WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature anisotropy instability

  1. Kinetic instabilities in the solar wind driven by temperature anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2017-12-01

    The present paper comprises a review of kinetic instabilities that may be operative in the solar wind, and how they influence the dynamics thereof. The review is limited to collective plasma instabilities driven by the temperature anisotropies. To limit the scope even further, the discussion is restricted to the temperature anisotropy-driven instabilities within the model of bi-Maxwellian plasma velocity distribution function. The effects of multiple particle species or the influence of field-aligned drift will not be included. The field-aligned drift or beam is particularly prominent for the solar wind electrons, and thus ignoring its effect leaves out a vast portion of important physics. Nevertheless, for the sake of limiting the scope, this effect will not be discussed. The exposition is within the context of linear and quasilinear Vlasov kinetic theories. The discussion does not cover either computer simulations or data analyses of observations, in any systematic manner, although references will be made to published works pertaining to these methods. The scientific rationale for the present analysis is that the anisotropic temperatures associated with charged particles are pervasively detected in the solar wind, and it is one of the key contemporary scientific research topics to correctly characterize how such anisotropies are generated, maintained, and regulated in the solar wind. The present article aims to provide an up-to-date theoretical development on this research topic, largely based on the author's own work.

  2. The Parametric Instability of Alfven Waves: Effects of Temperature Anisotropy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tenerani, A.; Velli, M.; Hellinger, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 851, č. 2 (2017), 99/1-99/9 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-10057S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : instabilities * plasmas * waves Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 5.533, year: 2016

  3. Temperature anisotropy instabilities in a plasma containing cold and hot species in the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renuka, G.; Viswanathan, K.S.

    1980-01-01

    The nature of convective instability has been investigated for an electromagnetic wave, either right circularly polarised or left circularly polarised, propagating along a magnetic line of force in a plasma whose distribution function exhibits a temperature anisotropy in the hot species, a loss cone structure and a beam of cold electrons or ions travelling along the line of force with velocity V 1 . Detailed numerical calculations have been made using a computer for the growth and decay of the wave for different values of the anisotropy ratio Tsub(perpendicular to)/Tsub(parallel to) delta of the perpendicular and parallel temperatures, the McIlwain parameter L, the loss cone index j, velocity V 1 of the streaming particle and the particle density ratio epsilon. The ranges of the values of epsilon and delta for which the waves becomes unstable have been studied in detail. It is found that wave propagation shows no dependence on the loss cone index but shows very strong dependence on the temperature anisotropy delta. (author)

  4. MIXING THE SOLAR WIND PROTON AND ELECTRON SCALES: EFFECTS OF ELECTRON TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY ON THE OBLIQUE PROTON FIREHOSE INSTABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maneva, Y.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Viñas, A., E-mail: yana.maneva@wis.kuleuven.be [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    The double adiabatic expansion of the nearly collisionless solar wind plasma creates conditions for the firehose instability to develop and efficiently prevent the further increase of the plasma temperature in the direction parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field. The conditions imposed by the firehose instability have been extensively studied using idealized approaches that ignore the mutual effects of electrons and protons. Recently, more realistic approaches have been proposed that take into account the interplay between electrons and protons, unveiling new regimes of the parallel oscillatory modes. However, for oblique wave propagation the instability develops distinct branches that grow much faster and may therefore be more efficient than the parallel firehose instability in constraining the temperature anisotropy of the plasma particles. This paper reports for the first time on the effects of electron plasma properties on the oblique proton firehose (PFH) instability and provides a comprehensive vision of the entire unstable wave-vector spectrum, unifying the proton and the smaller electron scales. The plasma β and temperature anisotropy regimes considered here are specific for the solar wind and magnetospheric conditions, and enable the electrons and protons to interact via the excited electromagnetic fluctuations. For the selected parameters, simultaneous electron and PFH instabilities can be observed with a dispersion spectrum of the electron firehose (EFH) extending toward the proton scales. Growth rates of the PFH instability are markedly boosted by the anisotropic electrons, especially in the oblique direction where the EFH growth rates are orders of magnitude higher.

  5. Mixing the Solar Wind Proton and Electron Scales: Effects of Electron Temperature Anisotropy on the Oblique Proton Firehose Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneva, Y.; Lazar, M.; Vinas, A.; Poedts, S.

    2016-01-01

    The double adiabatic expansion of the nearly collisionless solar wind plasma creates conditions for the firehose instability to develop and efficiently prevent the further increase of the plasma temperature in the direction parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field. The conditions imposed by the firehose instability have been extensively studied using idealized approaches that ignore the mutual effects of electrons and protons. Recently, more realistic approaches have been proposed that take into account the interplay between electrons and protons,? unveiling new regimes of the parallel oscillatory modes. However, for oblique wave propagation the instability develops distinct branches that grow much faster and may therefore be more efficient than the parallel firehose instability in constraining the temperature anisotropy of the plasma particles. This paper reports for the first time on the effects of electron plasma properties on the oblique proton firehose (PFH) instability and provides a comprehensive vision of the entire unstable wave-vector spectrum, unifying the proton and the smaller electron scales. The plasma ß and temperature anisotropy regimes considered here are specific for the solar wind and magnetospheric conditions, and enable the electrons and protons to interact via the excited electromagnetic fluctuations. For the selected parameters, simultaneous electron and PFH instabilities can be observed with a dispersion spectrum of the electron firehose (EFH) extending toward the proton scales. Growth rates of the PFH instability are markedly boosted by the anisotropic electrons, especially in the oblique direction where the EFH growth rates are orders of magnitude higher.

  6. Two-dimensional Nonlinear Simulations of Temperature-anisotropy Instabilities with a Proton-alpha Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovskii, S. A.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Vasquez, Bernard J.

    2018-04-01

    We present two-dimensional hybrid simulations of proton-cyclotron and mirror instabilities in a proton-alpha plasma with particle-in-cell ions and a neutralizing electron fluid. The instabilities are driven by the protons with temperature perpendicular to the background magnetic field larger than the parallel temperature. The alpha particles with initially isotropic temperature have a nonzero drift speed with respect to the protons. The minor ions are known to influence the relative effect of the proton-cyclotron and mirror instabilities. In this paper, we show that the mirror mode can dominate the power spectrum at the nonlinear stage even if its linear growth rate is significantly lower than that of the proton-cyclotron mode. The proton-cyclotron instability combined with the alpha-proton drift is a possible cause of the nonzero magnetic helicity observed in the solar wind for fluctuations propagating nearly parallel to the magnetic field. Our simulations generally confirm this concept but reveal a complex helicity spectrum that is not anticipated from the linear theory of the instability.

  7. Ion temperature anisotropy effects on threshold conditions of a shear-modified current driven electrostatic ion-acoustic instability in the topside auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. G. Perron

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Temperature anisotropies may be encountered in space plasmas when there is a preferred direction, for instance, a strong magnetic or electric field. In this paper, we study how ion temperature anisotropy can affect the threshold conditions of a shear-modified current driven electrostatic ion-acoustic (CDEIA instability. In particular, this communication focuses on instabilities in the context of topside auroral F-region situations and in the limit where finite Larmor radius corrections are small. We derived a new fluid-like expression for the critical drift which depends explicitly on ion anisotropy. More importantly, for ion to electron temperature ratios typical of F-region, solutions of the kinetic dispersion relation show that ion temperature anisotropy may significantly lower the drift threshold required for instability. In some cases, a perpendicular to parallel ion temperature ratio of 2 and may reduce the relative drift required for the onset of instability by a factor of approximately 30, assuming the ion-acoustic speed of the medium remains constant. Therefore, the ion temperature anisotropy should be considered in future studies of ion-acoustic waves and instabilities in the high-latitude ionospheric F-region.

  8. Analytical theory and nonlinear δf perturbative simulations of temperature anisotropy instability in intense charged particle beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward A. Startsev

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available In plasmas with strongly anisotropic distribution functions (T_{∥b}/T_{⊥b}≪1 a Harris-like collective instability may develop if there is sufficient coupling between the transverse and longitudinal degrees of freedom. Such anisotropies develop naturally in accelerators and may lead to a deterioration of beam quality. This paper extends previous numerical studies [E. A. Startsev, R. C. Davidson, and H. Qin, Phys. Plasmas 9, 3138 (2002] of the stability properties of intense non-neutral charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy (T_{⊥b}≫T_{∥b} to allow for nonaxisymmetric perturbations with ∂/∂θ≠0. The most unstable modes are identified, and their eigenfrequencies, radial mode structure, and nonlinear dynamics are determined. The simulation results clearly show that moderately intense beams with s_{b}=ω[over ^]_{pb}^{2}/2γ_{b}^{2}ω_{β⊥}^{2}≳0.5 are linearly unstable to short-wavelength perturbations with k_{z}^{2}r_{b}^{2}≳1, provided the ratio of longitudinal and transverse temperatures is smaller than some threshold value. Here, ω[over ^]_{pb}^{2}=4πn[over ^]_{b}e_{b}^{2}/γ_{b}m_{b} is the relativistic plasma frequency squared, and ω_{β⊥} is the betatron frequency associated with the applied smooth-focusing field. A theoretical model is developed based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equations which describes the essential features of the linear stages of instability. Both the simulations and the analytical theory predict that the dipole mode (azimuthal mode number m=1 is the most unstable mode. In the nonlinear stage, tails develop in the longitudinal momentum distribution function, and the kinetic instability saturates due to resonant wave-particle interactions.

  9. Proton temperature-anisotropy-driven instabilities in weakly collisional plasmas: Hybrid simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 1 (2015), 305810103/1-305810103/14 ISSN 0022-3778 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/12/2023 Grant - others:EU(XE) SHOCK Project No. 284515 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 ; RVO:68378289 Keywords : magnetic field * solar wind * mirror instability Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (UFA-U) Impact factor: 0.981, year: 2015

  10. Proton temperature-anisotropy-driven instabilities in weakly collisional plasmas: Hybrid simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 1 (2015), s. 1-14 ISSN 0022-3778 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : magnetic-field * solar- wind * mirror instability * Langevin representation * Coulomb collisions * nonlinear-theory * fluid model * evolution * turbulence * threshold Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.981, year: 2015 http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9525437

  11. Anisotropy-Driven Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Startsev, Edward; Qin, Hong

    2005-01-01

    In electrically neutral plasmas with strongly anisotropic distribution functions, free energy is available to drive different collective instabilities such as the electrostatic Harris instability and the transverse electromagnetic Weibel instability. Such anisotropies develop naturally in particle accelerators and may lead to a detoriation of beam quality. We have generalized the analysis of the classical Harris and Weibel instabilities to the case of a one-component intense charged particle beam with anisotropic temperature including the important effects of finite transverse geometry and beam space-charge. For a long costing beam, the delta-f particle-in-cell code BEST and the eighenmode code bEASt have been used to determine detailed 3D stability properties over a wide range of temperature anisotropy and beam intensity. A theoretical model is developed which describes the essential features of the linear stage of these instabilities. Both, the simulations and analytical theory, clearly show that moderately...

