WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature coefficient composites

  1. Method for producing ceramic composition having low friction coefficient at high operating temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankford, Jr., James

    1988-01-01

    A method for producing a stable ceramic composition having a surface with a low friction coefficient and high wear resistance at high operating temperatures. A first deposition of a thin film of a metal ion is made upon the surface of the ceramic composition and then a first ion implantation of at least a portion of the metal ion is made into the near surface region of the composition. The implantation mixes the metal ion and the ceramic composition to form a near surface composite. The near surface composite is then oxidized sufficiently at high oxidizing temperatures to form an oxide gradient layer in the surface of the ceramic composition.

  2. Positive temperature coefficient of magnetic anisotropy in polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)-based magnetic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yiwei; Wang, Baomin; Zhan, Qingfeng; Tang, Zhenhua; Yang, Huali; Liu, Gang; Zuo, Zhenghu; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Xie, Yali; Zhu, Xiaojian; Chen, Bin; Wang, Junling; Li, Run-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic anisotropy is decreased with increasing temperature in normal magnetic materials, which is harmful to the thermal stability of magnetic devices. Here, we report the realization of positive temperature coefficient of magnetic anisotropy in a novel composite combining β-phase polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) with magnetostrictive materials (magnetostrictive film/PVDF bilayer structure). We ascribe the enhanced magnetic anisotropy of the magnetic film at elevated temperature to the st...

  3. Thermodynamics of aqueous electrolytes at various temperatures, pressures, and compositions. [Virial coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitzer, K.S.

    1979-09-01

    It is shown that the properties of fully ionized aqueous electrolyte systems can be represented by relatively simple equations over wide ranges of composition. There are only a few systems for which data are available over the full range to fused salt. A simple equation commonly used for nonelectrolytes fits the measured vapor pressure of water reasonably well and further refinements are clearly possible. Over the somewhat more limited composition range up to saturation of typical salts such as NaCl, the equations representing thermodynamic properties with a Debye-Hueckel term plus second and third virial coefficients are very successful and these coefficients are known for nearly 300 electrolytes at room temperature. These same equations effectively predict the properties of mixed electrolytes. A stringent test is offered by the calculation of all of the solubility relationships of the system Na-K-Mg-Ca-Cl-So{sub 4}-H{sub 2}0 and the calculated results of Harvie and Weare show excellent agreement with

  4. Investigation on low room-temperature resistivity Cr/(Ba0.85Pb0.15)TiO3 positive temperature coefficient composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Zeming; Ma, J.; Qu, Yuanfang

    2009-01-01

    discussed. Using these special processes, the prepared composite with 20 wt% Cr possessed low room-temperature resistivity (2.96 Ω cm at 25 °C) and exhibited PTC effect (resistivity jump of 10), which is considered as a promising candidate for over-current protector when working at low voltage. The grain......Low room-temperature resistivity positive temperature coefficient (PTC) Cr/(Ba0.85Pb0.15)TiO3 composites were produced via a reducing sintering and a subsequent oxidation treatment. The effects of metallic content and processing conditions on materials resistivity–temperature properties were...

  5. Distinct positive temperature coefficient effect of polymer-carbon fiber composites evaluated in terms of polymer absorption on fiber surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Zheng, Shaodi; Zheng, Xiaofang; Liu, Zhengying; Yang, Wei; Yang, Mingbo

    2016-03-21

    In this article, the positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect was studied for high-density polyethylene (HDPE)/carbon fiber (CF) composites. All of the samples showed a significant PTC effect during the heating processes without a negative temperature coefficient (NTC) effect, even at a temperature much higher than the melting point of the polymer matrix. An ever-increasing PTC intensity with increasing thermal cycles was observed in our study that had never been reported in previous research. The absence of a NTC effect resulted from the increased binding force between the matrix and fillers that contributed to the very special structure of CF surface. We incorporated thermal expansion theory and quantum tunneling effects to explain PTC effect. From the SEM micrographs for the HDPE/CF composites before and after the different thermal cycles, we found that the surface of CF was covered with a layer of polymer which resulted in a change in the gap length between CF and HDPE and its distribution. We believed that the gap change induced by polymer absorption on the fiber surface had a great effect on the PTC effect.

  6. Equivalent network for resistance and temperature coefficient of resistance versus temperature and composition of thick resistive films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusy, A.

    1987-01-01

    Two types of elementary resistances in thick resistive films have been considered: (i) constriction resistance R/sub C/ determined by the bulk properties of conducting material and by the geometry of constriction, and (ii) barrier resistance R/sub B/ determined by the parameters of a thermally activated type of tunneling process and by the geometry of the metal-insulator-metal unit. On this basis a resistance network composed of a large number of the two types of resistances has been defined. The network has been considered as being equivalent to thick resistive film (TRF) from the point of view of the resistance and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). The parameters of this network have been evaluated by the computer-aided approximation of the experimental data found for RuO 2 -based TRFs. On the basis of the equations derived for the network as well as the results of the approximation process, it can be concluded that the small values of the network TCR result from the superposition of the TCR of the conducting component β/sub C/ and of the temperature coefficient of barrier resistance α/sub B/. In this superposition β/sub C/ is attenuated (by 1--2 orders of magnitude), while α/sub B/ is attenuated by only few percentages. The network has been found to be strongly barrier dominated

  7. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  8. Revised Mark 22 coolant temperature coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Coolant temperature coefficients for the Mark 22 charge published previously are non-conservative because of the neglect of a significant mechanism which has a positive contribution to reactivity. Even after correcting for this effect, dynamic tests made on a Mark VIB charge in the early 60's suggest the results are still non-conservative. This memorandum takes both of these sources of information into account in making a best estimate of the prompt (coolant plus metal) temperature coefficient. Although no safety issues arise from this work (the overall temperature coefficient still strongly contributes to reactor stability), it is obviously desirable to use best estimates for prompt coefficients in limits and other calculations

  9. Research of fuel temperature control in fuel pipeline of diesel engine using positive temperature coefficient material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As fuel temperature increases, both its viscosity and surface tension decrease, and this is helpful to improve fuel atomization and then better combustion and emission performances of engine. Based on the self-regulated temperature property of positive temperature coefficient material, this article used a positive temperature coefficient material as electric heating element to heat diesel fuel in fuel pipeline of diesel engine. A kind of BaTiO3-based positive temperature coefficient material, with the Curie temperature of 230°C and rated voltage of 24 V, was developed, and its micrograph and element compositions were also analyzed. By the fuel pipeline wrapped in six positive temperature coefficient ceramics, its resistivity–temperature and heating characteristics were tested on a fuel pump bench. The experiments showed that in this installation, the surface temperature of six positive temperature coefficient ceramics rose to the equilibrium temperature only for 100 s at rated voltage. In rated power supply for six positive temperature coefficient ceramics, the temperature of injection fuel improved for 21°C–27°C within 100 s, and then could keep constant. Using positive temperature coefficient material to heat diesel in fuel pipeline of diesel engine, the injection mass per cycle had little change, approximately 0.3%/°C. This study provides a beneficial reference for improving atomization of high-viscosity liquids by employing positive temperature coefficient material without any control methods.

  10. Calculation of the Ionization Coefficient in the Townsend Discharge in the Mixture of Argon and Mercury Vapors with Temperature-Dependent Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, G. G.; Dubinina, M. S.; Fisher, M. R.; Kristya, V. I.

    2018-04-01

    For a hybrid model of the low-current discharge considering, along with direct ionization of the mixture components by electrons, the Penning ionization of mercury atoms by metastable argon atoms, the ionization coefficient in the argon-mercury mixture used in illuminating lamps is calculated. The analytical approximation formula describing the dependence of the ionization coefficient of the mixture on the reduced electric field strength and temperature is obtained for sufficiently wide ranges of their variations, and its accuracy is estimated. It is demonstrated that the discharge ignition voltage calculated using this formula is in agreement with the results of simulation and the available experimental data.

  11. Moderator temperature coefficient in BWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yoshitaka

    1977-01-01

    Temperature dependences of infinite multiplication factor k sub(infinity) and neutron leakage from the core must be examined for estimation of moderator temperature coefficient. Temperature dependence on k sub(infinity) has been investigated by many researchers, however, the dependence on neutron leakage of a BWR with cruciformed control rods has hardly been done. Because there are difficulties and necessity on calculations of three space dimensional and multi-energy groups neutron distribution in a BWR core. In this study, moderator temperature coefficients of JPDR-II (BWR) core were obtained by calculation with DIFFUSION-ACE, which is newly developed three-dimensional multi-group computer code. The results were compared with experimental data measured from 20 to 275 0 C of the moderator temperature and the good agreement was obtained between calculation and measurement. In order to evaluate neutron leakage from the core, the other two calculations were carried out, adjusting criticality by uniform absorption rate and by material buckling. The former underestimated neutron leakage and the latter overestimated it. Discussion on the results shows that in order to estimate the temperature coefficient of BWR, neutron leakage must be evaluated precisely, therefore the calculation at actual pattern of control rods is necessary. (auth.)

  12. Estimating temperature reactivity coefficients by experimental procedures combined with isothermal temperature coefficient measurements and dynamic identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Masashi; Aoki, Yukinori; Shimazu, Yoichiro; Yamasaki, Masatoshi; Hanayama, Yasushi

    2006-01-01

    A method to evaluate the moderator coefficient (MTC) and the Doppler coefficient through experimental procedures performed during reactor physics tests of PWR power plants is proposed. This method combines isothermal temperature coefficient (ITC) measurement experiments and reactor power transient experiments at low power conditions for dynamic identification. In the dynamic identification, either one of temperature coefficients can be determined in such a way that frequency response characteristics of the reactivity change observed by a digital reactivity meter is reproduced from measured data of neutron count rate and the average coolant temperature. The other unknown coefficient can also be determined by subtracting the coefficient obtained from the dynamic identification from ITC. As the proposed method can directly estimate the Doppler coefficient, the applicability of the conventional core design codes to predict the Doppler coefficient can be verified for new types of fuels such as mixed oxide fuels. The digital simulation study was carried out to show the feasibility of the proposed method. The numerical analysis showed that the MTC and the Doppler coefficient can be estimated accurately and even if there are uncertainties in the parameters of the reactor kinetics model, the accuracies of the estimated values are not seriously impaired. (author)

  13. PZT/PLZT - elastomer composites with improved piezoelectric voltage coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikrishnan, K.; Bavbande, D. V.; Mohan, Dhirendra; Manoharan, B.; Prasad, M. R. S.; Kalyanakrishnan, G.

    2018-02-01

    Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) and Lanthanum-modified Lead Zirconate Titanate (PLZT) ceramic sensor materials are widely used because of their excellent piezoelectric coefficients. These materials are brittle, high density and have low achievable piezoelectric voltage coefficients. The density of the sintered ceramics shall be reduced by burnable polymeric sponge method. The achievable porosity level in this case is nearly 60 - 90%. However, the porous ceramic structure with 3-3 connectivity produced by this method is very fragile in nature. The strength of the porous structure is improved with Sylgard®-184 (silicone elastomer) by vacuum impregnation method maintaining the dynamic vacuum level in the range of -650 mm Hg. The elastomer Sylgard®-184 is having low density, low dielectric constant and high compliance (as a resultant stiffness of the composites is increased). To obtain a net dipole moment, the impregnated ceramic composites were subjected to poling treatment with varying conditions of D.C. field and temperature. The properties of the poled PZT/PLZT - elastomer composites were characterized with LCR meter for measuring the dielectric constant values (k), d33 meter used for measuring piezo-electric charge coefficient values (d33) and piezo-electric voltage coefficient (g33) values which were derived from d33 values. The voltage coefficient (g33) values of these composites are increased by 10 fold as compared to the conventional solid ceramics demonstrates that it is possible to fabricate a conformable detector.

  14. Compositions, thermodynamic properties, and transport coefficients of high-temperature C5F10O mixed with CO2 and O2 as substitutes for SF6 to reduce global warming potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Zhong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available C5F10O has recently been found to be a very promising alternative to SF6. This paper is devoted to the investigation of compositions, thermodynamic properties, and transport coefficients of high-temperature C5F10O mixed with CO2 and O2. Firstly, the partition functions and enthalpies of formation for a few molecules (CxFy and CxFyO which are likely to exist in the mixtures, are calculated based on the G4(MP2 theory. The isomers of the above molecules are selected according to their Gibbs energy. The compositions of C5F10O-CO2-O2 mixtures are then determined using the minimization of the Gibbs free energy. Next, the thermodynamic properties (mass density, specific enthalpy, and specific heat are derived from the previously calculated compositions. Lastly, the transport coefficients (electrical conductivity, viscosity, and thermal conductivity are calculated based on Chapman-Enskog method. It is found that, as an arc quenching gas, C5F10O could not recombine into itself with the temperature decreasing down to room temperature after the arc extinction. Besides, the key species at room temperature are always CF4, CO2, and C4F6 if graphite is not considered. When taken into account, graphite will replace C4F6 as one of the dominate particles. The mixing of CO2 with C5F10O plasma significantly affects the thermodynamic properties (e.g. vanishing and/or shifting of the peaks in specific heat and transport coefficients (e.g. reducing viscosity and changing the number of peaks in thermal conductivity, while the addition of O2 with C5F10O-CO2 mixtures has no remarkable influence on both thermodynamic and transport properties.

  15. Compositions, thermodynamic properties, and transport coefficients of high-temperature C5F10O mixed with CO2 and O2 as substitutes for SF6 to reduce global warming potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Linlin; Rong, Mingzhe; Wang, Xiaohua; Wu, Junhui; Han, Guiquan; Han, Guohui; Lu, Yanhui; Yang, Aijun; Wu, Yi

    2017-07-01

    C5F10O has recently been found to be a very promising alternative to SF6. This paper is devoted to the investigation of compositions, thermodynamic properties, and transport coefficients of high-temperature C5F10O mixed with CO2 and O2. Firstly, the partition functions and enthalpies of formation for a few molecules (CxFy and CxFyO) which are likely to exist in the mixtures, are calculated based on the G4(MP2) theory. The isomers of the above molecules are selected according to their Gibbs energy. The compositions of C5F10O-CO2-O2 mixtures are then determined using the minimization of the Gibbs free energy. Next, the thermodynamic properties (mass density, specific enthalpy, and specific heat) are derived from the previously calculated compositions. Lastly, the transport coefficients (electrical conductivity, viscosity, and thermal conductivity) are calculated based on Chapman-Enskog method. It is found that, as an arc quenching gas, C5F10O could not recombine into itself with the temperature decreasing down to room temperature after the arc extinction. Besides, the key species at room temperature are always CF4, CO2, and C4F6 if graphite is not considered. When taken into account, graphite will replace C4F6 as one of the dominate particles. The mixing of CO2 with C5F10O plasma significantly affects the thermodynamic properties (e.g. vanishing and/or shifting of the peaks in specific heat) and transport coefficients (e.g. reducing viscosity and changing the number of peaks in thermal conductivity), while the addition of O2 with C5F10O-CO2 mixtures has no remarkable influence on both thermodynamic and transport properties.

  16. Compositions, thermodynamic properties, and transport coefficients of high-temperature C5F10O mixed with CO2 and O2 as substitutes for SF6 to reduce global warming potential

    OpenAIRE

    Linlin Zhong; Mingzhe Rong; Xiaohua Wang; Junhui Wu; Guiquan Han; Guohui Han; Yanhui Lu; Aijun Yang; Yi Wu

    2017-01-01

    C5F10O has recently been found to be a very promising alternative to SF6. This paper is devoted to the investigation of compositions, thermodynamic properties, and transport coefficients of high-temperature C5F10O mixed with CO2 and O2. Firstly, the partition functions and enthalpies of formation for a few molecules (CxFy and CxFyO) which are likely to exist in the mixtures, are calculated based on the G4(MP2) theory. The isomers of the above molecules are selected according to their Gibbs en...

  17. Measuring device for the temperature coefficient of reactor moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Yuzo.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To rapidly determine by automatic calculation the temperature coefficient for moderators which has been determined so far by a log of manual processings. Constitution: Each of signals from a control rod position indicator, a reactor reactivity, instrument and moderator temperature meter are inputted, and each of the signals and designed valued for the doppler temperature coefficients are stored. Recurling calculation is conducted based on the reactivity and the moderator temperature at an interval where the temperature changes of the moderators are equalized at an identical control rod position, to determine isothermic coefficient. Then, the temperature coefficient for moderator are calculated from the isothermic coefficient and the doppler temperature coefficient. The relationship between the reactivity and the moderator temperature is plotted on a X-Y recorder. The stored signals and the calculated temperature coefficient for moderators are sequentially displayed and the results are printed out when the measurement is completed. According to the present device, since the real time processing is conducted, the processing time can be shortened remarkably. Accordingly, it is possible to save the man power for the test of the nuclear reactor and improve the reactor operation performance. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. Modelling of tandem cell temperature coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, D.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses the temperature dependence of the basic solar-cell operating parameters for a GaInP/GaAs series-connected two-terminal tandem cell. The effects of series resistance and of different incident solar spectra are also discussed.

  19. Determining Composite Validity Coefficients for Army Jobs and Job Families

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zeidner, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    ...) is to compute composite validity coefficients. using criterion data derived from the 1987 - 1989 Skill Qualifications Test program, for the 7-test ASVAB for 150, 17, and 9 job family structures...

  20. Amide temperature coefficients in the protein G B1 domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, Jennifer H.; Williamson, Mike P.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature coefficients have been measured for backbone amide 1 H and 15 N nuclei in the B1 domain of protein G (GB1), using temperatures in the range 283–313 K, and pH values from 2.0 to 9.0. Many nuclei display pH-dependent coefficients, which were fitted to one or two pK a values. 1 H coefficients showed the expected behaviour, in that hydrogen-bonded amides have less negative values, but for those amides involved in strong hydrogen bonds in regular secondary structure there is a negative correlation between strength of hydrogen bond and size of temperature coefficient. The best correlation to temperature coefficient is with secondary shift, indicative of a very approximately uniform thermal expansion. The largest pH-dependent changes in coefficient are for amides in loops adjacent to sidechain hydrogen bonds rather than the amides involved directly in hydrogen bonds, indicating that the biggest determinant of the temperature coefficient is temperature-dependent loss of structure, not hydrogen bonding. Amide 15 N coefficients have no clear relationship with structure.

  1. Isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient measurement in TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, T.; Ravnik, M.; Trkov, A.

    2002-01-01

    Direct measurement of an isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient at room temperatures in TRIGA Mark II research reactor at Jozef Stefan Institute in Ljubljana is presented. Temperature reactivity coefficient was measured in the temperature range between 15 o C and 25 o C. All reactivity measurements were performed at almost zero reactor power to reduce or completely eliminate nuclear heating. Slow and steady temperature decrease was controlled using the reactor tank cooling system. In this way the temperatures of fuel, of moderator and of coolant were kept in equilibrium throughout the measurements. It was found out that TRIGA reactor core loaded with standard fuel elements with stainless steel cladding has small positive isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient in this temperature range.(author)

  2. Measurement and analysis of reactivity temperature coefficient of CEFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yiyu; Hu Yun; Yang Xiaoyan; Fan Zhendong; Zhang Qiang; Zhao Jinkun; Li Zehua

    2013-01-01

    The reactivity temperature coefficient of CEFR was calculated by CITATION program and compared with the results calculated by correlative programs and measured from experiments for temperature effects. It is indicated that the calculation results from CITATION agree well with measured values. The reactivity temperature coefficient of CEFR is about -4 pcm/℃. The deviation of the measured values between the temperature increasing and decreasing processes is about 11%, which satisfies the experiment acceptance criteria. The measured results can validate the calculation ones by program and can provide important reference data for the safety operation of CEFR and the analysis of the reactivity balance in the reactor refueling situation. (authors)

  3. Transport coefficients in high-temperature ionized air flows with electronic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomin, V. A.; Oblapenko, G. P.

    2018-01-01

    Transport coefficients are studied in high-temperature ionized air mixtures using the modified Chapman-Enskog method. The 11-component mixture N2/N2+/N /N+/O2/O2+/O /O+/N O /N O+/e- , taking into account the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of molecules and electronic degrees of freedom of both atomic and molecular species, is considered. Using the PAINeT software package, developed by the authors of the paper, in wide temperature range calculations of the thermal conductivity, thermal diffusion, diffusion, and shear viscosity coefficients for an equilibrium ionized air mixture and non-equilibrium flow conditions for mixture compositions, characteristic of those in shock tube experiments and re-entry conditions, are performed. For the equilibrium air case, the computed transport coefficients are compared to those obtained using simplified kinetic theory algorithms. It is shown that neglecting electronic excitation leads to a significant underestimation of the thermal conductivity coefficient at temperatures higher than 25 000 K. For non-equilibrium test cases, it is shown that the thermal diffusion coefficients of neutral species and the self-diffusion coefficients of all species are strongly affected by the mixture composition, while the thermal conductivity coefficient is most strongly influenced by the degree of ionization of the flow. Neglecting electronic excitation causes noticeable underestimation of the thermal conductivity coefficient at temperatures higher than 20 000 K.

  4. Studies on preparation and adaptive thermal control performance of novel PTC (positive temperature coefficient) materials with controllable Curie temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wen-long; Yuan, Shuai; Song, Jia-liang

    2014-01-01

    PTC (positive temperature coefficient) material is a kind of thermo-sensitive material. In this study, a series of novel PTC materials adapted to thermal control of electron devices are prepared. By adding different low-melting-point blend matrixes into GP (graphite powder)/LDPE (low density polyethylene) composite, the Curie temperatures are adjusted to 9 °C, 25 °C, 34 °C and 41 °C, and the resistance–temperature coefficients are enhanced to 1.57/°C–2.15/°C. These PTC materials remain solid in the temperature region of PTC effect, which makes it possible to be used as heating element to achieve adaptive temperature control. In addition, the adaptive thermal control performances of this kind of materials are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The result shows that the adaptive effect becomes more significant while the resistance–temperature coefficient increases. A critical heating power defined as the initial heating power which makes the equilibrium temperature reach terminal temperature is presented. The adaptive temperature control will be effective only if the initial power is below this value. The critical heating power is determined by the Curie temperature and resistance–temperature coefficient of PTC materials, and a higher Curie temperature or resistance–temperature coefficient will lead to a larger critical heating power. - Highlights: • A series of novel PTC (positive temperature coefficient) materials were prepared. • The Curie point of PTC material can be adjusted by choosing different blend matrixes. • The resistance–temperature coefficient of PTC materials is enhanced to 2.15/°C. • The material has good adaptive temperature control ability with no auxiliary method. • A mathematical model is established to analyze the performance and applicability

  5. Amide proton temperature coefficients as hydrogen bond indicators in proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cierpicki, Tomasz; Otlewski, Jacek

    2001-01-01

    Correlations between amide proton temperature coefficients (Δσ HN /ΔT) and hydrogen bonds were investigated for a data set of 793 amides derived from 14 proteins. For amide protons showing temperature gradients more positive than -4.6 ppb/K there is a hydrogen bond predictivity value exceeding 85%. It increases to over 93% for amides within the range between -4 and -1 ppb/K. Detailed analysis shows an inverse proportionality between amide proton temperature coefficients and hydrogen bond lengths. Furthermore, for hydrogen bonds of similar bond lengths, values of temperature gradients in α-helices are on average 1 ppb/K more negative than in β-sheets. In consequence, a number of amide protons in α-helices involved in hydrogen bonds shorter than 2 A show Δσ HN /ΔT 10 helices and 98% in β-turns have temperature coefficients more positive than -4.6ppb/K. Ring current effect also significantly influences temperature coefficients of amide protons. In seven out of eight cases non-hydrogen bonded amides strongly deshielded by neighboring aromatic rings show temperature coefficients more positive than -2 ppb/K. In general, amide proton temperature gradients do not change with pH unless they correspond to conformational changes. Three examples of pH dependent equilibrium showing hydrogen bond formation at higher pH were found. In conclusion, amide proton temperature coefficients offer an attractive and simple way to confirm existence of hydrogen bonds in NMR determined structures

  6. Study of Temperature Coefficients for Parameters of Photovoltaic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Tudor Cotfas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature is one of the most important factors which affect the performance of the photovoltaic cells and panels along with the irradiance. The current voltage characteristics, I-V, are measured at different temperatures from 25°C to 87°C and at different illumination levels from 400 to 1000 W/m2, because there are locations where the upper limit of the photovoltaic cells working temperature exceeds 80°C. This study reports the influence of the temperature and the irradiance on the important parameters of four commercial photovoltaic cell types: monocrystalline silicon—mSi, polycrystalline silicon—pSi, amorphous silicon—aSi, and multijunction InGaP/InGaAs/Ge (Emcore. The absolute and normalized temperature coefficients are determined and compared with their values from the related literature. The variation of the absolute temperature coefficient function of the irradiance and its significance to accurately determine the important parameters of the photovoltaic cells are also presented. The analysis is made on different types of photovoltaics cells in order to understand the effects of technology on temperature coefficients. The comparison between the open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current was also performed, calculated using the temperature coefficients, determined, and measured, in various conditions. The measurements are realized using the SolarLab system, and the photovoltaic cell parameters are determined and compared using the LabVIEW software created for SolarLab system.

  7. The HD+ dissociative recombination rate coefficient at low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the rotational temperature of the ions is considered for low-energy dissociative recombination (DR of HD+. Merged beams measurements with HD+ ions of a rotational temperature near 300 K are compared to multichannel quantum defect theory calculations. The thermal DR rate coefficient for a Maxwellian electron velocity distribution is derived from the merged-beams data and compared to theoretical results for a range of rotational temperatures. Good agreement is found for the theory with 300 K rotational temperature. For a low-temperature plasma environment where also the rotational temperature assumes 10 K, theory predicts a considerably higher thermal DR rate coefficient. The origin of this is traced to predicted resonant structures of the collision-energy dependent DR cross section at few-meV collision energies for the particular case of HD+ ions in the rotational ground state.

  8. Static pressure and temperature coefficients of laboratory standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1996-01-01

    of the microphone. The static pressure and temperature coefficients were determined experimentally for about twenty samples of type BK 4160 and BK 4180 microphones. The results agree almost perfectly with the predictions for BK 4160, while some modifications of the lumped parameter values are called for to make......-order approximation of resonances in the back cavity. It was found that each of the coefficients, for a given type of microphone, can be expressed by a single function when the coefficients are normalized by their low-frequency value and the frequency axis normalized by the individual resonance frequency...

  9. Distribution of temperature coefficient density for muons in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmenko V.S.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To date, several dozens of new muon detectors have been built. When studying cosmic-ray intensity variations with these detectors, located deep in the atmosphere, it is necessary to calculate all characteristics, including the distribution of temperature coefficient density for muons in the atmosphere, taking into account their specific geometry. For this purpose, we calculate the density of temperature coefficients of muon intensity in the atmosphere at various zenith angles of detection at sea level and at various depths underground for different absorption ranges of primary protons and pions in the atmosphere.

  10. NdFeB magnets with zero temperature coefficient of induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, B.M.; Narasimhan, K.S.V.L.; Hurt, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature compensation for the induction of NdFeB type magnets has been investigated. A computer assisted alloy selection method was adopted to identify composition of zero temperature coefficient of induction over -50 to 200 0 C. Selected alloys were processed into magnet by the conventional powder metallurgy method. The experimental temperature coefficient on the sintered magnet correlated with the prediction satisfactory. Holmium is an essential ingredient required for temperature compensation of NdFeB magnets. A magnet, (Nd/sub 0.23/Ho/sub 0.64/Dy/sub 0.13/)/sub 15/Fe/sub 79/B/sub 6/ with B/sub r/ of 7,700 Gauss, H/sub c/ of 7,700 Oe, H/sub ci/ of 20,600 Oe, Bh/sub max/ of 14.8 MGOe and temperature coefficient of -0.029% per 0 C over -50 to +150 was obtained

  11. Temperature coefficients in the Dragon low-enriched power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, U

    1972-05-15

    The temperature coefficient of the fuel and of the moderator have been evaluated for the Dragon HTR design for different stages in reactor life, initial core, end of no-refuelling period and equilibrium conditions. The investigation has shown the low-enriched HTR to have a strong, positive moderator coefficient. In some cases and for special operating conditions, even leading to a positive total temperature coefficient. This does not imply, however, that the HTR is an unsafe reactor system. By adequate design of the control system, safe and reliable operating characteristics can be achieved. This has already been proved satisfactory through many years of operation of other graphite moderated systems, such as the Magnox stations.

  12. Temperature coefficients of reactivity in the fourth loading of ZENITH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caro Manso, R.; Freemantle, R.G.; Rogers, J.D.

    1962-10-01

    Measurements have been made of the temperature coefficients of reactivity associated with the core plus end reflectors and the side reflector of the fourth core loading of ZENITH, which had a carbon/U235 atomic ratio of 7788 and no other absorber. (author)

  13. Temperature coefficients of reactivity in the fourth loading of ZENITH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro Manso, R; Freemantle, R G; Rogers, J D [Graphite Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1962-10-15

    Measurements have been made of the temperature coefficients of reactivity associated with the core plus end reflectors and the side reflector of the fourth core loading of ZENITH, which had a carbon/U235 atomic ratio of 7788 and no other absorber. (author)

  14. A study of the irradiation temperature coefficient for L-alanine and DL-alanine dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desrosiers, M. F.; Lin, M.; Cooper, S. L.; Cui, Y.; Chen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Alanine dosimetry is now well established both as a reference and routine dosemeter for industrial irradiation processing. Accurate dosimetry under the relatively harsh conditions of industrial processing requires a characterisation of the parameters that influence the dosemeter response. The temperature of the dosemeter during irradiation is a difficult quantity to measure so that the accuracy of the temperature coefficient that governs the dosemeter response becomes a critical factor. Numerous publications have reported temperature coefficients for several types of alanine dosemeters. The observed differences in the measured values were commonly attributed to the differences in the polymer binder or the experimental design of the measurement. However, the data demonstrated a consistent difference in the temperature coefficients between L-alanine and DL-alanine. Since there were no commonalities in the dosemeter composition or the measurement methods applied, a clear conclusion is not possible. To resolve this issue, the two isomeric forms of alanine dosemeters were prepared and irradiated in an identical manner. The results indicated that the DL-alanine temperature coefficient is more than 50% higher than the L-alanine temperature coefficient. (authors)

  15. Self-Consistency Method to Evaluate a Linear Expansion Thermal Coefficient of Composite with Dispersed Inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zarubin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rational use of composites as structural materials, while perceiving the thermal and mechanical loads, to a large extent determined by their thermoelastic properties. From the presented review of works devoted to the analysis of thermoelastic characteristics of composites, it follows that the problem of estimating these characteristics is important. Among the thermoelastic properties of composites occupies an important place its temperature coefficient of linear expansion.Along with fiber composites are widely used in the technique of dispersion hardening composites, in which the role of inclusions carry particles of high-strength and high-modulus materials, including nanostructured elements. Typically, the dispersed particles have similar dimensions in all directions, which allows the shape of the particles in the first approximation the ball.In an article for the composite with isotropic spherical inclusions of a plurality of different materials by the self-produced design formulas relating the temperature coefficient of linear expansion with volume concentration of inclusions and their thermoelastic characteristics, as well as the thermoelastic properties of the matrix of the composite. Feature of the method is the self-accountability thermomechanical interaction of a single inclusion or matrix particles with a homogeneous isotropic medium having the desired temperature coefficient of linear expansion. Averaging over the volume of the composite arising from such interaction perturbation strain and stress in the inclusions and the matrix particles and makes it possible to obtain such calculation formulas.For the validation of the results of calculations of the temperature coefficient of linear expansion of the composite of this type used two-sided estimates that are based on the dual variational formulation of linear thermoelasticity problem in an inhomogeneous solid containing two alternative functional (such as Lagrange and Castigliano

  16. Temperature dependence of the dispersion of single crystals SrCl/sub 2/. [Temperature coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzin, M P [L' vovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (Ukrainian SSR)

    1976-01-01

    The dispersion of the refractive index of SrCl/sub 2/ monocrystals in the spectral range 300-700 nm at temperatures of 223, 295 adn 373 K has been studied. The temperature coefficient of the refractive index as a function of the wave length has been determined for the room temperature. The function resembles the corresponding dependence for alkali-halide crystals.

  17. Experimental study on thermophysical properties of C/C composites at high temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; YI Fa-jun; HAN Jie-cai; MENG Song-he

    2006-01-01

    The coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity and specific heat of C/C composites from room temperature to ultra high temperature were experimentally investigated. Thermal conductivity and thermal stress resistance of the composites were therefore computed based on experimental results. The results show that the composite has a very low thermal expansion coefficient. Thermal diffusivity decreases exponentially with temperature increase. The specific heat increases linearly as the temperature rises, and the variation trend of thermal conductivity is similar to that of thermal diffusivity. The thermal stress coefficient of C/C composite has little change with temperature variation, and thermal stress resistance of the composite at high temperature is stable.

  18. Measurement of the temperature coefficient of ratio transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Matthew E.; Gammon, Robert W.; Shaumeyer, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    We have measured the temperature coefficient of the output of several ratio transformers at ratios near 0.500,000 using an ac bridge and a dual-phase, lock-in amplifier. The two orthogonal output components were each resolved to +/- ppb of the bridge drive signal. The results for three commercial ratio transformers between 20 and 50 C range from 0.5 to 100 ppb/K for the signal component in phase with the bridge drive, and from 4 to 300 ppb/K for the quadrature component.

  19. Temperature and Doppler coefficients of various space nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mughabghab, S.F.; Ludewig, H. Schmidt, E.

    1993-01-01

    Temperature and Doppler feedback effects for a Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) designed to operate as a propulsion reactor are investigated. Several moderator types and compositions fuel enrichments and reactor sizes are considered in this study. From this study it could be concluded that a PBR can be configured which has a negative prompt feedback, zero coolant worth, and a small positive to zero moderator worth. This reactor would put the lowest demands on the control system

  20. Temperature and Doppler Coefficients of Various Space Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughabghab, Said F.; Ludewig, Hans; Schmidt, Eldon

    1994-07-01

    Temperature and Doppler feedback effects for a Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) designed to operate as a propulsion reactor are investigated. Several moderator types and compositions fuel enrichments and reactor sizes are considered in this study. From this study it could be concluded that a PBR can be configured which has a negative prompt feedback, zero coolant worth, and a small positive to zero moderator worth. This reactor would put the lowest demands on the control system.

  1. Improved cryo-resistors with low temperature coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, P.; Braun, E.

    1989-01-01

    A new type of 10- and 12.9κΩ cryo-resistors operating in a liquid helium bath with small temperature coefficient of resistivity have been built. Details for the fabrication of these improved cryo-resistors are reported. Experimental evidence of their drift rates are on the order of a few parts in 10 9 per day. A reduction of the mean pressure of 98.7 kPa in the helium dewar to 86.1 kPa, corresponding to a temperature decrease from 4.19 to 4.07 Κ, did not change the resistance value by more than the experimental resolution of 4 parts in 10 8

  2. Compilation report of VHTRC temperature coefficient benchmark calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Hideshi; Yamane, Tsuyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1995-11-01

    A calculational benchmark problem has been proposed by JAERI to an IAEA Coordinated Research Program, `Verification of Safety Related Neutronic Calculation for Low-enriched Gas-cooled Reactors` to investigate the accuracy of calculation results obtained by using codes of the participating countries. This benchmark is made on the basis of assembly heating experiments at a pin-in block type critical assembly, VHTRC. Requested calculation items are the cell parameters, effective multiplication factor, temperature coefficient of reactivity, reaction rates, fission rate distribution, etc. Seven institutions from five countries have joined the benchmark works. Calculation results are summarized in this report with some remarks by the authors. Each institute analyzed the problem by applying the calculation code system which was prepared for the HTGR development of individual country. The values of the most important parameter, k{sub eff}, by all institutes showed good agreement with each other and with the experimental ones within 1%. The temperature coefficient agreed within 13%. The values of several cell parameters calculated by several institutes did not agree with the other`s ones. It will be necessary to check the calculation conditions again for getting better agreement. (J.P.N.).

  3. Effect of graphene nanoplatelets on coefficient of thermal expansion of polyetherimide composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Huang; Drzal, Lawrence T.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal expansion is one of the major concerns for polymer composites. In this research, graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were added to polyetherimide (PEId) thermoplastic polymer in order to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the injection molded composite. First, the coefficient of linear thermal expansion (LTE) was measured in three directions in the anisotropic coupon: 0°, 90° and the out of plane Z direction. It is found that the GNP particles are very effective in terms of reducing the LTE in 0° direction due to high degree of alignment. After annealing above glass transition temperature, significant increase of 0° LTE and decrease of Z° LTE were observed. The bulk CTE was calculated by adding up the LTEs in all three directions and is found to be independent of annealing. Second, several models were applied to predict both CTE and LTE. It is found that Schapery's lower limit model fits the experimental CTE very well. Chow's model was applied for LTEs in three directions. The behavior of GNP-5/PEId composites is explained by the combination of Chow's model and morphology obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM). - Highlights: • Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of polymer composite is characterized. • Reduction of linear thermal expansion depends on filler orientation. • Filler orientation is characterized based on the location of the specimen. • Filler orientation is changed by annealing, causing subsequent change in CTE. • CTE and linear thermal expansion coefficient are modeled

  4. Design and fabrication of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets with a low temperature coefficient of intrinsic coercivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui X.G.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To decrease the temperature coefficients of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets, the influencing factors on temperature coefficients, especially the reversible temperature coefficient β of intrinsic coercivity Hcj, were analyzed. The results showed that the absolute value of β decreased with increasing Hcj and also the ratio of microstructure parameter c to Neff, indicating that the increase of magnetocrystalline anisotropy field HA and c/Neff can effectively decrease the absolute value of β. On the basis of this analysis, a sintered Nd-Fe-B magnet with a low temperature coefficient of Hcj was fabricated through composition design, and the value of β was only -0.385%/ºC in the temperature interval of 20-150ºC.

  5. Creep of high temperature composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadananda, K.; Feng, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    High temperature creep deformation of composites is examined. Creep of composites depends on the interplay of many factors. One of the basic issues in the design of the creep resistant composites is the ability to predict their creep behavior from the knowledge of the creep behavior of the individual components. In this report, the existing theoretical models based on continuum mechanics principles are reviewed. These models are evaluated using extensive experimental data on molydisilicide-silicon carbide composites obtained by the authors. The analysis shows that the rule of mixture based on isostrain and isostress provides two limiting bounds wherein all other theoretical predictions fall. For molydisilicide composites, the creep is predominantly governed by the creep of the majority phase, i.e. the matrix with fibers deforming elastically. The role of back stresses both on creep rates and activation energies are shown to be minimum. Kinetics of creep in MoSi 2 is shown to be controlled by the process of dislocation glide with climb involving the diffusion of Mo atoms

  6. A new kind of shape-stabilized PCMs with positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wen-long; Wu, Wan-fan; Song, Jia-liang; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Shuai; Liu, Na

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new kind of shape-stabilized PCMs with PTC effect is first prepared. • It provides a potential means for the thermal control of the electronic devices. • The switching temperature of the materials is about 25 °C. • The most appropriate component of the material is found out by experimental study. • The NTC effect of the new PCMs is eliminated effectively by heat treatment. - Abstract: A new kind of shape-stabilized phase change materials (PCMs) with positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect was prepared in this paper. The materials were prepared by adding graphite powder (GP) to the paraffin/low density polyethylene (LDPE) composite and the PTC characteristic was found by adjusting the component ratio of the material. Then the physical structures and thermal properties of the materials were investigated and the effect of various GP mass fractions and paraffin/LDPE mass proportions on the PTC behavior of the materials was studied experimentally. The results showed that the switching temperature of the materials was about 25 °C (room temperature) which approached to the first phase change temperature of paraffin dispersed in the materials. The PTC behavior of the materials was the best when the GP mass fraction and the mass proportion of LDPE/paraffin were 40 wt% and 30:70, respectively. Furthermore, the negative temperature coefficient (NTC) effect of the materials could be eliminated effectively with heat treatment. This new kind of materials is different from the former PTC materials which the switching temperatures focus on high temperature ranges. It makes up for the defect of previous materials that the switching temperatures only range in high temperature rather than room temperature and provides a potential means for the thermal control of the electronic devices or other room temperature thermal control applications

  7. Temperature dependence of Kerr coefficient and quadratic polarized optical coefficient of a paraelectric Mn:Fe:KTN crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qieni Lu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We measure temperature dependence on Kerr coefficient and quadratic polarized optical coefficient of a paraelectric Mn:Fe:KTN crystal simultaneously in this work, based on digital holographic interferometry (DHI. And the spatial distribution of the field-induced refractive index change can also be visualized and estimated by numerically retrieving sequential phase maps of Mn:Fe:KTN crystal from recording digital holograms in different states. The refractive indices decrease with increasing temperature and quadratic polarized optical coefficient is insensitive to temperature. The experimental results suggest that the DHI method presented here is highly applicable in both visualizing the temporal and spatial behavior of the internal electric field and accurately measuring electro-optic coefficient for electrooptical media.

  8. Static pressure and temperature coefficients of working standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Torras Rosell, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    be a significant contribution to the uncertainty of the measurement. Determining the environmental coefficients of individual specimens of measurement microphones can be a straightforward though time-consuming procedure provided the appropriate facilities are available. An alternative is to determine them using...... coefficients. For this purpose, the environmental coefficients of some commercially available microphones have been determined experimentally, and whenever possible, compared with the coefficients determined numerically using the Boundary Element Method....... for these coefficients which are used for calibration purposes. Working standard microphones are not exempt of these influences. However, manufacturers usually provide a low frequency value of the environmental coefficient. While in some applications the influence of this coefficient may be negligible, in others it may...

  9. Simultaneous interferometric measurement of linear coefficient of thermal expansion and temperature-dependent refractive index coefficient of optical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsetti, James A; Green, William E; Ellis, Jonathan D; Schmidt, Greg R; Moore, Duncan T

    2016-10-10

    Characterizing the thermal properties of optical materials is necessary for understanding how to design an optical system for changing environmental conditions. A method is presented for simultaneously measuring both the linear coefficient of thermal expansion and the temperature-dependent refractive index coefficient of a sample interferometrically in air. Both the design and fabrication of the interferometer is presented as well as a discussion of the results of measuring both a steel and a CaF2 sample.

  10. On determination of enthalpies of complex formation reactions by means of temperature coefficient of complexing degree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povar, I.G.

    1995-01-01

    Equations describing the relation between temperature coefficient of ∂lnα/∂T complexing degree and the sum of changes in the enthalpy of complex formation of the composition M m L n δH mn multiplied by the weight coefficients k mm , are presented. A method to determine changes in the enthalpy of certain ΔH mm reactions from ∂lnα/∂T derivatives has been suggested. The best approximating equation from lnα/(T) dependence has been found. Errors of thus determined δH mm values are estimated and the results of calculation experiment for the system In 3+ -F - are provided. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  11. The static pressure and temperature coefficients of laboratory standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1999-01-01

    , for a given type of microphone, can be described by a single function when the coefficients are normalized by their low-frequency value and the frequency is normalized with respect to the individual resonance frequency of the microphone. The theoretical results are supported by experimentally determined...... on an extended lumped parameter representation of the mechanical and acoustic elements of the microphone. The extension involves the frequency dependency of the dynamic diaphragm mass and stiffness as well as a first-order approximation of resonances in the back cavity. It was found that each coefficient...... coefficients for about twenty samples of microphone types B&K 4160 and B&K 4180....

  12. Determining Composite Validity Coefficients for Army Jobs and Job Families

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zeidner, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    .... These correlation coefficients are corrected, first, for unreliability of the criterion and, then, for restriction in range effects due to assignment from an Army input population to MOS samples...

  13. Two-temperature transport coefficients of SF6–N2 plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Fei; Chen, Zhexin; Wu, Yi; Rong, Mingzhe; Wang, Chunlin; Guo, Anxiang; Liu, Zirui

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) is widely adopted in electric power industry, especially in high-voltage circuit breakers and gas-insulated switchgear. However, the use of SF 6 is limited by its high liquidation temperature and high global warming potential. Recently, research shows SF 6 –N 2 mixture, which shows environmental friendliness and good electrical properties, may be a feasible substitute for pure SF 6 . This paper is devoted to the calculation of and transport coefficients of SF 6 –N 2 mixture under both LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) and non-LTE condition. The two–temperature mass action law was used to determine the composition. The transport coefficients were calculated by classical Chapman–Enskog method simplified by Devoto. The thermophysical properties are presented for electron temperatures of 300–40 000 K, ratios of electron to heavy species temperature of 1–10 and N 2 mole fraction of 0%–100% at atmospheric pressure. The ionization processes under both LTE and non-LTE have been discussed. The results show that deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium significantly affect the properties of SF 6 –N 2 plasma, especially before the plasma is fully ionized. The different influence of N 2 on properties for SF 6 –N 2 plasma in and out of LTE has been found. The results will serve as reliable reference data for computational simulation of the behavior of SF 6 –N 2 plasmas

  14. A study of temperature coefficients of reactivity for a Savannah River Site tritium-producing charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, D.L.; Frost, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Temperature coefficients of reactivity have been calculated for the Mark 22 assembly in the K-14 charge at the Savannah River Site. Temperature coefficients are the most important reactivity feedback mechanism in SRS reactors; they are used in all safety analyses performed in support of the Safety Analysis Report, and in operations to predict reactivity changes with control rod moves. The effects of the radial location of the assembly in the reactor, isotope depletion, and thermal expansion of the metal components on the temperature coefficients have also been investigated. With the exception of the dead space coefficient, all of the regional temperature coefficients were found to be negative or zero. All of the temperature coefficients become more negative with isotopic depletion over the fuel cycle. Coefficients also become more negative with increasing radial distance of the assembly from the center of the core; this is proven from first principles and confirmed by calculations. It was found that axial and radial thermal expansion effects on the metal fuel and target tubes counteract one another, indicating these effects do not need to be considered in future temperature coefficient calculations for the Mark 22 assembly. The moderator coefficient was found to be nonlinear with temperature; thus, the values derived for accidents involving increases in moderator temperature are significantly different than those for decreases in moderator temperature, although the moderator coefficient is always negative

  15. Improvement of calculation method for temperature coefficient of HTTR by neutronics calculation code based on diffusion theory. Analysis for temperature coefficient by SRAC code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Minoru; Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi

    2007-03-01

    The HTTR temperature coefficients required for the core dynamics calculations had been calculated from the HTTR core calculation results by the diffusion code with which the corrections had been performed using the core calculation results by the Monte-Carlo code MVP. This calculation method for the temperature coefficients was considered to have some issues to be improved. Then, the calculation method was improved to obtain the temperature coefficients in which the corrections by the Monte-Carlo code were not required. Specifically, from the point of view of neutron spectrum calculated by lattice calculations, the lattice model was revised which had been used for the calculations of the temperature coefficients. The HTTR core calculations were performed by the diffusion code with the group constants which were generated by the lattice calculations with the improved lattice model. The core calculations and the lattice calculations were performed by the SRAC code system. The HTTR core dynamics calculation was performed with the temperature coefficient obtained from the core calculation results. In consequence, the core dynamics calculation result showed good agreement with the experimental data and the valid temperature coefficient could be calculated only by the diffusion code without the corrections by Monte-Carlo code. (author)

  16. Dependence of Seebeck coefficient on a load resistance and energy conversion efficiency in a thermoelectric composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Osamu; Odahara, Hirotaka; Ochi, Takahiro; Satou, Kouji

    2007-01-01

    The thermo-emf ΔV and current ΔI generated by imposing the alternating temperature gradients (ATG) at a period of T and the steady temperature gradient (STG) on a thermoelectric (TE) composite were measured as a function of t, where t is the lapsed time and T was varied from 60 to or ∞ s. The STG and ATG were produced by imposing steadily and alternatively a source voltage V in the range from 1.0 to 4.0 V on two Peltier modules sandwiching a composite. ΔT, ΔV, ΔI and V P oscillate at a period T and their waveforms vary significantly with a change of T, where ΔV and V P are the voltage drops in a load resistance R L and in resistance R P of two modules. The resultant Seebeck coefficient |α| = |ΔV|/ΔT of a composite under the STG was found to be expressed as |α| = |α 0 |(1 - R comp /R T ), where R T is the total resistance of a circuit for measuring the output signals and R comp is the resistance of a composite. The effective generating power ΔW eff has a local maximum at T = 960 s for the p-type composite and at T = 480 s for the n-type one. The maximum energy conversion efficiency η of the p- and n-type composites under the ATG produced by imposing a voltage of 4.0 V at an optimum period were 0.22 and 0.23% at ΔT eff = 50 K, respectively, which are 42 and 43% higher than those at ΔT = 42 K under the STG. These maximum η for a TE composite sandwiched between two Peltier modules, were found to be expressed theoretically in terms of R P , R T , R L , α P and α, where α P and α are the resultant Seebeck coefficients of Peltier modules and a TE composite

  17. Modeling maximum daily temperature using a varying coefficient regression model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han Li; Xinwei Deng; Dong-Yum Kim; Eric P. Smith

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between stream water and air temperatures are often modeled using linear or nonlinear regression methods. Despite a strong relationship between water and air temperatures and a variety of models that are effective for data summarized on a weekly basis, such models did not yield consistently good predictions for summaries such as daily maximum temperature...

  18. The negative temperature coefficient resistivities of Ag2S-Ag core–shell structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Mingming; Liu, Dongzhi; Li, Wei; Zhou, Xueqin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the conductivity of silver nanoparticle films protected by 3-mercaptopropionic acid (Ag/MPA) has been investigated. When the nanoparticles were annealed in air at 200 °C, they converted to stable Ag 2 S-Ag core–shell structures. The mechanism for the formation of the Ag 2 S-Ag core–shell structures along with the compositional changes and the microstructural evolution of the Ag/MPA nanoparticles during the annealing process are discussed. It is proposed that the Ag 2 S-Ag core–shell structure was formed through a solid-state reduction reaction, in which the Ag + ions coming from Ag 2 S were reduced by sulfonate species and sulfur ions. The final Ag 2 S-Ag films display an exponentially decreased resistivity with increasing temperature from 25 to 170 °C. The negative temperature coefficient resistivity of Ag 2 S-Ag films can be adjusted by changing the S/Ag molar ratio used for the synthesis of the Ag/MPA nanoparticles, paving the way for the preparation of negative temperature-coefficient thermistors via printing technology for use in the electronics.

  19. Local Seebeck coefficient near the boundary in touching Cu/Bi-Te/Cu composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, O.; Odahara, H.

    2007-01-01

    The thermo-emf ΔV and temperature difference ΔT across the boundary were measured as a function of r for the touching p- and n-type Cu/Bi-Te/Cu composites composed of a combination of t Bi-Te =2.0 mm and t Cu =0.3 mm, where ΔT is produced by imposing a constant voltage of 1.7 V on two Peltier modules connected in series and r is the distance from the boundary that corresponds to the interval s between two thermocouples. The resultant Seebeck coefficient α across the boundary was obtained from the relation α=ΔV/ΔT. As a result, the resultant α of the touching p- and n-type composites have surprisingly great local maximum values of 1330 and -1140 μV/K at r∼0.03 mm, respectively, and decreased rapidly with an increase of r to approach the Seebeck coefficients of the intrinsic Bi-Te compounds. The resultant maximum α of the touching p- and n-type Cu/Bi-Te/Cu composites are approximately 5.4 and 5.5 times higher in absolute value than those of the intrinsic Bi-Te compounds, respectively. It was thus clarified for the first time that the local Seebeck coefficient is enhanced most strongly in the Bi-Te region where there is an approximately 30-μm distance from the boundary, not at the boundary between Bi-Te compounds and copper. (orig.)

  20. Why does the martensitic transformation temperature strongly depend on composition?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, X.; Otsuka, K.

    2000-01-01

    The reason for the strong composition and heat-treatment dependence of the martensitic transformation temperature was investigated by a simple Landau-type model. Assuming the anharmonic and coupling coefficients are insensitive to composition, we obtained an important result martensitic transformation occurs at a critical elastic constant c' and a critical TA 2 phonon energy ω η 2 , which are independent of alloy composition. This result gained support from a large body of experimental data of Cu-based alloys. Since c' and phonon energy are strongly dependent on composition, the constancy of c' at Ms demands that the (transformation) temperature must exhibit an opposite effect to compensate the composition effect. Therefore, the lower the c', the higher the Ms is. Because the temperature dependence of c' is weak (due to the 1 st order nature of the transformation), the big c' change by a slight composition change must be compensated by a large change in temperature. Thus Ms has strong composition dependence. The effect of quench is to increase point defects, being equivalent to a composition change, thus has a strong effect on Ms. From the present study, we can conclude that the strong composition dependence of Ms is mainly a harmonic effect. (orig.)

  1. On the second-order temperature jump coefficient of a dilute gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Gregg A.; Hadjiconstantinou, N. G.; Takata, S.; Aoki, K.

    2012-09-01

    We use LVDSMC simulations to calculate the second-order temperature jump coefficient for a dilute gas whose temperature is governed by the Poisson equation with a constant forcing term. Both the hard sphere gas and the BGK model of the Boltzmann equation are considered. Our results show that the temperature jump coefficient is different from the well known linear and steady case where the temperature is governed by the homogeneous heat conduction (Laplace) equation.

  2. Calculation of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity considering non-uniform radial temperature distribution in the fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazirandeh, Ali [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Science and Research Branch; Hooshyar Mobaraki, Almas

    2017-07-15

    The safe operation of a reactor is based on feedback models. In this paper we attempted to discuss the influence of a non-uniform radial temperature distribution on the fuel rod temperature coefficient of reactivity. The paper demonstrates that the neutron properties of a reactor core is based on effective temperature of the fuel to obtain the correct fuel temperature feedback. The value of volume-averaged temperature being used in the calculations of neutron physics with feedbacks would result in underestimating the probable event. In the calculation it is necessary to use the effective temperature of the fuel in order to provide correct accounting of the fuel temperature feedback. Fuel temperature changes in different zones of the core and consequently reactivity coefficient change are an important parameter for analysis of transient conditions. The restricting factor that compensates the inserted reactivity is the temperature reactivity coefficient and effective delayed neutron fraction.

  3. OSMOTIC COEFFICIENTS, SOLUBILITIES, AND DELIQUESCENCE RELATIONS IN MIXED AQUEOUS SALT SOLUTIONS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.S. Gruszkiewicz; D.A. Palmer

    2006-01-01

    While thermodynamic properties of pure aqueous electrolytes are relatively well known at ambient temperature, there are far fewer data for binary systems extending to elevated temperatures and high concentrations. There is no general theoretically sound basis for prediction of the temperature dependence of ionic activities, and consequently temperature extrapolations based on ambient temperature data and empirical equations are uncertain and require empirical verification. Thermodynamic properties of mixed brines in a wide range of concentrations would enhance the understanding and precise modeling of the effects of deliquescence of initially dry solids in humid air in geological environments and in modeling the composition of waters during heating, cooling, evaporation or condensation processes. These conditions are of interest in the analysis of waters on metal surfaces at the proposed radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The results obtained in this project will be useful for modeling the long-term evolution of the chemical environment, and this in turn is useful for the analysis of the corrosion of waste packages. In particular, there are few reliable experimental data available on the relationship between relative humidity and composition that reveals the eutonic points of the mixtures and the mixture deliquescence RH. The deliquescence RH for multicomponent mixtures is lower than that of pure component or binary solutions, but is not easy to predict quantitatively since the solutions are highly nonideal. In this work we used the ORNL low-temperature and high-temperature isopiestic facilities, capable of precise measurements of vapor pressure between ambient temperature and 250 C for determination of not only osmotic coefficients, but also solubilities and deliquescence points of aqueous mixed solutions in a range of temperatures. In addition to standard solutions of CaCl 2 , LiCl, and NaCl used as references, precise direct

  4. Temperature dependence of transport coefficients of 'simple liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... has been investigated. The study carried out at two densities, r* = 0.60 and r* = 0.95. Result shows erratic variations of the shear viscosity in the two lattices structures. KeyWords: Temperature effect, face centred, simple cubic, transport properties, simple liquid. [Global Jnl Pure & Appl. Sci. Vol.9(3) 2003: 403-406] ...

  5. Reflection and Transmission Coefficient of Yttrium Iron Garnet Filled Polyvinylidene Fluoride Composite Using Rectangular Waveguide at Microwave Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Hassan; Abbas, Zulkifly; Yahya, Noorhana; Shameli, Kamyar; Soleimani, Hojjatollah; Shabanzadeh, Parvaneh

    2012-01-01

    The sol-gel method was carried out to synthesize nanosized Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG). The nanomaterials with ferrite structure were heat-treated at different temperatures from 500 to 1000 °C. The phase identification, morphology and functional groups of the prepared samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), respectively. The YIG ferrite nanopowder was composited with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) by a solution casting method. The magnitudes of reflection and transmission coefficients of PVDF/YIG containing 6, 10 and 13% YIG, respectively, were measured using rectangular waveguide in conjunction with a microwave vector network analyzer (VNA) in X-band frequencies. The results indicate that the presence of YIG in polymer composites causes an increase in reflection coefficient and decrease in transmission coefficient of the polymer. PMID:22942718

  6. Two-temperature transport coefficients of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Fei; Chen, Zhexin; Wu, Yi, E-mail: wuyic51@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Rong, Mingzhe; Wang, Chunlin [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, School of Electrical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Guo, Anxiang; Liu, Zirui [Electric Power Research Institute of State Grid Shaanxi Electric Power Company, Xian (China)

    2015-10-15

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is widely adopted in electric power industry, especially in high-voltage circuit breakers and gas-insulated switchgear. However, the use of SF{sub 6} is limited by its high liquidation temperature and high global warming potential. Recently, research shows SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} mixture, which shows environmental friendliness and good electrical properties, may be a feasible substitute for pure SF{sub 6}. This paper is devoted to the calculation of and transport coefficients of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} mixture under both LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) and non-LTE condition. The two–temperature mass action law was used to determine the composition. The transport coefficients were calculated by classical Chapman–Enskog method simplified by Devoto. The thermophysical properties are presented for electron temperatures of 300–40 000 K, ratios of electron to heavy species temperature of 1–10 and N{sub 2} mole fraction of 0%–100% at atmospheric pressure. The ionization processes under both LTE and non-LTE have been discussed. The results show that deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium significantly affect the properties of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasma, especially before the plasma is fully ionized. The different influence of N{sub 2} on properties for SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasma in and out of LTE has been found. The results will serve as reliable reference data for computational simulation of the behavior of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasmas.

  7. The theoretical ultimate magnetoelectric coefficients of magnetoelectric composites by optimization design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.-L.; Liu, B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates what is the largest magnetoelectric (ME) coefficient of ME composites, and how to realize it. From the standpoint of energy conservation, a theoretical analysis is carried out on an imaginary lever structure consisting of a magnetostrictive phase, a piezoelectric phase, and a rigid lever. This structure is a generalization of various composite layouts for optimization on ME effect. The predicted theoretical ultimate ME coefficient plays a similar role as the efficiency of ideal heat engine in thermodynamics, and is used to evaluate the existing typical ME layouts, such as the parallel sandwiched layout and the serial layout. These two typical layouts exhibit ME coefficient much lower than the theoretical largest values, because in the general analysis the stress amplification ratio and the volume ratio can be optimized independently and freely, but in typical layouts they are dependent or fixed. To overcome this shortcoming and achieve the theoretical largest ME coefficient, a new design is presented. In addition, it is found that the most commonly used electric field ME coefficient can be designed to be infinitely large. We doubt the validity of this coefficient as a reasonable ME effect index and consider three more ME coefficients, namely the electric charge ME coefficient, the voltage ME coefficient, and the static electric energy ME coefficient. We note that the theoretical ultimate value of the static electric energy ME coefficient is finite and might be a more proper measure of ME effect

  8. Evaluation of temperature coefficients of reactivity for 233U--thorium fueled HTGR lattices. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.F.; Leonard, B.R. Jr.; Trapp, T.J.; Gore, B.F.; Kottwitz, D.A.; Thompson, J.K.; Purcell, W.L.; Stewart, K.B.

