temperature, gamma-radiation and different compositions of salt brines. (orig./PW) [de

  11. Phase Stability Diagrams for High Temperature Corrosion Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Ramos-Hernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion phenomena of metals by fused salts depend on chemical composition of the melt and environmental conditions of the system. Detail knowledge of chemistry and thermodynamic of aggressive species formed during the corrosion process is essential for a better understanding of materials degradation exposed to high temperature. When there is a lack of kinetic data for the corrosion processes, an alternative to understand the thermodynamic behavior of chemical species is to utilize phase stability diagrams. Nowadays, there are several specialized software programs to calculate phase stability diagrams. These programs are based on thermodynamics of chemical reactions. Using a thermodynamic data base allows the calculation of different types of phase diagrams. However, sometimes it is difficult to have access to such data bases. In this work, an alternative way to calculate phase stability diagrams is presented. The work is exemplified in the Na-V-S-O and Al-Na-V-S-O systems. This system was chosen because vanadium salts is one of the more aggressive system for all engineering alloys, especially in those processes where fossil fuels are used.

  12. Corrosion behaviour of Ni–Co alloy coatings at Kish Island (marine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. In this study, the corrosion behaviour of Ni-Co alloys with low Co content, electroplated on steel ... charge flow from the water molecule to the substrate is produced. ... is also a gas refinery in the west side of the island so its pollutants ...

  13. Thermal characteristics and corrosion behaviour of Mg–xZn alloys ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 36; Issue 6. Thermal characteristics and corrosion behaviour of Mg–Zn alloys for biomedical applications. Amir Fereidouni Lotfabadi Mohd Hasbullah Idris Ali Ourdjini Mohammed Rafiq Abdul Kadir Saeed Farahany Hamid Reza Bakhsheshi-Rad. Volume 36 Issue 6 ...

  14. Corrosion behaviour of layers obtained by nitrogen implantation into boron films deposited onto iron substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, F.; Fedrizzi, L.; Giacomozzi, F.; Guzman, L.; Borgese, A.

    1985-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviour and corrosion resistance of boron films deposited onto Armco iron after bombardment with 100 keV N + ions were determined in various test solutions. The changes in the electrochemical parameters give evidence of lower anodic dissolution rates for the treated samples. Scanning electron microscopy and Auger analysis of the corroded surfaces confirm the presence of protective layers. (Auth.)

  15. An ac impedance study of the corrosion behaviour of mild steel coated with electrochemically synthesized polyoxyphenylenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musiani, M.M.; Mengoli, G.; Pagura, C.

    1985-04-01

    Electrochemically synthesized polyoxphenylene coatings on mild steel exposed to NaCl or H2SO4 solutions were investigated by ac impedance measurements. The influence of coating cohesion, adhesion to substrate, and surface pretreatment on the corrosion behaviour of the samples is clarified.

  16. Corrosion behaviour of WC-VC-Co hardmetals in acidic media

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Konadu, DS

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of increasing vanadium carbide (VC) content on the corrosion behaviour of tungsten carbide – 10 wt% cobalt hard metals was investigated in 1 M hydrochloric (HCl), and sulphuric (H2SO4) acids solutions. Increasing VC content makes the open...

  17. Corrosion behaviour of zircaloy 4 fuel rod cladding in EDF power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romary, H; Deydier, D [EDF, Direction de l` Equipment SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-02-01

    Since the beginning of the French nuclear program, a surveillance of fuel has been carried out in order to evaluate the fuel behaviour under irradiation. Until now, nuclear fuels provided by suppliers have met EDF requirements concerning fuel behaviour and reliability. But, the need to minimize the costs and to increase the flexibility of the power plants led EDF to the definition of new targets: optimization of the core management and fuel cycle economy. The fuel behaviour experience shows that some of these new requirements cannot be fully fulfilled by the present standard fuel due to some technological limits. Particularly, burnup enhancement is limited by the oxidation and the hydriding of the Zircaloy 4 fuel rod cladding. Also, fuel suppliers and EDF need to have a better knowledge of the Zy-4 cladding behaviour in order to define the existing margins and the limiting factors. For this reason, in-reactor fuel characterization programs have been set up by fuel suppliers and EDF for a few years. This paper presents the main results and conclusions of EDF experience on Zy-4 in-reactor corrosion behaviour. Data obtained from oxide layer or zirconia thickness measurements show that corrosion performance of Zy-4 fuel rod cladding, as irradiated until now in EDF reactors, is satisfactory but not sufficient to meet the future needs. The fuel suppliers propose in order to improve the corrosion resistance of fuel rod cladding, low tin Zy-4 cladding and then optimized Zy-4 cladding. Irradiation of these claddings are ongoing. The available corrosion data show the better in-reactor corrosion resistance of optimized Zy-4 fuel rod cladding compared to the standard Zy-4 cladding. The scheduled fuel surveillance program will confirm if the optimized Zy-4 fuel rod cladding will meet the requirements for the future high burnup and high flexibility fuel. (author). 10 refs, 19 figs, 4 tabs.

  18. Investigation of Microstructure and Corrosion Propagation Behaviour of Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abidin Kamal Ariff Zainal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Martensitic stainless steels are commonly used for fabricating components. For many applications, an increase in surface hardness and wear resistance can be beneficial to improve performance and extend service life. However, the improvement in hardness of martensitic steels is usually accompanied by a reduction in corrosion strength. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of nitriding on AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel, in terms of microstructure and corrosion propagation behavior. The results indicate that the microstructure and phase composition as well as corrosion resistance were influenced by nitriding temperatures.

  19. Corrosion behaviour of Arc-PVD coatings and hybrid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichel, K.

    1992-01-01

    To achieve a comprehensive protective effect against corrosion and wear stresses, coating systems are increasingly being developed, in which there is a separation of the tasks of the coating materials regarding the protective effect. On the one hand, pure PVD coating systems are used, on the other hand hybrid coatings are examined, where galvanic processes are combined with PVD technique. The results of experiments introduced in this article were determined on Arc-PVD coatings. By this process, titanium nitride and chromium nitride coatings are both deposited directly on the basic material and are also deposited as combination coatings of Ti/TiN and chemical nickel/TiN. (orig.) [de

  20. Effects of alpha-decay on spent fuel corrosion behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiss, T.; Rondinella, V.V.; Cobos, J.; Wegen, D.H.; Amme, M.; Ronchi, C.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of results in the area of spent fuel characterization as nuclear waste is presented. These studies are focused on primary aspects of spent fuel corrosion, by considering different fuel compositions and burn ups, as well as a wide set of environmental conditions. The key parameter is the storage time of the fuel e.g. in view of spent fuel retrieval or in view of its final disposal. To extrapolate data obtainable from a laboratory-acceptable timescale to those expected after storage periods of interest have elapsed (amounting in the extreme case to geological ages) is a tough challenge. Emphasis is put on key aspects of fuel corrosion related to fuel properties at a given age and environmental conditions expected in the repository: e.g. the fuel activity (radiolysis effects), the effects of helium build-up and of groundwater composition. A wide range of techniques, from traditional leaching experiments to advanced electrochemistry, and of materials, including spent fuel with different compositions/burnups and analogues like the so-called alpha-doped UO 2 , are employed for these studies. The results confirm the safety of European underground repository concepts. (authors)

  1. Comparative evaluation of corrosion behaviour of type K thin film thermocouple and its bulk counterpart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.K.; Barhai, P.K.; Srikanth, S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Anodic vacuum arc deposited chromel and alumel films are more 'noble' in 5% NaCl solution than their respective wires. → Chromel undergoes localised corrosion while alumel shows uniform corrosion. → Virgin samples of chromel-alumel TFTCs exhibit good thermoelectric response. → Their thermoelectric outputs remain largely unaffected when shelved under normal atmospheric conditions. → After 288 h of exposure in salt spray environment, their thermoelectric outputs show noticeable change due to size effects. - Abstract: This paper investigates the corrosion behaviour of type K thermoelements and their thin films, and compares the performance of chromel-alumel thin film thermocouple with its wire counterpart before and after exposure to 5% NaCl medium. Potentiodynamic polarisation tests reveal that chromel and alumel films are more 'noble' than their respective wires. Alumel corrodes faster when coupled with chromel in films than as wires. Secondary electron micrographs and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that chromel shows localised corrosion while alumel undergoes uniform corrosion. Corrosion adversely affects the thermocouple output and introduces an uncertainty in the measurement.

  2. The corrosion behaviour and structure of amorphous and thermally treated Fe-B-Si alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raicheff, R.; Zaprianova, V.; Petrova, E.

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of magnetic amorphous alloys Fe 78 B 13 Si 9 , Fe 81 B 13 Si 4 C 2 and Fe 67 Co 18 Bi 4 S 1 obtained by rapid quenching from the melts are investigated in a model corrosive environment of 1N H 2 SO 4 . The structure of the alloys, is, characterized by DTA, SEM, TEM, X-ray and electron diffraction techniques. The dissolution kinetics of the,alloys is studied using gravimetric and electrochemical polarization measurements. It is established that the corrosion rate of the amorphous Fe 67 Co 18 Bt 4 S 1 alloy is up to 50 times lower than that of Fe 78 Bi 3 Si 9 alloy and the addition of cobalt leads to a considerable reduction of the rates of both partial corrosion reactions, while the addition of carbon results only in a moderate decrease (2-3 times) of the corrosion rate. It is also shown that the crystallization of the amorphous Fe 78 B 13 Si 9 alloy (at 700 o C for 3 h) leads to formation of multiphase structure consisting of crystalline phases α-Fe and Fe 3 (B,Si). After crystallization an increase of the rate of both hydrogen evolution and anodic dissolution reactions is observed which results in a considerable (an order of magnitude) increase of the corrosion rate of the alloy. (Original)

  3. Influence of microstructure on the microbial corrosion behaviour of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, D. A.; Ibars, J. R.; Ranninger, C.

    2000-01-01

    Several stainless steels (Type UNS S30300, S30400, S30403; S31600, S31603 and S42000) with different microstructural characteristics have been used to study the influence of heat treatments on microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Bio corrosion and accelerated electrochemical testing was performed in various microbiological media. Two species of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have been used in order to ascertain the influence of microstructure. The morphology of corrosion pits produced in both chloride and chloride plus sulphide-SRB metabolites, was inspected by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) complemented with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Results have shown different behaviours regarding corrosion resistance in each case studied. Sensitized austenitic stainless steels were more affected by the presence of aggressive anions and pitting potential (Ep) values were more cathodic than those of as-received state. A corrosion enhancement is produced by the synergistic action of biogenic sulphides and chloride anions. Pitting corrosion in martensitic stainless steel Type UNS S42000 was found in biocorrosion test. The pitting morphology is correlated to the chemical composition, the microstructure and the electrolyte. (Author) 36 refs

  4. Corrosion behaviour of steels and CRA in sour gas environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, M. Alvarez de; Lancha, A.M.; Hernandez, F.; Gomez-Briceno, D. [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Coca, P. [ELCOGAS, S.A., C.T. GICC Puertollano, Carretera de Calzada de Calatrava a Puertollano, km 27, 13500 Puertollano, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    The ELCOGAS power plant in Puertollano (Spain), with 335 MWe (ISO conditions), is an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant built to demonstrate both the technical and economic feasibility of this alternative for clean generation of electricity from coal. IGCC technology is based on a coal gasification process, namely the conversion of coal into combustible gas, which is then subjected to an exhaustive cleaning process. The result is a synthetic gas, virtually free of pollutants that can be burned with a high efficiency in a combined cycle electricity-generating unit. Basically, the ELCOGAS plant consists of three islands jointly designed and integrated into the process: gasification island, air separation island and combined cycle island. In the gasification island, the gas from the gasifier is cleaned (de-dusted and washed) and desulfurized before being sent to the combined cycle island. The washing system consists of a Venturi scrubber with a separator where halogens and alkalis (NH{sub 3}, HCl, HF) are removed from the previously de-dusted gas by means of the wash water. The halogens and alkalis removed are then stripped from the wash water as stripped gas, which is a sour gas. The coal-gas coming from the separator proceeds to sulphur removal in a MDEA system and then, the clean gas (mainly CO, H{sub 2}) is sent to the combined cycle plant. As COS is a significant part of the sulphur containing gases in the coal gas, hydrolysis of the COS to H{sub 2}S takes place before the desulfurization stage, since MDEA is a selective amine for H{sub 2}S. There are many important areas related to materials corrosion within the gas cleaning system. In the ELCOGAS plant carbon steels, austenitic stainless steels and nickel based alloys, such as AISI 316Ti, AISI 904L and Hastelloy C276, are used in the Venturi, the water separator and the strippers. AISI 316Ti is used for the gas piping from the separator to the COS hydrolysis system. Laboratory tests to evaluate

  5. The corrosion behavior of hafnium in high-temperature-water environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rishel, D.M.; Smee, J.D.; Kammenzind, B.F.

    1999-10-01

    The high-temperature-water corrosion performance of hafnium is evaluated. Corrosion kinetic data are used to develop correlations that are a function of time and temperature. The evaluation is based on corrosion tests conducted in out-of-pile autoclaves and in out-of-flux locations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at temperatures ranging from 288 to 360 C. Similar to the corrosion behavior of unalloyed zirconium, the high-temperature-water corrosion response of hafnium exhibits three corrosion regimes: pretransition, posttransition, and spalling. In the pretransition regime, cubic corrosion kinetics are exhibited, whereas in the posttransition regime, linear corrosion kinetics are exhibited. Because of the scatter in the spalling regime data, it is not reasonable to use a best fit of the data to describe spalling regime corrosion. Data also show that neutron irradiation does not alter the corrosion performance of hafnium. Finally, the data illustrate that the corrosion rate of hafnium is significantly less than that of Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4.

  6. Pitting Corrosion Behaviour of New Corrosion-Resistant Reinforcement Bars in Chloride-Containing Concrete Pore Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jin-Yang; Liu, Yao; Chu, Hong-Yan; Wang, Danqian; Ma, Han; Sun, Wei

    2017-08-04

    In this study, the pitting behaviour of a new corrosion-resistant alloy steel (CR) is compared to that of low-carbon steel (LC) in a simulated concrete pore solution with a chloride concentration of 5 mol/L. The electrochemical behaviour of the bars was characterised using linear polarisation resistance (LPR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The pitting profiles were detected by reflective digital holographic microscopy (DHM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the chemical components produced in the pitting process were analysed by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that the CR bars have a higher resistance to pitting corrosion than the LC bars. This is primarily because of the periodic occurrence of metastable pitting during pitting development. Compared to the pitting process in the LC bars, the pitting depth grows slowly in the CR bars, which greatly reduces the risk of pitting. The possible reason for this result is that the capability of the CR bars to heal the passivation film helps to restore the metastable pits to the passivation state.

  7. Corrosion behaviours of the dental magnetic keeper complexes made by different alloys and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min-Ke; Song, Ning; Liu, Fei; Kou, Liang; Lu, Xiao-Wen; Wang, Min; Wang, Hang; Shen, Jie-Fei

    2016-09-29

    The keeper and cast dowel-coping, as a primary component for a magnetic attachment, is easily subjected to corrosion in a wet environment, such as the oral cavity, which contains electrolyte-rich saliva, complex microflora and chewing behaviour and so on. The objective of this in vitro study was to examine the corrosion resistance of a dowel and coping-keeper complex fabricated by finish keeper and three alloys (cobalt-chromium, CoCr; silver-palladium-gold, PdAu; gold-platinum, AuPt) using a laser-welding process and a casting technique. The surface morphology characteristics and microstructures of the samples were examined by means of metallographic microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) with SEM provided elements analysis information for the test samples after 10% oxalic acid solution etching test. Tafel polarization curve recordings demonstrated parameter values indicating corrosion of the samples when subjected to electrochemical testing. This study has suggested that massive oxides are attached to the surface of the CoCr-keeper complex but not to the AuPt-keeper complex. Only the keeper area of cast CoCr-keeper complex displayed obvious intergranular corrosion and changes in the Fe and Co elements. Both cast and laser-welded AuPt-keeper complexes had the highest free corrosion potential, followed by the PdAu-keeper complex. We concluded that although the corrosion resistance of the CoCr-keeper complex was worst, the keeper surface passive film was actually preserved to its maximum extent. The laser-welded CoCr- and PdAu-keeper complexes possessed superior corrosion resistance as compared with their cast specimens, but no significant difference was found between the cast and laser-welded AuPt-keeper complexes. The Fe-poor and Cr-rich band, appearing on the edge of the keeper when casting, has been proven to be a corrosion-prone area.

  8. Corrosion of structural materials and electrochemistry in high temperature water of nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    The latest experiences with corrosion in the cooling systems of nuclear power plants are reviewed. High temperature cooling water causes corrosion of structural materials, which often leads to adverse effects in the plants, e.g., generating defects in materials of major components and fuel claddings, increasing shutdown radiation and increasing the volume of radwaste sources. Corrosion behaviors are much affected by water qualities and differ according to the values of water qualities and the materials themselves. In order to establish reliable operation, each plant requires its own unique optimal water chemistry control based on careful consideration of its system, materials and operational history. Electrochemistry is one of key issues that determine corrosion related problems but it is not the only issue. Most phenomena for corrosion related problems, e.g., flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC), intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and thinning of fuel cladding materials, can be understood based on an electrochemical index, e.g., electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), conductivities and pH. The most important electrochemical index, ECP, can be measured at elevated temperature and applied to in situ sensors of corrosion conditions to detect anomalous conditions of structural materials at their very early stages. In the paper, theoretical models based on electrochemistry to estimate wall thinning rate of carbon steel piping due to flow-accelerated corrosion and corrosive conditions determining IGSCC crack initiation and growth rate are introduced. (author)

  9. Corrosion behaviour of borated aluminium used as neutron absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmerich, R. [EaglePicher Technologies GmbH, Oehringen (Germany); Ensinger, W.; Enders, B. [Philipps-Univ. of Marburg, Dept. of Chemistry, Material Science Centre (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of pure and borated aluminium was examined. Measurements were performed in two different electrolytes at 90 C containing different trace-amounts of chloride. For borated aluminium current transients, i.e. metastable depassivation events were found. It is suggested to attribute these transients to less stable passivation layers in comparison to pure aluminium.

  10. Influence of pH, temperature and thermal treatment on site corrosion of SAE 304 steel in chlorinated solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konrad, I.B.

    1982-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviour and fracture morphology of homogenized and sensitized type SAE 304 stainless steel U bent specimens, in 3% NaCl solution, at pH=2.0 and pH=7.0 both at room temperature and 100 0 C was studied. Polarization curves, galvanostatic and potentiostatic experiments were run. It could be observed that high temperature and low pH favour transgranular cracking and longer sensitization times lower fracture time and tend to give rise to intergranular fracture. Light sensitization can produce transgranular cracking even at room temperature, when the homogenized alloy does not present stress-corrosion cracking for the same condition. (Author) [pt

  11. Influence of pH and oxygen content of buffer solutions on the corrosion behaviour of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, K.H.

    1977-05-01

    The application of solutions to the decontamination of materials in nuclear installations is based on the condition that their corrosion behaviour is clearly understood. Since electrochemical corrosion is due to cathodic and anodic partial reactions which are influenced in different ways by the pH of the solution and the oxygen content it is suggested that the results of electrochemical experiments with buffer solutions be used as a model for predicting the corrosion behaviour of materials in other solutions. In the tests described here potentio-kinetic current-potential-curves have been traced and galvanic corrosion tests have been made. The results obtained in ascorbic acid, potassium hydrogen phthalate, ammonium citrate and acetate, sodium and potassium tartrate, ammonium hydrogen phosphate, sodium carbonate, hexamethylene tetramin, ethylene diamine enable - on the basis of summarized current-potential-curves - the metals studied to be classified in four groups characterized by clear differences concerning the influence of pH on the corrosion behaviour. (Auth.)

  12. Influence of heat treatment on corrosion behaviour of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr-Sc alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Y.P.; Liu, X.Y.; He, Y.B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Pan, Q.L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Materials Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410083 (China); Li, W.B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); School of Civil Engineering, Hunan City University, Yiyang 413000 (China)

    2012-05-15

    Corrosion behaviour of different tempers (namely NA, UA, PA and OA) of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr-Sc alloy was studied by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), optical microscopy (OM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Over aged (OA) can decrease the susceptibility to exfoliation due to the discontinuous distribution of the {eta} precipitates at the grain boundaries, cause a negative shift of the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}), and lead to the prolonging of the time of the appearance of two time constants in impedance diagrams. In addition, Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr-Sc alloy with over aged treatment has an enhanced resistance to exfoliation corrosion. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Corrosion behaviour of container materials for geological disposal of high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accary, A.

    1985-01-01

    The disposal of high level radioactive waste in geological formations, based on the multibarrier concept, may include the use of a container as one of the engineered barriers. In this report the requirements imposed on this container and the possible degradation processes are reviewed. Further on an overview is given of the research being carried out by various research centres in the European Community on the assessment of the corrosion behaviour of candidate container materials. The results obtained on a number of materials under various testing conditions are summarized and evaluated. As a result, three promising materials have been selected for a detailed joint testing programme. It concerns two highly corrosion resistant alloys, resp. Ti-Pd (0.2 Pd%) and Hastelloy C4 and one consumable material namely a low carbon steel. Finally the possibilities of modelling the corrosion phenomena are discussed

  14. Corrosion behaviour of powder metallurgical and cast Al-Zn-Mg base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sameljuk, A.V.; Neikov, O.D.; Krajnikov, A.V.; Milman, Yu.V.; Thompson, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    The behaviour of Al-Zn-Mg base alloys produced by powder metallurgy and casting has been studied using potentiodynamic polarisation in 0.3% and 3% NaCl solutions. The influence of alloy production route on microstructure has been examined by scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. An improvement in performance of powder metallurgy (PM) materials, compared with the cast alloy, was evident in solutions of low chloride concentration; less striking differences were revealed in high chloride concentration. Both powder metallurgy and cast alloys show two main types of precipitates, which were identified as Zn-Mg and Zr-Sc base intermetallic phases. The microstructure of the PM alloys is refined compared with the cast material, which assists understanding of the corrosion performance. The corrosion process commences with dissolution of the Zn-Mg base phases, with the relatively coarse phases present in the cast alloy showing ready development of corrosion

  15. Mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of MIG welded 5083 aluminium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmus, Huelya [Celal Bayar Univ., Turgutlu-Manisa (Turkey)

    2011-07-01

    For this study 5083 Aluminium alloy plates, as used in automobiles and watercraft, were experimentally MIG welded. The plates were joined with different wires and at various currents. The effects of welding with different parameters on the mechanical and corrosion properties were investigated. The corrosion behaviour of the MIG welded 5083 Aluminium base material was also investigated. The effects of the chemical composition of the filler material on the mechanical properties were examined by metallographic inspection and tensile testing. By EDS and XRD analyses of specimens it turned out that different structures in the weld metal (Cu3Si) affect its mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of the specimens welded with 5356 filler metal were found as quite well improved as compared to those specimens welded with 4043 and 5183 filler material. The results of the metallographic analysis, and mechanical and corrosion tests exhibited that the 5356 filler material was most suitable for the 5083 Al alloy base material. (orig.)

  16. High Temperature Corrosion under Laboratory Conditions Simulating Biomass-Firing: A Comprehensive Characterization of Corrosion Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    characterization of the corrosion products. The corrosion products consisted of three layers: i) the outermost layer consisting of a mixed layer of K2SO4 and FexOy on a partly molten layer of the initial deposit, ii) the middle layer consists of spinel (FeCr2O4) and Fe2O3, and iii) the innermost layer is a sponge......-like Ni3S2 containing layer. At the corrosion front, Cl-rich protrusions were observed. Results indicate that selective corrosion of Fe and Cr by Cl, active oxidation and sulphidation attack of Ni are possible corrosion mechanisms....

  17. Corrosion behaviour of zinc and aluminium in simulated nuclear accident environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piippo, J.; Laitinen, T.; Sirkiae, P.

    1997-02-01

    The corrosion rates of zinc and aluminium were determined in simulated large pipe break and in severe accident cases. An in situ on fine measurement technique, which is based on the resistance measurement of sample wires, was used. In the large pipe break case the corrosion rates of zinc and aluminium were determined at pH 8 and pH 10 in deaerated and in aerated solutions. Tests were also performed in aerated 0.1 M borate buffer solution at pH 9.2. Temperature range was 130 deg C - 50 deg C. The corrosion of zinc appears to be relatively fast in neutral or mildly alkaline aerated water, while both high pH and deaeration tend to reduce the corrosion rates of zinc. The aeration and pH elevation decrease the corrosion rate of aluminium. The simulation of the severe accident case took place in the pH range 3-11 in chloride containing solutions at 50 deg C temperature. The corrosion rate of aluminium was lower than that of zinc, except for the solution with pH 11, in which the corrosion rate of aluminium was practically identical to that of zinc. Both metals corroded more rapidly in the presence of chlorides in acidic and alkalic conditions than in the absence of chlorides at neutral environment. The solubility of zinc and aluminium and the stability of the corrosion products were estimated using thermodynamical calculations. The experimental results and the thermodynamical calculations were in fair agreement. (8 refs.)

  18. The effect of O{sub 2} content on the corrosion behaviour of X65 and 5Cr in water-containing supercritical CO{sub 2} environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Yong, E-mail: leo.huayong@gmail.com; Barker, Richard; Neville, Anne

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • Corrosion behaviour was evaluated in water-containing SC-CO{sub 2} with different O{sub 2} levels. • Corrosion was observed when no free water was present. • Localized corrosion was a fundamental consideration in water-containing CO{sub 2} systems. • O{sub 2} content plays a key role in influencing the critical water content. - Abstract: The general and localized corrosion behaviour of X65 carbon steel and 5Cr low alloy steel were evaluated in a water-saturated supercritical CO{sub 2} environment in the presence of varying concentrations of O{sub 2}. Experiments were performed at a temperature of 35 °C and a pressure of 80 bar to simulate the conditions encountered during CO{sub 2} transport and injection. Results indicated that increasing O{sub 2} concentration from 0 to 1000 ppm caused a progressive reduction in the general corrosion rate, but served to increase the extent of localized corrosion observed on both materials. Pitting (or localized attack) rates for X65 ranged between 0.9 and 1.7 mm/year, while for 5Cr rose from 0.3 to 1.4 mm/year as O{sub 2} concentration was increased from 0 to 1000 ppm. General corrosion rates were over an order of magnitude lower than the pitting rates measured. Increasing O{sub 2} content in the presence of X65 and 5Cr suppressed the growth of iron carbonate (FeCO{sub 3}) on the steel surface and resulted in the formation of a corrosion product consisting mainly of iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). 5Cr was shown to offer more resistance to pitting corrosion in comparison to X65 steel over the conditions tested. At concentrations of O{sub 2} above 500 ppm 5Cr produced general corrosion rates less than 0.04 mm/year, which were half that recorded for X65. The improved corrosion resistance of 5Cr was believed to be at least partially attributed to the formation of a Cr-rich film on the steel surface which was shown using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to contain chromium oxide (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and chromium

  19. Monitoring corrosion and corrosion control of iron in HCl by non-ionic surfactants of the TRITON-X series - Part II. Temperature effect, activation energies and thermodynamics of adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Mohammed A.; Ahmed, M.A.; Arida, H.A.; Arslan, Taner; Saracoglu, Murat; Kandemirli, Fatma

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → TX-305 exhibits inhibiting properties for iron corrosion more than TX-165 and TX 100. → Inhibition efficiency increases with temperature, suggesting chemical adsorption. → The three tested surfactants act as mixed-type inhibitors with cathodic predominance. → Validation of corrosion rates measured by Tafel extrapolation method is confirmed. - Abstract: The inhibition characteristics of non-ionic surfactants of the TRITON-X series, namely TRITON-X-100 (TX-100), TRITON-X-165 (TX-165) and TRITON-X-305 (TX-305), on the corrosion of iron was studied in 1.0 M HCl solutions as a function of inhibitor concentration (0.005-0.075 g L -1 ) and solution temperature (278-338 K). Measurements were conducted based on Tafel extrapolation method. Electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM), a non-destructive corrosion measurement technique that can directly give values of corrosion current without prior knowledge of Tafel constants, is also presented. Experimental corrosion rates determined by the Tafel extrapolation method were compared with corrosion rates obtained by the EFM technique and an independent method of chemical analysis. The chemical method of confirmation of the corrosion rates involved determination of the dissolved cation, using ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry). The aim was to confirm validation of corrosion rates measured by the Tafel extrapolation method. Results obtained showed that, in all cases, the inhibition efficiency increased with increase in temperature, suggesting that chemical adsorption occurs. The adsorptive behaviour of the three surfactants followed Temkin-type isotherm. The standard free energies of adsorption decreased with temperature, reflecting better inhibition performance. These findings confirm chemisorption of the tested inhibitors. Thermodynamic activation functions of the dissolution process were also calculated as a function of each inhibitor concentration. All the results

  20. Effect of cerium addition on the corrosion behaviour of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, S.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Mungole, M.N.; Bharagava, S.; Baligidad, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of Ce addition on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides Fe-20.0Al-2.0C, Fe-18.5Al-3.6C and Fe-19.2Al-3.3C-0.07Ce (in at.%) has been studied. The potentiodynamic polarization behaviour of the alloys was evaluated in freely aerated 0.25 mol/l H 2 SO 4 . A 0.05% C steel was used for comparison purposes. All the alloys exhibited active-passive behaviour in the acidic solution. The addition of Ce destroyed passivity as indicated by lower breakdown potentials in polarization studies. This has been related to the finer distribution of the carbides in the microstructure. Corrosion rates were evaluated by immersion testing. The iron aluminide with Ce addition exhibited a lower corrosion rate compared to the aluminides without Ce addition. This has been attributed to modifications in surface film with Ce addition. Scanning electron microscopy of corroded surfaces indicated that the carbon-alloyed intermetallics were susceptible to localized galvanic corrosion due to the presence of carbides in the microstructure

  1. Corrosion behaviour of WC-Co based hardmetal in neutral chloride and acid sulphate media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozzini, B.; Serra, M.; Fanigliulo, A.; Bogani, F. [Lecce Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione; Gaudenzi, G.P. de [Harditalia s.r.l. (OMCD Group), Genova (Italy)

    2002-05-01

    A comparative study of the corrosion behaviour of WC-Co based hardmetals with Ni and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} additions is carried out. The aggressive environments are neutral and acidic aerated aqueous solutions of NaCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This study is based on electrochemical (linear sweep voltammery), compositional (surface EDX analyses, AAS analyses of attack solutions), structural (XRD) and morphological (SEM) investigations. Electrochemical figures of merit were computed from linear sweep voltammograms in order to rank the corrosion behaviour close to free-immersion conditions in the studied environments and with presence of oxidising agents. EDX and XRD analyses allow to accurately characterise the penetration depth of the attack as well as the preferential dissolution of the constituents. Binders containing Ni show a significantly improved corrosion resistance in the studied systems. The amount of Ni in the binder is the single most important factor affecting corrosion performance. Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} additions to hardmetals with lower-Ni binders cannot balance the effect of Ni, but give an improved resistance in neutral chloride-containing solutions. (orig.)

  2. Sliding Wear Characteristics and Corrosion Behaviour of Selective Laser Melted 316L Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y.; Moroz, A.; Alrbaey, K.

    2014-02-01

    Stainless steel is one of the most popular materials used for selective laser melting (SLM) processing to produce nearly fully dense components from 3D CAD models. The tribological and corrosion properties of stainless steel components are important in many engineering applications. In this work, the wear behaviour of SLM 316L stainless steel was investigated under dry sliding conditions, and the corrosion properties were measured electrochemically in a chloride containing solution. The results show that as compared to the standard bulk 316L steel, the SLM 316L steel exhibits deteriorated dry sliding wear resistance. The wear rate of SLM steel is dependent on the vol.% porosity in the steel and by obtaining full density it is possible achieve wear resistance similar to that of the standard bulk 316L steel. In the tested chloride containing solution, the general corrosion behaviour of the SLM steel is similar to that of the standard bulk 316L steel, but the SLM steel suffers from a reduced breakdown potential and is more susceptible to pitting corrosion. Efforts have been made to correlate the obtained results with porosity in the SLM steel.

  3. Comparative study of the corrosion behaviour of plasma nitrocarburised AISI 4140 steel before and after post-oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heydarzadeh Sohi, M.; Ebrahimi, M.; Honarbakhsh Raouf, A.; Mahboubi, F.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the corrosion behaviour of plasma nitrocarburised AISI 4140 steel before and after post-oxidation was investigated. Plasma nitrocarburising was carried out at 530 o C, 570 o C and 630 o C for 5 h in an atmosphere consisting of 80 vol.% N 2 , 17 vol.% H 2 and 3 vol.% CO 2 . After nitrocarburising, plasma post-oxidation was performed at 450 o C for 1 h in a gas mixture of 50 vol.% O 2 and 50 vol.% H 2 . The microstructure of the treated samples was characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and surface roughness techniques. Dynamic polarization test was also used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the samples. The results indicated that the compound layer was composed of ε-Fe 2-3 (N, C) and γ'-Fe 4 (N, C) phases. The amount of ε-Fe 2-3 (N, C) phase increased as the treatment temperature rose from 530 o C to 570 o C and decreased at 630 o C. The X-ray diffraction patterns of post-oxidized samples confirmed the formation of the highest amount of magnetite after post-oxidation of samples that had been nitrocarburised at 570 o C as compared with the samples that had been treated at 530 o C and 630 o C. Nitrocarburising at 570 o C followed by post-oxidation also provided the highest corrosion resistance among all treatment conditions.

  4. Erosion-corrosion behaviour of Ni-based superalloy Superni-75 in the real service environment of the boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, T.S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R.D.; Bhagat, R. [Shaheed Bhagat Singh College of Engineering & Technology, Ferozepur (India)

    2009-04-15

    The super-heater and re-heater tubes of the boilers used in thermal power plants are subjected to unacceptable levels of surface degradation by the combined effect of erosion-corrosion mechanism, resulting in the tube wall thinning and premature failure. The nickel-based superalloys can be used as boiler tube materials to increase the service life of the boilers, especially for the new generation ultra-supercritical boilers. The aim of the present investigation is to evaluate the erosion-corrosion behaviour of Ni-based superalloy Superni-75 in the real service environment of the coal-fired boiler of a thermal power plant. The cyclic experimental study was performed for 1000 h in the platen superheater zone of the coal-fired boiler where the temperature was around 900{sup o}C. The corrosion products have been characterized with respect to surface morphology, phase composition and element concentration using the combined techniques of X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive analysis (SEM/EDAX) and electron probe micro analyser (EPMA). The Superni-75 performed well in the coal-fired boiler environment, which has been attributed mainly to the formation of a thick band of chromium in scale due to selective oxidation of the chromium.

  5. Corrosion behaviour of 8090 alloy in saline solution with moderate aggressiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conde, A.; Damborenea, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion studies of Al-Li alloys are not so extensive and concentrate almost exclusively on atmospheric exposure tests and accelerated laboratory tests due to the fact they provide a reasonable approximation to the real behaviour of the alloy in service conditions. This paper attempts to establish a correlation between the evolution of the impedance diagrams and the process of the attack undergone by a commercial 8090 T8171 alloy, with the aim of establishing the kinetics of the corrosion process. After 100 h of immersion, samples showed only a slight intergranular attack. As a results of the low aggressiveness of the solution no major deviations from the ideal behaviour described by the Randles circuit are expected in the impedance plots. After 50 hours of testing, the impedance diagram evolves towards two semicircles which seem to be related with the charge transfer and ionic migration through the oxide layer and the adsorption of electrolyte anions. (Author) 7 refs

  6. Electrochemical noise evaluation of anodized aluminum. Comparative study against corrosion behaviour in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betancourt, N.; Corvo, F.; Mendoza, A.; Simancas, J.; Morcillo, M.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Fragata, F.; Pena, J. J.; Sanchez de Villalaz, M.; Flores, S.; Almeida, E.; Rivero, S.; Rincon, O. T. de.

    2003-01-01

    The present work reports the evaluation of aluminum and anodized aluminum by electrochemical noise, as a part of the PATINE/CYTED project of the working group NS5. A visual examination is also made. The samples were exposed at several Ibero-American atmospheres up to 2 years of exposure. Different thickness of anodized aluminum were evaluated. The electrochemical potential noise of the 5 μm unexposed sample (pattern) showed a different behaviour to that showed by the other anodized specimens. This could be due to a slower sealed of the samples of higher thickness. The same behavior was observed on the samples exposed at the rural station. el Pardo. According to the visual examination, the samples of bare aluminum and those of anodized 5 μm thickness were the most affected by pitting corrosion in the highly polluted atmospheres. A good correlation between corrosion behaviour determined by visual examination and EN was obtained. (Author) 4 refs

  7. Electrochemical Studies of Corrosion in Liquid Electrolytes for Energy Conversion Applications at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey Valerievich; Petrushina, Irina; Bjerrum, Niels J.

    2016-01-01

    -temperature (200–400°C) water electrolysis. Pt, Ta, Nb, Ti, Inconel®625, and Ni demonstrated high corrosion resistance. Au and the rest of the tested materials were not corrosion resistant. It means that Ni, Ti and Inconel®625 may be used as relatively cheap construction materials for the intermediate......-temperature water electrolyzer....

  8. Inhibitive Behaviour of Corrosion of Aluminium Alloy in NaCl by Mangrove Tannin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solhan Yahya; Afidah Abdul Rahim; Affaizza Mohd Shah; Rohana Adnan

    2011-01-01

    Anticorrosion potential of mangrove tannins on aluminium alloys AA6061 in NaCl solution has been studied using potentiodynamic polarisation method and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study was carried out in different pH of corrosive medium in the absence and presence of various concentrations of tannin. The corrosion inhibition behaviour of the mangrove tannin on AA6061 aluminium alloy corrosion was found to be dependant on the pH of NaCl solution. Our results showed that the inhibition efficiency increased with increasing tannins concentration in chloride solution at pH 6. Treatment of aluminium alloy 6061 with all concentrations of mangrove tannins reduced the current density, thus decreased the corrosion rate. Tannins behaved as mixed inhibitors at pH 6 and reduction in current density predominantly affected in cathodic reaction. Meanwhile, at pH 12, addition of tannins shifted the corrosion potential to more cathodic potentials and a passivating effect was observed in anodic potentials. SEM studies have shown that the addition of tannins in chloride solution at pH 12 reduced the surface degradation and the formation of pits. (author)

  9. The effect of PVD coatings on the corrosion behaviour of AZ91 magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altun, Hikmet; Sen, Sadri

    2006-01-01

    In this study, multilayered AlN (AlN + AlN + AlN) and AlN + TiN were coated on AZ91 magnesium alloy using physical vapour deposition (PVD) technique of DC magnetron sputtering, and the influence of the coatings on the corrosion behaviour of the AZ91 alloy was examined. A PVD system for coating processes, a potentiostat for electrochemical corrosion tests, X-ray difractometer for compositional analysis of the coatings, and scanning electron microscopy for surface examinations were used. It was determined that PVD coatings deposited on AZ91 magnesium alloy increased the corrosion resistance of the alloy, and AlN + AlN + AlN coating increased the corrosion resistance much more than AlN + TiN coating. However, it was observed that, in the coating layers, small structural defects e.g., pores, pinholes, cracks that could arise from the coating process or substrate and get the ability of protection from corrosion worsened were present

  10. Boron effect on fabrication properties and service behaviour of complex corrosion-resistant steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol'dshtejn, Ya.E.; Piskunova, A.I.; Shmatko, M.N.

    1978-01-01

    In order to determine the optimum boron admixtures for the improvement of the technological plasticity without the considerable reduction in the corrosion resistance of the complex alloy Cr-Ni-Mo steels, industrial heats of the 03KH16N15M3, 03KH17N14M3 and other steels, containing 0.0005-0.003% boron, have been researched. The plasticity, corrosion resistance and microstructure of certain steels have been determined. It is shown that small additions of boron enhance the technological plasticity during the ingot rolling. In order to prevent a sharp reduction in the corrosion resistance, the boron content should be confined to 0.0015% and the quenching temperature raised to 1,120-1,150 deg C. The positive effect of the quenching temperature increase is accounted for by the solution of the excess phases and by the reduction of the dislocation density in the near-the-boundary zones

  11. Thermodynamic behaviour of ruthenium at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garisto, F.

    1988-01-01

    Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations are used to determine the chemical speciation of ruthenium under postulated reactor accident conditions. The speciation of ruthenium is determined for various values of temperature, pressure, oxygen partial pressure and ruthenium concentration. The importance of these variables, in particular the oxygen partial pressure, in determining the volatility of ruthenium is clearly demonstrated in this report. Reliable thermodynamic data are required to determine the behaviour of ruthenium using equilibrium calculations. Therefore, it was necessary to compile a thermodynamic database for the ruthenium species that can be formed under reactor accident conditions. The origin of the thermodynamic data for the ruthenium species included in our calculations is discussed in detail in Appendix A. 23 refs

  12. Corrosion of structural materials and electrochemistry in high temperature water of nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke

    2008-01-01

    The latest experiences with corrosion in the cooling systems of nuclear power plants are reviewed. High temperature cooling water causes corrosion of structural materials, which often leads to adverse effects in the plants, e.g., increased shutdown radiation, generation of defects in materials of major components and fuel claddings, and increased volume of radwaste sources. Corrosion behavior is greatly affected by water quality and differs according to the water quality values and the materials themselves. In order to establish reliable operation, each plant requires its own unique optimal water chemistry control based on careful consideration of its system, materials and operational history. Electrochemistry is one of the key issues that determine corrosion-related problems, but it is not the only issue. Most corrosion-related phenomena, e.g., flow accelerated corrosion (FAC), intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and thinning of fuel cladding materials, can be understood based on an electrochemical index, e.g., the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), conductivities and pH. The most important electrochemical index, the ECP, can be measured at elevated temperature and applied to in situ sensors of corrosion conditions to detect anomalous conditions of structural materials at their very early stages. (orig.)