  12. Ion temperature anisotropy limitation in high beta plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scime, Earl E.; Keiter, Paul A.; Balkey, Matthew M.; Boivin, Robert F.; Kline, John L.; Blackburn, Melanie; Gary, S. Peter

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of parallel and perpendicular ion temperatures in the Large Experiment on Instabilities and Anisotropies (LEIA) space simulation chamber display an inverse correlation between the upper bound on the ion temperature anisotropy and the parallel ion beta (β=8πnkT/B 2 ). Fluctuation measurements indicate the presence of low frequency, transverse, electromagnetic waves with wave numbers and frequencies that are consistent with predictions for Alfven Ion Cyclotron instabilities. These observations are also consistent with in situ spacecraft measurements in the Earth's magnetosheath and with a theoretical/computational model that predicts that such an upper bound on the ion temperature anisotropy is imposed by scattering from enhanced fluctuations due to growth of the Alfven ion cyclotron instability. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  13. Effects of electrons on the solar wind proton temperature anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michno, M. J.; Lazar, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2014-01-01

    Among the kinetic microinstabilities, the firehose instability is one of the most efficient mechanisms to restrict the unlimited increase of temperature anisotropy in the direction of an ambient magnetic field as predicted by adiabatic expansion of collision-poor solar wind. Indeed, the solar wind proton temperature anisotropy detected near 1 AU shows that it is constrained by the marginal firehose condition. Of the two types of firehose instabilities, namely, parallel and oblique, the literature suggests that the solar wind data conform more closely to the marginal oblique firehose condition. In the present work, however, it is shown that the parallel firehose instability threshold is markedly influenced by the presence of anisotropic electrons, such that under some circumstances, the cumulative effects of both electron and proton anisotropies could describe the observation without considering the oblique firehose mode.

  14. Ion temperature gradient instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Anomalous ion thermal conductivity remains an open physics issue for the present generation of high temperature Tokamaks. It is generally believed to be due to Ion Temperature Gradient Instability (η i mode). However, it has been difficult, if not impossible to identify this instability and study the anomalous transport due to it, directly. Therefore the production and identification of the mode is pursued in the simpler and experimentally convenient configuration of the Columbia Linear Machine (CLM). CLM is a steady state machine which already has all the appropriate parameters, except η i . This parameter is being increased to the appropriate value of the order of 1 by 'feathering' a tungsten screen located between the plasma source and the experimental cell to flatten the density profile and appropriate redesign of heating antennas to steepen the ion temperature profile. Once the instability is produced and identified, a thorough study of the characteristics of the mode can be done via a wide range of variation of all the critical parameters: η i , parallel wavelength, etc

  15. 3D analyses of cavitation instabilities accounting for plastic anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2010-01-01

    Full three dimensional cell model analyses are carried out for a solid containing a single small void, in order to determine the critical stress levels for the occurrence of cavitation instabilities. The material models applied are elastic‐viscoplastic, with a small rate‐hardening exponent...... that the quasi‐static solution is well approximated. A special procedure is used to strongly reduce the loading rate a little before the instability occurs. It is found that plastic anisotropy has a significant effect on the level of the critical stress for cavitation instabilities....

  16. Limits on the ions temperature anisotropy in turbulent intracluster medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Lima, R. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Potsdam Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik und Astronomie; Univ. de Sao Paulo (Brazil). Inst. de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas; Yan, H. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Potsdam Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik und Astronomie; Gouveia Dal Pino, E.M. de [Univ. de Sao Paulo (Brazil). Inst. de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas; Lazarian, A. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Astronomy

    2016-05-15

    Turbulence in the weakly collisional intracluster medium of galaxies (ICM) is able to generate strong thermal velocity anisotropies in the ions (with respect to the local magnetic field direction), if the magnetic moment of the particles is conserved in the absence of Coulomb collisions. In this scenario, the anisotropic pressure magnetohydrodynamic (AMHD) turbulence shows a very different statistical behaviour from the standard MHD one and is unable to amplify seed magnetic fields, in disagreement with previous cosmological MHD simulations which are successful to explain the observed magnetic fields in the ICM. On the other hand, temperature anisotropies can also drive plasma instabilities which can relax the anisotropy. This work aims to compare the relaxation rate with the growth rate of the anisotropies driven by the turbulence. We employ quasilinear theory to estimate the ions scattering rate due to the parallel firehose, mirror, and ion-cyclotron instabilities, for a set of plasma parameters resulting from AMHD simulations of the turbulent ICM. We show that the ICM turbulence can sustain only anisotropy levels very close to the instabilities thresholds. We argue that the AMHD model which bounds the anisotropies at the marginal stability levels can describe the Alfvenic turbulence cascade in the ICM.

  17. Electron temperature anisotropy modeling and its effect on anisotropy-magnetic field coupling in an underdense laser heated plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morreeuw, J.P.; Dubroca, B. [CEA Centre d' Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques d' Aquitaine, 33 - Le Barp (France); Sangam, A.; Dubroca, B.; Charrier, P.; Tikhonchuk, V.T. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., CELIA, 33 - Talence (France); Sangam, A.; Dubroca, B.; Charrier, P. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., MAB, 33 - Talence (France)

    2006-06-15

    The laser interaction with an underdense plasma leads to an anisotropic laser heating of electrons. This temperature anisotropy gradient in turn is the source of an early magnetic field, which has an important effect on the plasma evolution, due to the thermal flux reduction. We describe the temperature anisotropy by an evolution equation including the anisotropy-magnetic field coupling and observe a rather efficient magnetic field generation. However at high anisotropy levels, a small-scale instability emerges, leading to a serious problem in numerical calculations. We introduce the kinetics effects, which fix the problem by the anisotropy diffusion through the heat flux tensor. A constant-coefficient Fokker-Planck model in the 2-dimensional geometry allows us to derive an anisotropy diffusion term. The diffusion coefficient is fitted from the kinetic theory of the collisional anisotropic (Weibel) instability growth rate. Such an anisotropy diffusion term wipes out the unphysical instability without any undesirable smoothing. This diffusion along with the viscosity term leads also to a quite good restitution of the Weibel instability growth rate and to the short wavelength cutoff, even in a weakly collisional situation. This allows us to use such a model to predict the emergence of the Weibel instability as well as its saturation. (authors)

  18. Pressure-anisotropy-induced nonlinearities in the kinetic magnetorotational instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J.; Quataert, E.; Kunz, M. W.

    2017-12-01

    In collisionless and weakly collisional plasmas, such as hot accretion flows onto compact objects, the magnetorotational instability (MRI) can differ significantly from the standard (collisional) MRI. In particular, pressure anisotropy with respect to the local magnetic-field direction can both change the linear MRI dispersion relation and cause nonlinear modifications to the mode structure and growth rate, even when the field and flow perturbations are very small. This work studies these pressure-anisotropy-induced nonlinearities in the weakly nonlinear, high-ion-beta regime, before the MRI saturates into strong turbulence. Our goal is to better understand how the saturation of the MRI in a low-collisionality plasma might differ from that in the collisional regime. We focus on two key effects: (i) the direct impact of self-induced pressure-anisotropy nonlinearities on the evolution of an MRI mode, and (ii) the influence of pressure anisotropy on the `parasitic instabilities' that are suspected to cause the mode to break up into turbulence. Our main conclusions are: (i) The mirror instability regulates the pressure anisotropy in such a way that the linear MRI in a collisionless plasma is an approximate nonlinear solution once the mode amplitude becomes larger than the background field (just as in magnetohyrodynamics). This implies that differences between the collisionless and collisional MRI become unimportant at large amplitudes. (ii) The break up of large-amplitude MRI modes into turbulence via parasitic instabilities is similar in collisionless and collisional plasmas. Together, these conclusions suggest that the route to magnetorotational turbulence in a collisionless plasma may well be similar to that in a collisional plasma, as suggested by recent kinetic simulations. As a supplement to these findings, we offer guidance for the design of future kinetic simulations of magnetorotational turbulence.

  19. Electromagnetic Weible Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Energy Anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2003-01-01

    In plasmas with strongly anisotropic distribution functions, collective instabilities may develop if there is sufficient coupling between the transverse and longitudinal degrees of freedom. Our previous numerical and theoretical studies of intense charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy [E. A. Startsev, R. C. Davidson and H. Qin, PRSTAB, 6, 084401 (2003); Phys. Plasmas 9, 3138 (2002)] demonstrated that a fast, electrostatic, Harris-like instability develops, and saturates nonlinearly, for sufficiently large temperature anisotropy (T perpendi c ular b /T parallelb >> 1). The total distribution function after saturation, however, is still far from equipartitioned. In this paper the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations are used to investigate detailed properties of the transverse electromagnetic Weibel-type instability for a long charge bunch propagating through a cylindrical pipe of radius r w . The kinetic stability analysis is carried out for azimuthally symmetric perturbations about a two-temperature thermal equilibrium distribution in the smooth-focusing approximation. The most unstable modes are identified, and their eigenfrequencies, radial mode structure and instability thresholds are determined. The stability analysis shows that, although there is free energy available to drive the electromagnetic Weibel instability, the finite transverse geometry of the charged particle beam introduces a large threshold value for the temperature anisotropy ((T perpendi c ularb /T parallelb ) Weibel >> (T perpendi c ularb /T parallelb ) Harris ) below which the instability is absent. Hence, unlike the case of an electrically neutral plasma, the Weibel instability is not expected to play as significant a role in the process of energy isotropization of intense unneutralized charged particle beams as the electrostatic Harris-type instability

  20. Finite temperature instability for compactification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accetta, F.S.; Kolb, E.W.

    1986-03-01

    We consider finite temperature effects upon theories with extra dimensions compactified via vacuum stress energy (Casimir) effects. For sufficiently high temperature, a static configuration for the internal space is impossible. At somewhat lower temperatures, there is an instability due to thermal fluctuations of radius of the compact dimensions. For both cases, the Universe can evolve to a de Sitter-like expansion of all dimensions. Stability to late times constrains the initial entropy of the universe. 28 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  1. Shaping the solar wind electron temperature anisotropy by the interplay of core and suprathermal populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban Hamd, S. M.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Pierrard, V.; Štverák

    2017-12-01

    We present the results of an advanced parametrization of the temperature anisotropy of electrons in the slow solar wind and the electromagnetic instabilities resulting from the interplay of their thermal core and suprathermal halo populations. A large set of observational data (from the Ulysses, Helios and Cluster missions) is used to parametrize these components and establish their correlations. Comparative analysis demonstrates for the first time a particular implication of the suprathermal electrons which are less dense but hotter than thermal electrons. The instabilities are significantly stimulated by the interplay of the core and halo populations, leading to lower thresholds which shape the observed limits of the temperature anisotropy for both the core and halo populations. This double agreement strongly suggests that the selfgenerated instabilities play the major role in constraining the electron anisotropy.

  2. Numerical Studies of Electromagnetic Instabilities in Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Energy Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Startsev, Edward; Lee, Wei-li

    2005-01-01

    In intense charged particle beams with large energy anisotropy, free energy is available to drive transverse electromagnetic Weibel-type instabilities. Such slow-wave transverse electromagnetic instabilities can be described by the so-called Darwin model, which neglects the fast-wave portion of the displacement current. The Weibel instability may also lead to an increase in the longitudinal velocity spread, which would make the focusing of the beam difficult and impose a limit on the minimum spot size achievable in heavy ion fusion experiments. This paper reports the results of recent numerical studies of the Weibel instability using the Beam Eigenmode And Spectra (bEASt) code for space-charge-dominated, low-emittance beams with large tune depression. To study the nonlinear stage of the instability, the Darwin model is being developed and incorporated into the Beam Equilibrium Stability and Transport(BEST) code.