    1977-05-01

    A comparison of calculated and measured neutron multiplication factors as a function of temperature was made for three graphite-moderated lattices in the High Temperature Lattice Test Reactor (HTLTR) using 233 UO 2 --ThO 2 fuels in varying amounts and configurations. Correlation of neutronic analysis methods and cross section data with the experimental measurements forms the basis for assessing the accuracy of the methods and data and developing confidence in the ability to predict the temperature coefficient of reactivity for various High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) conditions in which 233 U and thorium are present in the fuel. The calculated values of k/sub infinity/(T) were correlated with measured values using two least-squares-fitted correlation coefficients: (1) a normalization factor, and (2) a temperature coefficient bias factor. These correlations indicate the existence of a negative (nonconservative) bias in temperature coefficients of reactivity calculated using ENDF/B-IV cross section data

  9. High temperature polymer concrete compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Jack J.; Reams, Walter

    1985-01-01

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system. A preferred formulation emphasizing the major necessary components is as follows: ______________________________________ Component A: Silica sand 60-77 wt. % Silica flour 5-10 wt. % Portland cement 15-25 wt. % Acrylamide 1-5 wt. % Component B: Styrene 50-60 wt. % Trimethylolpropane 35-40 wt. % trimethacrylate ______________________________________ and necessary initiators, accelerators, and surfactants.

  10. Monitoring of the temperature reactivity coefficient at the PWR nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostic, Lj.

    1996-01-01

    For monitoring temperature coefficient of reactivity of pressurized water reactor a method based on the correction of fluctuation in signals of i-core neutron detectors and core-exit thermocouples and neural network paradigm is used it is shown that the moderator temperature coefficient of relativity can be predicted with the aid of the back propagation neural network technique by measuring the frequency response function between the in-core neutron flux and the core-exit coolant temperature

  11. Determination of the temperature coefficients and the kinetic parameters for the HTTR safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuhara, K.; Nakata, T.; Murata, I.; Yamashita, K.; Shindo, R.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the calculational methods which were employed to determine the temperature coefficients and the kinetic parameters for the safety analysis in the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor). The temperature coefficients (doppler, moderator temperature) and the kinetic parameters (prompt neutron life time; l, effective delayed neutron fraction; β eff) are important for the point model core dynamic analysis and should be evaluated properly. The temperature coefficients were calculated by the whole core model. Doppler coefficient was evaluated under the conditions of all control rods withdrawn and the uniform change of fuel temperature. The minimum and the maximum value of the evaluated doppler coefficients in a burnup cycle are -4.6x10 -5 and -1.5x10 -5 ΔK/K/deg. C respectively. The moderator temperature coefficient was evaluated under the conditions of all control rods withdrawn and the uniform change of moderator temperature. The minimum and the maximum value of the evaluated moderator temperature coefficients in a burnup cycle are -17.1x10 -5 and 0.99x10 -5 ΔK/K/deg. C respectively. In spite of positive moderator temperature coefficient, the power coefficient is always negative. Therefore the HTTR possesses inherent power-suppressing feed back characteristic in all operating condition. We surveyed the effects of the Xe existence, the control rods existence, the fuel temperature and the region in which the temperature was changed on the moderator temperature coefficients. The kinetic parameters were calculated by the perturbation method with the whole core model. The minimum and the maximum value of the evaluated effective delayed neutron fraction (β eff) are 0.0047 and 0.0065 respectively. These of the evaluated prompt neutron life time (l) are 0.67 and 0.78 ms respectively. We have surveyed the effects of the fuel depletion and the core power level on these parameters, and considered these effects on the kinetic parameters. From

  12. An Analytical Solution for Transient Heat Conduction in a Composite Slab with Time-Dependent Heat Transfer Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoichi Chiba

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical solution is derived for one-dimensional transient heat conduction in a composite slab consisting of n layers, whose heat transfer coefficient on an external boundary is an arbitrary function of time. The composite slab, which has thermal contact resistance at n-1 interfaces, as well as an arbitrary initial temperature distribution and internal heat generation, convectively exchanges heat at the external boundaries with two different time-varying surroundings. To obtain the analytical solution, the shifting function method is first used, which yields new partial differential equations under conventional types of external boundary conditions. The solution for the derived differential equations is then obtained by means of an orthogonal expansion technique. Numerical calculations are performed for two composite slabs, whose heat transfer coefficient on the heated surface is either an exponential or a trigonometric function of time. The numerical results demonstrate the effects of temporal variations in the heat transfer coefficient on the transient temperature field of composite slabs.

  13. High temperature resistant cermet and ceramic compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Cermet compositions having high temperature oxidation resistance, high hardness and high abrasion and wear resistance, and particularly adapted for production of high temperature resistant cermet insulator bodies are presented. The compositions are comprised of a sintered body of particles of a high temperature resistant metal or metal alloy, preferably molybdenum or tungsten particles, dispersed in and bonded to a solid solution formed of aluminum oxide and silicon nitride, and particularly a ternary solid solution formed of a mixture of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride. Also disclosed are novel ceramic compositions comprising a sintered solid solution of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride.

  14. The significance level and repeatability for isotope-temperature coefficient of precipitation in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dongsheng; Wang Jinglan

    2003-01-01

    The good linear relationship with significance level α = 0.01 exists between isotope in precipitation and surface air temperature with multi-year average in 32 stations of China, and the yearly δD-temperature coefficient = 3.1‰/1℃ and the yearly δ 18 O-temperature coefficient = 0.36‰/1℃, and its determination coefficient R 2 = 0.67 and 0.64 respectively. So the isotope-temperature coefficient with yearly average can serve as the temperature yearly measure. But the monthly average isotope-temperature coefficient in each station is variable according to both of space and time, and its repeatability is determined by the meteorological regimes. According to the monthly isotope-temperature coefficient (B) and the coefficient of determination (R 2 ) and its α, all of China can be zoned the following three belts: (1) In the North Belt, B>O, R 2 ≈ 0.3-0.65, α = 0.01, the relation between monthly isotope in precipitation and surface air temperature (RMIT) belongs to a direct correlation and is closer in 99% probability; (2) In the South Belt, Btemperature coefficient with both of yearly average and monthly average and its statistical attribution is site-specific, it may be used to reconstruct past surface air temperatures or to diagnose regional climate models. (authors)

  15. Glass Transition Temperature- and Specific Volume- Composition Models for Tellurite Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report provides models for predicting composition-properties for tellurite glasses, namely specific gravity and glass transition temperature. Included are the partial specific coefficients for each model, the component validity ranges, and model fit parameters.

  16. Measurement of Linear Coefficient of Thermal Expansion and Temperature-Dependent Refractive Index Using Interferometric System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsetti, James A.; Green, William E.; Ellis, Jonathan D.; Schmidt, Greg R.; Moore, Duncan T.

    2017-01-01

    A system combining an interferometer with an environmental chamber for measuring both coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and temperature-dependent refractive index (dn/dT) simultaneously is presented. The operation and measurement results of this instrument are discussed.

  17. Positive Temperature Coefficient of Breakdown Voltage in 4H-SiC PN Junction Rectifiers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neudeck, Philip

    1998-01-01

    ...-suited SiC polytype for power device implementation. This paper reports the first experimental measurements of stable positive temperature coefficient behavior observed in 4H-SiC pn junction rectifiers...

  18. Chapter 10: Calculation of the temperature coefficient of reactivity of a graphite-moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.; Richmond, R.; Stace, R.H.W.

    1963-01-01

    The temperature coefficients of reactivity of the BEPO, Windscale and Calder reactors are calculated, using the revised methods given by Lockey et al. (1956) and by Campbell and Symonds (1962). The results are compared with experimental values. (author)

  19. Invar hardening under keeping of low values of temperature coefficient of linear expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashnin, Yu.A.; Shiryaeva, A.N.; Omel'chenko, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    Complex invar alloying with chromium, zirconium and nitrogen is conducted for increasing hardness and assuring low values of the temperature coefficient of linear expansion. It is shown that alloying with nitride-forming elements-chromium, zirconium and the following high-temperature saturation under high pressure with nitrogen provides the invar hardening at assuring a low temperature coefficient of linear expansion. Saturation with nitrogen under 100 MPa pressure at 1050 deg C during 3 hours permits to prepare an invar containing up to 0.2% N 2 uniformly distributed over the whole cross section of samples with 4 mm diameter. Nitrogen in invar alloys alloyed with chromium and zirconium affects the Curie point similarly to carbon and nickel shifting it towards higher temperatures, it slightly changes the value of the temperature coefficient of linear expansion and provides linear character of thermal expansion dependence on temperature in the +100 deg C - -180 deg C range

  20. Relationship between thermal expansion coefficient and glass transition temperature in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, H.; Chen, H.-S.; Inoue, A.

    2008-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficients of 13 metallic glasses were measured using a thermo-mechanical analyser. A unique correlation was found between the linear thermal expansion coefficient and the glass transition temperature-their product is nearly constant ∼8.24 x 10 -3 . If one assumes the Debye expression for thermal activation, the total linear thermal expansion up to glass transition temperature (T g ) is reduced to 6 x 10 -3 , nearly 25% of that at the fusion of pure metals

  1. Contribution to the study of the temperature reactivity coefficient for light water reactors; Contribution a l`etude du coefficient de temperature des reacteurs a eau legere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mounier, C.

    1994-05-01

    In this work, we looked for the error sources in the calculation of the isothermal temperature coefficient for light water lattices. We studied three fields implied: the nuclear data, the calculation methods and the temperature coefficient measurement. About the measurement, we pointed out the difficulties of he interpretation. So we used an indirect approach by the mean of critical states at various temperatures. In that way, we can say that if the errors in the effective multiplication factor are constants with temperature then the temperature coefficient is correctly calculated. We studied the neutronic influence of light water models which are used in the thermal scattering cross-section computation. This cross-section determines the thermalization process of neutrons. We showed that the actual model (JEF2) is satisfactory of the needs of the reactors physics. Concerning the majors isotopes ({sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu), the uncertainties on the nuclear data do not seem as a preponderant cause of errors, without to be totally negligible. We also studied, with the neutron transport code Apollo-2, the influence of difference approximations for cell calculation . The new possibilities of the code has been used to represent the critical experiments, particularly the improvement of the resonance self-shielding formalism. The calculation scheme adopted permits to remove partially the fundamental mode approximation by the mean of a two-dimensional transport calculation with the SN method, the axial leakage being treated as an absorption in DB{sup 2}{sub Z}. The agreement between theory and experiment is good both for the reactivity and the temperature coefficient. (author). 114 refs., 40 figs., 163 tabs., 1 append.

  2. Temperature and current coefficients of lasing wavelength in tunable diode laser spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, M; Mishima, T; Nakayama, N; Masuda, T

    2010-08-01

    The factors determining temperature and current coefficients of lasing wavelength are investigated and discussed under monitoring CO(2)-gas absorption spectra. The diffusion rate of Joule heating at the active layer to the surrounding region is observed by monitoring the change in the junction voltage, which is a function of temperature and the wavelength (frequency) deviation under sinusoidal current modulation. Based on the experimental results, the time interval of monitoring the wavelength after changing the ambient temperature or injected current (scanning rate) has to be constant at least to eliminate the monitoring error induced by the deviation of lasing wavelength, though the temperature and current coefficients of lasing wavelength differ with the rate.

  3. Simultaneous determination of reference free-stream temperature and convective heat transfer coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Gi Ho; Song, Ki Bum; Kim, Kui Soon

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the development of a new method that can obtain heat transfer coefficient and reference free stream temperature simultaneously. The method is based on transient heat transfer experiments using two narrow-band TLCs. The method is validated through error analysis in terms of the random uncertainties in the measured temperatures. It is shown how the uncertainties in heat transfer coefficient and free stream temperature can be reduced. The general method described in this paper is applicable to many heat transfer models with unknown free stream temperature

  4. Spin fluctuations and low temperature features of thermal coefficient of linear expansion of iron monosilicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, A.G.; Kortov, S.V.; Povzner, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    The low temperature measurements of thermal coefficient of linear expansion of strong paramagnet FeSi are carried out. The results obtained are discussed with in the framework of spin-fluctuation theory. It is shown that electronic part of the thermal coefficient of linear expansion is negative in the range of temperatures lower that of the semiconductor-metal phase transition. In metal phase it becomes positive. This specific features of the thermal coefficient is explained by the spin-fluctuation renormalization of d-electronic states density

  5. Temperature reactivity coefficient of the RA reactor; Temperaturni koeficijenat reaktivnosti reaktora RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N; Strugar, P; Dobrosavljevic, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Temperature reactivity coefficient of the RA reactor was determined as follows. Stabilization of moderator temperature and graphite reflector was achieved in the reactor operated at power levels of 20, 100, 500, 1000, 3000 and 5000 kW. Temperature change of the moderator was achieved by changing the water flow rate in the secondary cooling system. The fuel temperature was changed simultaneously. During the measurement at each power level the temperature change was between 30 - 50 deg C. Changing the position of the automated regulator is registered during moderator temperature change, and these changes were used for determining the total reactivity change by using the calibration curves for the automated regulator. In the measured temperature range the the reactivity change was linear and it was possible to determine the total temperature coefficient.

  6. Influence of the Previous Preheating Temperature on the Static Coefficient of Friction with Lubrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Živković

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigations static coefficient of friction in lubricated conditions and pre-heating of the sample pin at high temperatures is discussed in this paper. The static coefficient of friction was measured in the sliding steel copper pins per cylinder of polyvinylchloride. Pins are previously heated in a special chamber from room temperature to a temperature of 800 oC with a step of 50 °C. Tribological changes in the surface layer of the pins caused by pre-heating the pins at high temperatures and cooling systems have very significantly influenced the increase in the coefficient of static friction. The results indicate the possibility of improving the friction characteristics of metal materials based on their thermal treatment at elevated temperatures.

  7. The Merkel coefficient and its dependence on the temperature position of the cooling tower process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klenke, W.

    1977-01-01

    The Merkel coefficient, or evaporation coefficient, is still being used as a characteristic factor for the cooling tower process. Its dependence on the cooling range or on the warm water temperature of the process is often considered a disadvantage of the theory of evaporation cooling. This is also the reason for the suggestion to change the theory in such a way that the Merkel coefficient becomes independent of the temperature. The present investigation, however, leads to the result that the dependence of the Merkel coefficient on the temperature must be considered as a remarkable confirmation for the evidence of the theory of heat and mass transfer, as the experimental statements agree fully with the results of the theoretical considerations. (orig.) [de

  8. Crack diffusion coefficient - A candidate fracture toughness parameter for short fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mull, M. A.; Chudnovsky, A.; Moet, A.

    1987-01-01

    In brittle matrix composites, crack propagation occurs along random trajectories reflecting the heterogeneous nature of the strength field. Considering the crack trajectory as a diffusive process, the 'crack diffusion coefficient' is introduced. From fatigue crack propagation experiments on a set of identical SEN polyester composite specimens, the variance of the crack tip position along the loading axis is found to be a linear function of the effective 'time'. The latter is taken as the effective crack length. The coefficient of proportionality between variance of the crack trajectory and the effective crack length defines the crack diffusion coefficient D which is found in the present study to be 0.165 mm. This parameter reflects the ability of the composite to deviate the crack from the energetically most efficient path and thus links fracture toughness to the microstructure.

  9. Thermomechanics of composite structures under high temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrienko, Yu I

    2016-01-01

    This pioneering book presents new models for the thermomechanical behavior of composite materials and structures taking into account internal physico-chemical transformations such as thermodecomposition, sublimation and melting at high temperatures (up to 3000 K). It is of great importance for the design of new thermostable materials and for the investigation of reliability and fire safety of composite structures. It also supports the investigation of interaction of composites with laser irradiation and the design of heat-shield systems. Structural methods are presented for calculating the effective mechanical and thermal properties of matrices, fibres and unidirectional, reinforced by dispersed particles and textile composites, in terms of properties of their constituent phases. Useful calculation methods are developed for characteristics such as the rate of thermomechanical erosion of composites under high-speed flow and the heat deformation of composites with account of chemical shrinkage. The author expan...

  10. Simultaneous estimation of diet composition and calibration coefficients with fatty acid signature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.; Budge, Suzanne M.; Thiemann, Gregory W.; Rode, Karyn D.

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of animal diets provides essential insights into their life history and ecology, although diet estimation is challenging and remains an active area of research. Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) has become a popular method of estimating diet composition, especially for marine species. A primary assumption of QFASA is that constants called calibration coefficients, which account for the differential metabolism of individual fatty acids, are known. In practice, however, calibration coefficients are not known, but rather have been estimated in feeding trials with captive animals of a limited number of model species. The impossibility of verifying the accuracy of feeding trial derived calibration coefficients to estimate the diets of wild animals is a foundational problem with QFASA that has generated considerable criticism. We present a new model that allows simultaneous estimation of diet composition and calibration coefficients based only on fatty acid signature samples from wild predators and potential prey. Our model performed almost flawlessly in four tests with constructed examples, estimating both diet proportions and calibration coefficients with essentially no error. We also applied the model to data from Chukchi Sea polar bears, obtaining diet estimates that were more diverse than estimates conditioned on feeding trial calibration coefficients. Our model avoids bias in diet estimates caused by conditioning on inaccurate calibration coefficients, invalidates the primary criticism of QFASA, eliminates the need to conduct feeding trials solely for diet estimation, and consequently expands the utility of fatty acid data to investigate aspects of ecology linked to animal diets.

  11. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, StewarT.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  12. Innovative Health Monitoring Techniques for High Temperature Composites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High temperature composite materials, which include ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), carbon-carbon and polyimide composites, will be essential for future space...

  13. CH3Cl self-broadening coefficients and their temperature dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudaryonok, A.S.; Lavrentieva, N.N.; Buldyreva, J.V.

    2013-01-01

    CH 3 35 Cl self-broadening coefficients at various temperatures of atmospheric interest are computed by a semi-empirical method particularly suitable for molecular systems with strong dipole–dipole interactions. In order to probe the dependence on the rotational number K, the model parameters are adjusted on extensive room-temperature measurements for K≤7 and allow reproducing fine features of J-dependences observed for K≤3; for higher K up to 20, the fitting is performed on specially calculated semi-classical values. The temperature exponents for the standard power law are extracted and validated by calculation of low-temperature self-broadening coefficients comparing very favorably with available experimental data. An extensive line-list of self-broadening coefficients at the reference temperature 296 K and associated temperature exponents for 0≤J≤70, 0≤K≤20 is provided as Supplementary material for their use in atmospheric applications and spectroscopic databases. -- Highlights: • We calculated methyl chloride self-broadening coefficients using two methods. • Rotational quantum numbers were J from 0 till 70 and K from 0 till 20. • The temperature exponents were calculated for every mentioned line

  14. High-Temperature Graphite/Phenolic Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Ellis C.; Bodepudi, Venu P.; Biggs, Robert W., Jr.; Cranston, John A.

    1995-01-01

    Graphite-fiber/phenolic-resin composite material retains relatively high strength and modulus of elasticity at temperatures as high as 1,000 degrees F. Costs only 5 to 20 percent as much as refractory materials. Fabrication composite includes curing process in which application of full autoclave pressure delayed until after phenolic resin gels. Curing process allows moisture to escape, so when composite subsequently heated in service, much less expansion of absorbed moisture and much less tendency toward delamination. Developed for nose cone of external fuel tank of Space Shuttle. Other potential aerospace applications for material include leading edges, parts of nozzles, parts of aircraft engines, and heat shields. Terrestrial and aerospace applications include structural firewalls and secondary structures in aircraft, spacecraft, and ships. Modified curing process adapted to composites of phenolic with other fiber reinforcements like glass or quartz. Useful as high-temperature circuit boards and electrical insulators.

  15. Temperature effects on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol in subcritical water extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilia Anisa, Nor; Azian, Noor; Sharizan, Mohd; Iwai, Yoshio

    2014-04-01

    6-gingerol and 6-shogaol are the main constituents as anti-inflammatory or bioactive compounds from zingiber officinale Roscoe. These bioactive compounds have been proven for inflammatory disease, antioxidatives and anticancer. The effect of temperature on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol were studied in subcritical water extraction. The diffusion coefficient was determined by Fick's second law. By neglecting external mass transfer and solid particle in spherical form, a linear portion of Ln (1-(Ct/Co)) versus time was plotted in determining the diffusion coefficient. 6-gingerol obtained the higher yield at 130°C with diffusion coefficient of 8.582x10-11 m2/s whilst for 6-shogaol, the higher yield and diffusion coefficient at 170°C and 19.417 × 10-11 m2/s.

  16. Temperature effects on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol in subcritical water extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisa, Nor Ilia; Azian, Noor; Sharizan, Mohd; Iwai, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    6-gingerol and 6-shogaol are the main constituents as anti-inflammatory or bioactive compounds from zingiber officinale Roscoe. These bioactive compounds have been proven for inflammatory disease, antioxidatives and anticancer. The effect of temperature on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol were studied in subcritical water extraction. The diffusion coefficient was determined by Fick's second law. By neglecting external mass transfer and solid particle in spherical form, a linear portion of Ln (1-(Ct/Co)) versus time was plotted in determining the diffusion coefficient. 6-gingerol obtained the higher yield at 130°C with diffusion coefficient of 8.582x10 −11 m 2 /s whilst for 6-shogaol, the higher yield and diffusion coefficient at 170°C and 19.417 × 10 −11 m 2 /s.

  17. Temperature dependence of the hydrogen-broadening coefficient for the nu 9 fundamental of ethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, G. W.; Hillman, J. J.; Nadler, Shacher; Jennings, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results for the temperature dependence of the H2-broadening coefficient for the nu 9 fundamental of ethane are reported. Measurements were made over the temperature range 95-300 K using a novel low-temperature absorption cell. These spectra were recorded with the Doppler-limited diode laser spectrometer at NASA Goddard. The results are compared with recent measurements and model predictions.

  18. Coefficient of friction and wear rate effects of different composite nanolubricant concentrations on Aluminium 2024 plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawawi, N. N. M.; Azmi, W. H.; Redhwan, A. A. M.; Sharif, M. Z.

    2017-10-01

    Wear of sliding parts and operational machine consistency enhancement can be avoided with good lubrication. Lubrication reduce wear between two contacting and sliding surfaces and decrease the frictional power losses in compressor. The coefficient of friction and wear rate effects study were carried out to measure the friction and anti-wear abilities of Al2O3-SiO2 composite nanolubricants a new type of compressor lubricant to enhanced the compressor performances. The tribology test rig employing reciprocating test conditions to replicate a piston ring contact in the compressor was used to measure the coefficient of friction and wear rate. Coefficient of friction and wear rate effects of different Al2O3-SiO2/PAG composite nanolubricants of Aluminium 2024 plate for 10-kg load at different speed were investigated. Al2O3 and SiO2 nanoparticles were dispersed in the Polyalkylene Glycol (PAG 46) lubricant using two-steps method of preparation. The result shows that the coefficient friction and wear rate of composite nanolubricants decreased compared to pure lubricant. The maximum reduction achievement for friction of coefficient and wear rate by Al2O3-SiO2 composite nanolubricants by 4.78% and 12.96% with 0.06% volume concentration. Therefore, 0.06% volume concentration is selected as the most enhanced composite nanolubricants with effective coefficient of friction and wear rate reduction compared to other volume concentrations. Thus, it is recommended to be used as the compressor lubrication to enhanced compressor performances.

  19. Monitoring temperature reactivity coefficient by noise method in a NPP at full power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, O.; Por, G.

    1987-04-01

    A new method based on noise measurement was used to estimate the temperature reactivity coefficient of the PAKS-2 reactor during the entire fuel cycle. Based on the measurements it is possible to measure the dependence of reactivity coefficient on boron concentration. Good agreement was found between the results obtained by the new method and by the conventional ones. Based on this method a new equipment can be develop which assures permanent measurements during operation. (author)

  20. THERMODYNAMICS OF ELECTROLYTES. X. ENTHALPY AND THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE ACTIVITY COEFFICIENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvester, Leonard F.; Pitzer, Kenneth S.

    1977-11-01

    Heat of dilution and of solution data are fitted to the form of equation corresponding to that used successfully for activity and osmotic coefficients over a wide range of concentration. The resulting parameters give the change with temperature of the activity and osmotic coefficients. Results are reported for 84 electrolytes of 1-1, 2-1, 3-1, and 2-2 valence types.

  1. Measurement of reactivity temperature coefficient by noise method in a power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, O.

    1986-07-01

    The temperature reactivity coefficient was estimated on the basis of noise measurements performed in a PWR. The magnitude of the coefficient was evaluated by relating the values of the APSD and CPSD between ex-core neutron detector signals and fuel assembly outlet thermocouple in the low frequency range. Comparison with δρ/δT measurements performed in PWR by standard methods supports the validity of the results. (author)

  2. Influence on Heat Transfer Coefficient of Heat Exchanger by Velocity and Heat Transfer Temperature Difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Fang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aimed to insufficient heat transfer of heat exchanger, research the influence on the heat transfer coefficient impacted by velocity and heat transfer temperature difference of tube heat exchanger. According to the different heat transfer temperature difference and gas velocity,the experimental data were divided into group. Using the control variable method,the above two factors were analyzed separately. K一△T and k一:fitting curve were clone to obtain empirical function. The entire heat exchanger is as the study object,using numerical simulation methods,porous media,k一£model,second order upwind mode,and pressure一velocity coupling with SIMPLE algorithm,the entire heat exchanger temperature field and the heat transfer coefficient distribution were given. Finally the trend of the heat transfer coefficient effected by the above two factors was gotten.

  3. Temperature dependence of diffusion coefficients of trivalent uranium ions in chloride and chloride-fluoride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, V.E.; Borodina, N.P.

    1981-01-01

    Diffusion coefficients of U 3+ ions are measured by chronopotentiometric method in chloride 3LiCl-2KCl and in mixed chloride fluoride 3LiCl(LiF)-2KCl melts in the temperature range 633-1235 K. It is shown It is shown that experimental values of diffusion-coefficients are approximated in a direct line in lg D-1/T coordinate in chloride melt in the whole temperature range and in chloride-fluoride melt in the range of 644-1040 K. Experimental values of diffusion coefficients diviate from Arrhenius equation in the direction of large values in chloride-fluoride melt at further increase of temperature up to 1235 K. Possible causes of such a diviation are considered [ru

  4. Estimation of moderator temperature coefficient of actual PWRs using wavelet transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumata, Ryosuke; Shimazu, Yoichiro

    2001-01-01

    Recently, an applicability of wavelet transform for estimation of moderator temperature coefficient was shown in numerical simulations. The basic concept of the wavelet transform is to eliminate noise in the measured signals. The concept is similar to that of Fourier transform method in which the analyzed reactivity component is divided by the analyzed component of relevant parameter. In order to apply the method to analyze measured data in actual PWRs, we carried out numerical simulations on the data that were more similar to actual data and proposed a method for estimation of moderator temperature coefficient using the wavelet transform. In the numerical simulations we obtained moderator temperature coefficients with the relative error of less than 4%. Based on this result we applied this method to analyze measured data in actual PWRs and the results have proved that the method is applicable for estimation of moderator temperature coefficients in the actual PWRs. It is expected that this method can reduce the required data length during the measurement. We expect to expand the applicability of this method to estimate the other reactivity coefficients with the data of short transient. (author)

  5. Estimation of water diffusion coefficient into polycarbonate at different temperatures using numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasirabadi, P. Shojaee; Jabbari, M.; Hattel, J. H. [Process Modelling Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Nils Koppels Allé, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2016-06-08

    Nowadays, many electronic systems are exposed to harsh conditions of relative humidity and temperature. Mass transport properties of electronic packaging materials are needed in order to investigate the influence of moisture and temperature on reliability of electronic devices. Polycarbonate (PC) is widely used in the electronics industry. Thus, in this work the water diffusion coefficient into PC is investigated. Furthermore, numerical methods used for estimation of the diffusion coefficient and their assumptions are discussed. 1D and 3D numerical solutions are compared and based on this, it is shown how the estimated value can be different depending on the choice of dimensionality in the model.

  6. Effect of oxyfluorinated multi-walled carbon nanotube additives on positive temperature coefficient/negative temperature coefficient behavior in high-density polyethylene polymeric switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Byong Chol; Kang, Seok Chang; Im, Ji Sun; Lee, Se Hyun; Lee, Young-Seak

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The electrical properties of MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches and their effect on oxyfluorination. Highlights: → Oxyfluorinated MWCNTs were used to reduce the PTC/NTC phenomenon in MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches. → Electron mobility is difficult in MWCNT particles when the number of oxygen functional groups (C-O, C=O) increases by oxyfluorination. → A mechanism of improved electrical properties of oxyfluorinated MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches was suggested. -- Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were embedded into high-density polyethylene (HDPE) to improve the electrical properties of HDPE polymeric switches. The MWCNT surfaces were modified by oxyfluorination to improve their positive temperature coefficient (PTC) and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behaviors in HDPE polymeric switches. HDPE polymeric switches exhibit poor electron mobility between MWCNT particles when the number of oxygen functional groups is increased by oxyfluorination. Thus, the PTC intensity of HDPE polymeric switches was increased by the destruction of the electrical conductivity network. The oxyfluorination of MWCNTs also leads to weak NTC behavior in the MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches. This result is attributed to the reduction of the mutual attraction between the MWCNT particles at the melting temperature of HDPE, which results from a decrease in the surface free energy of the C-F bond in MWCNT particles.

  7. Sample size planning for composite reliability coefficients: accuracy in parameter estimation via narrow confidence intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Leann; Kelley, Ken

    2012-11-01

    Composite measures play an important role in psychology and related disciplines. Composite measures almost always have error. Correspondingly, it is important to understand the reliability of the scores from any particular composite measure. However, the point estimates of the reliability of composite measures are fallible and thus all such point estimates should be accompanied by a confidence interval. When confidence intervals are wide, there is much uncertainty in the population value of the reliability coefficient. Given the importance of reporting confidence intervals for estimates of reliability, coupled with the undesirability of wide confidence intervals, we develop methods that allow researchers to plan sample size in order to obtain narrow confidence intervals for population reliability coefficients. We first discuss composite reliability coefficients and then provide a discussion on confidence interval formation for the corresponding population value. Using the accuracy in parameter estimation approach, we develop two methods to obtain accurate estimates of reliability by planning sample size. The first method provides a way to plan sample size so that the expected confidence interval width for the population reliability coefficient is sufficiently narrow. The second method ensures that the confidence interval width will be sufficiently narrow with some desired degree of assurance (e.g., 99% assurance that the 95% confidence interval for the population reliability coefficient will be less than W units wide). The effectiveness of our methods was verified with Monte Carlo simulation studies. We demonstrate how to easily implement the methods with easy-to-use and freely available software. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  8. High temperature oxidation resistant cermet compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Cermet compositions are designed to provide high temperature resistant refractory coatings on stainless steel or molybdenum substrates. A ceramic mixture of chromium oxide and aluminum oxide form a coating of chromium oxide as an oxidation barrier around the metal particles, to provide oxidation resistance for the metal particles.

  9. Control rod position and temperature coefficients in HTTR power-rise tests. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Nojiri, Naoki; Takada, Eiji; Saito, Kenji; Kobayashi, Shoichi; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Kokusen, Sigeru

    2001-03-01

    Power-rise tests of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) have been carried out aiming to achieve 100% power. So far, 50% of power operation and many tests have been carried out. In the HTTR, temperature change in core is so large to achieve the outlet coolant temperature of 950degC. To improve the calculation accuracy of the HTTR reactor physics characteristics, control rod positions at criticality and temperature coefficients were measured at each step to achieve 50% power level. The calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo code and diffusion theory with temperature distributions in the core obtained by reciprocal calculation of thermo-hydraulic code and diffusion theory. Control rod positions and temperature coefficients were calculated by diffusion theory and Monte Carlo method. The test results were compared to calculation results. The control rod positions at criticality showed good agreement with calculation results by Monte Carlo method with error of 50 mm. The control position at criticality at 100% was predicted around 2900mm. Temperature coefficients showed good agreement with calculation results by diffusion theory. The improvement of calculation will be carried out comparing the measured results up to 100% power level. (author)

  10. Effect of filler geometry on coefficient of thermal expansion in carbon nanofiber reinforced epoxy composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, M; Jang, J; Suhr, J

    2011-02-01

    This study involves the investigation of the geometry effect of nano-fillers on thermally induced dimensional stability of epoxy composites by experimentally evaluating the linear coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). Carbon nanofibers (CNF) were chosen as the filler in epoxy matrix to investigate the effect of an aspect ratio on the CTE of the nanocomposites at three different volume fractions of 0.5, 1, and 2% of the nano-filler. The composites were fabricated using a mechanical mixing method. The CTE values were evaluated by measuring thermal strains of the composites and also compared with a micromechanics model. It was observed that the composites with short CNF (average L/d = 10) show better thermal stability than one of the composites with long CNF (average L/d = 70), and the thermal stability of the composites was proportional to the volume fraction of the filler in each composite. In addition, the CTE of mutliwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) reinforced epoxy composites was evaluated and compared with the CTE of the CNF reinforced composites. Interestingly, the MWNT reinforced composites show the greatest thermal stability with an 11.5% reduction in the CTE over the pure epoxy. The experimental data was compared with micromechanics model.

  11. High-Temperature Ceramic Matrix Composite with High Corrosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    description of high temperature oxidation processes of composite ceramic materials of ZrB2 - SiC and ZrB2-SiC-Zr(Mo)Si2 systems up to high (~1300 °C...analysis was applied using MІN-7 mineralogical microscope and a set of standard immersion liquids with the known values of refraction coefficients...2.0 V) corresponds to the simultaneous formation of ZrO2 zirconium dioxide of monoclinic modification and Zr(OH)4 zirconium hydroxide which is

  12. Optimization of tribological behaviour on Al- coconut shell ash composite at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siva Sankara Raju, R.; Panigrahi, M. K.; Ganguly, R. I.; Srinivasa Rao, G.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, determine the tribological behaviour of composite at elevated temperature i.e. 50 - 150 °C. The aluminium matrix composite (AMC) are prepared with compo casting route by volume of reinforcement of coconut shell ash (CSA) such as 5, 10 and 15%. Mechanical properties of composite has enhances with increasing volume of CSA. This study details to optimization of wear behaviour of composite at elevated temperatures. The influencing parameters such as temperature, sliding velocity and sliding distance are considered. The outcome response is wear rate (mm3/m) and coefficient of friction. The experiments are designed based on Taguchi [L9] array. All the experiments are considered as constant load of 10N. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that temperature is highest influencing factor followed by sliding velocity and sliding distance. Similarly, sliding velocity is most influencing factor followed by temperature and distance on coefficient of friction (COF). Finally, corroborates analytical and regression equation values by confirmation test.

  13. Temperature distribution of thick thermoset composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhan-Sheng; Du, Shanyi; Zhang, Boming

    2004-05-01

    The development of temperature distribution of thick polymeric matrix laminates during an autoclave vacuum bag process was measured and compared with numerically calculated results. The finite element formulation of the transient heat transfer problem was carried out for polymeric matrix composite materials from the heat transfer differential equations including internal heat generation produced by exothermic chemical reactions. Software based on the general finite element software package was developed for numerical simulation of the entire composite process. From the experimental and numerical results, it was found that the measured temperature profiles were in good agreement with the numerical ones, and conventional cure cycles recommended by prepreg manufacturers for thin laminates should be modified to prevent temperature overshoot.

  14. High temperature performance of polymer composites

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The authors explain the changes in the thermophysical and thermomechanical properties of polymer composites under elevated temperatures and fire conditions. Using microscale physical and chemical concepts they allow researchers to find reliable solutions to their engineering needs on the macroscale. In a unique combination of experimental results and quantitative models, a framework is developed to realistically predict the behavior of a variety of polymer composite materials over a wide range of thermal and mechanical loads. In addition, the authors treat extreme fire scenarios up to more than 1000°C for two hours, presenting heat-protection methods to improve the fire resistance of composite materials and full-scale structural members, and discuss their performance after fire exposure. Thanks to the microscopic approach, the developed models are valid for a variety of polymer composites and structural members, making this work applicable to a wide audience, including materials scientists, polymer chemist...

  15. Measurements of fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity on a commercial AGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telford, A.; Bridge, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    Tests have been carried out on the commercial AGR at Hikley Point to determine the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity, an important safety related parameter. Reactor neutron flux was measured during transients induced by movement of a bank of control rods from one steady position to another. An inverse kinetics analysis was applied to the measured flux to determine the change which occured in core reactivity as the fuel temperature changed. The variation of mean fuel temperature was deduced from the flux transient by means of a nine-plane thermal hydraulics representation of the AGR fuel channel. Results so far obtained confirm the predicted variation of fuel temperature coefficient with butn-up. (author)

  16. Temperature coefficients for GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, Arto; Isoaho, Riku; Tukiainen, Antti; Polojärvi, Ville; Aho, Timo; Raappana, Marianna; Guina, Mircea [Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2015-09-28

    We report the temperature coefficients for MBE-grown GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb multijunction solar cells and the corresponding single junction sub-cells. Temperature-dependent current-voltage measurements were carried out using a solar simulator equipped with a 1000 W Xenon lamp and a three-band AM1.5D simulator. The triple-junction cell exhibited an efficiency of 31% at AM1.5G illumination and an efficiency of 37–39% at 70x real sun concentration. The external quantum efficiency was also measured at different temperatures. The temperature coefficients up to 80°C, for the open circuit voltage, the short circuit current density, and the conversion efficiency were determined to be −7.5 mV/°C, 0.040 mA/cm{sup 2}/°C, and −0.09%/°C, respectively.

  17. Temperature dependencies of Henry's law constants and octanol/water partition coefficients for key plant volatile monoterpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copolovici, Lucian O; Niinemets, Ulo

    2005-12-01

    To model the emission dynamics and changes in fractional composition of monoterpenoids from plant leaves, temperature dependencies of equilibrium coefficients must be known. Henry's law constants (H(pc), Pa m3 mol(-1) and octanol/water partition coefficients (K(OW), mol mol(-1)) were determined for 10 important plant monoterpenes at physiological temperature ranges (25-50 degrees C for H(pc) and 20-50 degrees C for K(OW)). A standard EPICS procedure was established to determine H(pc) and a shake flask method was used for the measurements of K(OW). The enthalpy of volatilization (deltaH(vol)) varied from 18.0 to 44.3 kJ mol(-1) among the monoterpenes, corresponding to a range of temperature-dependent increase in H(pc) between 1.3- and 1.8-fold per 10 degrees C rise in temperature. The enthalpy of water-octanol phase change varied from -11.0 to -23.8 kJ mol(-1), corresponding to a decrease of K(OW) between 1.15- and 1.32-fold per 10 degrees C increase in temperature. Correlations among physico-chemical characteristics of a wide range of monoterpenes were analyzed to seek the ways of derivation of H(pc) and K(OW) values from other monoterpene physico-chemical characteristics. H(pc) was strongly correlated with monoterpene saturated vapor pressure (P(v)), and for lipophilic monoterpenes, deltaH(vol) scaled positively with the enthalpy of vaporization that characterizes the temperature dependence of P(v) Thus, P(v) versus temperature relations may be employed to derive the temperature relations of H(pc) for these monoterpenes. These data collectively indicate that monoterpene differences in H(pc) and K(OW) temperature relations can importantly modify monoterpene emissions from and deposition on plant leaves.

  18. Self-consistent transport coefficients for average collective motion at moderately high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaji, Shuhei; Hofmann, H.; Samhammer, R.

    1987-01-01

    Linear response theory is applied to compute the coefficients for inertia, friction and local stiffness for slow, large scale nuclear collective motion. It is shown how these coefficients can be defined within a locally harmonic approximation. The latter allows to study the implications arising from a finite local collective frequency. It is only for temperatures around 2 MeV that the zero frequency limit becomes a fair approximation. Friction is found to have a marked temperature dependence. The numerical computations are performed on the basis of a two-center shell model, but allowing the particles and holes to become dressed through effects of the medium. The dependence of the transport coefficients on the parameters of these self-energies is studied. It is argued that the uncertainties are smaller than a factor of 2. (orig.)

  19. Current Sharing inside a High Power IGBT Module at the Negative Temperature Coefficient Operating Region

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084596; Papastergiou, Konstantinos; Bongiorno, M; Thiringer, T

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the current sharing effect of a high power Soft Punch Through IGBT module in the Negative Temperature Coefficient region. The unbalanced current sharing between two of the substrates is demonstrated for different current and temperature levels and its impact on the thermal stressing of the device is evaluated. The results indicate that the current asymmetry does not lead to a significant thermal stressing unbalance between the substrates.

  20. Anomalous temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient for the substitutionally-disordered hopping conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffaelle, R.P.; Parris, P.E.; Anderson, H.U.; Sparlin, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Thermoelectric power measurements are presented for the (La,Sr)(Cr,Mn)O 3 series. The nonlinear temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient is analyzed in terms of a random distribution of energetically equivalent hopping sites. The limitations of Heikes' formula, which has been traditionally used to calculate small polaron carrier densities in these systems, are discussed. Recent theoretical developments in the interpretation of Seebeck measurements in substitutionally-disordered high-temperature hopping conductors are reviewed

  1. Measurement of Mechanical Property and Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Carbon-Nano tube-Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, Min Ye; Kim, Jung Hyun; Kang, Hee Yong; Lee, Gyo Woo

    2013-01-01

    By using shear mixing and ultrasonication, we fabricated specimens of well-dispersed multi-walled carbon nano tube composites. To confirm the proper dispersion of the filler, we used scanning electron microscopy images for quantitative evaluation and a tensile test for qualitative assessment. Furthermore, the coefficients of thermal expansion of several specimens having different filler contents were calculated from the measured thermal strains and temperatures of the specimens. Based on the microscopy images of the well-dispersed fillers and the small deviations in the measurements of the tensile strength and stiffness, we confirmed the proper dispersion of absentee in the epoxy. As the filler contents were increased, the values of tensile strength increased from 58.33 to 68.81 MPa, and those of stiffness increased from 2.93 to 3.27 GPa. At the same time, the coefficients of thermal expansion decreased. This implies better thermal stability of the specimen

  2. Measuring temperature coefficient of TRIGA MARK I reactor by noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, P.A.

    1975-01-01

    The transfer function of TRIGA MARK I Reactor is measured at power zero (5w) and power 118Kw, in the frequency range of 0.02 to 0.5 rd/s. The method of intercorrelation between a pseudostochasticbinary signal is used. A simple dynamic model of the reactor is developed and the coefficient of temperature is estimated [pt

  3. Temperature dependence of the absorption coefficient of water for midinfrared laser radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, E. D.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Motamedi, M.; Borst, C.; Welch, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamics of the water absorption peak around 1.94 microns was examined. This peak is important for the absorption of holmium and thulium laser radiation. To examine the effect of temperature on the absorption coefficient, the transmission of pulsed Ho:YAG, Ho:YAG, Ho:YSGG, and Tm:YAG laser

  4. Investigations of the reactivity temperature coefficient of the Dresden Technical University training and research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, E.; Knorr, J.

    1982-01-01

    Approximate formulas are derived for determining the temperature coefficient of reactivity of the training and research reactor (AKR) of the Dresden Technical University. Values calculated on the basis of these approximations show good agreement with experimentally obtained results, thus confirming the applicability of the formulas to simple systems

  5. Monte Carlo calculation of the nuclear temperature coefficient in fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthes, W.

    1974-04-15

    A Monte Carlo program for the calculation of the nuclear temperature coefficient for fast reactors is described. The special difficulties for this problem are the energy and space dependence of the cross sections and the calculation of differential eifects. These difficulties are discussed in detail and the way for their solution chosen in this program is described. (auth)

  6. Experimental estimation of moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity of the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Rubens C. da; Bitelli, Ulysses D.; Mura, Luiz Ernesto C.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the procedure for the experimental estimation of the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity of the IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor, a parameter that has an important role in the physics and the control operations of any reactor facility. At the experiment, the IPEN/MB-01 reactor went critical at the power of 1W (1% of its total power), and whose core configuration was 28 x 26 rectangular array of UO_2 fuel rods, inside a light water (moderator) tank. In addition, there was a heavy water (D_2O) reflector installed in the West side of the core to obtain an adequate neutron reflection along the experiment. The moderator temperature was increased in steps of 4 °C, and the measurement of the mean moderator temperature was acquired using twelve calibrated thermocouples, placed around the reactor core. As a result, the mean value of -4.81 pcm/°C was obtained for such coefficient. The curves of ρ(T) (Reactivity x Temperature) and α"M_T(T)(Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity x Temperature) were developed using data from an experimental measurement of the integral reactivity curves through the Stable Period and Inverse Kinetics Methods, that was carried out at the reactor with the same core configuration. Such curves were compared and showed a very similar behavior between them. (author)

  7. Experimental estimation of moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity of the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Rubens C. da; Bitelli, Ulysses D.; Mura, Luiz Ernesto C., E-mail: rubensrcs@usp.br, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br, E-mail: credidiomura@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (PNV/POLI/USP), SP (Brazil). Arquitetura Naval e Departamento de Engenharia Oceanica; Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this article is to present the procedure for the experimental estimation of the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity of the IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor, a parameter that has an important role in the physics and the control operations of any reactor facility. At the experiment, the IPEN/MB-01 reactor went critical at the power of 1W (1% of its total power), and whose core configuration was 28 x 26 rectangular array of UO{sub 2} fuel rods, inside a light water (moderator) tank. In addition, there was a heavy water (D{sub 2}O) reflector installed in the West side of the core to obtain an adequate neutron reflection along the experiment. The moderator temperature was increased in steps of 4 °C, and the measurement of the mean moderator temperature was acquired using twelve calibrated thermocouples, placed around the reactor core. As a result, the mean value of -4.81 pcm/°C was obtained for such coefficient. The curves of ρ(T) (Reactivity x Temperature) and α{sup M}{sub T}(T)(Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity x Temperature) were developed using data from an experimental measurement of the integral reactivity curves through the Stable Period and Inverse Kinetics Methods, that was carried out at the reactor with the same core configuration. Such curves were compared and showed a very similar behavior between them. (author)

  8. Elasticity moduli, thermal expansion coefficients and Debye temperature of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beletskij, V.M.; Glej, V.A.; Maksimyuk, P.A.; Tabachnik, V.I.; Opanasenko, V.F.

    1979-01-01

    Studied are the characteristics of titanium alloys which reflect best the bonding forces for atoms in a crystal lattice: elastic modules, their temperature dependences, thermal expansion coefficient and Debye temperatures. For the increase of the accuracy of measuring modules and especially their changes with temperature an ultrasonic echo-impulse method of superposition has been used. The temperature dependences of Young modulus of the VT1-0, VT16 and VT22 titanium alloys are plotted. The Young module and its change with temperature depend on the content of alloying elements. The Young module decrease with temperature may be explained within the framework of the inharmonic effect theory. The analysis of the results obtained permits to suppose that alloying of titanium alloys with aluminium results in an interatomic interaction increase that may be one of the reasons of their strength increase

  9. Measurement of the Thermal Expansion Coefficient for Ultra-High Temperatures up to 3000 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompan, T. A.; Kondratiev, S. V.; Korenev, A. S.; Puhov, N. F.; Inochkin, F. M.; Kruglov, S. K.; Bronshtein, I. G.

    2018-03-01

    The paper is devoted to a new high-temperature dilatometer, a part of the State Primary Standard of the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) unit. The dilatometer is designed for investigation and certification of materials for TEC standards in the range of extremely high temperatures. The critical review of existing methods of TEC measurements is given. Also, the design, principles of operation and metrological parameters of the new device are described. The main attention is paid to the system of machine vision that allows accurate measurement of elongation at high temperatures. The results of TEC measurements for graphite GIP-4, single crystal Al2O3, and some other materials are also presented.

  10. The accommodation coefficient of the liquid at temperatures below the boiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulba Elena E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Are carried out experimental investigation of the laws of vaporization at temperatures below the boiling point. Is determined the mass rate of evaporation of distilled water in large intervals of time at different temperatures in order to sound conclusions about the stationarity of the process of evaporation of the liquid in the conditions of the experiments performed, and also studied the effect of temperature on the rate of evaporation. Accommodation coefficient is defined in the mathematical expression of the law of Hertz-Knudsen for standart substance used in the experiments.

  11. Electrical resistivity, Hall coefficient and electronic mobility in indium antimonide at different magnetic fields and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jee, Madan; Prasad, Vijay; Singh, Amita

    1995-01-01

    The electrical resistivity, Hall coefficient and electronic mobility of n-type and p-type crystals of indium antimonide have been measured from 25 degC-100 degC temperature range. It has been found by this measurement that indium antimonide is a compound semiconductor with a high mobility 10 6 cm 2 /V.S. The Hall coefficient R H was measured as a function of magnetic field strength H for a number of samples of both p and n-type using fields up to 12 kilo gauss. The Hall coefficient R h decreases with increasing magnetic fields as well as with increase in temperature of the sample. The electric field is more effective on samples with high mobilities and consequently the deviations from linearity are manifested at comparatively low values of the electric field. The measurement of R H in weak and strong magnetic fields makes it possible to determine the separate concentration of heavy and light holes. Measured values of Hall coefficient and electrical resistivity show that there is a little variation of ρ and R h with temperatures as well as with magnetic fields. (author). 12 refs., 5 tabs

  12. Study on Characteristic of Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity for Plutonium Core of Pebbled Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhair; Suwoto; Setiadipura, T.; Bakhri, S.; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    As a part of the solution searching for possibility to control the plutonium, a current effort is focused on mechanisms to maximize consumption of plutonium. Plutonium core solution is a unique case in the high temperature reactor which is intended to reduce the accumulation of plutonium. However, the safety performance of the plutonium core which tends to produce a positive temperature coefficient of reactivity should be examined. The pebble bed inherent safety features which are characterized by a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity must be maintained under any circumstances. The purpose of this study is to investigate the characteristic of temperature coefficient of reactivity for plutonium core of pebble bed reactor. A series of calculations with plutonium loading varied from 0.5 g to 1.5 g per fuel pebble were performed by the MCNPX code and ENDF/B-VII library. The calculation results show that the k eff curve of 0.5 g Pu/pebble declines sharply with the increase in fuel burnup while the greater Pu loading per pebble yields k eff curve declines slighter. The fuel with high Pu content per pebble may reach long burnup cycle. From the temperature coefficient point of view, it is concluded that the reactor containing 0.5 g-1.25 g Pu/pebble at high burnup has less favorable safety features if it is operated at high temperature. The use of fuel with Pu content of 1.5 g/pebble at high burnup should be considered carefully from core safety aspect because it could affect transient behavior into a fatal accident situation.

  13. Estimation of Water Diffusion Coefficient into Polycarbonate at Different Temperatures Using Numerical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shojaee Nasirabadi, Parizad; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    ) is widely used in the electronics industry. Thus, in this work the water diffusion coefficient into PC is investigated. Furthermore, numerical methods used for estimation of the diffusion coefficient and their assumptions are discussed. 1D and 3D numerical solutions are compared and based on this, itis......Nowadays, many electronic systems are exposed to harsh conditions of relative humidity and temperature. Masstransport properties of electronic packaging materials are needed in order to investigate the influence of moisture andtemperature on reliability of electronic devices. Polycarbonate (PC...... shown how the estimated value can be different depending on the choice of dimensionality in the model....

  14. Lithium-doped hydroxyapatite nano-composites: Synthesis, characterization, gamma attenuation coefficient and dielectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badran, H.; Yahia, I. S.; Hamdy, Mohamed S.; Awwad, N. S.

    2017-01-01

    Lithium-hydroxyapatite (0, 1, 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 wt% Li-HAp) nano-composites were synthesized by sol-gel technique followed by microwave-hydrothermal treatment. The composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman techniques. Gamma attenuation coefficient and the dielectric properties for all composites were investigated. The crystallinity degree of Li-doped HAp was higher than that of un-doped HAp. Gamma attenuation coefficient values increased from 0.562 cm-1 for 0 wt% Li-HAp to 2.190 cm-1 for 40 wt% Li-HAp. The alternating current conductivity increased with increasing frequency. The concentration of Li affect the values of dielectric constant where Li doped HAp of low dielectric constant can have an advantage for healing in bone fractures. The calcium to phosphorus ratio decreased from 1.43 to 1.37 with the addition of lithium indicating the Ca deficiency in the studied composites. Our findings lead to the conclusion that Li-HAp is a new nano-composite useful for medical applications and could be doped with gamma shield materials.

  15. High temperature electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient of Ge2Sb2Te5 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnane, L.; Dirisaglik, F.; Cywar, A.; Cil, K.; Zhu, Y.; Lam, C.; Anwar, A. F. M.; Gokirmak, A.; Silva, H.

    2017-09-01

    High-temperature characterization of the thermoelectric properties of chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is critical for phase change memory devices, which utilize self-heating to quickly switch between amorphous and crystalline states and experience significant thermoelectric effects. In this work, the electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient are measured simultaneously as a function of temperature, from room temperature to 600 °C, on 50 nm and 200 nm GST thin films deposited on silicon dioxide. Multiple heating and cooling cycles with increasingly maximum temperature allow temperature-dependent characterization of the material at each crystalline state; this is in contrast to continuous measurements which return the combined effects of the temperature dependence and changes in the material. The results show p-type conduction (S > 0), linear S(T), and a positive Thomson coefficient (dS/dT) up to melting temperature. The results also reveal an interesting linearity between dS/dT and the conduction activation energy for mixed amorphous-fcc GST, which can be used to estimate one parameter from the other. A percolation model, together with effective medium theory, is adopted to correlate the conductivity of the material with average grain sizes obtained from XRD measurements. XRD diffraction measurements show plane-dependent thermal expansion for the cubic and hexagonal phases.

  16. Composite Materials for Low-Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Composite materials with improved thermal conductivity and good mechanical strength properties should allow for the design and construction of more thermally efficient components (such as pipes and valves) for use in fluid-processing systems. These materials should have wide application in any number of systems, including ground support equipment (GSE), lunar systems, and flight hardware that need reduced heat transfer. Researchers from the Polymer Science and Technology Laboratory and the Cryogenics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center were able to develop a new series of composite materials that can meet NASA's needs for lightweight materials/composites for use in fluid systems and also expand the plastic-additive markets. With respect to thermal conductivity and physical properties, these materials are excellent alternatives to prior composite materials and can be used in the aerospace, automotive, military, electronics, food-packaging, and textile markets. One specific application of the polymeric composition is for use in tanks, pipes, valves, structural supports, and components for hot or cold fluid-processing systems where heat flow through materials is a problem to be avoided. These materials can also substitute for metals in cryogenic and other low-temperature applications. These organic/inorganic polymeric composite materials were invented with significant reduction in heat transfer properties. Decreases of 20 to 50 percent in thermal conductivity versus that of the unmodified polymer matrix were measured. These novel composite materials also maintain mechanical properties of the unmodified polymer matrix. These composite materials consist of an inorganic additive combined with a thermoplastic polymer material. The intrinsic, low thermal conductivity of the additive is imparted into the thermoplastic, resulting in a significant reduction in heat transfer over that of the base polymer itself, yet maintaining most of the polymer's original properties. Normal

  17. Laboratory Studies of Low Temperature Rate Coefficients: The Atmospheric Chemistry of the Outer Planets and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogan, Denis

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory measurements have been carried out to determine low temperature chemical rate coefficients of ethynyl radical (C2H) for the atmospheres of the outer planets and their satellites. This effort is directly related to the Cassini mission which will explore Saturn and Titan. A laser-based photolysis/infrared laser probe setup was used to measure the temperature dependence of kinetic rate coefficients from approx. equal to 150 to 350 K for C2H radicals with H2, C2H2, CH4, CD4, C2H4, C2H6, C3H8, n-C4H10, i-C4H10, neo-C5H12, C3H4 (methylacetylene and allene), HCN, and CH3CN. The results revealed discrepancies of an order of magnitude or more compared with the low temperature rate coefficients used in present models. A new Laval nozzle, low Mach number supersonic expansion kinetics apparatus has been constructed, resulting in the first measurements of neutral C2H radical kinetics at 90 K and permitting studies on condensable gases with insufficient vapor pressure at low temperatures. New studies of C 2H with acetylene have been completed.

  18. Monitoring on internal temperature of composite insulator with embedding fiber Bragg grating for early diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Tang, Ming

    2017-04-01

    The abnormal temperature rise is the precursor of the defective composite insulator in power transmission line. However no consolidated techniques or methodologies can on line monitor its internal temperature now. Thus a new method using embedding fiber Bragg grating (FBG) in fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) rod is adopted to monitor its internal temperature. To correctly demodulate the internal temperature of FRP rod from the Bragg wavelength shift of FBG, the conversion coefficient between them is deduced theoretically based on comprehensive investigation on the thermal stresses of the metal-composite joint, as well as its material and structural properties. Theoretical model shows that the conversion coefficients of FBG embedded in different positions will be different because of non-uniform thermal stress distribution, which is verified by an experiment. This work lays the theoretical foundation of monitoring the internal temperature of composite insulator with embedding FBG, which is of great importance to its health structural monitoring, especially early diagnosis.

  19. Temperature modulation of the visible and near infrared absorption and scattering coefficients of human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Omar S; Yeh, Shu-Jen; Lowery, Michael G; Wu, Xiaomao; Hanna, Charles F; Kantor, Stanislaw; Jeng, Tzyy-Wen; Kanger, Johannes S; Bolt, Rene A; de Mul, Frits F

    2003-04-01

    We determine temperature effect on the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients (mu(a) and mu(s)(')) of human forearm skin. Optical and thermal simulation data suggest that mu( a) and mu(s)(') are determined within a temperature-controlled depth of approximately 2 mm. Cutaneous mu(s)(') change linearly with temperature. Change in mu(a) was complex and irreversible above body normal temperatures. Light penetration depth (delta) in skin increased on cooling, with considerable person-to-person variations. We attribute the effect of temperature on mu(s)(') to change in refractive index mismatch, and its effect on mu(a) to perfusion changes. The reversible temperature effect on mu (s)(' ) was maintained during more than 90 min. contact between skin and the measuring probe, where temperature was modulated between 38 and 22 degrees C for multiple cycles While temperature modulated mu(s)(' ) instantaneously and reversibly, mu(a) exhibited slower response time and consistent drift. There was a statistically significant upward drift in mu(a) and a mostly downward drift in mu( s)(') over the contact period. The drift in temperature-induced fractional change in mu(s)(') was less statistically significant than the drift in mu(s)('). Deltamu( s)(') values determined under temperature modulation conditions may have less nonspecific drift than mu(s)(') which may have significance for noninvasive determination of analytes in human tissue.

  20. Assessment of the crossflow loss coefficient in Very High Temperature Reactor core - 15338

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.N.; Tak, N.I.; Kim, M.H.; Noh, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is a helium gas cooled and graphite moderated reactor. It was chosen as one of the Gen-4 reactors owing to its inherent safety. Various researches for prismatic gas-cooled reactors have been conducted for efficient and safe use. The prismatic VHTR consists of vertically stacked fuel blocks. Between the vertical fuel blocks, there is cross gap because of manufacturing tolerance or graphite change during the operation. This cross gap changes the coolant flow path, called a crossflow, which may affect the fuel temperature. Various tests and numerical studies have been conducted to predict the crossflow and loss coefficient. In the present study, the CFD calculation is conducted to draw the loss coefficient, and compared with Groehn, Kaburaki and General Atomics (GA) correlations. The results of the Groehn and Kaburaki correlations tend to decrease as the gap size increases, whereas the data of GA show the opposite. The loss coefficient given by the CFD calculation tends to maintain the regular value without regard to the gap size for the standard fuel block, like the Groehn correlation. However, the loss coefficient of the control fuel block increases as the gap size widens, like the GA results

  1. Optimization of temperature coefficient and breeding ratio for a graphite-moderated molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, C.Y.; Cai, X.Z.; Jiang, D.Z.; Yu, C.G.; Li, X.X.; Ma, Y.W.; Han, J.L. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in TMSR Energy System, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Chen, J.G., E-mail: chenjg@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in TMSR Energy System, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The temperature feedback coefficient with different moderation ratios for TMSR in thermal neutron region is optimized. • The breeding ratio and doubling time of a thermal TMSR with three different reprocessing schemes are analyzed. • The smaller hexagon size and larger salt fraction with more negative feedback coefficient can better satisfy the safety demands. • A shorter reprocessing time can achieve a better breeding ratio in a thermal TMSR. • The graphite moderator lifespan is compared with other MSRs and discussed. - Abstract: Molten salt reactor (MSR) has fascinating features: inherent safety, no fuel fabrication, online fuel reprocessing, etc. However, the graphite moderated MSR may present positive feedback coefficient which has severe implications for the transient behavior during operation. In this paper, the feedback coefficient and the breeding ratio are optimized based on the fuel-to-graphite ratio variation for a thorium based MSR (TMSR). A certain thermal core with negative feedback coefficient and relative high initial breeding ratio is chosen for the reprocessing scheme analysis. The breeding performances for the TMSR under different online fuel reprocessing efficiencies and frequencies are evaluated and compared with other MSR concepts. The results indicate that the thermal TMSR can get a breeding ratio greater than 1.0 with appropriate reprocessing scheme. The low fissile inventory in thermal TMSR leads to a short doubling time and low transuranic (TRU) inventory. The lifetime of graphite used for the TMSR is also discussed.