  13. Corrosion behavior of austempered ductile iron (ADI) in iron ore slurry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADI austempered at higher temperature showed better corrosion resistance than the ..... temperature and time on corrosion behaviour of ductile iron in chloride and acidic ... iron ore in ball mills, Transactions of the Indian Institute of Metals, Vol.

  14. Modelling of zircaloy-4 corrosion in nitrogen and oxygen mixtures at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasserre, M.; Peres, V.; Pijolat, M.; Coindreau, O.; Duriez, C.; Mardon, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of zircaloy-4 corrosion in air have shown accelerated corrosion in the 600-1000 Celsius degrees temperature range with Zr nitrides precipitating near the metal/oxide surface. The aim of this series of slides is to assess the influence of N 2 and O 2 partial pressures on the kinetic rate of growth of a new phase and to propose a kinetic modelling of zircaloy-4 corrosion

  15. Influence of tool pin profile on microstructure and corrosion behaviour of AA2219 Al–Cu alloy friction stir weld nuggets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Venkata Rao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the problems of fusion welding of aluminium alloys, the friction stir welding (FSW is recognized as an alternative joining method to improve the mechanical and corrosion properties. Tool profile is one of the important variables which affect the performance of the FS weld. In the present work, the effect of tool profile on the weld nugget microstructure and pitting corrosion of AA2219 aluminium–copper alloy was studied. FSW of AA2219 alloy was carried out using five profiles, namely conical, square, triangle, pentagon and hexagon. The temperature measurements were made in the region adjacent to the rotating pin. It was observed that the peak temperature is more in hexagonal tool pin compared to the welds produced with other tool pin profiles. It is observed that the extensive deformation experienced at the nugget zone and the evolved microstructure strongly influences the hardness and corrosion properties of the joint during FSW. It was found that the microstructure changes like grain size, misorientation and precipitate dissolution during FSW influence the hardness and corrosion behaviour. Pitting corrosion resistance of friction stir welds of AA2219 was found to be better for hexagon profile tool compared to other profiles, which was attributed to material flow and strengthening precipitate morphology in nugget zone. Higher amount of heat generation in FS welds made with hexagonal profile tool may be the reason for greater dissolution of strengthening precipitates in nugget zone.

  16. Thermal behaviour properties and corrosion resistance of organoclay/polyurethane film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, O.; Soegijono, B.

    2018-03-01

    Organoclay/polyurethane film composite was prepared by adding organoclay with different content (1, 3, and 5 wt.%) in polyurethane as a matrix. TGA and DSC showed decomposition temperature shifted to a lower point as organoclay content change. FT-IR spectra showed chemical bonding of organoclay and polyurethane as a matrix, which means that the bonding between filler and matrix occured and the composite was stronger but less bonding occur in composite with 5 wt.% organoclay. The corrosion resistance overall increased with the increasing organoclay content. Composite with 5 wt.% organoclay had more thermal stability and corrosion resistance may probably due to exfoliation of organoclay.

  17. 9% Cr steel high temperature oxidation. Solutions investigated for improving corrosion resistance of the steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evin, Harold Nicolas; Heintz, Olivier; Chevalier, Sebastien [UMR 5209 CNRS-Bourgogne Univ. (France). Lab. Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne; Foejer, Cecilia; Jakani, Saad; Dhont, Annick; Claessens, Serge [OCAS N.V. ArcelorMittal Global R and D, Gent (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    The improvement of high temperature oxidation resistance of low chromium content steels, such as T/P91, is of great interest in regards with their application in thermal power generating plants. Indeed, they possess good creep properties, but are facing their limits of use at temperature higher than 600 C, due to accelerated corrosion phenomena. Good knowledge of the mechanisms involved during their oxidation process is needed to prevent the degradation of the materials and to extend life time of the power plants components. Oxide layers thermally grown, on 9% Cr steels (provided by OCAS N.V), during isothermal tests between 600 C and 750 C in laboratory air under atmospheric pressure were investigated, by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The oxidation behaviour appeared very limited at 750 C, due to the presence of a breakaway, which can be linked to iron porous oxide grown over the surface of the samples. ''In situ'' X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses were performed in air at 600 C after short exposures (between 5 min and 25 h). A complex mixture of iron oxide, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cr (VI) species were characterized in the scales. The in-situ analyses were compared and related to XPS analyses performed on thick oxide scales formed on samples oxidized in air at 600 C for 100h. An oxidation mechanism is then proposed to understand the oxide scale growth in the temperature range 600 - 750 C. The second step of this study consists in improving the high temperature corrosion resistance of these steels without modifying their mechanical properties. Thus several solutions were investigated such as MOCVD coatings, pack cementation coatings, and tested in cycle conditions prior. (orig.)

  18. Morphological characterisation and spectroscopic studies of the corrosion behaviour of tungsten heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogundipe, A.; Greenberg, B.; Braida, W.; Christodoulatos, C.; Dermatas, D.

    2006-01-01

    Tungsten-based alloys have been used in a wide variety of industrial and military applications. These alloys are composed mainly of tungsten (88-95%) with various combinations of nickel, cobalt, iron and copper usually making up the remaining fraction. The corrosion behaviours of five munitions grade tungsten alloys of interest have been examined using immersion tests and wet-dry cycle tests to determine the mechanisms involved in the release of the metallic components. Analyses carried out using SEM, EDS and grazing incidence XRD techniques, show the release of tungsten as well as alloying elements due to galvanic corrosion resulting from the difference in electrode potential between the tungsten phase and the binder phase in all cases studied. The extent of corrosion was directly related with the dissolution of tungsten in the binder phase during the sintering stage of manufacture. In W-Ni-Co-Fe alloys binder phase corrosion was observed while the relatively noble tungsten phase was less affected. The reverse was observed for a W-Cu alloy

  19. Comparative Studies on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion behaviour of DMR 249A Steel and its welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Dilkush; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    DMR249A Medium strength (low carbon) Low-alloy steels are used as structural components in naval applications due to its low cost and high availability. An attempt has been made to weld the DMR 249A steel plates of 8mm thickness using shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Welds were characterized for metallography to carry out the microstructural changes, mechanical properties were evaluated using vickers hardness tester and universal testing machine. Potentio-dynamic polarization tests were carried out to determine the pitting corrosion behaviour. Constant load type Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) testing was done to observe the cracking tendency of the joints in a 3.5%NaCl solution. Results of the present study established that SMA welds resulted in formation of relatively higher amount of martensite in ferrite matrix when compared to gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). It is attributed to faster cooling rates achieved due to high thermal efficiency. Improved mechanical properties were observed for the SMA welds and are due to higher amount of martensite. Pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking resistance of SMA welds were poor when compared to GTA welds.

  20. Cavitation erosion - corrosion behaviour of ASTM A27 runner steel in natural river water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tôn-Thât, L

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation erosion is still one of the most important degradation modes in hydraulic turbine runners. Part of researches in this field focuses on finding new materials, coatings and surface treatments to improve the resistance properties of runners to this phenomenon. However, only few studies are focused on the deleterious effect of the environment. Actually, in some cases a synergistic effect between cavitation erosion mechanisms and corrosion kinetics can establish and increase erosion rate. In the present study, the cavitation erosion-corrosion behaviour of ASTM A27 steel in natural river water is investigated. This paper state the approach which has been used to enlighten the synergy between both phenomena. For this, a 20 kHz vibratory test according ASTM G32 standard is coupled to an electrochemical cell to be able to follow the different corrosion parameters during the tests to get evidence of the damaging mechanism. Moreover, mass losses have been followed during the exposure time. The classical degradation parameters (cumulative weight loss and erosion rate) are determined. Furthermore, a particular effort has been implemented to determine the evolution of surface damages in terms of pitting, surface cracking, material removal and surface corrosion. For this, scanning electron microscopy has been used to link the microstructure to the material removal mechanisms

  1. Corrosion behaviour of Al based tritium permeation barriers in flowing Pb-17Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasbrenner, H.; Konys, J.; Voss, Z.; Wedemeyer, O.

    2002-01-01

    Tritium permeation barriers on low-activation steels are required in fusion technology in order to reduce the tritium permeation rate through the structural material into the cooling water system. Al-Fe layers with alumina on top can fulfil the required reduction rate. Three techniques were selected to produce such a multi-layered coating system: chemical vapour deposition (CVD) by CEA, hot-dip aluminising (HDA) by FZK and vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) by JRC Ispra. A sufficient corrosion resistance against Pb-17Li attack is also required for the coating. Therefore, the corrosion behaviour of these three coatings on ferritic-martensitic steels was studied in the PICOLO loop of FZK in flowing Pb-17Li at 480 deg. C up to 10 000 h. Corrosion effects could not be found on HDA and VPS coated specimens even up to the longest time of exposure. The total thickness of the two-layered system remained unchanged at around 130 μm for all examined HDA and VPS specimens. In contrast to this, corrosion effects could be inspected on CVD coated specimens

  2. Corrosion behaviour of welds and Ta in liquid lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzel, A., E-mail: Annette.heinzel@kit.edu; Müller, G.; Weisenburger, A.

    2016-02-15

    Four specimens, P91 welded by friction stir welding with and without post heat treatment, P91 electromagnetic pulse welded (EMP) and 14Cr ODS (explosive welding) were exposed at 550 °C for up to 2131 h to Pb containing 10{sup −6} wt% oxygen. After the exposure none of the samples showed dissolution attack, all were protected by an oxide layer at the surface. Nearly no effect on the oxidation due to welding was found in both friction stir welded specimens. Severe deformation and partial melting during explosive welding result in a slower oxide layer growth within the welding zone. The EMP sample was tested as delivered without post-heat treatment. No Pb penetrated into the tiny gap between the welded parts. After the test, the gap is filled up with oxides. Additionally, Ta, discussed as a pump impeller material, was exposed to Pb and PbBi at different temperatures (400–900 °C) and oxygen concentrations in liquid metal (saturated, 10{sup −6} wt%, 10{sup −8} wt% and reduced (<<10{sup −8} wt%). Only the Ta specimens exposed to Pb with highly reduced oxygen content showed nearly no attack. All the others exhibited oxide scale formation that becomes severe above 400 °C test temperature.

  3. High temperature corrosion in chloridizing atmospheres: development of material quasi-stability diagrams and coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doublet, S.; Schuetze, M. [Karl-Winnacker-Institut der DECHEMA e.V., Theodor-Heuss-Allee 25, D-60486 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Chlorine gas is widely encountered in chemical industries, e. g. in waste incinerators and plastic/polymer decomposition mills. The presence of chlorine may significantly reduce the life-time of the components. Although metallic materials have been widely used under such conditions there is still a need for data on the role of the different alloying elements in commercial alloys. The purpose of this work is to produce a clear picture of which alloying elements play a detrimental role and which elements are beneficial. These results can be used as a tool for general assessment of metallic alloys with regard to their performance in chloridizing high temperature environments. A previous study has already been performed in oxidizing-chloridizing atmospheres and led to the elaboration of material quasi-stability diagrams. As a follow-up the present work has been performed in reducing-chloridizing atmospheres in order to validate these diagrams at low partial pressures of oxygen. The behaviour of 9 commercial materials where the content of the major alloying elements was varied in a systematic manner was investigated in reducing-chloridizing atmospheres (in Ar containing up to 2 vol.% Cl{sub 2} and down to 1 ppm O{sub 2}) at 800 deg. C. As the thermodynamical approach to corrosion in such atmospheres could not explain all the phenomena which occur, kinetics calculations i.e. diffusion calculations were carried out. Pack cementation and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) coatings were also developed from the best alloying elements previously found by the calculations and the corrosion experiments. Corrosion tests on the coated materials were then performed in the same conditions as the commercial alloys. (authors)

  4. High temperature corrosion under conditions simulating biomass firing: depth-resolved phase identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    ) were coated with KCl and is o-thermally exposed at 560 o C for 168 h under a flue gas corresponding to straw firing. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) characterization techniques were employed for comprehensive characterization......Both cross-sectional and plan view, ‘top-down’ characterization methods were employed , for a depth-resolved characterization of corrosion products resulting from high temperature corrosion under laboratory conditions simulating biomass firing. Samples of an austenitic stainless steel (TP 347H FG...... of the corrosion product. Results from this comprehensive characterization revealed more details on the morphology and composition of the corrosion product....

  5. Electrochemical corrosion of Zircaloy-2 under PWR water chemistry but at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, Abdel-Aziz Fahmy; Kandil, Abdel-Hakim Taha; Hamed, Hani M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • There is no simple relation between the corrosion rate and LiOH concentration. • At low concentration, 100 ppm Li, an increase of the rate is due to the pH impact. • LiOH in concentrated solution led to accelerated corrosion by pH effect and porosity. • Boron abates the lithium effect by pH neutralizing and participation in the corrosion. - Abstract: Electrochemical corrosion of Zircaloy-2 was tested at room temperature in lithium hydroxide (LiOH) concentrations that ranged from 2.2 to 7000 ppm and boric acid (H 3 BO 3 ) concentrations that ranged from 50 to 4000 ppm. Following the corrosion experiments, the oxide films of specimens were examined by SEM to examine the oxide existence. LiOH concentrations as high as 1 M (7000-ppm lithium) can lead to significantly increased electrochemical corrosion rate. It is suggested that the accelerated corrosion in concentrated solution is caused by the synergetic effect of LiOH, pH and porosity generation. In solutions containing 100 ppm of lithium, the presence of boron had an ameliorating effect on the corrosion rates of Zircaloy-2. Similar to acceleration of corrosion by lithium, the inhibition by boron is due to a combined effect of pH neutralizing and its participation in the corrosion process.

  6. Effect of Iron-Containing Intermetallic Particles on the Corrosion Behaviour of Aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan

    2006-01-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the corrosion behaviour of binary Al-Fe alloys containing iron at levels between 0.04 and 0.42 wt.% was investigated by electrochemical measurements in both acidic and alkaline chloride solutions. Comparing solution heat-treated and quenched materials with samples...... with {100} facets, and are observed to contain numerous intermetallic particles. Fine facetted filaments also radiate out from the periphery of pits. The results demonstrate that the corrosion of "pure" 99.96% Al is thus dominated by the role of iron, which is the main impurity, and its electrochemical...... that had been subsequently annealed to promote precipitation of Al3Fe intermetallic particles, it was found that annealing increases both the cathodic and anodic reactivity. The increased cathodic reactivity is believed to be directly related to the increased available surface area of the iron...

  7. On the corrosion behaviour of phosphoric irons in simulated concrete pore solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Gadadhar; Balasubramaniam, R.

    2008-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of three phosphoric irons P 1 (Fe-0.11P-0.028C), P 2 (Fe-0.32P-0.026C) and P 3 (Fe-0.49P-0.022C) has been studied in simulated concrete pore solution (saturated Ca(OH) 2 solution) containing different chloride concentration. This has been compared with that of two commercial concrete reinforcement steels, a low carbon steel TN (Fe-0.148C-0.542Mn-0.128Si) and a microalloyed corrosion resistant steel CS (Fe-0.151C-0.088P-0.197Si-0.149Cr-0.417Cu). The beneficial aspect of phosphoric irons was revealed from potentiodynamic polarization experiments. The pitting potentials and pitting nucleation resistances for phosphoric irons and CS were higher than that for TN. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies revealed thickening and growth of passive film as a function of time in case of phosphoric irons and CS in saturated Ca(OH) 2 pore solutions without chloride and in the same solution with 0.05% Cl - and 0.1% Cl - . In case of TN, breakdown of passive film resulted in active corrosion in simulated pore solution containing 0.1% Cl - . Linear polarization resistance measurements complemented EIS results. Visual observations indicated that phosphoric iron P 3 was immune to corrosion even after 125 days of immersion in saturated Ca(OH) 2 solution containing 5% NaCl. The good corrosion resistance of phosphoric irons in simulated concrete pore solution containing chloride ions has been related to the formation of phosphate, based on ultraviolet spectrophotometric analysis and Pourbaix diagram of phosphorus-water system

  8. Corrosion behaviour of E110- and E635- type zirconium alloys under PWR irradiation simulating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markelov, V.A.; Novikov, V.V.; Kon'kov, V.F.; Tselishchev, A.V.; Dologov, A.B.; Zmitko, M.; Maserik, V.; Kocik, J.

    2008-01-01

    As structural materials for VVER 1000 fuel rod claddings and FA components use is made of zirconium alloys E110 (Zr 1Nb) and E635 (Zr 1.2Sn 1Nb 0.35Fe) that meet the design parameters of operation. Nonetheless, the work is in progress to perfect those alloys to reach higher corrosion and shape change resistance. At VNIINM updated E110M and E635M alloys have been developed on E110 and E635 bases. To assess the corrosion behaviour of the updated alloys in comparison to the base alloys their cladding samples were tested in RVS 3 loop of LWR 15 reactor (NRI, Rez) in PWR water chemistry with coolant surface and volume boiling. The data are presented on the influence effected by in pile irradiation for up to 324 days on oxide coat thickness and microstructure of fuel claddings produced from the four tested alloys. It has been revealed that E110 alloy its updated version E110M and E635M alloy compared to E635 have higher corrosion resistances. The paper discusses th+e results on the in pile corrosion of cladding samples from the alloys under study in comparison to the results acquired for similar samples tested in LWR 15 inactive channel and under autoclave conditions. Using methods of TEM, EDX analyses of extraction replicas dislocation structure and phase composition changes were studied in samples of all four alloy claddings LWR 15 reactor irradiated to the material damage dose of 1.5 dpa. The interrelation is discussed between irradiation effected strengthening and corrosion of fuel claddings made of E110 and E635 type zirconium alloys and the evolution of their structure and phase states

  9. Corrosion behaviour of Al-Fe-Ti-V medium entropy alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodunrin, M. O.; Obadele, B. A.; Chown, L. H.; Olubambi, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    Alloys containing up to four multi-principal elements in equiatomic ratios are referred to as medium entropy alloys (MEA). These alloys have attracted the interest of many researchers due to the superior mechanical properties it offers over the traditional alloys. The design approach of MEA often results to simple solid solution with either body centered cubic; face centered cubic structures or both. As the consideration for introducing the alloys into several engineering application increases, there have been efforts to study the corrosion behaviour of these alloys. Previous reports have shown that some of these alloys are more susceptible to corrosion when compared with traditional alloys due to lack of protective passive film. In this research, we have developed AlFeTiV medium entropy alloys containing two elements (Ti and Al) that readily passivate when exposed to corrosive solutions. The alloys were produced in vacuum arc furnace purged with high purity argon. Open circuit potential and potentiodynamic polarisation tests were used to evaluate the corrosion behaviour of the as-cast AlFeTiV alloy in 3.5 wt% NaCl and 1 M H2SO4. The corrosion performance of the alloy was compared with Ti-6Al-4V alloy tested under similar conditions. The results show that unlike in Ti-6Al-4V alloy, the open circuit potential of the AlFeTiV alloy move towards the negative values in both 3.5 wt% NaCl and 1 M H2SO4 solutions indicating that self-activation occurred rapidly on immersion. Anodic polarisation of the alloys showed that AlFeTiV alloy exhibited a narrow range of passivity in both solutions. In addition, the alloys exhibited lower Ecorr and higher Icorr when compared with traditional Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The traditional Ti-6Al-4V alloy showed superior corrosion resistant to the AlFeTiV alloy in both 3.5 wt.% NaCl and 1 M H2SO4 solutions.

  10. Corrosion behaviour of low alloy steels: from ancient past to far future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santarini, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA-Saclay DEN/DPC, Bat 450, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    With the envisaged concepts of long term storage and underground disposal of high level radioactive waste, corrosion science has to face a new challenge: to obtain reliable behaviour predictions over very long periods of time, up to thousands of years. For such durations, the development of mechanistically based models becomes an absolute necessity. In France, the first candidate materials considered for the containers of high level waste are low alloy steels because of their relatively low sensitivity to localized corrosion, when compared, for example, to passive materials: this characteristics makes their corrosion behaviour less difficult to predict. In this mechanistic modelling, numerous physicochemical steps have to be taken into consideration, such as chemical and/or electrochemical reactions, solid state diffusion of point defects, liquid state diffusion of chemical species in oxide pores, etc. However, since the complex links between all these steps highly depend on the nature and on the characteristics (porosity, conductivity, protectiveness, etc.) of the corrosion products, the first stage before the model construction is to obtain experimental data on this phenomenology in the very near environment of the metal. At the opposite, once a model constructed, it is necessary to compare its predictions to field experience, and to verify that the mechanisms and phenomenology retained in the model remain unchanged over very long periods of time. In the various stages of a progressive iterative model improvement, the examination of archaeological objects is liable to provide useful information. The considerable interest of such objects, in this context, comes from the long duration of the contact with a natural environment, a duration of the same order of magnitude as the one considered for high level waste storage. However, the differences between the ancient materials and the modern ones and also the poor knowledge about the initial conditions and about the

  11. Characterization of the behaviour of electro-galvanised steel sheets in terms of corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finoly, Guylene

    1992-01-01

    This research thesis reports the development of a test method for the characterization of the behaviour of electro-galvanised steel sheets (i.e. zinc coated steel sheets as those used in the automotive industry) with respect to corrosion, and the definition of a classification of these materials with respect to their surface activity. After an overview of the different existing methods of determination of corrosion rate, the author reports the development of an experimental device adapted to the electrochemical study of electro-galvanised sheets, i.e. adapted to their low thickness (0,7 mm) and coating characteristics (10 μm thick). This device is then used in the case of solid zinc. The authors reports the study of the behaviour of sheets in a NaCl solution in order to meet industrial conditions used to activate the surface before the phosphate conversion process which aims at ensuring paint adherence. A test is proposed and validated by comparison with other electrochemical or chemical methods, and used to study the behaviour of electro-galvanised sheets submitted to a phosphate conversion coating process [fr

  12. The precious metal effect in high temperature corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wit, J.H.W. de (Lab. for Materials Science, Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)); Manen, P.A. van (Lab. for Materials Science, Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands))

    1994-01-01

    Additions of platinum and to a smaller extent rhodium, to aluminium oxide forming alloys are known to improve the high temperature corrosion resistance of the alloys. This effect is known as the ''precious metal effect''. The expensive Pt-additions are used because of the increased lifetime of turbine-vanes especially in marine environments. Only a limited number of coating systems is commercially available, as JML-1, LDC-2 and RT22. Normally Pt is deposited electrochemically or by a fused salt method. After deposition the high or low activity pack-cementation-process is applied to obtain a PtNiAl-coating. In this paper the effect of platinum on the oxidation mechanism is discussed by comparing the oxidation mechanism of [beta]-NiAl and Pt20Ni30Al50. This composition agrees with the average composition of a platinum modified aluminide coating. The alloys were oxidized at temperatures from 1000 to 1200 C. The growth of the oxide scale on the NiAl alloy proceeds both by aluminium and by oxygen diffusion through the scale resulting in growth within the scale. On Pt20Ni30Al50 the growth of the scale is limited to the oxide/gas interface due to a predominant aluminium transport through the scale. The morphology of the oxide scales did not show large differences. However, the extensive void formation at the [beta]-NiAl/oxide interface was not observed on the Pt20Ni30Al50 samples. The absence of voids at the interface and the reduction of growth stresses, as a result of the outward growth of the scale, are the two likely reasons for the improved oxide scale adherence and can thus be considered, to be two elements of the ''precious metal effect''. (orig.)

  13. Study on Increasing High Temperature pH(t) to Reduce Iron Corrosion Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Dong Man; Hur, Nam Yong; Kim, Waang Bae

    2011-01-01

    The transportation and deposition of iron corrosion products are important elements that affect both the steam generator (SG) integrity and secondary system in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants. Most of iron corrosion products are generated on carbon steel materials due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC). The several parameters like water chemistry, temperature, hydrodynamic, and steel composition affect FAC. It is well established that the at-temperature pH of the deaerated water system has a first order effect on the FAC rate of carbon steels through nuclear industry researches. In order to reduce transportation and deposition of iron corrosion products, increasing pH(t) tests were applied on secondary system of A, B units. Increasing pH(t) successfully reduced flow accelerated corrosion. The effect of increasing pH(t) to inhibit FAC was identified through the experiment and pH(t) evaluation in this paper

  14. Temperature factors effect on occurrence of stress corrosion cracking of main gas pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarova, M. N.; Akhmetov, R. R.; Krainov, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the article is to analyze and compare the data in order to contribute to the formation of an objective opinion on the issue of the growth of stress corrosion defects of the main gas pipeline. According to available data, a histogram of the dependence of defects due to stress corrosion on the distance from the compressor station was constructed, and graphs of the dependence of the accident density due to stress corrosion in the winter and summer were also plotted. Data on activation energy were collected and analyzed in which occurrence of stress corrosion is most likely constructed, a plot of activation energy versus temperature is plotted, and the process of occurrence of stress corrosion by the example of two different grades of steels under the action of different temperatures was analyzed.

  15. Potential high temperature corrosion problems due to co-firing of biomass and fossil fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Vilhelmsen, T.; Jensen, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past years, considerable high temperature corrosion problems have been encountered when firing biomass in power plants due to the high content of potassium chloride in the deposits. Therefore to combat chloride corrosion problems co-firing of biomass with a fossil fuel has been undertaken....... This results in potassium chloride being converted to potassium sulphate in the combustion chamber and it is sulphate rich deposits that are deposited on the vulnerable metallic surfaces such as high temperature superheaters. Although this removes the problem of chloride corrosion, other corrosion mechanisms...... appear such as sulphidation and hot corrosion due to sulphate deposits. At Studstrup power plant Unit 4, based on trials with exposure times of 3000 hours using 0-20% straw co-firing with coal, the plant now runs with a fuel of 10% straw + coal. After three years exposure in this environment...

  16. Potential high temperature corrosion problems due to co-firing of biomass and fossil fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Vilhelmsen, T.; Jensen, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few years, considerable high temperature corrosion problems have been encountered when firing biomass in power plants due to the high content of potassium chloride in the deposits. Therefore, to combat chloride corrosion problems cofiring of biomass with a fossil fuel has been...... undertaken. This results in potassium chloride being converted to potassium sulphate in the combustion chamber and it is sulphate rich deposits that are deposited on the vulnerable metallic surfaces such as high temperature superheaters. Although this removes the problem of chloride corrosion, other...... corrosion mechanisms appear such as sulphidation and hot corrosion due to sulphate deposits. At Studstrup power plant Unit 4, based on trials with exposure times of 3000 h using 0–20% straw co-firing with coal, the plant now runs with a fuel mix of 10% strawþcoal. Based on results from a 3 years exposure...

  17. In vitro corrosion behaviour of Ti-Nb-Sn shape memory alloys in Ringer's physiological solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosalbino, F; Macciò, D; Scavino, G; Saccone, A

    2012-04-01

    The nearly equiatomic Ni-Ti alloy (Nitinol) has been widely employed in the medical and dental fields owing to its shape memory or superelastic properties. The main concern about the use of this alloy derives form the fact that it contains a large amount of nickel (55% by mass), which is suspected responsible for allergic, toxic and carcinogenic reactions. In this work, the in vitro corrosion behavior of two Ti-Nb-Sn shape memory alloys, Ti-16Nb-5Sn and Ti-18Nb-4Sn (mass%) has been investigated and compared with that of Nitinol. The in vitro corrosion resistance was assessed in naturally aerated Ringer's physiological solution at 37°C by corrosion potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements as a function of exposure time, and potentiodynamic polarization curves. Corrosion potential values indicated that both Ni-Ti and Ti-Nb-Sn alloys undergo spontaneous passivation due to spontaneously formed oxide film passivating the metallic surface, in the aggressive environment. It also indicated that the tendency for the formation of a spontaneous oxide is greater for the Ti-18Nb-5Sn alloy. Significantly low anodic current density values were obtained from the polarization curves, indicating a typical passive behaviour for all investigated alloys, but Nitinol exhibited breakdown of passivity at potentials above approximately 450 mV(SCE), suggesting lower corrosion protection characteristics of its oxide film compared to the Ti-Nb-Sn alloys. EIS studies showed high impedance values for all samples, increasing with exposure time, indicating an improvement in corrosion resistance of the spontaneous oxide film. The obtained EIS spectra were analyzed using an equivalent electrical circuit representing a duplex structure oxide film, composed by an outer and porous layer (low resistance), and an inner barrier layer (high resistance) mainly responsible for the alloys corrosion resistance. The resistance of passive film present on the metals' surface

  18. High temperature electrochemistry related to light water reactor corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Gabor; Kerner, Zsolt; Balog, Janos; Schiller, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The present work deals with corrosion problems related to conditions which prevail in a WWER primary circuit. We had a two-fold aim: (A) electrochemical methods were applied to characterise the hydrothermally produced oxides of the cladding material (Zr-1%Nb) of nuclear fuel elements used in Russian made power reactors of WWER type, and (B) a number of possible reference electrodes were investigated with a view to high temperature applications. (A) Test specimens made of the cladding material, Zr-1%Nb, were immersed into an autoclave, filled with an aqueous solution typical to a WWER primary circuit, and were treated for different periods of time up to 28 weeks. The electrode potentials were measured and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) were taken regularly both as a function of oxidation time and temperature. This rendered information on the overall kinetics of oxide growth. By combining in situ and ex situ impedance measurements, with a particular view of the temperature dependence of EIS, we concluded that the high frequency region of impedance spectra is relevant to the presence of oxide layer on the alloy. This part of the spectra was treated in terms of a parallel CPE||R ox equivalent circuit (CPE denoting constant phase element, R ox ohmic resistor). The CPE element was understood as a dispersive resistance in terms of the continuous time random walk theory by Scher and Lax. This enabled us to tell apart electrical conductance and oxide growth with a model of charge transfer and recombination within the oxide layer as rate determining steps. (B) Three types of reference electrodes were tested within the framework of the LIRES EU5 project: (i) external Ag/AgCl, (ii) Pt/Ir alloy and (iii) Pd(Pt) double polarised active electrode. The most stable of the electrodes was found to be the Pt/Ir one. The Ag/AgCl electrode showed good stability after an initial period of some days, while substantial drifts were found for the Pd(Pt) electrode. EIS spectra of the

  19. Corrosion behaviour of container materials for geological disposal of high-level waste. Joint annual progress report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Within the framework of the Community R and D programme on management and storage of radioactive waste (shared-cost action), a research activity is aiming at the assessment of corrosion behaviour of potential container materials for geological disposal of vitrified high-level wastes. In this report, the results obtained during the year 1983 are described. Research performed at the Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre d'Etudes de l'Energie Nucleaire (SCK/CEN) at Mol (B), concerns the corrosion behaviour in clay environments. The behaviour in salt is tested by the Kernforschungszentrum (KfK) at Karlsruhe (D). Corrosion behaviour in granitic environments is being examined by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) at Fontenay-aux-Roses (F) and the Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE) at Harwell (UK); the first is concentrating on corrosion-resistant materials and the latter on corrosion-allowance materials. Finally, the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) at Vitry (F) is examining the formation and behaviour of passive layers on the metal alloys in the various environments

  20. Sulphide stress corrosion behaviour of a nickel coated high-strength low-alloyed steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvago, G; Fumagalli, G; Cigada, A; Scolari, P

    1987-01-01

    The sulphide stress corrosion cracking (SSCC) of the quenched and tempered AISI 4137 H steel either bare or coated with nickel alloys was examined. Both traditional electrochemical and linear elastic fracture mechanics methods were used to examine cracking in the NACE environment and in environments simulating the geothermal fluids found in the area of Larderello in Italy. Some tests were carried out on a geothermal well in Ferrara. High nickel content coatings seem to increase the SSCC resistance of the AISI 4137-H steel. Galvanic couplings effects are possible factors responsible for the behaviour in SSCC.

  1. High temperature (salt melt) corrosion tests with ceramic-coated steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schütz, Adelheid [University Bayreuth, Metals and Alloys, Ludwig-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Günthner, Martin; Motz, Günter [University Bayreuth, Ceramic Materials Engineering, L.-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Greißl, Oliver [EnBW Kraftwerke AG, Schelmenwasenstraße 13-15, D-70567 Stuttgart (Germany); Glatzel, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.glatzel@uni-bayreuth.de [University Bayreuth, Metals and Alloys, Ludwig-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    Thermal recycling of refuse in waste-to-energy plants reduces the problems connected to waste disposal, and is an alternative source of electric energy. However, the combustion process in waste incinerators results in a fast degradation of the steam-carrying superheater steel tubes by corrosive attack and abrasive wear. Higher firing temperatures are used to increase their efficiency but lead to higher corrosion rates. It is more economical to apply protective coatings on the superheater steel tubes than to replace the base material. In-situ tests were conducted in a waste-to-energy plant first in order to identify and quantify all involved corrosive elements. Laboratory scale experiments with salt melts were developed accordingly. The unprotected low-alloyed steel displayed substantial local corrosion. Corrosion was predominant along the grain boundaries of α-ferrite. The corrosion rate was further increased by FeCl{sub 3} and a mixture of HCL and FeCl{sub 3}. Coatings based on pre-ceramic polymers with specific filler particles were engineered to protect superheater tubes. Tests proved their suitability to protect low-alloYed steel tubes from corrosive attack under conditions typical for superheaterS in waste incinerators, rendering higher firing temperatures in waste-to-energy plants possible. - Highlights: • Corrosion wall thickness losses of 400 μm/2 weeks occurred in a waste incinerator. • Abrasion is a major problem on superheater tubes in waste incinerators. • Laboratory salt melt tests can simulate metal corrosion in waste incinerators. • Corrosion protection coatings for steel (temperature: max. 530 °C) were developed. • Higher steam temperatures are possible in WIs with the developed coatings.

  2. Mechanism of Corrosion by Naphthenic Acids and Organosulfur Compounds at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng

    Due to the law of supply and demand, the last decade has witnessed a skyrocketing in the price of light sweet crude oil. Therefore, refineries are increasingly interested in "opportunity crudes", characterized by their discounted price and relative ease of procurement. However, the attractive economics of opportunity crudes come with the disadvantage of high acid/organosulfur compound content, which could lead to corrosion and even failure of facilities in refineries. However, it is generally accepted that organosulfur compounds may form protective iron sulfide layers on the metal surface and decrease the corrosion rate. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the corrosive property of crudes at high temperatures, the mechanism of corrosion by acids (naphthenic acids) in the presence of organosulfur compounds, and methods to mitigate its corrosive effect. In 2004, an industrial project was initiated at the Institute for Corrosion and Multiphase Technology to investigate the corrosion by naphthenic acids and organosulfur compounds. In this project, for each experiment there were two experimentation phases: pretreatment and challenge. In the first pretreatment phase, a stirred autoclave was filled with a real crude oil fraction or model oil of different acidity and organosulfur compound concentration. Then, the stirred autoclave was heated to high temperatures to examine the corrosivity of the oil to different materials (specimens made from CS and 5% Cr containing steel were used). During the pretreatment, corrosion product layers were formed on the metal surface. In the second challenge phase, the steel specimens pretreated in the first phase were inserted into a rotating cylinder autoclave, called High Velocity Rig (HVR). The HVR was fed with a high-temperature oil solution of naphthenic acids to attack the iron sulfide layers. Based on the difference of specimen weight loss between the two steps, the net corrosion rate could be calculated and the protectiveness

  3. Sliding wear and corrosion behaviour of alloyed austempered ductile iron subjected to novel two step austempering treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethuram, D.; Srisailam, Shravani; Rao Ponangi, Babu

    2018-04-01

    Austempered Ductile Iron(ADI) is an exciting alloy of iron which offers the design engineers the best combination high strength-to-weight ratio, low cost design flexibility, good toughness, wear resistance along with fatigue strength. The two step austempering procedure helps in simultaneously improving the tensile strength as-well as the ductility to more than that of the conventional austempering process. Extensive literature survey reveals that it’s mechanical and wear behaviour are dependent on heat treatment and alloy additions. Current work focuses on characterizing the two-step ADI samples (TSADI) developed by novel heat treatment process for resistance to corrosion and wear. The samples of Ductile Iron were austempered by the two-Step Austempering process at temperatures 300°C to 450°C in the steps of 50°C.Temperaturesare gradually increased at the rate of 14°C/Hour. In acidic medium (H2SO4), the austempered samples showed better corrosive resistance compared to conventional ductile iron. It has been observed from the wear studies that TSADI sample at 350°C is showing better wear resistance compared to ductile iron. The results are discussed in terms of fractographs, process variables and microstructural features of TSADI samples.

  4. Influence of Ti, C and N concentration on the intergranular corrosion behaviour of AISI 316Ti and 321 stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Coy, A.E.; Viejo, F.; Carboneras, M.; Arrabal, R.

    2007-01-01

    Intergranular corrosion behaviour of 316Ti and 321 austenitic stainless steels has been evaluated in relation to the influence exerted by modification of Ti, C and N concentrations. For this evaluation, electrochemical measurements - double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) - were performed to produce time-temperature-sensitization (TTS) diagrams for tested materials. Transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to determine the composition and nature of precipitates. The addition of Ti promotes better intergranular corrosion resistance in stainless steels. The precipitation of titanium carbides reduces the formation of chromium-rich carbides, which occurs at lower concentrations. Also, the reduction of carbon content to below 0.03 wt.% improves sensitization resistance more than does Ti content. The presence of Mo in AISI 316Ti stainless steel reduces chromium-rich carbide precipitation; the reason is that Mo increases the stability of titanium carbides and tends to replace chromium in the formation of carbides and intermetallic compounds, thus reducing the risks of chromium-depletion

  5. Effect of antimony, bismuth and calcium addition on corrosion and electrochemical behaviour of AZ91 magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wei; Aung, Naing Naing; Sun Yangshan

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of antimony, bismuth and calcium addition on the corrosion and electrochemical behaviour of AZ91 magnesium alloy in 3.5% NaCl solution. Techniques including constant immersion, electrochemical potentiodynamic polarisation, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersed spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterise electrochemical and corrosion properties and surface topography. It was found that corrosion attack occurred preferentially on Mg 3 Bi 2 and Mg 3 Sb 2 particles while Mg 17 Al 8 Ca 0.5 and Mg 2 Ca phases showed no detrimental effect on corrosion. Combined addition of small amounts of bismuth and antimony to the AZ91 alloy resulted in significant increase in corrosion rate

  6. Corrosion behaviour of construction materials for high temperature water electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey

    2010-01-01

    proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolysers (HTPEMWE). All samples were exposed to anodic polarisation in 85% phosphoric acid electrolyte solution. Platinum and gold plates were tested for the valid comparison. Steady-state voltammetry was used in combination with scanning electron microscopy...

  7. Corrosion behaviour of low energy, high temperature nitrogen ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    primary ions were used and negative secondary ions were detected. A difference in the distribution of the CrN and the alleged N signal was observed and attributed to CrN acting as a diffusion barrier for nitrogen diffusion. It may be noted here that nitrogen does not form stable elemental negative ions [2] and is thus.

  8. Influence of temperature and lithium purity on corrosion of ferrous alloys in a flowing lithium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Smith, D.L.

    1986-03-01

    Corrosion data have been obtained on ferritic HT-9 and Fe-9Cr-1Mo steel and austenitic Type 316 stainless steel in a flowing lithium environment at temperatures between 372 and 538 0 C. The corrosion behavior is evaluated by measurements of weight loss as a function of time and temperature. A metallographic characterization of materials exposed to a flowing lithium environment is presented

  9. Influence of yttria surface modification on high temperature corrosion of porous Ni22Cr alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karczewski, Jakub; Dunst, Katarzyna; Jasinski, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Protective coatings for porous alloys for high temperature use are relatively new materials. Their main drawback is high temperature corrosion. In this work protective coatings based the on Y-precursor infiltrated into the sintered Ni22Cr alloys are studied at 700°C. Effects of the amount...... of the protective phase on the resulting corrosion properties are evaluated in air and humidified hydrogen. Weight gain of the samples, their open porosities and microstructures are analyzed and compared. Results show, that by the addition of even a minor amount of the Y-precursor corrosion rates can be decreased...