  3. Tail anisotropy instability during plasma current rise by lower-hybrid waves in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagiwa, Mitsuru.

    1986-01-01

    Tail anisotropy instability during lower-hybrid current rise is investigated. Tail formation by lower-hybrid waves is studied by using a Fokker-Planck equation combined with the return field and the rf associated terms. Quasi-linear relaxation of the electron tail distribution under the influence of the plasma waves excited due to the instability is examined. It is found that the instability condition is related to the strength of the parallel diffusion by lower-hybrid waves and the ratio of the electron cyclotron frequency to the electron plasma frequency. The time scale between the instability spikes and the suppression of the instability by electron cyclotron heating are also discussed. (author)

  4. Kinetic-MHD simulations of gyroresonance instability driven by CR pressure anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebiga, O.; Santos-Lima, R.; Yan, H.

    2018-05-01

    The transport of cosmic rays (CRs) is crucial for the understanding of almost all high-energy phenomena. Both pre-existing large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and locally generated turbulence through plasma instabilities are important for the CR propagation in astrophysical media. The potential role of the resonant instability triggered by CR pressure anisotropy to regulate the parallel spatial diffusion of low-energy CRs (≲100 GeV) in the interstellar and intracluster medium of galaxies has been shown in previous theoretical works. This work aims to study the gyroresonance instability via direct numerical simulations, in order to access quantitatively the wave-particle scattering rates. For this, we employ a 1D PIC-MHD code to follow the growth and saturation of the gyroresonance instability. We extract from the simulations the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient Dμμ produced by the instability during the linear and saturation phases, and a very good agreement (within a factor of 3) is found with the values predicted by the quasi-linear theory (QLT). Our results support the applicability of the QLT for modelling the scattering of low-energy CRs by the gyroresonance instability in the complex interplay between this instability and the large-scale MHD turbulence.

  5. Whistler waves with electron temperature anisotropy and non-Maxwellian distribution functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Usman Malik

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The previous works on whistler waves with electron temperature anisotropy narrated the dependence on plasma parameters, however, they did not explore the reasons behind the observed differences. A comparative analysis of the whistler waves with different electron distributions has not been made to date. This paper attempts to address both these issues in detail by making a detailed comparison of the dispersion relations and growth rates of whistler waves with electron temperature anisotropy for Maxwellian, Cairns, kappa and generalized (r, q distributions by varying the key plasma parameters for the problem under consideration. It has been found that the growth rate of whistler instability is maximum for flat-topped distribution whereas it is minimum for the Maxwellian distribution. This work not only summarizes and complements the previous work done on the whistler waves with electron temperature anisotropy but also provides a general framework to understand the linear propagation of whistler waves with electron temperature anisotropy that is applicable in all regions of space plasmas where the satellite missions have indicated their presence.

  6. Instability of flat space at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, D.J.; Perry, M.J.; Yaffe, L.G.

    1982-01-01

    The instabilities of quantum gravity are investigated using the path-integral formulation of Einstein's theory. A brief review is given of the classical gravitational instabilities, as well as the stability of flat space. The Euclidean path-integral representation of the partition function is employed to discuss the instability of flat space at finite temperature. Semiclassical, or saddle-point, approximations are utilized. We show how the Jeans instability arises as a tachyon in the graviton propagator when small perturbations about hot flat space are considered. The effect due to the Schwarzschild instanton is studied. The small fluctuations about this instanton are analyzed and a negative mode is discovered. This produces, in the semiclassical approximation, an imaginary part of the free energy. This is interpreted as being due to the metastability of hot flat space to nucleate black holes. These then evolve by evaporation or by accretion of thermal gravitons, leading to the instability of hot flat space. The nucleation rate of black holes is calculated as a function of temperature

  7. The BEAN experiment - An EISCAT study of ion temperature anisotropies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. W. McCrea

    Full Text Available Results are presented from a novel EISCAT special programme, SP-UK-BEAN, intended for the direct measurement of the ion temperature anisotropy during ion frictional heating events in the high-latitude F-region. The experiment employs a geometry which provides three simultaneous estimates of the ion temperature in a single F-region observing volume at a range of aspect angles from 0° to 36°. In contrast to most previous EISCAT experiments to study ion temperature anisotropies, field-aligned observations are made using the Sodankylä radar, while the Kiruna radar measures at an aspect angle of the order of 30°. Anisotropic effects can thus be studied within a small common volume whose size and altitude range is limited by the radar beamwidth, rather than in volumes which overlap but cover different altitudes. The derivation of line-of-sight ion temperature is made more complex by the presence of an unknown percentage of atomic and molecular ions at the observing altitude and the possibility of non-Maxwellian distortion of the ion thermal velocity distribution. The first problem has been partly accounted for by insisting that a constant value of electron temperature be maintained. This enables an estimate of the ion composition to be made, and facilitates the derivation of more realistic line-of-sight ion temperatures and temperature anisotropies. The latter problem has been addressed by assuming that the thermal velocity distribution remains bi-Maxwellian. The limitations of these approaches are discussed. The ion temperature anisotropies and temperature partition coefficients during two ion heating events give values intermediate between those expected for atomic and for molecular species. This result is consistent with an analysis which indicates that significant proportions of molecular ions (up to 50% were present at the times of greatest heating.

  8. Effect of Surface Tension Anisotropy and Welding Parameters on Initial Instability Dynamics During Solidification: A Phase-Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fengyi; Wei, Yanhong

    2018-05-01

    The effects of surface tension anisotropy and welding parameters on initial instability dynamics during gas tungsten arc welding of an Al-alloy are investigated by a quantitative phase-field model. The results show that the surface tension anisotropy and welding parameters affect the initial instability dynamics in different ways during welding. The surface tension anisotropy does not influence the solute diffusion process but does affect the stability of the solid/liquid interface during solidification. The welding parameters affect the initial instability dynamics by varying the growth rate and thermal gradient. The incubation time decreases, and the initial wavelength remains stable as the welding speed increases. When welding power increases, the incubation time increases and the initial wavelength slightly increases. Experiments were performed for the same set of welding parameters used in modeling, and the results of the experiments and simulations were in good agreement.

  9. PIC simulation of a thermal anisotropy-driven Weibel instability in a circular rarefaction wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieckmann, M E; Sarri, G; Kourakis, I; Borghesi, M; Murphy, G C; O'C Drury, L; Bret, A; Romagnani, L; Ynnerman, A

    2012-01-01

    The expansion of an initially unmagnetized planar rarefaction wave has recently been shown to trigger a thermal anisotropy-driven Weibel instability (TAWI), which can generate magnetic fields from noise levels. It is examined here whether the TAWI can also grow in a curved rarefaction wave. The expansion of an initially unmagnetized circular plasma cloud, which consists of protons and hot electrons, into a vacuum is modelled for this purpose with a two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. It is shown that the momentum transfer from the electrons to the radially accelerating protons can indeed trigger a TAWI. Radial current channels form and the aperiodic growth of a magnetowave is observed, which has a magnetic field that is oriented orthogonal to the simulation plane. The induced electric field implies that the electron density gradient is no longer parallel to the electric field. Evidence is presented here that this electric field modification triggers a second magnetic instability, which results in a rotational low-frequency magnetowave. The relevance of the TAWI is discussed for the growth of small-scale magnetic fields in astrophysical environments, which are needed to explain the electromagnetic emissions by astrophysical jets. It is outlined how this instability could be examined experimentally. (paper)

  10. PIC simulation of a thermal anisotropy-driven Weibel instability in a circular rarefaction wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckmann, M. E.; Sarri, G.; Murphy, G. C.; Bret, A.; Romagnani, L.; Kourakis, I.; Borghesi, M.; Ynnerman, A.; O'C Drury, L.

    2012-02-01

    The expansion of an initially unmagnetized planar rarefaction wave has recently been shown to trigger a thermal anisotropy-driven Weibel instability (TAWI), which can generate magnetic fields from noise levels. It is examined here whether the TAWI can also grow in a curved rarefaction wave. The expansion of an initially unmagnetized circular plasma cloud, which consists of protons and hot electrons, into a vacuum is modelled for this purpose with a two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. It is shown that the momentum transfer from the electrons to the radially accelerating protons can indeed trigger a TAWI. Radial current channels form and the aperiodic growth of a magnetowave is observed, which has a magnetic field that is oriented orthogonal to the simulation plane. The induced electric field implies that the electron density gradient is no longer parallel to the electric field. Evidence is presented here that this electric field modification triggers a second magnetic instability, which results in a rotational low-frequency magnetowave. The relevance of the TAWI is discussed for the growth of small-scale magnetic fields in astrophysical environments, which are needed to explain the electromagnetic emissions by astrophysical jets. It is outlined how this instability could be examined experimentally.

  11. Electron temperature anisotropy constraints in the solar wind

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štverák, Štěpán; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Maksimovic, M.; Marsch, E.; Fazakerley, A.; Scime, E. E.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 113, A3 /2008/ (2008), A03103/1-A03103/10 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300420602 Grant - others:EU(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501; CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : solar wind electrons * temperature anisotropy * radial Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.147, year: 2008

  12. Bias temperature instability for devices and circuits

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a single-source reference to one of the more challenging reliability issues plaguing modern semiconductor technologies, negative bias temperature instability.  Readers will benefit from state-of-the art coverage of research in topics such as time dependent defect spectroscopy, anomalous defect behavior, stochastic modeling with additional metastable states, multiphonon theory, compact modeling with RC ladders and implications on device reliability and lifetime.  ·         Enables readers to understand and model negative bias temperature instability, with an emphasis on dynamics; ·         Includes coverage of DC vs. AC stress, duty factor dependence and bias dependence; ·         Explains time dependent defect spectroscopy, as a measurement method that operates on nanoscale MOSFETs; ·         Introduces new defect model for metastable defect states, nonradiative multiphonon theory and stochastic behavior.

  13. Surface-Energy-Anisotropy-Induced Orientation Effects on RayleighInstabilities in Sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santala, Melissa; Glaeser, Andreas M.

    2006-01-01

    Arrays of controlled-geometry, semi-infinite pore channels of systematically varied crystallographic orientation were introduced into undoped m-plane (10{bar 1}0) sapphire substrates using microfabrication techniques and ion-beam etching and subsequently internalized by solid-state diffusion bonding. A series of anneals at 1700 C caused the breakup of these channels into discrete pores via Rayleigh instabilities. In all cases, channels broke up with a characteristic wavelength larger than that expected for a material with isotropic surface energy, reflecting stabilization effects due to surface-energy anisotropy. The breakup wavelength and the time required for complete breakup varied significantly with channel orientation. For most orientations, the instability wavelength for channels of radius R was in the range of 13.2R-25R, and complete breakup occurred within 2-10 h. To first order, the anneal times for complete breakup scale with the square of the breakup wavelength. Channels oriented along a <11{bar 2}0> direction had a wavelength of {approx} 139R, and required 468 h for complete breakup. Cross-sectional analysis of channels oriented along a <11{bar 2}0> direction showed the channel to be completely bounded by stable c(0001), r{l_brace}{bar 1}012{r_brace}, and s{l_brace}10{bar 1}1{r_brace} facets.