  2. Calculation of fuel and moderator temperature coefficients in APR1400 nuclear reactor by MVP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Tuan Nam; Le Thi Thu; Nguyen Huu Tiep; Tran Viet Phu

    2014-01-01

    In this project, these fuel and moderator temperature coefficients were calculated in APR1400 nuclear reactor by MVP code. APR1400 is an advanced water pressurized reactor, that was researched and developed by Korea Experts, its electric power is 1400 MW. The neutronics calculations of full core is very important to analysis and assess a reactor. Results of these calculation is input data for thermal-hydraulics calculations, such as fuel and moderator temperature coefficients. These factors describe the self-safety characteristics of nuclear reactor. After obtaining these reactivity parameters, they were used to re-run the thermal hydraulics calculations in LOCA and RIA accidents. These thermal-hydraulics results were used to analysis effects of reactor physics parameters to thermal hydraulics situation in nuclear reactors. (author)

  3. RADIAL FORCE IMPACT ON THE FRICTION COEFFICIENT AND TEMPERATURE OF A SELF-LUBRICATING PLAIN BEARING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Bojić

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-lubricating bearings are available in spherical, plain, flanged journal, and rod end bearing configurations. They were originally developed to eliminate the need for re-lubrication, to provide lower torque and to solve application problems where the conventional metal-to-metal bearings would not perform satisfactorily, for instance, in the presence of high frequency vibrations. Among the dominant tribological parameters of the self-lubricating bearing, two could be singled out: the coefficient of friction and temperature. To determine these parameters, an experimental method was applied in this paper. By using this method, the coefficient of friction and temperature were identified and their correlation was established. The aim of this research was to determine the effect of radial force on tribological parameters in order to predict the behavior of sliding bearings with graphite in real operating conditions.

  4. Effect of Mixed Working Fluid Composition on Binary Cycle Condenser Heat Transfer Coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

    2011-10-01

    Effect of Mixed Working Fluid Composition on Binary Cycle Condenser Heat Transfer Coefficients Dan Wendt, Greg Mines Idaho National Laboratory The use of mixed working fluids in binary power plants can provide significant increases in plant performance, provided the heat exchangers are designed to take advantage of these fluids non-isothermal phase changes. In the 1980's testing was conducted at DOE's Heat Cycle Research Facility (HCRF) where mixtures of different compositions were vaporized at supercritical pressures and then condensed. This testing had focused on using the data collected to verify that Heat Transfer Research Incorporated (HTRI) codes were suitable for the design of heat exchangers that could be used with mixtures. The HCRF data includes mixture compositions varying from 0% to 40% isopentane and condenser tube orientations of 15{sup o}, 60{sup o}, and 90{sup o} from horizontal. Testing was performed over a range of working fluid and cooling fluid conditions. Though the condenser used in this testing was water cooled, the working fluid condensation occurred on the tube-side of the heat exchanger. This tube-side condensation is analogous to that in an air-cooled condenser. Tube-side condensing heat transfer coefficient information gleaned from the HCRF testing is used in this study to assess the suitability of air-cooled condenser designs for use with mixtures. Results of an air-cooled binary plant process model performed with Aspen Plus indicate that that the optimal mixture composition (producing the maximum net power for the scenario considered) is within the range of compositions for which data exist. The HCRF data is used to assess the impact of composition, tube orientation, and process parameters on the condensing heat transfer coefficients. The sensitivity of the condensing coefficients to these factors is evaluated and the suitability of air-cooled condenser designs with mixtures is assessed. This paper summarizes the evaluation

  5. Statistical analysis of solid waste composition data: Arithmetic mean, standard deviation and correlation coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edjabou, Maklawe Essonanawe; Martín-Fernández, Josep Antoni; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    -derived food waste amounted to 2.21 ± 3.12% with a confidence interval of (−4.03; 8.45), which highlights the problem of the biased negative proportions. A Pearson’s correlation test, applied to waste fraction generation (kg mass), indicated a positive correlation between avoidable vegetable food waste...... and plastic packaging. However, correlation tests applied to waste fraction compositions (percentage values) showed a negative association in this regard, thus demonstrating that statistical analyses applied to compositional waste fraction data, without addressing the closed characteristics of these data......, have the potential to generate spurious or misleading results. Therefore, ¨compositional data should be transformed adequately prior to any statistical analysis, such as computing mean, standard deviation and correlation coefficients....

  6. Noise analysis method for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of pressurized water reactors: Neural network calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.R. Jr.; Adams, J.T.

    1994-01-01

    A neural network was trained with data for the frequency response function between in-core neutron noise and core-exit thermocouple noise in a pressurized water reactor, with the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) as target. The trained network was subsequently used to predict the MTC at other points in the same fuel cycle. Results support use of the method for operating pressurized water reactors provided noise data can be accumulated for several fuel cycles to provide a training base

  7. Temperature and void reactivity coefficient calculations for the high flux isotope reactor safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engle, W.W. Jr.; Williams, L.R.

    1994-07-01

    This report provides documentation of a series of calculations performed in 1991 in order to provide input for the High Flux Isotope Reactor Safety Analysis Report. In particular, temperature and void reactivity coefficients were calculated for beginning-of-life, end-of-life, and xenon equilibrium (29 h) conditions. Much of the data used to prepare the computer models for these calculations was derived from the original HFIR nuclear design study

  8. Evaluation of heat transfer coefficient of tungsten filaments at low pressures and high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chondrakis, N.G.; Topalis, F.V.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents an experimental method for the evaluation of the heat transfer coefficient of tungsten filaments at low pressures and high temperatures. For this purpose an electrode of a T5 fluorescent lamp was tested under low pressures with simultaneous heating in order to simulate the starting conditions in the lamp. It was placed in a sealed vessel in which the pressure was varied from 1 kM (kilo micron) to 760 kM. The voltage applied to the electrode was in the order of the filament's voltage of the lamp at the normal operation with the ballast during the preheating process. The operating frequency ranged from DC to 50 kHz. The experiment targeted on estimating the temperature of the electrode at the end of the first and the ninth second after initiating the heating process. Next, the heat transfer coefficient was calculated at the specific experimental conditions. A mathematical model based on the results was developed that estimates the heat transfer coefficient. The experiments under different pressures confirm that the filament's temperature strongly depends on the pressure.

  9. Temperature-Dependent Rate Coefficients for the Reaction of CH2OO with Hydrogen Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mica C; Chao, Wen; Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S; Takahashi, Kaito; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2017-02-09

    The reaction of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH 2 OO with hydrogen sulfide was measured with transient UV absorption spectroscopy in a temperature-controlled flow reactor, and bimolecular rate coefficients were obtained from 278 to 318 K and from 100 to 500 Torr. The average rate coefficient at 298 K and 100 Torr was (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10 -13 cm 3 s -1 . The reaction was found to be independent of pressure and exhibited a weak negative temperature dependence. Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations of the temperature-dependent reaction rate coefficient at the QCISD(T)/CBS level are in reasonable agreement with the experiment. The reaction of CH 2 OO with H 2 S is 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than the reaction with H 2 O monomer. Though rates of CH 2 OO scavenging by water vapor under atmospheric conditions are primarily controlled by the reaction with water dimer, the H 2 S loss pathway will be dominated by the reaction with monomer. The agreement between experiment and theory for the CH 2 OO + H 2 S reaction lends credence to theoretical descriptions of other Criegee intermediate reactions that cannot easily be probed experimentally.

  10. The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral for uranium metal and oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, P; Hellstrand, E; Homer, S

    1960-06-15

    The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral in uranium metal and oxide has been measured over a wide temperature range for rods with three different diameters. The results for metal agree with most earlier results from activation measurements but differ as much as a factor of two from results obtained with reactivity methods. For oxide only one measurement has been reported recently. Our value is considerably lower than the result of that measurement. The experiments will continue in order to find the reason for the large discrepancy mentioned above.

  11. The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral for uranium metal and oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomberg, P.; Hellstrand, E.; Homer, S.

    1960-06-01

    The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral in uranium metal and oxide has been measured over a wide temperature range for rods with three different diameters. The results for metal agree with most earlier results from activation measurements but differ as much as a factor of two from results obtained with reactivity methods. For oxide only one measurement has been reported recently. Our value is considerably lower than the result of that measurement. The experiments will continue in order to find the reason for the large discrepancy mentioned above

  12. Statistical analysis of solid waste composition data: Arithmetic mean, standard deviation and correlation coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edjabou, Maklawe Essonanawe; Martín-Fernández, Josep Antoni; Scheutz, Charlotte; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2017-11-01

    Data for fractional solid waste composition provide relative magnitudes of individual waste fractions, the percentages of which always sum to 100, thereby connecting them intrinsically. Due to this sum constraint, waste composition data represent closed data, and their interpretation and analysis require statistical methods, other than classical statistics that are suitable only for non-constrained data such as absolute values. However, the closed characteristics of waste composition data are often ignored when analysed. The results of this study showed, for example, that unavoidable animal-derived food waste amounted to 2.21±3.12% with a confidence interval of (-4.03; 8.45), which highlights the problem of the biased negative proportions. A Pearson's correlation test, applied to waste fraction generation (kg mass), indicated a positive correlation between avoidable vegetable food waste and plastic packaging. However, correlation tests applied to waste fraction compositions (percentage values) showed a negative association in this regard, thus demonstrating that statistical analyses applied to compositional waste fraction data, without addressing the closed characteristics of these data, have the potential to generate spurious or misleading results. Therefore, ¨compositional data should be transformed adequately prior to any statistical analysis, such as computing mean, standard deviation and correlation coefficients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Laboratory studies of low temperature rate coefficients: The atmospheric chemistry of the outer planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Stephen R.

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of the research are to measure low temperature laboratory rate coefficients for key reactions relevant to the atmospheres of Titan and Saturn. These reactions are, for example, C2H + H2, CH4, C2H2, and other hydrocarbons which need to be measured at low temperatures, down to approximately 150 K. The results of this work are provided to NASA specialists who study modeling of the hydrocarbon chemistry of the outer planets. The apparatus for this work consists of a pulsed laser photolysis system and a tunable F-center probe laser to monitor the disappearance of C2H. A low temperature cell with a cryogenic circulating fluid in the outer jacket provides the gas handling system for this work. These elements have been described in detail in previous reports. Several new results are completed and the publications are just being prepared. The reaction of C2H with C2H2 has been measured with an improved apparatus down to 154 K. An Arrhenius plot indicates a clear increase in the rate coefficient at the lowest temperatures, most likely because of the long-lived (C4H3) intermediate. The capability to achieve the lowest temperatures in this work was made possible by construction of a new cell and addition of a multipass arrangement for the probe laser, as well as improvements to the laser system.

  14. The effect of core configuration on temperature coefficient of reactivity in IRR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettan, M.; Silverman, I.; Shapira, M.; Nagler, A. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne (Israel)

    1997-08-01

    Experiments designed to measure the effect of coolant moderator temperature on core reactivity in an HEU swimming pool type reactor were performed. The moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity ({alpha}{sub {omega}}) was obtained and found to be different in two core loadings. The measured {alpha}{sub {omega}} of one core loading was {minus}13 pcm/{degrees}C at the temperature range of 23-30{degrees}C. This value of {alpha}{sub {omega}} is comparable to the data published by the IAEA. The {alpha}{sub {omega}} measured in the second core loading was found to be {minus}8 pcm/{degrees}C at the same temperature range. Another phenomenon considered in this study is core behavior during reactivity insertion transient. The results were compared to a core simulation using the Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power Plants. It was found that in the second core loading factors other than the moderator temperature influence the core reactivity more than expected. These effects proved to be extremely dependent on core configuration and may in certain core loadings render the reactor`s reactivity coefficient undesirable.

  15. Thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients of a two-temperature polytetrafluoroethylene vapor plasma for ablation-controlled discharge applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Weizong; Yan, Joseph D.; Qi, Haiyang; Geng, Jinyue; Wu, Yaowu

    2017-10-01

    Ablation-controlled plasmas have been used in a range of technical applications where local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) is often violated near the wall due to the strong cooling effect caused by the ablation of wall materials. The thermodynamic and transport properties of ablated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vapor, which determine the flowing plasma behavior in such applications, are calculated based on a two-temperature model at atmospheric pressure. To our knowledge, no data for PTFE have been reported in the literature. The species composition and thermodynamic properties are numerically determined using the two-temperature Saha equation and the Guldberg-Waage equation according to van de Sanden et al’s derivation. The transport coefficients, including viscosity, thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity, are calculated with the most recent collision interaction potentials using Devoto’s electron and heavy-particle decoupling approach but expanded to the third-order approximation (second-order for viscosity) in the frame of the Chapman-Enskog method. Results are computed for different degrees of thermal non-equilibrium, i.e. the ratio of electron to heavy-particle temperatures, from 1 to 10, with electron temperature ranging from 300 to 40 000 K. Plasma transport properties in the LTE state obtained from the present work are compared with existing published results and the causes for the discrepancy analyzed. The two-temperature plasma properties calculated in the present work enable the modeling of wall ablation-controlled plasma processes.

  16. Thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients of a two-temperature polytetrafluoroethylene vapor plasma for ablation-controlled discharge applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Haiyan; Qi, Haiyang; Wang, Weizong; Yan, Joseph D; Geng, Jinyue; Wu, Yaowu

    2017-01-01

    Ablation-controlled plasmas have been used in a range of technical applications where local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) is often violated near the wall due to the strong cooling effect caused by the ablation of wall materials. The thermodynamic and transport properties of ablated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vapor, which determine the flowing plasma behavior in such applications, are calculated based on a two-temperature model at atmospheric pressure. To our knowledge, no data for PTFE have been reported in the literature. The species composition and thermodynamic properties are numerically determined using the two-temperature Saha equation and the Guldberg–Waage equation according to van de Sanden et al ’s derivation. The transport coefficients, including viscosity, thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity, are calculated with the most recent collision interaction potentials using Devoto’s electron and heavy-particle decoupling approach but expanded to the third-order approximation (second-order for viscosity) in the frame of the Chapman–Enskog method. Results are computed for different degrees of thermal non-equilibrium, i.e. the ratio of electron to heavy-particle temperatures, from 1 to 10, with electron temperature ranging from 300 to 40 000 K. Plasma transport properties in the LTE state obtained from the present work are compared with existing published results and the causes for the discrepancy analyzed. The two-temperature plasma properties calculated in the present work enable the modeling of wall ablation-controlled plasma processes. (paper)

  17. Heat transfer coefficient: Medivance Arctic Sun Temperature Management System vs. water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, M J; Hemmerling, T M

    2008-07-01

    To improve heat transfer, the Medivance Arctic Sun Temperature Management System (Medivance, Inc., Louisville, CO, USA) features an adhesive, water-conditioned, highly conductive hydrogel pad for intimate skin contact. This study measured and compared the heat transfer coefficient (h), i.e. heat transfer efficiency, of this pad (hPAD), in a heated model and in nine volunteers' thighs; and of 10 degrees C water (hWATER) in 33 head-out immersions by 11 volunteers. Volunteer studies had ethical approval and written informed consent. Calibrated heat flux transducers measured heat flux (W m-2). Temperature gradient (DeltaT) was measured between skin and pad or water temperatures. Temperature gradient was changed through the pad's water temperature controller or by skin cooling on immersion. The heat transfer coefficient is the slope of W m-2/DeltaT: its unit is W m-2 degrees C-1. Average with (95% CI) was: model, hPAD = 110.4 (107.8-113.1), R2 = 0.99, n = 45; volunteers, hPAD = 109.8 (95.5-124.1), R2 = 0.83, n = 51; and water immersion, hWATER = 107.1 (98.1-116), R2 = 0.86, n = 94. The heat transfer coefficient for the pad was the same in the model and volunteers, and equivalent to hWATER. Therefore, for the same DeltaT and heat transfer area, the Arctic Sun's heat transfer rate would equal water immersion. This has important implications for body cooling/rewarming rates.

  18. Re-evaluation of SiC permeation coefficients at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi, E-mail: yama3707@kansai-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering Science, Kansai Univ., Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Murakami, Yuichiro; Yamaguchi, Hirosato; Yamamoto, Takehiro; Yonetsu, Daigo [Faculty of Engineering Science, Kansai Univ., Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Noborio, Kazuyuki [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, Univ. of Toyama, Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Konishi, Satoshi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto Univ., Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The deuterium permeation coefficients of CVD-SiC at 600–950 °C were evaluated. • The wraparound flow was reduced to less than 1/100th of the permeation flow. • CVD-SiC materials are very effective as hydrogen isotope permeation barriers. - Abstract: Since 2007, our group has studied the deuterium permeation and diffusion coefficients for SiC materials at temperatures above 600 °C as a means of evaluating the tritium inventory and permeation in fusion blankets. During such measurements, control and evaluation of the wraparound flow through the sample holder are important, and so the heated sample holder is enclosed by a glass tube and kept under vacuum during experimental trials. However, detailed studies regarding the required degree of vacuum based on model calculations have shown that the wraparound flow is much larger than expected, and so can affect measurements at high temperatures. We therefore modified the measurement apparatus based on calculations involving reduced pressure in the glass tube, and are now confident that the measurement error is only several percent, even at 950 °C. In this paper, recent experimental results obtained with a chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC sample over the temperature range of 600–950 °C are presented, showing that the permeation coefficient for CVD-SiC is more than three orders of magnitude smaller than that for stainless steel (SS316) at 600 °C, and that at 950 °C, the coefficient for CVD-SiC is almost equal to that for SUS316 at 550 °C.

  19. Experimental and Numerical Study on Effects of Airflow and Aqueous Ammonium Temperature on Ammonia Mass Transfer Coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li; Nielsen, Peter V.; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2010-01-01

    greatly along the airflow direction on the emission surface. The average mass transfer coefficient increases with higher velocity and turbulence intensity. However, the mass transfer coefficient estimated by CFD simulation is consistently larger than the calculated one by the method using dissociation...... constant and Henry's constant models. In addition, the results show that the liquid-air temperature difference has little impact on the simulated mass transfer coefficient by CFD modeling, whereas the mass transfer coefficient increases with higher liquid temperature using the other method under...... the conditions that the liquid temperature is lower than the air temperature. Although there are differences of mass transfer coefficients between these two methods, the mass transfer coefficients determined by these two methods are significantly related....

  20. High Temperature Degradation Mechanisms in Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Ronan A.

    1996-01-01

    Polymer matrix composites are increasingly used in demanding structural applications in which they may be exposed to harsh environments. The durability of such materials is a major concern, potentially limiting both the integrity of the structures and their useful lifetimes. The goal of the current investigation is to develop a mechanism-based model of the chemical degradation which occurs, such that given the external chemical environment and temperatures throughout the laminate, laminate geometry, and ply and/or constituent material properties, we can calculate the concentration of diffusing substances and extent of chemical degradation as functions of time and position throughout the laminate. This objective is met through the development and use of analytical models, coupled to an analysis-driven experimental program which offers both quantitative and qualitative information on the degradation mechanism. Preliminary analyses using a coupled diffusion/reaction model are used to gain insight into the physics of the degradation mechanisms and to identify crucial material parameters. An experimental program is defined based on the results of the preliminary analysis which allows the determination of the necessary material coefficients. Thermogravimetric analyses are carried out in nitrogen, air, and oxygen to provide quantitative information on thermal and oxidative reactions. Powdered samples are used to eliminate diffusion effects. Tests in both inert and oxidative environments allow the separation of thermal and oxidative contributions to specimen mass loss. The concentration dependency of the oxidative reactions is determined from the tests in pure oxygen. Short term isothermal tests at different temperatures are carried out on neat resin and unidirectional macroscopic specimens to identify diffusion effects. Mass loss, specimen shrinkage, the formation of degraded surface layers and surface cracking are recorded as functions of exposure time. Geometry effects

  1. Influence of variable heat transfer coefficient of fireworks and crackers on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Zerong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of variable heat transfer coefficient of fireworks and crackers on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition, considering the heat transfer coefficient as the power function of temperature, mathematical thermal explosion steady state and unsteady-state model of finite cylindrical fireworks and crackers with complex shell structures are established based on two-dimensional steady state thermal explosion theory. The influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition are analyzed. When heat transfer coefficient is changing with temperature and in the condition of natural convection heat transfer, critical ambient temperature lessen, thermal explosion time to ignition shorten. If ambient temperature is close to critical ambient temperature, the influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on time to ignition become large. For firework with inner barrel in example analysis, the critical ambient temperature of propellant is 463.88 K and the time to ignition is 4054.9s at 466 K, 0.26 K and 450.8s less than without considering the change of heat transfer coefficient respectively. The calculation results show that the influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on thermal explosion time to ignition is greater in this example. Therefore, the effect of variable heat transfer coefficient should be considered into thermal safety evaluation of fireworks to reduce potential safety hazard.

  2. Coefficient of Friction Measurements for Thermoplastics and Fibre Composites Under Low Sliding Velocity and High Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Svendsen, Gustav Winther; Hiller, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    that friction materials which are untypical for brake applications, like thermoplastics and fibre composites, can offer superior performance in terms of braking torque, wear resistance and cost than typical brake linings. In this paper coefficient of friction measurements for various thermoplastic and fibre......Friction materials for typical brake applications are normally designed considering thermal stability as the major performance criterion. There are, however, brake applications with very limited sliding velocities, where the generated heat is insignificant. In such cases it is possible...... in order to interpret the changes of friction observed during the running-in phase....

  3. Rate coefficients for the reactions of ions with polar molecules at interstellar temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, N.G.; Smith, D.; Clary, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    A theory has been developed recently which predicts that the rate coefficients, k, for the reactions of ions with polar molecules at low temperatures will be much greater than the canonical value of 10 -9 cm 3 s -1 . The new theory indicates that k is greatest for low-lying rotational sates and increases rapidly with decreasing temperature. We refer to recent laboratory measurements which validate the theory, present calculated values of k for the reactions of H + 3 ions with several polar molecules, and discuss their significance to interstellar chemistry. For the reactions of ions with molecules having large dipole moments, we recommend that k values as large as 10 -7 cm 3 s -1 should be used in ion-chemical models of low-temperature interstellar clouds

  4. Thermopower coefficient of pine-wood biocarbon preforms and the biocarbon-preform/copper composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkov, A. T.; Novikov, S. V.; Smirnov, B. I.; Smirnov, I. A.; Sulkovski, Cz.; Jezowski, A.

    2010-11-01

    The thermopower S( T) of the composites prepared by filling empty sap channels in high-porosity biocarbon preforms of white pine wood by melted copper in vacuum and the thermopower S( T) of these preforms have been measured in the temperature range 5-300 K. The biocarbon preforms have been obtained by pyrolysis of pine wood in an argon flow at two carbonization temperatures, 1000 and 2400°C. An analysis of the experimental data has demonstrated that the thermopower of the composites is determined by the contribution related to the copper filling the channels of the biocarbon preform and exhibits a characteristic temperature dependence with a deep minimum close to 20 K. This suggests that copper in the preform channels is essentially a Kondo alloy with the iron and manganese impurities entering into it from the carbon preform in the course of infiltration of melted copper.

  5. Disalignment rate coefficient of neon excited atoms due to helium atom collisions at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, M; Shimamura, T; Furutani, T; Hasuo, M; Bahrim, C; Fujimoto, T

    2003-01-01

    Disalignment of neon excited atoms in the fine-structure 2p i levels (in Paschen notation) of the 2p 5 3p configuration is investigated in a helium-neon glow discharge at temperatures between 15 and 77 K. At several temperatures, we plot the disalignment rate as a function of the helium atom density for Ne* (2p 2 or 2p 7 ) + He(1s 2 ) collisions. The slope of this dependence gives the disalignment rate coefficient. For both collisions, the experimental data for the disalignment rate coefficient show a more rapid decrease with the decrease in temperature below 40 K than our quantum close-coupling calculations based on the model potential of Hennecart and Masnou-Seeuws (1985 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 18 657). This finding suggests that the disalignment cross section rapidly decreases below a few millielectronvolts, in disagreement with our theoretical quantum calculations which predict a strong increase below 1 meV. The disagreement suggests that the long-range electrostatic potentials are significantly more repulsive than in the aforementioned model

  6. Temperature dependences of the electrical conductivity and Hall coefficient of indium telluride single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Conductivity type, carrier concentration and carrier mobility of InTe samples grown by Bridgman technique were determined by the Hall effect and electrical conductivity measurements. The study was performed in the temperature range 150-480 K. Two samples with different growth rate were used in the investigation. The samples under test were P-type conducting, in accordance with previous measurements of undoped material. The Hall coefficient was found to be isotropic yielding room temperature hole concentration in the range 10 15 -10 16 cm -3 . The hole mobilities of InTe samples were in the range 1.17 x 10 3 -2.06 x 10 3 cm 2 /V · sec at room temperature. The band-gap of InTe determined from Hall coefficient studies has been obtained equal to 0.34 eV. The scattering mechanism was checked, and the electrical properties were found to be sensitive to the crystal growth rate. (author)

  7. The influence of the surface composition of mixed monolayer films on the evaporation coefficient of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Rachael E H; Davies, James F; Reid, Jonathan P

    2016-07-20

    We explore the dependence of the evaporation coefficient of water from aqueous droplets on the composition of a surface film, considering in particular the influence of monolayer mixed component films on the evaporative mass flux. Measurements with binary component films formed from long chain alcohols, specifically tridecanol (C13H27OH) and pentadecanol (C15H31OH), and tetradecanol (C14H29OH) and hexadecanol (C16H33OH), show that the evaporation coefficient is dependent on the mole fractions of the two components forming the monolayer film. Immediately at the point of film formation and commensurate reduction in droplet evaporation rate, the evaporation coefficient is equal to a mole fraction weighted average of the evaporation coefficients through the equivalent single component films. As a droplet continues to diminish in surface area with continued loss of water, the more-soluble, shorter alkyl chain component preferentially partitions into the droplet bulk with the evaporation coefficient tending towards that through a single component film formed simply from the less-soluble, longer chain alcohol. We also show that the addition of a long chain alcohol to an aqueous-sucrose droplet can facilitate control over the degree of dehydration achieved during evaporation. After undergoing rapid gas-phase diffusion limited water evaporation, binary aqueous-sucrose droplets show a continued slow evaporative flux that is limited by slow diffusional mass transport within the particle bulk due to the rapidly increasing particle viscosity and strong concentration gradients that are established. The addition of a long chain alcohol to the droplet is shown to slow the initial rate of water loss, leading to a droplet composition that remains more homogeneous for a longer period of time. When the sucrose concentration has achieved a sufficiently high value, and the diffusion constant of water has decreased accordingly so that bulk phase diffusion arrest occurs in the monolayer

  8. Tribological characteristics of electroless Ni–P–MoS2 composite coatings at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhen; Wang Jingbo; Lu Jinjun; Meng Junhu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Uniform Ni–P–MoS 2 composite coatings are deposited by electroless plating. ► Friction coefficient of composite coating decreases with the increase of temperature. ► Formation of lubricious oxide film leads to excellent tribological property. - Abstract: Ni–P–MoS 2 composite coatings were deposited on AISI-1045 steel plate by electroless plating followed by a heat treatment at 300 °C for 2 h. The high-temperature tribological characteristics of the composite coatings were evaluated under dry sliding conditions in a tribometer with ball-on-disk configuration. The effect of the co-deposition of MoS 2 on the friction and wear behaviors of composite coatings at elevated temperature was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine the morphology of the worn surface of composite coating. The chemical states of some typical elements on the worn surfaces were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. The results indicate that friction coefficient of the composite coatings decreases with the increase of test temperature up to 500 °C, and the best tribological properties of Ni–P–MoS 2 composite coatings are achieved at 400 °C. The worn surface of Ni–P–MoS 2 composite coatings are characterized by mild scuffing and deformation. The improvement of tribological properties of the composite coatings was attributed to the formation of the lubricious oxide film composed of oxides of Ni and Mo at high temperatures. With the test temperature increasing to 600 °C, the tribological properties of the composite coating begin to deteriorate due to softening of the coating.

  9. A method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient (KdPAR)from paired temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jordan S.; Rose, Kevin C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Read, Emily K.

    2015-01-01

    A new method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient for photosynthetically active radiation (KdPAR) from paired temperature sensors was derived. We show that during cases where the attenuation of penetrating shortwave solar radiation is the dominant source of temperature changes, time series measurements of water temperatures at multiple depths (z1 and z2) are related to one another by a linear scaling factor (a). KdPAR can then be estimated by the simple equation KdPAR ln(a)/(z2/z1). A suggested workflow is presented that outlines procedures for calculating KdPAR according to this paired temperature sensor (PTS) method. This method is best suited for conditions when radiative temperature gains are large relative to physical noise. These conditions occur frequently on water bodies with low wind and/or high KdPARs but can be used for other types of lakes during time periods of low wind and/or where spatially redundant measurements of temperatures are available. The optimal vertical placement of temperature sensors according to a priori knowledge of KdPAR is also described. This information can be used to inform the design of future sensor deployments using the PTS method or for campaigns where characterizing sub-daily changes in temperatures is important. The PTS method provides a novel method to characterize light attenuation in aquatic ecosystems without expensive radiometric equipment or the user subjectivity inherent in Secchi depth measurements. This method also can enable the estimation of KdPAR at higher frequencies than many manual monitoring programs allow.

  10. Determination and importance of temperature dependence of retention coefficient (RPHPLC) in QSAR model of nitrazepams' partition coefficient in bile acid micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posa, Mihalj; Pilipović, Ana; Lalić, Mladena; Popović, Jovan

    2011-02-15

    Linear dependence between temperature (t) and retention coefficient (k, reversed phase HPLC) of bile acids is obtained. Parameters (a, intercept and b, slope) of the linear function k=f(t) highly correlate with bile acids' structures. Investigated bile acids form linear congeneric groups on a principal component (calculated from k=f(t)) score plot that are in accordance with conformations of the hydroxyl and oxo groups in a bile acid steroid skeleton. Partition coefficient (K(p)) of nitrazepam in bile acids' micelles is investigated. Nitrazepam molecules incorporated in micelles show modified bioavailability (depo effect, higher permeability, etc.). Using multiple linear regression method QSAR models of nitrazepams' partition coefficient, K(p) are derived on the temperatures of 25°C and 37°C. For deriving linear regression models on both temperatures experimentally obtained lipophilicity parameters are included (PC1 from data k=f(t)) and in silico descriptors of the shape of a molecule while on the higher temperature molecular polarisation is introduced. This indicates the fact that the incorporation mechanism of nitrazepam in BA micelles changes on the higher temperatures. QSAR models are derived using partial least squares method as well. Experimental parameters k=f(t) are shown to be significant predictive variables. Both QSAR models are validated using cross validation and internal validation method. PLS models have slightly higher predictive capability than MLR models. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Replacement of unsteady heat transfer coefficient by equivalent steady-state one when calculating temperature oscillations in a thermal layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supel'nyak, M. I.

    2017-11-01

    Features of calculation of temperature oscillations which are damped in a surface layer of a solid and which are having a small range in comparison with range of temperature of the fluid medium surrounding the solid at heat transfer coefficient changing in time under the periodic law are considered. For the specified case the equations for approximate definition of constant and oscillating components of temperature field of a solid are received. The possibility of use of appropriately chosen steady-state coefficient when calculating the temperature oscillations instead of unsteady heat-transfer coefficient is investigated. Dependence for definition of such equivalent constant heat-transfer coefficient is determined. With its help the research of temperature oscillations of solids with canonical form for some specific conditions of heat transfer is undertaken. Comparison of the obtained data with results of exact solutions of a problem of heat conductivity by which the limits to applicability of the offered approach are defined is carried out.

  12. Application of noise analysis technique for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, D.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Sweeney, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique, based on the noise analysis of neutron detector and core-exit coolant temperature signals, is developed for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). A detailed multinodal model is developed and evaluated for the reactor core subsystem of the loss-of-fluid test (LOFT) reactor. This model is used to study the effect of changing the sign of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity on the low-frequency phase angle relationship between the neutron detector and the core-exit temperature noise signals. Results show that the phase angle near zero frequency approaches - 180 deg for negative coefficients and 0 deg for positive coefficients when the perturbation source for the noise signals is core coolant flow, inlet coolant temperature, or random heat transfer

  13. Analysis of Moderator Temperature Reactivity Coefficient of the PWR Core Using WIMS-ANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukiran; Rokhmadi

    2007-01-01

    The Moderator Temperature Reactivity Coefficient (MTRC) is an important parameter in design, control and safety, particularly in PWR reactor. It is then very important to validate any new processed library for an accurate prediction of this parameter. The objective of this work is to validate the newly WIMS library based on ENDF/B-VI nuclear data files, especially for the prediction of the MTRC parameter. For this purpose, it is used a set of light water moderated lattice experiments as the NORA experiment and R1-100H critical reactors, both of reactors using UO 2 fuel pellet. Analysis is used with WIMSD/4 lattice code with original cross section libraries and WIMS-ANL with ENDF/B-VI cross section libraries. The results showed that the moderator temperatures reactivity coefficients for the NORA reactor using original libraries is - 5.039E-04 %Δk/k/℃ but for ENDF/B-VI libraries is - 2.925E-03 %Δk/k/℃. Compared to the designed value of the reactor core, the difference is in the range of 1.8 - 3.8 % for ENDF/B-IV libraries. It can be concluded that for reactor safety and control analysis, it has to be used ENDF/B- VI libraries because the original libraries is not accurate any more. (author)

  14. Experimental verification of temperature coefficients of resistance for uniformly doped P-type resistors in SOI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszacki, M.; Maj, C.; Bahri, M. Al; Marrot, J.-C.; Boukabache, A.; Pons, P.; Napieralski, A.

    2010-06-01

    Many today's microsystems like strain-gauge-based piezoresistive pressure sensors contain doped resistors. If one wants to predict correctly the temperature impact on the performance of such devices, the accurate data about the temperature coefficients of resistance (TCR) are essential. Although such data may be calculated using one of the existing mobility models, our experiments showed that we can observe the huge mismatch between the calculated and measured values. Thus, in order to investigate the TCR values, a set of the test structures that contained doped P-type resistors was fabricated. As the TCR value also depends on the doping profile shape, we decided to use the very thin, 340 nm thick SOI wafers in order to fabricate the quasi-uniformly doped silicon layers ranging from 2 × 1017 at cm-3 to 1.6 × 1019 at cm-3. The results showed that the experimental data for the first-order TCR are quite far from the calculated ones especially over the doping range of 1018-1019 at cm-3 and quite close to the experimental ones obtained by Bullis about 50 years ago for bulk silicon. Moreover, for the first time, second-order coefficients that were not very consistent with the calculations were obtained.

  15. Experimental verification of temperature coefficients of resistance for uniformly doped P-type resistors in SOI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszacki, M; Maj, C; Al Bahri, M; Marrot, J-C; Boukabache, A; Pons, P; Napieralski, A

    2010-01-01

    Many today's microsystems like strain-gauge-based piezoresistive pressure sensors contain doped resistors. If one wants to predict correctly the temperature impact on the performance of such devices, the accurate data about the temperature coefficients of resistance (TCR) are essential. Although such data may be calculated using one of the existing mobility models, our experiments showed that we can observe the huge mismatch between the calculated and measured values. Thus, in order to investigate the TCR values, a set of the test structures that contained doped P-type resistors was fabricated. As the TCR value also depends on the doping profile shape, we decided to use the very thin, 340 nm thick SOI wafers in order to fabricate the quasi-uniformly doped silicon layers ranging from 2 × 10 17 at cm −3 to 1.6 × 10 19 at cm −3 . The results showed that the experimental data for the first-order TCR are quite far from the calculated ones especially over the doping range of 10 18 –10 19 at cm −3 and quite close to the experimental ones obtained by Bullis about 50 years ago for bulk silicon. Moreover, for the first time, second-order coefficients that were not very consistent with the calculations were obtained.

  16. Measurements of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity at Hinkley Point 'B': 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, T.A.

    1982-03-01

    Measurements of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity made at Hinkley Point 'B' AGR in 1981 are described. These measurements follow earlier tests reported in e.g. RD/B/N4846 and are part of a series of measurements designed to support theoretical estimates of the change of fuel temperature coefficient as a function of core irradiation. Low and high power measurements were made at a mean core irradiation of 1170GWD. As previously, the measurements at both power levels show agreement with theoretical predictions to within the estimated experimental errors. Recent measurements (mean core irradiation >500GWD) show evidence of a small systematic difference between measured and theoretical values with the experimental values being approximately equal to 0.1mN/ 0 C more positive than the theoretical ones. The measured value of αsub(U) at high power was -0.64+-0.10mN/ 0 C and the low power value, corrected theoretically to normal operating conditions, was also -0.64+-0.10mN/ 0 C. (author)

  17. Analytical method for estimating the thermal expansion coefficient of metals at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamoto, S; Izumi, S; Nakata, T; Sakai, S; Oinuma, S; Nakatani, Y

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an analytical method for estimating the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of metals at high-temperature ranges. Although the conventional method based on quasiharmonic approximation (QHA) shows good results at low temperatures, anharmonic effects caused by large-amplitude thermal vibrations reduces its accuracy at high temperatures. Molecular dynamics (MD) naturally includes the anharmonic effect. However, since the computational cost of MD is relatively high, in order to make an interatomic potential capable of reproducing TEC, an analytical method is essential. In our method, analytical formulation of the radial distribution function (RDF) at finite temperature realizes the estimation of the TEC. Each peak of the RDF is approximated by the Gaussian distribution. The average and variance of the Gaussian distribution are formulated by decomposing the fluctuation of interatomic distance into independent elastic waves. We incorporated two significant anharmonic effects into the method. One is the increase in the averaged interatomic distance caused by large amplitude vibration. The second is the variation in the frequency of elastic waves. As a result, the TECs of fcc and bcc crystals estimated by our method show good agreement with those of MD. Our method enables us to make an interatomic potential that reproduces the TEC at high temperature. We developed the GEAM potential for nickel. The TEC of the fitted potential showed good agreement with experimental data from room temperature to 1000 K. As compared with the original potential, it was found that the third derivative of the wide-range curve was modified, while the zeroth, first and second derivatives were unchanged. This result supports the conventional theory of solid state physics. We believe our analytical method and developed interatomic potential will contribute to future high-temperature material development. (paper)

  18. Determination of temperature dependence of piezoelectric coefficients matrix of lead zirconate titanate ceramics by quasi-static and resonance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fei; Xu Zhuo; Wei Xiaoyong; Yao Xi

    2009-01-01

    The piezoelectric coefficients (d 33 , -d 31 , d 15 , g 33 , -g 31 , g 15 ) of soft and hard lead zirconate titanate ceramics were measured by the quasi-static and resonance methods, at temperatures from 20 to 300 0 C. The results showed that the piezoelectric coefficients d 33 , -d 31 and d 15 obtained by these two methods increased with increasing temperature for both hard and soft PZT ceramics, while the piezoelectric coefficients g 33 , -g 31 and g 15 decreased with increasing temperature for both hard and soft PZT ceramics. In this paper, the observed results were also discussed in terms of intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to piezoelectric response.

  19. Application of numerical inverse method in calculation of composition-dependent interdiffusion coefficients in finite diffusion couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yuanrong; Chen, Weimin; Zhong, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The previously developed numerical inverse method was applied to determine the composition-dependent interdiffusion coefficients in single-phase finite diffusion couples. The numerical inverse method was first validated in a fictitious binary finite diffusion couple by pre-assuming four standard...... sets of interdiffusion coefficients. After that, the numerical inverse method was then adopted in a ternary Al-Cu-Ni finite diffusion couple. Based on the measured composition profiles, the ternary interdiffusion coefficients along the entire diffusion path of the target ternary diffusion couple were...... obtained by using the numerical inverse approach. The comprehensive comparisons between the computations and the experiments indicate that the numerical inverse method is also applicable to high-throughput determination of the composition-dependent interdiffusion coefficients in finite diffusion couples....

  20. A composite approach boosts transduction coefficients of piezoceramics for energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaole; Hou, Yudong; Zheng, Mupeng; Zhao, Haiyan; Zhu, Mankang

    2018-03-01

    Piezoelectric energy harvesting is a hotspot in the field of new energy, the core goal of which is to prepare piezoceramics with a high transduction coefficient (d33×g33). The traditional solid-solution design strategy usually causes the same variation trend of d33 and ɛr, resulting in a low d33×g33 value. In this work, a composite design strategy was proposed that uses PZN-PZT/ZnAl2O4 as an example. By introducing ZnAl2O4, which is nonferroelectric with low ɛr, to the PZN-PZT piezoelectric matrix, ɛr decreased rapidly while d33 remained relatively stable. This behavior was ascribed to the increase of Q33 caused by an interfacial effect facilitating the formation of micro-domain structure.

  1. A composite approach boosts transduction coefficients of piezoceramics for energy harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaole Yu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric energy harvesting is a hotspot in the field of new energy, the core goal of which is to prepare piezoceramics with a high transduction coefficient (d33×g33. The traditional solid–solution design strategy usually causes the same variation trend of d33 and εr, resulting in a low d33×g33 value. In this work, a composite design strategy was proposed that uses PZN–PZT/ZnAl2O4 as an example. By introducing ZnAl2O4, which is nonferroelectric with low εr, to the PZN–PZT piezoelectric matrix, εr decreased rapidly while d33 remained relatively stable. This behavior was ascribed to the increase of Q33 caused by an interfacial effect facilitating the formation of micro-domain structure.

  2. Neutron absorbing room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoch, H.L.

    1979-01-01

    A neutron absorbing composition is described and consists of a one-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition or a two-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition in which the composition contains from 25 to 300 parts by weight based on the base silanol or vinyl containing diorganopolysiloxane polymer of a boron compound or boron powder as the neutron absorbing ingredient. An especially useful boron compound in this application is boron carbide. 20 claims

  3. Estimation of Temperature Conductivity Coefficient Impact upon Fatigue Damage of Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibik, V; Galeeva, A

    2015-01-01

    In the paper we consider the peculiarities of adhesive wear of cutting tools. Simulation of heat flows in the cutting zone showed that, as thermal conduction and heat conductivity of tool material grow, the heat flows from the front and back surfaces to tool holder will increase and so, the temperature of the contact areas of the tool will lower. When estimating the adhesive wear rate of cemented-carbide tool under the cutting rates corresponding to the cutting temperature of up to 900 °C, it is necessary to take the fatigue character of adhesive wear into consideration. The process of accumulation and development of fatigue damage is associated with micro- and macroplastic flowing of material, which is determined by the processes of initiation, motion, generation, and elimination of line defects - dislocations. Density of dislocations grows with increase of the loading cycles amount and increase of load amplitude. Growth of dislocations density leads to loosening of material, formation of micro- and macrocracks. The heat capacity of material grows as the loosening continues. In the given paper the authors prove theoretically that temperature conductivity coefficient which is associated with heat capacity of material, decreases as fatigue wear grows. (paper)

  4. New proposal of moderator temperature coefficient estimation method using gray-box model in NPP, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Michitsugu; Kagami, Yuichi; Kanemoto, Shigeru; Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Tamaoki, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Shinichiro

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to establish a new void reactivity coefficient (VRC) estimation method based on gray box modeling concept. The gray box model consists of a point kinetics model as the first principle model and a fitting model of moderator temperature kinetics. Applying Kalman filter and maximum likehood estimation algorithms to the gray box model, MTC can be estimated. The verification test is done by Monte Carlo simulation, and, it is shown that the present method gives the best estimation results comparing with the conventional methods from the viewpoints of non-biased and smallest scattering estimation performance. Furthermore, the method is verified via real plant data analysis. The reason of good performance of the present method is explained by proper definition of likelihood function based on explicit expression of observation and system noise in the gray box model. (author)

  5. Temperature coefficient of piezoelectric constants in Pb(Mg1/3 Nb2/3O3 - PbTiO3 ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Henrique Lente

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the thermal stability of piezoelectric constants of PMN-PT ceramics in the tetragonal and rhombohedral phases were investigated in a wide range of temperatures. The results showed that the tetragonal PMN-PT presented higher thermal stability and, consequently, the temperature coefficients for the piezoelectric constants were approximately zero. This result revealed to be much better than that commonly found for PZT ceramics. Although the rhombohedral PMN-PT presented a slight lower thermal stability, the values found for the coupling factor were significantly higher than the tetragonal composition.

  6. Experimental measurement of variation of heat transfer coefficient and temperature gradients in 16'' deep fluidised beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blacker, P.T.; McLain, D.R.

    1962-04-01

    The object of the experiments was to choose suitable particulate materials for a fluidised bed cooler, to test a deep fluidised bed for uniformity of heat transfer coefficient, and to explore the temperature distribution in a centrally heated annular fluidised bed. This memorandum records the techniques used and some of the practical aspects involved, together with the performance results obtained, for the assistance of other experimenters who may wish to use fluidised beds as a laboratory technique. Mathematical correlation of the results has not been attempted since some of the properties of the bed material were not known and to determine them was beyond the scope of the work programme. Rather, we have compared our results with those of other experimenters. Graphite tubes, for use in steady state thermal stress experiments, are to be heated by a graphite radiant heater situated in the bore and cooled on the outer surface. The tubes are 2 cm. bore, 8 cm. outside diameter and 48 cm. long. The outside temperature of the tubes is to be between 500 deg. C. and 1500 deg. C. It is estimated that the heat transfer rate required for fracture at the outer surface is 30 watts/cm 2 . This could readily be achieved by cooling with liquid metals, water or high velocity gas. However, serious problems of either materials compatibility or mechanical complexity make these undesirable. A water-cooled fluidised bed of compatible solids fluidised with nitrogen gas can overcome most of these problems and give heat transfer coefficients close to that required, vis. about 0.1 w/cm C . A coolant bed about 20'' long would be required and an annulus of about 2'' radial width round the specimen was considered to be practicable

  7. Experimental measurement of variation of heat transfer coefficient and temperature gradients in 16'' deep fluidised beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blacker, P T; McLain, D R [Reactor Development Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1962-04-15

    The object of the experiments was to choose suitable particulate materials for a fluidised bed cooler, to test a deep fluidised bed for uniformity of heat transfer coefficient, and to explore the temperature distribution in a centrally heated annular fluidised bed. This memorandum records the techniques used and some of the practical aspects involved, together with the performance results obtained, for the assistance of other experimenters who may wish to use fluidised beds as a laboratory technique. Mathematical correlation of the results has not been attempted since some of the properties of the bed material were not known and to determine them was beyond the scope of the work programme. Rather, we have compared our results with those of other experimenters. Graphite tubes, for use in steady state thermal stress experiments, are to be heated by a graphite radiant heater situated in the bore and cooled on the outer surface. The tubes are 2 cm. bore, 8 cm. outside diameter and 48 cm. long. The outside temperature of the tubes is to be between 500 deg. C. and 1500 deg. C. It is estimated that the heat transfer rate required for fracture at the outer surface is 30 watts/cm{sup 2}. This could readily be achieved by cooling with liquid metals, water or high velocity gas. However, serious problems of either materials compatibility or mechanical complexity make these undesirable. A water-cooled fluidised bed of compatible solids fluidised with nitrogen gas can overcome most of these problems and give heat transfer coefficients close to that required, vis. about 0.1 w/cm C . A coolant bed about 20'' long would be required and an annulus of about 2'' radial width round the specimen was considered to be practicable.

  8. Rate Coefficients of the Reaction of OH with Allene and Propyne at High Temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Es-sebbar, Et-touhami

    2016-09-28

    Allene (H2C═C═CH2; a-C3H4) and propyne (CH3C≡CH; p-C3H4) are important species in various chemical environments. In combustion processes, the reactions of hydroxyl radicals with a-C3H4 and p-C3H4 are critical in the overall fuel oxidation system. In this work, rate coefficients of OH radicals with allene (OH + H2C═C═CH2 → products) and propyne (OH + CH3C≡CH → products) were measured behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 843–1352 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. Hydroxyl radicals were generated by rapid thermal decomposition of tert-butyl hydroperoxide ((CH3)3–CO–OH), and monitored by narrow line width laser absorption of the well-characterized R1(5) electronic transition of the OH A–X (0,0) electronic system near 306.7 nm. Results show that allene reacts faster with OH radicals than propyne over the temperature range of this study. Measured rate coefficients can be expressed in Arrhenius form as follows: kallene+OH(T) = 8.51(±0.03) × 10–22T3.05 exp(2215(±3)/T), T = 843–1352 K; kpropyne+OH(T) = 1.30(±0.07) × 10–21T3.01 exp(1140(±6)/T), T = 846–1335 K.

  9. Graphical assessment of the linear contact steel on composite material at high temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rus, Dorin; Florescu, Virgil; Bausic, Florin; Ursache, Robert; Sasu, Anca

    2018-01-01

    In this article we have tried to present a graphical assessment of the dry linear contact for composite materials reinforced with glass fibers as well as of the influence of the sliding speed, load and friction coefficient. Perpendicular loads, the contact temperature and the wear of the metal surface were recorded. The wear volume was calculated using the Archard relationship. Using the Archard relationship, the width of trace can be calculated in 3 locations. Numerous experimental trials were performed in connection to the wear of the metal surface, the contact temperature and the value of the friction coefficient. A connection between the evolution of the wear process and the dependency on the contact temperature and friction coefficient can be observed.

  10. Temperature gradient measurements by using thermoelectric effect in CNTs-silicone adhesive composite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tariq Saeed Chani

    Full Text Available This work presents the fabrication and investigation of thermoelectric cells based on composite of carbon nanotubes (CNT and silicone adhesive. The composite contains CNT and silicon adhesive 1∶1 by weight. The current-voltage characteristics and dependences of voltage, current and Seebeck coefficient on the temperature gradient of cell were studied. It was observed that with increase in temperature gradient the open circuit voltage, short circuit current and the Seebeck coefficient of the cells increase. Approximately 7 times increase in temperature gradient increases the open circuit voltage and short circuit current up to 40 and 5 times, respectively. The simulation of experimental results is also carried out; the simulated results are well matched with experimental results.

  11. Graphene-based mid-infrared room-temperature pyroelectric bolometers with ultrahigh temperature coefficient of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, U; Parret, R; Nanot, S; Bruna, M; Borini, S; De Fazio, D; Zhao, Z; Lidorikis, E; Koppens, F H L; Ferrari, A C; Colli, A

    2017-01-31

    There is a growing number of applications demanding highly sensitive photodetectors in the mid-infrared. Thermal photodetectors, such as bolometers, have emerged as the technology of choice, because they do not need cooling. The performance of a bolometer is linked to its temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR, ∼2-4% K -1 for state-of-the-art materials). Graphene is ideally suited for optoelectronic applications, with a variety of reported photodetectors ranging from visible to THz frequencies. For the mid-infrared, graphene-based detectors with TCRs ∼4-11% K -1 have been demonstrated. Here we present an uncooled, mid-infrared photodetector, where the pyroelectric response of a LiNbO 3 crystal is transduced with high gain (up to 200) into resistivity modulation for graphene. This is achieved by fabricating a floating metallic structure that concentrates the pyroelectric charge on the top-gate capacitor of the graphene channel, leading to TCRs up to 900% K -1 , and the ability to resolve temperature variations down to 15 μK.

  12. Comparative evaluation of fuel temperature coefficient of standard and CANFLEX fuels in CANDU 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woosong; Hartant, Donny; Kim, Yonghee

    2012-01-01

    The fuel temperature reactivity coefficient (FTC) of CANDU 6 has become a concerning issue. The FTC was found to be slightly positive for the operating condition of CANDU 6. Since CANDU 6 has unique fuel arrangement and very soft neutron spectrum, its Doppler reactivity feedback of U 238 is rather weak. The upscattering by oxygen in fuel and Pu 239 buildup with fuel depletion are responsible for the positive FTC value at high temperature. In this study, FTC of both standard CANDU and CANFLEX fuel lattice are re evaluated. A Monte Carlo code Serpent2 was chosen as the analysis tool because of its high calculational speed and it can account for the thermal motion of heavy nuclides in fuel by using the Doppler Broadening Rejection Correction (DBRC) method. It was reported that the fuel Doppler effect is noticeably enhanced by accounting the target thermal motion. Recently, it was found that the FTC of the CANDU 6 standard fuel is noticeably enhanced by the DBRC

  13. Temperature Dependence of the Seebeck Coefficient in Zinc Oxide Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Amirreza; Masoumi, Saeed; Hashemi, Najmeh

    2017-12-01

    Thermoelectric devices are reliable tools for converting waste heat into electricity as they last long, produce no noise or vibration, have no moving elements, and their light weight makes them suitable for the outer space usage. Materials with high thermoelectric figure of merit (zT) have the most important role in the fabrication of efficient thermoelectric devices. Metal oxide semiconductors, specially zinc oxide has recently received attention as a material suitable for sensor, optoelectronic and thermoelectric device applications because of their wide direct bandgap, chemical stability, high-energy radiation endurance, transparency and acceptable zT. Understanding the thermoelectric properties of the undoped ZnO thin films can help design better ZnO-based devices. Here, we report the results of our experimental work on the thermoelectric properties of the undoped polycrystalline ZnO thin films. These films are deposited on alumina substrates by thermal evaporation of zinc in vacuum followed by a controlled oxidation process in air carried out at the 350-500 °C temperature range. The experimental setup including gradient heaters, thermometry system and Seebeck voltage measurement equipment for high resistance samples is described. Seebeck voltage and electrical resistivity of the samples are measured at different conditions. The observed temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient is discussed.

  14. Mapping grain boundary heterogeneity at the nanoscale in a positive temperature coefficient of resistivity ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsgrove, Kristina M.; Kepaptsoglou, Demie M.; Douglas, Alan M.; Ramasse, Quentin M.; Prestat, Eric; Haigh, Sarah J.; Ward, Michael B.; Kumar, Amit; Gregg, J. Marty; Arredondo, Miryam

    2017-06-01

    Despite being of wide commercial use in devices, the orders of magnitude increase in resistance that can be seen in some semiconducting BaTiO3-based ceramics, on heating through the Curie temperature (TC), is far from well understood. Current understanding of the behavior hinges on the role of grain boundary resistance that can be modified by polarization discontinuities which develop in the ferroelectric state. However, direct nanoscale resistance mapping to verify this model has rarely been attempted, and the potential approach to engineer polarization states at the grain boundaries, that could lead to optimized positive temperature coefficient (PTC) behavior, is strongly underdeveloped. Here we present direct visualization and nanoscale mapping in a commercially optimized BaTiO3-PbTiO3-CaTiO3 PTC ceramic using Kelvin probe force microscopy, which shows that, even in the low resistance ferroelectric state, the potential drop at grain boundaries is significantly greater than in grain interiors. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy reveal new evidence of Pb-rich grain boundaries symptomatic of a higher net polarization normal to the grain boundaries compared to the purer grain interiors. These results validate the critical link between optimized PTC performance and higher local polarization at grain boundaries in this specific ceramic system and suggest a novel route towards engineering devices where an interface layer of higher spontaneous polarization could lead to enhanced PTC functionality.

  15. Mapping grain boundary heterogeneity at the nanoscale in a positive temperature coefficient of resistivity ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M. Holsgrove

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite being of wide commercial use in devices, the orders of magnitude increase in resistance that can be seen in some semiconducting BaTiO3-based ceramics, on heating through the Curie temperature (TC, is far from well understood. Current understanding of the behavior hinges on the role of grain boundary resistance that can be modified by polarization discontinuities which develop in the ferroelectric state. However, direct nanoscale resistance mapping to verify this model has rarely been attempted, and the potential approach to engineer polarization states at the grain boundaries, that could lead to optimized positive temperature coefficient (PTC behavior, is strongly underdeveloped. Here we present direct visualization and nanoscale mapping in a commercially optimized BaTiO3–PbTiO3–CaTiO3 PTC ceramic using Kelvin probe force microscopy, which shows that, even in the low resistance ferroelectric state, the potential drop at grain boundaries is significantly greater than in grain interiors. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy reveal new evidence of Pb-rich grain boundaries symptomatic of a higher net polarization normal to the grain boundaries compared to the purer grain interiors. These results validate the critical link between optimized PTC performance and higher local polarization at grain boundaries in this specific ceramic system and suggest a novel route towards engineering devices where an interface layer of higher spontaneous polarization could lead to enhanced PTC functionality.

  16. The influence of thorium on the temperature reactivity coefficient in a 400 MWth pebble bed high temperature plutonium incinerating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, Guy A.; Serfontein, Dawid E.

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates advanced fuel cycles containing thorium and reactor grade plutonium (Pu(PWR)) in a 400 MW th Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) Demonstration Power Plant. Results presented were determined from coupled neutronics and thermo-hydraulic simulations of the VSOP 99/05 diffusion codes. In a previous study impressive burn-ups (601 MWd/kg heavy metal (HM)) and thus plutonium destruction rates (69.2 %) were obtained with pure plutonium fuel with mass loadings of 3 g Pu(PWR)/fuel sphere or less. However the safety performance was poor in that the limit on the maximum fuel temperature during equilibrium operation was exceeded and positive Uniform Temperature Reactivity Coefficients (UTCs) were obtained. In the present study fuel cycles containing mixtures of thorium and plutonium achieved negative maximum UTCs. Plutonium only fuel cycles also achieved negative maximum UTCs, provided that much higher mass loadings are used. It is proposed that the lower thermal neutron flux was responsible for this effect. The plutonium only fuel cycle with 12 g Pu(PWR)/fuel sphere also achieved the adopted safety limits for the PBMR DPP-400 in that the maximum fuel temperature and the maximum power density did not exceed 1130°C or 4.5 kW/sphere respectively. This design would thus be licensable and could potentially be economically feasible. However the burn-up was much lower at 181 MWd/kgHM and thus the plutonium destruction fraction was also much lower at 24.5%, which may be sub-optimal with respect to proliferation and waste disposal objectives and therefore further optimisation studies are proposed. (author)

  17. Ion composition and temperature in the topside ionosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brace, L. H.; Dunham, G. S.; Mayr, H. G.

    1967-01-01

    Particle and energy continuity equations derived and solved by computer method ion composition and plasma temperature measured by Explorer XXII PARTICLE and energy continuity equations derived and solved by computer method for ion composition and plasma temperature measured by Explorer XXII

  18. Surface temperature measurement using infrared radiometer. 1st Report. ; Radiosity coefficient and radiation temperature. Sekigaisen eizo sochi wo riyoshita jitsuyoteki ondo keisoku ni kansuru kenkyu. 1. ; Shado keisu to hosha ondo no kankei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Y; Inagaki, T; Sekiya, M [Ibaraki University, Ibaraki (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1993-12-25

    As a part of the studies on practical surface temperature measurement by infrared radiometer, some basic characteristics of an infrared radiometer were studied by using three kinds of sensors with different detectable wave lengths. Specimens allowable for gray body approximation such as mortar, graphite and carbon fiber composite material were tested at a practical ambient temperature of 293 K. As a result, the difference between a radiation temperature in consideration of reflection and that derived from an emissivity increased with a decrease in emissivity, and the deviation of an emissivity derived from a radiosity coefficient increased at 20 K or less in difference between a specimen surface temperature and ambient one. Each radiosity coefficient measured by each sensor also fairly agreed with each other. The deviation of a radiosity coefficient was relatively small indicating a good agreement between theoretical and experimental data, while the difference between emissivity and radiosity coefficient deviations decreased with an increase in specimen surface temperature. 3 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Adjustment of activity coefficients as a function of changes in temperature, using the SIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giffaut, E.; Vitorge, P.; Capdevila, H.