  10. Corrosion behaviour of selected high-level waste packaging materials under gamma irradiation and in-situ disposal conditions in rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailos, E.; Schwarzkopf, W.; Koester, R.

    1988-07-01

    Corrosion studies performed until now on a number of materials have shown that unalloyed steels, Hastelloy C4 and Ti 99.8-Pd are the most promising materials for a long-term resistant packaging to be used in high-level waste (HLW) canister disposal in rock salt formations. To characterize their corrosion behaviour in more detail, additional studies have been performed. The influence has been examined which is exerted by the gamma dose rate (1 Gy/h to 100 Gy/h) on the corrosion of three preselected steels and Hastelloy C4 at 90 0 C in a salt brine (Q-brine) rich in MgCl 2 , i.e., conditions relevant to accident scenarios in a repository. In addition, in-situ corrosion experiments have been carried out in the Asse salt mine at elevated temperatures (120 0 C to 210 0 C) in the absence and in the presence of a gamma radiation field of 3 x 10 2 Gy/h, within the framework of the German/US Brine Migration Test. Under the test conditions the gamma radiation did not exert a significant influence on the corrosion of the steels investigated, whereas Hastelloy C4, exposed to dose rates of 10 Gy/h and 100 Gy/h, underwent pitting and crevice corrosion (20 μm/a at the maximum).The low amounts of migrated salt brine (140 ml after 900 days) in the in-situ- experiment did not produce noticeable corrosion of the materials. (orig./RB) [de

  11. Stress Corrosion Cracking of alloy 600 in high temperature water: a study of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boursier, J.M.; Bouvier, O. de; Gras, J.M.; Noel, D.; Vaillant, F.; Rios, R.

    1992-12-01

    Investigations of the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of Alloy 600 tubing in high temperature water were performed in order to get a precise knowledge of the different stages of the cracking and their dependence on various parameters. The compatibility of the results with the main mechanisms to be considered was examined. Results showed three stages in the cracking: a true incubation time, a slow-rate propagation period followed by a rapid-propagation stage. Tests separating stress and strain rate contributions show that the strain rate is the main parameter which controls the crack propagation. The hydrogen overpressure was found to increase the crack growth rate up to 1-4 bar, but a strong decrease is observed from 4 to 20 bar. Analysis of the hydrogen ingress in the metal showed that it is neither correlated to the hydrogen overpressure nor to the severity of cracking; so cracking resulting from an hydrogen-model is unlikely. No detrimental effect of oxygen (4 bar) was noticed both in the mill-annealed and the sensitized conditions. Finally, none of the classical mechanisms, neither hydrogen-assisted cracking nor slip-step dissolution, can correctly describe the observed behaviour. Some fractographic examinations, and an influence of primary water on the creep rate of Alloy 600, lead to consider that other recent mechanisms, involving an interaction between dissolution and plasticity, have to be considered

  12. Effect of postreatment on the corrosion behaviour of tartaric-sulphuric anodic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Rubio, M. [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Department of Surface Technologies, Engineering of Materials and Processes, Airbus Spain, Av. John Lennon s/n 28906 Getafe (Spain); Lara, M.P. de [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ocon, P. [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: pilar.ocon@uam.es; Diekhoff, S. [Fraunhofer-IFAM, Lesumer Heerstrasse 36, 28717 Bremen (Germany); Beneke, M. [Department of Surface Technologies, Engineering of Materials and Processes, Airbus Deutschland, GmbH Hunefeldstr. 1-5, 28199 Bremen (Germany); Lavia, A.; Garcia, I. [Department of Surface Technologies, Engineering of Materials and Processes, Airbus Spain, Av. John Lennon s/n 28906 Getafe (Spain)

    2009-08-30

    Unclad and clad AA2024 T3 specimens were anodised in a chromium-free tartaric-sulphuric acid bath (TSA) and subsequently postreated by different processes including impregnation in a cold, concentrated chromate solution, Cr-free hot-water sealing, and dichromate hot-water sealing. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the effectiveness of the classical postreatments used in the aircraft industry on the TSA-anodic films and their corrosion resistance behaviour. TSA-anodic films were characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their thicknesses were measured by SEM and the eddy current method. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to characterise the barrier and porous layers, and jointly with potentiodynamic polarisation allowed the evaluation of corrosion resistance parameters with immersion time in NaCl solution for anodised and postreated specimens. In all cases the postreatments increased the resistance of the barrier layer against degradation. However, the NaCl electrolyte easily penetrated TSA-anodised porous layers when they were not postreated, while penetration was slightly more difficult in cold-postreated specimens. The effective pore plugging was observed in the sealed TSA specimens resulting in an improved corrosion resistance. On the other hand, unsealed clad AA2024 specimens showed a self-sealing process of the TSA-anodic layer, which was slower for the cold chromate solution-postreated specimens.

  13. Effect of postreatment on the corrosion behaviour of tartaric-sulphuric anodic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Rubio, M.; Lara, M.P. de; Ocon, P.; Diekhoff, S.; Beneke, M.; Lavia, A.; Garcia, I.

    2009-01-01

    Unclad and clad AA2024 T3 specimens were anodised in a chromium-free tartaric-sulphuric acid bath (TSA) and subsequently postreated by different processes including impregnation in a cold, concentrated chromate solution, Cr-free hot-water sealing, and dichromate hot-water sealing. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the effectiveness of the classical postreatments used in the aircraft industry on the TSA-anodic films and their corrosion resistance behaviour. TSA-anodic films were characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their thicknesses were measured by SEM and the eddy current method. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to characterise the barrier and porous layers, and jointly with potentiodynamic polarisation allowed the evaluation of corrosion resistance parameters with immersion time in NaCl solution for anodised and postreated specimens. In all cases the postreatments increased the resistance of the barrier layer against degradation. However, the NaCl electrolyte easily penetrated TSA-anodised porous layers when they were not postreated, while penetration was slightly more difficult in cold-postreated specimens. The effective pore plugging was observed in the sealed TSA specimens resulting in an improved corrosion resistance. On the other hand, unsealed clad AA2024 specimens showed a self-sealing process of the TSA-anodic layer, which was slower for the cold chromate solution-postreated specimens.

  14. Effect of cerium conversion of A3xx.x/SiCp composites surfaces on salt fog corrosion behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Arrabal, R.; Viejo, F.; Carboneras, M.; Coy, A.E. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Merino, S. [Departamento de Tecnologia Industrial, Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio, 28691, Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    A study of the effect of cerium conversion treatment on surface of four composites (A360/SiC/10p, A360/SiC/20p, A380/SiC/10p, A380/SiC/20p) on their salt fog corrosion behaviour was performed. The conversion treatment was carried out using thermal activated full immersion in Ce(III) aqueous solutions. The matrix of A360/SiC/xxp composites is virtually free of Cu while the A380/SiC/xxp matrix contains 1.39-1.44 wt.%Ni and 3.13-3.45 wt.%Cu. Conversion performance was evaluated in neutral salt fog environment according to ASTM B117. The kinetics of the corrosion process were studied on the basis of gravimetric tests. The influence of SiCp proportion and matrix composition was evaluated and the nature of corrosion products was analysed by SEM and low angle XRD before and after accelerated testing to determine the influence of microstructural changes on corrosion behaviour during exposure to the corrosive environment. The Ce(III) precipitates on the cathodic sites, mainly on the intermetallic compounds, decreased both the cathodic current density and the corrosion rate of the composites tested. The presence of Cu in the matrix composition increased the corrosion rate, due to the galvanic couple Al/Cu. (authors)

  15. Bacterial corrosion in low-temperature geothermal. Mechanisms of corrosion by sulphate-reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daumas, Sylvie

    1987-01-01

    Within the frame of researches aimed at determining the causes of damages noticed on geothermal equipment, this research thesis aims at assessing the respective importance of physical-chemical processes and bacterial intervention in corrosion phenomena. It proposes an ecological approach of the fluid sampled in the Creil geothermal power station. The aim is to define the adaptation and activity degree of isolated sulphate-reducing bacteria with respect to their environment conditions. The author studied the effect of the development of these bacteria on the corrosion of carbon steel used in geothermal. Thus, he proposes a contribution to the understanding of mechanisms related to iron attack by these bacteria. Electrochemical techniques have been adapted to biological processes and used to measure corrosion [fr

  16. Corrosion of Nickel-Based Alloys in Ultra-High Temperature Heat Transfer Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Reddy, Ramana G.

    2017-03-01

    MgCl2-KCl binary system has been proposed to be used as high temperature reactor coolant. Due to its relatively low melting point, good heat capacity and excellent thermal stability, this system can also be used in high operation temperature concentrating solar power generation system as heat transfer fluid (HTF). The corrosion behaviors of nickel based alloys in MgCl2-KCl molten salt system at 1,000 °C were determined based on long-term isothermal dipping test. After 500 h exposure tests under strictly maintained high purity argon gas atmosphere, the weight loss and corrosion rate analysis were conducted. Among all the tested samples, Ni-201 demonstrated the lowest corrosion rate due to the excellent resistance of Ni to high temperature element dissolution. Detailed surface topography and corrosion mechanisms were also determined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS).

  17. High Temperature Corrosion Problem of Boiler Components in presence of Sulfur and Alkali based Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debashis; Mitra, Swapan Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Material degradation and ageing is of particular concern for fossil fuel fired power plant components. New techniques/approaches have been explored in recent years for Residual Life assessment of aged components and material degradation due to different damage mechanism like creep, fatigue, corrosion and erosion etc. Apart from the creep, the high temperature corrosion problem in a fossil fuel fired boiler is a matter of great concern if the fuel contains sulfur, chlorine sodium, potassium and vanadium etc. This paper discusses the material degradation due to high temperature corrosion in different critical components of boiler like water wall, superheater and reheater tubes and also remedial measures to avoid the premature failure. This paper also high lights the Residual Life Assessment (RLA) methodology of the components based on high temperature fireside corrosion. of different critical components of boiler.

  18. High temperature corrosion investigations at AW2-bio. Final report; Biomass boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, U.

    2011-01-15

    The measured corrosion rates in the test superheaters and ordinary superheaters of Avedoere 2 biomass boiler reveal that the corrosion rate increases with metal temperature and is significantly accelerated above steam temperatures of 540 deg. C. For the boiler with a live steam temperature of 540 deg. C, the measured corrosion rates in superheater 2 and 3 were up to 1mm pr. 10000 hours. It was observed that the flue gas temperature and heat flux had a significant effect on the corrosion rates through the surface metal temperature. Thus, the highest corrosion rates in the ordinary superheaters were not found at the position of the highest steam temperature in the outlet of superheater 3, but at the outlet of superheater 2. A steam temperature of approximately 580 deg. C at the outlet of one of the test superheater loops caused a tube fracture after a few months. A HVOF coating was applied to a section of superheater 2 and at a higher temperature in the test superheater loop. Analyses of the tube section after exposure showed that parts of the coating were not present and corrosion of the underlying TP347H FG was apparent. This indicates that the coating had spalled during operation. Furthermore, chlorine diffusion through the coating was observed causing attack at the coating-alloy interface. The project work has shown that it is not possible to increase the live steam temperature of the biomass fired boiler to more than 540 deg. C without a significant increase in superheater corrosion rates for the applied tube materials and coatings. (Author)

  19. A computer analysis code of radioactive corrosion product behaviour in primary circuits of LMFBRs (PSYCHE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizawa, Katsuyuki; Seki, Seiichi; Kawasaki, Yuji; Kano, Shigeki; Nihei, Isao

    1986-01-01

    Recently it has become an important subject to reduce exposure to radiation from radioactive corrosion products (CPs) during maintenance and repair works in reactor plants. Metallic sodium is used as cooling material in fast reactor plants, leading to different CP behaviours compared to light water reactors. In the present study, a computer code for analyzing behaviours of CPs in fast reactor plants is developed. The analysis code, called PSYCHE, makes it possible to perform consistent analysis of production, migration and deposition of CPs in primary circuits together with dose rate around piping of apparatus in cooling systems. An analysis model is developed based on test results on CP behaviour in out-pile sodium. The model, called the ''dissolution-deposition model'', can reproduce atom-selective behaviour, transient phenomenon and downstream effect of CPs, which represent mass transfer phenomena in sodium. Verification of this code is carried out on the basis of CP measurements made in ''Joyo''. The calculation vs. measurement ratio is found to be 0.5 - 2 for CP deposition density in piping for cooling systems and 0.7 - 1.3 for dose rate, demonstrating that this code can give reasonable results. Analysis is also made to predict future changes in total amount of deposited CP in ''Joyo''. (Nogami, K.)

  20. Corrosion behaviour of porous chromium carbide/oxide based ceramics in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Z.; Xin, T.; Chen, W.; Zheng, W.; Guzonas, D.

    2011-01-01

    Porous chromium carbide with a high density of open pores was fabricated by a reactive sintering method. Chromium oxide ceramics were obtained by re-oxidizing the porous chromium carbides formed. Some samples were added with yttria at 5 wt. %, prior to reactive sintering to form porous structures. Corrosion tests in SCW were performed at temperatures ranging from 375 o C to 625 o C with a fixed pressure at around 25∼30 MPa. The results show that chromium carbide is stable in SCW environments at temperatures up to 425 o C, above which disintegration of carbides through oxidation occurs. Porous chromium oxide samples show better corrosion resistance than porous chromium carbide, but disintegrate in SCW at around 625 o C. Among all the samples tested, chromium oxide ceramics with added yttria exhibited much better corrosion resistance compared with the pure chromium carbide/oxides. No evidence of weight change or disintegration of porous chromium oxides with 5 wt % added yttria was observed after exposure at 625 o C in SCW for 600 hours. (author)

  1. Aspects of the effects of temperature and electrolyte composition on pitting corrosion of stainless steel in dairy fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, F.X. [Toulon Univ., 83 - La Garde (France). Lab. de Chimie Appliquee; Girard, H.; Pagetti, J. [Universite de Franche-Comte, Besancon (France). Lab. de Corrosion et Traitments de Surfaces; Daufin, G. [INRA, Rennes (France). Lab. de Recherches de Technologie Laitiere

    2001-08-01

    The pitting corrosion resistance of 304L stainless steel in dairy fluids (milks, wheys, soya juice and peptidic fluids) was studied using electrochemical measurements. The effects of temperature, chloride content and other components of the fluids was particularly investigated. In the range 30- 70 C, the pitting potential in whole milk E{sub p} is related to the temperature by the relation ln(E{sub p} + 100) = aT{sup -1} + b. Above 70 C, a further phenomenon adds to the common activation effect of temperature. Heat induced conformational changes (denaturation) of the proteins were believed to explain such a behaviour. A typical linear relationship was found between E{sub p} and the logarithm of chloride concentration. All fluids are well represented by a single relationship. Therefore, the buffering capacity of casein micelles in milks do not significantly change the pitting resistance of the oxide film. In dairy industry, the corrosion risk is usually estimated from the difference between the pitting potential and the potential of a gold electrode (E{sub g}). It is noteworthy that the pitting risk decreases when temperature increases in the temperature range 50-90 C. Such a trend was due to the strong decrease in dissolved oxygen above 50 C. Besides, in aggressive peptidic solutions, the resistance of the passive film to localized attack is directly related to the Cr, Mo and N alloy content of stainless steel. (orig.)

  2. The effect of discontinuities on the corrosion behaviour of copper canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.

    2004-03-01

    Discontinuities may remain in the weld region of copper canisters following the final closure welding and inspection procedures. Although the shell of the copper canister is expected to exhibit excellent corrosion properties in the repository environment, the question remains what impact these discontinuities might have on the long-term performance and service life of the canister. A review of the relevant corrosion literature has been carried out and an expert opinion of the impact of these discontinuities on the canister lifetime has been developed. Since the amount of oxidant in the repository is limited and the maximum wall penetration is expected to be 2 O/Cu(OH) 2 film at a critical electrochemical potential determines where and when pits initiate, not the presence of pit-shaped surface discontinuities. The factors controlling pit growth and death are well understood. There is evidence for a maximum pit radius for copper in chloride solutions, above which the small anodic: cathodic surface area ratio required for the formation of deep pits cannot be sustained. This maximum pit radius is of the order of 0.1-0.5 mm. Surface discontinuities larger than this size are unlikely to propagate as pits, and pits generated from smaller discontinuities will die once they reach this maximum size. Death of propagating pits will be compounded by the decrease in oxygen flux to the canister as the repository environment becomes anoxic. Surface discontinuities could impact the SCC behaviour either through their effect on the local environment or via stress concentration or intensification. There is no evidence that surface discontinuities will affect the initiation of SCC by ennoblement of the corrosion potential or the formation of locally aggressive conditions. Stress concentration at pits could lead to crack initiation under some circumstances, but the stress intensity factor for the resultant cracks, or for pre-existing crack-like discontinuities, will be smaller than the

  3. Influence of Temperature on Corrosion Behavior of 2A02 Al Alloy in Marine Atmospheric Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Cao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of 2A02 Al alloy under 4 mg/cm2 NaCl deposition at different temperatures (from 30 to 80 °C has been studied. This corrosion behavior was researched using mass-gain, scanning electron microscopy-SEM, laser scanning confocal microscopy-LSCM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy-XPS and other techniques. The results showed and revealed that the corrosion was maximal at 60 °C after 200 h of exposure. The increase of temperature not only affected the solubility of oxygen gas in the thin film, but also promoted the transport of ions (such as Cl−, and the formation of protective AlO(OH, which further affects the corrosion speed.

  4. Peculiar high temperature corrosion of martensite alloy under impact of Estonian oil shale fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallermo, H.; Klevtsov, I. [Thermal Engineering Department of Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The superheaters` surfaces of oil shale steam boiler made of pearlitic and austenitic alloys, are subject to intensive corrosion, mainly due to presence of chlorine in external deposits. The applicability of martensitic alloys X1OCrMoVNb91 and X20CrMoV121 for superheaters is examined here and empirical equations allowing to predict alloys` corrosion resistance in the range of operational temperatures are established. Alloy X1OCrMoVNb91 is found been most perspective for superheaters of boilers firing fossil fuel that contain alkaline metals and chlorine. The abnormal dependence of corrosion resistance of martensitic alloys on temperature is revealed, namely, corrosion at 580 deg C in presence of oil shale fly ash is more intensive than at 620 deg C. (orig.) 2 refs.

  5. Peculiar high temperature corrosion of martensite alloy under impact of Estonian oil shale fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallermo, H; Klevtsov, I [Thermal Engineering Department of Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1999-12-31

    The superheaters` surfaces of oil shale steam boiler made of pearlitic and austenitic alloys, are subject to intensive corrosion, mainly due to presence of chlorine in external deposits. The applicability of martensitic alloys X1OCrMoVNb91 and X20CrMoV121 for superheaters is examined here and empirical equations allowing to predict alloys` corrosion resistance in the range of operational temperatures are established. Alloy X1OCrMoVNb91 is found been most perspective for superheaters of boilers firing fossil fuel that contain alkaline metals and chlorine. The abnormal dependence of corrosion resistance of martensitic alloys on temperature is revealed, namely, corrosion at 580 deg C in presence of oil shale fly ash is more intensive than at 620 deg C. (orig.) 2 refs.

  6. Influence of Temperature on Corrosion Behavior of 2A02 Al Alloy in Marine Atmospheric Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Min; Liu, Li; Fan, Lei; Yu, Zhongfen; Li, Ying; Oguzie, Emeka E.; Wang, Fuhui

    2018-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 2A02 Al alloy under 4 mg/cm2 NaCl deposition at different temperatures (from 30 to 80 °C) has been studied. This corrosion behavior was researched using mass-gain, scanning electron microscopy-SEM, laser scanning confocal microscopy-LSCM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy-XPS and other techniques. The results showed and revealed that the corrosion was maximal at 60 °C after 200 h of exposure. The increase of temperature not only affected the solubility of oxygen gas in the thin film, but also promoted the transport of ions (such as Cl−), and the formation of protective AlO(OH), which further affects the corrosion speed. PMID:29401690

  7. Corrosion Behaviour of Heat - Treated Al-6063/ SiCp Composites Immersed in 5 wt% NaCl Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth ALANEME

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of SiC volume percent and temper conditions (namely, as-cast, solutionized, and artificial age hardening at 180°C and 195°C on the corrosion behaviour of Al (6063 composites and its monolithic alloy immersed in 5wt% NaCl solution has been investigated. Al (6063 - SiC particulate composites containing 6, 12 and 15 volume percent SiC were produced by premixing the SiC particles with borax additive and then adopting two step stir casting. Mass loss and corrosion rate measurements were utilized as criteria for evaluating the corrosion behaviour of the composites. The results show that the corrosion susceptibility of the Al (6063 - SiCp composites was higher than that of the monolithic alloy, and for most cases the corrosion rate of the composites increased with increase in volume percent of SiC. However, it was discovered that the nature of the passive films formed on the composites was sufficiently stable to reduce significantly the corrosion rate of the composites after 13days of immersion. This trend was observed to be consistent for all heat-treatment conditions utilized.

  8. Influence of Silver nanoparticles addition on the phase transformation, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of Cu–Al–Ni shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saud, Safaa N.; Hamzah, E., E-mail: esah@fkm.utm.my; Abubakar, T.; Bakhsheshi-Rad, H.R.; Farahany, S.; Abdolahi, A.; Taheri, M.M.

    2014-11-05

    Highlights: • Thermal analysis showed four different phase β, α, NiAl and γ2 during solidification. • The martensite appeared in the microstructure as a plate and needle like shape. • Shape recovery ratio of 80% was obtained after Ag nanoparticles addition. • Effect of Ag nanoparticles on the corrosion behaviour of Cu–Al–Ni SMA was investigated. - Abstract: Incorporation of silver nanoparticles into Cu-based shape memory alloys is recommended to enhance their phase transformation behaviour. However, this incorporation can affect their transformation temperatures, mechanical, microstructural and corrosion characteristics. Four different phase reactions β, α, NiAl and γ{sub 2} were detected on a derivative curve during the solidification by-computer-aided cooling curve thermal analysis. The highest fraction solid (82%) was calculated for the parent phase (β) based on the Newtonian baseline method. The microstructural changes and mechanical properties were investigated using field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction tensile test and shape memory effect test. It was found that the addition of Ag can control the phase morphology and orientations along with the formation of the Ag-rich precipitates, and thus the tensile strength, elongation, fracture stress–strain, yield strength and shape memory effect are improved. Remarkably, the shape recovery ratio reached approximately 80% of the original shape. The corrosion behaviour of the Cu–Al–Ni shape memory alloy were investigated using electrochemical tests in NaCl solution and their results showed that the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) of Cu–Al–Ni SMA is shifted towards the nobler direction from −307.4 to −277.1 m V{sub SCE} with the addition of 0.25 wt.% Ag.

  9. Investigation of high temperature corrosion behavior on 304L austenite stainless steel in corrosive environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahri, M. I.; Othman, N. K.; Samsu, Z.; Daud, A. R. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    In this work, 304L stainless steel samples were exposed at 700 °C for 10hrs in different corrosive environments; dry oxygen, molten salt, and molten salt + dry oxygen. The corrosion behavior of samples was analyzed using weight change measurement technique, optical microscope (OM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX). The existence phases of corroded sample were determined using X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The lowest corrosion rate was recorded in dry oxygen while the highest was in molten salt + dry oxygen environments with the value of 0.0062 mg/cm{sup 2} and −13.5225 mg/cm{sup 2} respectively. The surface morphology of sample in presence of salt mixture showed scale spallation. Oxide scales of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were the main phases developed and detected by XRD technique. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was not developed in every sample as protective layers but chromate-rich oxide was developed. The cross-section analysis found the oxide scales were in porous, thick and non-adherent that would not an effective barrier to prevent from further degradation of alloy. EDX analysis also showed the Cr-element was low compared to Fe-element at the oxide scale region.

  10. The impact of high temperatures on foraging behaviour and body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High temperatures can pose significant thermoregulation challenges for endotherms, and determining how individual species respond to high temperatures will be important for predicting the impact of global warming on wild populations. Animals can adjust their behaviour or physiology to cope with higher temperatures, ...

  11. High temperature flow behaviour of SiC reinforced lithium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The compressive flow behaviour of lithium aluminosilicate (LAS) glass, with and without SiC particulate reinforcements, was studied. The LAS glass crystallized to spodumene during high-temperature testing. The flow behaviour of LAS glass changed from Newtonian to non-Newtonian due to the presence of crystalline ...

  12. High temperature corrosion of nickel alloys by molten calcium chloride in an oxidising environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, Roger; Gittos, Mike

    2012-09-01

    A series of nickel alloys was submerged in molten calcium chloride (a molten salt proposed for and used in the nuclear industry for a variety of applications), at 850 deg. C for 72 hours under an oxidising environment. The samples were analysed in detail, in order to determine their corrosion behaviour and suitability for use under these conditions. 310 stainless steel was used as a reference material. Extensive corrosion occurred and the observed attack on the metal substrates was general and massive with corrosion rates ranging from 1.17 mm/year, for Haynes 214, to 13.3 mm/year, for 310 stainless steel. All materials showed selective leaching of chromium from the samples but the oxide layer formed was not protective, spalling away easily. The severity of the attack was not immediately visible from the corrosion rate alone: samples showed a friable scale on the surface and deep penetration of the attack beneath, up to 0.63 mm for 310 stainless steel. In some cases, the attack was clearly intergranular with chromium being depleted along the grain boundaries, whereas in others, the attack was more general. No simple correlation between alloying elements and corrosion rate was apparent, with additions of aluminium and silicon appearing to have little or no protective effect. Alloys 600 and Haynes HR-160 showed promise, with relatively low corrosion rates and penetration depths. (authors)

  13. Corrosion behaviour of sintered Ti–Ni–Cu–Nb in 0.9% NaCl environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moipone Linda Lethabane

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The uniform and localized corrosion behaviour of sintered Ti–Ni containing niobium and copper additions were studied using potentiodynamic and cyclic polarization measurements in 0.9% sodium chloride. Results indicated that copper and niobium addition did not have significant effects on the uniform corrosion characteristics, but significantly improved the pitting corrosion resistance. Both copper and niobium additions significantly increased the re-passivation potentials, while copper was observed to reduce the pitting hysteresis loop area. Alloys containing 15% copper and 2% niobium additions depicted the most improved pitting corrosion resistance, and increased the re-passivation value from −315.60 mV to a high re-passivation potential of 840.68 mV.

  14. Electrochemical corrosion behaviour of plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings on AM50 magnesium alloy formed in silicate and phosphate based electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, J.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Blawert, C.; Stoermer, M.; Dietzel, W.

    2009-01-01

    PEO coatings were produced on AM50 magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation process in silicate and phosphate based electrolytes using a pulsed DC power source. The microstructure and composition of the PEO coatings were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The corrosion resistance of the PEO coatings was evaluated using open circuit potential (OCP) measurements, potentiodynamic polarisation tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 0.1 M NaCl solution. It was found that the electrolyte composition has a significant effect on the coating evolution and on the resulting coating characteristics, such as microstructure, composition, coating thickness, roughness and thus on the corrosion behaviour. The corrosion resistance of the PEO coating formed in silicate electrolyte was found to be superior to that formed in phosphate electrolyte in both the short-term and long-term electrochemical corrosion tests.

  15. Corrosion behaviour of chemical conversion treatments on as-cast Mg-Al alloys: Electrochemical and non-electrochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocca, E.; Juers, C.; Steinmetz, J.

    2010-01-01

    Magnesium alloys are often used in as-cast conditions. So, the aim of this work is to characterize the corrosion protection of as-cast AZ91D alloys coated with simple chemical conversion (phosphate-permanganate, and cerium-based coatings). With the two coatings, the electrochemical measurements show that the corrosion protection is due to both the inhibition of cathodic and anodic reactions, because of the presence of stable CeO 2 or manganese oxides in basic pH. Nevertheless, the non-electrochemical tests of corrosion are required to bring to light the healing effect of phosphate-permanganate coating compared to Ce-coating and to describe the corrosion behaviour completely. Finally phosphoric and soda pickling associated to phosphate-permanganate conversion treatment or cerium coating are ecologically efficient alternatives to fluoride-based pickling and the chromating treatment.

  16. Corrosion behaviour of chemical conversion treatments on as-cast Mg-Al alloys: Electrochemical and non-electrochemical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocca, E. [Institut Jean Lamour UMR CNRS 7198, Nancy Universite - Corrosion Group, B.P. 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy (France)], E-mail: emmanuel.rocca@lcsm.uhp-nancy.fr; Juers, C.; Steinmetz, J. [Institut Jean Lamour UMR CNRS 7198, Nancy Universite - Corrosion Group, B.P. 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy (France)

    2010-06-15

    Magnesium alloys are often used in as-cast conditions. So, the aim of this work is to characterize the corrosion protection of as-cast AZ91D alloys coated with simple chemical conversion (phosphate-permanganate, and cerium-based coatings). With the two coatings, the electrochemical measurements show that the corrosion protection is due to both the inhibition of cathodic and anodic reactions, because of the presence of stable CeO{sub 2} or manganese oxides in basic pH. Nevertheless, the non-electrochemical tests of corrosion are required to bring to light the healing effect of phosphate-permanganate coating compared to Ce-coating and to describe the corrosion behaviour completely. Finally phosphoric and soda pickling associated to phosphate-permanganate conversion treatment or cerium coating are ecologically efficient alternatives to fluoride-based pickling and the chromating treatment.

  17. The corrosion behaviour of stainless steels in natural seawater: results of an european collaborative project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scotto, V.; Mollica, A. [Institut de Recherches de la Siderurgie Francaise (IRSID), 78 - Saint-Germain-en-Laye (France); Feron, D. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Direction des Technologies Avancees; Rogne, T.; Steinsmo, U. [Stiftelsen for Industriell og Teknisk Forskning (SINTEF), Trondheim (Norway); Compere, C.; Festy, D.; Audouard, J.P.; Taxen, C.; Thierry, D.

    1996-12-31

    One of the goals of the European collaborative Project `Marine Bio-film on Stainless steels: effects, monitoring and prevention`, started in 1992 and partially funded by the European Communities in the framework of the Marine Science and Technologies Program, was to give some conclusive and general remarks regarding the possible link, outlined in literature, between aerobic bio-film settlement and both the increased risk of localized corrosion onset and the propagation rate of ongoing localized corrosion on Stainless Steels. For this purpose several SS types of European production (austenitic and duplex), in form of tubes and plates, with and without artificial crevices preformed on their surfaces, have been exposed to flowing and quite seawater (flow rate from 0 to 1.5 m/s), at different marine stations (respectively located in the Mediterranean Sea, in the Eastern Atlantic, in the North and Baltic Seas) and the tests were repeated during each season of the year when seawater temperatures ranged from 6 up to 28 deg C. During each exposure, the SS free corrosion potentials were recorded. (authors).

  18. The Effect of Low-Quantity Cr Addition on the Corrosion Behaviour of Dual-Phase High Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Handoko

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Industrial application of high carbon low alloy steel with the dual-phase structure of martensite and austenite has increased drastically in recent years. Due to its excellent compression strength and its high abrasion resistance, this grade of steel has used as a high performance cutting tool and in press machinery applications. By increasing the usage of more corrosive media in industrial practice and increasing the demand for reducing the production cost, it is crucial to understand the effect of the small addition of Cr on the corrosion behaviour of this grade of steel. In this study, this effect was investigated using Secondary Electron Microscopy (SEM and in-situ Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM in the sodium chloride solution. Also, the corrosion rate was measured using the Tafel polarisation curve. It has been found that the small addition of Cr increased the stability of retained austenite, thus improving its corrosion resistance and reducing its corrosion rate. This effect has been acquired through in-situ high resolution topography images in which the samples were submerged in a corrosive solution. It has been demonstrated that the corrosion rate was reduced when the stability of austenite enhanced.

  19. Experiences with high temperature corrosion at straw‐firing power plants in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Jensen, S. A.; Borg, U.

    2011-01-01

    to enable better lifetime prediction of vulnerable components in straw‐firing plants since the corrosion rates are so much faster than in coal firing plants. Therefore, there are continued investigations in recently commissioned plants with test tubes installed into actual superheaters. In addition...... temperature is measured on the specific tube loops where there are test tube sections. Thus a corrosion rate can be coupled to a temperature histogram. This is important since although a superheater has a defined steam outlet temperature, there is variation in the tube bundle due to variations of heat flux...

  20. High-Temperature Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 617 in Helium Environment of Very High Temperature Gas Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gyeong-Geun; Jung, Sujin; Kim, Daejong; Jeong, Yong-Whan; Kim, Dong-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Alloy 617 is a Ni-base superalloy and a candidate material for the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) of a very high temperature gas reactor (VHTR) which is one of the next generation nuclear reactors under development. The high operating temperature of VHTR enables various applications such as mass production of hydrogen with high energy efficiency. Alloy 617 has good creep resistance and phase stability at high temperatures in an air environment. However, it was reported that the mechanical properties decreased at a high temperature in an impure helium environment. In this study, high-temperature corrosion tests were carried out at 850°C-950°C in a helium environment containing the impurity gases H_2, CO, and CH_4, in order to examine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 617. Until 250 h, Alloy 617 specimens showed a parabolic oxidation behavior at all temperatures. The activation energy for oxidation in helium environment was 154 kJ/mol. The SEM and EDS results elucidated a Cr-rich surface oxide layer, Al-rich internal oxides and depletion of grain boundary carbides. The thickness and depths of degraded layers also showed a parabolic relationship with time. A normal grain growth was observed in the Cr-rich surface oxide layer. When corrosion tests were conducted in a pure helium environment, the oxidation was suppressed drastically. It was elucidated that minor impurity gases in the helium would have detrimental effects on the high temperature corrosion behavior of Alloy 617 for the VHTR application.

  1. Effect of the electrochemical passivation on the corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbucci, A.; Delucchi, M.; Panizza, M.; Farne, G.; Cerisola, G.

    2004-01-01

    Cold rolled SS is also fruitfully used in deep drawing however the presence of scales or oxides on the surface reduces the life of the tools and emphasises creep phenomena of the material. Then a cleaning of the SS surface from these impurities is necessary. Oxides can be formed during the hot rolling preceding the cold one, or during the annealing performed between the several steps of thickness reduction. The annealing helps to decrease the work hardening occurring during the process. Normally this heat treatment is performed in reducing atmosphere of pure hydrogen (bright annealing), but even in this conditions oxides are formed on the SS surface. To avoid this uncontrolled oxide growth one method recently applied is an electrochemical cleaning performed in an electrolytic solution containing chrome, generally called electrochemical passivation. The electrochemical passivation allows the dissolution of the contaminating hard particles on the strips. Few scientific contributions are available in literature, which explain in detail the process mechanism. The aim of this work is to investigate if the electrochemical passivated surface acts in a different way with regard to corrosion phenomena with respect to conventional SS. Electrochemical measurements like polarisation, chrono-amperometries and surface analysis were used to investigate the corrosion behaviour of electrochemically passivated AISI 304L and AISI 305. The effect of some process parameters were considered, too. (authors)

  2. Effect of the electrochemical passivation on the corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbucci, A.; Delucchi, M.; Panizza, M.; Farne, G.; Cerisola, G. [DICheP, University of Genova, P.le Kennedy 1, 16129 Genova (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    Cold rolled SS is also fruitfully used in deep drawing however the presence of scales or oxides on the surface reduces the life of the tools and emphasises creep phenomena of the material. Then a cleaning of the SS surface from these impurities is necessary. Oxides can be formed during the hot rolling preceding the cold one, or during the annealing performed between the several steps of thickness reduction. The annealing helps to decrease the work hardening occurring during the process. Normally this heat treatment is performed in reducing atmosphere of pure hydrogen (bright annealing), but even in this conditions oxides are formed on the SS surface. To avoid this uncontrolled oxide growth one method recently applied is an electrochemical cleaning performed in an electrolytic solution containing chrome, generally called electrochemical passivation. The electrochemical passivation allows the dissolution of the contaminating hard particles on the strips. Few scientific contributions are available in literature, which explain in detail the process mechanism. The aim of this work is to investigate if the electrochemical passivated surface acts in a different way with regard to corrosion phenomena with respect to conventional SS. Electrochemical measurements like polarisation, chrono-amperometries and surface analysis were used to investigate the corrosion behaviour of electrochemically passivated AISI 304L and AISI 305. The effect of some process parameters were considered, too. (authors)

  3. A new steel with good low-temperature sulfuric acid dew point corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, X.Q.; Li, X.G. [Corrosion and Protection Center, University of Science and Technology Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Corrosion and Protection (Ministry of Education), Beijing (China); Sun, F.L. [Corrosion and Protection Center, University of Science and Technology Beijing (China); Lv, S.J. [Corrosion and Protection Center, University of Science and Technology Beijing (China); Equipment and Power Department, Shijiazhuang Refine and Chemical Company Limited, SINOPEC, Shijiazhuang (China)

    2012-07-15

    In this work, new steels (1, 2, and 3) were developed for low-temperature sulfuric acid dew point corrosion. The mass loss rate, macro- and micro-morphologies and compositions of corrosion products of new steels in 10, 30, and 50% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions at its corresponding dew points were investigated by immersion test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results indicated that mass loss rate of all the tested steels first strongly increased and then decreased as H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration increased, which reached maximum at 30%. Corrosion resistance of 2 steel is the best among all specimens due to its fine and homogeneous morphologies of corrosion products. The electrochemical corrosion properties of new steels in 10 and 30% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions at its corresponding dew points were studied by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The results demonstrated that corrosion resistance of 2 steel is the best among all the experimental samples due to its lowest corrosion current density and highest charge transfer resistance, which is consistent with the results obtained from immersion tests. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Hot temperature corrosion of a zircon-1%niobium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, Sebastian; Lanzani, Liliana

    2010-01-01

    The reaction of the Zr-1%Niobium alloy to corrosion is studied in this work, which is used as fuel elements sheath material in Russian VVER reactors. For comparative purposes, the conventional alloys Zircaloy-4 y Zr-2.5%Nb have been tested as well. Autoclave tests were carried out in water and in solutions of LiOH with concentrations of 0-1 to 1M at 343 o C and in water vapor at 400 o C (following ASTM G2/G2M-06). The gain in weight/unit of area of the autoclaved samples was determined in order to evaluate the corrosion, and metallographics were performed to characterize the oxides and hydrides that formed. The results show that for tests of 16 hours, a minimum concentration of 0.65M LiOH is needed to accelerate corrosion in Zr-1%Nb and Zr-2.5%Nb, while acceleration occurs in Zircaloy-4 at a concentration of 0.45M. In solutions of LiOH 1M the hydrogen 'uptake' in Zr-1Nb and Zr-2,5Nb is considerably lower in Zircaloy-4. The lesser amount of β-Zr phase present in the Zr-1Nb alloy produces thinner and more compact oxides, with better visual characteristics than for those formed in Zr-2.5Nb

  5. Effect of heat treatment on the corrosion behaviour of Al-Zn alloys in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Radiah Mohd Kamarudin; Muhamad Daud; Nur Ubaidah Saidin; Zaifol Samsu

    2010-01-01

    A study has been carried out to investigate the effect of heat treatment on the corrosion behaviour of Al-Zn alloys in seawater environment. The microstructure, potential and current capacity of the samples were studied. Open circuit potential (OCP) of 96 hours was measured against saturated calomel electrode (SCE) and estimating current capacity of the alloys were calculated by using protective current generated from the capacity test. For the microstructure study, optical microscope is used to examine the surface morphology before and after test. The results show that the heat treated samples of 2 hours at 550 degree Celsius and variation in alloys composition affected the values of alloys OCP, current capacity and microstructure. (author)

  6. Passivation and corrosion behaviours of cobalt and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metikos-Hukovic, M.; Babic, R.

    2007-01-01

    Passivation and corrosion behaviour of the cobalt and cobalt-base alloy Co30Cr6Mo was studied in a simulated physiological solution containing chloride and bicarbonate ions and with pH of 6.8. The oxido-reduction processes included solid state transformations occurring at the cobalt/electrolyte interface are interpreted using theories of surface electrochemistry. The dissolution of cobalt is significantly suppressed by alloying it with chromium and molybdenum, since the alloy exhibited 'chromium like' passivity. The structural and protective properties of passive oxide films formed spontaneously at the open circuit potential or during the anodic polarization were studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the wide frequency range

  7. Corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  8. Influence of noble metals alloying additions on the corrosion behaviour of titanium in a fluoride-containing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosalbino, F; Delsante, S; Borzone, G; Scavino, G

    2012-05-01

    Titanium alloys exhibit excellent corrosion resistance in most aqueous media due to the formation of a stable oxide film, and some of these alloys (particularly Ti-6Al-7Nb) have been chosen for surgical and odontological implants for their resistance and biocompatibility. Treatment with fluorides (F(-)) is known to be the main method for preventing plaque formation and dental caries. Toothpastes, mouthwashes, and prophylactic gels can contain from 200 to 20,000 ppm F(-) and can affect the corrosion behaviour of titanium alloy devices present in the oral cavity. In this work, the electrochemical corrosion behaviour of Ti-1M alloys (M = Ag, Au, Pd, Pt) was assessed in artificial saliva of pH = 3.0 containing 910 ppm F(-) (0.05 M NaF) through open circuit potential, E(OC), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The corrosion behaviour of the Ti-6Al-7Nb commercial alloy was also evaluated for comparison. E (OC) measurements show an active behaviour for all the titanium alloys in fluoridated acidified saliva due to the presence of significant concentrations of HF and HF(2) (-) species that dissolve the spontaneous air-formed oxide film giving rise to surface activation. However, an increase in stability of the passive oxide layer and consequently a decrease in surface activation is observed for the Ti-1M alloys. This behaviour is confirmed by EIS measurements. In fact, the Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy exhibits lower impedance values as compared with Ti-1M alloys, the highest values being measured for the Ti-1Au alloy. The experimental results show that the corrosion resistance of the studied Ti-1M alloys is similar to or better than that of Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy currently used as biomaterial, suggesting their potential for dental applications.