  14. Solar Wind Proton Temperature Anisotropy: Linear Theory and WIND/SWE Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P.; Kasper, J. C.; Lazarus, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a comparison between WIND/SWE observations (Kasper et al., 2006) of beta parallel to p and T perpendicular to p/T parallel to p (where beta parallel to p is the proton parallel beta and T perpendicular to p and T parallel to p are the perpendicular and parallel proton are the perpendicular and parallel proton temperatures, respectively; here parallel and perpendicular indicate directions with respect to the ambient magnetic field) and predictions of the Vlasov linear theory. In the slow solar wind, the observed proton temperature anisotropy seems to be constrained by oblique instabilities, by the mirror one and the oblique fire hose, contrary to the results of the linear theory which predicts a dominance of the proton cyclotron instability and the parallel fire hose. The fast solar wind core protons exhibit an anticorrelation between beta parallel to c and T perpendicular to c/T parallel to c (where beta parallel to c is the core proton parallel beta and T perpendicular to c and T parallel to c are the perpendicular and parallel core proton temperatures, respectively) similar to that observed in the HELIOS data (Marsch et al., 2004).

  15. Positive temperature coefficient of magnetic anisotropy in polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)-based magnetic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yiwei; Wang, Baomin; Zhan, Qingfeng; Tang, Zhenhua; Yang, Huali; Liu, Gang; Zuo, Zhenghu; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Xie, Yali; Zhu, Xiaojian; Chen, Bin; Wang, Junling; Li, Run-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic anisotropy is decreased with increasing temperature in normal magnetic materials, which is harmful to the thermal stability of magnetic devices. Here, we report the realization of positive temperature coefficient of magnetic anisotropy in a novel composite combining β-phase polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) with magnetostrictive materials (magnetostrictive film/PVDF bilayer structure). We ascribe the enhanced magnetic anisotropy of the magnetic film at elevated temperature to the st...

  16. Anomalous plasma transport due to electron temperature gradient instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Sinji; Ito, Hiroshi; Kamimura, Tetsuo.

    1979-01-01

    The collisionless drift wave instability driven by an electron temperature inhomogeneity (electron temperature gradient instability) and the enhanced transport processes associated with it are studied using a two-and-a-half dimensional particle simulation code. The simulation results show that quasilinear diffusion in phase space is an important mechanism for the saturation of the electron temperature gradient instability. Also, the instability yields particle fluxes toward the hot plasma regions. The heat conductivity of the electron temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field, T sub(e'), is not reduced by magnetic shear but remains high, whereas the heat conductivity of the parallel temperature, T sub(e''), is effectively reduced, and the instability stabilized. (author)

  17. Lower hybrid drift instability in a current sheet with anisotropic temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Feng; Liu Guohong; Yan Fei; Deng Yan; Chen Yinhua; Yu, M Y; Chen Hanshuang

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the temperature anisotropy on the lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) in a current sheet is investigated using local kinetic theory. It is found that the ratio r te of the perpendicular to parallel electron temperatures can significantly affect the instability. In fact, a critical value exists r te = r te * , such that when r te >r te * the LHD waves are unstable if the perpendicular wave vector k y is between two threshold values, and when r te te * the LHD mode is stable for any k y . It is also found that r te * increases and the unstable LHD regime shrinks as the parallel wave vector k z increases. That is, sufficiently low perpendicular electron temperature can stabilize the LHDI, especially that of short parallel wavelength. (paper)

  18. Temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropies in ultrathin Fe film on vicinal Si(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong-Sheng; He, Wei; Ye, Jun; Hu, Bo; Tang, Jin; Zhang, Xiang-Qun [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Cheng, Zhao-Hua, E-mail: zhcheng@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); School of Physical Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2017-05-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy of ultrathin Fe film with different thickness epitaxially grown on vicinal Si(111) substrate has been quantitatively investigated using the anisotropic magnetoresistance(AMR) measurements. Due to the effect of the vicinal substrate, the magnetic anisotropy is the superposition of a four-fold, a two-fold and a weakly six-fold contribution. It is found that the temperature dependence of the first-order magnetocrystalline anisotropies coefficient follows power laws of the reduced magnetization m(T)(=M(T)/M(0)) being consistent with the Callen and Callen's theory. However the temperature dependence of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA) shows novel behavior that decreases roughly as a function of temperature with different power law for samples with different thickness. We also found that the six-fold magnetocrystalline anisotropy is almost invariable over a wide temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different exponents are discussed.

  19. Temperature dependence of the interfacial magnetic anisotropy in W/CoFeB/MgO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Min Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in W/CoFeB (1.2 ∼ 3 nm/MgO thin film structures is strongly dependent on temperature, and is significantly reduced at high temperature. The interfacial magnetic anisotropy is generally proportional to the third power of magnetization, but an additional factor due to thermal expansion is required to explain the temperature dependence of the magnetic anisotropy of ultrathin CoFeB films. The reduction of the magnetic anisotropy is more prominent for the thinner films; as the temperature increases from 300 K to 400 K, the anisotropy is reduced ∼50% for the 1.2-nm-thick CoFeB, whereas the anisotropy is reduced ∼30% for the 1.7-nm-thick CoFeB. Such a substantial reduction of magnetic anisotropy at high temperature is problematic for data retention when incorporating W/CoFeB/MgO thin film structures into magneto-resistive random access memory devices. Alternative magnetic materials and structures are required to maintain large magnetic anisotropy at elevated temperatures.

  20. Temperature dependence of exchange anisotropy in monodisperse cobalt nanoparticles with a cobalt oxide shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spasova, M.; Wiedwald, U.; Farle, M.; Radetic, T.; Dahmen, U.; Hilgendorff, M.; Giersig, M.

    2004-01-01

    Exchange anisotropy was studied by SQUID magnetometry on an array of monodisperse colloidal nanoparticles consisting of a 7-8 nm diameter FCC Co core covered with a 2-2.5 nm thick FCC CoO shell. Temperature-dependent measurements of the exchange bias field show that the exchange anisotropy vanishes when a magnetic field was applied during cooling below 150 K. The suppression of exchange anisotropy is due to uncompensated interfacial antiferromagnetic spins

  1. Effect of temperature on anisotropy in forming simulations of aluminum alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurukuri, S.; Miroux, A.; Ghosh, M.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.

    2009-01-01

    A combined experimental and numerical study of the effect of temperature on anisotropy in warm forming of AA 6016-T4 aluminum was performed. The anisotropy coefficients of the Vegter yield function were calculated from crystal plasticity models with an adequate combination of extra slip systems.

  2. Temperature anisotropy in a cyclotron resonance heated tokamak plasma and the generation of poloidal electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, W.; Ono, M.; Chang, C.S.

    1994-11-01

    The temperature anisotropy generated by cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak plasmas is calculated and the poloidal equilibrium electric field due to the anisotropy is studied. For the calculation of anisotropic temperatures, bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck equation with a bi-Maxwellian distribution function of heated particles is solved, assuming a moderate wave power and a constant quasilinear cyclotron resonance diffusion coefficient. The poloidal electrostatic potential variation is found to be proportional to the particle density and the degree of temperature anisotropy of warm species created by cyclotron resonance heating

  3. Temperature-gradient instability induced by conducting end walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Ryutov, D.D.; Tsidulko, Yu.A.

    1990-04-01

    A new rapidly growing electron temperature gradient instability is found for a plasma in contact with a conducting wall. The linear instability analysis is presented and speculations are given for its nonlinear consequences. This instability illustrates that conducting walls can produce effects that are detrimental to plasma confinement. This mode should be of importance in open-ended systems including astrophysical plasmas, mirror machines and at the edge of tokamaks where field lines are open and are connected to limiters or divertors. 16 refs., 2 figs

  4. Absolute decay parametric instability of high-temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zozulya, A.A.; Silin, V.P.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

    1986-01-01

    A new absolute decay parametric instability having wide spatial localization region is shown to be possible near critical plasma density. Its excitation is conditioned by distributed feedback of counter-running Langmuir waves occurring during parametric decay of incident and reflected pumping wave components. In a hot plasma with the temperature of the order of kiloelectronvolt its threshold is lower than that of a known convective decay parametric instability. Minimum absolute instability threshold is shown to be realized under conditions of spatial parametric resonance of higher orders

  5. Influence of temperature on the Zircaloy-4 plastic anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limon, R.; Bechade, J.L.; Lehmann, S.; Maury, R.; Soniak, A.

    1995-01-01

    In order to improve the comportment modelling of PWR fuel pin, and more precisely their canning tubes, Framatome and the CEA have undertake an important study program of Zircaloy-4 mechanical properties. It includes in particular the study of the plasticity between 20 and 400 degree Celsius. This material being not isotropic because of the zirconium hexagonal crystal network and the texture presented by the canning tubes, its plastic anisotropy has been measured. The obtained results for the canning in *slack* and recrystallized before irradiation Zircaloy-4 are presented and the deformation systems able to explain the observed anisotropy is researched. (O.L.). 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  6. Studies of the trapped particle and ion temperature gradient instabilities in the Columbia Linear Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathey, O.H.

    1989-01-01

    In the first part of the work, the effects of weak Coulomb and neutral collisions on the collisionless curvature driven trapped particle mode are studied in the Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 1729, (1986)]. Low Coulomb collisionality yields a small stabilizing correction to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) collisionless mode, which scales as v, using the Krook model, and ν ec 1/2 using a Lorentz pitch angle operator. In higher collisionality regimes, both models tend to yield similar scalings. In view of relative high neutral collisionality in CLM, both types of collisionality are then combined, modeling neutral collisions with the conserving Krook and Coulomb collisions with a Lorentz model. The dispersion relation is then integrated over velocity space. This combination yields results in very good accord with the available experimental data. The Ion Temperature Gradient Instability is then investigated. It is shown that anisotropy in gradient has a substantial effect on the ion temperature gradient driven mode. A gradient in the parallel temperature is needed for an instability to occur, and a gradient in the perpendicular temperature gradient further enhances the instability indirectly as long as the frequency of the mode is near ion resonance. The physical reason for this important role difference is presented. The Columbia Linear Machine is being redesigned to produce and identify the ion temperature gradient driven η i mode. Using the expected parameters, the author has developed detailed predictions of the mode characteristics in the CLM. Strong multi mode instabilities are expected. As the ion parallel and perpendicular ion temperature gradients are expected to differ significantly, we differentiate between η i parallel and ν i perpendicular and explore the physical differences between them, which leads to a scheme for stabilization of the mode

  7. Temperature and carrier density dependence of anisotropy in supercurrent density in layered cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.P.; Tewari, B.S.; Ajay

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we have studied the effect of temperature and carrier density on anisotropy in supercurrent density in bilayer cuprate superconductors. Here, we have considered a tight binding bilayered Hubbard Hamiltonian containing intra and interlayer attractive interactions. The situation considered here is similar to a SIS junction. We have got the expressions for the superconducting order parameters, carrier density and anisotropy in superconducting density (I ab /I c ) for such SIS junction. The numerical analysis show that the anisotropy in the supercurrent density depends on temperature and carrier density in layered high T c cuprates. (author)

  8. Macroscopic Description of Pressure-anisotropy-driven Collective Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strasburg, Sean; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2000-01-01

    The macroscopic warm-fluid model developed by Lund and Davidson [Phys.Plasmas 5, 3028 (1998)] is used in the smooth-focusing approximation to investigate detailed stability properties of an intense charged particle beam with pressure anisotropy, assuming small-amplitude electrostatic perturbations about a waterbag equilibrium

  9. Reconstruction of CMB temperature anisotropies with primordial CMB induced polarization in galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Chin; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2016-07-01

    Scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation in galaxy clusters induces polarization signals determined by the quadrupole anisotropy in the photon distribution at the location of clusters. This `remote quadrupole' derived from the measurements of the induced polarization in galaxy clusters provides an opportunity to reconstruct local CMB temperature anisotropies. In this Letter, we develop an algorithm of the reconstruction through the estimation of the underlying primordial gravitational potential, which is the origin of the CMB temperature and polarization fluctuations and CMB induced polarization in galaxy clusters. We found a nice reconstruction for the quadrupole and octopole components of the CMB temperature anisotropies with the assistance of the CMB induced polarization signals. The reconstruction can be an important consistency test on the puzzles of CMB anomalies, especially for the low-quadrupole and axis-of-evil problems reported in Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and Planck data.