    1993-11-01

    The aim of this work is to propose and to check approximations to calculate from only a few experimental measurements, ionic strength, I, and temperature, T, influences on Gibbs energy, G, redox formal potential, E, and standard equilibrium constant, K. Series expansions versus T are first used: S and Cp/2T a are typically the -G first and second order terms. In the same way, -ΔH and T 2 ΔCp/2 are the first and second order terms of R in K expansions versus 1/T. This type of approximation is discussed for the E of the M 4+ /M 3+ , MO 2 2+ /MO 2 + and MO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- /MO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 5- couples (M = U or Pu) measured from 5 to 70 deg C, for the standard ΔG of some solid U compounds, calculated from 17 to 117 deg C, and for ΔCp, ΔG and Ig K of the CO 2 (aq)/HCO 3 - equilibrium from 0 to 150 deg C. Excess functions, X ex , are then calculated from activity coefficients, γ: enthalpy, H, or heat capacity, Cp, adjustment as a function of I changes is needed only when the γ adjustment as a function of T changes is needed. The SIT coefficient, ε, variations with T, are small and roughly linear for the above redox equilibria and for chloride electrolytes mean γ: first order expansion seems enough to deduce ε, and then the excess functions G ex , S ex and H ex , in this T range; but second order expansion is more consistent to estimate Cp ex . (authors). 25 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig

  20. Temperature evolution in silver nanoparticle doped PETN composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameswari, D. P. S. L.; Kiran, P. Prem

    2018-04-01

    Optical absorption and the associated spatio-temporal evolution of temperature silver nanoparticles doped energetic material composite is presented. Silver nanoparticles of radii 10 - 150 nm are doped in Penta Erythrtol Tetra Nitrate (PETN), a secondary energetic material to form the composite materials. Of all the composites the ones doped with 35 nm sized nanoparticles have shown maximum absorption at excitation wavelength of 532 nm. The spatio-temporal evolution of temperature within these composites up on excitation with ns laser pulses of energy density 0.5 J/cm2 is studied. The role of particle sizes on the temperature of composites is studied and a maximum temperature of 2200 K at the nanoparticle interface is observed for 35 nm doped PETN composite.

  1. Piezoelectric Flexible LCP-PZT Composites for Sensor Applications at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolvanen, Jarkko; Hannu, Jari; Juuti, Jari; Jantunen, Heli

    2018-03-01

    In this paper fabrication of piezoelectric ceramic-polymer composites is demonstrated via filament extrusion enabling cost-efficient large-scale production of highly bendable pressure sensors feasible for elevated temperatures. These composites are fabricated by utilizing environmentally resistant and stable liquid crystal polymer matrix with addition of lead zirconate titanate at loading levels of 30 vol%. These composites, of approximately 0.99 mm thick and length of > 50 cm, achieved excellent bendability with minimum bending radius of 6.6 cm. The maximum piezoelectric coefficients d33 and g33 of the composites were > 14 pC/N and > 108 mVm/N at pressure < 10 kPa. In all cases, the piezoelectric charge coefficient (d33) of the composites decreased as a function of pressure. Also, piezoelectric coefficient (d33) further decreased in the case of increased frequency press-release cycle sand pre-stress levels by approximately 37-50%. However, the obtained results provide tools for fabricating novel piezoelectric sensors in highly efficient way for environments with elevated temperatures.

  2. Characteristics of radiation temperature and radiosity coefficient by means of infrared radiometer. Sekigai hoshakei ni yoru zairyo hyomen no hosha tokusei ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Y; Kaminaga, F [Ibaraki University, Ibaraki (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Ishii, T; Sato, K [Ibaraki University, Ibaraki (Japan); Kurokawa, T [NEC San-ei Instrumentsu Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1991-12-25

    A radiation thermometer was applied to the measurement and analysis of radiation temperature of the material surface. In this paper, the characteristics of the radiation temperature and the radiosity coefficient of gray body materials are investigatied. An infrared radiometer was used, which detects radiation energy in the region between 8 and 13{mu}m of wavelength. This infared radiometer has a Hg-Cd-Te photon radiation sensor. The variation of emissivity was measured for the four kinds of non-metalic materials, i.e., graphite, carbon fiber composite, Si-SiC ceramic, and black paint spread on an aluminum plate. As a result, the relationship between material temperature and radiation energy was made clear. Furthermore, the space-dependent variation of the radiation temperature and the radiosity coefficient was derived from the two-dimensional CRT image of the infrared radiometer. Consequently, the emmisivity variation gave a maximum for the carbon fiber composite surface rich in irregularity, and decreased in the order of graphite, Si-SiC, and black paint. 7 refs., 15 figs.

  3. Positron annihilation lifetime study of positive temperature coefficient BaTiO3 samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling Chen; Mingkang Teng; Guanghou Wang; Xiaoyun Li; Tianchang Lu

    1989-01-01

    In order to investigate the doped vacancies in BaTiO 3 samples as well as their influence on the positive temperature coefficient (PTC) the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was applied. Two groups of BaTiO 3 samples with BaO excess were prepared by doping different concentrations of La 2 O 3 and Nb 2 O 5 , respectively in the range from 0.1 to 3 at%. A third group of samples of two Sb-doped PTC BaTiO 3 semiconductors with excess BaO or TiO 2 were studied by the aid of positron technique before and after being reduced. It is shown that the positron lifetime parameters are sensitive to changes in the vacancy concentration in BaTiO 3 ceramics near the 0.1 mol% region. But they are almost unchanged during reduction processing; the resistivity of samples changed by one to two orders of magnitude through the reduction. It can be concluded that the PTC effect is due to oxygen on the grain boundary rather than vacancies, and that the Heywang-Jonker model is more reasonable

  4. Rational design and synthesis of an orally bioavailable peptide guided by NMR amide temperature coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Conan K.; Northfield, Susan E.; Colless, Barbara; Chaousis, Stephanie; Hamernig, Ingrid; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Nielsen, Daniel S.; Schroeder, Christina I.; Liras, Spiros; Price, David A.; Fairlie, David P.; Craik, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing the oral bioavailability of peptide drug leads is a major challenge in drug design. As such, methods to address this challenge are highly sought after by the pharmaceutical industry. Here, we propose a strategy to identify appropriate amides for N-methylation using temperature coefficients measured by NMR to identify exposed amides in cyclic peptides. N-methylation effectively caps these amides, modifying the overall solvation properties of the peptides and making them more membrane permeable. The approach for identifying sites for N-methylation is a rapid alternative to the elucidation of 3D structures of peptide drug leads, which has been a commonly used structure-guided approach in the past. Five leucine-rich peptide scaffolds are reported with selectively designed N-methylated derivatives. In vitro membrane permeability was assessed by parallel artificial membrane permeability assay and Caco-2 assay. The most promising N-methylated peptide was then tested in vivo. Here we report a novel peptide (15), which displayed an oral bioavailability of 33% in a rat model, thus validating the design approach. We show that this approach can also be used to explain the notable increase in oral bioavailability of a somatostatin analog. PMID:25416591

  5. On the use temperature parameterized rate coefficients in the estimation of non-equilibrium reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizgal, Bernie D.; Chikhaoui, Aziz

    2006-06-01

    The present paper considers a detailed analysis of the nonequilibrium effects for a model reactive system with the Chapman-Eskog (CE) solution of the Boltzmann equation as well as an explicit time dependent solution. The elastic cross sections employed are a hard sphere cross section and the Maxwell molecule cross section. Reactive cross sections which model reactions with and without activation energy are used. A detailed comparison is carried out with these solutions of the Boltzmann equation and the approximation introduced by Cukrowski and coworkers [J. Chem. Phys. 97 (1992) 9086; Chem. Phys. 89 (1992) 159; Physica A 188 (1992) 344; Chem. Phys. Lett. A 297 (1998) 402; Physica A 275 (2000) 134; Chem. Phys. Lett. 341 (2001) 585; Acta Phys. Polonica B 334 (2003) 3607.] based on the temperature of the reactive particles. We show that the Cukrowski approximation has limited applicability for the large class of reactive systems studied in this paper. The explicit time dependent solutions of the Boltzmann equation demonstrate that the CE approach is valid only for very slow reactions for which the corrections to the equilibrium rate coefficient are very small.

  6. Modelling of composition and stress profiles in low temperature surface engineered stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    temperature, time and gas composition is a prerequisite for targeted process optimization. A realistic model to simulate the developing case has to take the following influences on composition and stress into account: - a concentration dependent diffusion coefficient - trapping of nitrogen by chromium atoms...... stresses are introduced in the developing case, arising from the volume expansion that accompanies the dissolution of high interstitial contents in expanded austenite. Modelling of the composition and stress profiles developing during low temperature surface engineering from the processing parameters...... - the effect of residual stress on diffusive flux - the effect of residual stress on solubility of interstitials - plastic accommodation of residual stress. The effect of all these contributions on composition and stress profiles will be addressed....

  7. Correlation between Mechanical Properties with Specific Wear Rate and the Coefficient of Friction of Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Alajmi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between the mechanical properties of Fillers/Epoxy composites and their tribological behavior was investigated. Tensile, hardness, wear, and friction tests were conducted for Neat Epoxy (NE, Graphite/Epoxy composites (GE, and Data Palm Fiber/Epoxy with or without Graphite composites (GFE and FE. The correlation was made between the tensile strength, the modulus of elasticity, elongation at the break, and the hardness, as an individual or a combined factor, with the specific wear rate (SWR and coefficient of friction (COF of composites. In general, graphite as an additive to polymeric composite has had an eclectic effect on mechanical properties, whereas it has led to a positive effect on tribological properties, whilst date palm fibers (DPFs, as reinforcement for polymeric composite, promoted a mechanical performance with a slight improvement to the tribological performance. Statistically, this study reveals that there is no strong confirmation of any marked correlation between the mechanical and the specific wear rate of filler/Epoxy composites. There is, however, a remarkable correlation between the mechanical properties and the friction coefficient of filler/Epoxy composites.

  8. Correlation between Mechanical Properties with Specific Wear Rate and the Coefficient of Friction of Graphite/Epoxy Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alajmi, Mahdi; Shalwan, Abdullah

    2015-07-08

    The correlation between the mechanical properties of Fillers/Epoxy composites and their tribological behavior was investigated. Tensile, hardness, wear, and friction tests were conducted for Neat Epoxy (NE), Graphite/Epoxy composites (GE), and Data Palm Fiber/Epoxy with or without Graphite composites (GFE and FE). The correlation was made between the tensile strength, the modulus of elasticity, elongation at the break, and the hardness, as an individual or a combined factor, with the specific wear rate (SWR) and coefficient of friction (COF) of composites. In general, graphite as an additive to polymeric composite has had an eclectic effect on mechanical properties, whereas it has led to a positive effect on tribological properties, whilst date palm fibers (DPFs), as reinforcement for polymeric composite, promoted a mechanical performance with a slight improvement to the tribological performance. Statistically, this study reveals that there is no strong confirmation of any marked correlation between the mechanical and the specific wear rate of filler/Epoxy composites. There is, however, a remarkable correlation between the mechanical properties and the friction coefficient of filler/Epoxy composites.

  9. Measurement of the high-temperature Seebeck coefficient of thin films by means of an epitaxially regrown thermometric reference material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramu, Ashok T; Mages, Phillip; Zhang, Chong; Imamura, Jeffrey T; Bowers, John E

    2012-09-01

    The Seebeck coefficient of a typical thermoelectric material, silicon-doped InGaAs lattice-matched to InP, is measured over a temperature range from 300 K to 550 K. By depositing and patterning a thermometric reference bar of silicon-doped InP adjacent to a bar of the material under test, temperature differences are measured directly. This is in contrast to conventional two-thermocouple techniques that subtract two large temperatures to yield a small temperature difference, a procedure prone to errors. The proposed technique retains the simple instrumentation of two-thermocouple techniques while eliminating the critical dependence of the latter on good thermal contact. The repeatability of the proposed technique is demonstrated to be ±2.6% over three temperature sweeps, while the repeatability of two-thermocouple measurements is about ±5%. The improved repeatability is significant for reliable reporting of the ZT figure of merit, which is proportional to the square of the Seebeck coefficient. The accuracy of the proposed technique depends on the accuracy with which the high-temperature Seebeck coefficient of the reference material may be computed or measured. In this work, the Seebeck coefficient of the reference material, n+ InP, is computed by rigorous solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed technique can be systematically improved by scaling, and the method is easily extensible to other material systems currently being investigated for high thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency.

  10. Determination of temperature dependence of piezoelectric coefficients matrix of lead zirconate titanate ceramics by quasi-static and resonance method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Fei; Xu Zhuo; Wei Xiaoyong; Yao Xi, E-mail: lifei1216@gmail.co [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2009-05-07

    The piezoelectric coefficients (d{sub 33}, -d{sub 31}, d{sub 15}, g{sub 33}, -g{sub 31}, g{sub 15}) of soft and hard lead zirconate titanate ceramics were measured by the quasi-static and resonance methods, at temperatures from 20 to 300 {sup 0}C. The results showed that the piezoelectric coefficients d{sub 33}, -d{sub 31} and d{sub 15} obtained by these two methods increased with increasing temperature for both hard and soft PZT ceramics, while the piezoelectric coefficients g{sub 33}, -g{sub 31} and g{sub 15} decreased with increasing temperature for both hard and soft PZT ceramics. In this paper, the observed results were also discussed in terms of intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to piezoelectric response.

  11. Analysis of the reactivity coefficients of the advanced high-temperature reactor for plutonium and uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakova, Jitka; Talamo, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The conceptual design of the advanced high-temperature reactor (AHTR) has recently been proposed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the intention to provide and alternative energy source for very high temperature applications. In the present study, we focused on the analyses of the reactivity coefficients of the AHTR core fueled with two types of fuel: enriched uranium and plutonium from the reprocessing of light water reactors irradiated fuel. More precisely, we investigated the influence of the outer graphite reflectors on the multiplication factor of the core, the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients and the void reactivity coefficient for five different molten salts: NaF, BeF 2 , LiF, ZrF 4 and Li 2 BeF 4 eutectic. In order to better illustrate the behavior of the previous parameters for different core configurations, we evaluated the moderating ratio of the molten salts and the absorption rate of the key fuel nuclides, which, of course, are driven by the neutron spectrum. The results show that the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients are always negative, whereas the void reactivity coefficient can be set negative provided that the fuel to moderator ratio is optimized (the core is undermoderated) and the moderating ratio of the coolant is large

  12. Analysis of the reactivity coefficients of the advanced high-temperature reactor for plutonium and uranium fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakova, Jitka [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691, Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: jitka.zakova@neutron.kth.se; Talamo, Alberto [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, ANL, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: alby@anl.gov

    2008-05-15

    The conceptual design of the advanced high-temperature reactor (AHTR) has recently been proposed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the intention to provide and alternative energy source for very high temperature applications. In the present study, we focused on the analyses of the reactivity coefficients of the AHTR core fueled with two types of fuel: enriched uranium and plutonium from the reprocessing of light water reactors irradiated fuel. More precisely, we investigated the influence of the outer graphite reflectors on the multiplication factor of the core, the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients and the void reactivity coefficient for five different molten salts: NaF, BeF{sub 2}, LiF, ZrF{sub 4} and Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} eutectic. In order to better illustrate the behavior of the previous parameters for different core configurations, we evaluated the moderating ratio of the molten salts and the absorption rate of the key fuel nuclides, which, of course, are driven by the neutron spectrum. The results show that the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients are always negative, whereas the void reactivity coefficient can be set negative provided that the fuel to moderator ratio is optimized (the core is undermoderated) and the moderating ratio of the coolant is large.

  13. Creep-Fatigue Life Design with Various Stress and Temperature Conditions on the Basis of Lethargy Coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung Eun; Yang, Sung Mo; Han, Jae Hee; Yu, Hyo Sun

    2011-01-01

    High temperature and stress are encounted in power plants and vehicle engines. Therefore, determination of the creep-fatigue life of a material is necessary prior to fabricating equipment. In this study, life design was determined on the basis of the lethargy coefficient for different temperatures, stress and rupture times. SP-Creep test data was compared with computed data. The SP-Creep test was performed to obtain the rupture time for X20CrMoV121 steel. The integration life equation was considered for three cases with various load, temperature and load-temperature. First, the lethargy coefficient was calculated by using the obtained rupture stress and the rupture time that were determined by carrying out the SP-Creep test. Next, life was predicted on the basis of the temperature condition. Finally, it was observed that life decreases considerably due to the coupling effect that results when fatigue and creep occur simultaneously

  14. Temperature dependent electron transport and rate coefficient studies for e-beam-sustained diffuse gas discharge switching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.G.; Hunter, S.R.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the electron drift velocity, w, attachment coefficient, eta/N/sub a/, and ionization coefficient, α/N, have been made in C 2 F 6 /Ar and C 2 F 6 /CH 4 gas mixtures at gas temperatures, T, of 300 and 500 0 K over the concentration range of 0.1 to 100% of the C 2 F 6 . These measurements are useful for modeling the expected behavior of repetitively operated electron-beam sustained diffuse gas discharge opening switches where gas temperatures within the switch are anticipated to rise several hundred degrees during switch operation

  15. Ceramic/Metal Composites with Positive Temperature Dependence of Thermal Conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianhui; Yu Qi; Sun Wei; Zhang Rui; Wang Ke; Li Jingfeng; Ichigozaki, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    Most materials show decreasing thermal conductivity with increasing temperature, but an opposite temperature dependence of thermal conductivity is required for some industrial applications. The present work was conducted with a motivation to develop composite materials with a positive temperature dependence of thermal conductivity. ZrO 2 / stainless steel powders (304L) composite, with 3% stearic acid, was prepared by normal sintering under the protecting of Ar after mixing by mechanical ball milling technique. With the 304L content increasing from 10% to 20%, the thermal conductivity values increased. For all samples, the thermal conductivity in the temperature range of room temperature to 700 °C decreased with temperature below 300 °C, and then began to increase. The increasing thermal conductivity of the composites (within the high temperature range was attributed to the difference of the thermal conductivity and thermal expansion coefficient between ZrO 2 ceramic and 304L stainless steel powders. Two simple models were also used to estimate the thermal conductivity of the composites, which were in good agreement with the experiment results.

  16. Measurement and Evaluation of Thermal Expansion Coefficients of Micrometer - Sized SiO{sub 2} Particle - Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Hyu Sang; Kang, Hee Yong; Lee, Gyo Woo [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    In this experimental study, the thermal stability values of micrometer-sized silica particle-reinforced epoxy composite specimens were evaluated by measuring their thermal expansion coefficients and Young's moduli. For all specimens used in this study (from the baseline specimen to that containing 70 wt% silica filler), the thermal expansion coefficients and Young's moduli were gradually reduced down to 25% and increased up to 51%, respectively. The results of the experiment were compared with those of certain empirical models. The experimental results of the measurement of thermal expansion coefficients corresponded well with those of Kerner's model, which considers the bulk and shear moduli of the matrix and silica filler. However, the results of the measurement of Young's moduli using the empirical Mori-Tanaka model were observed to match better with those of the experiment. The comparison of the results of the experiment with those of the empirical models demonstrated that a reliable model for measuring the thermal expansion coefficients and Young's moduli of composite specimens needs to consider certain property variations in the composites in addition to volume fraction changes in the filler and matrix.

  17. Measurement and Evaluation of Thermal Expansion Coefficients of Micrometer - Sized SiO2 Particle - Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Hyu Sang; Kang, Hee Yong; Lee, Gyo Woo

    2015-01-01

    In this experimental study, the thermal stability values of micrometer-sized silica particle-reinforced epoxy composite specimens were evaluated by measuring their thermal expansion coefficients and Young's moduli. For all specimens used in this study (from the baseline specimen to that containing 70 wt% silica filler), the thermal expansion coefficients and Young's moduli were gradually reduced down to 25% and increased up to 51%, respectively. The results of the experiment were compared with those of certain empirical models. The experimental results of the measurement of thermal expansion coefficients corresponded well with those of Kerner's model, which considers the bulk and shear moduli of the matrix and silica filler. However, the results of the measurement of Young's moduli using the empirical Mori-Tanaka model were observed to match better with those of the experiment. The comparison of the results of the experiment with those of the empirical models demonstrated that a reliable model for measuring the thermal expansion coefficients and Young's moduli of composite specimens needs to consider certain property variations in the composites in addition to volume fraction changes in the filler and matrix

  18. Double Bag VARTM for High Temperature Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cost and size are limiting factors in efforts to produce high strength, high stiffness, and high temperature composite parts. To address these issues, new processes...

  19. VARTM Processing of High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Criss, Jr, Jim M

    2008-01-01

    The overall technical objective of the Phase 1 effort was to extend and advance the state the-art in high temperature composite fabrication techniques by developing a High Tempera Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM...

  20. Non-linear dynamo waves in an incompressible medium when the turbulence dissipative coefficients depend on temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Pataraya

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-linear α-ω; dynamo waves existing in an incompressible medium with the turbulence dissipative coefficients depending on temperature are studied in this paper. We investigate of α-ω solar non-linear dynamo waves when only the first harmonics of magnetic induction components are included. If we ignore the second harmonics in the non-linear equation, the turbulent magnetic diffusion coefficient increases together with the temperature, the coefficient of turbulent viscosity decreases, and for an interval of time the value of dynamo number is greater than 1. In these conditions a stationary solution of the non-linear equation for the dynamo wave's amplitude exists; meaning that the magnetic field is sufficiently excited. The amplitude of the dynamo waves oscillates and becomes stationary. Using these results we can explain the existence of Maunder's minimum.

  1. Determination of Scattering and Absorption Coefficients for Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Markham, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the scattering and absorption coefficients for a set of freestanding plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was determined at temperatures up to 1360 C in a wavelength range from 1.2 micrometers up to the 8YSZ absorption edge. The scattering and absorption coefficients were determined by fitting the directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance values calculated by a four-flux Kubelka Munk method to the experimentally measured hemispherical-directional reflectance and transmittance values obtained for five 8YSZ thicknesses. The scattering coefficient exhibited a continuous decrease with increasing wavelength and showed no significant temperature dependence. The scattering is primarily attributed to the relatively temperature-insensitive refractive index mismatch between the 8YSZ and its internal voids. The absorption coefficient was very low (less than 1 per centimeter) at wavelengths between 2 micrometers and the absorption edge and showed a definite temperature dependence that consisted of a shift of the absorption edge to shorter wavelengths and an increase in the weak absorption below the absorption edge with increasing temperature. The shift in the absorption edge with temperature is attributed to strongly temperature-dependent multiphonon absorption. While TBC hemispherical transmittance beyond the absorption edge can be predicted by a simple exponential decrease with thickness, below the absorption edge, typical TBC thicknesses are well below the thickness range where a simple exponential decrease in hemispherical transmittance with TBC thickness is expected. [Correction added after online publication August 11, 2009: "edge to a shorter wavelengths" has been updated as edge to shorter wavelengths."

  2. Flow boiling heat transfer coefficients at cryogenic temperatures for multi-component refrigerant mixtures of nitrogen-hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    The recuperative heat exchanger governs the overall performance of the mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler. In these heat exchangers, the non-azeotropic refrigerant mixture of nitrogen-hydrocarbons undergoes boiling and condensation simultaneously at cryogenic temperature. Hence, the design of such heat exchanger is crucial. However, due to lack of empirical correlations to predict two-phase heat transfer coefficients of multi-component mixtures at low temperature, the design of such heat exchanger is difficult.

  3. Bivariate functional data clustering: grouping streams based on a varying coefficient model of the stream water and air temperature relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Li; X. Deng; Andy Dolloff; E. P. Smith

    2015-01-01

    A novel clustering method for bivariate functional data is proposed to group streams based on their water–air temperature relationship. A distance measure is developed for bivariate curves by using a time-varying coefficient model and a weighting scheme. This distance is also adjusted by spatial correlation of streams via the variogram. Therefore, the proposed...

  4. Temperature induced changes in the heterocyst glycolipid composition of N

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauersachs, T.; Stal, L.J.; Grego, M.; Schwark, L.; Schwark, L.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of temperature on the heterocyst glycolipid (HG) composition of the diazotrophic heterocystous cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. strain CCY9613 and Nostoc sp. strain CCY9926 grown at 9, 12, 16, 20 and 24 degrees C. Both strains contained an overall similar composition of

  5. Doppler Temperature Coefficient Calculations Using Adjoint-Weighted Tallies and Continuous Energy Cross Sections in MCNP6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Matthew Alejandro

    The calculation of the thermal neutron Doppler temperature reactivity feedback co-efficient, a key parameter in the design and safe operation of advanced reactors, using first order perturbation theory in continuous energy Monte Carlo codes is challenging as the continuous energy adjoint flux is not readily available. Traditional approaches of obtaining the adjoint flux attempt to invert the random walk process as well as require data corresponding to all temperatures and their respective temperature derivatives within the system in order to accurately calculate the Doppler temperature feedback. A new method has been developed using adjoint-weighted tallies and On-The-Fly (OTF) generated continuous energy cross sections within the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP6) transport code. The adjoint-weighted tallies are generated during the continuous energy k-eigenvalue Monte Carlo calculation. The weighting is based upon the iterated fission probability interpretation of the adjoint flux, which is the steady state population in a critical nuclear reactor caused by a neutron introduced at that point in phase space. The adjoint-weighted tallies are produced in a forward calculation and do not require an inversion of the random walk. The OTF cross section database uses a high order functional expansion between points on a user-defined energy-temperature mesh in which the coefficients with respect to a polynomial fitting in temperature are stored. The coefficients of the fits are generated before run- time and called upon during the simulation to produce cross sections at any given energy and temperature. The polynomial form of the OTF cross sections allows the possibility of obtaining temperature derivatives of the cross sections on-the-fly. The use of Monte Carlo sampling of adjoint-weighted tallies and the capability of computing derivatives of continuous energy cross sections with respect to temperature are used to calculate the Doppler temperature coefficient in a research

  6. Temperature dependent thermoelectric property of reduced graphene oxide-polyaniline composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, Mousumi, E-mail: mousumimitrabesu@gmail.com; Banerjee, Dipali, E-mail: dipalibanerjeebesu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology (IIEST), Howrah-711103 (India); Kargupta, Kajari, E-mail: karguptakajari2010@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata (India); Ganguly, Saibal, E-mail: gangulysaibal2011@gmail.com [Chemical Engineering department, Universiti Teknologi Petronas, Perak, Tronoh (Malaysia)

    2016-05-06

    A composite material of reduced graphene oxide (rG) nanosheets with polyaniline (PANI) protonated by 5-sulfosalicylic acid has been synthesized via in situ oxidative polymerization method. The morphological and spectral characterizations have been done using FESEM and XRD measurements. The thermoelectric (TE) properties of the reduced graphene oxide-polyaniline composite (rG-P) has been studied in the temperature range from 300-400 K. The electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient of rG-P is higher than the of pure PANI, while the thermal conductivity of the composite still keeps much low value ensuing an increase in the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) in the whole temperature range.

  7. Low temperature hall effect investigation of conducting polymer-carbon nanotubes composite network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Afarin; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Yunus, Wan Mahmood Mat; Behzad, Kasra; M Abdi, Mahnaz; Din, Fasih Ud

    2012-11-14

    Polypyrrole (PPy) and polypyrrole-carboxylic functionalized multi wall carbon nanotube composites (PPy/f-MWCNT) were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The structure of the resulting complex nanotubes was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of f-MWCNT concentration on the electrical properties of the resulting composites were studied at temperatures between 100 K and 300 K. The Hall mobility and Hall coefficient of PPy and PPy/f-MWCNT composite samples with different concentrations of f-MWCNT were measured using the van der Pauw technique. The mobility decreased slightly with increasing temperature, while the conductivity was dominated by the gradually increasing carrier density.

  8. [Correlation of molecular weight and nanofiltration mass transfer coefficient of phenolic acid composition from Salvia miltiorrhiza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cun-Yu; Wu, Xin; Gu, Jia-Mei; Li, Hong-Yang; Peng, Guo-Ping

    2018-04-01

    Based on the molecular sieving and solution-diffusion effect in nanofiltration separation, the correlation between initial concentration and mass transfer coefficient of three typical phenolic acids from Salvia miltiorrhiza was fitted to analyze the relationship among mass transfer coefficient, molecular weight and concentration. The experiment showed a linear relationship between operation pressure and membrane flux. Meanwhile, the membrane flux was gradually decayed with the increase of solute concentration. On the basis of the molecular sieving and solution-diffusion effect, the mass transfer coefficient and initial concentration of three phenolic acids showed a power function relationship, and the regression coefficients were all greater than 0.9. The mass transfer coefficient and molecular weight of three phenolic acids were negatively correlated with each other, and the order from high to low is protocatechualdehyde >rosmarinic acid> salvianolic acid B. The separation mechanism of nanofiltration for phenolic acids was further clarified through the analysis of the correlation of molecular weight and nanofiltration mass transfer coefficient. The findings provide references for nanofiltration separation, especially for traditional Chinese medicine with phenolic acids. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  9. Effect of drying temperatures on the proximate composition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results of the proximate composition showed that the nutritional qualities of the dried eggs were retained during drying thus the drying temperature did not affect the quality of eggs. The moisture contents of the dried whole egg, dried egg yolk and dried egg white at the different temperatures range from 6.25 -7.23%, ...

  10. Key physical parameters and temperature reactivity coefficients of the deep burn modular helium reactor fueled with LWRs waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto E-mail: alby@neutron.kth.se; Gudowski, Waclaw E-mail: wacek@neutron.kth.se; Cetnar, Jerzy E-mail: jerzy@neutron.kth.se; Venneri, Francesco E-mail: venneri@lanl.gov

    2004-11-01

    We investigated some important neutronic features of the deep burn modular helium reactor (DB-MHR) using the MCNP/MCB codes. Our attention was focused on the neutron flux and its spectrum, capture to fission ratio of {sup 239}Pu and the temperature coefficient of fuel and moderator. The DB-MHR is a graphite-moderated helium-cooled reactor proposed by General Atomic to address the need for a fast and efficient incineration of plutonium for non-proliferation purposes as well as the management of light water reactors (LWRs) waste. In fact, recent studies have shown that the use of the DB-MHR coupled to ordinary LWRs would keep constant the world inventory of plutonium for a reactor fleet producing 400 TW{sub e}/y. In the present studies, the DB-MHR is loaded with Np-Pu driver fuel (DF) with an isotopic composition corresponding to LWRs spent fuel waste. DF uses fissile isotopes (e.g. {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu), previously generated in the LWRs, and maintains criticality conditions in the DB-MHR. After an irradiation of three years, the spent DF is reprocessed and its remaining actinides are manufactured into fresh transmutation fuel (TF). TF mainly contains non-fissile actinides which undergo neutron capture and transmutation during the subsequent three-year irradiation in the DB-MHR. At the same time, TF provides control and negative reactivity feedback to the reactor. After extraction of the spent TF, irradiated for three years, over 94% of {sup 239}Pu and 53% of all actinides coming from LWRs waste will have been destroyed in the DB-MHR. In this paper we look at the operation conditions at equilibrium for the DB-MHR and evaluate fluxes and reactivity responses using state of the art 3-D Monte Carlo simulations.

  11. Modelling of a multi-temperature plasma composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liani, B.; Benallal, R.; Bentalha, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of plasma composition is very important for various plasma applications and prediction of plasma properties. The authors use the Saha equation and Debye length equation to calculate the non-local thermodynamic-equilibrium plasma composition. It has been shown that the model to 2T with T representing the temperature (electron temperature and heavy-particle temperature) described by Chen and Han [J. Phys. D 32(1999)1711] can be applied for a mixture of gases, where each atomic species has its own temperature, but the model to 4T is more general because it can be applicable to temperatures distant enough of the heavy particles. This can occur in a plasma composed of big- or macro-molecules. The electron temperature T e varies in the range 8000∼20000 K at atmospheric pressure. (authors)

  12. H2 line-mixing coefficients in the ν2 and ν4 bands of PH3 at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, Jamel; Blanquet, Ghislain; Lepère, Muriel; Aroui, Hassen

    2016-01-01

    Using a tunable diode-laser spectrometer adapted with a low temperature cell, we have measured the H 2 line-mixing coefficients for 21 lines in the Q R branch of the ν 2 band and in the P P and R P branches of the ν 4 band of phosphine (PH 3 ) at low temperature. These coefficients were determined using a multi-pressure fitting procedure that accounts for the apparatus function, the Doppler and the collisional effects. These lines with J values ranging from 2 to 11 and K from 0 to 9 are located in the spectral range from 1016 to 1093 cm −1 . The variations of these parameters with the temperature, and the ro-vibrational quantum numbers are discussed. - Graphical abstract: Comparisons of the determined line-mixing coefficients (in atm −1 ) obtained in this study in the ν 2 and ν 4 bands of PH 3 at T=173.2 K with those measured at T=298 K for different values of the J quantum number. - Highlights: • The spectra have been recorded with a tunable diode-laser spectrometer at 173.2 K. • The line-mixing coefficients are determined by a multi-pressure fitting procedure. • The effect of the line-mixing in the spectra, appear to be important.

  13. Shear piezoelectric coefficients of PZT, LiNbO3 and PMN-PT at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukhari, Syed; Islam, Md; Haziot, Ariel; Beamish, John

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric transducers are used to detect stress and to generate nanometer scale displacements but their piezoelectric coefficients decrease with temperature, limiting their performance in cryogenic applications. We have developed a capacitive technique and directly measured the temperature dependence of the shear coefficient d 15 for ceramic lead zirconium titanate (PZT), 41° X-cut lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) and single crystal lead magnesium niobium-lead titanate (PMN-PT). In PZT, d 15 decreases nearly linearly with temperature, dropping by factor of about 4 by 1.3 K. LiNbO3 has the smallest room temperature d15, but its value decreased by only 6% at the lowest temperatures. PMN-PT had the largest value of d15 at room temperature (2.9 × 10 −9 m/V, about 45 times larger than for LiNbO 3 ) but it decreased rapidly below 75 K; at 1.3 K, d 15 was only about 8% of its room temperature value

  14. Diffusion barrier coatings for high temperature corrosion resistance of advanced carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh Raman, K.S.

    2000-01-01

    Carbon possesses an excellent combination of mechanical and thermal properties, viz., excellent creep resistance at temperatures up to 2400 deg C in non-oxidizing environment and a low thermal expansion coefficient. These properties make carbon a potential material for very high temperature applications. However, the use of carbon materials at high temperatures is considerably restricted due to their extremely poor oxidation resistance at temperatures above 400 deg C. The obvious choice for improving high temperature oxidation resistance of such materials is a suitable diffusion barrier coating. This paper presents an overview of recent developments in advanced diffusion- and thermal-barrier coatings for ceramic composites, with particular reference to C/C composites. The paper discusses the development of multiphase and multi-component ceramic coatings, and recent investigations on the oxidation resistance of the coated C/C composites. The paper also discusses the cases of innovative engineering solutions for traditional problems with the ceramic coatings, and the scope of intelligent processing in developing coatings for the C/C composites. Copyright (2000) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  15. Temperature coefficient of elastic constants of SiO2 over-layer on LiNbO3 for a temperature stable SAW device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay; Sreenivas, K

    2003-01-01

    The influence of sputtered SiO 2 over-layer on the SAW propagation characteristics of a 128 deg. rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate SAW filter has been studied. Experimentally measured SAW phase velocity and temperature coefficient of delay (TCD), with varying SiO 2 over-layer thickness, show a significant deviation from the theoretically calculated values using the bulk material parameters of SiO 2 . The observed deviation is attributed to the differences in the material parameters (density, elastic and dielectric constants and their temperature coefficient) of the deposited SiO 2 over-layer. The density and the dielectric constant of the deposited SiO 2 layer were determined separately, and the elastic constants and their temperature coefficients were estimated by fitting the experimental velocity and TCD data, respectively. The deviation in the dielectric constant and the density in comparison to the bulk was insignificant, and the estimated values of the elastic constants (C 11 = 0.75x10 11 N m -2 and C 44 0.225x10 11 N m -2 ) were found to be lower, and the respective temperature coefficients (5.0x10 -4 deg C -1 and 2.0x10 -4 deg C -1 ) were high in comparison to the bulk material parameters

  16. Temperature coefficient of elastic constants of SiO{sub 2} over-layer on LiNbO{sub 3} for a temperature stable SAW device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay; Sreenivas, K [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2003-08-07

    The influence of sputtered SiO{sub 2} over-layer on the SAW propagation characteristics of a 128 deg. rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate SAW filter has been studied. Experimentally measured SAW phase velocity and temperature coefficient of delay (TCD), with varying SiO{sub 2} over-layer thickness, show a significant deviation from the theoretically calculated values using the bulk material parameters of SiO{sub 2}. The observed deviation is attributed to the differences in the material parameters (density, elastic and dielectric constants and their temperature coefficient) of the deposited SiO{sub 2} over-layer. The density and the dielectric constant of the deposited SiO{sub 2} layer were determined separately, and the elastic constants and their temperature coefficients were estimated by fitting the experimental velocity and TCD data, respectively. The deviation in the dielectric constant and the density in comparison to the bulk was insignificant, and the estimated values of the elastic constants (C{sub 11} = 0.75x10{sup 11} N m{sup -2} and C{sub 44} 0.225x10{sup 11} N m{sup -2}) were found to be lower, and the respective temperature coefficients (5.0x10{sup -4} deg C{sup -1} and 2.0x10{sup -4} deg C{sup -1}) were high in comparison to the bulk material parameters.

  17. Ceramic matrix composites -- Advanced high-temperature structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowden, R.A.; Ferber, M.K.; DiPietro, S.G.

    1995-01-01

    This symposium on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Advanced High-Temperature Structural Materials was held at the 1994 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts on November 28--December 2. The symposium was sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technology's Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites Program, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and NASA Lewis Research Center. Among the competing materials for advanced, high-temperature applications, ceramic matrix composites are leading candidates. The symposium was organized such that papers concerning constituents--fibers and matrices--were presented first, followed by composite processing, modeling of mechanical behavior, and thermomechanical testing. More stable reinforcements are necessary to enhance the performance and life of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, and to ensure final acceptance of these materials for high-temperature applications. Encouraging results in the areas of polymer-derived SiC fibers and single crystal oxide filaments were given, suggesting composites with improved thermomechanical properties and stability will be realized in the near future. The significance of the fiber-matrix interface in the design and performance of these materials is evident. Numerous mechanical models to relate interface properties to composite behavior, and interpret test methods and data, were enthusiastically discussed. One issue of great concern for any advanced material for use in extreme environments is stability. This theme arose frequently throughout the symposium and was the topic of focus on the final day. Fifty nine papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  18. The effect of different solar simulators on the measurement of short-circuit current temperature coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, H. B.; Hart, R. E., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Gallium arsenide solar cells are considered for several high temperature missions in space. Both near-Sun and concentrator missions could involve cell temperatures on the order of 200 C. Performance measurements of cells at elevated temperatures are usually made using simulated sunlight and a matched reference cell. Due to the change in bandgap with increasing temperature at portions of the spectrum where considerable simulated irradiance is present, there are significant differences in measured short circuit current at elevated temperatures among different simulators. To illustrate this, both experimental and theoretical data are presented for gallium arsenide cells.

  19. Partition coefficient n-octanol/water of propranolol and atenolol at different temperatures: Experimental and theoretical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsen-Nia, M.; Ebrahimabadi, A.H.; Niknahad, B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► n-Octanol/water partition coefficients of propranolol and atenolol were measured. ► The effect of temperature on the partition coefficient was studied. ► The equilibrium data were correlated using the NRTL and UNIQUAC activity models. ► The binary interaction parameters of the activity models were reported. ► It is concluded that propranolol is more hydrophobic than the atenolol at 298.15 K. - Abstract: The n-octanol/water partition coefficients of propranolol and atenolol were experimentally determined by ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy at T = (298.15, 310.15 and 314.15) K. All measurements were made at the maximum wavelength corresponding to maximum absorption. The results showed that the n-octanol/water partition coefficients of propranolol and atenolol increase with the increase of temperature. The experimental data of this work were also used to examine the phase equilibrium correlating capability of some liquid-phase models. The equilibrium experimental data were correlated using the NRTL and UNIQUAC activity coefficient models and the binary interaction parameters were reported. The average root-mea n-square deviations (RMSD) between the experimental and calculated mass fractions of the (n-octanol + propranolol + water) and (n-octanol + atenolol + water) systems were determined. From the partition coefficients obtained, it is concluded that propranolol (log P ow = 3.12 ± 0.14) is more hydrophobic than the atenolol (log P ow = 0.16 ± 0.01) at T = 298.15 K.

  20. Evaluation of diffusion coefficients from composition profiles - the influence of trapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    The applicability of the Boltzmann-Matano method for evaluation of a diffusion coefficient and its concentration dependency by line profile analysis is tested on three different (model) systems. All systems involve interstitial diffusion. It is shown that the occurrence of trapping corrupts...... the applicability of the Boltzmann-Matano method....

  1. Anomalous composition dependence of the band gap pressure coefficients in In-containing nitride semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Kamińska, A.; Staszczak, G.

    2010-01-01

    The pressure-induced changes in the electronic band structures of In-containing nitride alloys, InxGa1-xN and InxAl1-xN are examined experimentally as well as by ab initio calculations. It is found that the band gap pressure coefficients, dEg/dp, exhibit very large bowing with x, and calculations...

  2. Electron energy distribution functions and transport coefficients relevant for air plasmas in the troposphere: impact of humidity and gas temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordillo-Vazquez, F J [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA), CSIC, PO Box 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Donko, Z [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, H-1525 Budapest, PO Box, 49 (Hungary)

    2009-08-15

    A Boltzmann and Monte Carlo analysis of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and transport coefficients for air plasmas is presented for the conditions of the Earth troposphere where some transient luminous events (TLEs) such as blue jets, blue starters and gigantic jets have been observed. According to recent model results (Minschwaner et al 2004 J. Climate 17 1272) supported by the halogen occultation experiment, the relative humidity of the atmospheric air between 0 and 15 km can change between 15% and 100% depending on the altitude investigated and the ground temperature. The latter results cover a region of latitudes between -25 deg. S and +25 deg. N, that is, the Earth tropical region where lightning and TLE activity is quite high. The calculations shown here suggest that the relative humidity has a clear impact on the behaviour of the EEDF and magnitude of the transport coefficients of air plasmas at ground (0 km) and room temperature conditions (293 K). At higher altitudes (11 and 15 km), the influence of the relative humidity is negligible when the values of the gas temperature are assumed to be the 'natural' ones corresponding to those altitudes, that is, {approx}215 K (at 11 km) and {approx}198 K (at 15 km). However, it is found that a small enhancement (of maximum 100 K) in the background gas temperature (that could be reasonably associated with the TLE activity) would lead to a remarkable impact of the relative humidity on the EEDF and transport coefficients of air plasmas under the conditions of blue jets, blue starters and gigantic jets at 11 and 15 km. The latter effects are visible for relatively low reduced electric fields (E/N {<=} 25 Td) that could be controlling the afterglow kinetics of the air plasmas generated by TLEs. However, for much higher fields such as, for instance, 400 Td (representative of the fields in the streamer coronas and lightning leaders), the impact of increasing the relative humidity and gas

  3. Electron energy distribution functions and transport coefficients relevant for air plasmas in the troposphere: impact of humidity and gas temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordillo-Vazquez, F J; Donko, Z

    2009-01-01

    A Boltzmann and Monte Carlo analysis of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and transport coefficients for air plasmas is presented for the conditions of the Earth troposphere where some transient luminous events (TLEs) such as blue jets, blue starters and gigantic jets have been observed. According to recent model results (Minschwaner et al 2004 J. Climate 17 1272) supported by the halogen occultation experiment, the relative humidity of the atmospheric air between 0 and 15 km can change between 15% and 100% depending on the altitude investigated and the ground temperature. The latter results cover a region of latitudes between -25 deg. S and +25 deg. N, that is, the Earth tropical region where lightning and TLE activity is quite high. The calculations shown here suggest that the relative humidity has a clear impact on the behaviour of the EEDF and magnitude of the transport coefficients of air plasmas at ground (0 km) and room temperature conditions (293 K). At higher altitudes (11 and 15 km), the influence of the relative humidity is negligible when the values of the gas temperature are assumed to be the 'natural' ones corresponding to those altitudes, that is, ∼215 K (at 11 km) and ∼198 K (at 15 km). However, it is found that a small enhancement (of maximum 100 K) in the background gas temperature (that could be reasonably associated with the TLE activity) would lead to a remarkable impact of the relative humidity on the EEDF and transport coefficients of air plasmas under the conditions of blue jets, blue starters and gigantic jets at 11 and 15 km. The latter effects are visible for relatively low reduced electric fields (E/N ≤ 25 Td) that could be controlling the afterglow kinetics of the air plasmas generated by TLEs. However, for much higher fields such as, for instance, 400 Td (representative of the fields in the streamer coronas and lightning leaders), the impact of increasing the relative humidity and gas temperature is only slightly

  4. Temperature and curing time affect composite sorption and solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Luscino Alves de Castro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the effect of temperature and curing time on composite sorption and solubility. Material and Methods: Seventy five specimens (8×2 mm were prepared using a commercial composite resin (ICE, SDI. Three temperatures (10°C, 25°C and 60°C and five curing times (5 s, 10 s, 20 s, 40 s and 60 s were evaluated. The specimens were weighed on an analytical balance three times: A: before storage (M1; B: 7 days after storage (M2; C: 7 days after storage plus 1 day of drying (M3. The storage solution consisted of 75% alcohol/25% water. Sorption and solubility were calculated using these three weights and specimen dimensions. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U Tests (α=5%. Results: The results showed that time, temperature and their interaction influenced the sorption and solubility of the composite (p0.05. The 60°C composite temperature led to lower values of sorption for all curing times when compared with the 10°C temperature (p0.05. Solubility was similar at 40 s and 60 s for all temperatures (p>0.05, but was higher at 10°C than at 60°C for all curing times (p0.05. Conclusions: In conclusion, higher temperatures or longer curing times led to lower sorption and solubility values for the composite tested; however, this trend was only significant in specific combinations of temperature and curing times.

  5. Bath temperature effect on magnetoelectric performance of Ni-lead zirconate titanate-Ni laminated composites synthesized by electroless deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, W. [College of Materials Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Y.G., E-mail: yingang.wang@nuaa.edu.c [College of Materials Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Bi, K. [College of Materials Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2011-03-15

    Magnetoelectric (ME) Ni-lead zirconate titanate-Ni laminated composites have been prepared by electroless deposition at various bath temperatures. The structure of the Ni layers deposited at various bath temperatures was characterized by X-ray diffraction, and microstructures were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The magnetostrictive coefficients were measured by means of a resistance strain gauge. The transverse ME voltage coefficient {alpha}{sub E,31} was measured with the magnetic field applied parallel to the sample plane. The deposition rate of Ni increases with bath temperature. Ni layer with smaller grain size is obtained at higher bath temperature and shows higher piezomagnetic coefficient, promoting the ME effect of corresponding laminated composites. It is advantageous to increase the bath temperature, while trying to avoid the breaking of bath constituents. - Research Highlights: Laminated composites without interlayer are prepared by electroless deposition. Bath temperature affects the grain size of the deposited Ni layers. Higher bath temperature is beneficial to obtain stronger ME response.

  6. Relations between temperature coefficients of permittivity and elastic compliances in PZT ceramics near the morphotropic phase boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudys, M

    1991-01-01

    Variations of temperature coefficients of permittivity epsilon(33)(T), elastic compliances at constant electric fields s(11)(E), and constant polarization s(11)(P) with a Zr/Ti ratio of Pb(Zr(x)Ti(1-x))O(3) and Pb[(Sb(1/3)Mn(2/3))(0.05)Zr(x)Ti (0.95-x)]O(3) solid solutions, were investigated. Relations between temperature coefficients of epsilon(33)(T ), S(11)(E), and S(11) (P) were theoretically derived; a discrepancy was found between theoretical relations and experimental results. On the basis of the observed discrepancy, it is proposed that some extrinsic effects arising from the motion of interphase boundaries between the tetragonal and the rhombohedral phases which exist in grains contribute to values of both elastic compliances.

  7. Density of biogas digestate depending on temperature and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Mandy; Schneider, Nico

    2015-09-01

    Density is one of the most important physical properties of biogas digestate to ensure an optimal dimensioning and a precise design of biogas plant components like stirring devices, pumps and heat exchangers. In this study the density of biogas digestates with different compositions was measured using pycnometers at ambient pressure in a temperature range from 293.15 to 313.15K. The biogas digestates were taken from semi-continuous experiments, in which the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina, corn silage and a mixture of both were used as feedstocks. The results show an increase of density with increasing total solid content and a decrease with increasing temperature. Three equations to calculate the density of biogas digestate were set up depending on temperature as well as on the total solid content, organic composition and elemental composition, respectively. All correlations show a relative deviation below 1% compared to experimental data. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Effective neutron temperature measurements in well moderated reactor by the reactivity coefficient method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisic, N.; Klinc, T.

    1968-11-01

    The ratio of the reactivity changes of a nuclear reactor produced by successive introduction of two different neutron absorbers in the reactor core, has been measured and information on effective neutron temperature at a particular point obtained. Boron was used as a l/v absorber and cadmium as an absorber sensiti ve to neutron temperature. Effective neutron temperature distribution has been deduced by moving absorbers across the reactor core and observing the corresponding reactivity changes. (author)

  9. Measurement of the fuel temperature and the fuel-to-coolant heat transfer coefficient of Super Phenix 1 fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelmann, M.

    1995-12-01

    A new measurement method for measuring the mean fuel temperature as well as the fuel-to-coolant heat transfer coefficient of fast breeder reactor subassemblies (SA) is reported. The method is based on the individual heat balance of fuel SA's after fast reactor shut-downs and uses only the plants normal SA outlet temperature and neutron power signals. The method was used successfully at the french breeder prototype Super Phenix 1. The mean SA fuel temperature as well as the heat transfer coefficient of all SPX SA's have been determined at power levels between 15 and 90% of nominal power and increasing fuel burn-up from 3 to 83 EFPD (Equivalent of Full Power-Days). The measurements also provided fuel and whole SA time constants. The estimated accuracy of measured fuel parameters is in the order of 10%. Fuel temperatures and SA outlet temperature transients were also calculated with the SPX1 systems code DYN2 for exactly the same fuel and reactor operating parameters as in the experiments. Measured fuel temperatures were higher than calculated ones in all cases. The difference between measured and calculated core mean values increases from 50 K at low power to 180 K at 90% n.p. This is about the double of the experimental error margins. Measured SA heat transfer coefficients are by nearly 20% lower than corresponding heat transfer parameters used in the calculations. Discrepancies found between measured and calculated results also indicate that either the transient heat transfer in the gap between fuel and cladding (gap conductance) might not be exactly reproduced in the computer code or that the gap in the fresh fuel was larger than assumed in the calculations. (orig.) [de

  10. GRAPHENE-PEEK COMPOSITES AS HIGH TEMPERATURE ADHESIVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-15

    Technical Report ARWSB-TR-17024 GRAPHENE-PEEK COMPOSITES AS HIGH TEMPERATURE ADHESIVES Proceedings of the Composites and Advanced...findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy, or...decision, unless so designated by other documentation. The citation in this report of the names of commercial firms or commercially available

  11. A high temperature testing system for ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemann, John

    1994-01-01

    Ceramic composites are presently being developed for high temperature use in heat engine and space power system applications. The operating temperature range is expected to be 1090 to 1650 C (2000 F to 3000 F). Very little material data is available at these temperatures and, therefore, it is desirable to thoroughly characterize the basic unidirectional fiber reinforced ceramic composite. This includes testing mainly for mechanical material properties at high temperatures. The proper conduct of such characterization tests requires the development of a tensile testing system includes unique gripping, heating, and strain measuring devices which require special considerations. The system also requires an optimized specimen shape. The purpose of this paper is to review various techniques for measuring displacements or strains, preferably at elevated temperatures. Due to current equipment limitations it is assumed that the specimen is to be tested at a temperature of 1430 C (2600F) in an oxidizing atmosphere. For the most part, previous high temperature material characterization tests, such as flexure and tensile tests, have been performed in inert atmospheres. Due to the harsh environment in which the ceramic specimen is to be tested, many conventional strain measuring techniques can not be applied. Initially a brief description of the more commonly used mechanical strain measuring techniques is given. Major advantages and disadvantages with their application to high temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites are discussed. Next, a general overview is given for various optical techniques. Advantages and disadvantages which are common to these techniques are noted. The optical methods for measuring strain or displacement are categorized into two sections. These include real-time techniques. Finally, an optical technique which offers optimum performance with the high temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites is recommended.

  12. Grinding temperature and energy ratio coefficient in MQL grinding of high-temperature nickel-base alloy by using different vegetable oils as base oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Benkai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable oil can be used as a base oil in minimal quantity of lubrication (MQL. This study compared the performances of MQL grinding by using castor oil, soybean oil, rapeseed oil, corn oil, sunflower oil, peanut oil, and palm oil as base oils. A K-P36 numerical-control precision surface grinder was used to perform plain grinding on a workpiece material with a high-temperature nickel base alloy. A YDM–III 99 three-dimensional dynamometer was used to measure grinding force, and a clip-type thermocouple was used to determine grinding temperature. The grinding force, grinding temperature, and energy ratio coefficient of MQL grinding were compared among the seven vegetable oil types. Results revealed that (1 castor oil-based MQL grinding yields the lowest grinding force but exhibits the highest grinding temperature and energy ratio coefficient; (2 palm oil-based MQL grinding generates the second lowest grinding force but shows the lowest grinding temperature and energy ratio coefficient; (3 MQL grinding based on the five other vegetable oils produces similar grinding forces, grinding temperatures, and energy ratio coefficients, with values ranging between those of castor oil and palm oil; (4 viscosity significantly influences grinding force and grinding temperature to a greater extent than fatty acid varieties and contents in vegetable oils; (5 although more viscous vegetable oil exhibits greater lubrication and significantly lower grinding force than less viscous vegetable oil, high viscosity reduces the heat exchange capability of vegetable oil and thus yields a high grinding temperature; (6 saturated fatty acid is a more efficient lubricant than unsaturated fatty acid; and (7 a short carbon chain transfers heat more effectively than a long carbon chain. Palm oil is the optimum base oil of MQL grinding, and this base oil yields 26.98 N tangential grinding force, 87.10 N normal grinding force, 119.6 °C grinding temperature, and 42.7% energy

  13. Thermal contraction effects in epoxy resin composites at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.; Morgan, J.T.

    1979-10-01

    Because of their electrical and thermal insulation characteristics, high strength fibreglass/epoxy composites are widely used in the construction of bubble chamber and other cryogenic equipment. Thermal contraction effects on cooling to operating temperature present problems which need to be taken into account at the design stage. This paper gives results of thermal contraction tests carried out on fibreglass/epoxy composites including the somewhat anomalous results obtained with rings and tubes. Also considered are some of the problems associated with the use of these materials at temperatures in the region of 20K. (author)

  14. Negative temperature coefficient of the action of DDT in a sense organ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bercken, J. van den; Akkermans, L.M.A.

    1972-01-01

    DDT induced repetitive spontaneuos activity inthe afferent nerve fibers of the lateral-line organ of the clawed toad, Xenopus laevis. The action of DDT increased markedly with lowered temperature. This temperature-effect was easily reversible. The results demonstrate that DDT has a definite negative

  15. The effect of transition metals additions on the temperature coefficient of linear expansion of titanium and vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesnaya, M.I.; Volokitin, G.G.; Kashchuk, V.A.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported of an experimental research into the influence of small additions of α-transition metals on the temperature coefficient of linear expansion of titanium and vanadium. Using the configuration model of substance as the basis, expeained are the lowering of the critical liquefaction temperature or the melting point of vanadium and the raising of it, as caused by the addition of metals of the 6 group of the periodic chart and by the addition of metals of the 8 group, respectively, and also a shift in the temperature of the polymorphic α-β-transformation of titanium. Suggested as the best alloying metal for vanadium are tungsten and tantalum; for titaniums is vanadium whose admixtures lower the melting point and shift the polymorphic transformation temperature by as much as 100 to 120 degrees

  16. Analytical calculation of the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors for plutonium and uranium-thorium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    We analytically evaluated the fuel coefficient of temperature both for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors when they utilize as fuel plutonium and minor actinides from light water reactors spent fuel or a mixture of 50% uranium, enriched 20% in 235 U, and 50% thorium. In both cores the calculation involves the evaluation of the resonances integrals of the high absorbers fuel nuclides 240 Pu, 238 U and 232 Th and it requires the esteem of the Dancoff-Ginsburg factor for a pebble bed or prismatic core. The Dancoff-Ginsburg factor represents the only discriminating parameter in the results for the two different reactors types; in fact, both the pebble bed and the prismatic reactors share the same the pseudo-cross-section describing an infinite medium made of graphite filled by TRISO particles. We considered only the resolved resonances with a statistical spin factor equal to one and we took into account 267, 72, 212 resonances in the range 1.057-5692, 6.674-14485, 21.78-3472 eV for 240 Pu, 238 U and 232 Th, respectively, for investigating the influence on the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient of the variation of the TRISO kernel radius and TRISO particles packing fraction from 100, 200 to 300 μm and from 10% to 50%, respectively. Finally, in the pebble bed core, we varied the radius of the pebble for setting a fuel temperature reactivity coefficient similar to the one of a prismatic core

  17. From boiling point to glass transition temperature: transport coefficients in molecular liquids follow three-parameter scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, B; Petzold, N; Kahlau, R; Hofmann, M; Rössler, E A

    2012-10-01

    The phenomenon of the glass transition is an unresolved problem in condensed matter physics. Its prominent feature, the super-Arrhenius temperature dependence of the transport coefficients, remains a challenge to be described over the full temperature range. For a series of molecular glass formers, we combined τ(T) collected from dielectric spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering covering a range 10(-12) s < τ(T) < 10(2) s. Describing the dynamics in terms of an activation energy E(T), we distinguish a high-temperature regime characterized by an Arrhenius law with a constant activation energy E(∞) and a low-temperature regime for which E(coop)(T) ≡ E(T)-E(∞) increases exponentially while cooling. A scaling is introduced, specifically E(coop)(T)/E(∞) [proportionality] exp[-λ(T/T(A)-1)], where λ is a fragility parameter and T(A) a reference temperature proportional to E(∞). In order to describe τ(T) still the attempt time τ(∞) has to be specified. Thus, a single interaction parameter E(∞) describing the high-temperature regime together with λ controls the temperature dependence of low-temperature cooperative dynamics.

  18. Stress envelope of silicon carbide composites at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozawa, Takashi; Kim, Sunghun; Ozawa, Kazumi; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2014-01-01

    To identify a comprehensive stress envelope, i.e., strength anisotropy map, of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite (SiC/SiC composite) for practical component design, tensile and compressive tests were conducted using the small specimen test technique specifically tailored for high-temperature use. In-plane shear properties were, however, estimated using the off-axial tensile method and assuming that the mixed mode failure criterion, i.e., Tsai–Wu criterion, is valid for the composites. The preliminary test results indicate no significant degradation to either proportional limit stress (PLS) or fracture strength by tensile loading at temperatures below 1000 °C. A similarly good tolerance of compressive properties was identified at elevated temperatures, except for a slight degradation in PLS. With the high-temperature test data of tensile, compressive and in-plane shear properties, the stress envelopes at elevated temperatures were finally obtained. A slight reduction in the design limit was obvious at elevated temperatures when the compressive mode is dominant, whereas a negligibly small impact on the design is expected by considering the tensile loading case

  19. Stress envelope of silicon carbide composites at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozawa, Takashi, E-mail: nozawa.takashi67@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Omotedate, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Kim, Sunghun [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Ozawa, Kazumi; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Omotedate, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    To identify a comprehensive stress envelope, i.e., strength anisotropy map, of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite (SiC/SiC composite) for practical component design, tensile and compressive tests were conducted using the small specimen test technique specifically tailored for high-temperature use. In-plane shear properties were, however, estimated using the off-axial tensile method and assuming that the mixed mode failure criterion, i.e., Tsai–Wu criterion, is valid for the composites. The preliminary test results indicate no significant degradation to either proportional limit stress (PLS) or fracture strength by tensile loading at temperatures below 1000 °C. A similarly good tolerance of compressive properties was identified at elevated temperatures, except for a slight degradation in PLS. With the high-temperature test data of tensile, compressive and in-plane shear properties, the stress envelopes at elevated temperatures were finally obtained. A slight reduction in the design limit was obvious at elevated temperatures when the compressive mode is dominant, whereas a negligibly small impact on the design is expected by considering the tensile loading case.