  9. Effect of high temperature filtration on out-core corrosion product activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, G.L.; Bogancs, J.

    1983-01-01

    Investigation of the effect of high temperature filtration on corrosion product transport and out-core corrosion product activity has been carried out for VVER-440 plants. In the physico-chemical model applied particulate and dissolved corrosion products were taken into account. We supposed 100% effectivity for the particulate filter. It was found that about 0,5% 160 t/h/ of the main flow would result in an approx.50% reduction of the out-core corrosion product activity. Investigation of the details of the physico-chemical model in Nuclear Power Plant Paks showed a particle deposition rate measured during power transients fairly agreeing with other measurements and data used in the calculations. (author)

  10. Effects of high temperature surface oxides on room temperature aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effects of high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing, heat treatment (750 {degrees}C in air, one hour) or simulated in-service-type oxidation (1000{degrees}C in air, 24 hours) on the room-temperature aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of iron aluminides. Materials evaluated included the Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides, FA-84, FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo, a FeAl-based iron aluminide, FA-385, and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy, FAPY. Tests were performed in a mild acid-chloride solution to simulate aggressive atmospheric corrosion. Cyclic-anodic-polarization tests were employed to evaluate resistances to localized aqueous corrosion. The high-temperature oxide surfaces consistently produced detrimental results relative to mechanically or chemically cleaned surfaces. Specifically, the pitting corrosion resistances were much lower for the as-processed and 750{degrees} C surfaces, relative to the cleaned surfaces, for FA-84, FA-129, FAL-Mo, FA-385 and FAPY. Furthermore, the pitting corrosion resistances were much lower for the 1000{degrees}C surfaces, relative to cleaned surfaces, for FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo.

  11. The effect of Co-firing with Straw and Coal on High Temperature Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Frandsen, Flemming; Larsen, OH

    2001-01-01

    As a part of ELSAMS development programme into alternative energy sources, various concepts of straw-firing have been investigated. This paper concerns co-firing of straw with coal to reduce the corrosion rate observed in straw-fired power plants. Co-firing with coal reduces the amount of potassium......: a) the exposure of metal rings on water/air cooled probes, and b) the exposure of a range of materials built into the existing superheaters. A range of austenitic and ferritic steels was exposed in the steam temperature region of 520-580°C. The flue gas temperature ranged from 925-1100°C....... The corrosion products for the various steel types were investigated using light optical and scanning electron microscopy. Corrosion mechanisms for the austenitic and ferritic steels are presented. These are discussed in relation to temperature and deposit composition. Co-firing with coal has removed potassium...

  12. High temperature fatigue behaviour of intermetallics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The effect of processing route on strain-controlled low cycle fatigue (LCF) life of binary ..... the once regarding close control of composition, control and reproduction of ... inverse effect of temperature on fatigue life seen in tests conducted in air.

  13. Effect of refining techniques on stress corrosion cracking behaviour of Inconel X-750

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, B.; Moore, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    High-strength age-hardenable nickel-base superalloy Inconel X-750, is susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) when used in the triple heat-treated condition. In this research, the slow strain-rate technique has been employed to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of alloy X-750 under simulated nuclear pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions, using an automated autoclave system at 8 x 10 6 N m -2 pressure and 289 0 C temperature. The alloys produced via electroslag refining (ESR) or vacuum arc refining (VAR) processing routes containing 0.004% and 0.011% sulphur, respectively, were solution annealed at either 1075 or 1240 0 C for 2 h and water quenched followed by ageing in the 704 to 871 0 C temperature range for up to 200 h, followed by air cooling or furnace cooling. The scanning electron microscopy performed on fractured surfaces revealed that Inconel X-750 processed through the ESR route, solution annealed at 1240 0 C for 2 h and water quenched, aged at 871 0 C for 200 h and furnace cooled provided the best combination of strength, ductility and resistance to SCC. A less sensitized area adjacent to the grain boundary was responsible for the improvement in properties and the alloy X-750 is recommended for PWR applications in the above conditions of processing and heat treatment. (author)

  14. The estimation of corrosion behaviour of ZrTi binary alloys for dental applications using electrochemical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mareci, Daniel; Bolat, Georgiana; Chelariu, Romeu; Sutiman, Daniel; Munteanu, Corneliu

    2013-01-01

    Titanium and zirconium are in the same group in the periodic table of elements and are known to have similar physical and chemical properties. Both Ti and Zr usually have their surfaces covered by a thin oxide film spontaneously formed in air. However, the cytotoxicity of ZrO 2 is lower than that of TiO 2 rutile. Treatments with fluoride are known as the main methods to prevent plaque formation and dental caries. The corrosion behaviour of ZrTi alloys with Ti contents of 5, 25 and 45 wt.% and cp-Ti was investigated for dental applications. All samples were tested by linear potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) performed in artificial saliva with different pH levels (5.6 and 3.4) and different fluoride (1000 ppm F − ) and albumin protein (0.6%) contents. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to observe the surface morphology of the test materials after linear potentiodynamic polarisation. The corrosion current densities for the ZrTi alloys increased with the titanium content. The Zr5Ti and Zr25Ti alloys were susceptible to localised corrosion. The role that Ti plays as an alloying element is that of increasing the resistance of ZrTi alloy to localised corrosion. The presence of 0.6% albumin protein in fluoridated acidified artificial saliva with 1000 ppm F − could protect the cp-Ti and ZrTi alloys from attack by fluoride ions. - Highlights: • Electrochemical and corrosion behaviour of the new ZrTi alloys were investigated. • The passive behaviour for all the ZrTi alloys is observed. • Addition of Ti to Zr improves the corrosion resistance in some fluoridated saliva. • The presence of albumin could prevent the ZrTi alloys from attack by fluoride ions

  15. The estimation of corrosion behaviour of ZrTi binary alloys for dental applications using electrochemical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mareci, Daniel [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, Iasi (Romania); Bolat, Georgiana, E-mail: georgiana20022@yahoo.com [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, Iasi (Romania); Chelariu, Romeu [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Iasi (Romania); Sutiman, Daniel [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, Iasi (Romania); Munteanu, Corneliu [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Mechanical, Iasi (Romania)

    2013-08-15

    Titanium and zirconium are in the same group in the periodic table of elements and are known to have similar physical and chemical properties. Both Ti and Zr usually have their surfaces covered by a thin oxide film spontaneously formed in air. However, the cytotoxicity of ZrO{sub 2} is lower than that of TiO{sub 2} rutile. Treatments with fluoride are known as the main methods to prevent plaque formation and dental caries. The corrosion behaviour of ZrTi alloys with Ti contents of 5, 25 and 45 wt.% and cp-Ti was investigated for dental applications. All samples were tested by linear potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) performed in artificial saliva with different pH levels (5.6 and 3.4) and different fluoride (1000 ppm F{sup −}) and albumin protein (0.6%) contents. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to observe the surface morphology of the test materials after linear potentiodynamic polarisation. The corrosion current densities for the ZrTi alloys increased with the titanium content. The Zr5Ti and Zr25Ti alloys were susceptible to localised corrosion. The role that Ti plays as an alloying element is that of increasing the resistance of ZrTi alloy to localised corrosion. The presence of 0.6% albumin protein in fluoridated acidified artificial saliva with 1000 ppm F{sup −} could protect the cp-Ti and ZrTi alloys from attack by fluoride ions. - Highlights: • Electrochemical and corrosion behaviour of the new ZrTi alloys were investigated. • The passive behaviour for all the ZrTi alloys is observed. • Addition of Ti to Zr improves the corrosion resistance in some fluoridated saliva. • The presence of albumin could prevent the ZrTi alloys from attack by fluoride ions.

  16. Effect of temperature on corrosion of steels in high purity water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Takashi; Kashimura, Eiji; Ohashi, Kenya; Furutani, Yasumasa; Ohsumi, Katsumi; Aizawa, Motohiro; Matsubayashi, Hideo.

    1987-01-01

    Effect of temperature on corrosion behavior of steels was evaluated in the range of 150 - 300 deg C in high purity water containing about 200 ppb oxygen. The exposure tests were carried out in actual and simulated reactor water of BWR plants. Through X-ray diffractometry, SIMS, XPS and chemical analyses, it was clarified that the chemical composition and morphology of oxide films formed on austenitic stainless steel changed above about 250 deg C. Chromium dissolved easily through corrosion above this temperature, and the oxide films primarily consisted of spinel type oxides containing high concentration of nickel. Further, as the protectivety of oxide films increased with temperature, the corrosion rate had a peak around 250 deg C after a long exposure period. A major phase of oxide films on carbon steel was magnetite in the whole temperature range. However, as the oxide films formed at high temperatures had very compact structures, the effect of temperature on the corrosion rate was similar to that observed on stainless steel. (author)

  17. Corrosion fatigue initiation and short crack growth behaviour of austenitic stainless steels under light water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S.; Leber, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion fatigue in austenitic stainless steels under light water reactor conditions. ► Identification of major parameters of influence on initiation and short crack growth. ► Critical system conditions for environmental reduction of fatigue initiation life. ► Comparison with the environmental factor (F env ) approach. - Abstract: The corrosion fatigue initiation and short crack growth behaviour of different wrought low-carbon and stabilised austenitic stainless steels was characterised under simulated boiling water reactor and pressurised water reactor primary water conditions by cyclic fatigue tests with sharply notched fracture mechanics specimens. The special emphasis was placed to the behaviour at low corrosion potentials and, in particular, to hydrogen water chemistry conditions. The major parameter effects and critical conjoint threshold conditions, which result in relevant environmental reduction and acceleration of fatigue initiation life and subsequent short crack growth, respectively, are discussed and summarised. The observed corrosion fatigue behaviour is compared with the fatigue evaluation procedures in codes and regulatory guidelines.

  18. The corrosion resistance of Zr-Nb and Zr-Nb-Sn alloys in high-temperature water and steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalgaard, S B

    1960-03-15

    An alloy of reactor-grade sponge zirconium-2.5 wt. % niobium was exposed to water and steam at high temperature. The corrosion was twice that of Zircaloy-2 while hydrogen pickup was found to be equal to that of Zircaloy-2. Ternary additions of tin to this alloy in the range 0.5-1.5 had no effect on the corrosion resistance in water at 315{sup o}C up to 100 days. At higher temperatures, tin increased the corrosion, the effect varying with temperature. Heat treatment of the alloys was shown to affect corrosion resistance. (author)

  19. The corrosion resistance of Zr-Nb and Zr-Nb-Sn alloys in high-temperature water and steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalgaard, S.B.

    1960-03-01

    An alloy of reactor-grade sponge zirconium-2.5 wt. % niobium was exposed to water and steam at high temperature. The corrosion was twice that of Zircaloy-2 while hydrogen pickup was found to be equal to that of Zircaloy-2. Ternary additions of tin to this alloy in the range 0.5-1.5 had no effect on the corrosion resistance in water at 315 o C up to 100 days. At higher temperatures, tin increased the corrosion, the effect varying with temperature. Heat treatment of the alloys was shown to affect corrosion resistance. (author)

  20. Influence of Chloride Ion and Temperature on the Corrosion Behavior of Ni-Fe-Cr Alloy 028

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L. N.; Dong, J. X.; Szpunar, J. A.; Zhang, M. C.; Basu, R.

    Recently, the working condition of tubing systems used in oil and natural gas industries are severer than before with the increasing exploitation of acidic gas fields. The corrosion problems induced from the corrosive environment with chloride ion medium and high temperature have been much more concerned. The presence of chloride ion can accelerate the dissolution of metals. The corrosion performance is also sensitive to the operating temperature. Classic localized corrosions such as the pitting or the crevice type due to environmental temperature and chloride ion.

  1. High Temperature Corrosion of Nickel in NaVO3-V2O5 Melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Porcayo-Calderon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many alloys used at high temperature in industrial processes are Ni-based and many others contain it in appreciable quantities, so it is of interest to evaluate the performance of pure nickel in order to determine the behavior of its alloys once the elements responsible for their protection have been depleted due to accelerated corrosion processes in the presence of vanadium-rich molten salts. Due to this, this work presents the study of Ni behavior in NaVO3-V2O5 mixtures at different temperatures. The behavior of pure nickel was determined by both electrochemical and mass loss measurements. The results show that the aggressiveness of the vanadium salts is increased by increasing both the V2O5 content and temperature. V2O5 addition considerably increases the current densities of the anodic and cathodic reactions. The corrosion process of Ni is modified due to the presence of its corrosion products, and its presence increases the activation energy by at least one order of magnitude. Although nickel shows a high reactivity in vanadium-rich salts, its reaction products are highly stable and protect it from the corrosive medium because the corrosion reactions trap the vanadium and block the migration of nickel ions.

  2. Electrochemical noise evaluation of anodized aluminum. Comparative study against corrosion behaviour in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betancourt, N.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports the evaluation of aluminum and anodized aluminum by electrochemical noise, as a part of the PATINA/CYTED project of the working group Nº 5. A visual examination is also made. The samples were exposed at several Ibero-American atmospheres up to 2 years of exposure. Different thickness of anodized aluminum were evaluated. The electrochemical potential noise of the 5 μm unexposed sample (pattern showed a different behaviour to that showed by the other anodized specimens. This could be due to a slower sealed of the samples of higher thickness. The same behaviour was observed on the samples exposed at the rural station El Pardo. According to the visual examination, the samples of bare aluminum and those of anodized 5 μm thickness were the most affected by pitting corrosion in the highly polluted atmospheres. A good correlation between corrosion behaviour determined by visual examination and EN was obtained.

    Como parte de las investigaciones de la Red PATINA el grupo de trabajo Nº 5 dedicó su atención al comportamiento del aluminio desnudo y anodizado con diferentes espesores en diferentes atmósferas de Iberoamérica. En el presente trabajo se presenta una evaluación de patrones de aluminio 99,5 % de pureza desnudo y anodizado con espesores de 15 y 25 μm, mediante ruido electroquímico. Los resultados obtenidos se comparan con el comportamiento determinado en diferentes atmósferas durante un período de 2 años. El ruido de voltaje del patrón de 5 μm de espesor presenta un comportamiento diferente al de los restantes espesores, lo que coincide con una mayor susceptibilidad a la corrosión picadura de este primer anodizado. Se reportan también algunas diferencias en el ruido de corriente. Se concluye que mediante la utilización del ruido electroquímico es posible caracterizar el aluminio con respecto a su sensibilidad a la corrosión picadura en condiciones atmosféricas.

  3. High temperature corrosion of thermally sprayed NiCr- and amorphous Fe-based coatings covered with a KCl-K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varis, T.; Suhonen, T.; Tuurna, S.; Ruusuvuori, K.; Holmstroem, S.; Salonen, J. [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Bankiewicz, D.; Yrjas, P. [Aabo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    New process conditions due to the requirement of higher efficiency together with the use of high-chlorine and alkali containing fuels such as biomass and waste fuels for heat and electricity production will challenge the resistance and life of tube materials. In conventional materials the addition of alloying elements to increase the corrosion resistance in aggressive combustion conditions increases costs relatively rapidly. Thermally sprayed coating offer promising, effective, flexible and cost efficient solutions to fulfill the material needs for the future. Some heat exchanger design alteractions before global commercialization have to be overcome, though. High temperature corrosion in combustion plants can occur by a variety of mechanisms including passive scale degradation with subsequent rapid scaling, loss of adhesion and scale detachment, attack by melted or partly melted deposits via fluxing reactions and intergranular-/interlamellar corrosion. A generally accepted model of the ''active oxidation'' attributes the responsibility for inducing corrosion to chlorine. The active oxidation mechanism plays a key role in the thermally sprayed coatings due to their unique lamellar structure. In this study, the corrosion behaviour of NiCr (HVOF and Wire Arc), amorphous Fe-based, and Fe13Cr (Wire Arc) thermally sprayed coatings, were tested in the laboratory under simplified biomass combustion conditions. The tests were carried out by using a KCl-K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} salt mixture as a synthetic biomass ash, which was placed on the materials and then heat treated for one week (168h) at two different temperatures (550{sup 0}C and 600 C) and in two different gas atmospheres (air and air+30%H{sub 2}O). After the exposures, the metallographic cross sections of the coatings were studied with SEM/EDX analyzer. The results showed that the coatings behaved relatively well at the lower test temperature while critical corrosion through the lamella boundaries

  4. Is KCl(g) corrosive at temperatures above its dew point? Influence of KCl(g) on initial stages of the high temperature corrosion of 11% Cr steel at 600 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segerdahl, K.; Pettersson, J.; Svensson, J.E.; Johansson, L.G. [Dept. of Environmental Inorganic Chemistry, High Temperature Corrosion Centre, Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    The influence of gaseous KCl on the high temperature oxidation of CrMoV11 1 (X20) steel at 600 C is reported. The sample temperature was above the dew point of KCl, the partial pressure of KCl being about 5ppm. The samples were investigated by a number of surface analytical techniques including grazing angle XRD, SEM/EDX, and SAM. CrMoV11 1 steel shows protective behaviour in clean dry O{sub 2} and O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O environment because of the formation of a chromium-rich oxide ({alpha}-(Fe,Cr){sub 2}O{sub 3}). It is often considered that alkali salts accelerate the corrosion of steel only when present on the surface in solid or liquid form. In contrast, the present result shows that gaseous KCl is very corrosive, also in the absence of condensation. KCl(g) reacts with chromium in the scale, forming K{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}(s). This depletes the protective oxide in chromium and leads to the formation of non-protective hematite, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. (orig.)

  5. Low-temperature behaviour of the engine oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kumbár

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of engine oil is very important. In this paper has been evaluated temperature dependence kinematic viscosity of engine oils in the low temperatures. Five different commercially distributed engine oils (primarily intended for automobile engines with viscosity class 0W–40, 5W–40, 10W–40, 15W–40, and 20W–40 have been evaluated. The temperature dependence kinematic viscosity has been observed in the range of temperature from −15 °C to 15 °C (for all oils. Considerable temperature dependence kinematic viscosity was found and demonstrated in case of all samples, which is in accordance with theoretical assumptions and literature data. Mathematical models have been developed and tested. Temperature dependence dynamic viscosity has been modeled using a polynomials 3rd and 4th degree. The proposed models can be used for prediction of flow behaviour of oils. With monitoring and evaluating we can prevent technical and economic losses.

  6. Evaluation of High Temperature Corrosion Resistance of Finned Tubes Made of Austenitic Steel And Nickel Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turowska A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper was to evaluate the resistance to high temperature corrosion of laser welded joints of finned tubes made of austenitic steel (304,304H and nickel alloys (Inconel 600, Inconel 625. The scope of the paper covered the performance of corrosion resistance tests in the atmosphere of simulated exhaust gases of the following chemical composition: 0.2% HCl, 0.08% SO2, 9.0% O2 and N2 in the temperature of 800°C for 1000 hours. One found out that both tubes made of austenitic steel and those made of nickel alloy displayed good resistance to corrosion and could be applied in the energy industry.

  7. Coal-fired power plants and the causes of high temperature corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oakey, J E; Simms, N J [British Coal Corporation, Coal Technology Development Div., Cheltenham, Glos (United Kingdom); Tomkings, A B [ERA Technology Ltd., Leatherhead, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-01

    The heat exchangers in all types of coal-fired power plant operate in aggressive, high temperature environments where high temperature corrosion can severely limit their service lives. The extent of this corrosion is governed by the combined effects of the operating conditions of the heat exchanger and the presence of corrosive species released from the coal during operation. This paper reviews the coal-related factors, such as ash deposition, which influence the operating environments of heat exchangers in three types of coal-fired power plant - conventional pulverized coal boilers, fluidized bed boilers and coal gasification systems. The effects on the performance of the materials used for these heat exchangers are then compared. (au) 35 refs.

  8. Laboratory Study of High Temperature Corrosion in Straw-fired Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Maahn, Ernst emanuel

    1997-01-01

    The components contributing to corrosion, HCl(g)SO2(g), KCl and K2SO4 were studied in the laboratory for Sandvik 8LR30 and Sanicro 28. The influence of HCl and SO2 was investigated at 600C material temperature and 600/800C flue gas temperature at time intervals up to 300 hours. The influence of ash...... deposits in air was examined at 525C-700C. Finally exposures were undertaken combining the aforementioned aggressive gas environment with the ash deposits. Thus the corrosion potential of individual components were evaluated and also whether they had a synergistic, antagonistic or additive effect on one...... another to influence the overall corrosion rate....

  9. Thermodynamic behaviour of tellurium at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garisto, F.

    1992-09-01

    Thermodynamic calculations are used to determine the chemical speciation of tellurium in the primary heat transport system under postulated reactor accident conditions. The speciation of tellurium is determined for various values of the temperature, oxygen partial pressure, tellurium concentration and Cs/Te ratio. The effects of the Zircaloy cladding and/or cesium on tellurium speciation and volatility are of particular interest in this report. (Author) (37 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.)

  10. High temperature corrosion control and monitoring for processing acidic crudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, C. [Betz/GE Water and Process Technologies, Woodlands, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The challenge of processing heavy crudes and bitumen in a reliable and economical way was discussed. Many refiners use a conservative approach regarding the rate at which they use discounted crudes or depend upon capital-intensive upgrades to equipment. New strategies based on data-driven decisions are needed in order to obtain the greatest benefit from heavy feedstock. The feasibility of successfully processing more challenging feed can be estimated more accurately by better understanding the interactions between a particular feed and a particular crude unit. This presentation reviewed newly developed techniques that refiners can use to determine the feeds corrosion potential and the probability for this potential to manifest itself in a given crude unit. tabs., figs.

  11. Intergranular corrosion of 13Cr and 17Cr martensitic stainless steels in accelerated corrosive solution and high-temperature, high-purity water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Toshinori; Ishikawa, Yuichi

    1988-01-01

    Intergranular corrosion behavior of 13Cr and 17Cr martensitic stainless steels was studied by electrochemical and immersing corrosion tests. Effects of the mEtallurgical and environmental conditions on the intergranular corrosion of various tempered steels were examined by the following tests and discussed. (a) Anodic polarization measurement and electrolytical etching test in 0.5 kmol/m 3 H 2 SO 4 solution at 293 K. (b) Immersion corrosion test in 0.88 kmol/m 3 HNO 3 solution at 293 K. (c) Long-time immersion test for specimens with a crevice in a high purity water at 473 K∼561 K. It was found from the anodic polarization curves in 0.5 kmol/m 3 H 2 SO 4 solution-at 293 K that the steels tempered at 773∼873 K had susceptibility to intergranular corrosion in the potential region indicating a second current maximum (around-0.1 V. vs. SCE). But the steel became passive in the more noble potential region than the second current peak potential, while in the less noble potential region general corrosion occurred independent of its microstructure. The intergranular corrosion occurred due to the localized dissolution along the pre-austenitic grain boundary and the martensitic lath boundary. It could be explained by the same dissolution model of the chromium depleted zone as proposed for the intergranular corrosion of austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. The intergranular corrosion occurred entirely at the free surface in 0.88 kmol/m 3 HNO 3 solution, while in the high temperature and high purity water only the entrance of the crevice corroded. It was also suggested that this intergranular corrosion might serve as the initiation site for stress corrosion cracking of the martensitic stainless steel. (author)

  12. Ash deposition and high temperature corrosion at combustion of aggressive fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hede Larsen, O [I/S Fynsvaerket, Faelleskemikerne, Odense (Denmark); Henriksen, N [Elsamprojekt A/S, Faelleskemikerne, Fredericia (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emission, ELSAM is investigating the possibilities of using biomass - mainly straw - for combustion in high efficiency power plants. As straw has very high contents of chlorine and potassium, a fuel with high corrosion and ash deposition propensities has been introduced. ELSAM has investigated 3 ultra supercritical boiler concepts for combustion of straw alone or together with coal: (1) PF boilers with a relatively low share of straw, (2) CFB boilers with low to high share of straw and (3) vibrating grate boilers with 100% straw. These investigations has mainly been full-scale tests with straw fed into existing boilers. Corrosion tests have been performed in these boilers using temperature regulated probes and in-plant test tubes in existing superheaters. The corrosion has been determined by detailed measurements of wall thickness reduction and light optical microscopic measurements of the material degradation due to high temperature corrosion. Corrosion mechanisms have been evaluated using SEM/EDX together with thermodynamical considerations based on measurements of the chemical environment in the flue gas. Ash deposition is problematic in CFB boilers and in straw fired boilers, especially in years with high potassium and chlorine content of the straw. This ash deposition also is related to condensation of KCl and can probably only be handled by improved cleaning devices. (EG)

  13. Thermal Spray Coatings for High-Temperature Corrosion Protection in Biomass Co-Fired Boilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksa, M.; Metsäjoki, J.; Kärki, J.

    2015-01-01

    There are over 1000 biomass boilers and about 500 plants using waste as fuel in Europe, and the numbers are increasing. Many of them encounter serious problems with high-temperature corrosion due to detrimental elements such as chlorides, alkali metals, and heavy metals. By HVOF spraying, it is possible to produce very dense and well-adhered coatings, which can be applied for corrosion protection of heat exchanger surfaces in biomass and waste-to-energy power plant boilers. Four HVOF coatings and one arc sprayed coating were exposed to actual biomass co-fired boiler conditions in superheater area with a probe measurement installation for 5900 h at 550 and 750 °C. The coating materials were Ni-Cr, IN625, Fe-Cr-W-Nb-Mo, and Ni-Cr-Ti. CJS and DJ Hybrid spray guns were used for HVOF spraying to compare the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr coating structures. Reference materials were ferritic steel T92 and nickel super alloy A263. The circulating fluidized bed boiler burnt a mixture of wood, peat and coal. The coatings showed excellent corrosion resistance at 550 °C compared to the ferritic steel. At higher temperature, NiCr sprayed with CJS had the best corrosion resistance. IN625 was consumed almost completely during the exposure at 750 °C.

  14. Resistance of various coatings to high temperature corrosion in HCl and SO{sub 2} containing environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cizner, Josef; Mlnarik, Jakub; Hruska, Jan [SVUM a.s., Prague (Czech Republic). Lab. of High Temperature Corrosion

    2010-07-01

    For high efficiency of the steam turbines it is necessary to produce steam of temperature at least 400 C, which in conjunction with specific composition of combustion gases causes fireside corrosion problems. The combustion gases contain aggressive compounds ike HCl and SO{sub 2} and some other elements which can form deposits on heat exchanging surfaces e.g. calcium, potassium salts etc. Using of high-alloy steels or nickel-based alloys is very costly and also these materials could have lower thermal conductivity. A cheaper solution is to produce a coating on low (medium)-alloy steel. Common heat-resistant steels show very short lifetime under these conditions. The solution is then to use the appropriate coatings. Some types of coatings can be applied even inside older boilers. In this work we tested many coatings composition (nickel-based, aluminium-based etc. As well as with different processing method - arc sprayed coating, weld deposits, HVOF, etc.) on 16Mo3 steel. In particular their high temperature corrosion behaviour in model atmosphere containing SO{sub 2} and HCl and also under deposit of fly ash was studied. (orig.)

  15. Corrosion behavior induced by LiCl-KCl in type 304 and 316 stainless steel and copper at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Jee Hyung; Kim, Yong Soo; Cho, Il Je [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The corrosion behavior of stainless steel (304 and 316 type) and copper induced by LiCl-KCl at low temperatures in the presence of sufficient oxygen and moisture was investigated through a series of experiments (at 30°C, 40°C, 60°C, and 80°C for 24 hours, 48 hours, 72 hours, and 96 hours). The specimens not coated on one side with an aqueous solution saturated with LiCl-KCl experienced no corrosion at any temperature, not even when the test duration exceeded 96 hours. Stainless steel exposed to LiCl-KCl experienced almost no corrosion below 40°C, but pitting corrosion was observed at temperatures above 60°C. As the duration of the experiment was increased, the rate of corrosion accelerated in proportion to the temperature. The 316 type stainless steel exhibited better corrosion resistance than did the 304 type. In the case of copper, the rate of corrosion accelerated in proportion to the duration and temperature but, unlike the case of stainless steel, the corrosion was more general. As a result, the extent of copper corrosion was about three times that of stainless steel.

  16. The stress-corrosion behaviour in water media containing chlorine of the brazing joint of grids for PWR fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weijie; Li Wenqing.

    1985-01-01

    This paper details the testing results of the stress-corrosion behaviour in the 150 deg C water media containing chlorine for the brazing joints made from three alloy systems, which are Ni-Cr-Si, Ni-Cr-P and Ni-P, including 16 compositions. The test results indicate that, in the Ni-Cr-Si system, Ni-Cr-Si-Ge brazing joint is the best, to resist stress-corrosion, while Ni-Cr-Si-P-Ge-Pd and BNi5 brazing joints are better. In the Ni-Cr-P system, only the Ni-Cr-P-Mo-Zr brazing joint has an excellent resistance to stress-corrosion

  17. High temperature chlorosilane corrosion of iron and AISI 316L stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Joshua Loren

    Chlorosilane gas streams are used at high temperatures (>500°C) throughout the semiconductor, polycrystalline silicon, and fumed silica industries, primarily as a way to refine, deposit, and produce silicon and silicon containing materials. The presence of both chlorine and silicon in chlorosilane species creates unique corrosion environments due to the ability of many metals to form both metal-chlorides and metal-silicides, and it is further complicated by the fact that many metal-chlorides are volatile at high-temperatures while metal-silicides are generally stable. To withstand the uniquely corrosive environments, expensive alloys are often utilized, which increases the cost of final products. This work focuses on the corrosion behavior of iron, the primary component of low-cost alloys, and AISI 316L, a common low-cost stainless steel, in environments representative of industrial processes. The experiments were conducted using a customized high temperature chlorosilane corrosion system that exposed samples to an atmospheric pressure, high temperature, chlorosilane environment with variable input amounts of hydrogen, silicon tetrachloride, and hydrogen chloride plus the option of embedding samples in silicon during the exposure. Pre and post exposure sample analysis including scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and gravimetric analysis showed the surface corrosion products varied depending on the time, temperature, and environment that the samples were exposed to. Most commonly, a volatile chloride product formed first, followed by a stratified metal silicide layer. The chlorine and silicon activities in the corrosion environment were changed independently and were found to significantly alter the corrosion behavior; a phenomenon supported by computational thermodynamic equilibrium simulations. It was found that in comparable environments, the stainless steel corroded significantly less than the pure iron. This

  18. Application of aluminum diffusion coatings to mitigate the KCl-induced high-temperature corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiamehr, Saeed; Lomholt, T. N.; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2017-01-01

    Pack cementation was used to produce Fe1−xAl and Fe2Al5 diffusion coatings on ferritic-martensitic steel P91 and a Ni2Al3 diffusion coating on pure nickel. The performance of diffusion coatings against high-temperature corrosion induced by potassium chloride (KCl) was evaluated by exposing...

  19. The corrosion rate measurement of Inconel 690 on high temperature and pressure by using CMS100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyono; Satmoko, Ari; Febrianto; Hidayati, N R; Arifal; Sumarno, Ady; Handoyo, Ismu; Prasetjo, Joko

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion rate measurement of Inconel 690 on high temperature and pressure had been done. By using an Autoclave, and temperature can be simulated. For reducing the pressure on Autoclave so its can be measure by Corrosion Measurement System 100(CMS100), the electrodes placement had designed and fabrication on the cover of Autoclave. The electrodes of CMS100 are reference electrode, working electrodes and counter electrodes. The electrodes placement are made and and designed on two packages, these are Salt bridge and Counter-specimen placement. From the result of testing these both of placement are able to 90 bar (pressure) and 280 C (temperature) operation rate measurement was done on temperature variation from 150 0C, 190 0C, 200 0C, 210 0C, 220 0C and 230 0C, and the solution is 0.1 ppm chloride. The pressure experiment is the pressure, which occurred in Autoclave. From the Tafel analysis, even through very little The corrosion current increased from 150 C to 230 C it is 2,54x10-10 a/cm2 to 1,62x10-9 A/cm2, but the the corrosion rate is still zero

  20. Effect of heat treatment conditions on stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloy X-750 in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Onimura, Kichiro; Sakamoto, Naruo; Sasaguri, Nobuya; Susukida, Hiroshi; Nakata, Hidenori.

    1984-01-01

    In order to improve the resistance of the Alloy X-750 in high temperature and high purity water, the authors investigated the influence of heat treatment condition on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the alloy. This paper describes results of the stress corrosion cracking test and some discussion on the mechanism of the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water. The following results were obtained. (1) The stress corrosion cracking resistance of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water remarkably depended upon the heat treatment condition. The materials solution heat treated and aged within temperature ranges from 1065 to 1100 0 C and from 704 to 732 0 C, respectively, have a good resistance to the stress corrosion cracking in deaerated high temperature water. Especially, water cooling after the solution heat treatment gives an excellent resistance to the stress corrosion cracking in deaerated high temperature water. (2) Any correlations were not observed between the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Alloy X-750 in deaerated high temperature water and grain boundary chromium depleted zones, precipitate free zones and the grain boundary segregation of impurity elements and so on. It appears that there are good correlations between the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the alloy in the environment and the kinds, morphology and coherency of precipitates along the grain boundaries. (author)

  1. Electrochemical Corrosion Behaviour of Alumina-Al 6061 and Silicon Carbide-Al 6061 Metal-Matrix Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, K.E.; Gad, M.M.A.; El-Sayed, A.A.; Moustafa, O.H.

    2001-01-01

    The electrochemical corrosion behaviour of powder metallurgy-processed metal-matrix composites (MMCs)based on Al alloy 6061 reinforced with particulate Al 2 O 3 or Sic has been studied in chloride-containing environment. Also, the corrosion behaviour of the unrein forced Al 6061 produced by the same route investigated. Electrochemical tests were conducted on composites containing 10 and 20 vo l% of both reinforced particulates. Potentiodynamic polarization tests have been carried out in neutral as well as acidic and alkaline de-aerated 10 -3 M Na CI solution. In the neutral environment, the addition of Al 2 O 3 particulates was found to shift both the corrosion potential (E corr ) and the break down potential (E b ) slightly into the positive direction irrespective of the volume fraction added (10 and 20 vo l%). On the other hand , Sic caused a shift of E corr into the active site while the E b value was slightly ennobled. For both composites, the corrosion current values at the break down potentials were almost the same as the unrein forced alloy. In an attempt to further clarify the role of both particulate addition, cathodic polarization runs were conducted in both acidic (ph 3) and alkaline (ph 9)solutions for 20 vo l% of Al 2 O 3 and 20 vo l% Sic composite specimens. This indicated that cathodic current values for Sic composites were higher than those corresponding to the unrein forced alloy 6061, and those for the Al 2 O 3 composites were lower

  2. Effect of ultrafine grain on tensile behaviour and corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Limin, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel was obtained by cold rolling and annealing. The tensile properties were investigated at room temperature. Comparing with coarse grained stainless steel, ultrafine grained sample showed higher strength and plasticity. In addition, grain size changed deformation orientation. The strain induced α'-martensite was observed in coarse grained 2205 duplex stainless steel with large strain. However, the grain refinement inhibited the transformation of α'-martensite;nevertheless, more deformation twins improved the strength and plasticity of ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel. In addition, the grain refinement improved corrosion resistance of the 2205 duplex stainless steel in sodium chloride solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. High-temperature corrosion of lanthanum in equimole mixture of sodium and potassium chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochergin, V.P.; Obozhina, R.N.; Dragoshanskaya, T.I.; Startsev, B.P.

    1984-01-01

    Results of investigation into the process of lanthanum corrosion in the molted equimole NaCl-KCl mixture after the change of test time, temperature and lanthanum trichloride were summarized. It was shown that polarization of lanthanum anode in equimole NaCl-KCl melt is controlled by La 3+ diffusion from near-electrode layer to electrolyte depth, which results in decrease of corrosion rate in time. The established electrochemical properties of metallic lanthanum in equimole NaCl-KCl mixture must be considered when improving the technology of electrochemical production of lanthanum or its alloys of molten chlorides of lanthanum and alkaline metals

  4. Task 20 - Prevention of Chloride Corrosion in High-Temperature Waste Treatment Systems (Corrosives Removals from Vitrification Slurries)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timpe, R.C.; Aulich, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    GTS Duratek is working with BNFL Incorporated on a US Department of Energy (DOE) contract to develop a facility to treat and immobilize radioactive waste at the Hanford site in southeast Washington. Development of the 10-ton/day Hanford facility will be based on findings from work at Duratek's 3.3-ton/day pilot plant in Columbia, Maryland, which is in the final stage of construction and scheduled for shakedown testing in early 1999. In prior work with the Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory, Duratek has found that slurrying is the most efficient way to introduce low-level radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes into vitrification melters. However, many of the Hanford tank wastes to be vitrified contain species (primarily chloride and sulfate) that are corrosive to the vitrifier or the downstream air pollution control equipment, especially under the elevated temperature conditions existent in these components. Removal of these corrosives presents a significant challenge because most tank wastes contain high (up to 10-molar) concentrations of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) along with significant levels of nitrate, nitrite, and other anions, which render standard ion-exchange, membrane filtration, and other separation technologies relatively ineffective. In Task 20, the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) will work with Duratek to develop and optimize a vitrification pretreatment process for consistent, quantitative removal of chloride and sulfate prior to vitrifier injection

  5. Corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel, nickel-base alloy and its weldments in aqueous LiBr solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Igual-Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Garcia-Garcia, D. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. E.T.S.I.Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012 E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    With the advances in materials production new alloys have been developed, such as High- Alloy Austenitic Stainless Steels and Nickel-base alloys, with high corrosion resistance. These new alloys are finding applications in Lithium Bromide absorption refrigeration systems, because LiBr is a corrosive medium which can cause serious corrosion problems, in spite of its favourable properties as absorbent. The objective of the present work was to study the corrosion resistance of a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031) used as base metal, a Nickel-base alloy (UNS N06059) used as its corresponding filler metal, and the weld metal obtained by the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) procedure. The materials have been tested in different LiBr solutions (400 g/l, 700 g/l, 850 g/l and a commercial 850 g/l LiBr heavy brine containing Lithium Chromate as corrosion inhibitor), at 25 deg. C. Open Circuit Potential tests and potentiodynamic anodic polarization curves have been carried out to obtain information about the general electrochemical behaviour of the materials. The polarization curves of all the alloys tested were typical of passivable materials. Pitting corrosion susceptibility has been evaluated by means of cyclic potentiodynamic curves, which provide parameters to analyse re-passivation properties. The galvanic corrosion generated by the electrical contact between the welded and the base material has been estimated from the polarization diagrams according to the Mixed Potential Method. Samples have been etched to study the microstructure by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate that the pitting resistance of all these materials increases as the LiBr concentration decreases. In general, the presence of chromate tended to shift the pitting potential to more positive values than those obtained in the 850 g/l LiBr solution. (authors)

  6. Corrosion behaviour of dissimilar welds between martensitic stainless steel and carbon steel from secondary circuit of candu npp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popa, L.; Fulger, M.; Tunaru, M.; Velciu, L.; Lazar, M.

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion damages of welds occur in spite of the fact that the proper base metal and filler metal have been correctly selected, industry codes and standards have been followed and welds have been realized with full weld penetration and have proper shape and contour. It is not unusual to find that, although the base metal or alloy is resistant to corrosion in a particular environment, the welded counterpart is not resistant. In secondary circuit of a Nuclear Power Station there are some components which have dissimilar welds. Our experiments were performed in chloride environmental on two types of samples: non-welded (420 martensitic steel and 52.2k carbon steel) and dissimilar welds (dissimilar metal welds: joints beetween 420 martensitic steel and 52.2k carbon steel). To evaluate corrosion susceptibility of dissimilar welds was used electrochemical method (potentiodynamic method) and metallography microscopy (microstructural analysis). The present paper follows the localized corrosion behaviour of dissimilar welds between austenitic stainless steel and carbon steel in solutions containing chloride ions. We have been evaluated the corrosion rates of samples (welded and non-welded) by electrochemically. (authors)

  7. The effect of boron implantation on the corrosion behaviour, microhardness and contact resistance of copper and silver surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, O.; Johnson, E.; Johansen, A.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.