  10. Layering and temperature-dependent magnetization and anisotropy of naturally produced Ni/NiO multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappas, S. D.; Trachylis, D.; Velgakis, M. J. [Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Kapaklis, V.; Joensson, P. E.; Papaioannou, E. Th. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Delimitis, A. [Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute (CPERI), Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH), 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki (Greece); Poulopoulos, P. [Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem (Germany); Materials Science Department, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Fumagalli, P. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem (Germany); Politis, C. [Laboratory of High-Tech Materials, School of Engineering, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Ni/NiO multilayers were grown by magnetron sputtering at room temperature, with the aid of the natural oxidation procedure. That is, at the end of the deposition of each single Ni layer, air is let to flow into the vacuum chamber through a leak valve. Then, a very thin NiO layer ({approx}1.2 nm) is formed. Simulated x-ray reflectivity patterns reveal that layering is excellent for individual Ni-layer thickness larger than 2.5 nm, which is attributed to the intercalation of amorphous NiO between the polycrystalline Ni layers. The magnetization of the films, measured at temperatures 5-300 K, has almost bulk-like value, whereas the films exhibit a trend to perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) with an unusual significant positive interface anisotropy contribution, which presents a weak temperature dependence. The power-law behavior of the multilayers indicates a non-negligible contribution of higher order anisotropies in the uniaxial anisotropy. Bloch-law fittings for the temperature dependence of the magnetization in the spin-wave regime show that the magnetization in the multilayers decreases faster as a function of temperature than the one of bulk Ni. Finally, when the individual Ni-layer thickness decreases below 2 nm, the multilayer stacking vanishes, resulting in a dramatic decrease of the interface magnetic anisotropy and consequently in a decrease of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  11. Variation in the strain anisotropy of Zircaloy with temperature and strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.; Worswick, D.

    1984-01-01

    The strong crystallographic texture which is developed during the fabrication of zirconium-based alloys causes pronounced anisotropy in their mechanical properties, particularly deformation. The tendency for circular-section tension specimens with a high concentration of basal poles in one direction to become elliptical when deformed in tension has been used in this study to provide quantitative data on the effects of both strain and temperature on strain anisotropy. Tension tests were carried out over a temperature range of 293 to 1193 K on specimens machined from Zircaloy-2 plate. The strain anisotropy was found to increase markedly at temperatures over 923 K, reaching a maximum in the region of 1070 K. The strain anisotropy increased with increasing strain in this temperature region. The study was extended to Zircaloy-4 pressurized-water reactor fuel cladding by carrying out tube swelling tests and evaluating the axial deformation produced. Although scatter in the test results was higher than that exhibited in the tension tests, the general trend in the data was similar. The effects of the strain anisotropy observed are discussed in relation to the effects of temperature on the ductility of Zircaloy fuel cladding tubes during postulated largebreak loss-of-coolant accidents

  12. Variation in the strain anisotropy of Zircaloy with temperature and strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.; Worswick, D.

    1984-04-01

    Strain anisotropy was investigated at temperatures in the range 293 to 1117K in circular tensile specimens prepared from rolled Zircaloy-2 plate so that their tensile axes were parallel to and transverse to the rolling direction. The strain anisotropy factor for both types of specimen increased markedly in the high alpha phase region above 923K reaching a maximum at circa 1070K. Above this temperature in the alpha-plus-beta phase region the strain anisotropy decreased rapidly as the proportion of beta phase increased and was almost non-existent at 1173K. The strain anisotropy was markedly strain dependent, particularly in the high alpha phase region. The study was extended to Zircaloy-4 pressurized water reactor (PWR) 17 x 17 type fuel rod tubing specimens which were strained under biaxial conditions using cooling conditions which promoted uniform diametral strain over most of their lengths (circa 250 mm). In these circumstances the strain anisotropy is manifest by a reduction in length. Measurement of this change along with that in diameter and wall thickness produced data from which the strain anisotropy factor was calculated. The results, although influenced by additional factors discussed in the paper, were similar to those observed in the uniaxial Zircaloy-2 tensile tests. (author)

  13. TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY IN THE PRESENCE OF ULTRA LOW FREQUENCY WAVES IN THE TERRESTRIAL FORESHOCK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selzer, L. A.; Hnat, B.; Osman, K. T.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Eastwood, J. P.; Burgess, D.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first study of the correlation between elevated solar wind core plasma temperatures and temperature anisotropy in the terrestrial foreshock. Plasma temperature is enhanced near the fire hose marginal stability threshold in the presence of ultra low frequency (ULF) large amplitude magnetic perturbations, which are intrinsically right-hand circularly polarized. Direct comparison of contemporaneous anisotropic temperatures in the upstream solar wind and the foreshock suggests that the net heating of plasma is mediated via increase of the parallel temperature in the foreshock region where the ULF waves are present. We consider the possibility that a mechanism based on Landau damping, where solar wind plasma temperature parallel to the background magnetic field is increased by interaction with oblique compressible fast magneto-acoustic ULF waves, influences temperature anisotropy

  14. TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY IN THE PRESENCE OF ULTRA LOW FREQUENCY WAVES IN THE TERRESTRIAL FORESHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selzer, L. A.; Hnat, B.; Osman, K. T.; Nakariakov, V. M. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Eastwood, J. P. [Space and Atmospheric Physics, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Burgess, D., E-mail: L.A.Selzer@warwick.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-10

    We report the first study of the correlation between elevated solar wind core plasma temperatures and temperature anisotropy in the terrestrial foreshock. Plasma temperature is enhanced near the fire hose marginal stability threshold in the presence of ultra low frequency (ULF) large amplitude magnetic perturbations, which are intrinsically right-hand circularly polarized. Direct comparison of contemporaneous anisotropic temperatures in the upstream solar wind and the foreshock suggests that the net heating of plasma is mediated via increase of the parallel temperature in the foreshock region where the ULF waves are present. We consider the possibility that a mechanism based on Landau damping, where solar wind plasma temperature parallel to the background magnetic field is increased by interaction with oblique compressible fast magneto-acoustic ULF waves, influences temperature anisotropy.

  15. Relationship between Magnetic Anisotropy below Pseudogap Temperature and Short-Range Antiferromagnetic Order in High-Temperature Cuprate Superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinari, Takao

    2018-06-01

    The central issue in high-temperature cuprate superconductors is the pseudogap state appearing below the pseudogap temperature T*, which is well above the superconducting transition temperature. In this study, we theoretically investigate the rapid increase of the magnetic anisotropy below the pseudogap temperature detected by the recent torque-magnetometry measurements on YBa2Cu3Oy [Y. Sato et al., 10.1038/nphys4205" xlink:type="simple">Nat. Phys. 13, 1074 (2017)]. Applying the spin Green's function formalism including the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction arising from the buckling of the CuO2 plane, we obtain results that are in good agreement with the experiment and find a scaling relationship. Our analysis suggests that the characteristic temperature associated with the magnetic anisotropy, which coincides with T*, is not a phase transition temperature but a crossover temperature associated with the short-range antiferromagnetic order.

  16. Strong anisotropy in the low temperature Compton profiles of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Compton profiles of momentum distribution of conduction electrons in the orthorhombic phase of -Ga metal at low temperature are calculated in the band model for the three crystallographic directions (100), (010), and (001). Unlike the results at room temperature, previously reported by Lengeler, Lasser and Mair, the ...

  17. Strong anisotropy in the low temperature Compton profiles of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    able for comparison with theory, the resistivity data in α-Ga at low temperature strongly support this anisotropic ... renormalized free-atom (RFA) model [3], band model [5–7] and quantum Monte Carlo ... probability distribution function.

  18. The electron temperature and anisotropy in the solar wind. Comparison of the core and halo populations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pierrard, V.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Štverák, Štěpán; Maksimovic, M.; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 291, č. 7 (2016), s. 2165-2179 ISSN 0038-0938 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : solar wind * electron velocity distributions * temperature anisotropy Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.682, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11207-016-0961-7

  19. The Electron Temperature and Anisotropy in the Solar Wind. Comparison of the Core and Halo Populations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pierrard, V.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Štverák, Štěpán; Maksimovic, M.; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 291, č. 7 (2016), s. 2165-2179 ISSN 0038-0938 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-17490S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : solar wind * electron velocity distributions * temperature anisotropy Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.682, year: 2016

  20. Ponderomotive force effects on temperature-gradient-driven instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaram, A.K.; Hershkowitz, N.

    1992-01-01

    The modification of temperature-gradient-driven instabilities due to the presence of nonuniform radio-frequency fields near the ion cyclotron frequency is investigated in the linear regime. Employing the fluid theory, it is shown that the induced field line compression caused by ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) fields makes the net parallel compressibility positive, and thus provides a stabilizing influence on the ion-temperature-gradient-driven mode for an appropriately tailored profile of radio-frequency (rf) pressure. Concomitantly, the radial ponderomotive force generates an additional contribution via coupling between the perturbed fluid motion and the equilibrium ponderomotive force and this effect plays the role of dissipation to enhance or decrease the growth of temperature-gradient-driven modes depending upon the sign of rf pressure gradients. For decreased growth of temperature-gradient-driven instabilities, the plasma density gradients and rf pressure gradients must have opposite signs while enhancement in growth arises when both gradients have the same sign. Finally, the kinetic effects associated with these modes are briefly discussed

  1. Three-dimensional spin mapping of antiferromagnetic nanopyramids having spatially alternating surface anisotropy at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kangkang; Smith, Arthur R

    2012-11-14

    Antiferromagnets play a key role in modern spintronic devices owing to their ability to modify the switching behavior of adjacent ferromagnets via the exchange bias effect. Consequently, detailed measurements of the spin structure at antiferromagnetic interfaces and surfaces are highly desirable, not only for advancing technologies but also for enabling new insights into the underlying physics. Here using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy at room-temperature, we reveal in three-dimensions an orthogonal spin structure on antiferromagnetic compound nanopyramids. Contrary to expected uniaxial anisotropy based on bulk properties, the atomic terraces are found to have alternating in-plane and out-of-plane magnetic anisotropies. The observed layer-wise alternation in anisotropy could have strong influences on future nanoscale spintronic applications.