  20. Ceramic Composite Intermediate Temperature Stress-Rupture Properties Improved Significantly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Hurst, Janet B.

    2002-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) composites are considered to be potential materials for future aircraft engine parts such as combustor liners. It is envisioned that on the hot side (inner surface) of the combustor liner, composites will have to withstand temperatures in excess of 1200 C for thousands of hours in oxidizing environments. This is a severe condition; however, an equally severe, if not more detrimental, condition exists on the cold side (outer surface) of the combustor liner. Here, the temperatures are expected to be on the order of 800 to 1000 C under high tensile stress because of thermal gradients and attachment of the combustor liner to the engine frame (the hot side will be under compressive stress, a less severe stress-state for ceramics). Since these composites are not oxides, they oxidize. The worst form of oxidation for strength reduction occurs at these intermediate temperatures, where the boron nitride (BN) interphase oxidizes first, which causes the formation of a glass layer that strongly bonds the fibers to the matrix. When the fibers strongly bond to the matrix or to one another, the composite loses toughness and strength and becomes brittle. To increase the intermediate temperature stress-rupture properties, researchers must modify the BN interphase. With the support of the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program, significant improvements were made as state-of-the-art SiC/SiC composites were developed during the Enabling Propulsion Materials (EPM) program. Three approaches were found to improve the intermediate-temperature stress-rupture properties: fiber-spreading, high-temperature silicon- (Si) doped boron nitride (BN), and outside-debonding BN.

  1. Iridescent cellulose nanocrystal/polyethylene oxide composite films with low coefficient of thermal expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairo A. Diaz; Julia L. Braun; Robert J. Moon; Jeffrey P. Youngblood

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous control over optical and thermal properties is particularly challenging and highly desired in fields like organic electronics. Here we incorporated cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) into polyethylene oxide (PEO) in an attempt to preserve the iridescent CNC optical reflection given by their chiral nematic organisation, while reducing the composite thermal...

  2. Effect of Propellant Composition to the Temperature Sensitivity of Composite Propellant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, Amir; Mamat, Rizalman; Amin, Makeen; Wan Ali, Wan Khairuddin

    2012-01-01

    The propellant composition is one of several parameter that influencing the temperature sensitivity of composite propellant. In this paper, experimental investigation of temperature sensitivity in burning rate of composite propellant was conducted. Four sets of different propellant compositions had been prepared with the combination of ammonium perchlorate (AP) as an oxidizer, aluminum (Al) as fuel and hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) as fuel and binder. For each mixture, HTPB binder was fixed at 15% and cured with isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI). By varying AP and Al, the effect of oxidizer- fuel mixture ratio (O/F) on the whole propellant can be determined. The propellant strands were manufactured using compression molded method and burnt in a strand burner using wire technique over a range of pressure from 1 atm to 31 atm. The results obtained shows that the temperature sensitivity, a, increases with increasing O/F. Propellant p80 which has O/F ratio of 80/20 gives the highest value of temperature sensitivity which is 1.687. The results shows that the propellant composition has significant effect on the temperature sensitivity of composite propellant

  3. A low temperature drift coefficient crystal-less frequency reference clock compensated by temperature sensor for microsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiqiang; Wu, Ruixuan; Wang, Yuteng; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Xiaowei; Zhu, Jiaqi

    2018-05-01

    Quartz oscillator has been widely used as reference clock source in the microsystems due to its good performance. But a good crystal oscillator costs too much and its bulky size is not desired. This paper aims at designing an alternative integrated oscillator to replace the external quartz oscillator. The proposed circuit used maneatis delay cell to construct a ring oscillator for its superior linear I-V characteristic. As for a frequency reference clock, its frequency stability over temperature is required at first. After detailed mathematical deducing and careful analysis, a formula is proposed to describe the relationship between desired control voltage and temperature by assuming the frequency as constant. This paper utilized bipolar transistor as the temperature sensor, combining it with CTAT current source and resistor to create a first-order temperature compensation control voltage. The chip with typical frequency of 10 MHz was fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS technology and occupied 0.45 mm2. The measured results show that the frequency variation is ±0.2% for supply changes from 4.8 V to 5 V, and frequency variation is 48 ppm when the temperature change is from ‑40∘C to 85∘C, while the average current of the tested chip consumes 50 μA from 5 V.

  4. Thermal Protective Coating for High Temperature Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Andrew R.

    1999-01-01

    The central theme of this research is the application of carboxylate-alumoxane nanoparticles as precursors to thermally protective coatings for high temperature polymer composites. In addition, we will investigate the application of carboxylate-alumoxane nanoparticle as a component to polymer composites. The objective of this research was the high temperature protection of polymer composites via novel chemistry. The significance of this research is the development of a low cost and highly flexible synthetic methodology, with a compatible processing technique, for the fabrication of high temperature polymer composites. We proposed to accomplish this broad goal through the use of a class of ceramic precursor material, alumoxanes. Alumoxanes are nano-particles with a boehmite-like structure and an organic periphery. The technical goals of this program are to prepare and evaluate water soluble carboxylate-alumoxane for the preparation of ceramic coatings on polymer substrates. Our proposed approach is attractive since proof of concept has been demonstrated under the NRA 96-LeRC-1 Technology for Advanced High Temperature Gas Turbine Engines, HITEMP Program. For example, carbon and Kevlar(tm) fibers and matting have been successfully coated with ceramic thermally protective layers.

  5. A variational centroid density procedure for the calculation of transmission coefficients for asymmetric barriers at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messina, M.; Schenter, G.K.; Garrett, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    The low temperature behavior of the centroid density method of Voth, Chandler, and Miller (VCM) [J. Chem. Phys. 91, 7749 (1989)] is investigated for tunneling through a one-dimensional barrier. We find that the bottleneck for a quantum activated process as defined by VCM does not correspond to the classical bottleneck for the case of an asymmetric barrier. If the centroid density is constrained to be at the classical bottleneck for an asymmetric barrier, the centroid density method can give transmission coefficients that are too large by as much as five orders of magnitude. We follow a variational procedure, as suggested by VCM, whereby the best transmission coefficient is found by varying the position of the centroid until the minimum value for this transmission coefficient is obtained. This is a procedure that is readily generalizable to multidimensional systems. We present calculations on several test systems which show that this variational procedure greatly enhances the accuracy of the centroid density method compared to when the centroid is constrained to be at the barrier top. Furthermore, the relation of this procedure to the low temperature periodic orbit or ''instanton'' approach is discussed. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  6. Mid-infrared response of reduced graphene oxide and its high-temperature coefficient of resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Liang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Much effort has been made to study the formation mechanisms of photocurrents in graphene and reduced graphene oxide films under visible and near-infrared light irradiation. A built-in field and photo-thermal electrons have been applied to explain the experiments. However, much less attention has been paid to clarifying the mid-infrared response of reduced graphene oxide films at room temperature. Thus, mid-infrared photoresponse and annealing temperature-dependent resistance experiments were carried out on reduced graphene oxide films. A maximum photocurrent of 75 μA was observed at room temperature, which was dominated by the bolometer effect, where the resistance of the films decreased as the temperature increased after they had absorbed light. The electrons localized in the defect states and the residual oxygen groups were thermally excited into the conduction band, forming a photocurrent. In addition, a temperature increase of 2 °C for the films after light irradiation for 2 minutes was observed using absorption power calculations. This work details a way to use reduced graphene oxide films that contain appropriate defects and residual oxygen groups as bolometer-sensitive materials in the mid-infrared range.

  7. Comparison of rotational temperature derived from ground-based OH airglow observations with TIMED/SABER to evaluate the Einstein Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W.; Xu, J.; Smith, A. K.; Yuan, W.

    2017-12-01

    Ground-based observations of the OH(9-4, 8-3, 6-2, 5-1, 3-0) band airglows over Xinglong, China (40°24'N, 117°35'E) from December 2011 to 2014 are used to calculate rotational temperatures. The temperatures are calculated using five commonly used Einstein coefficient datasets. The kinetic temperature from TIMED/SABER is completely independent of the OH rotational temperature. SABER temperatures are weighted vertically by weighting functions calculated for each emitting vibrational state from two SABER OH volume emission rate profiles. By comparing the ground-based OH rotational temperature with SABER's, five Einstein coefficient datasets are evaluated. The results show that temporal variations of the rotational temperatures are well correlated with SABER's; the linear correlation coefficients are higher than 0.72, but the slopes of the fit between the SABER and rotational temperatures are not equal to 1. The rotational temperatures calculated using each set of Einstein coefficients produce a different bias with respect to SABER; these are evaluated over each of vibrational levels to assess the best match. It is concluded that rotational temperatures determined using any of the available Einstein coefficient datasets have systematic errors. However, of the five sets of coefficients, the rotational temperature derived with the Langhoff et al.'s (1986) set is most consistent with SABER. In order to get a set of optimal Einstein coefficients for rotational temperature derivation, we derive the relative values from ground-based OH spectra and SABER temperatures statistically using three year data. The use of a standard set of Einstein coefficients will be beneficial for comparing rotational temperatures observed at different sites.

  8. Influence of the temperature on the composites' fusion bonding quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkous, Ali; Jurkowski, Tomasz; Bailleul, Jean-Luc; Le Corre, Steven

    2017-10-01

    Thermoplastic composite parts are increasingly used to replace metal pieces in automotive field due to their mechanical properties, chemical properties and recycling potential [1]. To assemble and give them new mechanical functions, fusion bonding is often used. It is a type of welding carried out at a higher temperature than the fusion one [2]. The mechanical quality of the final adhesion depends on the process parameters like pressure, temperature and cycle time [3]. These parameters depend on two phenomena at the origin of the bonding formation: intimate contact [4] and reptation and healing [5]. In this study, we analyze the influence of the temperature on the bonding quality, disregarding in this first steps the pressure influence. For that, two polyamide composite parts are welded using a specific setup. Then, they undergo a mechanical test of peeling in order to quantify the adhesion quality.

  9. Tribological properties of PM212: A high-temperature, self-lubricating, powder metallurgy composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Sliney, Harold E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a research program to develop and evaluate a new high temperature, self-lubricating powder metallurgy composite, PM212. PM212 has the same composition as the plasma-sprayed coating, PS212, which contains 70 wt percent metal-bonded chromium carbide, 15 wt percent silver and 15 wt percent barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The carbide acts as a wear resistant matrix and the silver and fluorides act as low and high temperature lubricants, respectively. The material is prepared by sequential cold press, cold isostatic pressing and sintering techniques. In this study, hemispherically tipped wear pins of PM212 were prepared and slid against superalloy disks at temperatures from 25 to 850 C in air in a pin-on-disk tribometer. Friction coefficients range from 0.29 to 0.38 and the wear of both the composite pins and superalloy disks was moderate to low in the 10(exp -5) to 10(exp -6) cubic mm/N-m range. Preliminary tests indicate that the material has a compressive strength of at least 130 MPa over the entire temperature range of 25 to 900 C. This material has promise for use as seal inserts, bushings, small inside diameter parts and other applications where plasma-sprayed coatings are impractical or too costly.

  10. Tribological properties of PM212 - A high temperature, self-lubricating, powder metallurgy composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Sliney, Harold E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a research program to develop and evaluate a new high temperature, self-lubricating powder metallurgy composite, PM212. PM212 has the same composition as the plasma-sprayed coating, PS212, which contains 70 wt percent metal-bonded chromium carbide, 15 wt percent silver and 15 wt percent barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The carbide acts as a wear resistant matrix and the silver and fluorides act as low and high temperature lubricants, respectively. The material is prepared by sequential cold press, cold isostatic pressing and sintering techniques. In this study, hemispherically tipped wear pins of PM212 were prepared and slid against superalloy disks at temperatures from 25 to 850 C in air in a pin-on-disk tribometer. Friction coefficients range from 0.29 to 0.38 and the wear of both the composite pins and superalloy disks was moderate to low in the 10(exp -5) to 10(exp -6) cubic mm/N-m range. Preliminary tests indicate that the material has a compressive strength of at least 130 MPa over the entire temperature range of 25 to 900 C. This material has promise for use as seal inserts, bushings, small inside diameter parts and other applications where plasma-sprayed coatings are impractical or too costly.

  11. Exploring the negative temperature coefficient behavior of acetaldehyde based on detailed intermediate measurements in a jet-stirred reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Tao

    2018-03-20

    Acetaldehyde is an observed emission species and a key intermediate produced during the combustion and low-temperature oxidation of fossil and bio-derived fuels. Investigations into the low-temperature oxidation chemistry of acetaldehyde are essential to develop a better core mechanism and to better understand auto-ignition and cool flame phenomena. Here, the oxidation of acetaldehyde was studied at low-temperatures (528–946 K) in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) with the corrected residence time of 2.7 s at 700 Torr. This work describes a detailed set of experimental results that capture the negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior in the low-temperature oxidation of acetaldehyde. The mole fractions of 28 species were measured as functions of the temperature by employing a vacuum ultra-violet photoionization molecular-beam mass spectrometer. To explain the observed NTC behavior, an updated mechanism was proposed, which well reproduces the concentration profiles of many observed peroxide intermediates. The kinetic analysis based on the updated mechanism reveals that the NTC behavior of acetaldehyde oxidation is caused by the competition between the O-addition to and the decomposition of the CHCO radical.

  12. Exploring the negative temperature coefficient behavior of acetaldehyde based on detailed intermediate measurements in a jet-stirred reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Tao; Sun, Wenyu; Hansen, Nils; Jasper, Ahren W.; Moshammer, Kai; Chen, Bingjie; Wang, Zhandong; Huang, Can; Dagaut, Philippe; Yang, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Acetaldehyde is an observed emission species and a key intermediate produced during the combustion and low-temperature oxidation of fossil and bio-derived fuels. Investigations into the low-temperature oxidation chemistry of acetaldehyde are essential to develop a better core mechanism and to better understand auto-ignition and cool flame phenomena. Here, the oxidation of acetaldehyde was studied at low-temperatures (528–946 K) in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) with the corrected residence time of 2.7 s at 700 Torr. This work describes a detailed set of experimental results that capture the negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior in the low-temperature oxidation of acetaldehyde. The mole fractions of 28 species were measured as functions of the temperature by employing a vacuum ultra-violet photoionization molecular-beam mass spectrometer. To explain the observed NTC behavior, an updated mechanism was proposed, which well reproduces the concentration profiles of many observed peroxide intermediates. The kinetic analysis based on the updated mechanism reveals that the NTC behavior of acetaldehyde oxidation is caused by the competition between the O-addition to and the decomposition of the CHCO radical.

  13. High temperature tribological behaviors of (WAl)C–Co ceramic composites with the additions of fluoride solid lubricants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Jun; Qiao, Zhuhui; Yin, Bing; Hao, Junying; Yang, Jun; Liu, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    The tribological behaviors of the (W 0.67 Al 0.33 )C 0.67 –Co/fluoride (CaF 2 , BaF 2 , CaF 2 /BaF 2 ) composites against SiC ball from room temperature to 600 °C were investigated. A marked increase in the friction coefficient resulting from fluoride oxidation was observed as the temperature increased. The composites containing BaF 2 or (Ca, Ba)F 2 displayed better integrated wear resistance over a wide temperature range compared with (W 0.67 Al 0.33 )C 0.67 –Co/CaF 2 . The high temperature tribological characteristics of the three composites were distinct, which originated from the composition difference on the worn surfaces. First, the SiO 2 /SiC film formed on the worn surfaces of the composites with BaF 2 or (Ca, Ba)F 2 was favorable for their wear resistance. Second, the oxidation of WC matrix was an important factor influencing the wear resistance of the composites. When mixture oxides of WO 2 and WO 3 appeared on the surface, wear is severe. In addition, single WO 3 formed on the worn surfaces, appeared more adhesive to the underlying substrate and decreased the wear rate. - Highlights: • The composites containing BaF 2 or (Ca, Ba)F 2 exhibit better wear resistance. • The tribological behaviors are strongly correlated to surface composition. • The stoichiometry difference in the tungsten oxides leads to distinct wear rate. • The friction coefficient of the composites increases with the testing temperature

  14. High temperature tribological behaviors of (WAl)C–Co ceramic composites with the additions of fluoride solid lubricants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jun; Qiao, Zhuhui, E-mail: zhqiao@licp.cas.cn; Yin, Bing; Hao, Junying, E-mail: jyhao@licp.cas.cn; Yang, Jun; Liu, Weimin

    2015-08-01

    The tribological behaviors of the (W{sub 0.67}Al{sub 0.33})C{sub 0.67}–Co/fluoride (CaF{sub 2}, BaF{sub 2}, CaF{sub 2}/BaF{sub 2}) composites against SiC ball from room temperature to 600 °C were investigated. A marked increase in the friction coefficient resulting from fluoride oxidation was observed as the temperature increased. The composites containing BaF{sub 2} or (Ca, Ba)F{sub 2} displayed better integrated wear resistance over a wide temperature range compared with (W{sub 0.67}Al{sub 0.33})C{sub 0.67}–Co/CaF{sub 2}. The high temperature tribological characteristics of the three composites were distinct, which originated from the composition difference on the worn surfaces. First, the SiO{sub 2}/SiC film formed on the worn surfaces of the composites with BaF{sub 2} or (Ca, Ba)F{sub 2} was favorable for their wear resistance. Second, the oxidation of WC matrix was an important factor influencing the wear resistance of the composites. When mixture oxides of WO{sub 2} and WO{sub 3} appeared on the surface, wear is severe. In addition, single WO{sub 3} formed on the worn surfaces, appeared more adhesive to the underlying substrate and decreased the wear rate. - Highlights: • The composites containing BaF{sub 2} or (Ca, Ba)F{sub 2} exhibit better wear resistance. • The tribological behaviors are strongly correlated to surface composition. • The stoichiometry difference in the tungsten oxides leads to distinct wear rate. • The friction coefficient of the composites increases with the testing temperature.

  15. Experimental determination of the Koo fuel temperature coefficient for an HTGR lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, P.; Benedetti, F.; Brighenti, G.; Chiodi, P. L.; Dell' Oro, P.; Giuliani, C.; Tassan, S.

    1974-10-15

    This paper describes temperature-dependent k-infinity measurements conducted using an assembly of loose HTGR coated particles in the BR-2 reactor by means of null reactivity oscillating method comparing the effect of poisoned and unpoisoned lattices like tests performed in the Physical Constants Test Reactor (PCTR) at Hanford. The RB-2 reactor was the property of the Italian firm AGIP NUCLEARE and operated at the Montecuccolino Center in Bologna.

  16. Lithium bromide high-temperature absorption heat pump: coefficient of performance and exergetic efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo, M [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (ES). Inst. de Optica; Aroca, S [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Valladolid (ES). Catedratico de Ingenieria Termica

    1990-04-01

    A theoretical study of a lithium bromide absorption heat pump, used as a machine type I and aimed to produce heat at 120{sup 0}C via waste heat sources at 60{sup 0}C, is given. Real performance conditions are stated for each component of the machine. By means of thermodynamic diagrams (p, t, x) and (h, x), the required data are obtained for calculation of the heat recovered in the evaporator Q{sub e}, the heat delivered to the absorber Q{sub a} and to the condenser Q{sub c}, and the heat supplied to the generator Q{sub g}. The heat delivered by the hot solution to the cold solution in the heat recovered Q{sub r}, and the work W{sub p} done by the solution pump are calculated. The probable COP is calculated as close to 1.4 and the working temperature in the generator ranges from 178 to 200{sup 0}C. The heat produced by the heat pump is 22% cheaper than that obtained from a cogeneration system comprising a natural gas internal combustion engine and high temperature heat pump with mechanical compression. Compared with a high temperature heat pump with mechanical compression, the heat produced by the absorption heat pump is 31% cheaper. From (h, x) and (s, x) diagrams, exergy losses for each component can be determined leading to an exergetic efficiency of 75% which provides the quality index of the absorption cycle. (author).

  17. Evaluating new methods for direct measurement of the moderator temperature coefficient in nuclear power plants during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makai, M.; Kalya, Z.; Nemes, I.; Pos, I.; Por, G.

    2007-01-01

    Moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity is not monitored during fuel cycles in WWER reactors, because it is not very easy or impossible to measure it without disturbing the normal operation. Two new methods were tested in our WWER type nuclear power plant to try methodologies, which enable to measure that important to safety parameter during the fuel cycle. One is based on small perturbances, and only small changes are requested in operation, the other is based on noise methods, which means it is without interference with reactor operation. Both method is new that aspects that they uses the plant computer data(VERONA) based signals calculated by C P ORCA diffusion code (Authors)

  18. Monte Carlo analysis of experiments on the reactivity temperature coefficient for UO2 and MOX light water moderated lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erradi, L.; Chetaine, A.; Chakir, E.; Kharchaf, A.; Elbardouni, T.; Elkhoukhi, T.

    2005-01-01

    In a previous work, we have analysed the main French experiments available on the reactivity temperature coefficient (RTC): CREOLE and MISTRAL experiments. In these experiments, the RTC has been measured in both UO 2 and UO 2 -PuO 2 PWR type lattices. Our calculations, using APOLLO2 code with CEA93 library based on JEF2.2 evaluation, have shown that the calculation error in UO 2 lattices is less than 1 pcm/C degrees which is considered as the target accuracy. On the other hand the calculation error in the MOX lattices is more significant in both low and high temperature ranges: an average error of -2 ± 0.5 pcm/C degrees is observed in low temperatures and an error of +3 ± 2 pcm/C degrees is obtained for temperatures higher than 250 C degrees. In the present work, we analysed additional experimental benchmarks on the RTC of UO 2 and MOX light water moderated lattices. To analyze these benchmarks and with the aim of minimizing uncertainties related to modelling of the experimental set up, we chose the Monte Carlo method which has the advantage of taking into account in the most exact manner the geometry of the experimental configurations. This analysis shows for the UO 2 lattices, a maximum experiment-calculation deviation of about 0,7 pcm/C degrees, which is below the target accuracy for this type of lattices. For the KAMINI experiment, which relates to the measurement of the RTC in a light water moderated lattice using U-233 as fuel our analysis shows that the ENDF/B6 library gives the best result, with an experiment-calculation deviation of the order of -0,16 pcm/C degrees. The analysis of the benchmarks using MOX fuel made it possible to highlight a discrepancy between experiment and calculation on the RTC of about -0.7 pcm/C degrees (for a range of temperatures going from 20 to 248 C degrees) and -1,2 pcm/C degrees (for a range of temperatures going from 20 to 80 C degrees). This result, in particular the tendency which has the error to decrease when the

  19. Electrolysis test of different composite membranes at elevated temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Kalmar

    temperatures, phosphoric acid (H3PO4)[1] and zirconium phosphate (ZrP)[2] were introduced. These composite membranes were tested in an electrolysis setup. A typical electrolysis test was performed at 130°C with a galvanostatic load. Polarization curves were recorded under stationary conditions. Testing...... night at 150°C in a zirconium phosphate saturated 85wt% phosphoric acid solution. Different thicknesses of membranes were tested and as expected, the performance increased when the thickness of the membranes decreased. Furthermore composite membranes only treated with phosphoric acid or only treated...

  20. Temperature increase beneath etched dentin discs during composite polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaarslan, Emine Sirin; Secilmis, Asli; Bulbul, Mehmet; Yildirim, Cihan; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to measure the temperature increase during the polymerization of a composite resin beneath acid-etched or laser-etched dentin discs. The irradiation of dentin with an Er:YAG laser may have a positive effect on the thermal conductivity of dentin. This technique has not been studied extensively. Forty dentin discs (5 mm in diameter and 0.5 or 1 mm in height) were prepared from extracted permanent third molars. These dentin discs were etched with 20% orthophosphoric acid or an Er:YAG laser, and were then placed on an apparatus developed to measure temperature increases. The composite resin was polymerized with a high-intensity quartz tungsten halogen (HQTH) or light-emitting diode unit (LED). The temperature increase was measured under the dentin disc with a J-type thermocouple wire that was connected to a data logger. Five measurements were made for each dentin disc, curing unit, and etching system combination. Differences between the initial and the highest temperature readings were taken, and the five calculated temperature changes were averaged to determine the value of the temperature increase. Statistical analysis was performed with a three-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests at a 0.05 level of significance. Further SEM examinations were performed. The temperature increase values varied significantly, depending on etching systems (p < 0.05), dentin thicknesses (p < 0.05), and curing units (p < 0.05). Temperature increases measured beneath laser-etched discs were significantly higher than those for acid-etched dentin discs (p < 0.05). The HQTH unit induced significantly higher temperature increases than the LED unit (p < 0.05). The LED unit induced the lowest temperature change (5.2°C) in the 1-mm, acid-etched dentin group. The HQTH unit induced the highest temperature change (10.4°C) for the 0.5-mm, laser-etched dentin group. The risk of heat-induced pulpal damage should be taken into consideration

  1. Temperature-related changes in respiration and Q10 coefficient of Guava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bron Ilana Urbano

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Guava (Psidium guajava L. is a tropical fruit that presents fast post-harvest ripening; therefore it is a very perishable product. Inappropriate storage temperature and retail practices can accelerate fruit quality loss. The objective of this study was to evaluate the respiratory activity (RA, the ethylene production (EP and Q10 of guava fruit at different storage temperatures. 'Paluma' guava fruits were harvested at maturity stage 1 (dark-green skin and stored at either 1, 11, 21, 31 or 41ºC; RA and EP were determined after 12, 36, 84 and 156 h of storage. RA and EP rates at 1 and 11ºC were the lowest - 0.16 and 0.43 mmol CO2 kg-1 h-1 and 0.003 and 0.019 µmol C2H4 kg-1 h-1, respectively. When guavas were stored at 21ºC, a gradual increase occurred in RA and EP, reaching 2.24 mmol CO2 kg-1 h-1 and 0.20 µmol C2H4 kg-1 h-1, after 156 h of storage. The highest RA and EP were recorded for guavas stored at 31ºC. In spite of high RA, guavas stored at 41ºC presented EP similar to guavas stored at 11ºC, an indicator of heat-stress injury. Considering the 1-11ºC range, the mean Q10 value was around 3.0; the Q10 value almost duplicated at 11-21ºC range (5.9. At 21-31ºC and 31-41ºC, Q10 was 1.5 and 0.8, respectively. Knowing Q10, respiratory variation and ripening behavior in response to different temperatures, fruit storage and retail conditions can be optimized to reduce quality losses.

  2. Estimation of internal heat transfer coefficients and detection of rib positions in gas turbine blades from transient surface temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidrich, P; Wolfersdorf, J v; Schmidt, S; Schnieder, M

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a non-invasive, non-destructive, transient inverse measurement technique that allows one to determine internal heat transfer coefficients and rib positions of real gas turbine blades from outer surface temperature measurements after a sudden flow heating. The determination of internal heat transfer coefficients is important during the design process to adjust local heat transfer to spatial thermal load. The detection of rib positions is important during production to fulfill design and quality requirements. For the analysis the one-dimensional transient heat transfer problem inside of the turbine blade's wall was solved. This solution was combined with the Levenberg-Marquardt method to estimate the unknown boundary condition by an inverse technique. The method was tested with artificial data to determine uncertainties with positive results. Then experimental testing with a reference model was carried out. Based on the results, it is concluded that the presented inverse technique could be used to determine internal heat transfer coefficients and to detect rib positions of real turbine blades.

  3. Analytical calculation of the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors for plutonium and uranium-thorium fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology - KTH, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: alby@anl.gov

    2007-01-15

    We analytically evaluated the fuel coefficient of temperature both for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors when they utilize as fuel plutonium and minor actinides from light water reactors spent fuel or a mixture of 50% uranium, enriched 20% in {sup 235}U, and 50% thorium. In both cores the calculation involves the evaluation of the resonances integrals of the high absorbers fuel nuclides {sup 240}Pu, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th and it requires the esteem of the Dancoff-Ginsburg factor for a pebble bed or prismatic core. The Dancoff-Ginsburg factor represents the only discriminating parameter in the results for the two different reactors types; in fact, both the pebble bed and the prismatic reactors share the same the pseudo-cross-section describing an infinite medium made of graphite filled by TRISO particles. We considered only the resolved resonances with a statistical spin factor equal to one and we took into account 267, 72, 212 resonances in the range 1.057-5692, 6.674-14485, 21.78-3472 eV for {sup 240}Pu, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, respectively, for investigating the influence on the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient of the variation of the TRISO kernel radius and TRISO particles packing fraction from 100, 200 to 300 {mu}m and from 10% to 50%, respectively. Finally, in the pebble bed core, we varied the radius of the pebble for setting a fuel temperature reactivity coefficient similar to the one of a prismatic core.

  4. Relationship between tolerance factor and temperature coefficient of permittivity of temperature-stable high permittivity BaTiO3–Bi(MeO3 compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natthaphon Raengthon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The temperature coefficient of permittivity (TCε of BaTiO3–Bi(MeO3 solid solutions were investigated. It was determined that as the tolerance factor was decreased with the addition of Bi(MeO3, the TCε shifted from large negative values to TCε values approaching zero. It is proposed that the different bonding nature of the dopant cation affects the magnitude and temperature stability of the permittivity. This study suggests that the relationship between tolerance factor and TCε can be used as a guide to design new dielectric compounds exhibiting temperature-stable high permittivity characteristics, which is similar to past research on perovskite and pyrochlore-based microwave dielectrics.

  5. Effect of variable heat transfer coefficient on tissue temperature next to a large vessel during radiofrequency tumor ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro Cleber

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the current shortcomings of radiofrequency (RF tumor ablation is its limited performance in regions close to large blood vessels, resulting in high recurrence rates at these locations. Computer models have been used to determine tissue temperatures during tumor ablation procedures. To simulate large vessels, either constant wall temperature or constant convective heat transfer coefficient (h have been assumed at the vessel surface to simulate convection. However, the actual distribution of the temperature on the vessel wall is non-uniform and time-varying, and this feature makes the convective coefficient variable. Methods This paper presents a realistic time-varying model in which h is a function of the temperature distribution at the vessel wall. The finite-element method (FEM was employed in order to model RF hepatic ablation. Two geometrical configurations were investigated. The RF electrode was placed at distances of 1 and 5 mm from a large vessel (10 mm diameter. Results When the ablation procedure takes longer than 1–2 min, the attained coagulation zone obtained with both time-varying h and constant h does not differ significantly. However, for short duration ablation (5–10 s and when the electrode is 1 mm away from the vessel, the use of constant h can lead to errors as high as 20% in the estimation of the coagulation zone. Conclusion For tumor ablation procedures typically lasting at least 5 min, this study shows that modeling the heat sink effect of large vessels by applying constant h as a boundary condition will yield precise results while reducing computational complexity. However, for other thermal therapies with shorter treatment using a time-varying h may be necessary.

  6. TIME-TEMPERATURE-TRANSFORMATION (TTT) DIAGRAMS FOR FUTURE WASTE COMPOSITIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billings, A.; Edwards, T.

    2010-01-01

    As a part of the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms defined by the Department of Energy - Office of Environmental Management, the waste form stability must be determined for each of the projected high-level waste (HLW) types at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Specifically, WAPS 1.4.1 requires the glass transition temperature (T g ) to be defined and time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagrams to be developed. The T g of a glass is an indicator of the approximate temperature where the supercooled liquid converts to a solid on cooling or conversely, where the solid begins to behave as a viscoelastic solid on heating. A TTT diagram identifies the crystalline phases that can form as a function of time and temperature for a given waste type or more specifically, the borosilicate glass waste form. In order to assess durability, the Product Consistency Test (PCT) was used and the durability results compared to the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. The measurement of glass transition temperature and the development of TTT diagrams have already been performed for the seven Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) projected compositions as defined in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and in SRNL-STI-2009-00025. Additional phase transformation information exists for other projected compositions, but overall these compositions did not cover composition regions estimated for future waste processing. To develop TTT diagrams for future waste types, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) fabricated two caches of glass from reagent grade oxides to simulate glass compositions which would be likely processed with and without Al dissolution. These were used for glass transition temperature measurement and TTT diagram development. The glass transition temperatures of both glasses were measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and were recorded to be 448 C and 452 C. Using the previous TTT diagrams as guidance

  7. Mechanical behavior and fatigue in polymeric composites at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, Y.; Bussiba, A.; Mathias, H.

    1986-01-01

    Advanced fiber reinforced polymeric composite materials are often suggested as structural materials at low temperature. In this study, graphite epoxy and Kevlar-49/epoxy systems were investigated. Fatigue behavior was emphasized after establishing the standard monotonic mechanical properties, including fracture resistance parameters at 77, 190, and 296 K. Tension-tension fatigue crack propagation testing was carried out at nominal constant stress intensity amplitudes using precracked compact tensile specimens. The crack tip damage zone was measured and tracked by an electro-potential device, opening displacement gage, microscopic observation, and acoustic emission activity recording. Fractograhic and metallographic studies were performed with emphasis on fracture morphology and modes, failure processes, and description of sequential events. On the basis of these experimental results, the problem of fatigue resistance, including low temperature effects, is analyzed and discussed. The fundamental concepts of fatigue in composites are assessed, particularly in terms of fracture mechanics methods

  8. Elastic scattering and transport coefficients for a quark plasma in SUf(3) at finite temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehberg, P.; Klevansky, S. P.; Hüfner, J.

    1996-02-01

    The temperature dependence of the elastic-scattering processes qq' → qq' and q overlineq' → q overlineq' , with q, q' = u, d, s is studied as a function of the scattering angle and the center-of-mass energy of the collision within the framework of the SUf(3) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. Critical scattering at threshold is observed in the q overlineq' → q overlineq' process, leading to an enhancement of the cross section as occurs in the phenomenon of critical opalescence. Transport properties such as viscosity, mean free paths and thermal relaxation times are calculated. Strangeness enhancement is investigated via the chemical relaxation times, which are found to be considerably higher than those calculated via perturbative QCD. A comparison with the experimental values for the strangeness enhancement in S + S collisions leads to an upper limit of 4 fm/ c for the lifetime of the plasma.

  9. Robust high temperature composite and CO sensor made from such composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Prabir K.; Ramasamy, Ramamoorthy; Li, Xiaogan; Akbar, Sheikh A.

    2010-04-13

    Described herein is a composite exhibiting a change in electrical resistance proportional to the concentration of a reducing gas present in a gas mixture, detector and sensor devices comprising the composite, a method for making the composite and for making devices comprising the composite, and a process for detecting and measuring a reducing gas in an atmosphere. In particular, the reducing gas may be carbon monoxide and the composite may comprise rutile-phase TiO2 particles and platinum nanoclusters. The composite, upon exposure to a gas mixture containing CO in concentrations of up to 10,000 ppm, exhibits an electrical resistance proportional to the concentration of the CO present. The composite is useful for making sensitive, low drift, fast recovering detectors and sensors, and for measuring CO concentrations in a gas mixture present at levels from sub-ppm up to 10,000 ppm. The composites, and devices made from the composites, are stable and operable in a temperature range of from about 450.degree. C. to about 700.degree. C., such as may be found in a combustion chamber.

  10. Room temperature synthesis of high temperature stable lanthanum phosphate–yttria nano composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, Sasidharan; Raj, Athira N.; Jyothi, C.K.; Warrier, K.G.K.; Padmanabhan, P.V.A.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A facile aqueous sol–gel route involving precipitation–peptization mechanism followed by electrostatic stabilization is used for synthesizing nanocrystalline composite containing lanthanum phosphate and yttria. Highlights: ► A novel lanthanum phosphate–Y 2 O 3 nano composite is synthesized for the first time using a modified facile sol gel process. ► The composite becomes crystalline at 600 °C and X-ray diffraction pattern is indexed for monoclinic LaPO 4 and cubic yttria. ► The composite synthesized was tested up to 1300 °C and no reaction between the phases of the constituents is observed with the morphologies of the phases being retained. -- Abstract: A facile aqueous sol–gel route involving precipitation–peptization mechanism followed by electrostatic stabilization is used for synthesizing nanocrystalline composite containing lanthanum phosphate and yttria. Lanthanum phosphate (80 wt%)–yttria (20 wt%) nano composite (LaPO 4 –20%Y 2 O 3 ), has an average particle size of ∼70 nm after heat treatment of precursor at 600 °C. TG–DTA analysis reveals that stable phase of the composite is formed on heating the precursor at 600 °C. The TEM images of the composite show rod shape morphology of LaPO 4 in which yttria is acquiring near spherical shape. Phase identification of the composite as well as the phase stability up to 1300 °C was carried out using X-ray diffraction technique. With the phases being stable at higher temperatures, the composite synthesized should be a potential material for high temperature applications like thermal barrier coatings and metal melting applications.

  11. Evaluating the coefficient of thermal expansion using time periods of minimal thermal gradient for a temperature driven structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, J.; Abdel-Jaber, H.; Yarnold, M.; Glisic, B.

    2017-04-01

    Structural Health Monitoring aims to characterize the performance of a structure from a combination of recorded sensor data and analytic techniques. Many methods are concerned with quantifying the elastic response of the structure, treating temperature changes as noise in the analysis. While these elastic profiles do demonstrate a portion of structural behavior, thermal loads on a structure can induce comparable strains to elastic loads. Understanding this relationship between the temperature of the structure and the resultant strain and displacement can provide in depth knowledge of the structural condition. A necessary parameter for this form of analysis is the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE). The CTE of a material relates the amount of expansion or contraction a material undergoes per degree change in temperature, and can be determined from temperature-strain relationship given that the thermal strain can be isolated. Many times with concrete, the actual amount of expansion with temperature in situ varies from the given values for the CTE due to thermally generated elastic strain, which complicates evaluation of the CTE. To accurately characterize the relationship between temperature and strain on a structure, the actual thermal behavior of the structure needs to be analyzed. This rate can vary for different parts of a structure, depending on boundary conditions. In a case of unrestrained structures, the strain in the structure should be linearly related to the temperature change. Thermal gradients in a structure can affect this relationship, as they induce curvature and deplanations in the cross section. This paper proposes a method that addresses these challenges in evaluating the CTE.

  12. Buckling and postbuckling of composite panels with cutouts subjected to combined edge shear and temperature change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Kim, Yong H.

    1995-01-01

    The results of a detailed study of the buckling and postbuckling responses of composite panels with central circular cutouts are presented. The panels are subjected to combined edge shear and temperature change. The panels are discretized by using a two-field degenerate solid element with each of the displacement components having a linear variation throughout the thickness of the panel. The fundamental unknowns consist of the average mechanical strains through the thickness and the displacement components. The effects of geometric nonlinearities and laminated anisotropic material behavior are included. The stability boundary, postbuckling response and the hierarchical sensitivity coefficients are evaluated. The hierarchical sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the buckling and postbuckling responses to variations in the panel stiffnesses, and the material properties of both the individual layers and the constituents (fibers and matrix). Numerical results are presented for composite panels with central circular cutouts subjected to combined edge shear and temperature change, showing the effects of variations in the hole diameter, laminate stacking sequence and fiber orientation, on the stability boundary and postbuckling response and their sensitivity to changes in the various panel parameters.

  13. Three-dimensional temperature field model of thermally decomposing resin composite irradiated by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Minsun; Jiang Houman; Liu Zejin

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental equations governing the temperature field of thermally decomposing resin composite irradiated by laser are derived from mass and energy conservation laws with the control Janume method. The thermal decomposition of resin is described by a multi-step model. An assumption is proposed that the flow of pyrolysis gas is one-dimensional, which makes it possible to consider the influence of pyrolysis gas convective transport and realize the closure of the three-dimensional model without introducing mechanical quantities. In view of the anisotropy of resin composite, expressions of the thermal conductivities of partially pyrolyzed material are deduced, as well as the computing formula for the laser absorption coefficient of partially pyrolyzed material. The energy conservation equation is consistent with reference under some simplifications. (authors)

  14. The impact of fuel temperature reactivity coefficient on loss of reactivity control accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. H.; Ryu, E. H.; Song, Y. M.; Jung, J. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear reactors experience small power fluctuations or anticipated operational transients during even normal power operation. During normal operation, the reactivity is mainly controlled by liquid zone controllers, adjuster rods, mechanical control absorbers, and moderator poison. Even when the reactor power is increased abruptly and largely from an accident and when reactor control systems cannot be actuated quickly due to a fast transient, the reactor should be controlled and stabilized by its inherent safety parameter, such as a negative PCR (Power Coefficient of Reactivity) feedback. A PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor), it is well designed for the reactor to have a negative PCR so that the reactor can be safely shut down or stabilized whenever an abrupt reactivity insertion into the reactor core occurs or the reactor power is abruptly increased. However, it is known that a CANDU reactor has a small amount of PCR, as either negative or positive, because of the different design basis and safety concepts from a PWR. CNSC's regulatory and safety regime has stated that; The PCR of CANDU reactors does not pose a significant risk. Consistent with Canadian nuclear safety requirements, nuclear power plants must have an appropriate combination of inherent and engineered safety features incorporated into the design of the reactor safety and control systems. A reactor design that has a PCR is quite acceptable provided that the reactor is stable against power fluctuations, and that the probability and consequences of any potential accidents that would be aggravated by a positive reactivity feedback are maintained within CNSCprescribed limits. Recently, it was issued licensing the refurbished Wolsong unit 1 in Korea to be operated continuously after its design lifetime in which the calculated PCR was shown to have a small positive value by applying the recent physics code systems, which are composed of WIMS IST, DRAGON IST, and RFSP IST. These code systems were transferred

  15. Low-temperature MIR to submillimeter mass absorption coefficient of interstellar dust analogues. II. Mg and Fe-rich amorphous silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demyk, K.; Meny, C.; Leroux, H.; Depecker, C.; Brubach, J.-B.; Roy, P.; Nayral, C.; Ojo, W.-S.; Delpech, F.

    2017-10-01

    Context. To model the cold dust emission observed in the diffuse interstellar medium, in dense molecular clouds or in cold clumps that could eventually form new stars, it is mandatory to know the physical and spectroscopic properties of this dust and to understand its emission. Aims: This work is a continuation of previous studies aiming at providing astronomers with spectroscopic data of realistic cosmic dust analogues for the interpretation of observations. The aim of the present work is to extend the range of studied analogues to iron-rich silicate dust analogues. Methods: Ferromagnesium amorphous silicate dust analogues were produced by a sol-gel method with a mean composition close to Mg1-xFexSiO3 with x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4. Part of each sample was annealed at 500 °C for two hours in a reducing atmosphere to modify the oxidation state of iron. We have measured the mass absorption coefficient (MAC) of these eight ferromagnesium amorphous silicate dust analogues in the spectral domain 30-1000 μm for grain temperature in the range 10-300 K and at room temperature in the 5-40 μm range. Results: The MAC of ferromagnesium samples behaves in the same way as the MAC of pure Mg-rich amorphous silicate samples. In the 30-300 K range, the MAC increases with increasing grain temperature whereas in the range 10-30 K, we do not see any change of the MAC. The MAC cannot be described by a single power law in λ- β. The MAC of the samples does not show any clear trend with the iron content. However the annealing process has, on average, an effect on the MAC that we explain by the evolution of the structure of the samples induced by the processing. The MAC of all the samples is much higher than the MAC calculated by dust models. Conclusions: The complex behavior of the MAC of amorphous silicates with wavelength and temperature is observed whatever the exact silicate composition (Mg vs. Fe amount). It is a universal characteristic of amorphous materials, and therefore of

  16. Transport of temperature-velocity covariance in gas-solid flow and its relation to the axial dispersion coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Shankar; Sun, Bo

    2015-11-01

    The presence of solid particles in a steady laminar flow generates velocity fluctuations with respect to the mean fluid velocity that are termed pseudo-turbulence. The level of these pseudo-turbulent velocity fluctuations has been characterized in statistically homogeneous fixed particle assemblies and freely evolving suspensions using particle-resolved direct numerical simulation (PR-DNS) by Mehrabadi et al. (JFM, 2015), and it is found to be a significant contribution to the total kinetic energy associated with the flow. The correlation of these velocity fluctuations with temperature (or a passive scalar) generates a flux term that appears in the transport equation for the average fluid temperature (or average scalar concentration). The magnitude of this transport of temperature-velocity covariance is quantified using PR-DNS of thermally fully developed flow past a statistically homogeneous fixed assembly of particles, and the budget of the average fluid temperature equation is presented. The relation of this transport term to the axial dispersion coefficient (Brenner, Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. A, 1980) is established. The simulation results are then interpreted in the context of our understanding of axial dispersion in gas-solid flow. NSF CBET 1336941.

  17. Effect of composition and temperature on viscosity and electrical conductivity of borosilicate glasses for Hanford nuclear waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrma, P.; Piepel, G.F.; Smith, D.E.; Redgate, P.E.; Schweiger, M.J.

    1993-04-01

    Viscosity and electrical conductivity of 79 simulated borosilicate glasses in the expected range of compositions to be produced in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant were measured within the temperature span from 950 to 1250 degree C. The nine major oxide components were SiO 2 , B 2 O 3 , Li 2 O, Na 2 O, CaO, MgO, Fe 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , and ZrO 2 . The test compositions were generated statistically. The data were fitted by Fulcher and Arrhenius equations with temperature coefficients being multilinear functions of the mass fractions of the oxide components. Mixture models were also developed for the natural logarithm of viscosity and that of electrical conductivity at 1150 degree C. Least squares regression was used to obtain component coefficients for all the models

  18. Theoretical Adiabatic Temperature and Chemical Composition of Sodium Combustion Flame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2003-01-01

    Sodium fire safety analysis requires fundamental combustion properties, e.g., heat of combustion, flame temperature, and composition. We developed the GENESYS code for a theoretical investigation of sodium combustion flame.Our principle conclusions on sodium combustion under atmospheric air conditions are (a) the maximum theoretical flame temperature is 1950 K, and it is not affected by the presence of moisture; the uppermost limiting factor is the chemical instability of the condensed sodium-oxide products under high temperature; (b) the main combustion product is liquid Na 2 O in dry air condition and liquid Na 2 O with gaseous NaOH in moist air; and (c) the chemical equilibrium prediction of the residual gaseous reactants in the flame is indispensable for sodium combustion modeling

  19. Determination of physical characteristics, chemical composition and digestion coefficients of treated lemon pulp with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in goat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadvar, P; Dayani, O; Mehdipour, M; Morovat, M

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of processing of lemon pulp with Saccharomyces cerevisiae on physical properties, chemical composition, digestion coefficients and blood parameters. Eight adult male Raeini goats were used in a 28-day period. The experimental design was a completely randomised design with two treatments and four replicates. The first 21 days were for adaptation, and the last 7 days were for collecting samples. The animals were housed in individual metabolic cages equipped with a urine-faeces separator and were fed with diet containing alfalfa hay (60%) and lemon pulp (40%) at the maintenance level. Collected data were subjected to analysis of completely randomised design. With diet containing processed lemon pulp, functional specific gravity, bulk density, soluble dry matter, percentage of crude protein, neutral detergent fibre (NDF), acid detergent fibre and crude ash were significantly increased and water-holding capacity, insoluble dry matter, insoluble ash percentage of dry matter, organic matter, crude fat, non-fibrous carbohydrates and nitrogen-free extract were significantly decreased (p lemon pulp (p lemon pulp, digestibility of crude protein and NDF was higher (p lemon pulp with S. cerevisiae improved the physical characteristics and increased the percentage of crude protein and the digestion coefficients of protein and NDF. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Compositional dependence of absorption coefficient and band-gap for Nb2O5-SiO2 mixture thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sancho-Parramon, Jordi; Janicki, Vesna; Zorc, Hrvoje

    2008-01-01

    The absorption coefficient of composite films consisting of niobia (Nb 2 O 5 ) and silica (SiO 2 ) mixtures is studied for photon energies around the band gap. The films were deposited by co-evaporation and their composition was varied by changing the ratio of deposition rates of the two materials. Both, as-deposited and thermally annealed films were characterized by different techniques: the absorption coefficient was determined by spectrophotometric measurements and the structural properties were investigated using infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The correlation between the variations of absorption properties and film composition and structure is established. The absorption coefficients determined experimentally are compared with the results derived from effective medium theories in order to evaluate the suitability of these theories for the studied composites

  1. Development of a standard for calculation and measurement of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in water-moderated power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosteller, R.D.; Hall, R.A.; Lancaster, D.B.; Young, E.H.; Gavin, P.H.; Robertson, S.T.

    1998-01-01

    The contents of ANS 19.11, the standard for ''Calculation and Measurement of the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity in Water-Moderated Power Reactors,'' are described. The standard addresses the calculation of the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) both at standby conditions and at power. In addition, it describes several methods for the measurement of the at-power MTC and assesses their relative advantages and disadvantages. Finally, it specifies a minimum set of documentation requirements for compliance with the standard

  2. Concurrent Probabilistic Simulation of High Temperature Composite Structural Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Frank

    1996-01-01

    A computational structural/material analysis and design tool which would meet industry's future demand for expedience and reduced cost is presented. This unique software 'GENOA' is dedicated to parallel and high speed analysis to perform probabilistic evaluation of high temperature composite response of aerospace systems. The development is based on detailed integration and modification of diverse fields of specialized analysis techniques and mathematical models to combine their latest innovative capabilities into a commercially viable software package. The technique is specifically designed to exploit the availability of processors to perform computationally intense probabilistic analysis assessing uncertainties in structural reliability analysis and composite micromechanics. The primary objectives which were achieved in performing the development were: (1) Utilization of the power of parallel processing and static/dynamic load balancing optimization to make the complex simulation of structure, material and processing of high temperature composite affordable; (2) Computational integration and synchronization of probabilistic mathematics, structural/material mechanics and parallel computing; (3) Implementation of an innovative multi-level domain decomposition technique to identify the inherent parallelism, and increasing convergence rates through high- and low-level processor assignment; (4) Creating the framework for Portable Paralleled architecture for the machine independent Multi Instruction Multi Data, (MIMD), Single Instruction Multi Data (SIMD), hybrid and distributed workstation type of computers; and (5) Market evaluation. The results of Phase-2 effort provides a good basis for continuation and warrants Phase-3 government, and industry partnership.

  3. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections

  4. Thermal stability and temperature coefficients of four rare-earth-cobalt matrix magnets heated in dry air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strnat, R. M. W.; Liu, S.; Strnat, K. J.

    1982-03-01

    Flux-loss characteristics during long-term air aging of four rare-earth-cobalt matrix magnet types were measured. Irreversible losses and reversible temperature coefficients on heating above room temperature are reported. Purely magnetic and permanent microstructure-related changes during aging were differentiated by measuring hysteresis curves before and after long-term exposure. Three commercial polymer-bonded magnets using different rare-earth-cobalt-transition metal alloys and a solder-matrix magnet with Sm(Co, Cu, Fe, Zr)7.4 were studied. They were cycled between 25 °C and maximum temperatures to 150 °C (25 ° intervals) as applicable. Aging data at 50 and 125 °C for an exposure time of 3300 h are reported. The 2-17 samples have a stability far superior to bonded 1-5. The soft metal binder imparts significantly better aging behavior on precipitation-hardened 2-17 magnet alloys above 100 °C than an epoxy resin matrix.

  5. W/Cu composites produced by low temperature Pulse Plasma Sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinski, M.S.; Fortuna, E.; Michalski, A.J.; Kurzydlowski, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    The plasma facing components (PFCs) must withstand the thermal, mechanical and neutron loads under cyclic mode of operation and vacuum. Despite that PFCs of ITER and demonstration reactors must assure reliability and long in service lifetime. For that reason PFCs are designed to be made of beryllium, tungsten or carbon fibre composites armours and copper based heat sink material. Such design concepts can only be used if joining methods of these dissimilar materials are resolved. Several techniques have been developed for joining W and Cu e. g. casting of pure Cu onto W, high temperature brazing, direct diffusion bonding or CVDs of W onto Cu. The main problem in the development of such joints is the large difference in the coefficients of thermal expansion, CTE (alpha Cu > 4 alpha W) and elastic modula (ECu > 0.2 EW). These differences result in large stresses at the W/Cu interfaces during manufacturing and/or during operation, which may lead to cracking or delamination reducing lifetime of the components. Possible solution to this problem is the use of W-Cu composites (FGM). W-Cu composites are widely used for spark erosion electrodes, in heavy duty circuit breakers and as heat sinks of microelectronic devices. They are commonly produced by infiltration of a porous sintered tungsten by liquid copper. Other technological route is powder metallurgy. Coatings can be produced by low pressure plasma spraying. All these methods, however, are known to have some disadvantages. For infiltration there is a 30 wt.% limit of Cu content while for powder metallurgy and plasma spraying techniques porosity is of concern. In our work the W-Cu composites of different composition were produced by pulse plasma sintering (PPS). This new method utilizes pulsed high electric discharges to heat the powders under uniaxial load. The arc discharges clean surface of powder particles and intensify diffusion. The total sintering time is reduced to several minutes. In our investigations various

  6. Monte Carlo analysis of experiments on the reactivity temperature coefficient for UO2 and MOX light water moderated lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakir, E.; Erradi, L.; Bardouni, T El.; Khoukhi, T El.; Boukhal, H.; Meroun, O.; Bakkari, B El

    2007-01-01

    Full text: In a previous work, we have analysed the main french experiments available on the reactivity temperature coefficient (RTC) : CREAOLE and Mistral experiments. In these experiments, the RTC has been measured in both UO2 and UO2-PuO2 PWR type lattices. Our calculations, using APPOLO2 code with CEA93 library based on JEF2.2 evaluation, have shown that the calculation error in UO2 lattices is less than 1 pcm/Deg C which is considered as the target accuracy. On the other hand the calculation error in the MOX lattices is more significant in both low and high temperature ranges : an average error of -2 ± 0.5 pcm/Deg C is observed in low temperatures and an error of +3±2 pcm/Deg C is obtained for temperature higher than 250Deg C. In the present work, we analysed additional experimental benchmarks on the RTC of UO2 and MOX light water moderated lattices. To analyze these benchmarks and with the aim of minimizing uncertainties related to modelling of the experimental set up, we chose the Monte Carlo Method which has the advantage of taking into account in the most exact manner the geometry of the experimental configurations. Thus we have used the code MCNP5, for its recognized power and its availability. This analysis shows for the UO2 lattices, an average experiment-calculation deviation of about 0,5 pcm/Deg C, which is largely below the target accuracy for this type of lattices, that we estimate at approximately 1 pcm/Deg C. For the KAMINI experiment, which relates to the measurement of the RTC in light water moderated lattice using U-233 as fuel our analysis shows that the Endf/B6 library gives the best result, with an experiment -calculation deviation of the order of -0,16 pcm/Deg C. The analysis of the benchmarks using MOX fuel made it possible to highlight a discrepancy between experiment and calculation on the RTC of about -0.7pcm/Deg C ( for a range of temperature going from 20 to 248 Deg C) and -1.2 pcm/Deg C ( for a range of temperature going from 20 to

  7. High temperature resin matrix composites for aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Accomplishments and the outlook for graphite-polyimide composite structures are briefly outlined. Laminates, skin-stiffened and honeycomb sandwich panels, chopped fiber moldings, and structural components were fabricated with Celion/LARC-160 and Celion/PMR-15 composite materials. Interlaminar shear and flexure strength data obtained on as-fabricated specimens and specimens that were exposed for 125 hours at 589 K indicate that epoxy sized and polyimide sized Celion graphite fibers exhibit essentially the same behavior in a PMR-15 matrix composite. Analyses and tests of graphite-polyimide compression and shear panels indicate that utilization in moderately loaded applications offers the potential for achieving a 30 to 50 percent reduction in structural mass compared to conventional aluminum panels. Data on effects of moisture, temperature, thermal cycling, and shuttle fluids on mechanical properties indicate that both LARC-160 and PMR-15 are suitable matrix materials for a graphite-polyimide aft body flap. No technical road blocks to building a graphite-polyimide composite aft body flap are identified.

  8. Temperature dependence of the particle/gas partition coefficient: An application to predict indoor gas-phase concentrations of semi-volatile organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Wenjuan, E-mail: Wenjuan.Wei@cstb.fr [University of Paris-Est, Scientific and Technical Center for Building (CSTB), Health and Comfort Department, French Indoor Air Quality Observatory (OQAI), 84 Avenue Jean Jaurès, Champs sur Marne, 77447 Marne la Vallée Cedex 2 (France); Mandin, Corinne [University of Paris-Est, Scientific and Technical Center for Building (CSTB), Health and Comfort Department, French Indoor Air Quality Observatory (OQAI), 84 Avenue Jean Jaurès, Champs sur Marne, 77447 Marne la Vallée Cedex 2 (France); INSERM-U1085, Irset-Research Institute for Environmental and Occupational Health, Rennes (France); LERES-Environment and Health Research Laboratory (Irset and EHESP Technologic Platform), Rennes (France); Blanchard, Olivier [EHESP-School of Public Health, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Rennes (France); INSERM-U1085, Irset-Research Institute for Environmental and Occupational Health, Rennes (France); Mercier, Fabien [EHESP-School of Public Health, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Rennes (France); LERES-Environment and Health Research Laboratory (Irset and EHESP Technologic Platform), Rennes (France); INSERM-U1085, Irset-Research Institute for Environmental and Occupational Health, Rennes (France); Pelletier, Maud [EHESP-School of Public Health, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Rennes (France); INSERM-U1085, Irset-Research Institute for Environmental and Occupational Health, Rennes (France); Le Bot, Barbara [EHESP-School of Public Health, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Rennes (France); LERES-Environment and Health Research Laboratory (Irset and EHESP Technologic Platform), Rennes (France); INSERM-U1085, Irset-Research Institute for Environmental and Occupational Health, Rennes (France); and others

    2016-09-01

    The indoor gas-phase concentrations of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) can be predicted from their respective concentrations in airborne particles by applying the particle/gas partitioning equilibrium. The temperature used for partitioning is often set to 25 °C. However, indoor temperatures frequently differ from this reference value. This assumption may result in errors in the predicted equilibrium gas-phase SVOC concentrations. To improve the prediction model, the temperature dependence of the particle/gas partition coefficient must be addressed. In this paper, a theoretical relationship between the particle/gas partition coefficient and temperature was developed based on the SVOC absorptive mechanism. The SVOC particle/gas partition coefficients predicted by employing the derived theoretical relationship agree well with the experimental data retrieved from the literature (R > 0.93). The influence of temperature on the equilibrium gas-phase SVOC concentration was quantified by a dimensionless analysis of the derived relationship between the SVOC particle/gas partition coefficient and temperature. The predicted equilibrium gas-phase SVOC concentration decreased by between 31% and 53% when the temperature was lowered by 6 °C, while it increased by up to 750% when the indoor temperature increased from 15 °C to 30 °C. - Highlights: • A theoretical relationship between K{sub p} and temperature was developed. • The relationship was based on the SVOC absorptive mechanism. • The temperature impact was quantified by a dimensionless analysis.

  9. Methods and compositions for treating low temperature subterranean well formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterji, J.

    1979-08-21

    An aqueous composition is described for treating subterranean formations having temperatures of up to 120 F. The aqueous composition consists of water, a water-soluble organic gelling agent, an oxidizing agent to supply free radicals, and a reducing agent to accelerate the generation of free radicals. Reducing agents are water-soluble metal salts of the halides, sulfates, nitrates or mixtures thereof. Oxidizing agents are water-soluble peroxides, persulfates or mixtures thereof. Gelling agents may be sodium polyacrylate, polyacrylic acid, polysodium-2-acrylamide-3-propylsulfonate polyacrylamides or polymetharylamides that have been hydrolyzed from 0 to 70% and neturalized with ammonium or alkali metal hydroxides; or gums such as guar, locust bean, taaga tragacanth, hydroxyethyl guar, hydroxy-propyl guar, carboxymethyl guar or mixtures thereof. 22 claims.