    1986-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of boron implantation on the corrosion resistance of electrical contacts, a number of pure copper, pure silver and copper edge connector samples have been implanted with boron (40 keV) to fluences of 5.10 20 m -2 and 2.10 21 m -2 . Atmospheric corrosion tests of the implanted species were conducted using the following exposures: H 2 S (12.5 ppm, 4 days), SO 2 (25 ppm, 21 days), saltfog (5% NaCl, 1 day), moist air (93% RH, 56 days), and hot/dry air (70 C, 56 days). The boron implantations lead to a significant reduction in the sulphidation rate of copper and silver. The corrosive film formed during exposure in H 2 S and SO 2 atmospheres is confined to pitted regions on the implanted areas, while a thick and relatively uniform film formation is observed on the unimplanted samples. The corrosion resistance of copper and silver in saltfog atmosphere is somewhat improved by boron implantation, whilst the results from exposures to moist air or hot/dry air are inconclusive. The improved corrosion behaviour is accompanied by an increase in the contact resistance and in the microhardness of the implanted samples. (orig.)

  8. Studies of the corrosion and cracking behavior of steels in high temperature water by electrochemical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Y.F.; Bullerwell, J.; Steward, F.R.

    2003-01-01

    Electrochemical methods were used to study the corrosion and cracking behavior of five Fe-Cr alloy steels and 304L stainless steel in high temperature water. A layer of magnetite film forms on the metal surface, which decreases the corrosion rate in high temperature water. Passivity can be achieved on A-106 B carbon steel with a small content of chromium, which cannot be passivated at room temperature. The formation rate and the stability of the passive film (magnetite film) increased with increasing Cr-content in the steels. A mechanistic model was developed to simulate the corrosion and cracking processes of steels in high temperature water. The crack growth rate on steels was calculated from the maximum current of the repassivation current curves according to the slip-oxidation model. The highest crack growth rate was found for 304L stainless steel in high temperature water. Of the four Fe-Cr alloys, the crack growth rate was lower on 0.236% Cr- and 0.33% Cr-steels than on 0.406% Cr-steel and 2.5% Cr-1% Mo steel. The crack growth rate on 0.33% Cr-steel was the smallest over the tested potential range. A higher temperature of the electrolyte led to a higher rate of electrochemical dissolution of steel and a higher susceptibility of steel to cracking, as shown by the positive increase of the electrochemical potential. An increase in Cr-content in the steel is predicted to reduce the corrosion rate of steel at high temperatures. However, this increase in Cr-content is predicted not to reduce the susceptibility of steel to cracking at high temperatures. (author)

  9. 3D, chemical and electrochemical characterization of blasted TI6Al4V surfaces: Its influence on the corrosion behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, V.; Escudero, M.L.; Garcia-Alonso, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    The blasting process to increase the roughness of the surface of metallic biomaterials is widely used. As a consequence, one can produce a renewed surface with different topography and chemical composition compared to the original one, which can alter the general corrosion behaviour of the samples. With this idea, the aim of this work is not only the topographical and compositional characterization of blasted surfaces of Ti6Al4V alloy but mainly its influence on the corrosion behaviour of these modified surfaces. The surfaces of Ti6Al4V alloys were blasted with SiO 2 /ZrO 2 and Al 2 O 3 particles of different size in order to obtain different roughnesses. To carry out the microstructural and topographical characterization of the blasted surfaces, the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), the contact profilometry method and the 3D characterization by means of stereo-Fe-SEM have been used. By means of stereo-Fe-SEM, the roughness and the real surface area of the rough surfaces have been calculated. The microstructural, topographical and compositional results have been correlated with the corrosion behaviour of the samples immersed in Hank's solution and studied by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The blasting process alters topographical and chemically the surface of the samples. These modifications induce to an increase in the capacitance values of the roughened samples due to the prevalence of the effect of electrochemically active areas of Ti6Al4V surface over the effect of the presence of Al 2 O 3 and ZrO 2 particles on the blasted surfaces. However, the general corrosion behaviour of the samples is not drastically changed

  10. Moessbauer study of the composition and corrosion behaviour of electrodeposited and cast brass containing 1-4 m% tin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Suba, M.; Varsanyi-Lakatos, M.; Czako-Nagy, I.; Pchelnikov, A.P.; Losev, V.V.

    1982-01-01

    Moessbauer measurements on electrodeposited and cast brass containing 1-4 m% tin were carried out using conversion electron detector. It was found that the tin formed phases with copper but not with zinc. The identified phases were β, γ, epsilon and eta and their ratio depended on the tin concentration and on the preparation process of the brass. The corrosion behaviour of the samples was also studied. (author)

  11. High temperature salt corrosion cracking of intermediate products of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinyavskij, V.S.; Usova, V.V.; Lunina, S.I.; Kushakevich, S.A.; Makhmutova, E.A.; Khanina, Z.K.

    1982-01-01

    The high temperature salt corrosion cracking (HTSCC) of intermediate products from titanium base alloys in the form of hot rolled plates and rods has been studied. The investigated materials are as follows: VT20 pseudo-α-alloy, VT6 and VT14 α+β alloys; the comparison has been carried out with commercial titanium and low-alloyed OT4-1 α-alloy. The experiments have been held at 400 and 500 deg C, defining different stress levels: 0.4; 0.5; 0.75 and 0.9 tausub(0.2). The test basis - not less than 100 h. Standard tensile samples of circular cross section with NaCl (approximately 0.2-0.3 mg/cm 2 ) salt coatings, cut off from hot-rolled rods along the direction of rolling and hot-rolled plates along and across the direction of rolling have been tested. It has been extablished before hand that the notch doesn't affect the resistance of titanium alloys to HTSCC. The sensitivity of titanium alloy subproducts to HTSCC is estimated as to the time until the failure of the sample with salt coatings and without them. It is shown that salt coating practically doesn't affect the behaviour of titanium, that allows to consider it to be resistant to HTSCC. Titanium alloys alloying with β-isomorphous stabilizing additions increases it's HTSCC resistance. Vanadium alloying of the alloy (VT6 alloy of Ti-Al-V system) produces a favourable effect; intermediate products of VT14 (α+β) alloy (Ti-Al-V-Mo system), containing two β-stabilizing additions-vanadium and molybdenum, have satisfactory HTSCC resistance. It is shown that by changes is mechanical properties of alloys during HTSCC one can indirectly judge about their HTSCC sensitivity

  12. Corrosion product behaviour in the primary circuit of the KNK nuclear reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamm, H.H.; Stade, K.Ch.

    1976-01-01

    During nuclear operation of the KNK facility from 1972 until September 1974 the composition and behaviour of radionuclides occuring in the primary circuit were investigated. Besides traces of 140 Ba/ 140 La, no fission product activity was detectable in the KNK primary circuit. The fuel element purification from sodium deposits (prior to transport to the reprocessing plant) did not yield any indication of a fuel element failure during KNK-I operation. The activity inventory of the primary loop was exclusively made up of activated corrosion products and 22 Na. The main activity was due to 65 Zn, followed by 54 Mn, 22 Na, sup(110m)Ag, 182 Ta, 60 Co and 124 Sb. It was found that the sorption of 65 Zn and 54 Mn on crucibles made from nickel was condiserably higher than on vessels made from other materials. This observation was confirmed both in tests with material samples from the primary circuit and for disks of gate valves of the primary circuit. sup(110m)Ag did hardly exhibit any sorption effects and had been dissolved largely homogeneously in the hot primary coolant. In the first primary cold trap which was removed from the circuit after some 20,000 hours of operation, only 65 Zn and 54 Mn were detected in addition to traces of 60 Co and 182 Ta. (author)

  13. Effect of Metakaolin and Slag blended Cement on Corrosion Behaviour of Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borade, Anita N.; Kondraivendhan, B.

    2017-06-01

    The present paper is aimed to investigate the influence of Metakaolin (MK) and Portland slag Cement (PSC) on corrosion behaviour of concrete. For this purpose, Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) was replaced by 15% MK by weight and readymade available PSC were used. The standard concrete specimens were prepared for both compressive strength and half- cell potential measurement. For the aforesaid experiments, the specimens were cast with varying water to binder ratios (w/b) such as 0.45, 0.5 and 0.55 and exposed to 0%, 3%, 5% and 7.5% of sodium chloride (NaCl) solution. The specimens were tested at wide range of curing ages namely 7, 28, 56, 90 and 180 days. The effects of MK, w/b ratio, age, and NaCl exposure upon concrete were demonstrated in this investigation along with the comparison of results of both MK and PSC concrete were done. It was also observed that concrete with MK shows improved performance as compared to concrete with PSC.

  14. Low temperature corrosion in bark fuelled, small boilers; Laagtemperaturkorrosion i barkeldade, mindre pannor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindau, Leif; Goldschmidt, Barbara [Sycon Energikonsult AB, Malmoe (Sweden)

    2002-04-01

    A number of small (3-12 MW), new biofuel boiler plants in South Sweden, and (at least) in Austria, have suffered a high (wastage of mm/yrs.) corrosion rate on the low temperature boiler side. This problem has been investigated with respect to its occurrence and its character by contacts with operators, by plant inspections, and by analysis of cold side deposits. The plants affected have low feed water temperatures (< 100 deg C ). The plants fire most types of Swedish biofuel: chips, bark, hog fuel, and 'GROT'(=twigs and tops). The results found give basis for a hypothesis that the corrosion results from the presence of an aqueous phase in the deposits, this phase being stabilized by dissolved salts having high solubility. It then follows that for each salt, there is a critical relative humidity (calculated from the flue gas water partial pressure and the cooling surface temperature as is common practice among boiler engineers) for both the presence of the aqueous phase and the corrosion. Some critical single salts, ZnC12 and CaC12 have been identified, and they give critical 'relative humidities' of 5% and 18% respectively. These figures are a lower bound. The corresponding figure, derived from the practical experience and the reported plant operational data, is between 20 and 30%. Corrosion tests have been carried out by exposing an air-cooled probe in the fluegases at a 12 MW boiler at Saevelundsverket in Alingsaas, and the material wastage at different temperatures has been measured with a profilometer. The high corrosion rates were reproduced in the tests for high relative humidities. The corrosion rate was small and not measurable (<0.1 mm/yr) for relative humidity < 22%. The work shows by means of indirect evidence that the corrosion critical components are ZnCl{sub 2} and possibly CaCl{sub 2} as well. The practical engineering design criterion derived from the work is that the relative humidity (calculated from the flue gas water partial

  15. Erosion-corrosion resistance properties of 316L austenitic stainless steels after low-temperature liquid nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangfeng; Wang, Jun; Fan, Hongyuan; Pan, Dong

    2018-05-01

    The low-temperature liquid nitriding of stainless steels can result in the formation of a surface zone of so-called expanded austenite (S-phase) by the dissolution of large amounts of nitrogen in the solid solution and formation of a precipitate-free layer supersaturated with high hardness. Erosion-corrosion measurements were performed on low-temperature nitrided and non-nitrided 316L stainless steels. The total erosion-corrosion, erosion-only, and corrosion-only wastages were measured directly. As expected, it was shown that low-temperature nitriding dramatically reduces the degree of erosion-corrosion in stainless steels, caused by the impingement of particles in a corrosive medium. The nitrided 316L stainless steels exhibited an improvement of almost 84% in the erosion-corrosion resistance compared to their non-nitrided counterparts. The erosion-only rates and synergistic levels showed a general decline after low-temperature nitriding. Low-temperature liquid nitriding can not only reduce the weight loss due to erosion but also significantly reduce the weight loss rate of interactions, so that the total loss of material decreased evidently. Therefore, 316L stainless steels displayed excellent erosion-corrosion behaviors as a consequence of their highly favorable corrosion resistances and superior wear properties.

  16. Corrosion behaviour of laser surface melted magnesium alloy AZ91D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taltavull, C.; Torres, B.; Lopez, A.J.; Rodrigo, P.; Otero, E.; Atrens, A.; Rams, J.

    2014-01-01

    A high power diode laser (HPDL) was used to produce laser surface melting (LSM) treatments on the surface of the Mg alloy AZ91D. Different treatments with different microstructures were produced by varying the laser-beam power and laser-scanning speed. Corrosion evaluation, using hydrogen evolution and electrochemical measurements, led to a relationship between microstructure and corrosion. Most corrosion rates for LSM treated specimens were within the scatter of the as-received AZ91D, whereas some treatments gave higher corrosion rates and some of the samples had corrosion rates lower than the average of the corrosion rate for AZ91D. There were differences in corroded surface morphology. Nevertheless laser treatments introduced surface discontinuities, which masked the effect of the microstructure. Removing these surface defects decreased the corrosion rate for the laser-treated samples. - Highlights: • Corrosion behavior of AZ91D Mg alloys is intimately related with its microstructure. • Laser surface melting treatments allows surface modification of the microstructure. • Different laser parameters can achieve different microstructures. • Controlling laser parameters can produce different corrosion rates and morphologies. • Increase of surface roughness due to laser treatment is relevant to the corrosion rate

  17. The effect of temperature and concentration on the corrosion inhibition mechanism of an amphiphilic amido-amine in CO2 saturated solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desimone, M.P.; Gordillo, G.; Simison, S.N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Behaviour of N-[2-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]ethyl]-9-octadecenamide (AAOA) as CO 2 corrosion inhibitor. → The adsorption of the AAOA corrosion inhibitor obeys a Frumkin adsorption isotherm. → The inhibition efficiency of the AAOA depends on temperature and concentration. → There is a change in the adsorption mode of the inhibitor with concentration. → AAOA is mainly physi- or chemisorbed for low or high concentrations, respectively. - Abstract: The corrosion inhibition mechanism of the N-[2-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]ethyl]-9-octadecenamide on mild steel surface in CO 2 -saturated 5% NaCl solution has been studied. The inhibition efficiency decreases with increasing temperature. Adsorption of the inhibitor studied is found to follow the Frumkin adsorption isotherm. EIS results show that the mechanism of its corrosion inhibition at concentrations higher than critical micelle concentration is by forming a protective porous bi-layer. The activation energy, thermodynamic parameters and electrochemical results reveal a change in the adsorption mode of the inhibitor studied: the inhibitor could primarily be physically adsorbed at low concentrations, while chemisorption is favoured as concentration increases.

  18. Effect of Aging Temperature on Corrosion Behavior of Sintered 17-4 PH Stainless Steel in Dilute Sulfuric Acid Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk-Nykiel, Aneta; Kazior, Jan

    2017-07-01

    The general corrosion behavior of sintered 17-4 PH stainless steel processed under different processing conditions in dilute sulfuric acid solution at 25 °C was studied by open-circuit potential measurement and potentiodynamic polarization technique. The corrosion resistance was evaluated based on electrochemical parameters, such as polarization resistance, corrosion potential, corrosion current density as well as corrosion rate. The results showed that the precipitation-hardening treatment could significantly improve the corrosion resistance of the sintered 17-4 PH stainless steel in studied environment. As far as the influence of aging temperature on corrosion behavior of the sintered 17-4 PH stainless steel is concerned, polarization resistance and corrosion rate are reduced with increasing aging temperature from 480 up to 500 °C regardless of the temperature of solution treatment. It can be concluded that the highest corrosion resistance in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution exhibits 17-4 PH after solution treatment at 1040 °C followed by aging at 480 °C.

  19. Effect of temperature, of oxygen content and the downstream effect on corrosion rate of structural materials in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilincev, G.

    1988-01-01

    The effects were experimentally tested of temperature and of oxygen content on the corrosion rate of structural materials in liquid sodium and on reducing the corrosion rate down the sodium stream. The results of the experiments are shown in graphs and tables and are discussed in detail. The duration of all tests was standard 1,000 hours. The test parameters were set such as to determine the effect of temperature on corrosion of a quantity of various materials in sodium with a low oxygen content (1.2 to 2 ppm) at temperatures of 500 to 800 degC and in sodium with a high oxygen content (345 ppm) at temperatures of 500 to 700 degC. More experiments served the determination of the effect of a different oxygen content varying between 1.2 and 2 ppm at a constant temperature of 600 degC. The materials being tested included main structural materials used for fast reactor construction and materials allowing to establish the effect of main alloying elements on their corrosion in liquid sodium of different temperatures and purity grades. The relationships showing the effects of temperature and oxygen content in sodium on the rate of corrosion of various structural materials in hot parts of the installation and on the reduction in the rate of corrosion downstream due to sodium saturation with corrosion products were constructed using the experimental results. (Z.M.). 15 figs., 2 tabs., 7 refs

  20. An assessment of thermal spray coating technologies for high temperature corrosion protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, G.R.; Heimgartner, P.; Gustafsson, S.; Irons, G.; Miller, R.

    1997-01-01

    The use of thermally sprayed coatings in combating high temperature corrosion continues to grow in the major industries of chemical, waste incineration, power generation and pulp and paper. This has been driven partially by the development of corrosion resistant alloys, improved knowledge and quality in the thermal spray industry and continued innovation in thermal spray equipment. There exists today an extensive range of thermal spray process options, often with the same alloy solution. In demanding corrosion applications it is not sufficient to just specify alloy and coating method. For the production of reliable coatings the whole coating production envelope needs to be considered, including alloy selection, spray parameters, surface preparation, base metal properties, heat input etc. Combustion, arc-wire, plasma, HVOF and spray+fuse techniques are reviewed and compared in terms of their strengths and limitations to provide cost-effective solutions for high temperature corrosion protection. Arc wire spraying, HP/HVOF and spray+fuse are emerging as the most promising techniques to optimise both coating properties and economic/practical aspects. (orig.)

  1. Pitting corrosion of Inconel 600 in chloride and sulfate solutions at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Mingyu; Yu Geping

    1993-01-01

    Pitting corrosion of Inconel 600 was examined in chloride and sulfate solutions through usage of potentiodynamic polarization techniques. The effects of chloride and sulfate concentration were investigated in the range of 0.0001 to 0.1 M. Increasing chloride concentrations resulted in active shifts of the pit nucleation potential. Immunity to pitting corrosion was evident at a chloride level below 0.005 M. Increasing sulfate concentrations resulted in improved pitting resistance of Inconel 600 in chloride solutions. Detrimental effects associated with pitting were evident with low-level sulfate being added to dilute chloride media. The density of pits increased with increasing chloride concentrations or temperature between room temperature and 70 C. Systematic trends for the depth of pits were not evident. The observations of pitting corrosion in open immersion were consistent with those in polarization methods. Corrosion products contained in the pits were enriched in nickel, chromium and iron with a small amount of titanium and silicon. The enrichment of chlorine or sulfur was still, however, not found. (orig.)

  2. Influence of the surface finishing on the corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L stainless steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dundeková, S.; Zatkalíková, V.; Fintová, Stanislava; Hadzima, B.; Škorík, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 48-53 ISSN 1335-0803 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0063 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : AISI 316L stainless steel * Corrosion * Immersion test * Corrosion rate Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials http://ojs.mateng.sk/index.php/Mateng/article/view/166/251

  3. The mechanism of cathodic electrodeposition of epoxy coatings and the corrosion behaviour of the electrodeposited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VESNA B. MISKOVIC-STANKOVIC

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The model of organic film growth on a cathode during electrodeposition process proposes the current density-time and film thickness-time relationships and enables the evaluation of the rate contants for the electrochemical reaction of OH– ion evolution and for the chemical reaction of organic film deposition. The dependences of film thickness and rate constants on the applied voltage, bath temperature and resin concentration in the electrodeposition bath have also been obtained. The deposition parameters have a great effect on the cathodic electrodeposition process and on the protective properties of the obtained electrodeposited coatings. From the time dependences of the pore resistance, coating capacitance and relative permittivity, obtained from impedance measurements, the effect of applied voltage, bath temperature and resin concentration on the protective properties of electrodeposited coatings has been shown. Using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, gravimetric liquid sorption experiments, differential scanning calorimetry and optical miscroscopy, the corrosion stability of epoxy coatings was investigated. A mechanism for the penetration of electrolyte through an organic coating has been suggested and the shape and dimensions of the conducting macropores have been determined. It was shown that conduction through a coating depends only on the conduction through the macropores, although the quantity of electrolyte in the micropores of the polymer net is about one order of magnitude greater than that inside the conducting macropores.

  4. Lifetime evaluation of superheater tubes exposed to steam oxidation, high temperature corrosion and creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, N [Elsamprojekt A/S, Faelleskemikerne, Fredericia (Denmark); Hede Larsen, O; Blum, R [I/S Fynsvaerket, Faelleskemikerne, Odense (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    Advanced fossil fired plants operating at high steam temperatures require careful design of the superheaters. The German TRD design code normally used in Denmark is not precise enough for the design of superheaters with long lifetimes. The authors have developed a computer program to be used in the evaluation of superheater tube lifetime based on input related to tube dimensions, material, pressure, steam temperature, mass flux, heat flux and estimated corrosion rates. The program is described in the paper. As far as practically feasible, the model seems to give a true picture of the reality. For superheaters exposed to high heat fluxes or low internal heat transfer coefficients as is the case for superheaters located in fluidized bed environments or radiant environments, the program has been extremely useful for evaluation of surface temperature, oxide formation and lifetime. The total uncertainty of the method is mainly influenced by the uncertainty of the determination of the corrosion rate. More precise models describing the corrosion rate as a function of tube surface temperature, fuel parameters and boiler parameters need to be developed. (au) 21 refs.

  5. A study on structural analysis of highly corrosive melts at high temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtori, N

    2002-01-01

    When sodium is burned at high temperature in the atmosphere, it reacts simultaneously with H sub 2 O in the atmosphere so that it can produce high temperature melt of sodium hydroxide as a solvent. If this melt includes peroxide ion (O sub 2 sup 2 sup -), it will be a considerably active and corrosive for iron so that several sodium iron double oxides will be produced as corrosion products after the reaction with steel structures. The present study was carried out in order to investigate the ability of presence of peroxide ion in sodium hydroxide solvent at high temperature and that of identification of the several corrosion products using laser Raman spectroscopy. The measurement system with ultraviolet laser was developed simultaneously in the present work to improve the ability of the measurement at high temperature. As results from the measurements, the possibility of the presence of peroxide ion was shown up to 823K in sodium peroxide and 823K in the melt of sodium hydroxide mixed with sodium peroxide. A...

  6. Temperature limits trail following behaviour through pheromone decay in ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oudenhove, Louise; Billoir, Elise; Boulay, Raphaël; Bernstein, Carlos; Cerdá, Xim

    2011-12-01

    In Mediterranean habitats, temperature affects both ant foraging behaviour and community structure. Many studies have shown that dominant species often forage at lower temperature than subordinates. Yet, the factors that constrain dominant species foraging activity in hot environments are still elusive. We used the dominant ant Tapinoma nigerrimum as a model species to test the hypothesis that high temperatures hinder trail following behaviour by accelerating pheromone degradation. First, field observations showed that high temperatures (> 30°C) reduce the foraging activity of T. nigerrimum independently of the daily and seasonal rhythms of this species. Second, we isolated the effect of high temperatures on pheromone trail efficacy from its effect on worker physiology. A marked substrate was heated during 10 min (five temperature treatments from 25°C to 60°C), cooled down to 25°C, and offered in a test choice to workers. At hot temperature treatments (>40°C), workers did not discriminate the previously marked substrate. High temperatures appeared therefore to accelerate pheromone degradation. Third, we assessed the pheromone decay dynamics by a mechanistic model fitted with Bayesian inference. The model predicted ant choice through the evolution of pheromone concentration on trails as a function of both temperature and time since pheromone deposition. Overall, our results highlighted that the effect of high temperatures on recruitment intensity was partly due to pheromone evaporation. In the Mediterranean ant communities, this might affect dominant species relying on chemical recruitment, more than subordinate ant species, less dependent on chemical communication and less sensitive to high temperatures.

  7. Corrosion behaviour of Mg-Cu and Mg-Mo composites in 3.5% NaCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budruk Abhijeet, S.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Gupta, M.

    2008-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of pure magnesium, Mg-Cu (0.3, 0.6, and 1 vol.%) and Mg-Mo (0.1, 0.3, and 0.6 vol.%) composites has been studied in 3.5% NaCl solution by weight loss and polarisation methods. Corrosion rates determined by weight loss method were considerably higher than that determined by polarisation method. The corrosion rate increased with increasing volume fraction of reinforcement in Mg-Cu and Mg-Mo composites. At the same volume fraction of reinforcement, molybdenum reinforced composite corroded faster than copper reinforced composite. The galvanic current density between Mg-Cu and Mg-Mo couples has been experimentally measured using zero resistance ammeter technique. The experimentally observed galvanic current densities were in close agreement with those obtained using mixed potential theory analysis. SEM observation of corroded samples confirmed microgalvanic activity at the matrix/reinforcement interfaces. The poor corrosion resistance of composites has been attributed to microgalvanic effects between the matrix and reinforcements and inferior quality of surface films

  8. Studies on microstructure, mechanical and pitting corrosion behaviour of similar and dissimilar stainless steel gas tungsten arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Dilkush; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to weld dissimilar alloys of 5mm thick plates i.e., austenitic stainless steel (316L) and duplex stainless steel (2205) and compared with that of similar welds. Welds are made with conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process with two different filler wires namely i.e., 309L and 2209. Welds were characterized using optical microscopy to observe the microstructural changes and correlate with mechanical properties using hardness, tensile and impact testing. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were carried out to observe the pitting corrosion behaviour in different regions of the welds. Results of the present study established that change in filler wire composition resulted in microstructural variation in all the welds with different morphology of ferrite and austenite. Welds made with 2209 filler showed plate like widmanstatten austenite (WA) nucleated at grain boundaries. Compared to similar stainless steel welds inferior mechanical properties was observed in dissimilar stainless steel welds. Pitting corrosion resistance is observed to be low for dissimilar stainless steel welds when compared to similar stainless steel welds. Overall study showed that similar duplex stainless steel welds having favorable microstructure and resulted in better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Relatively dissimilar stainless steel welds made with 309L filler obtained optimum combination of mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance when compared to 2209 filler and is recommended for industrial practice.

  9. Effect of Microstructure on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviour of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel Gas Tungsten Arc Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    Present work is aimed to improve stress corrosion cracking resistance of high nitrogen steel and its welds. An attempt to weld high nitrogen steel of 5 mm thick plate using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with three high strength age hardenable fillers i.e., 11-10 PH filler, PH 13- 8Mo and maraging grade of MDN 250 filler is made. Welds were characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Vickers hardness testing of the welds was carried out to study the mechanical behaviour of welds. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were done to determine pitting corrosion resistance in aerated 3.5% NaCl solution. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) testing was carried out using constant load type machine with applied stress of 50% yield strength and in 45% MgCl2 solution boiling at 155°C. The results of the present investigation established that improvement in resistance to stress corrosion cracking was observed for PH 13- 8Mo GTA welds when compared to 11-10 PH and MDN 250 GTA welds. However, All GTA welds failed in the weld interface region. This may be attributed to relatively lower pitting potential in weld interface which acts as active site and the initiation source of pitting.

  10. High-Temperature Ceramic Matrix Composite with High Corrosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    description of high temperature oxidation processes of composite ceramic materials of ZrB2 - SiC and ZrB2-SiC-Zr(Mo)Si2 systems up to high (~1300 °C...analysis was applied using MІN-7 mineralogical microscope and a set of standard immersion liquids with the known values of refraction coefficients...2.0 V) corresponds to the simultaneous formation of ZrO2 zirconium dioxide of monoclinic modification and Zr(OH)4 zirconium hydroxide which is

  11. Acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetric experiments dedicated to high temperature corrosion studies on metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serris, Eric; Al Haj, Omar; Peres, Veronique; Cournil, Michel; Kittel, Jean; Grosjean, Francois; Ropital, Francois

    2014-01-01

    High temperature corrosion of metallic alloys (like iron, nickel, zirconium alloys) can damage equipment of many industrial fields (refinery, petrochemical, nuclear..). Acoustic emission (AE) is an interesting method owing to its sensitivity and its non-destructive aspect to quantify the level of damage in use of these alloys under various environmental conditions. High temperature corrosive phenomena create stresses in the materials; the relaxation by cracks of these stresses can be recorded and analyzed using the AE system. The goal of our study is to establish an acoustic signals database which assigns the acoustic signals to the specific corrosion phenomena. For this purpose, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is coupled with acoustic emission (AE) devices. The oxidation of a zirconium alloy, zircaloy-4, is first studied using thermogravimetric experiment coupled to acoustic emission analysis at 900 C. An inward zirconium oxide scale, preliminary dense, then porous, grow during the isothermal isobaric step. The kinetic rate increases significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration occurs with an increase of acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts are recorded after the kinetic transition. Acoustic emission signals are also observed during the cooling of the sample. AE numerical treatments (using wavelet transform) completed by SEM microscopy characterizations allows us to distinguish the different populations of cracks. Metal dusting represents also a severe form of corrosive degradation of metal alloy. Iron metal dusting corrosion is studied by AE coupled with TGA at 650 C under C 4 H 10 + H 2 + He atmosphere. Acoustic emission signals are detected after a significant increase of the sample mass.

  12. A fundamental study on stress corrosion cracking of SUS 304 steel in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Yoshihiko; Murata, Masato

    1985-01-01

    SCC susceptibility of sensitized SUS 304 stainless steel in high temperature water was studied. The results obtained are as follows. SCC susceptibility was increased by adding crevices to the tensile specimen surface, for the corrodent became acidified by hydrolysis in crevices. SCC susceptibility was best fit to TTS curve obtained by EPR test, not by other corrosion tests such as Strauss test or the grain boundary corrosion test in high temperature water. In addition, by giving a simulated weld thermal cycle before the sensitizing heat treatment, the sensitization was clearly promoted. This seemed to be caused by the reason that nucleation of carbide occured in the simulated weld thermal cycle process and it promoted the carbide growth and the formation of Cr poor layer around carbide in the subsequent sensitization process. (author)

  13. Effect of Mn Content and Solution Annealing Temperature on the Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steel Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihsan-ul-Haq Toor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of two specially designed austenitic stainless steels (SSs having different Nickel (Ni and Manganese (Mn contents was investigated. Prior to electrochemical tests, SS alloys were solution-annealed at two different temperatures, that is, at 1030°C for 2 h and 1050°C for 0.5 h. Potentiodynamic polarization (PD tests were carried out in chloride and acidic chloride, whereas linear polarization resistance (LPR and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS was performed in 0.5 M NaCl solution at room temperature. SEM/EDS investigations were carried out to study the microstructure and types of inclusions present in these alloys. Experimental results suggested that the alloy with highest Ni content and annealed at 1050°C/0.5 hr has the highest corrosion resistance.

  14. Electrochemical and stress corrosion cracking behaviour of titanium in n-propanol and iso-propanol solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trasatti, S.P.; Sivieri, E.

    2004-01-01

    Titanium shows severe localised corrosion in non-aqueous media in the presence of applied stress and crevice. The present work brings a contribution to the behaviour of Ti in non-aqueous media by studying the role of water on the electrochemical properties and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) sensitivity of Ti in n-propanol and iso-propanol solutions. The anodic behaviour of titanium in n-propanol-H 2 O and iso-propanol-H 2 O systems is quite similar to that observed in methanol-H 2 O and ethanol-H 2 O systems. The minimum water content needed for the passive film to be stable is 2% for n-propanol and 0.1% for iso-propanol. In methanol and ethanol it is 20 and 8%, respectively. The minimum water content decreases as the number of carbon atoms increases and the lowest water content in iso-propanol is strictly related to the capability of the alcohol to dehydrate. The possibility of predicting by means of polarisation curves the conditions of occurrence of SCC of titanium has been confirmed by simply analysing when corrosion potential is higher than breakdown potential

  15. Biocompatibility and Corrosion Protection Behaviour of Hydroxyapatite Sol-Gel-Derived Coatings on Ti6Al4V Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hadad, Amir A.; Peón, Eduardo; García-Galván, Federico R.; Barranco, Violeta; Parra, Juan; Jiménez-Morales, Antonia; Galván, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare hydroxyapatite coatings (HAp) by a sol-gel method on Ti6Al4V alloy and to study the bioactivity, biocompatibility and corrosion protection behaviour of these coatings in presence of simulated body fluids (SBFs). Thermogravimetric/Differential Thermal Analyses (TG/DTA) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) have been applied to obtain information about the phase transformations, mass loss, identification of the phases developed, crystallite size and degree of crystallinity of the obtained HAp powders. Fourier Transformer Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) has been utilized for studying the functional groups of the prepared structures. The surface morphology of the resulting HAp coatings was studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The bioactivity was evaluated by soaking the HAp-coatings/Ti6Al4V system in Kokubo’s Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) applying Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) spectrometry. 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and Alamar blue cell viability assays were used to study the biocompatibility. Finally, the corrosion behaviour of HAp-coatings/Ti6Al4V system was researched by means of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The obtained results showed that the prepared powders were nanocrystalline HAp with little deviations from that present in the human bone. All the prepared HAp coatings deposited on Ti6Al4V showed well-behaved biocompatibility, good bioactivity and corrosion protection properties. PMID:28772455

  16. Biocompatibility and Corrosion Protection Behaviour of Hydroxyapatite Sol-Gel-Derived Coatings on Ti6Al4V Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir A. El Hadad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to prepare hydroxyapatite coatings (HAp by a sol-gel method on Ti6Al4V alloy and to study the bioactivity, biocompatibility and corrosion protection behaviour of these coatings in presence of simulated body fluids (SBFs. Thermogravimetric/Differential Thermal Analyses (TG/DTA and X-ray Diffraction (XRD have been applied to obtain information about the phase transformations, mass loss, identification of the phases developed, crystallite size and degree of crystallinity of the obtained HAp powders. Fourier Transformer Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR has been utilized for studying the functional groups of the prepared structures. The surface morphology of the resulting HAp coatings was studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The bioactivity was evaluated by soaking the HAp-coatings/Ti6Al4V system in Kokubo’s Simulated Body Fluid (SBF applying Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP spectrometry. 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT and Alamar blue cell viability assays were used to study the biocompatibility. Finally, the corrosion behaviour of HAp-coatings/Ti6Al4V system was researched by means of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS. The obtained results showed that the prepared powders were nanocrystalline HAp with little deviations from that present in the human bone. All the prepared HAp coatings deposited on Ti6Al4V showed well-behaved biocompatibility, good bioactivity and corrosion protection properties.

  17. Evaluation of corrosion behaviour of tantalum coating obtained by low pressure chemical vapor deposition using electrochemical polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, A.; Bouteville, A.; de Baynast, H.; Laveissière, B.

    2002-06-01

    antalum coatings are elaborated on titanium substrates through Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition from tantalum pentachloride-hydrogen gaseous phase at a deposition temperature of 800 °C and a total pressure of 3.3 mbar. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of this tantalum coating in corrosive solution. Optical Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy observations reveal that deposits are of 1.7 μm in thickness and conformal. The corrosion resistance of tantalum coated titanium substrates is quantified through standard potentiodynamic polarization method. Even for tantalum coatings exhibiting some defects as pores, the corrosion current density is as low as 0.25 mA/cm^2.in very agressive solutions like kroll reagent (HN03/HF).

  18. Corrosion Behaviors of Structural Materials in High Temperature S-CO{sub 2} Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jung; Kim, Hyunmyung; Jang, Changheui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The isothermal corrosion tests of several types of stainless steels, Ni-based alloys, and ferritic-martensitic steels (FMS) were carried out at the temperature of 550 and 650 .deg. C in SFR S-CO{sub 2} environment (200 bar) for 1000 h. The weight gain was greater in the order of FMSs, stainless steels, and Ni-based alloys. For the FMSs (Fe-based with low Cr content), a thick outer Fe oxide, a middle (Fe,Cr)-rich oxide, and an inner (Cr,Fe)-rich oxide were formed. They showed significant weight gains at both 550 and 650 .deg. C. In the case of austenitic stainless steels (Fe-based) such as SS 316H and 316LN (18 wt.% Cr), the corrosion resistance was dependent on test temperatures except SS 310S (25 wt.% Cr). After corrosion test at 650 .deg. C, a large increase in weight gain was observed with the formation of outer thick Fe oxide and inner (Cr,Fe)-rich oxide. However, at 550 .deg. C, a thin Cr-rich oxide was mainly developed along with partially distributed small and nodular shaped Fe oxides. Meanwhile, for the Ni-based alloys (16-28 wt.% Cr), a very thin Cr-rich oxide was developed at both test temperatures. The superior corrosion resistance of high Cr or Ni-based alloys in the high temperature S-CO{sub 2} environment was attributed to the formation of thin Cr-rich oxide on the surface of the materials.

  19. High temperature corrosion in the thermochemical hydrogen production from nuclear heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coen-Porisini, F.; Imarisio, G.

    1976-01-01

    In the production of hydrogen by water decomposition utilizing nuclear heat, a multistep process has to be employed. Water and the intermediate chemical products reach in chemical cycles giving hydrogen and oxygen with regeneration of the primary products used. Three cycles are examined, characterized by the presence of halide compounds and particularly hydracids at temperatures up to 800 0 C. Corrosion tests were carried out in hydrobromic acid, hydrochloric acid, ferric chloride solutions, and hydriodic acid

  20. Corrosion behaviour and galvanic coupling of titanium and welded titanium in LiBr solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Igual-Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Garcia-Garcia, D.

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion resistance and galvanic coupling of Grade 2 commercially pure titanium in its welded and non-welded condition were systematically analyzed in LiBr solutions. Galvanic corrosion was evaluated through two different methods: anodic polarization (according to the Mixed Potential Theory) and electrochemical noise (using a zero-resistance ammeter). Samples have been etched to study the microstructure. The action of lithium chromate as corrosion inhibitor has been evaluated. Titanium and welded titanium showed extremely low corrosion current densities and elevated pitting potential values (higher than 1 V). The results of both methods, anodic polarization and electrochemical noise, showed that the welded titanium was always the anodic element of the pair titanium-welded titanium, so that its corrosion resistance decreases due to the galvanic effect

  1. Corrosion behaviour of ion implanted aluminium alloy in 0.1 M NaCl electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, J W; Evans, P J [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Sood, D K [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Aluminum and its alloys are widely used in industry because of their light weight, high strength and good corrosion resistance which is due to the formation of a protective oxide layer. However, under saline conditions such as those encountered in marine environments, this group of metals are vulnerable to localised degradation in the form of pitting corrosion. This type of corrosion involves the adsorption of an anion, such as chlorine, at the oxide solution interface. Ion implantation of metal ions has been shown to improve the corrosion resistance of a variety of materials. This effect occurs : when the implanted species reduces anion adsorption thereby decreasing the corrosion rate. In this paper we report on the pitting behavior of Ti implanted 2011 Al alloy in dilute sodium chloride solution. The Ti implanted surfaces exhibited an increased pitting potential and a reduced oxygen uptake. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Corrosion behaviour of ion implanted aluminium alloy in 0.1 M NaCl electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, J.W.; Evans, P.J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Sood, D.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Aluminum and its alloys are widely used in industry because of their light weight, high strength and good corrosion resistance which is due to the formation of a protective oxide layer. However, under saline conditions such as those encountered in marine environments, this group of metals are vulnerable to localised degradation in the form of pitting corrosion. This type of corrosion involves the adsorption of an anion, such as chlorine, at the oxide solution interface. Ion implantation of metal ions has been shown to improve the corrosion resistance of a variety of materials. This effect occurs : when the implanted species reduces anion adsorption thereby decreasing the corrosion rate. In this paper we report on the pitting behavior of Ti implanted 2011 Al alloy in dilute sodium chloride solution. The Ti implanted surfaces exhibited an increased pitting potential and a reduced oxygen uptake. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  3. KCl-induced high temperature corrosion of selected commercial alloys. Part I: chromia-formers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiamehr, Saeed; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Montgomery, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    -grained), Sanicro 28 and the nickel-based alloys 625, 263 and C276. Exposure was performed at 600 °C for 168 h in flowing N2(g)+5%O2(g)+15% H2O(g) (vol.%). Samples were covered with KCl powder prior to exposure. A salt-free exposure was also performed for comparison. Corrosion morphology and products were studied......Laboratory testing of selected chromia-forming alloys was performed to rank the materials and gain further knowledge on the mechanism of KCl-induced high temperature corrosion. The investigated alloys were stainless steels EN1.4021, EN1.4057, EN1.4521, TP347H (coarse-grained), TP347HFG (fine....... In the presence of solid KCl, all the alloys showed significant corrosion. Measurement of corrosion extent indicated that alloys EN1.4057, Sanicro 28 and 625 show a better performance compared to the industrial state of the art material TP347HFG under laboratory conditions. An additional test was performed...