  2. Cross-correlation studies between CMB temperature anisotropies and 21 cm fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooray, Asantha

    2004-01-01

    During the transition from a neutral to a fully reionized universe, scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons via free electrons leads to a new anisotropy contribution to the temperature distribution. If the reionization process is inhomogeneous and patchy, the era of reionization is also visible via brightness temperature fluctuations in the redshifted 21 cm line emission from neutral hydrogen. Since regions containing electrons and neutral hydrogen are expected to trace the same underlying density field, the two are (anti)correlated and this is expected to be reflected in the anisotropy maps via a correlation between arcminute-scale CMB temperature and the 21 cm background. In terms of the angular cross-power spectrum, unfortunately, this correlation is insignificant due to a geometric cancellation associated with second-order CMB anisotropies. The same cross correlation between ionized and neutral regions, however, can be studied using a bispectrum involving large-scale velocity field of ionized regions from the Doppler effect, arcminute-scale CMB anisotropies during reionization, and the 21 cm background. While the geometric cancellation is partly avoided, the signal-to-noise ratio related to this bispectrum is reduced due to the large cosmic variance related to velocity fluctuations traced by the Doppler effect. Unless the velocity field during reionization can be independently established, it is unlikely that the correlation information related to the relative distribution of ionized electrons and regions containing neutral hydrogen can be obtained with a combined study involving CMB and 21 cm fluctuations

  3. Electron temperature gradient driven instability in the tokamak boundary plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.Q.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Diamond, P.H.

    1992-01-01

    A general method is developed for calculating boundary plasma fluctuations across a magnetic separatrix in a tokamak with a divertor or a limiter. The slab model, which assumes a periodic plasma in the edge reaching the divertor or limiter plate in the scrape-off layer(SOL), should provide a good estimate, if the radial extent of the fluctuation quantities across the separatrix to the edge is small compared to that given by finite particle banana orbit. The Laplace transform is used for solving the initial value problem. The electron temperature gradient(ETG) driven instability is found to grow like t -1/2 e γmt

  4. Anisotropy effects on curvature-driven flute instabilities in a hot-electron plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spong, D.A.; Berk, H.L.; Van Dam, J.W.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1982-08-01

    The effects of finite parallel temperature are investigated for a hot electron plasma with sufficiently large beta that the magnetic field scale length (Δ/sub B/) is small compared with the vacuum field radius of curvature (R). Numerical and analytical estimates of stability boundaries are obtained for the four possible modes that can be treated in this limit: the conventional hot electron interchange, the high frequency hot electron interchange (ω > ω/sub ci/), the compressional Alfven mode, and the interacting pressure-driven interchange

  5. Exploring thermal anisotropy of cortical bone using temperature measurements in drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Khurshid

    2016-05-12

    Bone drilling is widely used in orthopaedics for fracture treatment, reconstructive surgery and bone biopsy. Heat generation in bone drilling can cause rise in bone temperature resulting in prolonged healing time or loosening of fixation. The purpose of this study was to investigate thermal anisotropy of bone by measuring the level of temperature in bone drilling with and without cooling conditions in two anatomical directions. Drilling tests were performed on bovine cortical bone. A total of fifteen specimens were used to obtain data for statistical analysis. Temperature near the cutting zone was measured in two anatomical directions. i.e. along the longitudinal and circumferential direction. Temperature distribution was also found in the two prescribed directions. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to identify significant drilling parameter affecting bone temperature. Drilling speed, feed rate and drill size were found influential parameters affecting bone temperature. Higher drilling speed, feed rate, and large drill size were found to cause elevated temperature in bone. Much lower temperature was measured in bone when cooling fluid was supplied to the drilling region. Experimental results revealed lower temperatures in the circumferential direction compared to the longitudinal direction. Thermal anisotropy for heat transport was found in the bone. This study recommends lower drilling speed and feed rate and cooling for controlling rise in bone temperature.

  6. Nonlinear δf Simulation Studies of Intense Charged Particle Beams with Large Temperature Anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Qin, Hong

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a 3-D nonlinear perturbative particle simulation code (BEST) [H. Qin, R.C. Davidson and W.W. Lee, Physical Review Special Topics on Accelerators and Beams 3 (2000) 084401] is used to systematically study the stability properties of intense nonneutral charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy (T perpendicularb >> T parallelb ). The most unstable modes are identified, and their eigenfrequencies, radial mode structure, and nonlinear dynamics are determined for axisymmetric perturbations with ∂/∂θ = 0

  7. Solar wind proton temperature anisotropy: Linear theory and WIND/SWE observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel; Kasper, J. C.; Lazarus, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 9 (2006), L09101/1-L09101/4 ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA3042403 Grant - others:ESA(XE) PECS 98024; NASA (US) NAG-10915 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : proton temperature anisotropy * solar wind * in situ observations Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.602, year: 2006

  8. Bias temperature instability in tunnel field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizubayashi, Wataru; Mori, Takahiro; Fukuda, Koichi; Ishikawa, Yuki; Morita, Yukinori; Migita, Shinji; Ota, Hiroyuki; Liu, Yongxun; O'uchi, Shinichi; Tsukada, Junichi; Yamauchi, Hiromi; Matsukawa, Takashi; Masahara, Meishoku; Endo, Kazuhiko

    2017-04-01

    We systematically investigated the bias temperature instability (BTI) of tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs). The positive BTI and negative BTI mechanisms in TFETs are the same as those in metal-oxide-semiconductor FETs (MOSFETs). In TFETs, although traps are generated in high-k gate dielectrics by the bias stress and/or the interface state is degraded at the interfacial layer/channel interface, the threshold voltage (V th) shift due to BTI degradation is caused by the traps and/or the degradation of the interface state locating the band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) region near the source/gate edge. The BTI lifetime in n- and p-type TFETs is improved by applying a drain bias corresponding to the operation conditions.

  9. Temperature-Dependent Three-Dimensional Anisotropy of the Magnetoresistance in WTe_{2}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoutam, L R; Wang, Y L; Xiao, Z L; Das, S; Luican-Mayer, A; Divan, R; Crabtree, G W; Kwok, W K

    2015-07-24

    Extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR) was recently discovered in WTe_{2}, triggering extensive research on this material regarding the XMR origin. Since WTe_{2} is a layered compound with metal layers sandwiched between adjacent insulating chalcogenide layers, this material has been considered to be electronically two-dimensional (2D). Here we report two new findings on WTe_{2}: (1) WTe_{2} is electronically 3D with a mass anisotropy as low as 2, as revealed by the 3D scaling behavior of the resistance R(H,θ)=R(ϵ_{θ}H) with ϵ_{θ}=(cos^{2}θ+γ^{-2}sin^{2}θ)^{1/2}, θ being the magnetic field angle with respect to the c axis of the crystal and γ being the mass anisotropy and (2) the mass anisotropy γ varies with temperature and follows the magnetoresistance behavior of the Fermi liquid state. Our results not only provide a general scaling approach for the anisotropic magnetoresistance but also are crucial for correctly understanding the electronic properties of WTe_{2}, including the origin of the remarkable "turn-on" behavior in the resistance versus temperature curve, which has been widely observed in many materials and assumed to be a metal-insulator transition.

  10. Effects of ion temperature anisotropy on the interhemispheric plasma transport during plasmaspheric refilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.; Torr, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Effects of temperature anisotropies on the early stage refilling of the outer plasmasphere are studied by solving an appropriate set of hydrodynamic equations. The anisotropies result from the supersonic outflows from the conjugate ionospheres and from the perpendicular ion heating in the equatorial region. The equatorial ion heating affected by wave-particle interaction is included phenomenologically. Even for the equatorial heating associated with moderate wave levels, the mirror force on the flows severely limits the interhemispheric plasma exchange. The temporal evolution of the flow developing in an empty flux tube is characterized by: (1) supersonic plasma outflows from the conjugate ionospheres, (2) reflections of the flows by the mirror force as they begin to penetrate into the opposite hemispheres, (3) formation of shocks in the reflection region and (4) propagations of the shocks to the ionospheres of the origins of the flows. In the quasi-steady state when flow completely subsides, the density distribution in the flux tube shows distinctive large-scale features, determined by the balance between electric, pressure and anisotropy forces. The latter force becomes significant in a broad equatorial region where T t >> T p and also at relatively high geomagnetic latitudes where T t p ; T t and T p are the perpendicular and parallel ion temperatures, respectively

  11. Large diffusion anisotropy and orientation sorting of phosphorene nanoflakes under a temperature gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yingyan; Chang, Tienchong; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Cai, Yongqing; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2018-01-25

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the motion of phosphorene nanoflakes on a large graphene substrate under a thermal gradient. It is found that the atomic interaction between the graphene substrate and the phosphorene nanoflake generates distinct rates of motion for phosphorene nanoflakes with different orientations. Remarkably, for square phosphorene nanoflakes, the motion of zigzag-oriented nanoflakes is 2-fold faster than those of armchair-oriented and randomly-oriented nanoflakes. This large diffusion anisotropy suggests that sorting of phosphorene nanoflakes into specific orientations can be realized by a temperature gradient. The findings here provide interesting insights into strong molecular diffusion anisotropy and offer a novel route for manipulating two-dimensional materials.

  12. Strength and Anisotropy in Tournemire Shale: Temperature, Pressure and Time Dependences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnelye, A.; Schubnel, A.; Zhi, G.; David, C.; Dick, P.