  10. Chemical composition and effective temperatures of metallic line white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, G.L.

    1974-01-01

    Model atmosphere techniques have been employed to determine the composition, effective temperatures, radii, masses and surface gravities of white dwarfs Ross 640 and van Maanen 2. The non-gray, LTE, convective, constant flux models employed collisional damping constants for the Ca II H and K lines that were measured in a laboratory device that simulated white dwarf atmospheric conditions. Ross 640 was found to have an extremely helium-rich composition and T/sub eff/ = 8500K, while the observed properties of van Maanen 2 were fitted best by a model with 91 percent helium, 9 percent hydrogen and T/sub eff/ = 6100K. The laboratory measurements of pressure shifts for the Ca II lines casts some doubt on the interpretation of recent radial velocity determinations for van Maanen 2. (U.S.)

  11. Development of a non-intrusive method for the determination of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity (MTC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaziere, C.

    2000-01-01

    The Moderator Temperature Coefficient of reactivity (MTC) plays an important role in the feedback mechanism and thus in the inherent stability of Pressurised Water Reactors (PWRs). Due to the inaccuracy of the traditional at-power MTC measurement techniques, many power utilities nowadays only measure the zero-power MTC since its determination is relatively straightforward and accurate. For the at-power MTC determination during the remaining fuel cycle, core calculations are assumed to be reliable enough. Nevertheless, these calculations were never benchmarked and most importantly, the use of high burnup fuel might induce a slightly positive MTC at Beginning Of Cycle (BOC) due to the high initial boron concentration. Even if in such a case the Doppler effect would still insure a negative reactivity feedback, monitoring the MTC throughout the cycle could become crucial. In this respect, not only the sign of the MTC is of importance, but also its magnitude. Consequently, developing a method that would permit monitoring the MTC during the fuel cycle is of great interest. One of the main disadvantages of the traditional at-power MTC measurement techniques is that the reactor has to be perturbed in order to induce a change of the moderator temperature. The modification of other parameters that can only be estimated by core calculation represents also a severe drawback of these methods, both for their precision and their reliability. A measurement performed at Ringhals-4 by using the so-called boron dilution method revealed that the uncertainty associated to the MTC estimation could even be much larger than previously expected due to the calculated reactivity corrections. These corrections are very sensitive to the input parameters chosen for the core simulation, and slight mis-estimations of these have large reactivity effects. It is known that if the reactivity noise and the moderator temperature noise could be measured, the MTC could be determined without disturbing

  12. Development of a non-intrusive method for the determination of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity (MTC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaziere, C

    2000-07-01

    The Moderator Temperature Coefficient of reactivity (MTC) plays an important role in the feedback mechanism and thus in the inherent stability of Pressurised Water Reactors (PWRs). Due to the inaccuracy of the traditional at-power MTC measurement techniques, many power utilities nowadays only measure the zero-power MTC since its determination is relatively straightforward and accurate. For the at-power MTC determination during the remaining fuel cycle, core calculations are assumed to be reliable enough. Nevertheless, these calculations were never benchmarked and most importantly, the use of high burnup fuel might induce a slightly positive MTC at Beginning Of Cycle (BOC) due to the high initial boron concentration. Even if in such a case the Doppler effect would still insure a negative reactivity feedback, monitoring the MTC throughout the cycle could become crucial. In this respect, not only the sign of the MTC is of importance, but also its magnitude. Consequently, developing a method that would permit monitoring the MTC during the fuel cycle is of great interest. One of the main disadvantages of the traditional at-power MTC measurement techniques is that the reactor has to be perturbed in order to induce a change of the moderator temperature. The modification of other parameters that can only be estimated by core calculation represents also a severe drawback of these methods, both for their precision and their reliability. A measurement performed at Ringhals-4 by using the so-called boron dilution method revealed that the uncertainty associated to the MTC estimation could even be much larger than previously expected due to the calculated reactivity corrections. These corrections are very sensitive to the input parameters chosen for the core simulation, and slight mis-estimations of these have large reactivity effects. It is known that if the reactivity noise and the moderator temperature noise could be measured, the MTC could be determined without disturbing

  13. Microstructure and temperature coefficient of resistance of thin cermet resistor films deposited from CrSi2-Cr-SiC targets by S-gun magnetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felmetsger, Valery V.

    2010-01-01

    Technological solutions for producing nanoscale cermet resistor films with sheet resistances above 1000 Ω/□ and low temperature coefficients of resistance (TCR) have been investigated. 2-40 nm thick cermet films were sputter deposited from CrSi 2 -Cr-SiC targets by a dual cathode dc S-gun magnetron. In addition to studying film resistance versus temperature, the nanofilm structural features and composition were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. This study has revealed that all cermet resistor films deposited at ambient and elevated temperatures were amorphous. The atomic ratio of Si to Cr in these films was about 2 to 1. The film TCR displayed a significant increase when the deposited film thickness was reduced below 2.5 nm. An optimized sputter process consisting of wafer degassing, cermet film deposition at elevated temperature with rf substrate bias, and a double annealing in vacuum, consisting of in situ annealing following the film sputtering and an additional annealing following the exposure of the wafers to air, has been found to be very effective for the film thermal stabilization and for fine tuning the film TCR. Cermet films with thicknesses in the range of 2.5-4 nm deposited using this technique had sheet resistances ranging from 1800 to 1200 Ω/□ and TCR values from -50 ppm/ deg. C to near zero, respectively. A possible mechanism responsible for the high efficiency of annealing the cermet films in vacuum (after preliminary exposure to air), resulting in resistance stabilization and TCR reduction, is also discussed.

  14. Proceedings of damage and oxidation protection in high temperature composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haritos, G.K.; Ochoa, O.O.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains proceedings of Damage and Oxidation Protection in High Temperature Composites. Topics covered include: current issues in the development of new materials and structural concepts for the aerospace structures of the future; transportation vehicles of the future; materials and structural concepts; fundamental understanding and quantitative descriptions of the physical processes and mechanisms controlling the behavior of emerging materials and structures; and the critical need for advances in our understanding of how the interaction of service loads and environment influences the lifecycle of emerging structures and materials

  15. Non-linear temperature-dependent curvature of a phase change composite bimorph beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonder, Greg

    2017-06-01

    Bimorph films curl in response to temperature. The degree of curvature typically varies in proportion to the difference in thermal expansion of the individual layers, and linearly with temperature. In many applications, such as controlling a thermostat, this gentle linear behavior is acceptable. In other cases, such as opening or closing a valve or latching a deployable column into place, an abrupt motion at a fixed temperature is preferred. To achieve this non-linear motion, we describe the fabrication and performance of a new bilayer structure we call a ‘phase change composite bimorph (PCBM)’. In a PCBM, one layer in the bimorph is a composite containing small inclusions of phase change materials. When the inclusions melt, their large (generally positive and  >1%) expansion coefficient induces a strong, reversible step function jump in bimorph curvature. The measured jump amplitude and thermal response is consistent with theory, and can be harnessed by a new class of actuators and sensors.

  16. Effects of hexagonal boron nitride and sintering temperature on mechanical and tribological properties of SS316L/h-BN composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahathanabodee, S.; Palathai, T.; Raadnui, S.; Tongsri, R.; Sombatsompop, N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► 20 vol% h-BN in stainless steel gave the lowest friction coefficient. ► Sintering temperature of 1200 °C was recommended for optimum friction coefficient. ► h-BN in stainless steel transformed to a boride liquid phase at 1250 °C. - Abstract: In this work, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN)-embedded 316L stainless steel (SS316L/h-BN) composites were prepared using a conventional powder metallurgy process. In order to produce self-lubricating composites, various amounts of h-BN (10, 15 and 20 vol%) were incorporated. Effects of h-BN content and sintering temperature on the mechanical and tribological properties were of primary interest. The results suggested that an increase in h-BN content reduced the hardness of the composites, but that the hardness could be improved by increasing the sintering temperature. Addition of h-BN up to 20 vol% improved the friction coefficient of the composites. At a sintering temperature of 1250 °C, h-BN transformed into a boride liquid phase, which formed a eutectic during cooling and exhibited a deterioration effect on lubricating film formation of the h-BN, resulting in an increase in the friction coefficient of the composites. The specific wear rate was greatly reduced when the composites were sintered at 1200 °C. The lowest friction coefficient and specific wear rate in the composites could be found under the experimental conditions used in this work when using 20 vol% of h-BN at a sintering temperature of 1200 °C

  17. Polymer nanocomposites for high-temperature composite repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Xia [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A novel repair agent for resin-injection repair of advanced high temperature composites was developed and characterized. The repair agent was based on bisphenol E cyanate ester (BECy) and reinforced with alumina nanoparticles. To ensure good dispersion and compatibility with the BECy matrix in nanocomposites, the alumina nanoparticles were functionalized with silanes. The BECy nanocomposites, containing bare and functionalized alumina nanoparticles, were prepared and evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, rheological, and viscoelastic properties. The monomer of BECy has an extremely low viscosity at ambient temperature, which is good for processability. The cured BECy polymer is a highly cross-linked network with excellent thermal mechanical properties, with a high glass transition temperature (Tg) of 270 C and decomposition temperature above 350 C. The incorporation of alumina nanoparticles enhances the mechanical and rheological properties of the BECy nanocomposites. Additionally, the alumina nanoparticles are shown to catalyze the cure of BECy. Characterization of the nanocomposites included dynamic mechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results show that the BECy nanocomposite is a good candidate as repair agent for resin-injection repair applications.

  18. Scaling the Raman gain coefficient: Applications to Germanosilicate fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Bromage, J.; Stentz, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the temperature dependence of a Raman amplifier and the scaling of the Raman gain coefficient with wavelength, modal overlap, and material composition. The temperature dependence is derived by applying a quantum theoretical description, whereas...... the scaling of the Raman gain coefficient is derived using a classical electromagnetic model. We also present experimental verification of our theoretical findings....

  19. A review of creep behavior of high temperature composites in relation to molybdenum disilicide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadananda, K.; Feng, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    A brief review of creep behavior of composites is presented. It is shown that even for a two component system, creep of a composite depends on complex combination of several factors, including the constitutive behavior of the component phases at stress and temperature, and mechanical, chemical, diffusional and thermodynamic stability of the two-phase interfaces. The existing theoretical models based on continuum mechanics are presented. These models are evaluated using the extensive experimental data on molydisilicide--silicon carbide composites by the authors. The analysis shows that the rule of mixture based on isostrain and isostress provides two limiting bounds wherein all other predictions fall. For molydisilicide, the creep is predominantly governed by the creep of the majority phase, i.e. the matrix while fibers deform predominately elastically

  20. Measurements of Heat-Transfer and Friction Coefficients for Helium Flowing in a Tube at Surface Temperatures up to 5900 Deg R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Maynard F.; Kirchgessner, Thomas A.

    1959-01-01

    Measurements of average heat transfer and friction coefficients and local heat transfer coefficients were made with helium flowing through electrically heated smooth tubes with length-diameter ratios of 60 and 92 for the following range of conditions: Average surface temperature from 1457 to 4533 R, Reynolds numbe r from 3230 to 60,000, heat flux up to 583,200 Btu per hr per ft2 of heat transfer area, and exit Mach numbe r up to 1.0. The results indicate that, in the turbulent range of Reynolds number, good correlation of the local heat transfer coefficients is obtained when the physical properties and density of helium are evaluated at the surface temperature. The average heat transfer coefficients are best correlated on the basis that the coefficient varies with [1 + (L/D))(sup -0,7)] and that the physical properties and density are evaluated at the surface temperature. The average friction coefficients for the tests with no heat addition are in complete agreement with the Karman-Nikuradse line. The average friction coefficients for heat addition are in poor agreement with the accepted line.

  1. Effects of temperature and anion species on CO2 permeability and CO2/N2 separation coefficient through ionic liquid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jindaratsamee, Pinyarat; Shimoyama, Yusuke; Morizaki, Hironobu; Ito, Akira

    2011-01-01

    The permeability of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) through imidazolium-based ionic liquid membranes was measured by a sweep gas method. Six species of ionic liquids were studied in this work as follows: [emim][BF 4 ], [bmim][BF 4 ], [bmim][PF 6 ], [bmim][Tf 2 N], [bmim][OTf], and [bmim][dca]. The ionic liquids were supported with a polyvinylidene fluoride porous membrane. The measurements were performed at T = (303.15 to 343.15) K. The partial pressure difference between feed and permeate sides was 0.121 MPa. The permeability of the CO 2 increases with temperature for the all ionic liquid species. Base on solution diffusion theory, it can be explained that the diffusion coefficient of CO 2 in an ionic liquid affects the temperature dependence more strongly than the solubility coefficient. The greatest permeability was obtained with the [bmim][Tf 2 N] membrane. The membrane of [bmim][PF 6 ] presents the lowest permeability. The separation coefficient between CO 2 and N 2 through the ionic liquid membranes was also investigated at the volume fraction of CO 2 at feed side 0.10. The separation coefficient decreases with the increase of temperature for the all ionic liquid species. The membrane of [emim][BF 4 ] and [bmim][BF 4 ] gives the highest separation coefficient at constant temperature. The lowest separation coefficient was obtained from [bmim][Tf 2 N] membrane which presents the highest permeability of CO 2 .

  2. Influence of bearing pre-load coefficient on shaft vibration and pad temperature in a hydroturbine generator unit. A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Fuzhou; Chu Fulei; Guo Dan; Lu Wenxiu [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing, BJ (China). Dept. of Precision Instruments

    2001-07-01

    From data collected by an online condition monitoring and fault diagnosis system, a higher pad temperature at the upper guide bearing in a pumped storage power generator unit installed in Guangdong province(GPSPS), China, was found. And also a relatively intensive shaft vibration occurred at the lower guide bearing. By calculating the Reynolds equation and viscosity-temperature equation of the lubricant, a curve between the pre-load coefficient and the increment of pad temperature is obtained, which shows that the larger, the pre-load coefficient, the bigger, the increment of pad temperature. For a practical unit in GPSPS, by employing Transfer matrix method and Wilson-{theta} method to analyze shaft vibration at different pre-load coefficients of the whole bearing or ''pad pair'' bearings, the results show that the larger the pre-load coefficient is, the smaller the vibration amplitude is, the shorter the time for vibration to become steady is. And an uneven pre-load coefficient of the ''pad pair'' bearings will cause shaft orbit from a circle to an ellipse whose long axes is at the direction of the ''pad pair'' with the lowest pre-load coefficient. Finally, reasons of higher pad temperature of the upper guide bearing and larger shaft vibration at the lower guide bearing are due to the inconsistent relation of bearing assembling clearance or pre-load coefficient of the upper and lower guide bearing, and also due to the too small, uneven pre-load coefficient of ''pad pair'' bearings. After a scheme for adjusting the bearing clearance is given, data measured show that the analysis and simulation methods are correct and the adjustment scheme to the assembling clearance of the upper and lower guide bearings is feasible and can be used to guide the field maintenance conveniently. (orig.)

  3. Effective conductivity, dielectric constant, and diffusion coefficient of digitized composite media via first-passage-time equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torquato, S.; Kim, I.C.; Cule, D.

    1999-01-01

    We generalize the Brownian motion simulation method of Kim and Torquato [J. Appl. Phys. 68, 3892 (1990)] to compute the effective conductivity, dielectric constant and diffusion coefficient of digitized composite media. This is accomplished by first generalizing the first-passage-time equations to treat first-passage regions of arbitrary shape. We then develop the appropriate first-passage-time equations for digitized media: first-passage squares in two dimensions and first-passage cubes in three dimensions. A severe test case to prove the accuracy of the method is the two-phase periodic checkerboard in which conduction, for sufficiently large phase contrasts, is dominated by corners that join two conducting-phase pixels. Conventional numerical techniques (such as finite differences or elements) do not accurately capture the local fields here for reasonable grid resolution and hence lead to inaccurate estimates of the effective conductivity. By contrast, we show that our algorithm yields accurate estimates of the effective conductivity of the periodic checkerboard for widely different phase conductivities. Finally, we illustrate our method by computing the effective conductivity of the random checkerboard for a wide range of volume fractions and several phase contrast ratios. These results always lie within rigorous four-point bounds on the effective conductivity. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  4. Linear thermal expansion coefficient (at temperatures from 130 to 800 K) of borosilicate glasses applicable for coupling with silicon in microelectronics

    OpenAIRE

    Sinev, Leonid S.; Petrov, Ivan D.

    2017-01-01

    Processing results of measurements of linear thermal expansion coefficients and linear thermal expansion of two brands of borosilicate glasses --- LK5 and Borofloat 33 --- are presented. The linear thermal expansion of glass samples have been determined in the temperature range 130 to 800 K (minus 143 to 526 $\\deg$C) using thermomechanical analyzer TMA7100. Relative imprecision of indirectly measured linear thermal expansion coefficients and linear thermal expansion of both glass brands is le...

  5. Tribological Performance of M50-Ag-TiC Self-Lubricating Composites at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyan; Shi, Xiaoliang; Huang, Yuchun; Liu, Xiyao; Li, Ben

    2018-05-01

    M50 steel is widely used in aero-engine bearings and other high-temperature bearings. However, the poor wear of M50 steel resistance restrains its further applications. In this paper, the sliding tribological behaviors of M50 steel, M50-Ag composites (MAC) and M50-Ag-TiC composites (MATC) against Si3N4 ball were investigated from 150 to 600 °C at 15 N-0.2 m/s. MATC showed better tribological properties in comparison with M50 and MAC. Especially at 450 °C, MATC obtained the lowest friction coefficient of 0.15 and smallest wear rate of 1.3 × 10-5 mm3 N-1 m-1. The excellent tribological performance of MATC during the friction test was attributed to the continuous lubricating film containing lubricant Ag and reinforcement TiC, as well as the subsurface compacted layer that could well support the lubricating film to prevent it from being destroyed. At 600 °C, because of the tribo-chemical reaction between Ag and Mo oxide during sliding process, the newly formed Ag2MoO4 lubricating film was well spread out on the friction surface, which could continuously improve the tribological behavior of MATC. This investigation was meaningful to improve the anti-friction and wear resistance of M50 matrix bearing over a wide temperature range.

  6. Measurements of the isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient of KUCA C-Core with a D{sub 2}O tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyeon, Cheol Ho [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto Univ., Osaka (Japan); Shim, Hyung Jin; Choi, Sung Hoon; Jeon, Byoung Kyu [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Eun Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) is a multi-core type critical assembly consisting of three independent cores in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. The light-water-moderated core (Ccore) is a tank type reactor, and the experiments of the isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient (ITRC) of C-core with a D{sub 2}O tank were carried out with the use of six 10 kW heaters and a radiator system in a dump tank, one 10 kW heater in a core tank, and one 5 kW heater in the D{sub 2}O tank. The ITRCs of the C-core with the D{sub 2}O tank immersed in the core tank are considered important to investigate the mechanism of moderation and reflection effects of H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O in the core on the evaluation by numerical simulations. The objectives of this paper are to report the ITRC measurements for C-core with D{sub 2}O tank ranging between 26.7 .deg. C and 58.5 .deg. C, and to examine the accuracy of the numerical simulations by the Seoul National University Monte Carlo code, McCARD, through the comparison between measured and calculated results.

  7. High temperature concrete composites containing organosiloxane crosslinked copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeldin, A.; Carciello, N.; Kukacka, L.; Fontana, J.

    High temperature polymer concrete composites comprising about 10 to 30% by weight of a liquid monomer mixture is described. It consists essentially of an organosiloxane polymer crosslinked with an olefinically unsaturated monomer selected from the group consisting of styrene, methyl methacrylate, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate, triallyl cyanurate, n-phenylmalimide, divinyl benzene and mixtures thereof. About 70 to 90% by weight of an inert inorganic filler system containing silica sand and portland cement, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, carbon black or mixtures thereof. Optionally a free radical initiator such as di-tert-butyl peroxide, azobisisobyutyronitrile, benzoyl peroxide, lauryl peroxide and other organic peroxides are used to initiate crosspolymerization of the monomer mixture in the presence of the inorganic filler.

  8. Radiation effects on epoxy composites at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, H.; Miyata, K.; Nishijima, S.; Okada, T.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation effects on glass-fiber reinforced epoxy composites at cryogenic temperatures has been studied by measuring the changes in interlaminar shear strength of the specimens. The scanning electron microscope observation has also been performed on fracture surface of the specimens. At 8.5 MGy of absorbed dose, only 10 % decrease of the strength was observed in the case of gamma irradiation, whereas over 80 % decrease of the strength was found on the reactor irradiated specimen. The difference of degradation behavior between gamma and reactor irradiations is attributed to the additional absorbed dose in the latter from the nuclear reaction due to boron-10 contained in the glass fibers by capture of thermal neutrons. (author)

  9. Determination of the linear coefficient of thermal expansion in polymer films at the nanoscale: influence of the composition of EVA copolymers and the molecular weight of PMMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Benito, J; Castillo, E; Cruz-Caldito, J F

    2015-07-28

    Nanothermal-expansion of poly(ethylene-co-vinylacetate), EVA, and poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, in the form of films was measured to finally obtain linear coefficients of thermal expansion, CTEs. The simple deflection of a cantilever in an atomic force microscope, AFM, was used to monitor thermal expansions at the nanoscale. The influences of: (a) the structure of EVA in terms of its composition (vinylacetate content) and (b) the size of PMMA chains in terms of the molecular weight were studied. To carry out this, several polymer samples were used, EVA copolymers with different weight percents of the vinylacetate comonomer (12, 18, 25 and 40%) and PMMA polymers with different weight average molecular weights (33.9, 64.8, 75.600 and 360.0 kg mol(-1)). The dependencies of the vinyl acetate weight fraction of EVA and the molecular weight of PMMA on their corresponding CTEs were analyzed to finally explain them using new, intuitive and very simple models based on the rule of mixtures. In the case of EVA copolymers a simple equation considering the weighted contributions of each comonomer was enough to estimate the final CTE above the glass transition temperature. On the other hand, when the molecular weight dependence is considered the free volume concept was used as novelty. The expansion of PMMA, at least at the nanoscale, was well and easily described by the sum of the weighted contributions of the occupied and free volumes, respectively.

  10. Temperature dependence of gas sensing behaviour of TiO2 doped PANI composite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Subodh; Sharma, S. S.; Sharma, Preetam; Sharma, Vinay; Rajura, Rajveer Singh; Singh, M.; Vijay, Y. K.

    2014-04-01

    In the present work we have reported the effect of temperature on the gas sensing properties of TiO2 doped PANI composite thin film based chemiresistor type gas sensors for hydrogen gas sensing application. PANI and TiO2 doped PANI composite were synthesized by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline at low temperature. The electrical properties of these composite thin films were characterized by I-V measurements as function of temperature. The I-V measurement revealed that conductivity of composite thin films increased as the temperature increased. The changes in resistance of the composite thin film sensor were utilized for detection of hydrogen gas. It was observed that at room temperature TiO2 doped PANI composite sensor shows higher response value and showed unstable behavior as the temperature increased. The surface morphology of these composite thin films has also been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurement.

  11. Effect of Elevated Temperature Annealing on Nafion/SiO2 Composite Membranes for the All-Vanadium Redox Flow Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sixiu Zeng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Conducting Nafion/SiO2 composite membranes were successfully prepared using a simple electrostatic self-assembly method, followed by annealing at elevated temperatures of 240, 270, and 300 °C. Membrane performance was then investigated in vanadium redox flow batteries (VRB. These annealed composite membranes demonstrated lower vanadium permeability and a better selectivity coefficient than pure Nafion membranes. The annealing temperature of 270 °C created the highest proton conductivity in the Nafion/SiO2 composite membranes. The microstructures of these membranes were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. This study revealed that exposure to high temperatures resulted in an increase in the free volumes of the composite membranes, resulting in improved mechanical and chemical behavior, with the single cell system containing composite membranes performing better than systems containing pure Nafion membranes.

  12. Temperature and orientation dependence of the short-term strength characteristics, Young's modulus, and linear expansion coefficient of ZhS6F alloy single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svetlov, I L; Sukhanov, N N; Krivko, A I; Roshchina, I N; Khatsinskaia, I M

    1987-01-01

    Experimental data are presented on the temperature dependence of the short- term strength characteristics, Young's modulus, and linear expansion coefficients of single crystals of a nickel alloy, ZhS6F, with crystallographic orientations along the 001, 111, 011, and 112 lines. It is found that the mechanical properties and Young's modulus of the alloy crystals exibit anisotropy in the temperature range 20-900 C. The linear thermal expansion coefficient is isotropic up to 900 C and equal to that of the equiaxed alloy. 10 references.

  13. Determination of the Optimum Heat Transfer Coefficient and Temperature Rise Analysis for a Lithium-Ion Battery under the Conditions of Harbin City Bus Driving Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the heat problems that occur during the operation of power batteries, especially thermal runaway, which usually take place in high temperature environments. The study was conducted on a ternary polymer lithium-ion battery. In addition, a lumped parameter thermal model was established to analyze the thermal behavior of the electric bus battery system under the operation conditions of the driving cycles of the Harbin city electric buses. Moreover, the quantitative relationship between the optimum heat transfer coefficient of the battery and the ambient temperature was investigated. The relationship between the temperature rise (Tr, the number of cycles (c, and the heat transfer coefficient (h under three Harbin bus cycles have been investigated at 30 °C, because it can provide a basis for the design of the battery thermal management system. The results indicated that the heat transfer coefficient that meets the requirements of the battery thermal management system is the cubic power function of the ambient temperature. Therefore, if the ambient temperature is 30 °C, the heat transfer coefficient should be at least 12 W/m2K in the regular bus lines, 22 W/m2K in the bus rapid transit lines, and 32 W/m2K in the suburban lines.

  14. Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasen, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter discusses the roles of composite laminates and aggregates in cryogenic technology. Filamentary-reinforced composites are emphasized because they are the most widely used composite materials. Topics considered include composite systems and terminology, design and fabrication, composite failure, high-pressure reinforced plastic laminates, low-pressure reinforced plastics, reinforced metals, selectively reinforced structures, the effect of cryogenic temperatures, woven-fabric and random-mat composites, uniaxial fiber-reinforced composites, composite joints in cryogenic structures, joining techniques at room temperature, radiation effects, testing laminates at cryogenic temperatures, static and cyclic tensile testing, static and cyclic compression testing, interlaminar shear testing, secondary property tests, and concrete aggregates. It is suggested that cryogenic composite technology would benefit from the development of a fracture mechanics model for predicting the fitness-for-purpose of polymer-matrix composite structures

  15. The Development of High Temperature Thermoplastic Composite Materials for Additive Manufactured Autoclave Tooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunc, Vlastimil [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Duty, Chad E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lindahl, John M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hassen, Ahmed A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    In this work, ORNL and Techmer investigated and screened different high temperature thermoplastic reinforced materials to fabricate composite molds for autoclave processes using Additive Manufacturing (AM) techniques. This project directly led to the development and commercial release of two printable, high temperature composite materials available through Techmer PM. These new materials are targeted for high temperature tooling made via large scale additive manufacturing.

  16. High Temperature Dry Sliding Friction and Wear Performance of Laser Cladding WC/Ni Composite Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Jiao-xi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Two different types of agglomerate and angular WC/Ni matrix composite coatings were deposited by laser cladding. The high temperature wear resistance of these composite coatings was tested with a ring-on-disc MMG-10 apparatus. The morphologies of the worn surfaces were observed using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS for elemental composition. The results show that the high temperature wear resistance of the laser clad WC/Ni-based composite coatings is improved significantly with WC mass fraction increasing. The 60% agglomerate WC/Ni composite coating has optimal high temperature wear resistance. High temperature wear mechanism of 60% WC/Ni composite coating is from abrasive wear of low temperature into composite function of the oxidation wear and abrasive wear.

  17. 4TH International Conference on High-Temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... Topic to be covered include fibers, interfaces, interphases, non-oxide ceramic matrix composites, oxide/oxide ceramic matrix composites, coatings, and applications of high-temperature ceramic matrix...

  18. Micromechanical Prediction of Tensile Damage for Ceramic Matrix Composites under High Temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delale, F

    1994-01-01

    ... (namely Nicalon/CAS II Composites) at room and elevated temperatures. First the composite Specimens were machined into dog-bone shape and polished to increase efficacy of observation in the SEM...

  19. Vapor pressures, osmotic and activity coefficients for (LiBr + acetonitrile) between the temperatures (298.15 and 343.15) K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasirzadeh, Karamat E-mail: karamat.nasirzadeh@chemie.uni-regensburg.de; Neueder, Roland; Kunz, Werner

    2004-06-01

    Precise vapor pressure data for pure acetonitrile and (LiBr + acetonitrile) are given for temperatures ranging from T=(298.15 to 343.15) K. The molality range is from m=(0.0579 to 0.8298) mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}. The osmotic coefficients are calculated by taking into account the second virial coefficient of acetonitrile. The parameters of the extended Pitzer ion interaction model of Archer and the mole fraction-based thermodynamic model of Clegg-Pitzer are evaluated. These models accurately reproduce the available osmotic coefficients. The parameters of the extended Pitzer ion interaction model of Archer are used to calculate the mean molal activity coefficients.

  20. Composite properties for S-2 glass in a room-temperature-curable epoxy matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, L. L.; Moore, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The authors have measured thermal and mechanical properties of several composites of S-2 glass fiber in a room-temperature-curable epoxy matrix. The filament-wound composites ranged from 50 to 70 vol% fiber. The composites had generally good to excellent mechanical properties, particularly in view of the moderate cost of the material. However, the composites showed rapid increases in transverse thermal expansion above 50 C, and this property must be carefully considered if any use above that temperature is contemplated.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Friction Coefficient and Wear Rate of Composite Materials Sliding Against Smooth and Rough Mild Steel Counterfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Chowdhury

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, friction coefficient and wear rate of gear fiber reinforced plastic (gear fiber and glass fiber reinforced plastic (glass fiber sliding against mild steel are investigated experimentally. In order to do so, a pin on disc apparatus is designed and fabricated. Experiments are carried out when smooth or rough mild steel pin slides on gear fiber and glass fiber disc. Experiments are conducted at normal load 10, 15 and 20 N, sliding velocity 1, 1.5 and 2 m/s and relative humidity 70%. Variations of friction coefficient with the duration of rubbing at different normal loads and sliding velocities are investigated. Results show that friction coefficient is influenced by duration of rubbing, normal load and sliding velocity. In general, friction coefficient increases for a certain duration of rubbing and after that it remains constant for the rest of the experimental time. The obtained results reveal that friction coefficient decreases with the increase in normal load for gear fiber and glass fiber mating with smooth or rough mild steel counterface. On the other hand, it is also found that friction coefficient increases with the increase in sliding velocity for both of the tested materials. Moreover, wear rate increases with the increase in normal load and sliding velocity. The magnitudes of friction coefficient and wear rate are different depending on sliding velocity and normal load for both smooth and rough counterface pin materials.

  2. Coherent quantum transport in disordered systems: II. Temperature dependence of carrier diffusion coefficients from the time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Xinxin; Zhao, Yi; Cao, Jianshu

    2014-01-01

    The time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method for carrier quantum dynamics (Zhong and Zhao 2013 J. Chem. Phys. 138 014111), a truncated version of the stochastic Schrödinger equation/wavefunction approach that approximately satisfies the detailed balance principle and scales well with the size of the system, is applied to investigate the carrier transport in one-dimensional systems including both the static and dynamic disorders on site energies. The predicted diffusion coefficients with respect to temperature successfully bridge from band-like to hopping-type transport. As demonstrated in paper I (Moix et al 2013 New J. Phys. 15 085010), the static disorder tends to localize the carrier, whereas the dynamic disorder induces carrier dynamics. For the weak dynamic disorder, the diffusion coefficients are temperature-independent (band-like property) at low temperatures, which is consistent with the prediction from the Redfield equation, and a linear dependence of the coefficient on temperature (hopping-type property) only appears at high temperatures. In the intermediate regime of dynamic disorder, the transition from band-like to hopping-type transport can be easily observed at relatively low temperatures as the static disorder increases. When the dynamic disorder becomes strong, the carrier motion can follow the hopping-type mechanism even without static disorder. Furthermore, it is found that the memory time of dynamic disorder is an important factor in controlling the transition from the band-like to hopping-type motions. (paper)

  3. High temperature C/C–SiC composite by liquid silicon infiltration: a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    density, and lower thermal expansion coefficient than low modulus fibres ... the development of a regular crack pattern. ... SEM micrograph of crack microstructure after pyroly- ..... exchangers for high temperature processes like heat recovery.

  4. Temperature Induced Degradation of Nb Ti/Cu Composite Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Senatore, C; Di Michiel, M; Thilly, L; Gerardin, A; Reluner, B; Oberli, L; Willering, G; Bottura, L

    2009-01-01

    The degradation mechanisms of state-of-the-art Nb-Ti/Cu superconductors are described, based on in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements during heat treatment. A quantitative description of the Nb-Ti/Cu degradation in terms of critical current density, Cu stabiliser resistivity and mechanical composite strength is presented. In an applied magnetic field a significant critical current degradation is already observed after a 5-minute 400 °C heat treatment, due to variations of a-Ti precipitate size and distribution within the Nb-Ti alloy filaments. A strong degradation of the strand mechanical properties is observed after several minutes heating above 550 °C, which is also the temperature at which the formation of Cu Ti intermetallic phases is detected. Several minutes heating at 250 °C are sufficient to increase the RRR of the strongly cold work strands inside a Rutherford type cable from about 80 to about 240. Heating for several minutes at 400 °C does not cause a significant conductor degradati...

  5. Temperature profile and producer gas composition of high temperature air gasification of oil palm fronds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guangul, F M; Sulaiman, S A; Ramli, A

    2013-01-01

    Environmental pollution and scarcity of reliable energy source are the current pressing global problems which need a sustainable solution. Conversion of biomass to a producer gas through gasification process is one option to alleviate the aforementioned problems. In the current research the temperature profile and composition of the producer gas obtained from the gasification of oil palm fronds by using high temperature air were investigated and compared with unheated air. By preheating the gasifying air at 500°C the process temperature were improved and as a result the concentration of combustible gases and performance of the process were improved. The volumetric percentage of CO, CH4 and H2 were improved from 22.49, 1.98, and 9.67% to 24.98, to 2.48% and 13.58%, respectively. In addition, HHV, carbon conversion efficiency and cold gas efficiency were improver from 4.88 MJ/Nm3, 83.8% and 56.1% to 5.90 MJ/Nm3, 87.3% and 62.4%, respectively.

  6. High Performance High Temperature Thermoelectric Composites with Metallic Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, James M. (Inventor); Bux, Sabah K. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Ravi, Vilupanur A. (Inventor); Firdosy, Samad A. (Inventor); Star, Kurt (Inventor); Kaner, Richard B. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention provides a composite thermoelectric material. The composite thermoelectric material can include a semiconductor material comprising a rare earth metal. The atomic percent of the rare earth metal in the semiconductor material can be at least about 20%. The composite thermoelectric material can further include a metal forming metallic inclusions distributed throughout the semiconductor material. The present invention also provides a method of forming this composite thermoelectric material.

  7. Thermal Degradation Study of IM7/DMBZ-15 High Temperature Composite by TGA/FTIR

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nadler, Melvin

    2003-01-01

    (U) High temperature graphite composites such as IM7/8552 epoxy, IM7/5250 BMI, and IM7/DMBZ-15 polyimide show blistering and/or "catastrophic" delamination when rapidly heated to temperatures above...

  8. Effect of Ni, Fe and Mn in different proportions on microstructure and pollutant-catalyzed properties of Ni-Fe-Mn-O negative temperature coefficient ceramic nanocompositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Yonglin, E-mail: leiyonglin@163.com [Engineering Research Center of Biomass Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Lin, Xiaoyan, E-mail: linxy@swust.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center of Biomass Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Liao, Huiwei, E-mail: liaohw@swust.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2017-06-15

    The effect of Ni, Fe and Mn in different proportions on microstructure and pollutant-catalyzed properties of Ni-Fe-Mn-O negative temperature coefficient ceramic nanocompositions was studied. Structural and physical characterization of all the samples was carried out by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) method, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric (TG). The results revealed that the interplanar spacing decreased with increasing Fe content, the grain size decreased with increasing Ni content, the substitution of Ni{sup 2+} in the tetrahedral sites by Fe{sup 2+} increased with increasing Fe content. And increase of iron could improve Ni-Fe-Mn-O high temperature stability. The low-temperature thermal removal efficiencies of 30 mg/L methyl orange solution for NiFeMnO{sub 4}, Ni{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.9}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4,} Ni{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 1.8}Mn{sub 0.6}O{sub 4} and Ni{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 2.1}Mn{sub 0.6}O{sub 4} systems were 83.8%, 75.2%, 78.5% and 60.3% at 2400 min, respectively. And the microwave combining with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} removal efficiencies of 30 mg/L methyl orange solution for NiFeMnO{sub 4}, Ni{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.9}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4,} Ni{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 1.8}Mn{sub 0.6}O{sub 4} and Ni{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 2.1}Mn{sub 0.6}O{sub 4} systems were 96.5%,93.8%, 98.7% and 98% at 6.0 min, respectively. These results indicated that the Ni-Fe-Mn-O ceramics with appropriate increase of iron were useful for industrial applications on degrading organic pollute. - Highlights: • The relationship of composition and catalytic properties of Ni-Fe-Mn-O was proposed. • The interplanar spacing decreased with increasing Fe content. • The grain size decreased with increasing Ni content. • The substitution of Ni{sup 2+} in the tetrahedral site by Fe{sup 2+} with increasing Fe content.

  9. Microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of a particulate reinforced magnesium matrix composites forged at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, K.K.; Wu, K.; Wang, X.J.; Wu, Y.W.; Hu, X.S.; Zheng, M.Y.; Gan, W.M.; Brokmeier, H.G.

    2010-01-01

    SiCp/AZ91 magnesium matrix composite was fabricated by stir casting. The as-cast ingots were cut into cylindrical billets, and then forged at different temperatures (320, 370, 420, 470 and 520 deg. C) at a constant RAM speed of 15 mm/s with 50% reduction. The microstructure evolution of the composites during forging was investigated by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. The texture of the forged composites was measured by neutron diffraction. Mechanical properties of the composite at different forging temperatures were tested by tensile tests at room temperature. It was found that a strong basal plane texture formed during forging, and the intensity of basal plane texture weakened as forging temperatures increased. The particle distribution in the composite was significantly improved by hot forging. Typical microstructures were obtained after forging at different temperatures and the composite with different microstructures offered different mechanical properties during tensile test.

  10. High temperature tensile properties and deep drawing of fully green composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, research and development of materials using biomass sources are much expected to construct a sustainable society. The so-called green composite consisting of natural fibers and biodegradable resin, is one of the most promising materials in developing biomass products. In this study, especially, we focus on the tensile deformation behavior of the green composites reinforced with ramie woven fabrics at high temperature. The results show that the fracture strain at high temperatures increases larger than that of room temperature, and initial deformation resistance of the composites seen at room temperature does not appear at high temperatures. Thus, several conditions to cause more deformability of the green composites were found. Finally, in order to utilize such deformability, Lankford-values of the green composites were clarified, and deep drawing was carried out for sheet materials made of the green composites.

  11. Study of the temperature dependence of giant magnetoresistance in metallic granular composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Sheng; Li, Z.-Y.

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the giant magnetoresistance of metallic granular composite is studied. It is considered that the composite contains both large magnetic grains with surface spin S' and small magnetic impurities. It is found that the decrease of surface spin S' of grain is the main cause of an almost linear decrease of giant magnetoresistance with the increase of temperature in high temperature range. The magnetic impurities, composed of several atoms, lead to an almost linear increase of the giant magnetoresistance with the decrease of temperature in low temperature range. Our calculations are in good agreement with recent experimental data for metallic nanogranular composites

  12. Absorption coefficient and refractive index changes of a quantum ring in the presence of spin-orbit couplings: Temperature and Zeeman effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A.; Azargoshasb, T.; Niknam, E.

    2017-10-01

    Effects of applied magnetic field, temperature and dimensions on the optical absorption coefficients (AC) and refractive index (RI) changes of a GaAs quantum ring are investigated in the presence of both Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions (SOI). To this end, the finite difference method (FDM) is used in order to numerically calculate the energy eigenvalues and eigenstates of the system while the compact density matrix approach is hired to calculate the optical properties. It is shown that application of magnetic field, temperature as well as the geometrical size in the presence of spin-orbit interactions, alter the electronic structure and consequently influence the linear and third-order nonlinear optical absorption coefficients as well as the refractive index changes of the system. Results show an obvious blue shift in optical curves with enhancing external magnetic field and temperature while the increment of dimensions result in red shift.

  13. The Heat Resistance of Microbial Cells Represented by D Values Can be Estimated by the Transition Temperature and the Coefficient of Linear Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Koichi; Kogure, Akinori; Deuchi, Keiji; Kuwana, Ritsuko; Takamatsu, Hiromu; Ito, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We previously developed a method for evaluating the heat resistance of microorganisms by measuring the transition temperature at which the coefficient of linear expansion of a cell changes. Here, we performed heat resistance measurements using a scanning probe microscope with a nano thermal analysis system. The microorganisms studied included six strains of the genus Bacillus or related genera, one strain each of the thermophilic obligate anaerobic bacterial genera Thermoanaerobacter and Moorella, two strains of heat-resistant mold, two strains of non-sporulating bacteria, and one strain of yeast. Both vegetative cells and spores were evaluated. The transition temperature at which the coefficient of linear expansion due to heating changed from a positive value to a negative value correlated strongly with the heat resistance of the microorganism as estimated from the D value. The microorganisms with greater heat resistance exhibited higher transition temperatures. There was also a strong negative correlation between the coefficient of linear expansion and heat resistance in bacteria and yeast, such that microorganisms with greater heat resistance showed lower coefficients of linear expansion. These findings suggest that our method could be useful for evaluating the heat resistance of microorganisms.

  14. High-Temperature Oxidation-Resistant and Low Coefficient of Thermal Expansion NiAl-Base Bond Coat Developed for a Turbine Blade Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Many critical gas turbine engine components are currently made from Ni-base superalloys that are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC). The TBC consists of a ZrO2-based top coat and a bond coat that is used to enhance the bonding between the superalloy substrate and the top coat. MCrAlY alloys (CoCrAlY and NiCrAlY) are currently used as bond coats and are chosen for their very good oxidation resistance. TBC life is frequently limited by the oxidation resistance of the bond coat, along with a thermal expansion mismatch between the metallic bond coat and the ceramic top coat. The aim of this investigation at the NASA Glenn Research Center was to develop a new longer life, higher temperature bond coat by improving both the oxidation resistance and the thermal expansion characteristics of the bond coat. Nickel aluminide (NiAl) has excellent high-temperature oxidation resistance and can sustain a protective Al2O3 scale to longer times and higher temperatures in comparison to MCrAlY alloys. Cryomilling of NiAl results in aluminum nitride (AlN) formation that reduces the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the alloy and enhances creep strength. Thus, additions of cryomilled NiAl-AlN to CoCrAlY were examined as a potential bond coat. In this work, the composite alloy was investigated as a stand-alone substrate to demonstrate its feasibility prior to actual use as a coating. About 85 percent of prealloyed NiAl and 15 percent of standard commercial CoCrAlY alloys were mixed and cryomilled in an attritor with stainless steel balls used as grinding media. The milling was carried out in the presence of liquid nitrogen. The milled powder was consolidated by hot extrusion or by hot isostatic pressing. From the consolidated material, oxidation coupons, four-point bend, CTE, and tensile specimens were machined. The CTE measurements were made between room temperature and 1000 C in an argon atmosphere. It is shown that the CTE of the NiAl-AlN-CoCrAlY composite bond coat

  15. Disorder effect on heat capacity, self-diffusion coefficient, and choosing best potential model for melting temperature, in gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster with 55 atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taherkhani, Farid; Akbarzadeh, Hamed; Feyzi, Mostafa; Rafiee, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been implemented for doping effect on melting temperature, heat capacity, self-diffusion coefficient of gold–copper bimetallic nanostructure with 55 total gold and copper atom numbers and its bulk alloy. Trend of melting temperature for gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster is not same as melting temperature copper–gold bulk alloy. Molecular dynamics simulation of our result regarding bulk melting temperature is consistence with available experimental data. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that melting temperature of gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster increases with copper atom fraction. Semi-empirical potential model and quantum Sutton–Chen potential models do not change melting temperature trend with copper doping of gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster. Self-diffusion coefficient of copper atom is greater than gold atom in gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster. Semi-empirical potential within the tight-binding second moment approximation as new application potential model for melting temperature of gold–copper bulk structure shows better result in comparison with EAM, Sutton–Chen potential, and quantum Sutton–Chen potential models

  16. Disorder effect on heat capacity, self-diffusion coefficient, and choosing best potential model for melting temperature, in gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster with 55 atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taherkhani, Farid, E-mail: faridtaherkhani@gmail.com, E-mail: f.taherkhani@razi.ac.ir [Razi University, Department of Physical Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akbarzadeh, Hamed [Hakim Sabzevari University, Department of Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Feyzi, Mostafa; Rafiee, Hamid Reza [Razi University, Department of Physical Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been implemented for doping effect on melting temperature, heat capacity, self-diffusion coefficient of gold–copper bimetallic nanostructure with 55 total gold and copper atom numbers and its bulk alloy. Trend of melting temperature for gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster is not same as melting temperature copper–gold bulk alloy. Molecular dynamics simulation of our result regarding bulk melting temperature is consistence with available experimental data. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that melting temperature of gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster increases with copper atom fraction. Semi-empirical potential model and quantum Sutton–Chen potential models do not change melting temperature trend with copper doping of gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster. Self-diffusion coefficient of copper atom is greater than gold atom in gold–copper bimetallic nanocluster. Semi-empirical potential within the tight-binding second moment approximation as new application potential model for melting temperature of gold–copper bulk structure shows better result in comparison with EAM, Sutton–Chen potential, and quantum Sutton–Chen potential models.

  17. Behavior of specific heat and self diffusion coefficient of sodium near transition temperature: a molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.; Khan, G.

    1990-09-01

    In this report the author used of a very useful technique of simulation and applied it to successfully for determining the various properties of sodium, both in liquid and solid phase near transition point. As a first step the determination of specific heat and diffusion coefficient have been carried out. In liquid state the molecular dynamics (MD) values calculated matched the experimental data. But in solid state the diffusion coefficient obtained were not consistent with the one expected for a solid, rather the values obtained suggested that sodium remained in liquid state even below the melting point. (A.B.)

  18. Determination of the second virial coefficient of bovine serum albumin under varying pH and ionic strength by composition-gradient multi-angle static light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingfang; Acosta, Diana M; Whitney, Jon R; Podgornik, Rudolf; Steinmetz, Nicole F; French, Roger H; Parsegian, V Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Composition-gradient multi-angle static light scattering (CG-MALS) is an emerging technique for the determination of intermolecular interactions via the second virial coefficient B22. With CG-MALS, detailed studies of the second virial coefficient can be carried out more accurately and effectively than with traditional methods. In addition, automated mixing, delivery and measurement enable high speed, continuous, fluctuation-free sample delivery and accurate results. Using CG-MALS we measure the second virial coefficient of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solutions at various values of pH and ionic strength of a univalent salt (NaCl). The systematic variation of the second virial coefficient as a function of pH and NaCl strength reveals the net charge change and the isoelectric point of BSA under different solution conditions. The magnitude of the second virial coefficient decreases to 1.13 x 10(-5) ml*mol/g(2) near the isoelectric point of pH 4.6 and 25 mM NaCl. These results illuminate the role of fundamental long-range electrostatic and van der Waals forces in protein-protein interactions, specifically their dependence on pH and ionic strength.

  19. Fracture behavior of C/SiC composites at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Dong Hyun; Lee, Jeong Won; Kim, Jae Hoon; Shin, Ihn Cheol; Lim, Byung Joo [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    The fracture behavior of carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composites used in rocket nozzles has been investigated under tension, compression, and fracture conditions at room temperature, 773 K and 1173 K. The C/SiC composites used in this study were manufactured by liquid silicon infiltration process at ~1723 K. All experiments were conducted using two types of specimens, considering fiber direction and oxidation condition. Experimental results show that temperature, fiber direction, and oxidation condition affect the behavior of C/SiC composites. Oxidation was found to be the main factor that changes the strength of C/SiC composites. By applying an anti-oxidation coating, the tensile and compressive strengths of the C/SiC composites increased with temperature. The fracture toughness of the C/SiC composites also increased with increase temperature. A fractography analysis of the fractured specimens was conducted using a scanning electron microscope.

  20. Preparation and characterization of temperature-responsive magnetic composite particles for multi-modal cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Aihua; Chen, Qi; Ai, Fanrong; Wang, Deping; Huang, Wenhai

    2011-10-01

    The temperature-responsive magnetic composite particles were synthesized by emulsion-free polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and acrylamide (Am) in the presence of oleic acid-modified Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles. The magnetic properties and heat generation ability of the composite particles were characterized. Furthermore, temperature and alternating magnetic field (AMF) triggered drug release behaviors of vitamin B(12)-loaded composite particles were also examined. It was found that composite particles enabled drug release to be controlled through temperature changes in the neighborhood of lower critical solution temperature. Continuous application of AMF resulted in an accelerated release of the loaded drug. On the other hand, intermittent AMF application to the composite particles resulted in an "on-off", stepwise release pattern. Longer release duration and larger overall release could be achieved by intermittent application of AMF as compared to continuous magnetic field. Such composite particles may be used for magnetic drug targeting followed by simultaneous hyperthermia and drug release.

  1. Localized Temperature Variations in Laser-Irradiated Composites with Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    R. Brian Jenkins; Peter Joyce; Deborah Mechtel

    2017-01-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensors are embedded in composites to detect localized temperature gradients resulting from high energy infrared laser radiation. The goal is to detect the presence of radiation on a composite structure as rapidly as possible and to identify its location, much the same way human skin senses heat. A secondary goal is to determine how a network of sensors can be optimized to detect thermal damage in laser-irradiated composite materials or structures. Initia...

  2. Modelling the evolution of composition-and stress-depth profiles in austenitic stainless steels during low-temperature nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2016-01-01

    . In the present paper solid mechanics was combined with thermodynamics and diffusion kinetics to simulate the evolution of composition-depth and stress-depth profiles resulting from nitriding. The model takes into account a composition-dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite, short range......Nitriding of stainless steel causes a surface zone of expanded austenite, which improves the wear resistance of the stainless steel while preserving the stainless behaviour. During nitriding huge residual stresses are introduced in the treated zone, arising from the volume expansion...... that accompanies the dissolution of high nitrogen contents in expanded austenite. An intriguing phenomenon during low-temperature nitriding is that the residual stresses evoked by dissolution of nitrogen in the solid state, affect the thermodynamics and the diffusion kinetics of nitrogen dissolution...

  3. Neutronic study of nuclear reactors. Complete calculation of TRIGA MARKII reactor and calculations of fuel temperature coefficients. (Qualification of WIMS code)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benmansour, L.

    1992-01-01

    The present work shows a group of results, obtained by a neutronic study, concerning the TRIGA MARK II reactor and LIGHT WATER reactors. These studies aim to make cell and diffusion calculations. WIMS D-4 with extended library and DIXY programs are used and tested for those purposes. We also have proceeded to a qualification of WIMS code based on the fuel temperature coefficient calculations. 33 refs.; 23 figs.; 30 tabs. (author)

  4. Interfacial stabilities of high-temperature composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.A.; DeKock, J.; Zhang, M.X.; Kieschke, R.

    1993-01-01

    The thermodynamic and kinetic principles necessary to control interfacial reactions between the matrix and reinforcement in composite materials are presented. The concept of interfacial control has been applied to Ti-based/Al 2 O 3 composite. Results are presented which include estimated diffusivities for the reaction in β-Ti/Al 2 O 3 composites, estimated phase relationships for the systems Ti-Al-O, Ti-Y-O, Nb-Y-O and Nb-Al-O at 1100 C, and a coating scheme for αAl 2 O 3 fibers. 71 refs

  5. Effective longitudinal strength of high temperature metal-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, J.N.; Savvides, I.

    1991-01-01

    Several models for predicting the longitudinal strength of fiber composites are presented, ranging from a simple netting analysis to a model incorporating curvilinear strain hardening for all the components. Results from these models are presented for tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys, FeCrAlY and MARM200. It is shown that a simple elastic limit micromechanical model does not always adequately describe the useful strength of the composites. The methods proposed here are shown to be more appropriate for predicting the effective composite strength. 2 refs

  6. Estimating Seebeck Coefficient of a p-Type High Temperature Thermoelectric Material Using Bee Algorithm Multi-layer Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Fatih; Kilinc, Enes; Kurt, Huseyin; Celik, Erdal; Dugenci, Muharrem; Sagiroglu, Selami

    2017-08-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) convert heat into electrical energy. These energy-conversion systems do not involve any moving parts and are made of thermoelectric (TE) elements connected electrically in a series and thermally in parallel; however, they are currently not suitable for use in regular operations due to their low efficiency levels. In order to produce high-efficiency TEGs, there is a need for highly heat-resistant thermoelectric materials (TEMs) with an improved figure of merit ( ZT). Production and test methods used for TEMs today are highly expensive. This study attempts to estimate the Seebeck coefficient of TEMs by using the values of existing materials in the literature. The estimation is made within an artificial neural network (ANN) based on the amount of doping and production methods. Results of the estimations show that the Seebeck coefficient can approximate the real values with an average accuracy of 94.4%. In addition, ANN has detected that any change in production methods is followed by a change in the Seebeck coefficient.

  7. Development of the loss coefficient correlation for cross flow between graphite fuel blocks in the core of prismatic very high temperature reactor-PMR200

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong-Hun; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu; Park, Goon-Cherl

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Cross flow experimental data are produced with wedge-shaped and parallel gaps. • The results of a CFD analysis and experimental data are in good agreement. • Pressure loss coefficient for the cross gap between fuel blocks in PMR200 is found. • A new correlation of the cross flow loss coefficient for PMR200 is proposed. - Abstract: The core of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) PMR200 (a prismatic modular reactor rated at 200 MW of thermal power) consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of graphite. If the core bypass flow ratio increases, the coolant channel flow is decreased and can then lower the heat removal efficiency, resulting in a locally increased fuel block temperature. The coolant channels in the fuel blocks are connected to bypass gaps by the cross gap, complicating flow distribution in the VHTR core. Therefore, reliable estimation of the bypass flow is highly important for the design and safety analysis of the VHTR core. Because of the complexity of the core geometry and gap configuration, it is challenging to predict the flow distribution in the VHTR core. To analyze this flow distribution accurately, it is necessary to determine the cross flow phenomena, and the loss coefficient across the cross gap has to be evaluated to determine the flow distribution in the VHTR core when a lumped parameter code or a flow network analysis code that uses the correlation of the loss coefficient is employed. The purpose of this paper is to develop a loss coefficient correlation applicable to the cross gap in the PMR200 core. The cross flow was evaluated experimentally using the difference between the measured inlet and outlet mass flow rates. Next, the applicability of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX 15, was confirmed by comparing the experimental data and CFD analysis results. To understand the cross flow phenomena, the loss coefficient was evaluated; in the high Reynolds number region

  8. Development of the loss coefficient correlation for cross flow between graphite fuel blocks in the core of prismatic very high temperature reactor-PMR200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong-Hun, E-mail: huny12@snu.ac.kr; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu, E-mail: chohk@snu.ac.kr; Park, Goon-Cherl, E-mail: parkgc@snu.ac.kr

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Cross flow experimental data are produced with wedge-shaped and parallel gaps. • The results of a CFD analysis and experimental data are in good agreement. • Pressure loss coefficient for the cross gap between fuel blocks in PMR200 is found. • A new correlation of the cross flow loss coefficient for PMR200 is proposed. - Abstract: The core of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) PMR200 (a prismatic modular reactor rated at 200 MW of thermal power) consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of graphite. If the core bypass flow ratio increases, the coolant channel flow is decreased and can then lower the heat removal efficiency, resulting in a locally increased fuel block temperature. The coolant channels in the fuel blocks are connected to bypass gaps by the cross gap, complicating flow distribution in the VHTR core. Therefore, reliable estimation of the bypass flow is highly important for the design and safety analysis of the VHTR core. Because of the complexity of the core geometry and gap configuration, it is challenging to predict the flow distribution in the VHTR core. To analyze this flow distribution accurately, it is necessary to determine the cross flow phenomena, and the loss coefficient across the cross gap has to be evaluated to determine the flow distribution in the VHTR core when a lumped parameter code or a flow network analysis code that uses the correlation of the loss coefficient is employed. The purpose of this paper is to develop a loss coefficient correlation applicable to the cross gap in the PMR200 core. The cross flow was evaluated experimentally using the difference between the measured inlet and outlet mass flow rates. Next, the applicability of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX 15, was confirmed by comparing the experimental data and CFD analysis results. To understand the cross flow phenomena, the loss coefficient was evaluated; in the high Reynolds number region

  9. Saturation and negative temperature coefficient of electrical resistivity in liquid iron-sulfur alloys at high densities from first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Fabian; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd; de Koker, Nico

    2018-03-01

    We report results on electronic transport properties of liquid Fe-S alloys at conditions of planetary cores, computed using first-principle techniques in the Kubo-Greenwood formalism. We describe a combined effect of resistivity saturation due to temperature, compression, and chemistry by comparing the electron mean free path from the Drude response of optical conductivity to the mean interatomic distance. At high compression and high sulfur concentration the Ioffe-Regel condition is satisfied, and the temperature coefficient of resistivity changes sign from positive to negative. We show that this happens due to a decrease in the d density of states at the Fermi level in response to thermal broadening.

  10. Study of the mineralogic composition influence of the ground of Goiania, Brazil, in the distribution coefficient of the 137 Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2000-01-01

    Interactions between the soil and a solute in a liquid effluent depend on the characteristics of this solute as well as on the nature of the soil. The soil distribution coefficient K d in non altered natural systems can be estimated by the summation of the K d 's of its individual mineral components. In thesis this approach allows an evaluation of the distribution coefficient on the basis of the qualitative and quantitative identification of the mineral constituents of a given soil. This work reported here aimed at gathering preliminary data and at pointing the relevance of the approach in studies of radionuclide sorption by soils. A sample of the Goiania soil was collected and analyzed by X Ray diffractometry. The thus identified mineral components were subsequently submitted to individual batch tests, using 137 Cs as tracer. The mineral species tested were: kaolinite, gibbsite, goethite, hematite, muscovite, quartz and zirconite. The values obtained for K d are presented and discussed. (author)

  11. State-to-state quantum mechanical calculations of rate coefficients for the D+ + H2 → HD + H+ reaction at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honvault, P; Scribano, Y

    2013-10-03

    The dynamics of the D(+) + H2 → HD + H(+) reaction on a recent ab initio potential energy surface (Velilla, L.; Lepetit, B.; Aguado, A.; Beswick, J. A.; Paniagua, M. J. Chem. Phys. 2008, 129, 084307) has been investigated by means of a time-independent quantum mechanical approach. Cross-sections and rate coefficients are calculated, respectively, for collision energies below 0.1 eV and temperatures up to 100 K for astrophysical application. An excellent accord is found for collision energy above 5 meV, while a disagreement between theory and experiment is observed below this energy. We show that the rate coefficients reveal a slightly temperature-dependent behavior in the upper part of the temperature range considered here. This is in agreement with the experimental data above 80 K, which give a temperature independent value. However, a significant decrease is found at temperatures below 20 K. This decrease can be related to quantum effects and the decay back to the reactant channel, which are not considered by simple statistical approaches, such as the Langevin model. Our results have been fitted to appropriate analytical expressions in order to be used in astrochemical and cosmological models.

  12. Magnetic field and temperature dependent measurements of hall coefficient in thermal evaporated Tin-Doped Cadmium Oxide Thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamadi, O.; Shakir, N.; Mohammed, F.