  4. High-Temperature, Dual-Atmosphere Corrosion of Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Paul; Amendola, Roberta

    2012-12-01

    High-temperature corrosion of ferritic stainless steel (FSS) surfaces can be accelerated and anomalous when it is simultaneously subjected to different gaseous environments, e.g., when separating fuel (hydrogen) and oxidant (air) streams, in comparison with single-atmosphere exposures, e.g., air only. This so-called "dual-atmosphere" exposure is realized in many energy-conversion systems including turbines, boilers, gasifiers, heat exchangers, and particularly in intermediate temperature (600-800°C) planar solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. It is generally accepted that hydrogen transport through the FSS (plate or tube) and its subsequent integration into the growing air-side surface oxide layer can promote accelerated and anomalous corrosion—relative to single-atmosphere exposure—via defect chemistry changes, such as increased cation vacancy concentrations, decreased oxygen activity, and steam formation within the growing surface oxide layers. Establishment of a continuous and dense surface oxide layer on the fuel side of the FSS can inhibit hydrogen transport and the associated effects on the air side. Minor differences in FSS composition, microstructure, and surface conditions can all have dramatic influences on dual-atmosphere corrosion behaviors. This article reviews high-temperature, dual-atmosphere corrosion phenomena and discusses implications for SOFC stacks, related applications, and future research.

  5. Influence of Zn injection on corrosion behavior and oxide film characteristics of 304 stainless steel in borated and lithiated high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xinqiang; Liu, Xiahe; Han, En-Hou; Ke, Wei

    2012-09-01

    Water chemistry of the reactor coolant system plays a major role in maintaining safety and reliability of light water reactor nuclear power plants (NPPs). Zn water chemistry into pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in order to reduce the radiation buildup in primary coolant system has been widely applied, and the reduction effect has been experimentally confirmed. Zn injection can also lessen the corrosion phenomena in high temperature pressurized water by changing oxide films formed on components materials. Both the radiation buildup and material corrosion resistance in PWR coolant system are closely dependent on the oxide films formed. However, the influence of Zn injection on the chemical composition and structure of the oxide films on their protective properties is still a matter of considerable debate. The influence of Zn injection on corrosion inhibition and environmental degradation has not been fully clarified yet. Therefore, the understanding of corrosion behaviour, oxide film characteristics and their protective property is of significance to clarify the environmentally assisted material failure problems in NPPs. In the present work, oxide films formed on nuclear-grade 304 SS exposed to borated and lithiated high temperature water environments at 300 deg. C up to 4000 h with or without 10 ppb Zn injection were investigated ex-situ. Without Zn injection, the oxide films mainly consisted of Fe 3 O 4 and FeCr 2 O 4 . With Zn injection, ZnFe 2 O 4 and ZnCr 2 O 4 were detected in the oxide films at the initial stage of immersion and ZnCr 2 O 4 became dominant after long-term immersion. It was believed that the above Zn-Fe and Zn-Cr spinel oxides were formed by substitution reactions between Zn 2+ and Fe 2+ . At the initial stage of immersion, water chemistry significantly affected the formation of the oxide films. Once a stable oxide film formed, it is rather difficult to change its structure through changing water chemistry. The potential-pH diagrams for Zn

  6. Filterability of corrosion products formed between carbon steel and water. Influence of temperature and oxygen content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelen, T.; Falk, I.

    1975-09-01

    A laboratory investigation has been made for the purpose of studying the influence of temperature and oxygen content on the filterability of corrosion products formed between carbon-steel and water. The experiments were performed in a high temperature loop where the water is initially heated in a pre-heater, then cooled and finally filtered. The corrosion products were transferred to thewater from a carbon-steel surface that had previously been neutron activated and the amount of iron present was determined from measurements of the γ-radiation emitted by Fe-59. Filterability was then computed as the ratio between the total amount of iron in the water phase and the amount of iron retained on the filter. The investigation covers a series of experiments at filtering temperatures of 20, 90 and 160 dec G, pre-heater temperatures up to 300 deg C and oxygen contents of 10 and 300 ppb O 2 . In addition the extent of iron deposition in the pre-heater and heat regulator has been determined after each series of experiments. Filterability exhibited a pronounced dependence upon both the filter and pre-heater temperatures and also upon the oxygen content. Among the conclusions to which the results lead is the observation that a strict comparison of filterability values for the fraction of corrosion products in cooled water samples is impossible when these are taken from 1) different sections of a high temperature system 2) a single sampling point while the system is being run up 3) two separate systems (e.g. steam boilers) operated at different temperatures 4) two separate systems operated at different oxygen contents. It accordingly appears advizable to restrict the use of cold-filtered samples from conventional steam-raising plants to the comparison of values relating to a single sampling point under constant operating conditions. (author)

  7. Effect of the deposition temperature on corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of the hydroxyapatite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladescu, A., E-mail: alinava@inoe.ro [National Institute for Optoelectronics, 409 Atomistilor Str., Magurele (Romania); Braic, M. [National Institute for Optoelectronics, 409 Atomistilor Str., Magurele (Romania); Azem, F. Ak [Dokuz Eylul University, Engineering Faculty, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Buca-Izmir (Turkey); Titorencu, I. [Institute of Cellular Biology and Pathology Nicolae Simionescu of the Romanian Academy, 8 B.P.Hasdeu, Bucharest (Romania); Braic, V. [National Institute for Optoelectronics, 409 Atomistilor Str., Magurele (Romania); Pruna, V. [Institute of Cellular Biology and Pathology Nicolae Simionescu of the Romanian Academy, 8 B.P.Hasdeu, Bucharest (Romania); Kiss, A. [National Institute for Optoelectronics, 409 Atomistilor Str., Magurele (Romania); Parau, A.C.; Birlik, I. [Dokuz Eylul University, Engineering Faculty, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Buca-Izmir (Turkey)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite has been produced at temperature from 400 to 800 °C by magnetron sputtering. • Hydroxyapatite crystallinity is improved by increasing substrate temperature. • The increase of substrate temperature resulted in corrosion resistance increasing. • The coating shows high growth of the osteosarcoma cells over a wide temperature range. - Abstract: Hydroxyapatite (HAP) ceramics belong to a class of calcium phosphate-based materials, which have been widely used as coatings on titanium medical implants in order to improve bone fixation and thus to increase the lifetime of the implant. In this study, HAP coatings were deposited from pure HAP targets on Ti6Al4V substrates using the radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique at substrate temperatures ranging from 400 to 800 °C. The surface morphology and the crystallographic structure of the films were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion resistance of the coatings in saliva solution at 37 °C was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization. Additionally, the human osteosarcoma cell line (MG-63) was used to test the biocompatibility of the coatings. The results showed that all of the coatings grown uniformly and that the increasing substrate temperature induced an increase in their crystallinity. Corrosion performance of the coatings was improved with the increase of the substrate temperature from 400 °C to 800 °C. Furthermore, all the coatings support the attachment and growth of the osteosarcoma cells with regard to the in vitro test findings.

  8. The effect of welding parameters on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir welded AA2024-T351

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jariyaboon, M; Davenport, A.J.; Ambat, Rajan

    2007-01-01

    The effect of welding parameters (rotation speed and travel speed) on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir welds in the high strength aluminium alloy AA2024-T351 was investigated. It was found that rotation speed plays a major role in controlling the location of corrosion attack. Localised...... intergranular attack was observed in the nugget region for low rotation speed welds, whereas for higher rotation speed welds, attack occurred predominantly in the heat-affected zone. The increase in anodic reactivity in the weld zone was due to the sensitisation of the grain boundaries leading to intergranular...... attack. Enhancement of cathodic reactivity was also found in the nugget as a result of the precipitation of S-phase. The results were compared with samples of AA2024-T351 that had been heat treated to simulate the thermal cycle associated with welding, and with samples that had been exposed to high...

  9. Genetic variablilities of body temperature and resting behaviour in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This implies that neither progeny nor generation had effect on body temperature. The Alpha strain exhibited more resting behaviour than did the exotic and the pure native types. Majority of the birds rested in the afternoon at 2.00 pm. This could be attributed to the fact that at 2.00 pm the weather is hot and birds search for a ...

  10. Investigations on the determination of corrosion kinetics and the structure of corrosion products on high-temperature alloys under low oxygen partial pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poestges, A.; Naoumidis, A.; Nickel, H.

    1979-04-01

    On three nickel-base-alloys (NIMONIC 80A, INCONNEL 617 and ALLOY 713LC), which are planned as materials for components of the primary cooling circuit of high-temperature reactors, studies for the determination of the oxidation behaviour under reactor relevant conditions were performed. The test conditions were fixed at an oxygen partial pressure of 10 -16 bars with a total pressure of 0,2 bars and a temperature of 1080 0 C. The use of the X-ray diffraction analysis on the oxidised samples of type NIMONIC 80A showed the corrosion products Cr 2 O 3 , TiO 2 and Cr 2 Ti 2 O 7 in the outer oxide coating as well as Al 2 O 3 in the inner oxide zone. The samples of the alloy type INCOEL 617 showed the oxides Cr 2 O 3 and Cr 2 Ti 2 O 7 in the outer oxide coating. Samples of the alloy ALLOY 713LC showed Cr 2 O 3 and CrNbO 4 in the outer oxide coating and Al 2 O 3 in the zone of inner oxidation. Sufficient detection certainty was only ascertained by investigating samples with plane surface. For both alloys first mentioned, it was possible to prove the validity of the paralinear relationship W = k x t -1 / 2 - a x t for the increase in weight for the explanation of the time law of the oxidation. For the non-destructive determination of the oxide coating thickness on the alloys samples, the X-ray fluorescence analysis gave reproducible results of good precision. (orig.) [de

  11. Temperature effect on the behaviour of engineered clay barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, A.M.

    2005-11-01

    The present work deals with the thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of compacted swelling clay used for engineered barriers in high-level radioactive repositories. The MX80 bentonite was chosen for this work. Firstly, an experimental work on the thermal conductivity of the compacted bentonite was performed. The results evidenced the effects of dry density, water content, volumetric fraction of soil components, microstructure, and mineralogy. This experimental work gave rise to the proposition of a theoretical model for estimate the thermal conductivity of compacted bentonites. Secondly, after a calibration of suction generated by saturated saline solution in function of temperature, water retention curves were determined at different temperatures. The experimental results showed a decrease of the water retention capacity of soil after heating. A simple model based on the interfacial tension air-water was formulated to simulate this effect. Thirdly, a new isotropic cell enabling a simultaneous control of suction, temperature and mechanical stress was developed. With this new cell, an experimental work on the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the unsaturated compacted bentonite was performed. Finally, a constitutive model was developed for simulate the thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviours obtained experimentally. (author)

  12. The effects of time, temperature and rotation of water on the corrosion rate of different types of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamad Daud; Jamaliah Shariff.

    1984-01-01

    By using hot plate/magnetic stirrer and immersion technique, the steel corroded uniformly and their corrosion rates vary due to type of steel, time of immersion, temperature and rotation of water. Therefore the rate of general corrosion, or sealing, of steel alloys is influenced by a number of factors, those best established being the composition of the metal, time, temperature, velocity, cleanliness or roughness of the metal surface and direct contact with solutions of the other materials. (author)

  13. Study of anti corrosive behaviour on A I 6061 samples covered with Ni-P alloys obtained by autocatalytic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, M. E; Barbero, J. A; Bubach, E

    2006-01-01

    There are many ways to keep safe an industrial material from corrosion attack.One is covering the piece with a layer of another material which corrosion resistance is higher to the one of the element to protect.The anticorrosion protection mechanism is achieved by the formation of a physical pore less barrier without any defects.This avoid the arrival of those agents from environment responsible of electrochemical attack.In this paper, corrosion resistance of metallic coatings over nuclear usage aluminum samples is analyzed.Our interest is aimed on nickel I phosphorous alloy coatings (Ni I P) obtained by electroless method (autocatalytic) over Al 6061 alloy samples.A comparative study is carried on with different phosphorous contents but always under 12 %.This job is completed with other nickel coating, Vitro vac 0080 (with no phosphorous content) in order to compare structures and anti corrosive properties.Besides, the comparison between mentioned materials and aluminum samples is made.The study is carried on using superficial characterization of each sample with or without coating through a series of complementary techniques such as chemical, electrochemical (linear sweep voltammetry, cyclic voltammetry, polarization resistance determination) and physical (scanning electronic microscopy, hardness determination) techniques.Finally, variable correlation is made as a function of the phosphorous content in the samples used in the experiences.The coating structure obtained is amorphous.It presents no pore or failure and its hardness shows important values.The electrochemical analysis allows to check that anti corrosive protection capacity of Ni-P alloy increases with the phosphorous content in the coat. Al 6061 by itself demonstrate an electrochemically bad behaviour.Substrate I coating adherence is very good [es

  14. Electrodeposition of polypyrrole onto NiTi and the corrosion behaviour of the coated alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flamini, D.O.; Saidman, S.B.

    2010-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) films were electrodeposited onto nickel--titanium alloy (NiTi) employing sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (Aerosol OT or AOT) solutions. Polarizing anodically NiTi samples recovered by PPy in a monomer-free solution increases adhesion of the coating. Electrochemical techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and element analysis were used in determining the corrosion performance of the coated samples in chloride solution. The polymer improves the corrosion performance at the open circuit potential and at potentials where the bare substrate suffers pitting attack. The improvement in both, adhesion and corrosion performance, is discussed considering substrate/polymer interaction, overoxidation of PPy and the role played by AOT.

  15. Corrosion behaviour of the welded steel 1.4313/CA6-NM

    OpenAIRE

    Lovíšek, Martin; Liptáková, Tatiana; Pešlová, Františka

    2014-01-01

    The stainless steel 1.4313/CA6-NM (EN X3CrNiMo13-4) is used for turbine production. The weld joints are therefore very sensitive localities from mechanical and corrosion point of view. The subject of the work is corrosion studying of the steel welded by TIG method with consequent heat treatment. Corrosion resistance of the weld joints and base material are evaluated through potentiodynamic polarization test measured on the surface after heat treatment and on the surface cleaned by grinding an...

  16. Effect of Chlorine and Sulphur on Stainless Steel (AISI 310) Due To High Temperature Corrosion.

    OpenAIRE

    Onaivi Daniel Azamata; Titus Yusuf Jibatswen; Odinize C. Michael

    2016-01-01

    In a power station boiler, there are temperature of regimes of corrosion which occurs mainly in the economizer, boiler steam generation tubes, super-heater tubes and air tubes. The specific gas temperatures in degrees centigrade for the following include: 150 – 370oC for the economizer, 1000 – 1650oC for the boiler steam generation tubes, 650 – 1000oC for super-heater tubes and 1000 – 1200oC for air tubes. For power station boilers that burn coal as the source of fuel it is recommended that a...

  17. Optimization of Arc-Sprayed Ni-Cr-Ti Coatings for High Temperature Corrosion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S.; Schweizer, M.

    2013-04-01

    High Cr content Ni-Cr-Ti arc-spray coatings have proven successful in resisting the high temperature sulfidizing conditions found in black liquor recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry. The corrosion resistance of the coatings is dependent upon the coating composition, to form chromium sulfides and oxides to seal the coating, and on the coating microstructure. Selection of the arc-spray parameters influences the size, temperature and velocity of the molten droplets generated during spraying, which in turn dictates the coating composition and formation of the critical coating microstructural features—splat size, porosity and oxide content. Hence it is critical to optimize the arc-spray parameters in order to maximize the corrosion resistance of the coating. In this work the effect of key spray parameters (current, voltage, spray distance and gas atomizing pressure) on the coating splat thickness, porosity content, oxide content, microhardness, thickness, and surface profile were investigated using a full factorial design of experiment. Based on these results a set of oxidized, porous and optimized coatings were prepared and characterized in detail for follow-up corrosion testing.

  18. Corrosion Behaviour of Sn-based Lead-Free Solders in Acidic Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordarina, J.; Mohd, H. Z.; Ahmad, A. M.; Muhammad, F. M. N.

    2018-03-01

    The corrosion properties of Sn-9(5Al-Zn), Sn-Cu and SAC305 were studied via potentiodynamic polarization method in an acidic solution of 1 M hydrochloric acid (HCl). Sn-9(5Al-Zn) produced different polarization profile compared with Sn-Cu and SAC305. The morphological analysis showed that small, deep grooves shaped of corrosion product formed on top of Sn-9(5Al-Zn) solder while two distinctive structures of closely packed and loosely packed corrosion product formed on top of Sn-Cu and SAC305 solder alloys. Phase analysis revealed the formations of various corrosion products such as SnO and SnO2 mainly dominant on surface of solder alloys after potentiodynamic polarization in 1 M hydrochloric acid (HCl).

  19. Corrosion-electrochemical behaviour and mechanical properties ofaluminium alloy-321, alloyed by barium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganiev, I.; Mukhiddinov, G.N.; Kargapolova, T.V.; Mirsaidov, U.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of present work is studying of influence of barium additionson electrochemical corrosion of casting aluminium-copper alloy Al-321,containing as base alloying components copper, chromium, manganese, titanium,zirconium, cadmium

  20. Hot corrosion behaviour of austenitic steel-303 in molten chloride and carbonate salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Misbahul Amin; Shamsul Baharin Jamaludin; Che Mohd Ruzaidi Ghazali; Khairel Rafezi Ahmad

    2007-01-01

    The investigations are presented for the hot corrosion behaviors of Austenitic Steel-303, under influence of the molten chloride and carbonate salts viz KCl and K 2 CO 3 , oxidised at 1123 K for the period of 60 hour at atmospheric condition. The oxidation kinetic are effect of molten chloride and carbonate salts deposition on the oxidation rate were determined. The susceptibility to suffer a deleterious attack on the alloy by internal corrosion increases with increasing the time. In general, the corrosion resistance austenitic steel-303 in molten carbonate salts is much higher than chloride melt, being an active oxidizing agent providing oxygen during fluxing reaction. However, due to profuse evolution of CO/ CO 2 heavy mass losses are observed during corrosion and scales are porous. The test included mass change monitoring and surface layers were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies. (author)

  1. Pitting corrosion behaviour study of aluminium matrix composites (A3xx.x/SiCp)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M. C.; Merino, S.; Lopez, M. D.; Viejo, F.; Carboneras, M.; Arrabal, R.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of the SiCp proportion on the pitting corrosion of A3xx.x/SiC/xxp composites was studies by means of potenciodinamic polarization and double cyclic polarization in saline environment at 25 degree centigrade A360/SiC/xxp matrix does not contain copper, whereas the A380/SiC/xxp matric contains 1,39-1,44 wt %Cu. The kinetic study was carried out by gravimetric measurements. The nature of corrosion products was analysed by low angle XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The corrosion is due to nucleation and growth of Al 2 O 3 -3H 2 O on the material surface. The corrosion increases with the reinforcement proportion, chloride concentration and copper content. (Author) 10 refs

  2. Investigation of Mechanical, Microstructural and Corrosion behaviour of Titanium subjected to Laser Peening with and without Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjith Kumar, G.; Sowmya Joshi, K.; Rajyalakshmi, G.; Kalainathan, S.; Prabhakaran, S.

    2018-02-01

    Present competitive world is looking for Components with high strength and fatigue resistance finding their applications in aerospace, turbine parts and especially bio-medical devices with high bio-compatibility. Advanced surface engineering techniques are required to produce parts of higher complexities and desirable surface qualities. Laser peening stood first in a row of all various surface treatments of metallic component. This paper discusses about the mechanical properties like hardness and roughness then the surface morphology and the corrosion behaviour of the laser peened titanium samples with and without coating.

  3. Investigation of Microstructure and Corrosion Propagation Behaviour of Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel Plates

    OpenAIRE

    Abidin Kamal Ariff Zainal; Ismail Elya Atikah; Zainuddin Azman; Hussain Patthi

    2014-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels are commonly used for fabricating components. For many applications, an increase in surface hardness and wear resistance can be beneficial to improve performance and extend service life. However, the improvement in hardness of martensitic steels is usually accompanied by a reduction in corrosion strength. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of nitriding on AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel, in terms of microstructure and corrosion propagat...

  4. Irradiation and corrosion behaviour of cadmium aluminate, a burnable poison for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattenbach, K.; Ahlf, J.; Hilgendorff, W.; Zimmermann, H.U.

    1979-01-01

    In quest of a cadmium containing material for use as burnable poison cadmium aluminate seemed promising. Therefore irradiation and corrosion experiments on specimens of cadmium aluminate in a matrix of aluminia were performed. Irradiation at 575 K and fast fluences up to 10 25 m -2 showed the material to have good radiation resistance and low swelling rates. Cadmium pluminate was resistant to corrosion attack in demineralized water of 575K. (orig.) [de

  5. The Corrosion Rate Measurement of Inconel 690 on High Temperature andPressure by Using CMS100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyono; Febrianto

    2000-01-01

    The corrosion rate measurement of Inconel 690 on high temperature andpressure had been done. By using an Autoclave, pressure and temperature canbe simulated. The environment of this experiment is 0.1 ppm of chloridesolution, which permit to dissolved in secondary cooling of steam generator.The corrosion rate measurement was done on temperature between 150 o C and230 o C with step 10 o C. Pressure experiment is the pressure, which occurredin Autoclave. Corrosion rate is measured by CMS100. From the Tafel analysis,corrosion rate of Inconel 690 linearity increased from 6.548 x 10 -5 mpy to4.331 x 10 -4 mpy. It concludes that Inconel 690 is resist on corrosionenvironment, so it's most using on the fabrication of steam generator tubeson the advanced power plant. (author)

  6. Corrosion behaviour of alloy Ti-35 in boiling nitric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan Cui; Qiu Shaoyu

    2005-01-01

    This report states the corrosion behaviors of alloy Ti-35 in boiling nitric acid solution. The results show that its general corrosion rate is by far superior to high-purity austenitic stainless steel with super-low carbon content, the stress corrosion and crevice corrosion have been not discovered in its samples, and oxide film can be quickly reproduced in scratch. The microstructural analysis on samples shows that there is a thin compact TiO 2 film on the sample surface of alloy Ti-35, and most of the film possess the crystal structure of rutile type, the other has the crystal structure of anatase type. This oxide layer plays a role in hindering corrosion development, so the corrosion resistance of alloy Ti-35 is raised. In contrast with it, the oxide film on the sample surface of austenitic stainless steel is not found. It is evident that alloy Ti-35 can become the prime candidate structural material for dissolver of reprocessing facility of spent fuel and be substituted for high-purity austenitic stainless steel with super-low carbon content which is used now. (authors)

  7. Corrosion behaviour of water waste on the gray cast iron sanitary pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawzy, Y.H.A.H.

    2002-01-01

    The works of Plato (427-347 B.C.) contained the written description of corrosion. Plato defined rust as the earthy component separating out of the metal. (Georgius Agrico La) held to the same opinion some 2000 years later in his great mineralogical work De Natura Fossilium Iron rust (rat. Ferrug or Rubigo) is, so to speak, assertion of metallic iron. Iron can be protected against this defect by various wrapping, such as red lead, white lead, gypsum, bitumen or tar. Gaius Secundus Pliny also mentioned bitumen, pitch, white lead, and gypsum as protecting iron and bronze against corrosion. He reported that Alexander the Great had constructed Ponton Bridge at Zeugmar on the Euphrates with the aid of an iron chain. Link's that were inserted later suffered rust attacks, While the original ones remained immune. The opinion, sometimes expressed today, that modern iron inferior and more corrosion than old iron, was thus current even in ancient times. The concept of the corrosion process derived from the latin corrodere ( to eat away, to destroy ), first appeared in the philosophical transaction in 1667. It was discussed in German from the Frensh on the manufacture of white lead in 1785 and was mentioned in 1836 in the translation of an English paper by Savy on the cathodic protection of iron in sea water. However, almost unit the present day, the term was indiscriminately for corrosion reaction effects, and corrosion damage

  8. Effects of metallurgical factors on stress corrosion cracking of Ni-base alloys in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.; Sasaguri, N.; Onimura, K.

    1988-01-01

    Nickel-base Alloy 600 is the principal material used for the steam generator tubes of PWRs. Generally, this alloy has been proven to be satisfactory for this application, however when it is subjected to extremely high stress level in PWR primary water, it may suffer from stress corrosion cracking. The authors have systematically studied the effects of test temperature and such metallurgical factors as cold working, chemical composition and heat treatment on the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high temperature water, and also on that of Alloy 690 which is a promising material for the tubes and may provide improved crrosion resistance for steam generators. The test materials, the stress corrosion cracking test and the test results are reported. When the test temperature was raise, the stress corrosion cracking of the nickel-base alloys was accelerated. The time of stress corrosion cracking occurrence decreased with increasing applied stress, and it occurred at the stress level higher than the 0.2 % offset proof stress of Alloy 600. In Alloy 690, stress corrosion cracking was not observed at such stress level. Cold worked Alloy 600 showed higher resistance to stress corrosion cracking than the annealed alloy. (Kako, I.)

  9. Spent fuel UO2 matrix corrosion behaviour studies through alpha-doped UO2 pellets leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzeau, B.; Jegou, C.; Broudic, V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The option of direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geological formation raises the need to investigate the long-term behaviour of the UO 2 matrix in aqueous media subjected to α-β-γ radiations. The β-γ emitters account for the most of the activity of spent fuel at the moment it is removed from the reactor, but diminish within a millennial time frame by over three orders of magnitude to less than the long-term activity. The latter persist over much longer time periods and must therefore be taken into account over geological disposal scale. In the present investigation the UO 2 matrix corrosion under alpha radiation is studied as a function of different parameters such as: the alpha activity, the carbonates and hydrogen concentrations,.. In order to study the effect of alpha radiolysis of water on the UO 2 matrix, 238/239 Pu doped UO 2 pellets (0.22 %wt. Pu total) were fabricated with different 238 Pu/ 239 Pu ratio to reproduce the alpha activity of a 47 GWd.t HMi -1 UOX spent fuel at different milestones in time (15, 50, 1500, 10000 and 40000 years). Undoped UO 2 pellets were also available as reference sample. Leaching experiments were conducted in deionized or carbonated water (NaHCO 3 1 mM), under Argon (O 2 2 30% gas mixture. Previous experiments conducted in deionized water under argon atmosphere, have shown a good correlation between alpha activity and uranium release for the 15-, 1500- and 40000-years alpha doped UO 2 batches. Besides, uranium release in the leachate is controlled either by the kinetics, or by the thermodynamics. Provided the solubility limit of uranium is not achieved, uranium concentration increases and is only limited by the kinetics, unless precipitation occurs and the uranium concentration remains constant over time. These controls are highly dependant on the solution chemistry (HCO 3 - , pH, Eh,..), the atmosphere (Ar, Ar/H 2 ,..), and the radiolysis strength. The experimental matrix

  10. Analysis of the corrosion of carbon steels in simulated salt repository brines and acid chloride solutions at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.; Kassner, T.F.

    1988-04-01

    An analysis of literature data on the corrosion of carbon steels in anoxic brines and acid chloride solutions was performed, and the results were used to assess the expected life of high-level nuclear waste package containers in a salt repository environment. The corrosion rate of carbon steels in moderately acidic aqueous chloride environments obeys an Arrhenius dependence on temperature and a (pH 2 ) -1/2 dependence on hydrogen partial pressure. The cathodic reduction of water to produce hydrogen is the rate-controlling step in the corrosion process. An expression for the corrosion rate incorporating these two dependencies was used to estimate the corrosion life of several proposed waste package configurations. 42 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  11. The effect of some metallurgical factors on the corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steels in 3% NaCl aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed, A.A.; Morsy, S.M.; El-Raghy, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of cold work and subsequent heat treatment on the corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steels in 3% NaCl aqueous solutions was studied. Cold work was found to increase the corrosion rate, and heat treatment at 1050 C followed by water-quenching was found reduce to the rate of attack. The increase in the corrosion rate accompanied with a shift in the less noble direction of the steady state potential, an increase in the exchange current density and a decrease in the value of the activation energy. The results indicated that the corrosion potentials are less noble than the critical potentials for pitting, and they are discussed in terms of a simple dissolution process. A correlation is made between the corrosion rate, as expresses in weight loss, and the electrode properties of the corroding material

  12. Fe and Fe-P Foam for Biodegradable Bone Replacement Material: Morphology, Corrosion Behaviour, and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Hrubovčáková

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron and iron-phosphorus open-cell foams were manufactured by a replica method based on a powder metallurgical approach to serve as a temporary biodegradable bone replacement material. Iron foams alloyed with phosphorus were prepared with the aim of enhancing the mechanical properties and manipulating the corrosion rate. Two different types of Fe-P foams containing 0.5 wt.% of P were prepared: Fe-P(I foams from a phosphated carbonyl iron powder and Fe-P(II foams from a mixture of carbonyl iron and commercial Fe3P. The microstructure of foams was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties and the corrosion behaviour were studied by compression tests and potentiodynamic polarization in Hank’s solution and a physiological saline solution. The results showed that the manufactured foams exhibited an open, interconnected, microstructure similar to that of a cancellous bone. The presence of phosphorus improved the mechanical properties of the foams and decreased the corrosion rate as compared to pure iron foams.

  13. Corrosion behaviour of zinc and aluminum magnesium alloys by scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) and electrochemical noise (EN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klassen, R.D.; Roberge, P.R.; Lafront, A.-M.; Oteyaka, M.O.; Ghali, E.

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion characteristics of five permanent mould magnesium alloys were studied. Two contained aluminum (AZ91D and AZ91E) and three contained zinc as the primary alloying element (ZA104 (Zn 10%, Al 4%), ZAC and ZACS). ZAC contained a small amount of calcium and ZACS contained small amounts of calcium and strontium. Two techniques were used in this study, namely 1) scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) and 2) electrochemical noise (EN). The test solution for each case was 5% NaCl saturated with Mg(OH)2 at room temperature. According to the EN measurements, the corrosion rate of AZ91D was the lowest followed by AZ91E, ZACS, ZAC and ZA104. The EN measurements showed that both the frequency and magnitude of current transients were much higher for the zinc based alloys than for the aluminum based alloys. The SRET measurements illustrated that localized corrosion occurred more frequently on the ZA104 sample than on the AZ91D sample. It seemed that increasing the level of zinc and lowering the level of aluminum relative to the levels in AZ91D does not improve corrosion resistance. (author)

  14. Temperature dependency of external stress corrosion crack propagation of 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashibara, Hitoshi; Mizutani, Yoshihiro; Mayuzumi, Masami; Tani, Jun-ichi

    2010-01-01

    Temperature dependency of external stress corrosion cracking (ESCC) of 304 stainless steel was examined with CT specimens. Maximum ESCC propagation rates appeared in the early phase of ESCC propagation. ESCC propagation rates generally became smaller as testing time advance. Temperature dependency of maximum ESCC propagation rate was analyzed with Arrhenius plot, and apparent activation energy was similar to that of SCC in chloride solutions. Temperature dependency of macroscopic ESCC incubation time was different from that of ESCC propagation rate. Anodic current density of 304 stainless steel was also examined by anodic polarization measurement. Temperature dependency of critical current density of active state in artificial sea water solution of pH=1.3 was similar to that of ESCC propagation rate. (author)

  15. Effect of Fe, Ni, and Cr on the corrosion behaviour of hyper-eutectic Al-Si automotive alloy under different pH conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Salim Kaiser

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Fe, Ni and Cr on the corrosion behaviour of hyper-eutectic Al-Si automotive alloy was studied. The test of corrosion behaviour at different environmental pH 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13 was performed using conventional gravimetric measurements and complemented by resistivity, optical micrograph, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray analyser (EDX investigations. The highest corrosion rate was observed at pH 13 followed by pH 1, while in the pH range of 3.0 to 11, there is a high protection of surface due to formation of stable surface oxide film. The highest corrosion rate at pH 13 is due to presence of sodium hydroxide in the solution in which the surface oxide film is soluble. At pH 1, however, high corrosion rate can be attributed to dissolution of Al due to the surface attack by aggressive chloride ions. Presence of Fe, Ni and Cr in hyper-eutectic Al-Si automotive alloy has significant effect on the corrosion rate at both environmental pH values. Resistivity of alloy surfaces initially decreases at pH 1 and pH 13 due to formation of thin films. The SEM images of corroded samples immersed in pH 1 solution clearly show pores due to uniform degradation of the alloy. In pH 13 solution, however, the corrosion layer looks more packed and impermeable.

  16. Silicon coating treatment to improve high temperature corrosion resistance of 9%Cr steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    A silicon coating process is described which confers good protection on 9%Cr steels and alloys in CO 2 based atmospheres at high temperatures and pressures. The coatings are formed by decomposition of silane at temperatures above 720 K. Protective layers are typically up to 1 μm thick. The optimum coating conditions are discussed. The chemical state of the coatings has been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and has demonstrated the importance of avoiding silicon oxide formation during processing. Corrosion testing has been carried out for extended periods, up to 20 000 h, at temperatures between 753 and 853 K, in a simulated advanced gas cooled reactor gas at 4 MPa pressure. Benefit factors of up to 60 times have been measured for 9%Cr steels. Even higher values have been measured for 9Cr-Fe binary alloy on which a 1 μm coating was sufficient to eliminate significant oxidation over 19 000 h except at the specimen edges. The mechanism of protection is discussed. It is suggested that a silicon surface coating for protecting steels from high temperature corrosion has some advantages over adding silicon to the bulk metal. (author)

  17. Corrosion mechanism of 13Cr stainless steel in completion fluid of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yan; Xu, Lining; Lu, Minxu; Meng, Yao; Zhu, Jinyang; Zhang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The corrosion behavior of 13Cr steel exposed to bromine salt completion fluid containing high concentration bromine ions was investigated. • There are passive circles around pits on the 13Cr steel surface after 7 d of exposure. • Macroscopic galvanic corrosion formed between the passive halo and the pit. • The mechanism of pitting corrosion on 13Cr stainless steel exposed to heavy bromine brine was established. - Abstract: A series of corrosion tests of 13Cr stainless steel were conducted in a simulated completion fluid environment of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt. Corrosion behavior of specimens and the component of corrosion products were investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that 13Cr steel suffers from severe local corrosion and there is always a passive halo around every pit. The formation mechanism of the passive halo is established. OH − ligand generates and adsorbs in a certain scale because of abundant OH − on the surface around the pits. Passive film forms around each pit, which leads to the occurrence of passivation in a certain region. Finally, the dissimilarities in properties and morphologies of regions, namely the pit and its corresponding passive halo, can result in different corrosion sensitivities and may promote the formation of macroscopic galvanic pairs

  18. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking considerations at temperatures below 288 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, E.P.; Jones, R.H.; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1995-03-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) occurs above a critical neutron fluence in light-water reactor (LWR) water environments at 288 C, but very little information exists to indicate susceptibility as temperatures are reduced. Potential low-temperature behavior is assessed based on the temperature dependencies of intergranular (IG) SCC in the absence of irradiation, radiation-induced segregation (RIS) at grain boundaries and micromechanical deformation mechanisms. IGSCC of sensitized SS in the absence of irradiation exhibits high growth rates at temperatures down to 200 C under conditions of anodic dissolution control, while analysis of hydrogen-induced cracking suggests a peak crack growth rate near 100 C. Hence from environmental considerations, IASCC susceptibility appears to remain likely as water temperatures are decreased. Irradiation experiments and model predictions indicate that RIS also persists to low temperatures. Chromium depletion may be significant at temperatures below 100C for irradiation doses greater than 10 displacements per atom (dpa). Macromechanical effects of irradiation on strength and ductility are not strongly dependent on temperature below 288 C. However, temperature does significantly affect radiation effects on SS microstructure and micromechanical deformation mechanisms. The critical conditions for material susceptibility to IASCC at low temperatures may be controlled by radiation-induced grain boundary microchemistry, strain localization due to irradiation microstructure and irradiation creep processes. 39 refs

  19. Application of an empirical model in CFD simulations to predict the local high temperature corrosion potential in biomass fired boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, Thomas; Scharler, Robert; Obernberger, Ingwald

    2015-01-01

    To gain reliable data for the development of an empirical model for the prediction of the local high temperature corrosion potential in biomass fired boilers, online corrosion probe measurements have been carried out. The measurements have been performed in a specially designed fixed bed/drop tube reactor in order to simulate a superheater boiler tube under well-controlled conditions. The investigated boiler steel 13CrMo4-5 is commonly used as steel for superheater tube bundles in biomass fired boilers. Within the test runs the flue gas temperature at the corrosion probe has been varied between 625 °C and 880 °C, while the steel temperature has been varied between 450 °C and 550 °C to simulate typical current and future live steam temperatures of biomass fired steam boilers. To investigate the dependence on the flue gas velocity, variations from 2 m·s −1 to 8 m·s −1 have been considered. The empirical model developed fits the measured data sufficiently well. Therefore, the model has been applied within a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of flue gas flow and heat transfer to estimate the local corrosion potential of a wood chips fired 38 MW steam boiler. Additionally to the actual state analysis two further simulations have been carried out to investigate the influence of enhanced steam temperatures and a change of the flow direction of the final superheater tube bundle from parallel to counter-flow on the local corrosion potential. - Highlights: • Online corrosion probe measurements in a fixed bed/drop tube reactor. • Development of an empirical corrosion model. • Application of the model in a CFD simulation of flow and heat transfer. • Variation of boundary conditions and their effects on the corrosion potential

  20. Studies on Fusion Welding of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel: Microstructure, Mechanical and corrosion Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt has been made in the present investigation to weld high nitrogen steel of 5mm thick plates using various process i.e., shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and autogenous electron beam welding (EBW) process. Present work is aimed at studying the microstructural changes and its effects on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Microstructure is characterized by optical, scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction technique. Vickers hardness, tensile properties, impact toughness and face bend ductility testing of the welds was carried out. Pitting corrosion resistance of welds was determined using potentio-dynamic polarization testing in 3.5%NaCl solution. Results of the present investigation established that SMA welds made using Cr-Mn-N electrode were observed to have a austenite dendritic grain structure in the weld metal and is having poor mechanical properties but good corrosion resistance. GTA welds made using 18Ni (MDN 250) filler wire were observed to have a reverted austenite in martensite matrix of the weld metal and formation of unmixed zone at the fusion boundary which resulted in better mechanical properties and poor corrosion resistance. Fine grains and uniform distribution of delta ferrite in the austenite matrix and narrow width of weld zone are observed in autogeneous electron beam welds. A good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance was achieved for electron beam welds of high nitrogen steel when compared to SMA and GTA welds.

  1. Urban and marine corrosion: Comparative behaviour between field and laboratory conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iribarren Laco, J.I.; Liesa Mestres, F.; Bilurbina Alter, L. [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica E.T.S.E.I.B. Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Cadena Villota, F. [Departamento de Materiales, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Quito (Ecuador)

    2004-09-01

    A detailed study of the corrosion phenomena of carbon steel has been investigated in this work by means of the comparison of field and laboratory tests. Two areas of the metropolitan area of Barcelona (Spain) were selected to carry out the field tests, whereas two different solutions of sodium chloride and sodium hydrogen sulfite were used to simulate the field conditions by means of cyclic laboratory tests. The corrosion rate has been evaluated from the weight loss of the specimens and the morphology surface has been visualized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Corrosion products and contaminants have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, respectively. The penetration results can be adjusted to the Passano equation and the corrosivity degree can be assigned in accordance with ISO standards. A correlation between field and laboratory tests has been found, by comparing the specimens with the same degree of corrosion, showing the validity of the accelerated laboratory tests in order to simulate the field conditions. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Corrosion Behaviour of Nickel Plated Low Carbon Steel in Tomato Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluleke OLUWOLE

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This research work investigated the corrosion resistance of nickel plated low carbon steel in tomato fluid. It simulated the effect of continuous use of the material in a tomato environment where corrosion products are left in place. Low carbon steel samples were nickel electroplated at 4V for 20, 25, 30 and 35 mins using Watts solution.The plated samples were then subjected to tomato fluid environment for for 30 days. The electrode potentials mV (SCE were measured every day. Weight loss was determined at intervals of 5 days for the duration of the exposure period. The result showed corrosion attack on the nickel- plated steel, the severity decreasing with the increasing weight of nickel coating on substrate. The result showed that thinly plated low carbon steel generally did not have any advantage over unplated steel. The pH of the tomato solution which initially was acidic was observed to progress to neutrality after 4 days and then became alkaline at the end of the thirty days test (because of corrosion product contamination of the tomatocontributing to the reduced corrosion rates in the plated samples after 10 days. Un-plated steel was found to be unsuitable for the fabrication of tomato processing machinery without some form of surface treatment - thick nickel plating is suitable as a protective coating in this environment.

  3. Thermal Cycling and High-Temperature Corrosion Tests of Rare Earth Silicate Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darthout, Émilien; Gitzhofer, François

    2017-12-01

    Lutetium and yttrium silicates, enriched with an additional secondary zirconia phase, environmental barrier coatings were synthesized by the solution precursor plasma spraying process on silicon carbide substrates. A custom-made oven was designed for thermal cycling and water vapor corrosion testing. The oven can test four specimens simultaneously and allows to evaluate environmental barrier performances under similar corrosion kinetics compared to turbine engines. Coatings structural evolution has been observed by SEM on the polished cross sections, and phase composition has been analyzed by XRD. All coatings have been thermally cycled between 1300 °C and the ambient temperature, without spallation, due to their porosity and the presence of additional secondary phase which increases the thermal cycling resistance. During water vapor exposure at 1200 °C, rare earth disilicates showed a good stability, which is contradictory with the literature, due to impurities—such as Si- and Al-hydroxides—in the water vapor jets. The presence of vertical cracks allowed the water vapor to reach the substrate and then to corrode it. It has been observed that thin vertical cracks induced some spallation after 24 h of corrosion.