    2017-12-01

    Time and temperature dependent rock deformation has both scientific and socio-economic implications for natural hazards, the oil and gas industry and nuclear waste disposal. During the past decades, most studies on brittle creep have focused on igneous rocks and porous sedimentary rocks. To our knowledge, only few studies have been carried out on the brittle creep behavior of shale. We conducted a series of creep experiments on shale specimens coming from the French Institute for Nuclear Safety (IRSN) underground research laboratory located in Tournemire, France, under two different temperatures (26°C, 75°C) and confining pressures (10 MPa, 80 MPa), for three orientations (σ1along, perpendicular and 45° to bedding). In these long-term experiments (approximately 10 days), stress and strains were recorded continuously, while ultrasonic acoustic velocities were recorded every 1 15 minutes. The brittle creep failure stress of our Tournemire shale samples was systematically observed 50% higher than its short-term peak strength, with larger final axial strain accumulated. During creep, ultrasonic wave velocities first decreased, and then increased gradually. The magnitude of elastic wave velocity variations showed an important orientation and temperature dependence: velocities measured perpendicular to bedding showed increased variation, variation that was enhanced at higher temperature and higher pressure. The case of complete elastic anisotropy reversal was observed for sample deformed perpendicular to bedding, with amount of axial strain needed to reach anisotropy reversal reduced at higher temperature. SEM observations highlight the competition between crack growth, sealing/healing, and possibly mineral rotation, pressure solution or anisotropic compaction during creep defromation. Our study highlights that the short-term peak strength has little meaning in shale material, which can over-consolidate importantly by `plastic' flow. In addition, we show that elastic

  13. Modelling temporal variance of component temperatures and directional anisotropy over vegetated canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Zunjian; du, yongming; li, hua

    2016-04-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) as a key variable plays an important role on hydrological, meteorology and climatological study. Thermal infrared directional anisotropy is one of essential factors to LST retrieval and application on longwave radiance estimation. Many approaches have been proposed to estimate directional brightness temperatures (DBT) over natural and urban surfaces. While less efforts focus on 3-D scene and the surface component temperatures used in DBT models are quiet difficult to acquire. Therefor a combined 3-D model of TRGM (Thermal-region Radiosity-Graphics combined Model) and energy balance method is proposed in the paper for the attempt of synchronously simulation of component temperatures and DBT in the row planted canopy. The surface thermodynamic equilibrium can be final determined by the iteration strategy of TRGM and energy balance method. The combined model was validated by the top-of-canopy DBTs using airborne observations. The results indicated that the proposed model performs well on the simulation of directional anisotropy, especially the hotspot effect. Though we find that the model overestimate the DBT with Bias of 1.2K, it can be an option as a data reference to study temporal variance of component temperatures and DBTs when field measurement is inaccessible

  14. Effects of temperature anisotropy on neoclassical transport in the plateau and banana-plateau regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Masayoshi

    1999-01-01

    The neoclassical transport theory in a presence of temperature anisotropy is investigated in the low to the intermediate collision frequency regimes for a large aspect-ratio tokamak plasma. The standard procedure for an isotropic plasma in the plateau regime is extended to an anisotropic plasma, and the neoclassical transport coefficients in this regime are explicitly calculated. By interpolating the results in the plateau regime and the previously obtained ones in the banana regime, the expressions for the neoclassical transport coefficients which are continuously valid from the banana to the plateau regimes are presented. (author)

  15. Influence of anisotropy effect and internal stresses upon the superconductive critical temperature of plastically deformed tin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.; Stangler, F.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of plastic deformation on the superconductive critical temperature of tin single crystals has been investigated experimentally. It was shown by measurements that the lattice defects produced by plastic deformation lead to an anisotropy effect (according to the theory of Markowitz and Kadanoff), as do impurities in alloyed material. The decrease in T/sub c/ due to this effect can be measured, however, only with samples of certain special orientations. Samples with other orientations show an increase in T/sub c/, which can be explained by the assumption of internal stresses from dislocation pileups. A model is discussed which accounts for the measured rise in T/sub c/

  16. In-plane magnetic anisotropy and temperature dependence of switching field in (Ga, Mn) as ferromagnetic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamara, S; Terki, F; Dumas, R; Dehbaoui, M; Sadowski, J; Galéra, R M; Tran, Q-H; Charar, S

    2012-06-01

    We explore the magnetic anisotropy of GaMnAs ferromagnetic semiconductor by Planar Hall Effect (PHE) measurements. Using low magnitude of applied magnetic field (i.e., when the magnitude H is smaller than both cubic Hc and uniaxial Hu anisotropy field), we have observed various shapes of applied magnetic field direction dependence of Planar Hall Resistance (PHR). In particular, in two regions of temperature. At T Tc/2 the "zigzag-shape" signal of PHR. They reflect different magnetic anisotropy and provide information about magnetization reversal process in GaMnAs ferromagnetic semiconductor. The theoretical model calculation of PHR based on the free energy density reproduces well the experimental data. We report also the temperature dependence of anisotropy constants and magnetization orientations. The transition of easy axis from biaxial to uniaxiale axes has been observed and confirmed by SQUID measurements.

  17. Direct Observation of Field and Temperature Induced Domain Replication in Dipolar Coupled Perpendicular Anisotropy Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauet, T.; Gunther, C.M.; Pfau, B.; Eisebitt, S.; Fischer, P.; Rick, R. L.; Thiele, J.-U.; Hellwig, O.; Schabes, M.E.

    2007-07-01

    Dipolar interactions in a soft/Pd/hard [CoNi/Pd]{sub 30}/Pd/[Co/Pd]{sub 20} multilayer system, where a thick Pd layer between two ferromagnetic units prevents direct exchange coupling, are directly revealed by combining magnetometry and state-of-the-art layer resolving soft x-ray imaging techniques with sub-100-nm spatial resolution. The domains forming in the soft layer during external magnetic field reversal are found to match the domains previously trapped in the hard layer. The low Curie temperature of the soft layer allows varying its intrinsic parameters via temperature and thus studying the competition with dipolar fields due to the domains in the hard layer. Micromagnetic simulations elucidate the role of [CoNi/Pd] magnetization, exchange, and anisotropy in the duplication process. Finally, thermally driven domain replication in remanence during temperature cycling is demonstrated.

  18. Temperature dependence of the magnetic anisotropy of metallic Y-Ba-Cu-O single crystals in the normal phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miljak, M.; Zlatic, V.; Kos, I.; Aviani, I.; Hamzic, A.; Collin, G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnetic anisotropy measurements of metallic Y-Ba-Cu-O compounds in the normal phase reveal a temperature-dependent diamagnetic component of the susceptibility that increases with decreasing temperature. The temperature variation of the susceptibility anisotropy and its total change do not seem to be much affected by the presence of the superconductivity at some lower temperature and could not be accounted for by superconducting fluctuations. Rather, the data remind one of the behavior of some quasi-two-dimensional metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces, reflecting the properties of the low-energy excitations in the normal phase. The anisotropy measurements above the bulk superconducting transition temperature T c reveal the nonlinear effects, which are due to the onset of superconductivity in disconnected grains. The existence of a two-step transition, typical for granular superconductors, should be taken into consideration if the normal-phase susceptibility data are compared with the theoretical predictions in the vicinity of T c

  19. The temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy of Nd-Fe-B thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takuya; Hashimoto, Ryuji; Tanaka, Yoshitomo; Suzuki, Kenichi; Enokido, Yasushi; Choi, Kyung-Ku; Suzuki, Takao

    2018-05-01

    The magnetic properties of Nd-Fe-B thin films with the three different compositions (#1: Nd12.6Fe81.5B5.9, #2: Nd14.6Fe78.1B7.4 and #3: Nd22.6Fe66.2B11.2) are discussed. With increasing Nd content, the c-axis orientation along the film normal is enhanced. It is found that sample #2 possesses the saturation magnetization Ms very close to that for Nd2Fe14B over a temperature range from 100 to about 300K. The magnetic anisotropy constant Ku2 for sample #2 is the highest among those samples, but smaller by about 20%, as compared to that for Nd2Fe14B. It is of interest to note that the temperature TR at which Ku1 changes its sign is lower by about 30K as compared to that previously reported for Nd2Fe14B. The reason for this discrepancy is not clear, but could be due to the presence of the minority phases of Nd-rich compounds and also a possible contribution of the magneto-elastic effect to the net magnetic anisotropy.

  20. Flexibl Pavement Analysis Considering Temperature Profile and Anisotropy Behavior in Hot Mix Asphalt Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Joonho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A three Dimensional finite element model (FEM incorporating the anisotropic properties and temperature profile of hot mix asphalt (HMA pavement was developed to predict the structural responses of HMA pavement subject to heavy loads typically encountered in the field. In this study, ABAQUS was adopted to model the stress and strain relationships within the pavement structure. The results of the model were verified using data collected from the Korean Highway Corporation Test Road (KHCTR. The results demonstrated that both the base course and surface course layers follow the anisotropic behavior and the incorporation of the temperature profile throughout the pavement has a substantial effect on the pavement response predictions that impact pavement design. The results also showed that the anisotropy level of HMA and base material can be reduced to as low as 80% and 15% as a result of repeated loading, respectively.

  1. Anisotropy and temperature dependence of structural, thermodynamic, and elastic properties of crystalline cellulose Iβ: a first-principles investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ShunLi Shang; Louis G. Hector Jr.; Paul Saxe; Zi-Kui Liu; Robert J. Moon; Pablo D. Zavattieri

    2014-01-01

    Anisotropy and temperature dependence of structural, thermodynamic and elastic properties of crystalline cellulose Iβ were computed with first-principles density functional theory (DFT) and a semi-empirical correction for van der Waals interactions. Specifically, we report the computed temperature variation (up to 500...

  2. RELATIVISTIC CYCLOTRON INSTABILITY IN ANISOTROPIC PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, Rodrigo A.; Moya, Pablo S.; Muñoz, Víctor; Valdivia, J. Alejandro [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Navarro, Roberto E.; Araneda, Jaime A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Viñas, Adolfo F., E-mail: rlopez186@gmail.com [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    A sufficiently large temperature anisotropy can sometimes drive various types of electromagnetic plasma micro-instabilities, which can play an important role in the dynamics of relativistic pair plasmas in space, astrophysics, and laboratory environments. Here, we provide a detailed description of the cyclotron instability of parallel propagating electromagnetic waves in relativistic pair plasmas on the basis of a relativistic anisotropic distribution function. Using plasma kinetic theory and particle-in-cell simulations, we study the influence of the relativistic temperature and the temperature anisotropy on the collective and noncollective modes of these plasmas. Growth rates and dispersion curves from the linear theory show a good agreement with simulations results.

  3. High field magnetic anisotropy in praseodymium gallium garnet at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Yue Yuan; Liu Gongqiang

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → A detailed analysis of crystal field effect is presented, and a set of new crystal field parameters is given to study the magnetic behaviors of the paramagnetic praseodymium gallium garnet (PrGaG). → The contribution of the exchange interaction between the praseodymium ions to the magnetic properties of PrGaG is further explored. Meanwhile, some characteristics of exchange interaction are revealed. → With the consideration of crystal field and exchange interaction, the available experiments are successfully fitted by our theoretical model. → Our theory suggests that PrGaG is ferromagnetic ordering at low temperatures, and the exchange interaction is anisotropic. - Abstract: In this paper, with the consideration of crystal field and exchange interaction between the rare-earth Pr 3+ ions, the magnetic anisotropy in praseodymium gallium garnet (PrGaG) in high magnetic fields and at low temperatures is theoretically analyzed. A set of relatively suitable CF parameters is obtained by studying the influence of the variations of nine CF parameters on the magnetization. However, only taking crystal field effect into account, theoretical calculations indicate that the experiments cannot be excellently interpreted. Then, the exchange interaction between Pr 3+ ion, which can be described as an effective exchange field H v = vM = vχH e = ηH e , is further considered. On the other hand, by evaluating the variation of the parameter η with the magnetic fields, our theory implies that PrGaG exhibits ferrimagnetic ordering at low temperatures, and the exchange interaction in PrGaG displays obvious anisotropy. Also, the theoretical data show better agreements with the experimental results.

  4. A SEARCH FOR CONCENTRIC CIRCLES IN THE 7 YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE TEMPERATURE SKY MAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehus, I. K.; Eriksen, H. K.

    2011-01-01

    In this Letter, we search for concentric circles with low variance in cosmic microwave background sky maps. The detection of such circles would hint at new physics beyond the current cosmological concordance model, which states that the universe is isotropic and homogeneous, and filled with Gaussian fluctuations. We first describe a set of methods designed to detect such circles, based on matched filters and χ 2 statistics, and then apply these methods to the best current publicly available data, the 7 year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) temperature sky maps. We compare the observations with an ensemble of 1000 Gaussian ΛCDM simulations. Based on these tests, we conclude that the WMAP sky maps are fully compatible with the Gaussian and isotropic hypothesis as measured by low-variance ring statistics.