    2010-01-01

    CdO:Sn thin films are deposited onto glass substrates by thermal evaporation under vacuum. The studied films are polycrystalline and have an NaCl structure. The Hall effect is studied for films with different thickness as substrates are maintained at different temperatures. The temperature dependence of the Hall mobility is also investigated. (authors)

  13. MM98.04 Measurement of temperature and determination of heat transfer coefficient in backward can extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Wanheim, Tarras

    1998-01-01

    Temperature is measured during backward can extrusion of steel. The process is characterised by large deformations and very high surface pressure. In the experiments, a can in low carbon steel with a lubrication layer of phosphate soap is formed. The temperature is measured by thermocouples...

  14. MM98.34 Experimental Measurements of Die temperatures and determination of heat transfer coefficient in backward can extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Wanheim, Tarras

    1998-01-01

    The large deformations in backward can extrusion result in a rise of temperature of more than 200 degrees Centigrade. In the experiments cans in low carbon steel are formed, with a lubrication layer of phosphate soap. The temperature is measured by thermocouples in the die insert and the punch...

  15. Density, thermal expansion coefficient and viscosity of sodium tetraborate (borax)-UO2 and of sodium metaborate-UO2 solutions at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Dorner, S.; Roth, A.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements have been performed of the density, of the volumetric thermal expansion coefficient and of the viscosity of liquid sodium tetraborate (borax) and of sodium metaborate both pure and with two different amounts of UO 2 dissolved in each. The viscosity measurements have been performed for the solution of sodium tetraborate with UO 2 and CeO 2 , and with CeO 2 only as well. These data are required for the design of core-catchers based on sodium borates. The density measurements have been performed with the buoyancy method in the temperature range from 825 0 C to 1300 0 C, the viscosity measurements in the temperature range 700-1250 0 C with a modified Haake viscosity balance. The balance was previously calibrated at ambient temperature with a standard calibration liquid and at high temperatures, with data for pure borax available from the literature. (orig.)

  16. Ballistic performance of a Kevlar-29 woven fibre composite under varied temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soykasap, O.; Colakoglu, M.

    2010-05-01

    Armours are usually manufactured from polymer matrix composites and used for both military and non-military purposes in different seasons, climates, and regions. The mechanical properties of the composites depend on temperature, which also affects their ballistic characteristics. The armour is used to absorb the kinetic energy of a projectile without any major injury to a person. Therefore, besides a high strength and lightness, a high damping capacity is required to absorb the impact energy transferred by the projectile. The ballistic properties of a Kevlar 29/polyvinyl butyral composite are investigated under varied temperatures in this study. The elastic modulus of the composite is determined from the natural frequency of composite specimens at different temperatures by using a damping monitoring method. Then, the backside deformation of composite plates is analysed experimentally and numerically employing the finite-element program Abaqus. The experimental and numeric results obtained are in good agreement.

  17. Low temperature rate coefficients of the H + CH(+) → C(+) + H2 reaction: New potential energy surface and time-independent quantum scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfelli, Ghofran; Halvick, Philippe; Honvault, Pascal; Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Stoecklin, Thierry

    2015-09-21

    The observed abundances of the methylidyne cation, CH(+), in diffuse molecular clouds can be two orders of magnitude higher than the prediction of the standard gas-phase models which, in turn, predict rather well the abundances of neutral CH. It is therefore necessary to investigate all the possible formation and destruction processes of CH(+) in the interstellar medium with the most abundant species H, H2, and e(-). In this work, we address the destruction process of CH(+) by hydrogen abstraction. We report a new calculation of the low temperature rate coefficients for the abstraction reaction, using accurate time-independent quantum scattering and a new high-level ab initio global potential energy surface including a realistic model of the long-range interaction between the reactants H and CH(+). The calculated thermal rate coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental data in the range 50 K-800 K. However, at lower temperatures, the experimental rate coefficient takes exceedingly small values which are not reproduced by the calculated rate coefficient. Instead, the latter rate coefficient is close to the one given by the Langevin capture model, as expected for a reaction involving an ion and a neutral species. Several recent theoretical works have reported a seemingly good agreement with the experiment below 50 K, but an analysis of these works show that they are based on potential energy surfaces with incorrect long-range behavior. The experimental results were explained by a loss of reactivity of the lowest rotational states of the reactant; however, the quantum scattering calculations show the opposite, namely, a reactivity enhancement with rotational excitation.

  18. Low-temperature densification and excellent thermal properties of W–Cu thermal-management composites prepared from copper-coated tungsten powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lianmeng; Chen, Wenshu; Luo, Guoqiang; Chen, Pingan; Shen, Qiang; Wang, Chuanbin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • High-density (98.4%) W–20 wt.%Cu composites were low-temperature fabricated. • A highly pure Cu network and a homogenous microstructure formed in the composites. • The interfaces between W and Cu are well bonded with no spaces. • The composites have excellent thermal properties. -- Abstract: High-density W–20 wt.%Cu composites containing a Cu-network structure and exhibiting good thermal properties were fabricated by low-temperature hot-press sintering from high-purity copper-coated tungsten powders. The relative density of W–20 wt.%Cu composites sintered at 950 °C–100 MPa–2 h was 98.4%. The low-temperature densification of W–Cu composites occurs because the sintering mode of the coated particles involves only sintering of Cu to Cu, rather than both Cu to W and Cu to Cu, as required for conventional powder particles. The microstructure shows that a network of high-purity Cu extends throughout the composites, and that the W is distributed homogeneously; the interfaces between W and Cu show good contact. The composites have excellent thermal conductivity (239 W/(m K)) and a relatively low coefficient of thermal expansion (7.4 × 10 −6 /K), giving them some of the best properties reported to date for thermal-management materials. The excellent performance is mainly because of their structure, which arises from the characteristics of the high-purity copper-coated tungsten powders

  19. An investigation on the tribological properties of Co(ReO4)2/MoS2 composite as potential lubricating additive at various temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junhai; Lu, Bing; Zhang, Lixiu; Li, Ting; Yan, Tingting; Li, Mengxu

    2018-02-01

    The Co(ReO4)2 powder was fabricated via the aqueous solution method, and mixed with MoS2 powder using ball milling technique. A certain concentration of Co(ReO4)2/MoS2 composite additive was dispersed into the poly alpha olefin base oil with the assistance of surface active agents. The load-carrying property and lubricating behavior of base oil containing a certain content of Co(ReO4)2/MoS2 composite additive at various temperatures were evaluated by four-ball test and ball-on-disc sliding friction test. The physical properties and friction-reducing mechanism of synthesized composite were ascertained by a series of characterization techniques including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and differential thermal analysis/thermogravimetry. The four-ball test results suggested the Co(ReO4)2/MoS2 composite additive could effectively promote the load-carrying capacity of base oil, and decrease the friction coefficient as well as wear scar diameter. Ball-on-disc sliding friction test results showed that the base oil with Co(ReO4)2/MoS2 composite additive possessed lower friction coefficients than that of base oil in the whole temperature range, particularly at high temperatures. The protective layer consisted of composite additive and native oxides from superalloy substrate formed on the worn surface to prevent the direct contact between friction pair. The Co(ReO4)2/MoS2 composite played a dominant role in friction-reducing function in the protective layer at elevated temperatures, and the reason for this was that MoS2 possessed layered structure and superior adsorption capacity, and Co(ReO4)2 had experienced thermal softening with elevated temperatures and maintained shear-susceptible hexagonal structure.

  20. The Effect of Temperature on Kinetics and Diffusion Coefficients of Metallocene Derivatives in Polyol-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh Bahadori

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the density, dynamic viscosity and ionic conductivity of several deep eutectic solvents (DESs containing ammonium-based salts and hydrogen bond donvnors (polyol type are investigated. The temperature-dependent electrolyte viscosity as a function of molar conductivity is correlated by means of Walden's rule. The oxidation of ferrocene (Fc/Fc+ and reduction of cobaltocenium (Cc+/Cc at different temperatures are studied by cyclic voltammetry and potential-step chronoamperometry in DESs. For most DESs, chronoamperometric transients are demonstrated to fit an Arrhenius-type relation to give activation energies for the diffusion of redox couples at different temperatures. The temperature dependence of the measured conductivities of DES1 and DES2 are better correlated with the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher equation. The kinetics of the Fc/Fc+ and Cc+/Cc electrochemical systems have been investigated over a temperature range from 298 to 338 K. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant is then calculated at different temperatures by means of a logarithmic analysis. The glycerol-based DES (DES5 appears suitable for further testing in electrochemical energy storage devices.

  1. Peak divergence in the curve of magnetoelectric coefficient versus dc bias magnetic field at resonance region for bi-layer magnetostrictive/piezoelectric composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. J. Zuo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoelectric (ME coefficient dependence on the bias magnetic field at resonance frequencies for the bi-layered bonded Terfenol-D/Pb(Zr,TiO3 composite was investigated. The resonance frequency decreases first and then increases with the bias magnetic field (HDC, showing a “V” shape in the range of 0 ∼ 5 kOe. Below the resonance frequency, the pattern of ME coefficient dependence on the HDC shows a single peak, but splits into a double-peak pattern when the testing frequency increases into a certain region. With increasing the frequency, a divergent evolution of the HDC patterns was observed. Domain motion and ΔE effect combined with magnetostriction-piezoelectric coupling effect were employed to explain this experimental result.

  2. High temperature resistant cermet and ceramic compositions. [for thermal resistant insulators and refractory coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    High temperature oxidation resistance, high hardness and high abrasion and wear resistance are properties of cermet compositions particularly to provide high temperature resistant refractory coatings on metal substrates, for use as electrical insulation seals for thermionic converters. The compositions comprise a sintered body of particles of a high temperature resistant metal or metal alloy, preferably molybdenum or tungsten particles, dispersed in and bonded to a solid solution formed of aluminum oxide and silicon nitride, and particularly a ternary solid solution formed of a mixture of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride. Ceramic compositions comprising a sintered solid solution of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride are also described.

  3. Composition dependence of glow peak temperature in KCl1-xBrx doped with divalent cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Salas, R; Aceves, R; RodrIguez-Mijangos, R; Riveros, H G; Duarte, C

    2004-01-01

    Thermoluminescence measurements of β-irradiated Eu 2+ - and Ca 2+ - doped KCl 1-x KBr x solid solutions excited at room temperature have been carried out to identify the effect of composition on the glow peaks. A typical glow peak has been distinguished for each composition. A linear dependence of its temperature on the composition x has been found. These results indicate that for divalent impurity-doped alkali halide solid solutions these glow peak temperatures are mostly dependent on the lattice constant of the host than on the size of the anion or impurity cation

  4. Experimental Investigation of Friction Coefficient and Wear Rate of Composite Materials Sliding Against Smooth and Rough Mild Steel Counterfaces

    OpenAIRE

    M.A. Chowdhury; D.M. Nuruzzaman; B.K. Roy; S. Samad; R. Sarker; A.H.M. Rezwan

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, friction coefficient and wear rate of gear fiber reinforced plastic (gear fiber) and glass fiber reinforced plastic (glass fiber) sliding against mild steel are investigated experimentally. In order to do so, a pin on disc apparatus is designed and fabricated. Experiments are carried out when smooth or rough mild steel pin slides on gear fiber and glass fiber disc. Experiments are conducted at normal load 10, 15 and 20 N, sliding velocity 1, 1.5 and 2 m/s and relative h...

  5. Compositional dependence of the Young's modulus and piezoelectric coefficient of (110)-oriented pulsed laser deposited PZT thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazeer, H.; Nguyen, Duc Minh; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Sardan Sukas, Ö.; Abelmann, Leon; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution, we report on the compositional dependence of the mechanical and piezoelectric properties of Pb(ZrₓTi₿₋ₓ)O₃ (PZT) thin films fabricated by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). These films grow epitaxially on silicon with a (110) preferred orientation and have excellent piezoelectric

  6. Localized Temperature Variations in Laser-Irradiated Composites with Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Brian Jenkins

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber Bragg grating (FBG temperature sensors are embedded in composites to detect localized temperature gradients resulting from high energy infrared laser radiation. The goal is to detect the presence of radiation on a composite structure as rapidly as possible and to identify its location, much the same way human skin senses heat. A secondary goal is to determine how a network of sensors can be optimized to detect thermal damage in laser-irradiated composite materials or structures. Initial tests are conducted on polymer matrix composites reinforced with either carbon or glass fiber with a single optical fiber embedded into each specimen. As many as three sensors in each optical fiber measure the temporal and spatial thermal response of the composite to high energy radiation incident on the surface. Additional tests use a 2 × 2 × 3 array of 12 sensors embedded in a carbon fiber/epoxy composite to simultaneously measure temperature variations at locations on the composite surface and through the thickness. Results indicate that FBGs can be used to rapidly detect temperature gradients in a composite and their location, even for a direct strike of laser radiation on a sensor, when high temperatures can cause a non-uniform thermal response and FBG decay.

  7. Localized Temperature Variations in Laser-Irradiated Composites with Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, R Brian; Joyce, Peter; Mechtel, Deborah

    2017-01-27

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensors are embedded in composites to detect localized temperature gradients resulting from high energy infrared laser radiation. The goal is to detect the presence of radiation on a composite structure as rapidly as possible and to identify its location, much the same way human skin senses heat. A secondary goal is to determine how a network of sensors can be optimized to detect thermal damage in laser-irradiated composite materials or structures. Initial tests are conducted on polymer matrix composites reinforced with either carbon or glass fiber with a single optical fiber embedded into each specimen. As many as three sensors in each optical fiber measure the temporal and spatial thermal response of the composite to high energy radiation incident on the surface. Additional tests use a 2 × 2 × 3 array of 12 sensors embedded in a carbon fiber/epoxy composite to simultaneously measure temperature variations at locations on the composite surface and through the thickness. Results indicate that FBGs can be used to rapidly detect temperature gradients in a composite and their location, even for a direct strike of laser radiation on a sensor, when high temperatures can cause a non-uniform thermal response and FBG decay.

  8. High critical temperature superconducting composite and fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubots, P.; Legat, D.

    1989-01-01

    The core comprises a high temperature superconducting sintered oxide coated with alumina or barium oxide covered with a first sheath in aluminum, a second sheath in niobium and a third sheath in copper [fr

  9. Intrapulpal Temperature Rise During Light Activation of Restorative Composites in a Primary Molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinall, Craig V; Garcia-Silva, Tales C; Lou, Jennifer S B; Wells, Martha H; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis

    2017-05-15

    To investigate intrapulpal temperature rise in a primary molar during light activation of a composite restoration to determine if clinically significant pulpal temperatures (greater than 5.5 degrees Celsius) were reached. Restorative composites (EsthetX HD, Filtek Supreme Ultra, Filtek Bulk Fill) were placed into a primary molar with occlusal preparation (1.5 mm depth; remaining pulpal floor thickness one mm). The pulp was extirpated through a root access to place a thermocouple against the pulpal roof. Temperature changes were recorded during composite restoration light polymerization with three curing lights (one quartz-tungsten-halogen, two LEDs). Sample size was 10. Samples received additional irradiation to assure complete polymerization, followed by a third irradiation for calculating the exothermic heat contribution (subtracting third irradiation temperatures from first irradiation temperatures). Cured restorations were removed after each test, and the tooth was reused. Results were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis (α =0.05). Type of curing light and composite material affected the intrapulpal temperature rise, which was up to five degrees Celsius for one combination of LED-composite. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for clinically significant intrapulpal temperature rises when light-activating composite restorations in a primary molar with a moderately deep cavity.

  10. The coefficient of friction, particularly of ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Allan

    2008-01-01

    The static and dynamic coefficients of friction are defined, and values from 0.3 to 0.6 are quoted for common materials. These drop to about 0.15 when oil is added as a lubricant. Water ice at temperatures not far below 0 °C is remarkable for low coefficients of around 0.05 for static friction and 0.04–0.02 for dynamic friction, but these figures increase as the temperature diminishes. Reasons for the slipperiness of ice are summarized, but they are still not entirely clear. One hypothesis suggests that it is related to the transient formation of a lubricating film of liquid water produced by frictional heating. If this is the case, some composition melting a little above ambient temperatures might provide a skating rink that did not require expensive refrigeration. Various compositions have been tested, but an entirely satisfactory material has yet to be found

  11. A IR-Femtosecond Laser Hybrid Sensor to Measure the Thermal Expansion and Thermo-Optical Coefficient of Silica-Based FBG at High Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Litong; Lv, Dajuan; Yang, Minghong; Xiong, Liangming; Luo, Jie

    2018-01-26

    In this paper, a hybrid sensor was fabricated using a IR-femtosecond laser to measure the thermal expansion and thermo-optical coefficient of silica-based fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The hybrid sensor was composed of an inline fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) cavity and a type-II FBG. Experiment results showed that the type-II FBG had three high reflectivity resonances in the wavelength ranging from 1100 to 1600 nm, showing the peaks in 1.1, 1.3 and 1.5 μm, respectively. The thermal expansion and thermo-optical coefficient (1.3 μm, 1.5 μm) of silica-based FBG, under temperatures ranging from 30 to 1100 °C, had been simultaneously calculated by measuring the wavelength of the type-II FBG and FFPI cavity length.

  12. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, which allows a shape to be formed prior to the cure, and is then pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Basalt fibers are used for the reinforcement in the composite system. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material.

  13. Influence of ethanol and temperature on the cellular fatty acid composition of Zygosaccharomyces bailii spoilage yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baleiras Couto, M.M.; Huis in 't Veld, J.H.J.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the fatty acid profile of Zygosaccharomyces bailii strains, isolated from different sources, after growth at increasing concentrations of ethanol and/or decreasing temperatures were determined. Differences in fatty acid composition between Zygosaccharomyces bailii strains at standard

  14. Mode I and Mode II Interlaminar Crack Growth Resistances of Ceramic Matrix Composites at Ambient Temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choi, Sung R; Kowalik, Robert W; Alexander, Donald J

    2007-01-01

    ...) including three gas-turbine grade melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC composites. Modes I and II crack growth resistances, GI and GII, were evaluated at ambient temperature using double cantilever beam and end notched flexure methods, respectively...

  15. Monte Carlo analysis of KRITZ-2 critical benchmarks on the reactivity temperature coefficient using ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 nuclear data libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ouahdani, S.; Boukhal, H.; Erradi, L.; Chakir, E.; El Bardouni, T.; Hajjaji, O.; Boulaich, Y.; Benaalilou, K.; Kaddour, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A set of KRITZ-2 experiments with UO 2 and MOX LWR lattices, at room and elevated temperatures, have been analysed using the MCNP6.1 code with the libraries: JENDL-4 and ENDF/B-VII.1. • The detailed comparisons of the calculations and measurements demonstrate a good agreement between calculations and measurements. • To investigate better the influence of cross sections differences on the reactivity temperature coefficient, we break it down into its components using a pin cell model. - Abstract: A set of KRITZ-2 experiments light water moderated lattices with uranium oxide and mixed-oxide fuel rods, at room and elevated temperatures, performed in the early 1970’s have been assessed. Using the MCNP6.1 code with the most recent cross section libraries: JENDL-4 and ENDF/B-VII.1, the critical experiments KRITZ: 2-1, KRITZ: 2-13, and KRITZ: 2-19 achieved in the Sweden reactor KRITZ were analyzed. We have used the ENDF/B-VII.1 data provided with the MCNP6.1.1 version in ACE format and the Makxsf utility to handle the data in the specific temperatures not available in the MCNP6.1.1 original data. The JENDL-4 evaluations were processed using NJOY99 (update 364) to the temperatures of interest. The detailed comparisons of the calculated and measured (Benchmark, 2005) effective multiplication factors and pin power distributions for UO2 and MOX fuelled cores presented in this work demonstrate a good agreement between calculation and measurements. The maximum deviation of the calculation from the experimental data for k eff , is 0.58% (absolute value) obtained for the KRITZ 2:1 at 248.5 °C using ENDF/B-VII.1 data. To investigate better the influence of cross sections differences on the reactivity and temperature coefficient, we break down the infinite multiplication factor into its components using a pin cell model. Using this simple model we evaluated the temperature effect on the infinite multiplication factor and the effect on its components. We have

  16. The application of dual-electrode through vial impedance spectroscopy for the determination of ice interface temperatures, primary drying rate and vial heat transfer coefficient in lyophilization process development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Geoff; Jeeraruangrattana, Yowwares; Ermolina, Irina

    2018-06-22

    Through vial impedance spectroscopy (TVIS) is a product non-invasive process analytical technology which exploits the frequency dependence of the complex impedance spectrum of a composite object (i.e. the freeze-drying vial and its contents) in order to track the progression of the freeze-drying cycle. This work demonstrates the use of a dual electrode system, attached to the external surface of a type I glass tubing vial (nominal capacity 10 mL) in the prediction of (i) the ice interface temperatures at the sublimation front and at the base of the vial, and (ii) the primary drying rate. A value for the heat transfer coefficient (for a chamber pressure of 270 µbar) was then calculated from these parameters and shown to be comparable to that published by Tchessalov[1]. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Effect of different light curing units on Knoop hardness and temperature of resin composite

    OpenAIRE

    Guiraldo Ricardo; Consani Simonides; Xediek Consani Rafael; Mendes Wilson; Lympius Thais; Coelho Sinhoreti Mario

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the influence of quartz tungsten halogen and plasma arc curing (PAC) lights on Knoop hardness and change in polymerization temperature of resin composite. Materials and Methods: Filtek Z250 and Esthet X composites were used in the shade A3. The temperature increase was registered with Type-k thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46). A self-cured polymerized acrylic resin base was built in order to guide the thermocouple and to support the dentin disk ...

  18. Mechanical behaviour of aluminium matrix composites with particles in high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amigo, V.; Salvador, M. D.; Ferrer, C.; Costa d, C. E.; Busquets, D.

    2001-01-01

    The aluminium matrix composites materials reinforced by ceramic particles can be elaborated by powder metallurgy techniques, with extrusion processes. These can provide new materials, with a better mechanical behaviour and moreover when we need those properties at higher temperatures. Aluminium alloy reinforced composites with silicon nitride particles by powder extrusion process was done. Their mechanical properties were characterised at room and elevated temperatures. (Author) 28 refs

  19. Temperature and composition dependence of magnetic properties of cobalt-chromium co-substituted magnesium ferrite nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Javed, E-mail: mjiqauchem@yahoo.com [Surface and Solid State Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Zahoor [Surface and Solid State Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Meydan, Turgut; Melikhov, Yevgen [Wolfson Center for Magnetics, School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-15

    The temperature and composition dependence of magnetic properties of Co-Cr co-substituted magnesium ferrite, Mg{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Cr{sub x}Fe{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} (x=0.0-0.5), prepared by novel polyethylene glycol assisted microemulsion method, are studied. The synthesized materials are characterized by the Moessbauer spectrometer and standard magnetic measurements. Major hysteresis loops are measured up to the magnetic field of 50 kOe at 300, 200 and 100 K. The high field regimes of these loops are modeled using the Law of Approach to saturation to determine the first-order cubic anisotropy coefficient and saturation magnetization. Both the saturation magnetization and the anisotropy coefficient are observed to increase with the decrease in temperature for all Co-Cr co-substitution levels. Also, both the saturation magnetization and the anisotropy coefficient achieved maximum value at x=0.3 and x=0.2, respectively. Explanation of the observed behavior is proposed in terms of the site occupancy of the co-substituent, Co{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 3+} in the cubic spinel lattice. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Cr{sub x}Fe{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} are synthesized by novel PEG assisted microemulsion method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-Cr occupied octahedral site confirmed by the Moessbauer analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High field regime of M-H loops are modeled using the Law of Approach to saturation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of M{sub S}, M{sub r}, H{sub C} and K{sub 1} are found to increase with decreasing temperature.

  20. Effect of Firing Temperature on the Composition and Structural Parameters of Screen Printed ZrO2 Thick Film Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. PATIL

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The compositional, morphological and structural properties of ZrO2 thick films prepared by a standard screen printing method and fired between 800 oC to 1000 oC for 2 hours in an air atmosphere. The material characterization was done using X-ray energy dispersive analysis (EDX, X-ray diffraction (XRD and a scanning electron microscope (SEM. The deposited films were polycrystalline in nature having the monoclinic, tetragonal- cubic structure with a preferred orientation along the (1’11 plane. The result shows that the mass % of Zr was found to be 79.10, 82.14 and 82.04 % for firing temperatures of 800, 900 and 1000 0C respectively may be due to the release of excess oxygen. The effect of the firing temperature on structural parameters such as the crystallite size, percentage of phases, texture coefficient, RMSmicrostrain, dislocation density and stacking fault probability have been studied. The results indicate that grain growth can be increased by increasing the firing temperature which is responsible for decreasing the RMSmicrostrain and dislocation density in ZrO2 thick films. The stacking fault probability remains constant for all firing temperatures. The crystallite size changes from 25.71 nm to 30.80 nm with respect to the increase in the firing temperature.

  1. Temperature induced changes in the heterocyst glycolipid composition of N2-fixing heterocystous cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauersachs, T.; Stal, L.J.; Grego, M.; Schwark, L.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of temperature on the heterocyst glycolipid (HG) composition of the diazotrophic heterocystous cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. strain CCY9613 and Nostoc sp. strain CCY9926 grown at 9, 12, 16, 20 and 24 °C. Both strains contained an overall similar composition of heterocyst

  2. Temperature and composition dependence of birefringence of lithium-tantalate crystals determined by holographic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastwoeste, K.; Schwalenberg, S.; Baeumer, Ch.; Kraetzig, E.

    2003-01-01

    Iron-doped lithium-tantalate samples with different compositions ranging from the congruently melting to the stoichiometric one are analyzed by anisotropic holographic scattering. The temperature dependence of the birefringence yields information on the composition of the crystals. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Temperature and composition dependence of birefringence of lithium-tantalate crystals determined by holographic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastwoeste, K.; Schwalenberg, S.; Baeumer, Ch.; Kraetzig, E. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Osnabrueck, D-49069 Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2003-09-01

    Iron-doped lithium-tantalate samples with different compositions ranging from the congruently melting to the stoichiometric one are analyzed by anisotropic holographic scattering. The temperature dependence of the birefringence yields information on the composition of the crystals. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Microstructural changes and residual properties of fiber reinforced cement composites exposed to elevated temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Keppert, M.; Vejmelková, E.; Švarcová, Silvie; Bezdička, Petr; Černý, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2012), s. 77-89 ISSN 1425-8129 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : fiber reinforced cementcomposites * high temperatures * mineralodical composition * microstructure * residual strength * apparent moisture diffusivity Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.385, year: 2012

  5. Temperature-dependent charge transport mechanisms in carbon sphere/polyaniline composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, Cesar A.; Martinez, Luis M.; Meléndez, Anamaris; Ortiz, Margarita; Ramos, Idalia; Pinto, Nicholas J.; Zimbovskaya, Natalya

    2017-12-01

    Charge transport in the temperature range 80 K electrons between polymeric chains in PANi-filled gaps between CS is the predominant transport mechanism through CS/PANi composites. The high conductivity of the CS/PANi composite makes the material attractive for the fabrication of devices and sensors.

  6. Theoretical and Numerical Approaches for Determining the Reflection and Transmission Coefficients of OPEFB-PCL Composites at X-Band Frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ahmad F; Abbas, Zulkifly; Obaiys, Suzan J; Ibrahim, Norazowa; Hashim, Mansor; Khaleel, Haider

    2015-01-01

    Bio-composites of oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fibres and polycaprolactones (PCL) with a thickness of 1 mm were prepared and characterized. The composites produced from these materials are low in density, inexpensive, environmentally friendly, and possess good dielectric characteristics. The magnitudes of the reflection and transmission coefficients of OPEFB fibre-reinforced PCL composites with different percentages of filler were measured using a rectangular waveguide in conjunction with a microwave vector network analyzer (VNA) in the X-band frequency range. In contrast to the effective medium theory, which states that polymer-based composites with a high dielectric constant can be obtained by doping a filler with a high dielectric constant into a host material with a low dielectric constant, this paper demonstrates that the use of a low filler percentage (12.2%OPEFB) and a high matrix percentage (87.8%PCL) provides excellent results for the dielectric constant and loss factor, whereas 63.8% filler material with 36.2% host material results in lower values for both the dielectric constant and loss factor. The open-ended probe technique (OEC), connected with the Agilent vector network analyzer (VNA), is used to determine the dielectric properties of the materials under investigation. The comparative approach indicates that the mean relative error of FEM is smaller than that of NRW in terms of the corresponding S21 magnitude. The present calculation of the matrix/filler percentages endorses the exact amounts of substrate utilized in various physics applications.

  7. Nanomodified Carbon/Carbon Composites for Intermediate Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-31

    7] Properties Values Appearance Light yellow liquid (material is waxy at room temperature) Specific Gravity 1.245 Ionic Cl (ppm) ᝺ Ionic Na and K...and several types of nanoparticles: chemically modified montmorillonite (MMT) organoclays, polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS®), carbon...montmorillonite (MMT) organoclays, carbon nanofibers, polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS®), nanosilica, nano- silicon carbide (n-SiC), and

  8. [Biomass composition of thermotolerant yeasts of the genus Candida under elevated cultivation temperatures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakova, T I; Dediukhina, E G; Eroshin, V K

    1981-01-01

    The effect of growth temperature on the content of nucleic acids, the content and composition of protein, and the pool of free amino acids and lipids was studied under the conditions of chemostat cultivation of yeast strains at constant flow rates and pO2. The pool of free amino acids in all of the strains decreased with an increase in the temperature of growth. Changes in the content and composition of other cellular components depending on temperature were determined by individual characteristics of the strains. A linear relationship between the content of biomass components and the temperature of growth was found only in Candida scottii. The temperature of yeast cultivation may be used as a factor regulating the pool of free intracellular amino acids and the fatty acids composition of lipids.

  9. A new predictive dynamic model describing the effect of the ambient temperature and the convective heat transfer coefficient on bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Yaghlene, H; Leguerinel, I; Hamdi, M; Mafart, P

    2009-07-31

    In this study, predictive microbiology and food engineering were combined in order to develop a new analytical model predicting the bacterial growth under dynamic temperature conditions. The proposed model associates a simplified primary bacterial growth model without lag, the secondary Ratkowsky "square root" model and a simplified two-parameter heat transfer model regarding an infinite slab. The model takes into consideration the product thickness, its thermal properties, the ambient air temperature, the convective heat transfer coefficient and the growth parameters of the micro organism of concern. For the validation of the overall model, five different combinations of ambient air temperature (ranging from 8 degrees C to 12 degrees C), product thickness (ranging from 1 cm to 6 cm) and convective heat transfer coefficient (ranging from 8 W/(m(2) K) to 60 W/(m(2) K)) were tested during a cooling procedure. Moreover, three different ambient air temperature scenarios assuming alternated cooling and heating stages, drawn from real refrigerated food processes, were tested. General agreement between predicted and observed bacterial growth was obtained and less than 5% of the experimental data fell outside the 95% confidence bands estimated by the bootstrap percentile method, at all the tested conditions. Accordingly, the overall model was successfully validated for isothermal and dynamic refrigeration cycles allowing for temperature dynamic changes at the centre and at the surface of the product. The major impact of the convective heat transfer coefficient and the product thickness on bacterial growth during the product cooling was demonstrated. For instance, the time needed for the same level of bacterial growth to be reached at the product's half thickness was estimated to be 5 and 16.5 h at low and high convection level, respectively. Moreover, simulation results demonstrated that the predicted bacterial growth at the air ambient temperature cannot be assumed to be

  10. Niobium-Matrix-Composite High-Temperature Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Richard B.; Tuffias, Robert H.; La Ferla, Raffaele; Heng, Sangvavann; Harding, John T.

    1995-01-01

    High-temperture composite-material turbine blades comprising mainly niobium matrices reinforced with refractory-material fibers being developed. Of refractory fibrous materials investigated, FP-AL(2)0(3), tungsten, and polymer-based SiC fibers most promising. Blade of this type hollow and formed in nearly net shape by wrapping mesh of reinforcing refractory fibers around molybdenum mandrel, then using thermal-gradient chemical-vapor infiltration (CVI) to fill interstices with niobium. CVI process controllable and repeatable, and kinetics of both deposition and infiltration well understood.

  11. In vitro pulp chamber temperature rise from irradiation and exotherm of flowable composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroudi, Kusai; Silikas, Nick; Watts, David C

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pulpal temperature rise induced during the polymerization of flowable and non-flowable composites using light-emitting diode (LED) and halogen (quartz-tungsten-halogen) light-curing units (LCUs). Five flowable and three non-flowable composites were examined. Pulpal temperature changes were recorded over 10 min in a sample primary tooth by a thermocouple. A conventional quartz-tungsten-halogen source and two LEDs, one of which was programmable, were used for light curing the resin composites. Three repetitions per material were made for each LCU. There was a wide range of temperature rises among the materials (P < 0.05). Temperature rises ranged between 1.3 degrees C for Filtek Supreme irradiated by low-power LED and 4.5 degrees C for Grandio Flow irradiated by high-power LED. The highest temperature rises were observed with both the LED high-power and soft-start LCUs. The time to reach the exothermic peak varied significantly between the materials (P < 0.05). Pulpal temperature rise is related to both the radiant energy output from LCUs and the polymerization exotherm of resin composites. A greater potential risk for heat-induced pulp damage might be associated with high-power LED sources. Flowable composites exhibited higher temperature rises than non-flowable materials, because of higher resin contents.

  12. Tannat grape composition responses to spatial variability of temperature in an Uruguay's coastal wine region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourment, Mercedes; Ferrer, Milka; González-Neves, Gustavo; Barbeau, Gérard; Bonnardot, Valérie; Quénol, Hervé

    2017-09-01

    Spatial variability of temperature was studied in relation to the berry basic composition and secondary compounds of the Tannat cultivar at harvest from vineyards located in Canelones and Montevideo, the most important wine region of Uruguay. Monitoring of berries and recording of temperature were performed in 10 commercial vineyards of Tannat situated in the southern coastal wine region of the country for three vintages (2012, 2013, and 2014). Results from a multivariate correlation analysis between berry composition and temperature over the three vintages showed that (1) Tannat responses to spatial variability of temperature were different over the vintages, (2) correlations between secondary metabolites and temperature were higher than those between primary metabolites, and (3) correlation values between berry composition and climate variables increased when ripening occurred under dry conditions (below average rainfall). For a particular studied vintage (2013), temperatures explained 82.5% of the spatial variability of the berry composition. Daily thermal amplitude was found to be the most important spatial mode of variability with lower values recorded at plots nearest to the sea and more exposed to La Plata River. The highest levels in secondary compounds were found in berries issued from plots situated as far as 18.3 km from La Plata River. The increasing knowledge of temperature spatial variability and its impact on grape berry composition contributes to providing possible issues to adapt grapevine to climate change.

  13. Fatigue of a 3D Orthogonal Non-crimp Woven Polymer Matrix Composite at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, M. P.; Ruggles-Wrenn, M. B.

    2017-12-01

    Tension-tension fatigue behavior of two polymer matrix composites (PMCs) was studied at elevated temperature. The two PMCs consist of the NRPE polyimide matrix reinforced with carbon fibers, but have different fiber architectures: the 3D PMC is a singly-ply non-crimp 3D orthogonal weave composite and the 2D PMC, a laminated composite reinforced with 15 plies of an eight harness satin weave (8HSW) fabric. In order to assess the performance and suitability of the two composites for use in aerospace components designed to contain high-temperature environments, mechanical tests were performed under temperature conditions simulating the actual operating conditions. In all elevated temperature tests performed in this work, one side of the test specimen was at 329 °C while the other side was open to ambient laboratory air. The tensile stress-strain behavior of the two composites was investigated and the tensile properties measured for both on-axis (0/90) and off-axis (±45) fiber orientations. Elevated temperature had little effect on the on-axis tensile properties of the two composites. The off-axis tensile strength of both PMCs decreased slightly at elevated temperature. Tension-tension fatigue tests were conducted at elevated temperature at a frequency of 1.0 Hz with a ratio of minimum stress to maximum stress of R = 0.05. Fatigue run-out was defined as 2 × 105 cycles. Both strain accumulation and modulus evolution during cycling were analyzed for each fatigue test. The laminated 2D PMC exhibited better fatigue resistance than the 3D composite. Specimens that achieved fatigue run-out were subjected to tensile tests to failure to characterize the retained tensile properties. Post-test examination under optical microscope revealed severe delamination in the laminated 2D PMC. The non-crimp 3D orthogonal weave composite offered improved delamination resistance.

  14. High Temperature Resin/Carbon Nanotube Composite Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Sun, Keun J.; Criss, Jim M.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Connell, John W.

    2006-01-01

    For the purpose of incorporating multifunctionality into advanced composites, blends of phenylethynyl terminated imides-330 (PETI-330) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared, characterized and fabricated into moldings. PETI-330/MWCNT mixtures were prepared at concentrations ranging from 3 to 25 weight percent by dry mixing the components in a ball mill. The resulting powders were characterized for degree of mixing, thermal and rheological properties. Based on the characterization results, PETI-330/MWCNT samples were scaled up to approximately 300 g and used to fabricate moldings by injecting the mixtures at 260-280 deg C into a stainless steel tool followed by curing for 1 h at 371 deg C. The tool was designed to impart a degree of shear during the injection process in an attempt to achieve some alignment of the MWCNTs in the flow direction. Obtained moldings were subsequently characterized for thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties. The degree of dispersion and alignment of MWCNTs were investigated using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. The preparation and preliminary characterization of PETI-330/MWCNT composites will be discussed.

  15. Viscosity-based high temperature waste form compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimann, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    High-temperature waste forms such as iron-enriched basalt are proposed to immobilize and stabilize a variety of low-level wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The combination of waste and soil anticipated for the waste form results in high SiO 2 + Al 2 O 3 producing a viscous melt in an arc furnace. Adding a flux such as CaO to adjust the basicity ratio (the molar ratio of basic to acid oxides) enables tapping the furnace without resorting to extreme temperatures, but adds to the waste volume. Improved characterization of wastes will permit adjusting the basicity ratio to between 0.7 and 1.0 by blending of wastes and/or changing the waste-soil ratio. This minimizes waste form volume. Also, lower pouring temperatures will decrease electrode and refractory attrition, reduce vaporization from the melt, and, with suitable flux, facilitate crystallization. Results of laboratory tests were favorable and pilot-scale melts are planned; however, samples have not yet been subjected to leach testing

  16. Deposition temperature influence on sputtered nanogranular magnetoresistive composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujika, M.; Arana, S.; Castano, E.

    2007-01-01

    Among different physical principles magnetic sensors for low magnetic field detection can be based on, granular giant magnetoresistances have been studied due to their high sensitivity to small field changes and gradual magnetoresistance change at low fields. Following this aim, nanogranular Ag-Co thin films, deposited by DC co-sputtering from Ag and Co targets at different deposition temperatures have been tested. Samples have been grown at room temperature, 100 and 200 deg. C and annealed in a mixture of N 2 and H 2 at 200 and 300 deg. C for 45 min. The samples that have shown the best performance have been subjected to two sets of measurements where an external field has been applied in-plane and perpendicular to the film plane. The best performance has been shown by the samples deposited at room temperature and annealed at 300 deg. C, reporting a maximum value of magnetoresistance of 16.7% at 1.4 T and a linear sensitivity of 63%/T between 0.04 and 0.07 T within a magnetoresistance range varying from 1.5% to 3% when subjected to an in-plane external field

  17. Complete sets of elastic constants and photoelastic coefficients of pure and MgO-doped lithium niobate crystals at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrushchak, A. S.; Laba, H. P.; Yurkevych, O. V.; Mytsyk, B. G.; Solskii, I. M.; Kityk, A. V.; Sahraoui, B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of ultrasonic measurements of LiNbO 3 and LiNbO 3 :MgO crystals. The tensors of piezoelectric coefficients, elastic stiffness constants, and elastic compliances are determined for both crystals at room temperature. Combining these data with the results of piezo-optical measurements, a complete set of photoelastic tensor coefficients is also calculated. Doping of LiNbO 3 crystals by MgO does not lead to a considerable modification of their elastic and photoelastic properties. However, LiNbO 3 :MgO is characterized by a considerably higher resistance with respect to powerful light radiation, making it promising for future application in acousto-optic devices that deal with superpowerful laser radiation. Presented here are the complete tensor sets of elastic constants and photoelastic coefficients of LiNbO 3 and LiNbO 3 :MgO crystals that may be used for a geometry optimization of acousto-optical interaction providing the best diffraction efficiency of acousto-optical cells made of these materials.

  18. Annular convective-radiative fins with a step change in thickness, and temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barforoush, M. S. M.; Saedodin, S.

    2018-01-01

    This article investigates the thermal performance of convective-radiative annular fins with a step reduction in local cross section (SRC). The thermal conductivity of the fin's material is assumed to be a linear function of temperature, and heat transfer coefficient is assumed to be a power-law function of surface temperature. Moreover, nonzero convection and radiation sink temperatures are included in the mathematical model of the energy equation. The well-known differential transformation method (DTM) is used to derive the analytical solution. An exact analytical solution for a special case is derived to prove the validity of the obtained results from the DTM. The model provided here is a more realistic representation of SRC annular fins in actual engineering practices. Effects of many parameters such as conduction-convection parameters, conduction-radiation parameter and sink temperature, and also some parameters which deal with step fins such as thickness parameter and dimensionless parameter describing the position of junction in the fin on the temperature distribution of both thin and thick sections of the fin are investigated. It is believed that the obtained results will facilitate the design and performance evaluation of SRC annular fins.

  19. Mechanical performance of hemp fiber polypropylene composites at different operating temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi Tajvidi; Nazanin Motie; Ghonche Rassam; Robert H. Falk; Colin Felton

    2010-01-01

    In order to quantify the effect of temperature on the mechanical properties of hemp fiber polypropylene composites, formulations containing 25% and 40% (by weight) hemp fiber were produced and tested at three representative temperatures of 256, 296, and 336 K. Flexural, tensile, and impact tests, as well as dynamic mechanical analysis, were performed and the reduction...

  20. Highly selective room temperature NO2 gas sensor based on rGO-ZnO composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti, Kanaujiya, Neha; Varma, G. D.

    2018-05-01

    Blending metal oxide nanoparticles with graphene or its derivatives can greatly enhance gas sensing characteristics. In the present work, ZnO nanoparticles have been synthesized via reflux method. Thin films of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and composite of rGO-ZnO have been fabricated by drop casting method for gas sensing application. The samples have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) for the structural and morphological studies respectively. Sensing measurements have been carried out for the composite film of rGO-ZnO for different concentrations of NO2 ranging from 4 to 100 ppm. Effect of increasing temperature on the sensing performance has also been studied and the rGO-ZnO composite sensor shows maximum percentage response at room temperature. The limit of detection (LOD) for rGO-ZnO composite sensor is 4ppm and it exhibits a high response of 48.4% for 40 ppm NO2 at room temperature. To check the selectivity of the composite sensor, sensor film has been exposed to 40 ppm different gases like CO, NH3, H2S and Cl2 at room temperature and the sensor respond negligibly to these gases. The present work suggests that rGO-ZnO composite material can be a better candidate for fabrication of highly selective room temperature NO2 gas sensor.

  1. Near-zero temperature coefficient of resistivity associated with magnetic ordering in antiperovskite Mn{sub 3+x}Ni{sub 1−x}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Sihao; Sun, Ying; Wang, Lei; Shi, Kewen; Hu, Pengwei; Wang, Cong, E-mail: congwang@buaa.edu.cn [Center for Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Department of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wu, Hui; Huang, Qingzhen [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-6102 (United States)

    2016-01-25

    The near-zero temperature coefficient of resistivity (NZ-TCR) behavior is reported in the antiperovskite compounds Mn{sub 3+x}Ni{sub 1−x}N (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.333). Our results indicate that the broad temperature range (above 275 K extending to above 220 K) of NZ-TCR is obtained by Mn doping at the Ni site. The short-range magnetic ordering is revealed by both neutron powder diffraction and inverse magnetic susceptibility. Further, we find a strong correlation between the anomalous resistivity change of Mn{sub 3+x}Ni{sub 1−x}N from the metal-like to the NZ-TCR behavior and the lack of the long-range magnetic ordering. The possible mechanism of NZ-TCR behavior is discussed using the spin-disorder scattering model.

  2. Investigation on powder metallurgy Cr-Si-Ta-Al alloy target for high-resistance thin film resistors with low temperature coefficient of resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.Y.; Zhang, Z.S.; Bai, T.

    2010-01-01

    The sputtering target for high-resistance thin film resistors plays a decisive role in temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). Silicon-rich chromium (Cr)-silicon (Si) target was designed and smelted for high-resistance thin film resistors with low TCR. Valve metal tantalum (Ta) and aluminum (Al) were introduced to the Cr-Si target to improve the performance of the target prepared. The measures for grain refining in smelting Cr-Si-Ta-Al target were taken to improve the performance of the prepared target. The mechanism and role of grain refinement were discussed in the paper. The phase structure of the prepared target was detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Rate of temperature drop was studied to reduce the internal stress of alloy target and conquer the easy cracking disadvantage of silicon-rich target. The electrical properties of sputtered thin film resistors were tested to evaluate the performance of the prepared target indirectly.

  3. A study on the estimation method of internal stresses caused by the difference of thermal expansion coefficients between concrete and reinforcement at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazu, Tsutomu

    1998-01-01

    When a reinforced concrete member is exposed to high temperature conditions over 100degC, tensile strain occurs in the concrete and compressive strain occurs in reinforcements due to a difference of thermal expansion coefficients between concrete and reinforcement. Its mechanism is the same as that of restrained stress caused by drying shrinkage of concrete; tensile stress occurs in the concrete because drying shrinkage strain is restrained by reinforcements, but there is a different point that the phenomenon at a high temperature condition includes the change of mechanical properties of concrete and reinforcement. In the study, the phenomenon is measured in the experiments and is clarified quantitatively. Moreover, the estimation method, which is derived from expanding the equation of average strain of reinforcement in the CEB Design Manual, is suggested and is verified by the comparison with the experimental results. (author)

  4. Preparation and Dynamic Mechanical Properties at Elevated Temperatures of a Tungsten/Glass Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chong; Wang, Yingchun; Ma, Xueya; Liu, Keyi; Wang, Yubing; Li, Shukui; Cheng, Xingwang

    2018-03-01

    Experiments were conducted to prepare a borosilicate glass matrix composite containing 50 vol.% tungsten and examine its dynamic compressive behavior at elevated temperatures in the range of 450-775 °C. The results show that the homogenous microstructure of the tungsten/glass composite with relative density of 97% can be obtained by hot-pressing sintering at 800 °C for 1 h under pressure of 30 MPa. Dynamic compressive testing was carried out by a separate Hopkinson pressure bar system with a synchronous device. The results show that the peak stress decreases and the composite transforms from brittle to ductile in nature with testing temperature increasing from 450 to 750 °C. The brittle-ductile transition temperature is about 500 °C. Over 775 °C, the composite loses load-bearing capacity totally because of the excessive softening of the glass phase. In addition, the deformation and failure mechanism were analyzed.

  5. Fabrication of Titanium Diboride-Cu Composite by Self-High Temperature Synthesis plus Quick Press

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinyong ZHANG; Zhengyi FU; Weimin WANG

    2005-01-01

    Titanium diboride based composites, good candidates for contact materials, have high hardness, Young's modulus,high temperature stability, and excellent electrical, thermal conductivity. However a good interface of TiB2/Cu is very difficult to achieve for oxidation of TiB2. To avoid this oxidation behavior, the in situ combusting synthesis technology, SHS, was used to prepare TiB2/Cu composite. Thecharacters of Ti-B-xCu SHS were studied in detail,such as combustion temperature, products phases and grain size. Based on the experimental results a proper technology way of self-high temperature synthesis plus quick press (SHS/QP) was determined and compact TiB2/Cu composites with relative density over than 97 pct of the theoretical were fabricated by this method. The properties and microstructures of these TiB2 based composites were also investigated.

  6. Assessment of oxygen diffusion coefficients by studying high-temperature oxidation behaviour of Zr1Nb fuel cladding in the temperature range of 1100–1300 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Négyesi, M., E-mail: negy@seznam.cz [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); UJP PRAHA a.s., Nad Kamínkou 1345, 156 10 Praha – Zbraslav (Czech Republic); Chmela, T. [UJP PRAHA a.s., Nad Kamínkou 1345, 156 10 Praha – Zbraslav (Czech Republic); Veselský, T. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Krejčí, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); CHEMCOMEX Praha a.s., Elišky Přemyslovny 379, 156 10 Praha – Zbraslav (Czech Republic); Novotný, L.; Přibyl, A. [UJP PRAHA a.s., Nad Kamínkou 1345, 156 10 Praha – Zbraslav (Czech Republic); Bláhová, O. [New Technologies Research Centre, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitní 8, 306 14 Plzeň (Czech Republic); Burda, J. [NRI Rez plc, Husinec-Řež 130, 250 68 Řež (Czech Republic); Siegl, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Vrtílková, V. [UJP PRAHA a.s., Nad Kamínkou 1345, 156 10 Praha – Zbraslav (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-15

    The paper deals with high-temperature steam oxidation behaviour of Zr1Nb fuel cladding. First of all, comprehensive experimental program was conducted to provide sufficient experimental data, such as the thicknesses of evolved phase layers and the overall weight gain kinetics, as well as the oxygen concentration and nanohardness values at phase boundaries. Afterwards, oxygen diffusion coefficients in the oxide, in the α-Zr(O) layer, in the double-phase (α + β)-Zr region, and in the β-phase region have been estimated based on the experimental data employing analytical solution of the multiphase moving boundary problem, assuming the equilibrium conditions being fulfilled at the interface boundaries. Eventually, the determined oxygen diffusion coefficients served as input into the in-house numerical code, which was designed to predict the high-temperature oxidation behaviour of Zr1Nb fuel cladding. Very good agreement has been achieved between the numerical calculations and the experimental data.

  7. Flexural behaviour of post-cured composites at oral-simulating temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C T; Vijayaraghavan, T V; Lee, S Y; Tsai, A; Huang, H M; Pan, L C

    2001-07-01

    Post-curing treatments have been known to improve the mechanical stability of visible light-cured composites. After individual post-curing treatment, the flexural strength (FS) of four commercial direct/indirect placement composite materials which differ greatly in composition [oligocarbonate dimethacrylate (OCDMA)-based Conquest C & B (CQT), Bisphenol-A glycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA)-based Charisma, urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA)-based Concept (CCT), and BisGMA/UDMA-based Dentacolor] was evaluated under water in the temperature range of 12-50 degrees C. A control series was tested in air at room temperature (25 +/- 1 degrees C). Data were analysed using ANOVA and Duncan's test. Flexural strengths overall decreased (20-40%, P OCDMA-based materials. Post-cured composites can be significantly affected by exposure to oral environments. Different composition determines the degree of influence.

  8. Overview of Fiber Optic Sensor Technologies for Strain/Temperature Sensing Applications in Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Manjusha; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the different types of fiber optic sensors (FOS) that can be used with composite materials and also their compatibility with and suitability for embedding inside a composite material. An overview of the different types of FOS used for strain/temperature sensing in composite materials is presented. Recent trends, and future challenges for FOS technology for condition monitoring in smart composite materials are also discussed. This comprehensive review provides essential information for the smart materials industry in selecting of appropriate types of FOS in accordance with end-user requirements. PMID:26784192

  9. High temperature oxidation and crystallization behavior of phosphate glass compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, Diego; Rodriguez, Diego; Grumbaum, N.; Gonzalez Oliver, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed the thermal transformation of three iron phosphate glasses having the following nominal compositions: M4 [70% P 2 O 5 , 30% Fe 2 O 3 ], M5 [85% M4, 15% UO 2 ] y M7 [69.7% P 2 O 5 , 28.6% Fe 2 O 3 , 1,7% Al 2 O 3 ]. Thermogravimetric analysis, DTA (differential thermal analysis) and SAXS (Small Angle X-ray Scattering) were performed.It was observed that it is easily possible to produce glasses in these systems having very low crystallinity.We could determine the final stable crystalline phases [Fe 4 (P 2 O 7 ) 3 , Fe(PO 3 ) 3 and Fe 3 (P 2 O 7 ) 2 ].The presence of uranium ions affects not only the redox effects but also the crystallization of the system.SAXS data obtained during the heating in vacuum up to ∼600degC, gave some variation of scattering intensities vs. scattering vector suggesting the development of an extra phase or some kind inhomogeneities that seems to disappear on heating

  10. Effect of Sintering Temperature on the Properties of Aluminium-Aluminium Oxide Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewan Muhammad Nuruzzaman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, aluminium-aluminium oxide (Al-Al2O3 metal matrix composites of different weight percentage reinforcements of aluminium oxide were processed at different sintering temperatures. In order to prepare these composite specimens, conventional powder metallurgy (PM method was used. Three types specimens of different compositions such as 95%Al+5%Al2O3, 90%Al+10%Al2O3 and 85%Al+15%Al2O3 were prepared under 20 Ton compaction load. Then, all the specimens were sintered in a furnace at two different temperatures 550oC and 580oC. In each sintering process, two different heating cycles were used. After the sintering process, it was observed that undistorted flat specimens were successfully prepared for all the compositions. The effects of sintering temperature and weight fraction of aluminium oxide particulates on the density, hardness and microstructure of Al-Al2O3 composites were observed. It was found that density and hardness of the composite specimens were significantly influenced by sintering temperature and percentage aluminium oxide reinforcement. Furthermore, optical microscopy revealed that almost uniform distribution of aluminium oxide reinforcement within the aluminium matrix was achieved.

  11. Effect of calcination temperature on formaldehyde oxidation performance of Pt/TiO2 nanofiber composite at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feiyan; Le, Yao; Cheng, Bei; Jiang, Chuanjia

    2017-12-01

    Catalytic oxidation at room temperature over well-designed catalysts is an environmentally friendly method for the abatement of indoor formaldehyde (HCHO) pollution. Herein, nanocomposites of platinum (Pt) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanofibers with various phase compositions were prepared by calcining the electrospun TiO2 precursors at different temperatures and subsequently depositing Pt nanoparticles (NPs) on the TiO2 through a NaBH4-reduction process. The phase compositions and structures of Pt/TiO2 can be easily controlled by varying the calcination temperature. The Pt/TiO2 nanocomposites showed a phase-dependent activity towards the catalytic HCHO oxidation. Pt/TiO2 containing pure rutile phase showed enhanced activity with a turnover frequency (TOF) of 16.6 min-1 (for a calcination temperature of 800 °C) as compared to those containing the anatase phase or mixed phases. Density functional theory calculation shows that TiO2 nanofibers with pure rutile phase have stronger adsorption ability to Pt atoms than anatase phase, which favors the reduction of Pt over rutile phase TiO2, leading to higher contents of metallic Pt in the nanocomposite. In addition, the Pt/TiO2 with rutile phase possesses more abundant oxygen vacancies, which is conducive to the activation of adsorbed oxygen. Consequently, the Pt/rutile-TiO2 nanocomposite exhibited better catalytic activity towards HCHO oxidation at room temperature.

  12. Effect of different light curing units on Knoop hardness and temperature of resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiraldo Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the influence of quartz tungsten halogen and plasma arc curing (PAC lights on Knoop hardness and change in polymerization temperature of resin composite. Materials and Methods: Filtek Z250 and Esthet X composites were used in the shade A3. The temperature increase was registered with Type-k thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46. A self-cured polymerized acrylic resin base was built in order to guide the thermocouple and to support the dentin disk of 1.0 mm thickness obtained from bovine tooth. On the acrylic resin base, elastomer mold of 2.0 mm was adapted. The temperature increase was measured after composite light curing. After 24 h, the specimens were submitted to Knoop hardness test (HMV-2000, Shimadzu, Tokyo, Japan. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey′s test (a = 0.05. Results: For both composites, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05 in the top surface hardness; however, PAC promoted statistically lower (P < 0.05 Knoop hardness number values in the bottom. The mean temperature increase showed no significant statistical differences (P > 0.05. Conclusion: The standardized radiant exposure showed no influence on the temperature increase of the composite, however, showed significant effect on hardness values.

  13. Thermal buffering performance of composite phase change materials applied in low-temperature protective garments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Jiao, Mingli; Yu, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Xueying; Liu, Rangtong; Cao, Jian

    2017-07-01

    Phase change material (PCM) is increasingly being applied in the manufacturing of functional thermo-regulated textiles and garments. This paper investigated the thermal buffering performance of different composite PCMs which are suitable for the application in functional low-temperature protective garments. First, according to the criteria selecting PCM for functional textiles/garments, three kinds of pure PCM were selected as samples, which were n-hexadecane, n-octadecane and n-eicosane. To get the adjustable phase change temperature range and higher phase change enthalpy, three kinds of composite PCM were prepared using the above pure PCM. To evaluate the thermal buffering performance of different composite PCM samples, the simulated low-temperature experiments were performed in the climate chamber, and the skin temperature variation curves in three different low temperature conditions were obtained. Finally composite PCM samples’ thermal buffering time, thermal buffering capacity and thermal buffering efficiency were calculated. Results show that the comprehensive thermal buffering performance of n-octadecane and n-eicosane composite PCM is the best.

  14. Impact of the thermal scattering law of H in H_2O on the isothermal temperatures reactivity coefficients for UOX and MOX fuel lattices in cold operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scotta, J.P.; Noguere, G.; Bernard, D.; Santamarina, A.; Damian, J.I.M.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of the thermal scattering law of hydrogen in light water to isothermal temperature reactivity coefficients for UOX and MOX lattices was studied in the frame of the MISTRAL critical experiments carried out in the zero power reactor EOLE of CEA Cadarache (France). The interpretation of the core residual reactivity measured between 6 to 80 C. degrees (by step of 5 C. degrees) was performed with the Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4"R. The nuclear data from the JEFF-3.1.1 library were used in the calculations. 3 different thermal scattering laws of hydrogen in light water were tested in order to evaluate their impact on the MISTRAL calculations. The thermal scattering laws of interest were firstly those recommended in JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/BVII.1 and also that recently produced at the atomic center of Bariloche (CAB, Argentina) with molecular dynamic simulations. The present work indicates that the calculation-to-experimental bias is (0.4 ± 0.3) pcm/C. degree in the UOX core and (1.0 ± 0.3) pcm/C. degree in the MOX cores, when the JEFF-3.1.1 library is used. An improvement is observed over the whole temperature range with the CAB model. The calculation-to-experimental bias vanishes for the UOX core (0.02 pcm/C. degree) and becomes close to 0.7 pcm/C. degree for the MOX cores. The magnitude of these bias have to be connected to the typical value of the temperature reactivity coefficient that ranges from 5 pcm/C. degree at Beginning Of Cycle (BOC) up to 50 pcm/C. degrees at End Of Cycle (EOC), in PWR conditions. (authors)

  15. Temperature Dependences for Air-broadened Widths and Shift Coefficients in the 30013 - 00001 and 30012 - 00001 Bands of Carbon Dioxide near 1600 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, M.; Predoi-Cross, A.; McKellar, R.; Benner, C.; Miller, C. E.; Toth, R. A.; Brown, L. R.

    2008-12-01

    Nearly 40 high resolution spectra of air-broadened CO2 recorded at temperatures between 215 and 294 K were analyzed using a multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique to determine temperature dependences of air-broadened half width and air-induced pressure shift coefficients in the 30013-00001 and 30012-00001 bands of 12CO2. Data were recorded with two different Fourier transform spectrometers (Kitt Peak FTS at the National Solar Observatory in Arizona and the Bomem FTS at NRC, Ottawa) with optical path lengths ranging between 25 m and 121 m. The sample pressures varied between 11 torr (pure CO2) and 924 torr (CO2-air) with volume mixing ratios of CO2 in air between ~ 0.015 and 0.11. To minimize systematic errors and increase the accuracy of the retrieved parameters, we constrained the multispectrum nonlinear least squares fittings to use quantum mechanical expressions for the rovibrational energies and intensities rather than retrieving the individual positions and intensities line-by-line. The results suggest minimal vibrational dependence for the temperature dependence coefficients.1 1 A. Predoi-Cross and R. Mckellar are grateful for financial support from the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. The research at the Jet Propulsion laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, was performed under contract with National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The support received from the National Science Foundation under Grant No. ATM-0338475 to the College of William and Mary is greatly appreciated. The authors thank Mike Dulick of the National Solar Observatory for his assistance in obtaining the data recorded at Kitt Peak.