  4. Modelling of the high temperature behaviour of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, R.

    1999-01-01

    The design of components of metallic high-temperature materials by the finite element method requires the application of phenomenological viscoplastic material models. The route from the choice of a convenient model, the numerical integration of the equations and the parameter identification to the design of components is described. The Chaboche-model is used whose evolution equations are explicitly integrated. The parameters are determined by graphical and numerical methods in order to use the material model for describing the deformation behaviour of a chromium steel and an intermetallic titanium aluminide alloy. (orig.)

  5. ELOCA: fuel element behaviour during high temperature transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sills, H.E.

    1979-03-01

    The ELOCA computer code was developed to simulate the uniform thermal-mechanical behaviour of a fuel element during high-temperature transients such as a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Primary emphasis is on the diametral expansion of the fuel sheath. The model assumed is a single UO2/zircaloy-clad element with axisymmetric properties. Physical effects considered by the code are fuel expansion, cracking and melting; variation, during the transient, of internal gas pressure; changing fuel/sheath heat transfer; thermal, elastic and plastic sheath deformation (anisotropic); Zr/H 2 O chemical reaction effects; and beryllium-assisted crack penetration of the sheath. (author)

  6. Effects of 1000 C oxide surfaces on room temperature aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    Results of electrochemical aqueous-corrosion studies at room temperature indicate that retained in-service-type high-temperature surface oxides (1000 C in air for 24 hours) on FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo iron aluminides cause major reductions in pitting corrosion resistance in a mild acid-chloride solution designed to simulate aggressive atmospheric corrosion. Removal of the oxides by mechanical grinding restores the corrosion resistance. In a more aggressive sodium tetrathionate solution, designed to simulate an aqueous environment contaminated by sulfur-bearing combustion products, only active corrosion occurs for both the 1000 C oxide and mechanically cleaned surfaces at FAL. Results of slow-strain-rate stress-corrosion-cracking tests on FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo at free-corrosion and hydrogen-charging potentials in the mild acid chloride solution indicate somewhat higher ductilities (on the order of 50%) for the 1000 C oxides retard the penetration of hydrogen into the metal substrates and, consequently, are beneficial in terms of improving resistance to environmental embrittlement. In the aggressive sodium tetrathionate solution, no differences are observed in the ductilities produced by the 1000 C oxide and mechanically cleaned surfaces for FAL.

  7. High temperature behaviour of copper and silver in presence of gaseous carbon and of chlorine-water vapor mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beloucif, Luisa

    1986-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the effects of gaseous chlorine, in various conditions, on two metals, copper and silver, the chlorides of which can be precisely characterized and dosed by using different methods. After an overview of different aspects of corrosion of metals by halogens, and of copper and silver behaviour in chloride environment, the author reports and discusses results of tests performed in dry chlorine at high temperature, and the establishment of temperature-pressure semi-thermodynamic diagrams. The next part reports and discusses tests performed in a controlled atmosphere in presence of humidity. For all these tests, the author notably comments and discusses the nature of formed products, sample aspect, reaction progress, and influence of temperature or humidity

  8. Corrosion behaviour and in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility of surface-modified AZ31 alloy; Comportamiento frente a la corrosion y biocompatibilidad in vitrolin vivo de la aleacion AZ31 modificada superficialmente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carboneras, M.; Iglesias, C.; Perez-Maceda, B. T.; Valle, J. A. de; Garcia-Alonso, M. C.; Alobera, M. A.; Clemente, C.; Rubio, J. C.; Escudero, M. I.; Lozano, R. M.

    2011-07-01

    The present work evaluates the corrosion behaviour and the in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility of the AZ31 magnesium alloy, which fulfills the mechanical requirements of bone. The corrosion kinetic of as-received AZ31 alloy was not compatible with the cell growth. To improve its performance, the AZ31 alloy was surface modified by a chemical conversion treatment in hydrofluoric acid. The magnesium fluoride layer generated by the surface treatment of AZ31 alloy enhances its corrosion behaviour, allowing the in vitro growth of osteoblastic cells over the surface and the in vivo formation of a highly compact layer of new bone tissue. These results lead to consider the magnesium fluoride coating as necessary for potential use of the AZ31 alloy as biodegradable and absorbable implant for bone repair. (Author) 18 refs.

  9. Modelling the behaviour of corrosion products in the primary heat transfer circuits of pressurised water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodliffe, R.S.; Polley, M.V.; Thornton, E.W.

    1985-05-01

    The redistribution of corrosion products from the primary circuit surfaces of a water reactor can result in increased flow resistance, poorer heat transfer performance, fuel failure and radioactive contamination of circuit surfaces. The environment is generally sufficiently well controlled to ensure that the first three effects are not limiting. The last effect is of particular importance since radioactive corrosion products are major contributors to shutdown fields and since it is necessary to ensure that the radiation exposure of personnel is as low as reasonably achievable. This review focusses attention on the principles which must form the basis for any mechanistic model describing the formation, transport and deposition of radioactive corrosion products. It is relevant to all water reactors in which the primary heat transfer medium is predominantly single-phase water and in which steam is generated in a secondary circuit, i.e. including CANDU pressurised heavy water reactors, Sovient VVERs, etc. (author)

  10. Investigations of the corrosion behaviour of the Si-containing stainless steel 1.4361 with combined surface analysis, electrochemistry and radionuclide technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maar-Stumm, M.

    1990-03-01

    The present work aimed at detailed information on the corrosion behaviour and particularly the corrosion mechanism of the steel 1.4361 in concentrated nitric acid by use of a combination of electrochemical methods, radionuclide technique and surface analysis. For comparison steel samples corroded by other methods were investigated by surface analysis, too. At the beginning of the corrosion in nitric acid Fe and Ni are dissolved preferentially. Cr and Si are enriched in the surface region. A primary corrosion layer is formed which is equivalent to the oxidic overlayer of atmospherically oxidized samples. It consists of the oxides of chromium and iron mixed up with glass-like SiO 2 . Ni does not contribute to the formation of the oxidic overlayer. On top of this primary corrosion layer there is an isolating gel-like SiO 2 -layer with a thickness depending on strength and duration of the corrosive attack. Its mechanical stability decreases with increasing layer thickness. At the boundary to the primary corrosion layer this gel-like SiO 2 -layer is closed, mechanically stable and conducting. Samples corroded under the standardized conditions of the Huey-test show a similar structure of the overlayer with the exception that the primary corrosion layer consists only of glass-like SiO 2 . The combination of several methods revealed detailed information about mass loss and structure of the overlayer at different electrode potentials. (orig./MM) [de

  11. Effect of Water Vapor on High-Temperature Corrosion under Conditions Mimicking Biomass Firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    The variable flue gas composition in biomass-fired plants, among other parameters, contributes to the complexityof high-temperature corrosion of materials. Systematic parameter studies are thus necessary to understand the underlyingcorrosion mechanisms. This paper investigates the effect of water...... (H2O) vapor content in the flue gas on the high-temperaturecorrosion of austenitic stainless steel (TP 347H FG) under laboratory conditions, to improve the understanding of corrosionmechanisms. Deposit-coated and deposit-free samples were isothermally exposed for 72 h in a synthetic flue gas...... previouslyreported findings suggest that an increase in the water vapor content will cause competitive adsorption on active sites....

  12. Corrosion behaviour of high manganese austenitic stainless steels: positive and negative aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, V.S.

    1999-01-01

    Stainless steel 304 has found use as a most versatile engineering material in many industrial applications. Recently, the Indian industries have developed high Mn stainless steels with low C and Ni contents and simultaneously introduced N and Cu in the system. Composition of some of the alloys which are prevalent in the market are given. Individually, the effect of Ni, C, Mn, N and Cu on various forms of corrosion is reasonably understood. However, it will be worthwhile to review the response of these alloys, containing all these elements, towards various forms of corrosion. The objective of this paper is preciously to do this

  13. Corrosion Behaviour of a Silane Protective Coating for NdFeB Magnets in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Calabrese

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of coated and uncoated Ni/Cu/Ni rare earth magnets was assessed at increasing steps with a multilayering silanization procedure. Magnets’ durability was analyzed in Fusayama synthetic saliva solution in order to evaluate their application in dental field. Corrosion performance was evaluated by using polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in synthetic saliva solution up to 72 hours of continuous immersion. The results show that the addition of silane layers significantly improved anticorrosion properties. The coating and aging effects, in synthetic saliva solution, on magnetic field were evaluated by means of cyclic force-displacement curves.

  14. THE SLOWING DOWN OF THE CORROSION OF ELEMENTS OF THE EQUIPMENT OF HEAVY MET-ALS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES

    OpenAIRE

    Носачова, Юлія Вікторівна; Ярошенко, М. М.; Корзун, А. О.; КОРОВЧЕНКО, К. С.

    2017-01-01

    In this article examined the heavy metals ions and their ability to slow down the corrosion process also the impact of ambient temperature on their effectiveness. Solving the problem of corrosion will reduce the impact of large industrial enterprises on the environment and minimize the economic costs. To do this, plants should create a system without a discharge of waste water that is closed recycling systems, which result is a significant reduction in intake of fresh water from natural sourc...

  15. Analysis of corrosion data for carbon steels in simulated salt repository brines and acid chloride solutions at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.; Hull, A.B.; Kassner, T.F.

    1988-03-01

    Carbon steel is currently the leading candidate material for fabrication of a container for isolation of high level nuclear waste in a salt repository. Since brine entrapped in the bedded salt can migrate to the container by several transport processes, corrosion is an important consideration in the long-term performance of the waste package. A detailed literature search was performed to compile relevant corrosion data for carbon steels in anoxic acid chloride solutions, and simulated salt repository brines at temperatures between ∼ 20 and 400 0 C. The hydrolysis of Mg 2+ ions in simulated repository brines containing high magnesium concentrations causes acidification at temperatures above 25 0 C, which, in turn, influences the protective nature of the magnetite corrosion product layer on carbon steel. The corrosion data for the steels were analyzed, and an analytical model for general corrosion was developed to calculate the amount of penetration (i.e., wall thinning) as a function of time, temperature, and the pressure of corrosion product hydrogen than can build up during exposure in a closed system (e.g., a sealed capsule). Both the temperature and pressure dependence of the corrosion rate of steels in anoxic acid chloride solutions indicate that the rate-controlling partial reaction is the cathodic reduction of water to form hydrogen. Variations in the composition and microstructure of the steels or the concentration of the ionic species in the chloride solutions (provided that they do not change the pH significantly) do not appear to strongly influence the corrosion rate

  16. The development of an adsorbent for corrosion products in high-temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Ik; Sung, Ki Woung; Kim, Kwang Rag; Kim, Yu Hwan; Koo, Jae Hyoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-01

    In order to use as adsorbent for removal of the soluble corrosion products, mainly Co{sup 60} under PWR reactor coolant conditions (300 deg C, 160 kg/cm{sup 2}), stable ZrO{sub 2} adsorbent was prepared using sol-gel process from zirconyl nitrate, AlO adsorbent was prepared by hydrolysis of aluminum isopropoxide, and titanium tetraisopropoxide, respectively. The prepared adsorbents were calcined at various temperature and analyzed by physical properties and the Co{sup 2+} adsorption capacity. And it was shown that the Co{sup 2+} adsorption capacity of the TiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} adsorbents were found to have larger than that of ZrO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} adsorbents in high-temperature water. ZrO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} adsorbents were found to be suitable high-temperature adsorbents for the removal of dissolved corrosion products, mainly Co in PWR reactor coolant conditions. 15 tabs., 51 figs., 55 refs. (Author).

  17. Corrosion Behavior of Nickel-Plated Alloy 600 in High Temperature Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Hwang, Il Soon

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, electrochemical and microstructural characteristics of nickel-plated Alloy 600 wee investigated in order to identify the performance of electroless Ni-plating on Alloy 600 in high-temperature aqueous condition with the comparison of electrolytic nickel-plating. For high temperature corrosion test of nickel-plated Alloy 600, specimens were exposed for 770 hours to typical PWR primary water condition. During the test, open circuit potentials (OCP's) of all specimens were measured using a reference electrode. Also, resistance to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) test was examined in order to check the durability of plated layers in high-velocity flow environment at high temperature. After exposures to high flow rate aqueous condition, the integrity of surfaces was confirmed by using both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). For the field application, a remote process for electroless nickel-plating was demonstrated using a plate specimen with narrow gap on a laboratory scale. Finally, a practical seal design was suggested for more convenient application

  18. Effect of the deposition temperature on corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of the hydroxyapatite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladescu, A.; Braic, M.; Azem, F. Ak; Titorencu, I.; Braic, V.; Pruna, V.; Kiss, A.; Parau, A. C.; Birlik, I.

    2015-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) ceramics belong to a class of calcium phosphate-based materials, which have been widely used as coatings on titanium medical implants in order to improve bone fixation and thus to increase the lifetime of the implant. In this study, HAP coatings were deposited from pure HAP targets on Ti6Al4V substrates using the radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique at substrate temperatures ranging from 400 to 800 °C. The surface morphology and the crystallographic structure of the films were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion resistance of the coatings in saliva solution at 37 °C was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization. Additionally, the human osteosarcoma cell line (MG-63) was used to test the biocompatibility of the coatings. The results showed that all of the coatings grown uniformly and that the increasing substrate temperature induced an increase in their crystallinity. Corrosion performance of the coatings was improved with the increase of the substrate temperature from 400 °C to 800 °C. Furthermore, all the coatings support the attachment and growth of the osteosarcoma cells with regard to the in vitro test findings.

  19. The development of an adsorbent for corrosion products in high-temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Ik; Sung, Ki Woung; Kim, Kwang Rag; Kim, Yu Hwan; Koo, Jae Hyoo

    1996-08-01

    In order to use as adsorbent for removal of the soluble corrosion products, mainly Co 60 under PWR reactor coolant conditions (300 deg C, 160 kg/cm 2 ), stable ZrO 2 adsorbent was prepared using sol-gel process from zirconyl nitrate, AlO adsorbent was prepared by hydrolysis of aluminum isopropoxide, and titanium tetraisopropoxide, respectively. The prepared adsorbents were calcined at various temperature and analyzed by physical properties and the Co 2+ adsorption capacity. And it was shown that the Co 2+ adsorption capacity of the TiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 adsorbents were found to have larger than that of ZrO 2 and Al 2 O 3 adsorbents in high-temperature water. ZrO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and TiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 adsorbents were found to be suitable high-temperature adsorbents for the removal of dissolved corrosion products, mainly Co in PWR reactor coolant conditions. 15 tabs., 51 figs., 55 refs. (Author)

  20. Low temperature tensile properties and stress corrosion cracking resistance in the super duplex stainless steels weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeung Woo; Sung, Jang Hyun; Lee, Sung Keun

    1998-01-01

    Low temperature tensile properties and SCC resistances of super duplex stainless steels and their weldments are investigated. Tensile strengths increase remarkably with decreasing test temperature, while elongations decrease steeply at -196 .deg. C after showing peak or constant value down to -100 .deg. C. Owing to the low tensile deformation of weld region, elongations of welded specimen decrease in comparison to those of unwelded specimen. The welded tensile specimen is fractured through weld region at -196 .deg. C due to the fact that the finely dispersed ferrite phase in the austenite matrix increases an opportunity to supply the crack propagation path through the brittle ferrite phase at low temperature. The stress corrosion cracking initiates preferentially at the surface ferrite phase of base metal region and propagates through ferrite phase. When the corrosion crack meets with the fibrously aligned austenite phase to the tensile direction, the ferrite phase around austenite continues to corrode. Eventually, fracture of the austenite phase begins without enduring the tensile load. The addition of Cu+W to the super duplex stainless steel deteriorates the SCC resistance in boiling MgCl 2 solution, possibly due to the increment of pits in the ferrite phase and reduction of N content in the austenite phase

  1. High temperature corrosion of metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastidas, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    Research and development has made it possible to use metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) instead of ceramic materials. The use of metallic interconnects was formerly hindered by the high operating temperature, which made the interconnect degrade too much and too fast to be an efficient alternative. When the operating temperature was lowered, the use of metallic interconnects proved to be favourable since they are easier and cheaper to produce than ceramic interconnects. However, metallic interconnects continue to be degraded despite the lowered temperature, and their corrosion products contribute to electrical degradation in the fuel cell. coatings of nickel, chromium, aluminium, zinc, manganese, yttrium or lanthanum between the interconnect and the electrodes reduce this degradation during operation. (Author) 66 refs

  2. Corrosion of high temperature alloys in the primary circuit helium of high temperature gas cooled reactors. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    The reactive impurities H 2 O, CO, H 2 and CH 4 which are present in the primary coolant helium of high temperature gas-cooled reactors can cause scale formation, internal oxidation and carburization or decarburization of the high temperature structural alloys. In Part 1 of this contribution a theoretical model was presented, which allows the explanation and prediction of the observed corrosion effects. The model is based on a classical stability diagram for chromium, modified to account for deviations from equilibrium conditions caused by kinetic factors. In this paper it is shown how a stability diagram for a commercial alloy can be constructed and how this can be used to correlate the corrosion results with the main experimental parameters, temperature, gas and alloy composition. Using the theoretical model and the presented experimental results, conditions are derived under which a protective chromia based surface scale will be formed which prevents a rapid transfer of carbon between alloy and gas atmosphere. It is shown that this protective surface oxide can only be formed if the carbon monoxide pressure in the gas exceeds a critical value. Psub(CO), which depends on temperature and alloy composition. Additions of methane only have a limited effect provided that the methane/water ratio is not near to, or greater than, a critical value of around 100/1. The influence of minor alloying additions of strong oxide forming elements, commonly present in high temperature alloys, on the protective properties of the chromia surface scales and the kinetics of carbon transfer is illustrated. (orig.) [de

  3. Selected durability studies of geopolymer concrete with respect to carbonation, elevated temperature, and microbial induced corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badar, Mohammad Sufian

    This thesis reports a comprehensive study related to the experimental evaluation of carbonation in reinforced geopolymer concrete, the evaluation of geopolymer concretes at elevated temperature, and the resistance of geopolymer concrete to microbial induced corrosion (MIC). Carbonation: Reinforced concretes, made of geopolymer, prepared from two class F fly ashes and one class C fly ash, were subjected to accelerated carbonation treatment for a period of 450 days. Electrochemical, microstructure and pore structure examinations were performed to evaluate the effect of corrosion caused due to carbonation. GPC specimens prepared from class F fly ash exhibited lower corrosion rates by a factor of 21, and higher pH values (pH>12) when compared with concrete specimens prepared from class C Fly ash (GPCMN). Microstructure and pore characterization of GPC prepared using class F fly ash revealed lower porosity by a factor of 2.5 as compared with thier counterparts made using GPC-MN. The superior performace of GPC prepared with the class F fly ash could be attributed to the dense pore structure and formation of the protective layer of calcium and sodium alumino silicate hydrates (C/N-A-S-H) geopolymeric gels around the steel reinforcement. Elevated Temperature: Geopolymers are an emerging class of cementitious binders which possess a potential for high temperature resistance that could possibly be utilized in applications such as nozzles, aspirators and refractory linings. This study reports on the results of an investigation into the performance of a fly ash based geopolymer binder in high temperature environments. Geopolymer concrete (GPC) was prepared using eleven types of fly ashes obtained from four countries. High content alumina and silica sand was used in the mix for preparing GPC. GPC was subjected to thermal shock tests following ASTM C 1100-88. The GPC samples prepared with tabular alumina were kept at 1093° C and immediately quenched in water. GPC specimens

  4. Fuel corrosion processes under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoesmith, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    The release of the majority of radionuclides from spent nuclear fuel under permanent disposal conditions will be controlled by the rate of dissolution of the UO 2 fuel matrix. In this manuscript the mechanism of the coupled anodic (fuel dissolution) and cathodic (oxidant reduction) reactions which constitute the overall fuel corrosion process is reviewed, and the many published observations on fuel corrosion under disposal conditions discussed. The primary emphasis is on summarizing the overall mechanistic behaviour and establishing the primary factors likely to control fuel corrosion. Included are discussions on the influence of various oxidants including radiolytic ones, pH, temperature, groundwater composition, and the formation of corrosion product deposits. The relevance of the data recorded on unirradiated UO 2 to the interpretation of spent fuel behaviour is included. Based on the review, the data used to develop fuel corrosion models under the conditions anticipated in Yucca Mountain (NV, USA) are evaluated

  5. Corrosion behaviour of hot dip zinc and zinc-aluminium coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A comparative investigation of hot dip Zn–25Al alloy, Zn–55Al–Si and Zn coatings on steel was performed with attention to their corrosion performance in seawater. The results of 2-year exposure testing of these at Zhoushan test site are reported here. In tidal and immersion environments, Zn–25Al alloy coating is several ...

  6. Corrosion behaviour of hot dip zinc and zinc–aluminium coatings on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A comparative investigation of hot dip Zn–25Al alloy, Zn–55Al–Si and Zn coatings on steel was performed with attention to their corrosion performance in seawater. The results of 2-year exposure testing of these at Zhoushan test site are reported here. In tidal and immersion environments, Zn–25Al alloy coating is.

  7. Corrosion fatigue behaviour of aluminium 5083-H111 welded using gas metal arc welding method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium and its alloys are widely used as engineering materials on account of their low density, high strength-to-weight ratios, excellent formability and good corrosion resistance in many environments. Pure aluminium has a density of only 2.70 g...

  8. Stray current vs anodic polarization in reinforced mortar: a comparative study on steel corrosion behaviour in both regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Zhipei; Koleva, D.A.; van Breugel, K.

    2015-01-01

    Stray current arising from direct current electrified traction systems and then circulat-ing in reinforced concrete structures may initiate corrosion or even accelerate existing corrosion processes on embedded reinforcement. Therefore, stray-current induced corrosion of nearby reinforced concrete

  9. High temperature corrosion of nickel-base alloys in environments containing alkali sulphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Rachel; Flyg, Jesper; Caddeo, Sophie [Corrosion and Metals Research Institute, KIMAB, Stockholm (Sweden); Karlsson, Fredrik [Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery, Finspong (Sweden)

    2007-02-15

    This work is directed towards producing data to assist in lifetime assessment of components in gas turbines run in severely polluted industrial environments where the main corrosive species is SO{sub 2}, which can condense to form alkali sulphates. Corrosion rates have been measured for the base materials, in order to assess the worst-case scenario, in which cracks or other damage has occurred to the protective coating. The information is expected to be of value to manufacturers, owners and inspectors of gas turbines. Six nickel-base superalloys were subject to thermal cycles of 160 hours duration, and 0.8mg/cm{sup 2} of 20 mol % Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 80mol% K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was applied before each cycle. The test temperatures were 850 deg C and 900 deg C, with maximum test durations of 24 cycles and 12 cycles respectively. The metal loss was assessed by metallography of cross sections and the sulphidation attack was found to be very uneven. Mass change data indicated that the corrosion process was largely linear in character, and probability plots and estimations of the propagation rate of corrosion based on the linear growth assumption were produced. The performance of the alloys increased with increasing chromium content. The single crystal materials CMSX4 and MD2 showed such high corrosion rates that their use in severely contaminated industrial environments is considered inadvisable. The best performance was shown by Inconel 939 and Inconel 6203, so that even if cracks occur in the protective coating, a reasonable remaining lifetime can be expected for these materials. Sulphide formation occurred at the reaction front in all cases and mixed sulphides such as Ta-Ni or Ti-Nb sulphides were often present. The work has news value since very little long-term data is currently available for materials performance in severely sulphidising environments. The project goals in terms of exposures and metrology have been fully realised. Contributions have been made to the

  10. Development of low-temperature galvanizing and its application for corrosion protection of high-strength steels; Entwicklung einer niedrigschmelzenden Legierung und deren Applikation zum Korrosionsschutz hochfester Staehle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielage, B.; Lampke, T.; Steinhaeuser, S. [Technische Universitaet Chemnitz (Germany). Institut fuer Werkstoffwissenschaft und Werkstofftechnik; Strobel, C. [Fachhochschule Ingolstadt (Germany); Merklinger, V.

    2008-12-15

    Apart from reliability and quality, vehicle safety and cost efficiency are the decisive criteria for automobile manufacturers. Corrosion protection plays a decisive role because it increases the service life. The ultra-high-strength steels are materials which exhibit high lightweight potential as well as a very good energy absorption capacity because of their mechanical properties. In connection with the possibility of hot forming, they are predestined for the fabrication of complicated, load-compatible shapes in the crash-relevant frame and body construction. The application of these steel qualities has been carried out in structural parts which are protected from corrosion by a hot-dip coat of FeAl7 - the so-called Usibor. However, at the moment there is no ready-for-production solution for later corrosion protection of already hot-formed parts. Therefore, a corrosion protection system on the basis of conventional low-temperature galvanizing processes has been developed and utilized. First, the softening behavior of the highly-resistant 22MnB5 substrate was analyzed. Afterwards, a galvanizing system was developed and applied. The corrosion protection coatings were characterized with regard to their structure and corrosion protection potential. As a result, a significant improvement of the corrosion behaviour has occurred. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Neben Zuverlaessigkeit und Qualitaet sind vor allem Fahrzeugsicherheit und Wirtschaftlichkeit entscheidende Kriterien fuer den Automobilhersteller. Der Korrosionsschutz spielt dabei eine herausragende Rolle, da hierdurch die Lebens- und Gebrauchsdauer erhoeht wird. Mit der Bereitstellung hoechstfester Stahlqualitaeten stehen Werkstoffe zur Verfuegung, die auf Grund ihrer mechanischen Eigenschaften ein hohes Leichtbaupotenzial sowie ein sehr gutes Energieabsorptionsvermoegen aufweisen. In Verbindung mit der Moeglichkeit der Warmformgebung sind sie damit praedestiniert fuer die

  11. Effects of sintering temperature on the corrosion behavior of AZ31 alloy with Ca–P sol–gel coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Bo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Liaoning University of Technology, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province, 121001 (China); Shi, Ping, E-mail: p_shi@sohu.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Liaoning University of Technology, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province, 121001 (China); Wei, Donghua [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Liaoning University of Technology, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province, 121001 (China); E, Shanshan [School of Mathematics and Physics, Bohai University, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province, 121013 (China); Li, Qiang; Chen, Yang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Liaoning University of Technology, Jinzhou, Liaoning Province, 121001 (China)

    2016-04-25

    To slow down the initial biodegradation rate of magnesium alloy, calcium phosphate (Ca–P) coatings were prepared on AZ31 magnesium alloy by a sol–gel technique. To study the effects of sintering temperature on microstructure, bonding strength and corrosion behavior of the coatings, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and an adhesive strength test were used to characterize the coatings. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was investigated by immersion test and electrochemical corrosion techniques in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. It shows that the sol–gel coatings consist of Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}, mixture of Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and hydroxyapatite, and hydroxyapatite, by sintering respectively at 300 °C, 400 °C and 500 °C. There are major cracks on the coatings. The crack area portion on the coating and the bonding strength at the interface between the calcium phosphate coating and the bare AZ31 increases, and the corrosion resistance of the coated AZ31 in SBF decreases with increasing sintering temperatures from 300 °C to 500 °C. Based on our investigations, the corrosion resistance of the coated AZ31 in SBF depends mainly on the crack area portion on the coatings, rather than on the coating phase stability. - Highlights: • Ca–P coating was prepared on AZ31 alloy by a sol–gel technique. • Crack area portion in the coating increases with temperatures. • Bonding strength between Ca–P coating and substrate increases with temperatures. • Corrosion resistance of the coated AZ31 in SBF decreases with temperatures. • Corrosion resistance of the coated AZ31 depends mainly on the crack area portion.

  12. Corrosion of Structural Materials in Liquid Metals Used as Fast Reactor Coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbaud-Célérier, F.; Courouau, J.L.; Martinelli, L.

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: • Thermodynamic data give the stable state of the system, the compounds susceptible to form but no information on the kinetics of the process; • Need to perform corrosion tests in controlled conditions of temperature, chemistry, hydrodynamics; • Comparison of the materials behaviour: first selection of materials, optimisation of the composition; • Fundamental work on the understanding of the corrosion process to develop corrosion models and predictive laws to guarantee the long term behaviour

  13. High temperature filtration of radioactivable corrosion products in the primary circuit of PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, L.

    1976-01-01

    A effective limitation to the deposition of radioactive corrosion products in the core of a reactor at power operation, is to be obtained by filtering the water of the primary circuit at a flow rate upper than 1% of the coolant flow rate. However, in view of accounting for more important release of corrosion products during the reactor start-up and also for some possible variations in the efficiency of the system, it is better that the flow rate to be treated by the cleaning circuit is stated at 5%. Filtration must be effected at the temperature of the primary circuit and preferably on each loop. To this end, the feasibility of electromagnetic filtration or filtration through a deep bed of granulated graphite has been studied. The on-loop tests effected on each filter gave efficiencies and yields respectively upper than 90% and 99% for magnetite and ferrite particles in suspension in water at 250 deg C. Such results confirm the interest lying in high temperature filtration and lead to envisage its application to reactors [fr

  14. Effect of different ions on the anodic behaviour of alloy 800 chloride solutions at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafont, C.J.; Alvarez, M.G.

    1993-01-01

    The anodic behaviour and passivity breakdown of alloy 800 in sodium bicarbonate and sodium phosphate aqueous solutions were studied in the temperature range from 100 degrees C to 280 degrees C by means of electrochemical techniques. The effect of phosphate or bicarbonate additions on the pitting susceptibility and pitting morphology of the alloy in chloride solutions was also examined. Experiments were performed in the following solutions: 0.1M NaHCO 3 , at 100 degrees C, 200 degrees C, 280 degrees C; 0.06M NaH 2 PO 4 + 0.04M Na 2 HPO 4 , at 100 degrees C, 200 degrees C and 280 degrees C, and 0.1M NaCl with different additions of bicarbonate ion (0.02M, 0.05M and 0.1M) and phosphate ion (0.01M, 0.05M and 0.1M) at 100 degrees C and 280 degrees C. The anodic polarization curves of alloy 800 in deaerated 0.1M NaHCO 3 and 0.06M NaH 2 PO 4 + 0.04M Na 2 HPO 4 solutions exhibited a similar shape at all the tested temperatures. No localized or generalized corrosion was detected on the metallic surface after polarization. The results obtained in chloride plus bicarbonate and chloride plus phosphate mixtures showed that the pitting potential of alloy 800 in chloride solutions was increased by the presence of bicarbonate or phosphate ions. In those solutions where the inhibitor concentration in the mixture is equal or higher than the chloride concentration , the behaviour of the alloy is similar to the one observed in the absence of chlorides. Changes in pitting morphology were found in phosphate containing solutions, while the pits found in bicarbonate containing solutions were similar to those formed in pure chloride solutions. (author). 3 refs., 4 figs

  15. Contribution to the study of corrosion in cementitious media for the phenomenological modelling of the long-term behaviour of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'hostis, V.

    2010-12-01

    Many of the facilities and structures involved in the nuclear industry call for reinforced concrete (RC) in their construction. The corrosion of rebars is the main ageing pathology that those RC structures will meet during their service life (leading to concrete cracking and structural bearing capacity decrease). Concrete carbonation and chloride ingress in concrete are both at the origin of the active corrosion state. Passive corrosion has also to be considered in a context of very long lifetime (waste management). It is of primary importance to dispose of accurate and validated tools in order to predict where and how damages will appear. In 2002, the Commissariat a l Energie atomique decided to develop an intensive research programme dedicated to predicting the long-term behaviour of RC structures affected by steel corrosion (CIMETAL Project). This document aims at synthesize the main outputs coming from the project and exposes the scientific strategy was drawn and applied in order to predict the long-term behaviour of RCs that were mainly exposed to carbonation conditions. That strategy includes experiments for the characterisation of 'short-term' and 'long-term' corrosion layouts and processes, as well as modelling stages, with a view not only to predicting the behaviour of RC, but also to pointing out phenomena that are further verified experimentally. (author)

  16. Study of the corrosion of metallic coatings and alloys containing aluminum in a mixed atmosphere - sulphur, oxygen - at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellmann, Daniel

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is the development of materials for a sulphur experimental loop allowing the thermodynamic properties of such an energy cycle to be checked. As solutions must comply with industrial methods, rare materials are excluded as they are too expensive or difficult to implement. Iron-based materials have been tested but could not have at the same time a good corrosion resistance and high temperature forming and mechanical toughness properties. Therefore, metallic coatings have been chosen, specifically alumina. After having reported a bibliographical study on corrosion by sulphur vapour and by oxygen and by sulphur-oxygen, the author presents the experimental materials and methods. Then, the author reports the study of mixed corrosion (by sulphur and oxygen together) of metallic alloys (ferritic and austeno-ferritic alloys, aluminium and titanium alloys), and of the corrosion of FeAlx coatings, of AlTix alloys [fr

  17. KCl-induced high temperature corrosion of selected commercial alloys. Part II: alumina and silica-formers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiamehr, Saeed; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Montgomery, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    for 168 h in flowing N2(g)+5%O2(g)+15%H2O(g) (vol.%) with samples covered under KCl powder. A KCl-free exposure was also performed for comparison.Corrosion morphology and products were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD......Laboratory testing on selected alumina and silica-forming alloys was performed to evaluate their performance against high temperature corrosion induced by potassium chloride (KCl). The alloys studied were FeCrAlY, Kanthal APM, Nimonic 80A, 214, 153MA and HR160. Exposure was conducted at 600 °C......-chromium-silicon-oxygen containing layer forms as the innermost corrosion product. The layer was uniformly distributed over the surface and appears to render some protection as this alloy exhibited the best performance among the investigated alloys. To reveal further aspects of the corrosion mechanism, Nimonic 80A was exposed...

  18. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel in glycerol solution and chloride solution at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haftirman; Maruhum Tua Lubis

    2009-01-01

    Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) is an environmentally assisted failure caused by exposure to a corrodant while under a sustained tensile stress. SCC is most often rapid, unpredictable and catastrophic. Failure can occur in as little as a few hours or take years to happen. Most alloys are susceptible to SCC in one or more environments requiring careful consideration of alloy type in component design. In aqueous chloride environments austenitic stainless steels and many nickel based alloys are known to perform poorly. One of products Oleo chemical is glycerol solution. Glycerol solution contains chloride with concentration 50 ppm - 150 ppm. Austenitic stainless steel is usually used in distillation construction tank and pipe line of glycerol. Material AISI 304 will be failure in this glycerol solution with this concentration in 5 years. In production process, concentration of chloride in glycerol becomes more than 150 ppm at temperature 150 degree Celsius. The reason is that the experiment I conducted in high chloride with concentration such as 6000 ppm, 9000 ppm, and 12000 ppm. The stress corrosion cracking of the austenitic stainless steels of types AISI 304, 316 and 316L in glycerol solution at elevated temperature 150 degree Celsius is investigated as a function variation of chloride concentration, namely 50, 6000, 9000 and 12000 ppm using a constant load method with two kinds of initial tensile stress as 50 % and 70 % yield strength. The experiment uses a spring loaded fixture type and is based on ASTM G49 for experiment method, and E292 for geometry of specimen. Pitting corrosion occurs on the surface specimen until the stress level reaches the ultimate strength. Pitting corrosion attack and depletion occur on the surface as initiation of SCC failure as the stress reaches the ultimate strength. Failure has occurred in catastrophic brittle fracture type of transgranular. AISI 304 was more susceptible for all conditions. In chloride solution with concentration of

  19. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Zircaloy-4 in Halide Solutions: Effect of Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farina S.B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Zircaloy-4 was found to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in 1 M NaCl, 1 M KBr and 1 M KI aqueous solutions at potentials above the pitting potential. In all the solutions tested crack propagation was initially intergranular and then changed to transgranular. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the SCC propagation was investigated. An increase in the strain rate was found to lead to an increase in the crack propagation rate. The crack propagation rate increases in the three solutions tested as the temperatures increases between 20 and 90 °C. The Surface-Mobility SCC mechanism accounts for the observation made in the present work, and the activation energy predicted in iodide solutions is similar to that found in the literature.

  20. Effects of temperature on corrosion fatigue crack growth of pressure vessel steels in PWR coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.; Bramwell, I.L.; Fairbrother, H.; Worswick, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results concerning crack propagation rates in A508-III pressure vessel steel (medium sulphur content) exposed to PWR primary water at temperatures between 130 and 290 C. The results indicate that the greatest increase in corrosion fatigue crack growth rate occurs at temperatures in the range 150 to 200 C. Under these conditions, there was a marked change in the appearance of the fracture surface, with extensive micro-branching of the crack front and occasional bifurcation of the whole crack path. In contrast, at 290 C, the fracture surface is smoother, similar to that due to inert fatigue. The implication of these observations for assessment of the pressure vessel integrity, is examined. 14 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Evaluation of stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized 304SS in low-temperature borated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1981-05-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking has been observed in constant extension rate tests, CERT and constant load tests of 304SS tested at 32 0 C in borated water plus 15 ppM C1 - . Evidence of IGSCC was obtained in CERT tests of welded pipe samples only when the original inner diameter surface was intact and with 15 ppM C1 - added to the borated water while IGSCC occurred in a furnace sensitized pipe sample after 500 h at a constant stress of 340 MPa in borated water containing 15 ppM C1 - . These results indicate that surface features associated with weld preparation grinding contributed to the susceptibility of sensitized 304SS to IGSCC in low temperature borated water; however, the constant load test indicates that such surface defects are not necessary for IGSCC in low temperature borated water

  2. High temperature oxidation and corrosion behavior of Ni-base superalloy in He environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gyoeng Geun; Park, Ji Yeon; Jung, Su jin

    2010-11-01

    Ni-base superalloy is considered as a IHX (Intermediate Heat Exchanger) material for VHTR (Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor). The helium environment in VHTR contains small amounts of impure gases, which cause oxidation, carburization, and decarburization. In this report, we conducted the literature survey about the high temperature behavior of Ni-base superalloys in air and He environments. The basic information of Ni-base superalloy and the basic metal-oxidation theory were briefly stated. The He effect on the corrosion of Ni-base superalloy was also summarized. This works would provide a brief suggestion for the next research topic for the application of Ni-base superalloy to VHTR

  3. The synergy of corrosion and fretting wear process on Inconel 690 in the high temperature high pressure water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zihao; Xu, Jian; Li, Jie; Xin, Long; Lu, Yonghao; Shoji, Tetsuo; Takeda, Yoichi; Otsuka, Yuichi; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2018-04-01

    The synergistic effect of corrosion and fretting process of the steam generator (SG) tube was investigated by using a self-designed high temperature test rig in this paper. The experiments were performed at 100°C , 200°C and 288°C , respectively. The fretting corrosion damage was studied by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), Raman spectroscopy and auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The results demonstrated that the corrosion process in high temperature high pressure (HTHP) water environment had a distinct interaction with the fretting process of Inconel 690. With the increment of temperature, the damage mechanism changed from a simple mechanical process to a mechanochemical process.

  4. Comparison of electrochemical corrosion behaviour of MgO and ZrO2 coatings on AM50 magnesium alloy formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, J.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Blawert, C.; Dietzel, W.

    2009-01-01

    Two types of PEO coatings were produced on AM50 magnesium alloy using pulsed DC plasma electrolytic oxidation process in an alkaline phosphate and acidic fluozirconate electrolytes, respectively. The phase composition and microstructure of these PEO coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The corrosion behaviour of the coated samples was evaluated by open circuit potential (OCP) measurements, potentiodynamic polarization tests, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in neutral 0.1 M NaCl solution. The results showed that PEO coating prepared from alkaline phosphate electrolyte consisted of only MgO and on the other hand the one formed in acidic fluozirconate solution was mainly composed of ZrO 2 , MgF 2 . Electrochemical corrosion tests indicated that the phase composition of PEO coating has a significant effect on the deterioration process of coated magnesium alloy in this corrosive environment. The PEO coating that was composed of only MgO suffered from localized corrosion in the 50 h exposure studies, whereas the PEO coating with ZrO 2 compounds showed a much superior stability during the corrosion tests and provided an efficient corrosion protection. The results showed that the preparation of PEO coating with higher chemical stability compounds offers an opportunity to produce layers that could provide better corrosion protection to magnesium alloys.

  5. Temperature influence on corrosion rate of armco iron in acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perboni, G.; Rocchini, G.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study of the behaviour of Armco iron and several steels in acid solutions (HCl, H 2 SO 4 , H 3 PO 4 ) has been undertaken to determine the temperature effect on dissolution rate. The test temperatures were 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 deg C. The activation heat was determined by application of the Arrhenius law from colorimetric and electrochemical data. Investigation results obtained by both methods were represented diagrammatically and showed a good agreement, though the discrepancy in the data increased with test temperature

  6. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and corrosion behaviour of Al2O3-Ni nano composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciubotariu, Alina-Crina; Benea, Lidia; Lakatos-Varsanyi, Magda; Dragan, Viorel

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the results on the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and corrosion properties of electrodeposited nanostructured Al 2 O 3 -Ni composite coatings are presented. The nanocomposite coatings were obtained by codeposition of alumina nanoparticles (13 nm) with nickel during plating process. The coating thickness was 50 μm on steel support and an average of nano Al 2 O 3 particles inside of coatings at 15 vol.% was present. The structure of the coatings was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It has been found that the codeposition of Al 2 O 3 particles with nickel disturbs the nickel coating's regular surface structure. The electrochemical behavior of the coatings in the corrosive solutions was investigated by polarization potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods. As electrochemical test solutions 0.5 M sodium chloride and 0.5 M potassium sulphate were used in a three electrode open cell. The corrosion potential is shifted to more negative values for nanostructured coatings in 0.5 M sodium chloride. The polarization resistance in 0.5 M sodium chloride decreases in 24 h, but after that increases slowly. In 0.5 M potassium sulphate solution the polarization resistance decreases after 2 h and after 30 h of immersion the polarization resistance is higher than that of the beginning value. The corrosion rate calculated by polarization potentiodynamic curves obtained after 30 min from immersion in solution is smaller for nanostructured coatings in 0.5 M potassium sulphate (4.74 μm/year) and a little bit bigger in 0.5 M sodium chloride (5.03 μm/year)

  7. Effect of Welding Process on Microstructure, Mechanical and Pitting Corrosion Behaviour of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt has been made to weld 2205 Duplex stainless steel of 6mm thick plate using conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and activated gas tungsten arc welding (A- GTAW) process using silica powder as activated flux. Present work is aimed at studying the effect of welding process on depth of penetration, width of weld zone of 2205 duplex stainless steel. It also aims to observe the microstructural changes and its effect on mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel welds. Metallography is done to observe the microstructural changes of the welds using image analyzer attached to the optical microscopy. Hardness studies, tensile and ductility bend tests were evaluated for mechanical properties. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were carried out using a basic GillAC electro-chemical system in 3.5% NaCl solution to observe the pitting corrosion behaviour. Results of the present investigation established that increased depth of penetration and reduction of weld width in a single pass by activated GTAW with the application of SiO2 flux was observed when compared with conventional GTAW process. It may be attributed to the arc constriction effect. Microstructure of the weld zones for both the welds is observed to be having combination of austenite and delta ferrite. Grain boundary austenite (GBA) with Widmanstatten-type austenite (WA) of plate-like feature was nucleated from the grain boundaries in the weld zone of A-GTAW process. Mechanical properties are relatively low in activated GTAW process and are attributed to changes in microstructural morphology of austenite. Improved pitting corrosion resistance was observed for the welds made with A-GTAW process.

  8. Influence of 8-aminoquinoline on the corrosion behaviour of copper in 0.1 M NaCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cubillos, M.; Sancy, M.; Pavez, J.; Vargas, E.; Urzua, R.; Henriquez-Roman, J.; Tribollet, B.; Zagal, J.H.; Paez, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of copper in aerated 0.1 M NaCl solution in presence of 8-aminoquinoline (8-AQ), using open circuit potential (OCP) measurements, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM), was studied. The measurements revealed that the effect of 8-AQ is dependent on its concentration. For concentrations up to 10 -3 M, the organic compound displaces the corrosion potential following no trend and also reduces the anodic current. In contrast, for concentrations higher than 10 -3 , 8-AQ reduces markedly both, the anodic and cathodic currents and consequently, the corrosion current density of copper. After 9 days of exposure in chloride solution, containing the organic compound, potentiodynamic polarization analyses showed a significant reduction in the anodic response and a less significant reduction in the cathodic response, which is associated with a film formed at the copper surface of about 10 μm in thickness and visually observed by a colour change of the copper surface. In order to elucidate the most likely interaction between the 8-AQ molecule and the different molecular structures probably present on copper surfaces in chloride solutions, some results obtained from theoretical calculations are presented. The following molecular structures were considered: CuCl molecule, CuCl 2 - complex, and little copper clusters defect representation built as five atoms on C 4v symmetry. Thus, based on the geometric, energetic, frontier orbital, and Total Electronic Density analysis done for the optimized states found for the systems investigated, we suggest that the most probable interaction of 8-AQ proceeds above CuCl units and free copper sites.

  9. Role of Metal Cations on the corrosion behaviour of 8090-T851 in a pH 2.0 solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murthy, K.S.N.; Ambat, Rajan; Dwarakadasa, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of cations such as Cu2+, Al3+ and Li+ on the corrosion behaviour of 8090-T851(Al-Li) alloy in a pH 2.0 HCl solution was investigated by weight loss and polarisation techniques. Weight loss experiments showed that the effect of cation is a strong function of its nature...

  10. Electrochemical evaluation of corrosion and tribocorrosion behaviour of amorphous and nanocrystalline cobalt–tungsten electrodeposited coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathollahzade, N.; Raeissi, K., E-mail: k_raeissi@cc.iut.ac.ir

    2014-11-14

    Amorphous and nanocrystalline Co–W coatings were electrodeposited on copper substrates from a citrate–ammonia bath. The coatings showed nodular surface morphologies, but a microcrack network was detected in the amorphous coating. However, a better corrosion resistance was achieved for the amorphous coating. During sliding under open circuit potential (OCP) condition, the potential of amorphous coating gradually became more active probably due to the widening of wear scar, and thus expansion of active area. The amorphous coatings showed a higher volume loss at OCP probably due to its lower microhardness. In anodic sliding, a sharp increase in current density was observed due to mass transport and depassivation effects. In all sliding conditions, the proportion of mass transport was higher than wear accelerated corrosion, which implied that the dissolution reaction of the coatings was mainly a mass-transport controlled process. The results also showed that the effect of sliding on degradation is more intense for the nanocrystalline coating. For both coatings, the formation of the superficial microcracks in the vicinity of wear scars indicating on a surface fatigue wear mechanism. - Highlights: • Mass-transport effect had higher proportion in tribocorrosion of Co–W coatings. • The major electrochemical-wear degradation was for the nanocrystalline coating. • The higher proportion of wear accelerated corrosion was for the amorphous coating. • Superficial microcracks were formed near scars due to the coatings brittleness.

  11. Influence of aging at 180C on the corrosion behaviour of a ternary Al-Li-Zr alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan; Prasad, R.K.; Dwarakadasa, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    decreased for samples aged up to 6 h at 180 °C whereas Icorr increased for samples aged for longer times. Values of OCP and pitting potential initially shifted in the noble direction and then towards more active values. This change in OCP was observed on samples that had been aged for 20 h while in the case...... of pitting potential an aging time of only 6 h was required. The overall change in passive current density was small, although at longer aging times (> 40h) it showed an increase. As the amount of lithium depletion increased, OCP and pitting potential shifted in the active direction while passive current......The influence of aging at 180 °C on the corrosion behaviour of an Al-1.5%Li-0.1%Zr alloy has been studied using weight loss, open circuit potential (OCP) measurements and potentiodynamic polarization measurements in 3.5% NaCl solution. Corrosion rates obtained from weight loss and Icorr values...

  12. Rhyolitic glasses as natural analogues of nuclear waste glasses: behaviour of an Icelandic glass upon natural aqueous corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magonthier, M.-C.; Petit, J.-C.; Dran, J.-C.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed study of the altered rims present in narrow fissures of a 52 ka-old Icelandic obsidian reveals the behaviour of transition and heavy elements, as well as the mechanism and kinetics of alteration, during glass/solution interaction. These complex altered rims are alkali depleted and consist of alternating layers of Fe-rich aluminosilicate and aluminium thihydroxide. The elemental partitioning observed on this naturally corroded obsidian is supported by laboratory experiments performed on the same glass, the elemental accumulation being explained by the formation of a hydrosilicate. A good correlation exists between the thickness of the altered rims and that calculated from the amounts of Fe and Ti accumulated locally. Thus, immobile elements can be used reliably as indices of the extent of alteration because only near-equilibrium conditions occur. The good agreement between the experimental hydration rate of obsidians and the progress of natural corrosion, leads to the assumption that ion diffusion is the long-term controlling mechanism of corrosion. Such an assumption is supported by the particular distribution of the immobile elements which is due to ion diffusion and coprecipitation processes (self-organization genesis). These observations have implications for nuclear waste disposal topics and support the validity of obsidians as analogues of nuclear waste glasses with respect to some local environmental constraints induced by waste packaging and disposal. (author)

  13. Corrosion behaviour of a stream generator tube material in simulated steam generator feedwater containing chlorides and sulphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojinov, M.; Kinnunen, P.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Sirkiae, P.; Yliniemi, K. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland); Buddas, T.; Halin, M.; Tompuri, K. [Fortum Power and Heat Oy, Loviisa Power Plant (Finland)

    2002-07-01

    The goal of the present work has been to assess the effect of relatively high concentrations of anionic impurities (Cl{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) on the corrosion behaviour of Ti-stabilised stainless steel SG tubes in simulated steam generator feed-water. The main observations of this work can be summarised as follows: Sulphate ions seem to be more aggressive than chloride ions towards the primary passive film on 08X18H10T stainless steel. The results may indicate that it is more important to have a low concentration of sulphate ions than of chloride ions in secondary side water when the effects of chemical conditions on tube degradation are considered. The presence of chloride ions seems to weaken the detrimental effect of sulphate ions on the stability of oxide films growing on 08X18H10T stainless steel. No localised corrosion features of 08X18H10T stainless steel were detected in the voltammetric and impedance measurements in solutions containing up to 5000 ppb sulphates, chlorides or both of the anions. (authors)

  14. Corrosion behaviour of a stream generator tube material in simulated steam generator feedwater containing chlorides and sulphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojinov, M.; Kinnunen, P.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Sirkiae, P.; Yliniemi, K.; Buddas, T.; Halin, M.; Tompuri, K.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the present work has been to assess the effect of relatively high concentrations of anionic impurities (Cl - , SO 4 2- ) on the corrosion behaviour of Ti-stabilised stainless steel SG tubes in simulated steam generator feed-water. The main observations of this work can be summarised as follows: Sulphate ions seem to be more aggressive than chloride ions towards the primary passive film on 08X18H10T stainless steel. The results may indicate that it is more important to have a low concentration of sulphate ions than of chloride ions in secondary side water when the effects of chemical conditions on tube degradation are considered. The presence of chloride ions seems to weaken the detrimental effect of sulphate ions on the stability of oxide films growing on 08X18H10T stainless steel. No localised corrosion features of 08X18H10T stainless steel were detected in the voltammetric and impedance measurements in solutions containing up to 5000 ppb sulphates, chlorides or both of the anions. (authors)

  15. Thermo chemical calculations applied to the study of ceramic corrosion at high temperature - Steel-making applications; Apport de la thermodynamique a l'etude de la corrosion des ceramiques a haute temperature - Applications siderurgiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, J. [Orleans Univ., Polytechnique, 45 (France); Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS/CEMHTI), 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France)

    2008-05-15

    At high temperature, corrosion by gas, slag or metal is recognized in many cases as the essential degradation mode of ceramics. The reaction between the ceramic and the corrosive agent should be described taking into account both the kinetic aspects (rates and mechanisms of the reactions) and the thermodynamic aspects (equilibrium conditions). After a short description of the thermodynamic tools, we will show how some thermo chemical calculations, involving complex multi-component systems at high temperature, can be applied to explain some practical situations. Different examples, from steel making, will be considered: effects of composition changes upon the stability of the refractories and reactions of corrosion between the refractories, the gas and the liquid oxides. (author)

  16. Corrosion of high temperature resisting alloys exposed to heavy fuel ash; Corrosion de aleaciones resistentes a altas temperaturas expuestas a ceniza de combustoleo pesado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong Moreno, Adriana del Carmen

    1998-03-01

    The objective of the performed research was to study the degradation process by high temperature corrosion of alloys exposed to heavy fuel oil ashes through a comparative experimental evaluation of its performance that allowed to establish the mechanisms involved in the phenomenon. The experimentation carried out involved the determination of the resistance to the corrosion of 14 alloys of different type (low and medium alloy steels, ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, nickel base alloys and a FeCrAl alloy of type ODS) exposed to high temperatures (580 Celsius degrees - 900 Celsius degrees) in 15 ash deposits with different corrosive potential, which were collected in the high temperature zone of boilers of thermoelectric power stations. The later studies to the corrosion tests consisted of the analysis by sweeping electron microscopy supported by microanalysis of the corroded probes, with the purpose of determining the effect of Na, V and S on the corrosivity of the ash deposits and the effect of the main alloying elements on the corrosion resistance of the alloys. Such effects are widely documented to support the proposed mechanisms of degradation that are occurring. The global analysis of the generated results has allowed to propose a model to explain the global mechanism of corrosion of alloys exposed to the high temperatures of ash deposits. The proposed model, complements the processed one by Wilson, widely accepted for fused vanadates, as far as on one hand, it considers the effect of the sodium sulfate presence (in addition to the vanadium compounds) in the deposits, and on the other hand, it extends it to temperatures higher than the point of fusion of constituent vanadium compounds of the deposits. Both aspects involve considering the roll that the process of diffusion of species has on the degradation and the capacity of protection of the alloy. The research performed allowed to confirm what the Wilson model had established for deposits with high

  17. Modelling the behaviour of 210Po in high temperature processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, J.C.; Robles, B.; Corbacho, J.A.; Gasco, Catalina; Gazquez, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    In several Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) industries, relatively high temperatures are used as part of their industrial processes. In coal combustion, as occur in other high temperature processes, an increase of the activity concentration of every natural radioisotope is produced both, in residues and by-products. An additional increase can be observed in the activity concentration of radionuclides of elements with low boiling point. This work is centred in the increase of polonium, more precisely in its radioisotope Po-210, present in the natural chains, and with a half-life long enough to be considered for radiation protection purposes. This additional increase appears mainly in the residual particles that are suspended in the flue gases: the fly-ashes. Besides, scales, with a high concentration of this radioisotope, were observed. These scales are produced on surfaces with a temperature lower than the boiling point of the chemical element. Both, the accumulation in particles and the production of scales are attributed to condensation effects. When effective doses for the public and the workers are evaluated, taking into account these increases in activity concentrations, the use of theoretical models is necessary. In this work a theoretical description of those effects is presented. Moreover, a verification of the predictions of the model was performed by comparing them with measurements carried on in coal-fired power plants. The same description here presented is applicable in general to the behaviour of Po-210 in other NORM industries where high temperature processes involving raw materials are used, as can be ceramic, cement production, tiles production or steel processing.

  18. The electrochemical behaviour of copper in aerated 1 mol·dm-3 NaCl at room temperature: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Litke, C.D.

    1989-05-01

    Uniform corrosion will be an important process in determining the lifetime of a copper nuclear fuel waste container. We need to know the mechanism of the corrosion reaction if we are to make reliable predictions about the long-term corrosion behaviour. This series of reports summarizes the results of an electrochemical investigation of the corrosion of copper in aerated 1 mol·dm -3 NaCl at room temperature. In part 2 we discuss the cathodic reduction of oxygen on a copper rotating disc electrode. The anodic dissolution of copper and the behaviour under freely corroding conditions are considered in Parts 1 and 3, respectively. The mechanism of the oxygen reduction reaction has been studied over a wide range of applied potentials. At potentials close to the corrosion potential, the mechanism is complicated and not fully understood. It is possible that in this potential region, oxygen is reduced to peroxide. At more negative applied potentials, between -0.50 and -0.90 V sce , the predominant process is the 4-electron reduction of oxygen to hydroxide. In this potential region, the rate is controlled jointly by the interfacial reaction and the rate of supply of oxygen to the electrode surface. At an applied potential of about -1.0 V sce , the rate of reduction is almost totally controlled by the rate of transport of oxygen. Values for the kinetic parameters for the 4-electron reaction have been determined. In addition, the diffusion coefficient of oxygen was found to be 1.7 3 ± 0.0 5 x 10 -5 cm 2 ·s -1 . These data, along with the results on the anodic dissolution of copper, will be used to explain the behaviour of copper under freely corroding conditions

  19. Crack behaviour of ferritic pressure vessels steels in oxygenated high temperature water under transient loadings. Crack corrosion phase 2. Crack development and fatigue. Final report; Rissverhalten ferritischer Druckbehaelterstaehle in sauerstoffhaltigem Hochtemperaturwasser bei transienten Vorgaengen. Risskorrosion Phase 2. Rissentstehung und Ermuedung. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissenberg, Thomas

    2014-03-15

    Using the example of the ferritic steels 22NiMoCr3-7 and 15MnNi6-3 representative for Nuclear Power Plants experimental data for the evaluation of the influence of the light water reactor (LWR) coolant environment and postulated chloride contaminations on crack development and fatigue have been determined in order to verify and extend the basis for a reliable estimation of the residual service life of reactor components. The aim of the research project was the investigation of the environmental effects at low strain rate conditions and the determination of the fatigue life under cyclic loading at uniaxial and multiaxial stress state. The quasi-static tensile tests (Constant Extension Rate Test, CERT) were performed using 3 low strain rates, each differing by about one order of magnitude (2.5.10{sup -3}, 3.1.10{sup -4} and 2.3.10{sup -5} %/s). The low cycle fatigue (LCF) experiments were conducted applying alternating tensile-compression loading with strain amplitudes of 0.3, 0.5 and 0.9 % at strain rates of 0.1 and 0.01 %/s (tests in air primarily 0.1 %/s). The cyclic notched tensile tests were carried out with a nominal axial strain in the notch root of 0.5 % at a strain rate of 0.1 %/s. The experiments in each case were performed in air, high purity water and chloride containing water at a testing temperature of 240 C, the oxygen content of the liquid medium was set to 0.4 ppm (simulated boiling water reactor coolant). In the CERT experiments chloride contents of 30, 50 and 100 ppb were applied, in the LCF tests the chloride content was 50 ppb which can be regarded as an upper realistic limit for a postulated chloride contamination of the reactor coolant. All experiments in liquid environment were preceded by a pre-autoclaving phase of at least 100 h in order to allow the formation of a stable oxide layer (magnetite). The testing material 22NiMoCr3-7 was available in form of an original reactor pressure vessel shell primarily designated for the German nuclear

  20. Stress corrosion cracking of Inconel in high temperature water; Corrosion fissurante sous contrainte de l'Inconel dans l'eau a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coriou,; Grall,; Gall, Le; Vettier, [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    Some Inconel samples were subjected to hot water corrosion testing (350 deg. C), under stress slightly above the elastic limit. It has been observed that different types of alloys - with or without titanium - could suffer serious intergranular damage, including a complete rupture, within a three months period. In one case, we observed an unusual intergranular phenomenon which appeared quite different from common intergranular corrosion. (author) [French] Des essais de corrosion d'Inconel sont realises dans l'eau a 350 deg. C, et sous contrainte legerement superieure a la limite elastique. On constate que differentes varietes d'alliage avec ou sans titane donnent lieu a des accidents intergranulaires graves allant jusqu'a rupture complete en 3 mois. Dans un cas, on observe un phenomene intergranulaire particulier tres different de la corrosion intergranulaire classique. (auteur)

  1. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of low alloy and carbon steels in high temperature pure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubota, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Tsuzuki, R.

    1993-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of low alloy steels (A508 and SNCM630) and a carbon steel (SGV480) in high temperature water has been examined with relation to the heat treatment condition, including a long time aging, and the mechanical properties. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) as observed in the highly hardened specimens, and there was observed in the highly hardened specimens, and there was observed in the highly hardened specimens, and there was observed a close relationship between hardness and SCC susceptibility. From the engineering point of view, it was concluded that adequate SR (stress relief) or tempering heat treatment is necessary to avoid the IGSCC of the welded structures made of low alloy and carbon steels. A508 heat treated with specified quench and temper did not show the SCC susceptibility, even after aging 10000 hours at 350, 400 and 450 degrees C. Tensile properties corresponding to the critical hardness for SSC susceptibility coincided with the values at the 'necking point' in the true stress-strain curve. Ductile-brittle transition observed in the fracture toughness test also occurred at around the critical hardness for SCC susceptibility. Therefore, it was conjectured that the limitation of plasticity was an absolute cause for the SCC susceptibility of the steels

  2. High temperature oxidation behaviour of mullite coated C/C composites in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritze, H.; Borchardt, G.; Weber, S.; Scherrer, S.; Weiss, R.

    1997-01-01

    Based on thermogravimetric measurements on Si-SiC-mullite coated C/C material the temperature dependence of the overall rate constant is interpreted in the temperature range 400 C 1400 C), however, the oxidation behaviour of SiC limits long term application. In this temperature range, additional outer mullite coatings produced by pulsed laser deposition improve the oxidation behaviour. (orig.)

  3. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge

  4. Dependence on Temperature, pH, and Cl"− in the Uniform Corrosion of Aluminum Alloys 2024-T3, 6061-T6, and 7075-T6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, I-Wen; Hurley, Belinda L.; Yang, Fan; Buchheit, Rudolph G.

    2016-01-01

    With regards to localized corrosion, the role of uniform corrosion of aluminum alloys has not always been accounted for in the past. The impact of uniform corrosion on aluminum alloys 2024-T3, 6061-T6, and 7075-T6 is studied here to provide quantitative evidence of its importance. Preliminary weight loss experiments combined with optical profilometry (OP) indicate that corrosion attributed to uniform corrosion is very significant when compared to localized corrosion. A series of free immersion tests were conducted to understand the influence of environmental variables including temperature (20, 40, 60, 80 °C), initial pH without buffering (3, 5, 8, 10) and chloride concentration (0.01, 0.1, 1 M) for 1, 7, and 30 days. With time, uniform corrosion results exhibited a strong dependence on temperature accompanied by variable pH- and temperature-dependent corrosion product formation. Electrochemical approaches including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cathodic polarization were utilized to characterize the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and corrosion product formation as a function of temperature. Electron microscopy was conducted to assess the microstructure and morphology of corrosion products and provide supporting evidence for electrochemical findings.

  5. Characterization and corrosion behaviour of CoNi alloys obtained by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olvera, S. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Departamento de Ingeniería en Metalurgia y Materiales, México, D. F. (Mexico); Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Sánchez-Marcos, J. [Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Palomares, F.J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM-CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Salas, E. [Spline Spanish CRG Beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, ESRF, BP 220-38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Arce, E.M. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Departamento de Ingeniería en Metalurgia y Materiales, México, D. F. (Mexico); Herrasti, P., E-mail: pilar.herrasti@uam.es [Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    CoNi alloys including Co{sub 30}Ni{sub 70}, Co{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} and Co{sub 70}Ni{sub 30} were prepared via mechanical alloying using Co and Ni powders. The crystallinity and short-range order were studied using X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the milling process increases the number of vacancies, especially around the Co atoms, while the milling time decreases the crystalline size and enhances the crystallinity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterise the chemical composition of the samples surface. The magnetic properties were analysed using zero-field cooling, field cooling and a magnetic hysteresis loops. The magnetic saturation moment is approximately 1.05 μ{sub B}/atom; this value decreases with the mechanical alloying time, and it is proportional to the cobalt concentration. The polarization and impedance curves in different media (NaCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH) showed similar corrosion resistance values. The corrosion resistance increased in the order NaCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH. A good passivation layer was formed in NaOH due to the cobalt and nickel oxides on the particle surfaces. - Highlights: • Ni{sub x}Co{sub 100-x} alloys were synthesized by mechanical alloying • Milling time decrease size and enhances crystallinity. • Oxygen is not present in a significant percentage in bulk but is detected on the surface. • Magnetic saturation moment is 1.05 mB/atom and decrease with mechanical allowing time • Corrosion resistance is higher in NaOH than in NaCl or HCl solutions.

  6. Characterization and corrosion behaviour of CoNi alloys obtained by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olvera, S.; Sánchez-Marcos, J.; Palomares, F.J.; Salas, E.; Arce, E.M.; Herrasti, P.

    2014-01-01

    CoNi alloys including Co 30 Ni 70 , Co 50 Ni 50 and Co 70 Ni 30 were prepared via mechanical alloying using Co and Ni powders. The crystallinity and short-range order were studied using X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the milling process increases the number of vacancies, especially around the Co atoms, while the milling time decreases the crystalline size and enhances the crystallinity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterise the chemical composition of the samples surface. The magnetic properties were analysed using zero-field cooling, field cooling and a magnetic hysteresis loops. The magnetic saturation moment is approximately 1.05 μ B /atom; this value decreases with the mechanical alloying time, and it is proportional to the cobalt concentration. The polarization and impedance curves in different media (NaCl, H 2 SO 4 and NaOH) showed similar corrosion resistance values. The corrosion resistance increased in the order NaCl, H 2 SO 4 and NaOH. A good passivation layer was formed in NaOH due to the cobalt and nickel oxides on the particle surfaces. - Highlights: • Ni x Co 100-x alloys were synthesized by mechanical alloying • Milling time decrease size and enhances crystallinity. • Oxygen is not present in a significant percentage in bulk but is detected on the surface. • Magnetic saturation moment is 1.05 mB/atom and decrease with mechanical allowing time • Corrosion resistance is higher in NaOH than in NaCl or HCl solutions

  7. Synthesis of Ceramic Protective Coatings for Chemical Plant Parts Operated in Hi-temperature and Corrosive/Erosive Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, M. C.; Park, J. R.; Hong, K. T.; Seok, H. K.

    2005-01-01

    Some feasibility studies are conducted to produce an advanced ceramic coating, which reveals superior chemical and mechanical strength, on metal base structure used in chemical plant. This advanced coating on metallic frame can replace ceramic delivery pipe and reaction chamber used in chemical plant, which are operated in hi-temperature and corrosive/erosive environment. An dual spraying is adopted to reduce the residual stress in order to increase the coating thickness and the residual stress is estimated by in-situ manner. Then new methodology is tried to form special coating of yttrium aluminum garnet(YAG), which reveals hi-strength and low-creep rates at hi-temperature, superior anti-corrosion property, hi-stability against Alkali-Vapor corrosion, and so on, on iron base structure. To verify the formation of YAG during thermal spraying, XRD(X ray diffraction) technique was used

  8. Importance of temperature, pH, and boric acid concentration on rates of hydrogen production from galvanized steel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyola, V.M.

    1982-01-01

    One of the known sources of hydrogen gas within a nuclear plant containment building during a LOCA is the high temperature corrosion of galvanized steel yielding hydrogen gas. The importance of this source of hydrogen will vary depending on the severity of the accident. In an accident which resulted in core degradation, for example, the major source of hydrogen would probably be the metal-water reaction of the zircaloy cladding, and the corrosion of galvanized steel would then become a relatively minor source of hydrogen. However, in an accident in which core degradation is avoided or limited to minor damage, the corrosion of galvanized steel, and presumably of other materials as well, would then become a major contributor to the buildup of hydrogen within containment. The purpose of this paper is to present the overall effects of temperature, pH, and boric acid concentration on the rate of hydrogen generation over a broad range of each parameter

  9. Evaluation of structural behaviour and corrosion resistant of austenitic AISI 304 and duplex AISI 2304 stainless steel reinforcements embedded in ordinary Portland cement mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, E.; Cobo, A.; Bastidas, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical and structural behaviour of two stainless steels reinforcements, with grades austenitic EN 1.4301 (AISI 304) and duplex EN 1.4362 (AISI 2304) have been studied, and compared with the conventional carbon steel B500SD rebar. The study was conducted at three levels: at rebar level, at section level and at structural element level. The different mechanical properties of stainless steel directly influence the behaviour at section level and structural element level. The study of the corrosion behaviour of the two stainless steels has been performed by electrochemical measurements, monitoring the corrosion potential and the lineal polarization resistance (LPR), of reinforcements embedded in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) mortar specimens contaminated with different amount of chloride over one year time exposure. Both stainless steels specimens embedded in OPC mortar remain in the passive state for all the chloride concentration range studied after one year exposure. (Author) 26 refs.

  10. High temperature degradation by erosion-corrosion in bubbling fluidized bed combustors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Peggy

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat-exchanger tubes in fluidized bed combustors (FBCs often suffer material loss due to combined corrosion and erosion. Most severe damage is believed to be caused by the impact of dense packets of bed material on the lower parts of the tubes. In order to understand this phenomenon, a unique laboratory test rig at Berkeley was designed to simulate the particle hammering interactions between in-bed particles and tubes in bubbling fluidized bed combustors. In this design, a rod shaped specimen is actuated a short distance within a partially fluidized bed. The downward specimen motion is controlled to produce similar frequencies, velocities and impact forces as those experienced by the impacting particle aggregates in practical systems. Room temperature studies have shown that the degradation mechanism is a three-body abrasion process. This paper describes the characteristics of this test rig, reviews results at elevated temperatures and compares them to field experience. At higher temperatures, deposits of the bed material on tube surfaces can act as a protective layer. The deposition depended strongly on the type of bed material, the degree of tube surface oxidation and the tube and bed temperatures. With HCl present in the bed, wastage was increased due to enhanced oxidation and reduced oxide scale adherence.

  11. Effect of thermal stabilization on the low-temperature stress-corrosion cracking of Inconel 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1983-01-01

    The propensity to low-temperature stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of thermally stabilized Inconel 600 in sulfur-bearing environments has been investigated using U-bends and slow-strain-rate testing. The results have been compared with those of sensitized Inconel 600. The potential dependence of crack-propagation rate has been established in a single test by using several U-bends held at different potentials, by choosing an appropriate electrical circuitry. The difference in SCC susceptibility of the sensitized and stabilized materials is discussed in terms of the grain-boundary chromium depletion and resulting intergranular attack in boiling ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid tests, and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) tests. 10 figures

  12. Effect of temperature on the level of corrosion caused by heavy petroleum on AISI 304 and AISI 444 stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Sampaio Eufrásio Machado

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a study on the influence of national heavy petroleum in the corrosion of the AISI 444 and AISI 304 stainless steels in simulated refining operation conditions. The petroleum was first characterized through physicochemical analysis (density, fluidity point, viscosity, sulfur concentration. In an attempt to understand the corrosion effect of temperature and of the type of heating the referred types of steel thermal treatments were carried out at three levels of temperature (200, 300 and 400 °C. The procedure was done in conditions close to those in the distillation column. Heat was gradually increased from room temperature, and directly heated to working temperature. Each treatment took 4 hours to be completed. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM and the analysis of X rays dispersive energy (EDX were used after the trials to characterize the samples. The results show that treatment temperature, as well as the type of heating, has distinct influences on each type of steel.

  13. “In-vitro” corrosion behaviour of the magnesium alloy with Al and Zn (AZ31) protected with a biodegradable polycaprolactone coating loaded with hydroxyapatite and cephalexin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zomorodian, A.; Santos, C.; Carmezim, M.J.; Silva, T.Moura e; Fernandes, J.C.S.; Montemor, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    Mg alloys are very susceptible to corrosion in physiological media. This behaviour limits its widespread use in biomedical applications as bioresorbable implants, but it can be controlled by applying protective coatings. On one hand, coatings must delay and control the degradation process of the bare alloy and, on the other hand, they must be functional and biocompatible. In this study a biocompatible polycaprolactone (PCL) coating was functionalised with nano hydroxyapatite (HA) particles for enhanced biocompatibility and with an antibiotic, cephalexin, for anti-bacterial purposes and applied on the AZ31 alloy. The chemical composition and the surface morphology of the coated samples, before and after the corrosion tests, were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) and Raman. The results showed that the presence of additives induced the formation of agglomerates and defects in the coating that resulted in the formation of pores during immersion in Hanks' solution. The corrosion resistance of the coated samples was studied in Hank's solution by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results evidenced that all the coatings can provide corrosion protection of the bare alloy. However, in the presence of the additives, corrosion protection decreased. The wetting behaviour of the coating was evaluated by the static contact angle method and it was found that the presence of both hydroxyapatite and cephalexin increased the hydrophilic behaviour of the surface. The results showed that it is possible to tailor a composite coating that can store an antibiotic and nano hydroxyapatite particles, while allowing to control the in-vitro corrosion degradation of the bioresorbable Mg alloy AZ31.

  14. Tribological and corrosion behaviour of electroless Ni-B coating possessing a blackberry like structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülbül, Ferhat; Altun, Hikmet; Küçük, Özkan; Ezirmik, Vefa

    2012-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the tribological and corrosion properties of the electroless Ni-B coating deposited on AISI 304 stainless steels. The microstructure of the coating was characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS). XRD analysis revealed that the prepared coating possessed an amorphous character. SEM-EDS investigation also indicated that a non-stoichiometric Ni-B coating was deposited with a columnar growth mechanism on the stainless steel substrate and the morphology of the growth surface was blackberry-like. The hardness and tribological properties were characterized by microhardness and a pin-on-disc wear test. The electroless Ni-B coated sample had a higher degree of hardness, a lower friction coefficient and a lower wear rate than the uncoated substrate. The electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization method was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the coating. The electroless Ni-B coating offered cathodic protection on the substrate by acting as a sacrificial anode although it was electrochemically more reactive than the stainless steel substrate.

  15. Laser cladding of nickel base alloy on SS316L for improved wear and corrosion behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awasthi, Reena; Kushwaha, R.P.; Chandra, Kamlesh; Viswanadham, C.S.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G.K.; Limaye, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Laser cladding by an Nd:YAG laser was employed to deposit Ni base alloy (Ni-Mo-Cr-Si) on stainless steel-316 L substrate. The resulting defect-free clad with minimum dilution of the substrate was characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Vickers microhardness test. Dry sliding wear of the cladding and the substrate was evaluated using a ball-on-plate reciprocating wear tester against different counter bodies (WC and 52100 Cr steel). The reciprocating sliding wear resistance of the coating was evaluated as a function of the normal load, keeping the sliding amplitude and sliding speed constant. Wear mechanisms were analyzed by observation of wear track morphology using SEM-EDS. The electrochemical corrosion behavior of clad layer was studied in reducing environment (HCl) to estimate the general corrosion resistance of the laser clad layer in comparison with the substrate SS-316L. The clad layer showed higher wear resistance under reducing condition than that of the substrate material stainless steel 316L. (author)

  16. Corrosion behaviour of Zircaloy 4 fuel cans for high burnup in EdF PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blat, M.; Kerrec, O.; Bourgoin, J.; Vrignaud, E.; Amanrich, H.

    1994-01-01

    Uniform corrosion of fuel cladding could be a limitation for burn-up enhancement. First, the oxide thickness measured on fuel cladding for high burn-up has been compared to the prediction of the EDF code, CYRANO 2E. A comparative metallurgical characterization has been also performed on samples which were oxidized in pile and in autoclave. Then, laboratories studies have been launched for a better understanding of the corrosion mechanisms. A reflection was proposed on the two main theoretical concepts proposed for these mechanisms. Their kinetics could be controlled by transfers in liquid medium (electrolyte) or in solid medium (compact oxide). For the first topic, a nanoscopic characterization of the oxide is in progress, using Atomic Force Microscope. The first results are presented. In the second case, an electrochemical approach (impedance spectroscopy and voltametry) is developed in our laboratories. The obtained results could give some new keys in order to understand the influence of some parameters (alloys composition, coolant chemistry,...). (authors). 7 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs

  17. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Spear, K.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    A vertical flow-through furnace has been built to study the effect of corrosion on the morphology and mechanical properties of ceramic hot gas filters. Sections of 3M Type 203 and DuPont Lanxide SiC-SiC filter tubes were sealed at one end and suspended in the furnace while being subjected to a simulated coal combustion environment at 870{degrees}C. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy is used to identify phase and morphology changes due to corrosion while burst testing determines the loss of mechanical strength after exposure to the combustion gases. Additionally, a thermodynamic database of gaseous silicon compounds is currently being established so that calculations can be made to predict important products of the reaction of the environment with the ceramics. These thermodynamic calculations provide useful information concerning the regimes where the ceramic may be degraded by material vaporization. To verify the durability and predict lifetime performance of ceramic heat exchangers in coal combustion environments, long-term exposure testing of stressed (internally pressurized) tubes must be performed in actual coal combustion environments. The authors have designed a system that will internally pressurize 2 inch OD by 48 inch long ceramic heat exchanger tubes to a maximum pressure of 200 psi while exposing the outer surface of the tubes to coal combustion gas at the Combustion and Environmental Research Facility (CERF) at the Pittsburgh Energy and Technology Center. Water-cooled, internal o-ring pressure seals were designed to accommodate the existing 6 inch by 6 inch access panels of the CERF. Tubes will be exposed for up to a maximum of 500 hours at temperatures of 2500 and 2600{degrees}F with an internal pressure of 200 psi. If the tubes survive, their retained strength will be measured using the high temperature tube burst test facility at Penn State University. Fractographic analysis will be performed to identify the failure source(s) for the tubes.

  18. Corrosion behaviour of dissimilar welds between ferritic-martensitic stainless steel and austenitic stainless steel from secondary circuit of CANDU NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popa, L.; Fulger, M.; Tunaru, M.; Velciu, L.; Lazar, M.

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion damages of welds occur in spite of the fact that the proper base metal and filler metal have been correctly selected, industry codes and standards have been followed and welds have been realized with full weld penetration and have proper shape and contour. In secondary circuit of a Nuclear Power Station there are some components which have dissimilar welds. The principal criteria for selecting a stainless steel usually is resistance to corrosion, and white most consideration is given to the corrosion resistance of the base metal, additional consideration should be given to the weld metal and to the base metal immediately adjacent to the weld zone. Our experiments were performed in chloride environmental on two types of samples: non-welded (410 or W 1.4006 ferritic-martensitic steel and 304L or W 1.4307 austenitic stainless steel) and dissimilar welds (dissimilar metal welds: joints between 410 ferritic-martensitic and 304L austenitic stainless steel). To evaluate corrosion susceptibility of dissimilar welds was used electrochemical method (potentiodynamic method) and optic microscopy (microstructural analysis). The present paper follows the localized corrosion behaviour of dissimilar welds between austenitic stainless steel and ferritic-martensitic steel in solutions containing chloride ions. It was evaluated the corrosion rates of samples (welded and non-welded) by electrochemical methods. (authors)

  19. Thermomechanical analysis of Natural Rubber behaviour stressed at room temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysochoos A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their high molecular mobility, stressed rubber chains can easily change their conformations and get orientated. This phenomena leads to so high reversible draw ratio that this behaviour is called rubber elasticity [1-3]. The analogy with ideal gases leads to an internal energy independent of elongation, the stress being attributed to a so-called configuration entropy. However, this analysis cannot take thermal expansion into account and moreover prohibits predicting standard thermo-elastic effect noticed at small elongations and the thermoelastic inversion effects [4]. This paper aims at : observing and quantifying dissipative and coupling effects associated with deformation energy, generated when Natural Rubber is stretched. re-examine the thermomechanical behaviour model of rubberlike materials, under the generalised standard material concept. From an experimental viewpoint, energy balance is created using infrared and quantitative imaging techniques. Digital Image Correlation (DIC provides in-the-plane displacement fields and, after derivation, strain and strain-rate fields. We have used those techniques to evidence the thermoelastic inversion effect as shown on Figure 1 where different weights have been fixed to warmed specimen and we monitored the sample deformation while it recovers room temperature. But we have also used those techniques to perform energy balance : analysis of the mechanical equilibrium allows estimates of the stress pattern and computation of deformation energy rates under a plane stress hypothesis [5]. Infrared Thermography (IRT gives the surface temperature of the sample. To estimate the distribution of heat sources, image processing with a local heat equation and a minimal set of approximation functions (image filtering was used. The time courses of deformation energy and heat associated with cyclic process are plotted in Figure 2. The time derivatives of both forms of energy are approximately similar. This

  20. Corrosion Resistant FBG-Based Quasi-Distributed Sensor for Crude Oil Tank Dynamic Temperature Profile Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Marques, Rogério; Prado, Adilson Ribeiro; da Costa Antunes, Paulo Fernando; de Brito André, Paulo Sérgio; Ribeiro, Moisés R. N.; Frizera-Neto, Anselmo; Pontes, Maria José

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a corrosion resistant, maneuverable, and intrinsically safe fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-based temperature optical sensor. Temperature monitoring is a critical activity for the oil and gas industry. It typically involves acquiring the desired parameters in a hazardous and corrosive environment. The use of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was proposed as a means of simultaneously isolating the optical fiber from the corrosive environment and avoiding undesirable mechanical tensions on the FBGs. The presented sensor head is based on multiple FBGs inscribed in a lengthy single mode fiber. The sensor presents an average thermal sensitivity of 8.82 ± 0.09 pm/°C, resulting in a typical temperature resolution of ~0.1 °C and an average time constant value of 6.25 ± 0.08 s. Corrosion and degradation resistance were verified by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy during 90 days exposure to high salinity crude oil samples. The developed sensor was tested in a field pilot test, mimicking the operation of an inland crude tank, demonstrating its abilities to dynamically monitor temperature profile. PMID:26690166