  16. Influence of cookies composition on temperature profiles and qualitative parameters during baking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ž. Kožul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During baking of bakery products temperature of baking, temperature profiles, moisture content, volume and colour changes are strongly coupled. The objective of this paper was to study the influence of the cookies composition on temperature profiles and quality parameters (width and thickness, colour formation and textural properties: hardness, fracturability and work of breaking force during baking process. Composition of cookies differs due to flour type and initial moisture content. Cookies were baked at 205 °C and temperature was measured in the centre of samples which were 7 mm thick with a 60 mm diameter. The results of temperature profiles of the cookies during baking have shown the same trend for all of the 18 samples. Samples with the higher initial water content have lower values of total colour difference and also significantly affect textural properties.

  17. Fabrication and temperature dependent magnetic properties of Ni–Cu–Co composite nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Muhammad [Nanomaterials Research Group, Physics Division PINSTECH, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Khan, Maaz, E-mail: maaz@impcas.ac.cn [Nanomaterials Research Group, Physics Division PINSTECH, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Sun, Hongyu [Beijing National Center for Electron Microscopy, Laboratory of Advanced Materials and The State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Nairan, Adeela [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 54590 (Pakistan); Karim, Shafqat; Nisar, Amjad [Nanomaterials Research Group, Physics Division PINSTECH, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Maqbool, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306 (United States); Ahmad, Mashkoor, E-mail: mashkoorahmad2003@yahoo.com [Nanomaterials Research Group, Physics Division PINSTECH, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2015-10-15

    Ni–Cu–Co composite magnetic nanowires have been successfully synthesized by electrochemical deposition. Microstructural and compositional analyses were carried out using FESEM, TEM, HRTEM and XRD. Magnetic measurements were performed from in the temperature range 5–300 K. A strong diamagnetic contribution, which results from the polycarbonate template, was found to show s-shape behavior of the hysteresis loops of the nanowires. The coercivity of the samples was found to increase with the decreasing temperature following simple model of thermal activation of particle’s moment over the anisotropy barrier in the temperature range 50–300 K. Saturation magnetization was found to increase with decreasing temperature following the modified Bloch’s law at low temperatures.

  18. Fabrication and temperature dependent magnetic properties of Ni–Cu–Co composite nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Muhammad; Khan, Maaz; Sun, Hongyu; Nairan, Adeela; Karim, Shafqat; Nisar, Amjad; Maqbool, M.; Ahmad, Mashkoor

    2015-01-01

    Ni–Cu–Co composite magnetic nanowires have been successfully synthesized by electrochemical deposition. Microstructural and compositional analyses were carried out using FESEM, TEM, HRTEM and XRD. Magnetic measurements were performed from in the temperature range 5–300 K. A strong diamagnetic contribution, which results from the polycarbonate template, was found to show s-shape behavior of the hysteresis loops of the nanowires. The coercivity of the samples was found to increase with the decreasing temperature following simple model of thermal activation of particle’s moment over the anisotropy barrier in the temperature range 50–300 K. Saturation magnetization was found to increase with decreasing temperature following the modified Bloch’s law at low temperatures

  19. Theoretical and Numerical Approaches for Determining the Reflection and Transmission Coefficients of OPEFB-PCL Composites at X-Band Frequencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad F Ahmad

    Full Text Available Bio-composites of oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB fibres and polycaprolactones (PCL with a thickness of 1 mm were prepared and characterized. The composites produced from these materials are low in density, inexpensive, environmentally friendly, and possess good dielectric characteristics. The magnitudes of the reflection and transmission coefficients of OPEFB fibre-reinforced PCL composites with different percentages of filler were measured using a rectangular waveguide in conjunction with a microwave vector network analyzer (VNA in the X-band frequency range. In contrast to the effective medium theory, which states that polymer-based composites with a high dielectric constant can be obtained by doping a filler with a high dielectric constant into a host material with a low dielectric constant, this paper demonstrates that the use of a low filler percentage (12.2%OPEFB and a high matrix percentage (87.8%PCL provides excellent results for the dielectric constant and loss factor, whereas 63.8% filler material with 36.2% host material results in lower values for both the dielectric constant and loss factor. The open-ended probe technique (OEC, connected with the Agilent vector network analyzer (VNA, is used to determine the dielectric properties of the materials under investigation. The comparative approach indicates that the mean relative error of FEM is smaller than that of NRW in terms of the corresponding S21 magnitude. The present calculation of the matrix/filler percentages endorses the exact amounts of substrate utilized in various physics applications.

  20. Effects of atmospheric gas composition and temperature on the gasification of coal in hot briquetting carbon composite iron ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueki, Y.; Kanayama, M.; Maeda, T.; Nishika, K.; Shimizu, M. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering

    2007-01-15

    The gasification behavior of carbon composite iron ore produced by hot briquetting process was examined under various gas atmospheres such as CO-N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}-N, and CO-CO{sub 2} at various temperatures. The gasification of coal was affected strongly by atmospheric gas concentration and reaction temperature. Kinetic analysis in various gas atmospheres was carried out by using the first order reaction model, which yields the straight line relation between reaction rate constants for the gasification of coal and the gas concentration. Therefore, reaction rate constants for the gasification of coal in CO-CO{sub 2}-N{sub 2} gas atmosphere were derived.

  1. Effects of temperature variations on guided waves propagating in composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Siavash; Berbyuk, Viktor; Boström, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Effects of temperature on guided waves propagating in composite materials is a well-known problem which has been investigated in many studies. The majority of the studies is focused on effects of high temperature. Understanding the effects of low temperature has major importance in composite structures and components which are operating in cold climate conditions such as e.g. wind turbines operating in cold climate regions. In this study first the effects of temperature variations on guided waves propagating in a composite plate is investigated experimentally in a cold climate chamber. The material is a common material used to manufacture rotor blades of wind turbines. The temperature range is 25°C to -25°C and effects of temperature variations on amplitude and phase shift of the received signal are investigated. In order to apply the effects of lowering the temperature on the received signal, the Baseline Signal Stretch (BSS) method is modified and used. The modification is based on decomposing the signal into symmetric and asymmetric modes and applying two different stretch factors on each of them. Finally the results obtained based on the new method is compared with the results of application of BSS with one stretch factor and experimental measurements. Comparisons show that an improvement is obtained using the BSS with the mode decomposition method at temperature variations of more than 25°C.

  2. Correlation and prediction of gaseous diffusion coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, T. R.; Mason, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    A new correlation method for binary gaseous diffusion coefficients from very low temperatures to 10,000 K is proposed based on an extended principle of corresponding states, and having greater range and accuracy than previous correlations. There are two correlation parameters that are related to other physical quantities and that are predictable in the absence of diffusion measurements. Quantum effects and composition dependence are included, but high-pressure effects are not. The results are directly applicable to multicomponent mixtures.

  3. Property-Composition-Temperature Modeling of Waste Glass Melt Data Subject to a Randomization Restriction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Cooley, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    Properties such as viscosity and electrical conductivity of glass melts are functions of melt temperature as well as glass composition. When measuring such a property for several glasses, the property is typically measured at several temperatures for one glass, then at several temperatures for the next glass, and so on. This data-collection process involves a restriction on randomization, which is referred to as split-plot experiment. The split-plot data structure must be accounted for in developing property-composition-temperature models and the corresponding uncertainty equations for model predictions. Instead of ordinary least squares (OLS) regression methods, generalized least squares (GLS) regression methods using restricted maximum likelihood (REML) estimation must be used. This article describes the methodology for developing property-composition-temperature models and corresponding prediction uncertainty equations using the GLS/REML regression approach. Viscosity data collected on 197 simulated nuclear waste glasses are used to illustrate the GLS/REML methods for developing a viscosity-composition-temperature model and corresponding equations for model prediction uncertainties. The correct results using GLS/REML regression are compared to the incorrect results obtained using OLS regression

  4. Influence of Temperature on Symbiotic Bacterium Composition in Successive Generations of Egg Parasitoid, Anagrus nilaparvatae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Anagrus nilaparvatae is the dominant egg parasitoid of rice planthoppers and plays an important role in biological control. Symbiotic bacteria can significantly influence the development, survival, reproduction and population differentiation of their hosts. To study the influence of temperature on symbiotic bacterial composition in the successive generations of A. nilaparvatae, A. nilaparvatae were raised under different constant temperatures of 22 °C, 25 °C, 28 °C, 31 °C and 34 °C. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to investigate the diversity of symbiotic bacteria. Our results revealed that the endophytic bacteria of A. nilaparvatae were Pantoea sp., Pseudomonas sp. and some uncultured bacteria. The bacterial community composition in A. nilaparvatae significantly varied among different temperatures and generations, which might be partially caused by temperature, feeding behavior and the physical changes of hosts. However, the analysis of wsp gene showed that the Wolbachia in A. nilaparvatae belonged to group A, sub-group Mors and sub-group Dro. Sub-group Mors was absolutely dominant, and this Wolbachia composition remained stable in different temperatures and generations, except for the 3rd generation under 34 °C during which sub-group Dro became the dominant Wolbachia. The above results suggest that the continuous high temperature of 34 °C can influence the Wolbachia community composition in A. nilaparvatae.

  5. Effect of pressing temperature on the mechanical properties of waste styrofoam filled sawdust composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, H.; Harahap, H.; Riani, R.; Pelawi, A. I.

    2018-02-01

    This study has investigated the effect of pressing temperature on mechanical properties of waste styrofoam composite filled with sawdust. The waste styrofoam as the matrix was mixed with sawdust as filler and maleic anhydride (6%wt) as a compatibilizer. The weight fraction ratio between matrix and filler 70:30 (wt) and wood fiber size of 100 mesh were conducted. The pressing temperatures were investigated using a hot press with temperatures varied viz. 120, 130, 150, and 170 °C. Surface modification was applied to sawdust to diminish its polarity so that it could be compatible with the non-polar waste styrofoam matrix. Composites were evaluated using Instron and impact tester machine to investigate the tensile strength and impact strength of the material, respectively. The result indicated that tensile strength has decreased with the increase of pressing temperature where the largest tensile strength is at 130 °C of 33 MPa. The same trend has occurred on impact strength, where the value has reached of 300 J/cm2 on pressing temperature of 130 °C. From scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis it is also confirmed that during impact test, the resistance of the composite which has been pressed at the temperature of 130 °C have given better morphology than the composite at 170 °C.

  6. Oxidation Behavior of AlN/h-BN Nano Composites at High Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Haiyun; Huang Yinmao; Feng Dawei; He Bo; Yang Jianfeng

    2011-01-01

    Both AlN/ nano h-BN composites and AlN/ micro h-BN composites were fabricated. The high temperature oxidation behaviors were investigated at 1000deg. C and 1300deg. C using a cycle-oxidation method. The results showed that there were little changes of both nano composites and monolithic AlN ceramic at temperature of 1000deg. C. And at 1300deg. C, the oxidation dynamics curve of composites could be divided into two courses: a slowly weight increase and a rapid weight decrease, but the oxidation behavior of nano composites was better than micro composites. It was due to that the uniform distribution of oxidation production (Al 18 B 4 O 33 ) surround the AlN grains in nano composites and the oxidation proceeding was retarded. The XRD analysis and SEM observations showed that there was no BN remained in the composites surface after 1300deg. C oxidation and the micropores remain due to the vaporizing of B 2 O 3 oxidized by BN.

  7. Grinding temperature and energy ratio coefficient in MQL grinding of high-temperature nickel-base alloy by using different vegetable oils as base oil

    OpenAIRE

    Li Benkai; Li Changhe; Zhang Yanbin; Wang Yaogang; Jia Dongzhou; Yang Min

    2016-01-01

    Vegetable oil can be used as a base oil in minimal quantity of lubrication (MQL). This study compared the performances of MQL grinding by using castor oil, soybean oil, rapeseed oil, corn oil, sunflower oil, peanut oil, and palm oil as base oils. A K-P36 numerical-control precision surface grinder was used to perform plain grinding on a workpiece material with a high-temperature nickel base alloy. A YDM–III 99 three-dimensional dynamometer was used to measure grinding force, and a clip-type t...

  8. Statistical damage analysis of transverse cracking in high temperature composite laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zuo; Daniel, I.M.; Luo, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    High temperature polymer composites are receiving special attention because of their potential applications to high speed transport airframe structures and aircraft engine components exposed to elevated temperatures. In this study, a statistical analysis was used to study the progressive transverse cracking in a typical high temperature composite. The mechanical properties of this unidirectional laminate were first characterized both at room and high temperatures. Damage mechanisms of transverse cracking in cross-ply laminates were studied by X-ray radiography at room temperature and in-test photography technique at high temperature. Since the tensile strength of unidirectional laminate along transverse direction was found to follow Weibull distribution, Monte Carlo simulation technique based on experimentally obtained parameters was applied to predict transverse cracking at different temperatures. Experiments and simulation showed that they agree well both at room temperature and 149 deg. C (stress free temperature) in terms of applied stress versus crack density. The probability density function (PDF) of transverse crack spacing considering statistical strength distribution was also developed, and good agreements with simulation and experimental results are reached. Finally, a generalized master curve that predicts the normalized applied stress versus normalized crack density for various lay-ups and various temperatures was established

  9. Liquid phase PVTx properties of (water + tert-butanol) binary mixtures at temperatures from 278.15 to 323.15 K and pressures from 0.1 to 100 MPa. II. Molar isothermal compressions, molar isobaric expansions, molar thermal pressure coefficients, and internal pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, Gennadiy I.; Makarov, Dmitriy M.; Kolker, Arkadiy M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Molar isothermal compressions and molar isobaric expansions were evaluated. ► Coefficients of thermal pressure and internal pressure were obtained. ► Concentration dependences of coefficients under study display extremes. ► Temperature and pressure dependences of internal pressure of the mixture were linear. -- Abstract: Molar isothermal compressions, molar isobaric expansions, molar coefficients of thermal pressure, and internal pressure were calculated over the whole concentration range of {water (1) + tert-butanol (2)} mixture at pressures from 0.1 to 100 MPa and temperatures from 278.15 to 323.15 K. It was revealed that the extremes, observed on concentration dependences of molar isothermal compression K T,m and molar isobaric expansion E P,m of the mixture, became more pronounced with pressure growth and temperature lowering. Values of molar thermal pressure coefficients of the mixture sharply rose at compositions with small TBA mole fraction and then decreased practically linearly with the alcohol content increasing. Temperature and pressure dependences of the mixture internal pressure were almost linear, and at low TBA concentrations changed significantly from the dependences of water, tert-butanol and their mixtures at large alcohol content

  10. Wear Response of Aluminium 6061 Composite Reinforced with Red Mud at Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dabral

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is focused on the investigations on dry sliding wear behaviour of aluminium metal matrix composite at room and elevated temperature. Aluminium metal matrix composites reinforced with red mud are prepared by stir casting method. The experiments are planned using Taguchi technique. An orthogonal array, analysis of variance and signal to noise ratio are used to check the influence of wear parameters like temperature, percentage of reinforcement, mesh size, load, sliding distance and sliding speed on dry sliding wear of composites. The optimal testing parameters are found and their values are calculated which are then compared with predicted values. A reasonable agreement is found between predicted and actual values. The model prepared in the present work can be effectively used to predict the specific wear rate of the composites.

  11. High-temperature mechanical properties of a uniaxially reinforced zircon-silicon carbide composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that mechanical properties of a monolithic zircon ceramic and zircon-matrix composites uniaxially reinforced with either uncoated or BN-coated silicon carbide monofilaments were measured in flexure between 25 degrees and 1477 degrees C. Monolithic zircon ceramics were weak and exhibited a brittle failure up to abut 1300 degrees C. An increasing amount of the plastic deformation was observed before failure above about 1300 degrees C. In contrast, composites reinforced with either uncoated or BN-coated Sic filaments were stronger and tougher than the monolithic zircon at all test temperatures between 25 degrees and 1477 degrees. The ultimate strength and work-of-fracture of composite samples decreased with increasing temperature. A transgranular matrix fracture was shown by the monolithic and composite samples tested up to about 1200 degrees C, whereas an increasing amount of the intergranular matrix fracture was displayed above 1200 degrees C

  12. Embedding of MEMS pressure and temperature sensors in carbon fiber composites: a manufacturing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidinejad, Amir; Joshi, Shiv P.

    2000-06-01

    In this paper embedding of surface mount pressure and temperature sensors in the Carbon fiber composites are described. A commercially available surface mount pressure and temperature sensor are used for embedding in a composite lay- up of IM6/HST-7, IM6/3501 and AS4/E7T1-2 prepregs. The fabrication techniques developed here are the focus of this paper and provide for a successful embedding procedure of pressure sensors in fibrous composites. The techniques for positioning and insulating, the sensor and the lead wires, from the conductive carbon prepregs are described and illustrated. Procedural techniques are developed and discussed for isolating the sensor's flow-opening, from the exposure to the prepreg epoxy flow and exposure to the fibrous particles, during the autoclave curing of the composite laminate. The effects of the autoclave cycle (if any) on the operation of the embedded pressure sensor are discussed.

  13. Temperature dependency of tensile properties of GFRP composite for wind turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Yong Hak; Kim, Jong Il; Kim, Dong Jin; Lee, Gun Chang [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    In this study, the temperature dependency of the tensile properties of a glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) used in wind turbine blades was examined. The tensile strength, elastic modulus, and Poisson's ratio of the tensile specimen manufactured from uniaxial (0 .deg.) and triaxial (0/{+-}45.deg) laminate composite plates were measured at four different testing temperatures-room temperature, -30 .deg. C, -50 .deg. C, and 60 .deg. C. It was found that the tensile strengths and elastic moduli of the uniaxial laminates were greater than those of the triaxial laminates over the testing temperature range. The tensile strength of the two laminates was significantly dependent on the testing temperature, while the dependency of the elastic modulus on the temperature was insignificant. Furthermore, it could be considered that the Poisson's ratio changed slightly with a change in the testing temperature.

  14. Temperature dependency of tensile properties of GFRP composite for wind turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Yong Hak; Kim, Jong Il; Kim, Dong Jin; Lee, Gun Chang

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the temperature dependency of the tensile properties of a glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) used in wind turbine blades was examined. The tensile strength, elastic modulus, and Poisson's ratio of the tensile specimen manufactured from uniaxial (0 .deg.) and triaxial (0/±45.deg) laminate composite plates were measured at four different testing temperatures-room temperature, -30 .deg. C, -50 .deg. C, and 60 .deg. C. It was found that the tensile strengths and elastic moduli of the uniaxial laminates were greater than those of the triaxial laminates over the testing temperature range. The tensile strength of the two laminates was significantly dependent on the testing temperature, while the dependency of the elastic modulus on the temperature was insignificant. Furthermore, it could be considered that the Poisson's ratio changed slightly with a change in the testing temperature

  15. The Composition and Temperature Effects on the Ultra High Strength Stainless Steel Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W.; Del Castillo, P. E. J. Rivera Díaz; van der Zwaag, S.

    Alloy composition and heat treatment are of paramount importance to determining alloy properties. Their control is of great importance for new alloy design and industrial fabrication control. A base alloy utilizing MX carbide is designed through a theory guided computational approach coupling a genetic algorithm with optimization criteria based on thermodynamic, kinetic and mechanical principles. The combined effects of 11 alloying elements (Al, C, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ti and V) are investigated in terms of the composition optimization criteria: the martensite start (Ms) temperature, the suppression of undesirable phases, the Cr concentration in the matrix and the potency of the precipitation strengthening contribution. The results show the concentration sensitivities of each component and also point out new potential composition domains for further strength increase. The aging temperature effect is studied and the aging temperature industrially followed is recovered.

  16. Electrochemical performances of LSM/YSZ composite electrode for high temperature steam electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyu-Sung Sim; Ki-Kwang Bae; Chang-Hee Kim; Ki-Bae Park

    2006-01-01

    The (La 0.8 Sr 0.2 ) 0.95 MnO 3 /Yttria-stabilized Zirconia composite electrodes were investigated as anode materials for high temperature steam electrolysis using X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, galvano-dynamic and galvano-static polarization method. For this study, the LSM perovskites were fabricated in powders by the co-precipitation method and then were mixed with 8 mol% YSZ powders in different molar ratios. The LSM/YSZ composite electrodes were deposited on 8 mol% YSZ electrolyte disks by screen printing method, followed by sintering at temperature above 1100 C. From the experimental results, it is concluded that the electrochemical properties of pure and composite electrodes are closely related to their micro-structure and operating temperature. (authors)

  17. Determination of composition and physical properties of partially ionized plasmas in the function of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaporowski, B.

    1992-01-01

    The investigations of various kinds of partially ionized plasma were conducted for the pressure of 0.1 MPa and in the range of temperature of 298.15 K to 24000 K. The physical properties of various kinds of partially ionized plasma depend mainly of their composition and temperature. The composition of particular kinds of partially ionized plasmas varies also in the function of temperature. Simultaneous going on of physical and chemical processes in plasma is the reason of difficulties in the calculations of plasma's physical properties. The use of the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics for the calculations of physical properties of partially ionized plasma is impossible. There are enough exact methods for measuring of physical properties of partially ionized plasma. For these reasons the theoretical method using the base of statistic physics was used to calculate the composition and physical properties of various kinds of partially ionized plasma. (author) 2 refs., 2 figs

  18. Nuclear reactor core having nuclear fuel and composite burnable absorber arranged for power peaking and moderator temperature coefficient control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapil, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a burnable absorber coated nuclear fuel. It comprises a nuclear fuel substrate containing a fissionable material; and an outer burnable absorber coating applied on an outer surface of the substrate; the outer absorber coating being composed of an inner layer of a boron-bearing material except for erbium boride and an outer layer of an erbium material

  19. Nuclear reactor core having nuclear fuel and composite burnable absorber arranged for power peaking and moderator temperature coefficient control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapil, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor core. It comprises a first group of fuel rods containing fissionable material and being free of burnable absorber material; and a second group of fuel rods containing fissionable material and first and second burnable absorber material; the first burnable absorber material being a boron-bearing material which does not contain erbium and the second burnable absorber material being an erbium material; the first and second burnable absorber materials being in the form of an outer coating on the fissionable material, the outer coating being composed of an inner layer of one of the boron-bearing material which does not contain erbium and the erbium material and an outer layer of the other of the boron-bearing material which does not contain erbium and the erbium material

  20. Young`s modulus of ceramic matrix composites with polysiloxane based matrix at elevated temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Martin; Glogar, Petr

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 6 (2004), s. 2239-2242 ISSN 0022-2461 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/02/0177; GA ČR GP106/02/P025 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : composite material * Young `s modulus * high temperature Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.864, year: 2004

  1. Effect of different light curing units on Knoop hardness and temperature of resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Consani, Simonides; Xediek Consani, Rafael Leonardo; Mendes, Wilson Batista; Lympius, Thais; Coelho Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of quartz tungsten halogen and plasma arc curing (PAC) lights on Knoop hardness and change in polymerization temperature of resin composite. Filtek Z250 and Esthet X composites were used in the shade A3. The temperature increase was registered with Type-k thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46). A self-cured polymerized acrylic resin base was built in order to guide the thermocouple and to support the dentin disk of 1.0 mm thickness obtained from bovine tooth. On the acrylic resin base, elastomer mold of 2.0 mm was adapted. The temperature increase was measured after composite light curing. After 24 h, the specimens were submitted to Knoop hardness test (HMV-2000, Shimadzu, Tokyo, Japan). Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). For both composites, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in the top surface hardness; however, PAC promoted statistically lower (P 0.05). The standardized radiant exposure showed no influence on the temperature increase of the composite, however, showed significant effect on hardness values.

  2. Preparation and electromagnetic properties of low-temperature sintered ferroelectric-ferrite composite ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Zhenxing; Chen Shaofeng; Qi Xiwei; Gui Zhilun; Li Longtu

    2004-01-01

    For the purpose of multilayer chip EMI filters, the new ferroelectric-ferrite composite ceramics were prepared by mixing PMZNT relaxor ferroelectric powder with composition of 0.85Pb(Mg 1/3 Nb 2/3 )O 3 -0.1Pb(Ni 1/3 Nb 2/3 )O 3 -0.05PbTiO 3 and NiCuZn ferrite powder with composition of (Ni 0.20 Cu 0.20 Zn 0.60 )O(Fe 2 O 3 ) 0.97 at low sintering temperatures. A small amount of Bi 2 O 3 was added to low sintering temperature. Consequently, the dense composite ceramics were obtained at relative low sintering temperatures, which were lower than 940 deg. C. The X-ray diffractometer (XRD) identifications showed that the sintered ceramics retained the presence of distinct ferroelectric and ferrite phases. The sintering studies and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations revealed that the co-existed two phases affect the sintering behavior and grain growth of components. The electromagnetic properties, such as dielectric constant and initial permeability, change continuously between those of two components. Thus, the low-temperature sintered ferroelectric-ferrite composite ceramics with tunable electromagnetic properties were prepared by adjusting the relative content of two components. These materials can be used for multilayer chip EMI filters with various properties

  3. Development of a noise-based method for the determination of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity (MTC) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaziere, C.

    2002-01-01

    The Moderator Temperature Coefficient of reactivity (MTC) is an important safety parameter of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). In most countries, the so-called at-power MTC has to be measured a few months before the reactor outage, in order to determine if the MTC will not become too negative. Usually, the at-power MTC is determined by inducing a change in the moderator temperature, which has to be compensated for by other means, such as a change in the boron concentration. An MTC measurement using the boron dilution method is analysed in this thesis. It is demonstrated that the uncertainty of such a measurement technique is so large, that the measured MTC could become more negative than what the Technical Specifications allow. Furthermore, this technique incurs a disturbance of the plant operation. For this reason, another technique relying on noise analysis was proposed a few years ago. In this technique, the MTC is inferred from the neutron noise measured inside the core and the moderator temperature noise measured at the core-exit, in the same or in a neighbouring fuel assembly. This technique does not require any perturbation of the reactor operation, but was nevertheless proven to underestimate the MTC by a factor of 2 to 5. In this thesis, it is shown, both theoretically and experimentally, that the reason of the MTC underestimation by noise analysis is the radially loosely coupled character of the moderator temperature noise throughout the core. A new MTC noise estimator, accounting for this radially non-homogeneous moderator temperature noise is proposed and demonstrated to give the correct MTC value. This new MTC noise estimator relies on the neutron noise measured in a single point of the reactor and the radially averaged moderator temperature noise measured inside the core. In the case of the Ringhals-2 PWR in Sweden, Gamma-Thermometers (GTs) offer such a possibility since in dynamic mode they measure the moderator temperature noise, whereas in static

  4. Temperature rise due to mechanical energy dissipation in undirectional thermoplastic composites(AS4/PEEK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgious, I. T.; Sun, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    The history of temperature rise due to internal dissipation of mechanical energy in insulated off-axis uniaxial specimens of the unidirectional thermoplastic composite (AS4/PEEK) has been measured. The experiment reveals that the rate of temperature rise is a polynomial function of stress amplitude: It consists of a quadratic term and a sixth power term. This fact implies that the specific heat of the composite depends on the stretching its microstructure undergoes during deformation. The Einstein theory for specific heat is used to explain the dependence of the specific heat on the stretching of the microstructure.

  5. High-temperature effects on the electrical properties and macrostructure of carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhmurikov, E.I.; Gubin, K.V.; Romanenko, A.I.; Anikeeva, O.B.; Burgina, E.B.; Tsybulya, S.V.; Titov, A.T.; Tecchito, L.

    2006-01-01

    Conductivity of samples of carbon composites MPG-6 and MPG-7 as starting ones, so and after irradiation by powerful electron beam with the energy of 1.4 MeV and heating by alternative current to temperatures beyond 2500 Deg C is measured. Heating and irradiation as shown to rise of decreasing the conductivity of the samples and increasing the defectiveness at a level of microstructure. Sensible changing of the microstructure in the samples during heating up to temperature of decomposition does not indicate by X-ray analysis. It is excepted that the strength of carbon composites is limited by intercrystalline or intergranular boundaries [ru

  6. Transport Coefficients of Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Eu, Byung Chan

    2006-01-01

    Until recently the formal statistical mechanical approach offered no practicable method for computing the transport coefficients of liquids, and so most practitioners had to resort to empirical fitting formulas. This has now changed, as demonstrated in this innovative monograph. The author presents and applies new methods based on statistical mechanics for calculating the transport coefficients of simple and complex liquids over wide ranges of density and temperature. These molecular theories enable the transport coefficients to be calculated in terms of equilibrium thermodynamic properties, and the results are shown to account satisfactorily for experimental observations, including even the non-Newtonian behavior of fluids far from equilibrium.

  7. The chemical composition and compression strengths of refractory ceramics, tested for 3 curing temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Khairuddin bin Wan Ali

    1994-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine and compile the mechanical strength of a refractory ceramic made of ground fire bricks and refractory fire mortar. Three different compositions were studied for the compression strength and it was found that the composition with 50% fire bricks and 50% fire mortar gives the best mechanical strength. With this composition the maximum failure compression stress is 3.2 MPa. and the Young Modulus is 403.5 MPa. The investigation also shows that the curing temperatures and the composition percentages play an important role in determining the strength of the ceramic. The trend obtained from the investigation shows that there is the possibility that an optimum value of composition percentage exist

  8. Ultra-low temperature curable nano-silver conductive adhesive for piezoelectric composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao; Liao, Qingwei; Zhou, Xingli; Wang, Likun; Zhong, Chao; Zhang, Di

    2018-01-01

    Limited by the low thermal resistance of composite material, ultra-low temperature curable conductive silver adhesive with curing temperature less than 100 °C needed urgently for the surface conduction treatment of piezoelectric composite material. An ultra-low temperature curable nano-silver conductive adhesive with high adhesion strength for the applications of piezoelectric composite material was investigated. The crystal structure of cured adhesive, SEM/EDS analysis, thermal analysis, adhesive properties and conductive properties of different content of nano-silver filler or micron-silver doping samples were studied. The results show that with 60 wt.% nano-silver filler the ultra-low temperature curable conductive silver adhesive had the relatively good conductivity as volume resistivity of 2.37 × 10-4 Ω cm, and good adhesion strength of 5.13 MPa. Minor micron-doping (below 15 wt.%) could improve conductivity, but would decrease other properties. The ultra-low temperature curable nano-silver conductive adhesive could successfully applied to piezoelectric composite material.

  9. TEMPERATURE HETEROGENEITY OF TRAVELLING FIRE AND ITS INFLUENCE ON COMPOSITE STEEL-CONCRETE FLOOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Horová

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to follow modern trends in contemporary building architecture, which is moving off the limits of current fire design models, assumption of homogeneous temperature conditions used for structural fire analysis needs to be revised. In this paper fire dynamics of travelling fire is investigated experimentally by conducting fire test in two-storey experimental building. To evaluate the impact of travelling fire on the mechanical behaviour of a structure, the spatial and temporal evolution of the gas temperature calculated in NIST code FDS, which was validated to experimental measurements, is applied to the composite floor of dimensions 9.0 m by 9.0 m. Mechanical behaviour of the composite slab highly affected by regions of high temperatures and areas with only elevated temperatures is solved in code Vulcan. To highlight the severity of spreading fire causing non-uniform temperature conditions, which after-effects differ from traditional methods, a comparison of both methods is introduced. The calculation of mechanical behaviour of the composite floor is repeated in a series of three different thermal loading cases. Results of all cases are then compared in terms of vertical displacement and axial force in several positions of the composite floor.

  10. High Temperature Advanced Structural Composites. Volume 2. Ceramic Matrix Composites, Fiber Processing and Properties, and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-02

    furfural . toughness and a pseudoplasticity. the latter of treated to a higher temperature. The mamx or acetylenic resins provide simple processing...crystalline by TU/SAD and has an effective surface area of 250 m /go based on BET measurments with N2 adsorption . This solid crystallizes to high purity

  11. Influence of Temperature on Mechanical Properties of Jute/Biopolymer Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvdal, Alexandra Liv Vest; Laursen, Louise Løcke; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Biopolymers and natural fibers are receiving wide attention for the potential to have good performance composites with low environmental impact. A current limitation of most biopolymers is however their change in mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. This study investigates the mechanical...... of the fibers. Altogether, the results demonstrate that the thermal sensitivity parameters typically provided for polymers, e.g., the glass transition temperature and the heat deflection temperature, cannot be used as sole parameters for determining the gradual change in mechanical properties of polymers...... properties of two biomass-based polymers, polylactic acid (PLA) and cellulose acetate (CA), as a function of ambient temperature in the range from 5 to 80C. Tests were done for neat polymers and for jute fiber/biopolymer composites. Micromechanical models were applied to back-calculate the reinforcement...

  12. Steam gasification of waste tyre: Influence of process temperature on yield and product composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portofino, Sabrina, E-mail: sabrina.portofino@enea.it [UTTP NANO – C.R. ENEA Portici, P.le E. Fermi, 1 Loc. Granatello, 80055 Portici (Italy); Donatelli, Antonio; Iovane, Pierpaolo; Innella, Carolina; Civita, Rocco; Martino, Maria; Matera, Domenico Antonio; Russo, Antonio; Cornacchia, Giacinto [UTTTRI RIF – C.R. ENEA Trisaia, SS Jonica 106, km 419.5, 75026 Rotondella (Italy); Galvagno, Sergio [UTTP NANO – C.R. ENEA Portici, P.le E. Fermi, 1 Loc. Granatello, 80055 Portici (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Steam gasification of waste tyre as matter and energy recovery treatment. ► Process temperature affects products yield and gas composition. ► High temperature promotes hydrogen production. ► Char exploitation as activated carbon or carbon source. - Abstract: An experimental survey of waste tyre gasification with steam as oxidizing agent has been conducted in a continuous bench scale reactor, with the aim of studying the influence of the process temperature on the yield and the composition of the products; the tests have been performed at three different temperatures, in the range of 850–1000 °C, holding all the other operational parameters (pressure, carrier gas flow, solid residence time). The experimental results show that the process seems promising in view of obtaining a good quality syngas, indicating that a higher temperature results in a higher syngas production (86 wt%) and a lower char yield, due to an enhancement of the solid–gas phase reactions with the temperature. Higher temperatures clearly result in higher hydrogen concentrations: the hydrogen content rapidly increases, attaining values higher than 65% v/v, while methane and ethylene gradually decrease over the range of the temperatures; carbon monoxide and dioxide instead, after an initial increase, show a nearly constant concentration at 1000 °C. Furthermore, in regards to the elemental composition of the synthesis gas, as the temperature increases, the carbon content continuously decreases, while the oxygen content increases; the hydrogen, being the main component of the gas fraction and having a small atomic weight, is responsible for the progressive reduction of the gas density at higher temperature.

  13. Low temperature composite bolometers using RuO2 films as a thermistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapellier, M.; Rasmussen, F.B.

    1989-01-01

    Results from a massive composite bolometer made of a sapphire crystal and ruthenium oxide films are presented. The properties of such RuO 2 films, in the temperature range [50 mK, 200 mK] have been studied. Individual particle detections, using an 241 Am source, have been used to calibrate the system in this temperature interval. Improvements in the performances of such detectors lead to consider them as realistic candidates for the detection of Dark Matter

  14. Study of behavior of concrete and cement based composite materials exposed to high temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Bodnárová, L.; Horák, D.; Válek, J.; Hela, R.; Sitek, L. (Libor)

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes possibilities of observation of behaviour of concrete and cement based composite material exposed to high temperatures. Nowadays, for large-scale tests of behaviour of concrete exposed to high temperatures, testing devices of certified fire testing stations in the Czech Republic and surrounding states are used. These tests are quite expensive. For experimental verification of smaller test specimens, a testing device was built at the Technical University in Brno, wher...

  15. Low Temperature Mechanical Testing of Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy-Resin Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Biss, Emily J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of cryogenic fuels (liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen) in current space transportation vehicles, in combination with the proposed use of composite materials in such applications, requires an understanding of how such materials behave at cryogenic temperatures. In this investigation, tensile intralaminar shear tests were performed at room, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen temperatures to evaluate the effect of temperature on the mechanical response of the IM7/8551-7 carbon-fiber/epoxy-resin system. Quasi-isotropic lay-ups were also tested to represent a more realistic lay-up. It was found that the matrix became both increasingly resistant to microcracking and stiffer with decreasing temperature. A marginal increase in matrix shear strength with decreasing temperature was also observed. Temperature did not appear to affect the integrity of the fiber-matrix bond.

  16. Elevated temperature mechanical properties of novel ultra-fine grained Cu–Nb composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primorac, Mladen-Mateo [Department of Materials Physics, Montanuniversität Leoben (Austria); Abad, Manuel David; Hosemann, Peter [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley (United States); Kreuzeder, Marius [Department of Materials Physics, Montanuniversität Leoben (Austria); Maier, Verena [Department of Materials Physics, Montanuniversität Leoben (Austria); Erich-Schmid Institute for Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Leoben (Austria); Kiener, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.kiener@unileoben.ac.at [Department of Materials Physics, Montanuniversität Leoben (Austria)

    2015-02-11

    Ultra-fine grained materials exhibit outstanding properties and are therefore favorable for prospective applications. One of these promising systems is the composite assembled by the body centered cubic niobium and the face centered cubic copper. Cu–Nb composites show a high hardness and good thermal stability, as well as a high radiation damage tolerance. These properties make the material interesting for use in nuclear reactors. The aim of this work was to create a polycrystalline ultra-fine grained composite for high temperature applications. The samples were manufactured via a powder metallurgical route using high pressure torsion, exhibiting a randomly distributed oriented grain size between 100 and 200 nm. The mechanical properties and the governing plastic deformation behavior as a function of temperature were determined by high temperature nanoindentation up to 500 °C. It was found that in the lower temperature regions up to 300 °C the plastic deformation is mainly governed by dislocation interactions, such as dislocation glide and the nucleation of kink pairs. For higher temperatures, thermally activated processes at grain boundaries are proposed to be the main mechanism governing plastic deformation. This mechanistic view is supported by temperature dependent changes in hardness, strain rate sensitivity, activation volume, and activation energy.

  17. Thermophysical characterization tools and numerical models for high temperature thermo-structural composite materials; Outils de caracterisation thermophysique et modeles numeriques pour les composites thermostructuraux a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorrette, Ch

    2007-04-15

    This work is an original contribution to the study of the thermo-structural composite materials thermal behaviour. It aims to develop a methodology with a new experimental device for thermal characterization adapted to this type of material and to model the heat transfer by conduction within these heterogeneous media. The first part deals with prediction of the thermal effective conductivity of stratified composite materials in the three space directions. For that, a multi scale model using a rigorous morphology analysis of the structure and the elementary properties is proposed and implemented. The second part deals with the thermal characterization at high temperature. It shows how to estimate simultaneously the thermal effusiveness and the thermal conductivity. The present method is based on the observation of the heating from a plane sample submitted to a continuous excitation generated by Joule Effect. Heat transfer is modelled with the quadrupole formalism, temperature is here measured on two sides of the sample. The development of both resistive probes for excitation and linear probes for temperature measurements enables the thermal properties measured up to 1000 C. Finally, some experimental and numerical application examples lead to review the obtained results. (author)

  18. Temperature-dependence of creep behaviour of dental resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, S; Silikas, N; Watts, D C

    2013-04-01

    To determine the effect of temperature, over a clinically relevant range, on the creep behaviour of a set of conventional and flowable resin-composites including two subgroups having the same resin matrix and varied filler loading. Eight dental resin-composites: four flowable and four conventional were investigated. Stainless steel split moulds (4 mm × 6 mm) were used to prepare cylindrical specimens for creep examination. Specimens were irradiated in the moulds in layers of 2mm thickness (40s each), as well as from the radial direction after removal from the moulds, using a light-curing unit with irradiance of 650 mW/cm(2). A total of 15 specimens from each material were prepared and divided into three groups (n=5) according to the temperature; Group I: (23°C), Group II: (37°C) and Group III: (45°C). Each specimen was loaded (20 MPa) for 2h and unloaded for 2h. Creep was measured continuously over the loading and unloading periods. At higher temperatures greater creep and permanent set were recorded. The lowest mean creep occurred with GS and GH resin-composites. Percentage of creep recovery decreased at higher temperatures. At 23°C, the materials exhibited comparable creep. At 37°C and 45°C, however, there was a greater variation between materials. For all resin-composites, there was a strong linear correlation with temperature for both creep and permanent set. Creep parameters of resin-composites are sensitive to temperature increase from 23 to 45°C, as can occur intra-orally. For a given resin matrix, creep decreased with higher filler loading. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Microstructural optimization of high temperature SiC/SiC composites by nite process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoda, K.; Park, J.S.; Hinoki, T.; Kohyama, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: SiC/SiC composites are one of the promising structural materials for future fusion reactor because of the excellent potentiality in thermal and mechanical properties under very severe environment including high temperature and high energy neutron bombardment. For fusion-grade SiC/SiC composites, high-crystallinity and near-stoichiometric characteristic are required to keep excellent stability against neutron irradiation. The realization of the reactor will be strongly depend on optimization of SiC/SiC composites microstructure, particularly in regard to the materials and processes used for the fiber, interphase and matrix constituents. One of the important accomplishments is the new process, called nano-particle infiltration and transient eutectic phase (NITE) process developed in our group. The microstructure of NITE-SiC/SiC composites, such as fiber volume fraction, porosity and type of pores, can be controlled precisely by the selection of sintering temperature/applied stress history. The objective of this study is to investigate thermal stability and mechanical properties of NITE-SiC/SiC composites at high-temperature. Two kinds of highly-densified SiC/SiC composites with the difference of fiber volume fraction were prepared, and were subjected to exposure tests from 1000 deg. C to 1500 deg. C in an argon-oxygen gas mixture with an oxygen partial pressure of 0.1 Pa. The thermal stability of the composites was characterized through mass change and TEM/SEM observation. The in-situ tensile tests at 1300 deg. C and 1500 deg. C were carried out in the same atmosphere. Most of SiC/SiC composites, even for the advanced CVI-SiC/SiC composites with multi-layered SiC/C inter-phases, underwent reduction in the maximum strength by about 20% at 1300 deg. C. In particular, this reduction was attributed to a slight burnout of the carbon interphase due to oxygen impurities in test atmosphere. However, there was no significant degradation for

  20. Microstructural optimization of high temperature SiC/SiC composites by nite process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoda, K. [Kyoto Univ., Graduate School of Energy Science (Japan); Park, J.S. [Kyoto Univ., Institute of Advanced Energy (Japan); Hinoki, T.; Kohyama, A. [Kyoto Univ., lnstitute of Advanced Energy, Gokasho, Uji (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: SiC/SiC composites are one of the promising structural materials for future fusion reactor because of the excellent potentiality in thermal and mechanical properties under very severe environment including high temperature and high energy neutron bombardment. For fusion-grade SiC/SiC composites, high-crystallinity and near-stoichiometric characteristic are required to keep excellent stability against neutron irradiation. The realization of the reactor will be strongly depend on optimization of SiC/SiC composites microstructure, particularly in regard to the materials and processes used for the fiber, interphase and matrix constituents. One of the important accomplishments is the new process, called nano-particle infiltration and transient eutectic phase (NITE) process developed in our group. The microstructure of NITE-SiC/SiC composites, such as fiber volume fraction, porosity and type of pores, can be controlled precisely by the selection of sintering temperature/applied stress history. The objective of this study is to investigate thermal stability and mechanical properties of NITE-SiC/SiC composites at high-temperature. Two kinds of highly-densified SiC/SiC composites with the difference of fiber volume fraction were prepared, and were subjected to exposure tests from 1000 deg. C to 1500 deg. C in an argon-oxygen gas mixture with an oxygen partial pressure of 0.1 Pa. The thermal stability of the composites was characterized through mass change and TEM/SEM observation. The in-situ tensile tests at 1300 deg. C and 1500 deg. C were carried out in the same atmosphere. Most of SiC/SiC composites, even for the advanced CVI-SiC/SiC composites with multi-layered SiC/C inter-phases, underwent reduction in the maximum strength by about 20% at 1300 deg. C. In particular, this reduction was attributed to a slight burnout of the carbon interphase due to oxygen impurities in test atmosphere. However, there was no significant degradation for

  1. An Investigation of Fiber Reinforced Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Composites at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhu; Li, Yu-Yu; Lu, Can; Liu, Jian

    2018-05-21

    In this study, chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) fiber reinforced composites were made at indoor temperatures. The mechanical properties and microstructure of the CBPC composites were studied. The CBPC matrix of aluminum phosphate binder, metakaolin, and magnesia with different Si/P ratios was prepared. The results show that when the Si/P ratio was 1.2, and magnesia content in the CBPC was 15%, CBPC reached its maximum flexural strength. The fiber reinforced CBPC composites were prepared by mixing short polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers or unidirectional continuous carbon fiber sheets. Flexural strength and dynamic mechanical properties of the composites were determined, and the microstructures of specimens were analyzed by scanning electron micrography, X-ray diffraction, and micro X-ray computed tomography. The flexural performance of continuous carbon fiber reinforced CBPC composites was better than that of PVA fiber composites. The elastic modulus, loss modulus, and loss factor of the fiber composites were measured through dynamic mechanical analysis. The results showed that fiber reinforced CBPC composites are an inorganic polymer viscoelastic material with excellent damping properties. The reaction of magnesia and phosphate in the matrix of CBPC formed a different mineral, newberyite, which was beneficial to the development of the CBPC.

  2. Study of Tensile Properties and Deflection Temperature of Polypropylene/Subang Pineapple Leaf Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafizhah, R.; Juwono, A. L.; Roseno, S.

    2017-05-01

    The development of eco-friendly composites has been increasing in the past four decades because the requirement of eco-friendly materials has been increasing. Indonesia has a lot of natural fiber resources and, pineapple leaf fiber is one of those fibers. This study aimed to determine the influence of weight fraction of pineapple leaf fibers, that were grown at Subang, to the tensile properties and the deflection temperature of polypropylene/Subang pineapple leaf fiber composites. Pineapple leaf fibers were pretreated by alkalization, while polypropylene pellets, as the matrix, were extruded into sheets. Hot press method was used to fabricate the composites. The results of the tensile test and Heat Deflection Temperature (HDT) test showed that the composites that contained of 30 wt.% pineapple leaf fiber was the best composite. The values of tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and deflection temperature were (64.04 ± 3.91) MPa; (3.98 ± 0.55) GPa and (156.05 ± 1.77) °C respectively, in which increased 187.36%, 198.60%, 264.72% respectively from the pristine polypropylene. The results of the observation on the fracture surfaces showed that the failure modes were fiber breakage and matrix failure.

  3. Intersubband optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a graded quantum well under intense laser field: Effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature and electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungan, F.; Restrepo, R.L.; Mora-Ramos, M.E.; Morales, A.L.; Duque, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, and electric field on the optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes associated with intersubband transition in a typical GaAs/Ga 0.7 Al 0.3 As graded quantum well under intense laser field have been investigated theoretically. The electron energy eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenfunctions of the graded quantum well are calculated within the effective mass approximation and envelope wave function approach. The analytical expressions of the optical properties are obtained using the compact density-matrix approach and the iterative method. The numerical results show that the linear and nonlinear optical properties depend strongly on the intense laser field and electric field but weakly on the hydrostatic pressure and temperature. Additionally, it has been found that the electronic and optical properties in a GaAs/Ga 0.7 Al 0.3 As graded quantum well under the intense laser field can be tuned by changing these external inputs. Thus, these results give a new degree of freedom in the devices applications

  4. Intersubband optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a graded quantum well under intense laser field: Effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature and electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ungan, F., E-mail: fungan@cumhuriyet.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Cumhuriyet University, 58140 Sivas (Turkey); Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Restrepo, R.L. [Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Escuela de Ingeniería de Antioquia AA 7516, Medellín (Colombia); Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Ave. Universidad 1001, CP 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Morales, A.L.; Duque, C.A. [Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia)

    2014-02-01

    The effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, and electric field on the optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes associated with intersubband transition in a typical GaAs/Ga{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}As graded quantum well under intense laser field have been investigated theoretically. The electron energy eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenfunctions of the graded quantum well are calculated within the effective mass approximation and envelope wave function approach. The analytical expressions of the optical properties are obtained using the compact density-matrix approach and the iterative method. The numerical results show that the linear and nonlinear optical properties depend strongly on the intense laser field and electric field but weakly on the hydrostatic pressure and temperature. Additionally, it has been found that the electronic and optical properties in a GaAs/Ga{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}As graded quantum well under the intense laser field can be tuned by changing these external inputs. Thus, these results give a new degree of freedom in the devices applications.

  5. Giant magneto resistance and temperature coefficient of resistance in Sm0.55Sr0.30Ag0.15MnO3 perovskite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masroor Ahmad Bhat

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Silver ions substituted samarium strontium manganite (Sm0.55Sr0.30Ag0.15MnO3 pervoskite was synthesized by using respective oxides in stoichiometric ratio through solid state reaction. The as-prepared sample was characterized by various analytical techniques to confirm its formation and understand the effect of monovalent silver ions in pervoskite lattice. X-ray diffraction pattern confirms the single phase formation while grain morphology in SEM image indicates good connectivity among the grains. The enhancement in metal to insulator transition temperature shows quenched disorder and magnetoresistance phenomena. The magnetoresistance (MR and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR emerge from grain growth factor and homogeneity induced by Ag+ ions in the lattice. The reduction in hysteresis loss resulted from antiferromagnetic - ferromagnetic (TN and ferromagnetic - paramagnetic (Tc transitions reveals the removal of disorder in perovskite lattice by Ag+ ions substitution. This increases the magnetic moment across distinct ions on the applying magnetic field. The rise in MR% (~99% with silver doping emerging from smooth spin tunneling of the grains across the boundary and suppression of the disordered magnetic fluctuations with increase in magnetic field has been reported. The present compound exhibits the first order nature of magnetism and observed first time the highest value of TCR ~ 95%.

  6. H2-broadening, shifting and mixing coefficients of the doublets in the ν2 and ν4 bands of PH3 at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jamel; Blanquet, Ghislain; Lepère, Muriel; Younes, Rached ben

    2018-05-01

    The broadening, shifting and mixing coefficients of the doublet spectral lines in the ν2 and ν4 bands of PH3 perturbed by H2 have been determined at room temperature. Indeed, the collisional spectroscopic parameters: intensities, line widths, line shifts and line mixing parameters, are all grouped together in the collisional relaxation matrix. To analyse the collisional process and physical effects on spectra of phosphine (PH3), we have used the measurements carried out using a tunable diode-laser spectrometer in the ν2 and ν4 bands of PH3 perturbed by hydrogen (H2) at room temperature. The recorded spectra are fitted by the Voigt profile and the speed-dependent uncorrelated hard collision model of Rautian and Sobelman. These profiles are developed in the studies of isolated lines and are modified to account for the line mixing effects in the overlapping lines. The line widths, line shifts and line mixing parameters are given for six A1 and A2 doublet lines with quantum numbers K = 3n, (n = 1, 2, …) and overlapped by collisional broadening at pressures of less than 50 mbar.

  7. Evaluation of temperature rise with different curing methods and units in two composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabatabaei M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The majority of commercial curing units in dentistry are of halogen lamp type. The new polymerizing units such as blue LED are introduced in recent years. One of the important side effects of light curing is the temperature rise in composite resin polymerization which can affect the vitality of tooth pulp. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temperature rise in two different composite resins during polymerization with halogen lamps and blue LED. Materials and Methods: This experimental study investigated the temperature rise in two different composites (Hybrid, Tetric Ceram/Nanofilled, Filteke Supreme of A2 shade polymerized with two halogen lamps (Coltolux 50, 350 mW/cm2 and Optilux 501 in standard, 820 mW/cm2 and Ramp, 100-1030 mW/cm2 operating modes and one blue LED with the intensity of 620 mW/cm2. Five samples for each group were prepared and temperature rise was monitored using a k-type thermocouple. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests with P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: Light curing units and composite resins had statistically significant influence on the temperature rise (p<0.05. Significantly, lower temperature rise occurred in case of illumination with Coltolux 50.There was no significant difference between Optilux 501 in standard curing mode and LED. Tetric Ceram showed higher temperature rise. Conclusion: According to the results of this study the high power halogen lamp and LED could produce significant heat which may be harmful to the dental pulp.

  8. Transient optical studies of charge recombination dynamics in a polymer/fullerene composite at room temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montanari, Ivan; Nogueira, Ana F.; Nelson, Jenny; Durrant, James R.; Winder, Christoph; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar; Brabec, Christoph

    2002-01-01

    The recombination kinetics of photogenerated charge carriers in a composite of poly[2-methoxy-5-(3',7'-dimethyloctyloxy)-1-4-phenylene vinylene], (MDMO–PPV) and the functionalised fullerene 1-(3-methoxycarbonyl)-propyl-1-phenyl-(6,6)C61 are investigated at room temperature by transient absorption

  9. Room temperature NO2-sensing properties of porous silicon/tungsten oxide nanorods composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Yulong; Hu, Ming; Wang, Dengfeng; Zhang, Weiyi; Qin, Yuxiang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Porous silicon/WO 3 nanorods composite is synthesized via hydrothermal method. • The morphology of WO 3 nanorods depends on the amount of oxalic acid (pH value). • The sensor can detect ppb level NO 2 at room temperature. - Abstract: One-dimensional single crystalline WO 3 nanorods have been successfully synthesized onto the porous silicon substrates by a seed-induced hydrothermal method. The controlled morphology of porous silicon/tungsten oxide nanorods composite was obtained by using oxalic acid as an organic inducer. The reaction was carried out at 180 °C for 2 h. The influence of oxalic acid (pH value) on the morphology of porous silicon/tungsten oxide nanorods composite was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The NO 2 -sensing properties of the sensor based on porous silicon/tungsten oxide nanorods composite were investigated at different temperatures ranging from room temperature (∼25 °C) to 300 °C. At room temperature, the sensor behaved as a typical p-type semiconductor and exhibited high gas response, good repeatability and excellent selectivity characteristics toward NO 2 gas due to its high specific surface area, special structure, and large amounts of oxygen vacancies

  10. Polybenzimidazole and sulfonated polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane composite membranes for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Allward, Todd; Alfaro, Silvia Martinez

    2014-01-01

    Composite membranes based on poly(2,2′(m-phenylene)-5,5́bibenzimidazole) (PBI) and sulfonated polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (S-POSS) with S-POSS contents of 5 and 10wt.% were prepared by solution casting as base materials for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. With membranes...

  11. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Wang, Xin; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000 deg C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200 deg C, Beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  12. Maximized PUFA measurements improve insight in changes in fatty acid composition in response to temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dooremalen, C.; Pel, R.; Ellers, J.

    2009-01-01

    A general mechanism underlying the response of ectotherms to environmental changes often involves changes in fatty acid composition. Theory predicts that a decrease in temperature causes an increase in unsaturation of fatty acids, with an important role for long-chain poly-unsaturated fatty acids

  13. Maximized PUFA measurements improve insight in changes in fatty acid composition in response to temperature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dooremalen, J.A.; Pel, R.; Ellers, J.

    2009-01-01

    A general mechanism underlying the response of ectotherms to environmental changes often involves changes in fatty acid composition. Theory predicts that a decrease in temperature causes an increase in unsaturation of fatty acids, with an important role for long-chain poly-unsaturated fatty acids

  14. Low methanol permeable composite Nafion/silica/PWA membranes for low temperature direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Weilin; Lu Tianhong; Liu Changpeng; Xing Wei

    2005-01-01

    Nafion/silica/phosphotungstic acid (PWA) composite membranes were studied for low temperature ( max = 70 mW/cm 2 ) than those of commercial Nafion without treatment (OCV = 0.68 V, P max = 62 mW/cm 2 ) at 80 deg. C

  15. Room temperature aerobic oxidation of amines by a nanocrystalline ruthenium oxide pyrochlore nafion composite catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Shanmuganathan; Kumar, Annamalai Senthil; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Chan, Ting-Shan; Zen, Jyh-Myng

    2012-05-14

    The aerobic oxidation of primary amines to their respective nitriles has been carried out at room temperature using a highly reusable nanocrystalline ruthenium oxide pyrochlore Nafion composite catalyst (see figure). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200C, beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  17. Pressure and temperature induced electrical resistance change in nano-carbon/epoxy composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, J. T.; Buschhorn, S. T.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Schulte, K.; Fiedler, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the changes of electrical resistance of the carbon black (CB) and carbon nanotube (CNT) filled epoxy composites upon compression, swelling and temperature variation. For all samples we observe a decrease of electrical resistance under compression, while an increase of

  18. Temperature Dependent Rate Coefficients for the Gas-Phase Reaction of the OH Radical with Linear (L2, L3) and Cyclic (D3, D4) Permethylsiloxanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, François; Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K; Papadimitriou, Vassileios C; Burkholder, James B

    2018-04-19

    Permethylsiloxanes are emitted into the atmosphere during production and use as personal care products, lubricants, and cleaning agents. The predominate atmospheric loss process for permethylsiloxanes is expected to be via gas-phase reaction with the OH radical. In this study, rate coefficients, k(T), for the OH radical gas-phase reaction with the two simplest linear and cyclic permethylsiloxanes were measured using a pulsed laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence technique over the temperature range of 240-370 K and a relative rate method at 294 K: hexamethyldisiloxane ((CH 3 ) 3 SiOSi(CH 3 ) 3 , L 2 ), k 1 ; octamethyltrisiloxane ([(CH 3 ) 3 SiO] 2 Si(CH 3 ) 2 , L 3 ), k 2 ; hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane ([-Si(CH 3 ) 2 O-] 3 , D 3 ), k 3 ; and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane ([-Si(CH 3 ) 2 O-] 4 , D 4 ), k 4 . The obtained k(294 K) values and temperature-dependence expressions for the 240-370 K temperature range are (cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , 2σ absolute uncertainties): k 1 (294 K) = (1.28 ± 0.08) × 10 -12 , k 1 ( T) = (1.87 ± 0.18) × 10 -11 exp(-(791 ± 27)/ T); k 2 (294 K) = (1.72 ± 0.10) × 10 -12 , k 2 ( T) = 1.96 × 10 -13 (T/298) 4.34 exp(657/ T); k 3 (294 K) = (0.82 ± 0.05) × 10 -12 , k 3 ( T) = (1.29 ± 0.19) × 10 -11 exp(-(805 ± 43)/ T); and k 4 (294 K) = (1.12 ± 0.10) × 10 -12 , k 4 ( T) = (1.80 ± 0.26) × 10 -11 exp(-(816 ± 43)/ T). The cyclic molecules were found to be less reactive than the analogous linear molecule with the same number of -CH 3 groups, while the linear and cyclic permethylsiloxane reactivity both increase with the increasing number of CH 3 - groups. The present results are compared with previous rate coefficient determinations where available. The permethylsiloxanes included in this study are atmospherically short-lived compounds with estimated atmospheric lifetimes of 11, 8, 17, and 13 days, respectively.

  19. Stress-temperature-lifetime response of nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC composites in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Hua-Tay; Becher, P.F.

    1996-01-01

    Time-to-failure tests were conducted in four-point flexure and in air as a function of stress levels and temperatures to study the lifetime response of various Nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC (designated as Nic/SiC) composites with a graphitic interfacial coating. The results indicated that all of the Nic/SiC composites exhibit a similar stress-dependent failure at applied stress greater than a threshold value. In this case, the lifetimes of the composites increased with decrease in both stress level and test temperature. The lifetime of the composites appeared to be relatively insensitive to the thickness of graphitic interface layer and was enhanced somewhat by the addition of oxidation inhibitors. Electron microscopy and oxidation studies indicated that the life of the Nic/SiC composites was governed by the oxidation of the graphitic interfaces and the on of glass(es) in composites due to the oxidation of the fiber and matrix, inhibitor phases

  20. High-temperature protective coatings for C/SiC composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Yang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC composites were well-established light weight materials combining high specific strength and damage tolerance. For high-temperature applications, protective coatings had to provide oxidation and corrosion resistance. The literature data introduced various technologies and materials, which were suitable for the application of coatings. Coating procedures and conditions, materials design limitations related to the reactivity of the components of C/SiC composites, new approaches and coating systems to the selection of protective coatings materials were examined. The focus of future work was on optimization by further multilayer coating systems and the anti-oxidation ability of C/SiC composites at temperatures up to 2073 K or higher in water vapor.