  5. Coasting characteristic of the flywheel system under anisotropy effect of bulk high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J. F.; Li, Y.

    2014-10-01

    High-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) array with aligned growth section boundary (GSB) pattern (AGSBP) exhibits larger levitation force and suppression of levitation force decay above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG) compared with misaligned GSB pattern (MGSBP) has been studied in maglev train application (Zheng et al., 2013). This result maybe helpful and support a new way for the HTS bearing design for flywheel systems. So, in this paper, we further examine this growth anisotropy effect on the maglev performance of flywheel system. Levitation force and coasting time were investigated from the point-view of HTS flywheel applications. The GS/GSB alignment of AGSBP bulk HTSCs produces larger levitation force than that of MGSBP, but the coasting time is shorter than that of MGSBP, that is to say, the electric magnetic drag force with AGSBP is larger than that of MGSBP. This result may also exist in the maglev guideline when the maglev train stops freely.

  6. Simulation and quasilinear theory of proton firehose instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seough, Jungjoon [Korean Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Faculty of Human Development, University of Toyama, 3190, Gofuku, Toyama City, Toyama, 930-8555 (Japan); Yoon, Peter H. [University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Junga [Korean Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Korea, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    The electromagnetic proton firehose instability is driven by excessive parallel temperature anisotropy, T{sub ∥} > T{sub ⊥} (or more precisely, parallel pressure anisotropy, P{sub ∥} > P{sub ⊥}) in high-beta plasmas. Together with kinetic instabilities driven by excessive perpendicular temperature anisotropy, namely, electromagnetic proton cyclotron and mirror instabilities, its role in providing the upper limit for the temperature anisotropy in the solar wind is well-known. A recent Letter [Seough et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 071103 (2013)] employed quasilinear kinetic theory for these instabilities to explain the observed temperature anisotropy upper bound in the solar wind. However, the validity of quasilinear approach has not been rigorously tested until recently. In a recent paper [Seough et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 062118 (2014)], a comparative study is carried out for the first time in which quasilinear theory of proton cyclotron instability is tested against results obtained from the particle-in-cell simulation method, and it was demonstrated that the agreement was rather excellent. The present paper addresses the same issue involving the proton firehose instability. Unlike the proton cyclotron instability, however, it is found that the quasilinear approximation enjoys only a limited range of validity, especially for the wave dynamics and for the relatively high-beta regime. Possible causes and mechanisms responsible for the discrepancies are speculated and discussed.

  7. Saha and temperature relaxation approximations for the study of ionization instability in partially ionized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numano, M.

    1976-01-01

    The growth rates for the ionization instability obtained using the Saha and temperature relaxation approximations are compared with those obtained from an exact treatment, and the requirements for validity of these two approximations are obtained analytically. For the range of plasma parameters pertinent to MHD power generation it is found that the Saha approximation is valid for relatively high electron temperature, which it becomes inapplicable as the electron temperature is decreased. On the other hand, the temperature relaxation approximation is accurate over a wide range of electron temperature. It is found also that the marginal condition for the ionization instability is correctly obtained from both approximations. (author)

  8. Influence of temperature on the Zircaloy-4 plastic anisotropy; Influence de la temperature sur l`anisotropie plastique du Zircaloy-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limon, R.; Bechade, J.L.; Lehmann, S.; Maury, R.; Soniak, A. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Direction des Technologies Avancees; Mardon, J.P. [Societe Franco-Americaine de Constructions Atomiques (FRAMATOME), 92 - Paris-La-Defense (France)

    1995-12-31

    In order to improve the comportment modelling of PWR fuel pin, and more precisely their canning tubes, Framatome and the CEA have undertake an important study program of Zircaloy-4 mechanical properties. It includes in particular the study of the plasticity between 20 and 400 degree Celsius. This material being not isotropic because of the zirconium hexagonal crystal network and the texture presented by the canning tubes, its plastic anisotropy has been measured. The obtained results for the canning in *slack* and recrystallized before irradiation Zircaloy-4 are presented and the deformation systems able to explain the observed anisotropy is researched. (O.L.). 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Magnetic anisotropy and pressure dependence of the order temperature in the Gd3(FeTi)29 compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morellon, L.; Arnold, Z.; Pareti, L.; Albertini, F.; Paoluzi, A.

    1995-01-01

    In this work we report ac initial magnetic susceptibility under pressure, singular point detection (SPD) and linear thermal expansion measurements in the Gd 3 (FeTi) 29 intermetallic compound. From these measurements we have determined the anisotropy field, the order temperature and its pressure dependence. The thermal expansion measurement shows an Invar-like anomaly at the order temperature, T C =520 K, which decreases under increasing pressure with a slope of dT C /dp=-2.7 K/kbar. As the Gd 3+ ion is isotropic, no contribution to the anisotropy from the 4f sublattice is expected and low values of the anisotropy fields have been observed. (orig.)

  10. Temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy and magnetostriction: Beyond the mean-field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millev, Y.; Faehnle, M.

    1994-05-01

    The first nonvanishing magnetic anisotropy coefficient is calculated as a function of temperature for any spin quantum number and all temperatures below the Curie temperature for the case of face-centred cubic symmetry within the random-phase approximation (RPA). A detailed and instructive comparison between the mean-field and the RPA predictions is carried out. The RPA magnetization curves are also given for the first time for spins S>1/2. Most of the theoretical considerations are quite general as regard lattice type and even decoupling scheme and can thus be applied straightforwardly to other cases of interest. The progress reported here has been attained with the help of a new simplified and improved parametric approach and of a recent calculation of the average occupation number of magnons within the RPA. In particular, the new approach makes unnecessary the solving of integral equations so that the proposed procedure is especially simple and practically versatile in applications to any particular anisotropic material. (author). Refs, 6 figs

  11. Three-dimensional numerical studies of the temperature anisotropy instability in intense charged particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Qin, Hong

    2005-01-01

    In neutral plasmas with a uniform magnetic field and strongly anisotropic distribution function (T parallel /T perpendicular 0 <<1). Such high-intensity beams are relevant to next-step experiments such as the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX), which would serve as proof-of-principal experiment for heavy-ion fusion

  12. Evolution of the solar wind proton temperature anisotropy from 0.3 to 2.5 AU

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matteini, L.; Landi, S.; Hellinger, Petr; Pantellini, F.; Maksimovic, M.; Velli, M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Marsch, E.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 20 (2007), L20105/1-L20105/5 ISSN 0094-8276 Grant - others:ASI(IT) I/015/07/0 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Proton temperature anisotropy * solar wind * radial evolution * observations Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.744, year: 2007

  13. Absolute and convective instability of a liquid sheet with transverse temperature gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Qing-Fei; Yang, Li-Jun; Tong, Ming-Xi; Wang, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The spatial–temporal instability of a liquid sheet with thermal effects was studied. • The flow can transit to absolutely unstable with certain flow parameters. • The effects of non-dimensional parameters on the transition were studied. -- Abstract: The spatial–temporal instability behavior of a viscous liquid sheet with temperature difference between the two surfaces was investigated theoretically. The practical situation motivating this investigation is liquid sheet heated by ambient gas, usually encountered in industrial heat transfer and liquid propellant rocket engines. The existing dispersion relation was used, to explore the spatial–temporal instability of viscous liquid sheets with a nonuniform temperature profile, by setting both the wave number and frequency complex. A parametric study was performed in both sinuous and varicose modes to test the influence of dimensionless numbers on the transition between absolute and convective instability of the flow. For a small value of liquid Weber number, or a great value of gas-to-liquid density ratio, the flow was found to be absolutely unstable. The absolute instability was enhanced by increasing the liquid viscosity. It was found that variation of the Marangoni number hardly influenced the absolute instability of the sinuous mode of oscillations; however it slightly affected the absolute instability in the varicose mode

  14. Crystalline instability of Bi-2212 superconducting whiskers near room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cagliero, Stefano; Khan, Mohammad Mizanur Rahman; Agostino, Angelo; Truccato, Marco; Orsini, Francesco; Marinone, Massimo; Poletti, Giulio; Lascialfari, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    We report new evidences for the thermodynamic instability of whisker crystals in the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BSCCO) system. Annealing treatments at 90 C have been performed on two sets of samples, which were monitored by means of X-rays diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, respectively. Two main crystalline domains of Bi 2 Sr 2 CuCa 2 O 8+x (Bi-2212) were identified in the samples by the XRD data, which underwent an evident crystalline segregation after about 60 hours. Very fast dynamics of the surface modifications was also described by the AFM monitoring. Two typologies of surface structures formed after about 3 annealing hours: continuous arrays of dome shaped bodies were observed along the edges of the whiskers, while in the central regions a dense texture of flat bodies was found. These modifications are described in terms of the formation of simple oxide clusters involving a degradation of the internal layers. (orig.)

  15. Coasting characteristic of the flywheel system under anisotropy effect of bulk high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J.F.; Li, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Coasting time was investigated from the point-view of HTS flywheel applications. • The coasting time of aligned growth section boundary pattern (AGSBP) is shorter than that of MGSBP. • The electric magnetic drag force with AGSBP is larger than that of MGSBP. • This result may also exist in the maglev guideline when the maglev train stops freely. - Abstract: High-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) array with aligned growth section boundary (GSB) pattern (AGSBP) exhibits larger levitation force and suppression of levitation force decay above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG) compared with misaligned GSB pattern (MGSBP) has been studied in maglev train application (Zheng et al., 2013). This result maybe helpful and support a new way for the HTS bearing design for flywheel systems. So, in this paper, we further examine this growth anisotropy effect on the maglev performance of flywheel system. Levitation force and coasting time were investigated from the point-view of HTS flywheel applications. The GS/GSB alignment of AGSBP bulk HTSCs produces larger levitation force than that of MGSBP, but the coasting time is shorter than that of MGSBP, that is to say, the electric magnetic drag force with AGSBP is larger than that of MGSBP. This result may also exist in the maglev guideline when the maglev train stops freely

  16. Coasting characteristic of the flywheel system under anisotropy effect of bulk high temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J.F., E-mail: wujf@ciomp.ac.cn; Li, Y.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Coasting time was investigated from the point-view of HTS flywheel applications. • The coasting time of aligned growth section boundary pattern (AGSBP) is shorter than that of MGSBP. • The electric magnetic drag force with AGSBP is larger than that of MGSBP. • This result may also exist in the maglev guideline when the maglev train stops freely. - Abstract: High-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) array with aligned growth section boundary (GSB) pattern (AGSBP) exhibits larger levitation force and suppression of levitation force decay above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG) compared with misaligned GSB pattern (MGSBP) has been studied in maglev train application (Zheng et al., 2013). This result maybe helpful and support a new way for the HTS bearing design for flywheel systems. So, in this paper, we further examine this growth anisotropy effect on the maglev performance of flywheel system. Levitation force and coasting time were investigated from the point-view of HTS flywheel applications. The GS/GSB alignment of AGSBP bulk HTSCs produces larger levitation force than that of MGSBP, but the coasting time is shorter than that of MGSBP, that is to say, the electric magnetic drag force with AGSBP is larger than that of MGSBP. This result may also exist in the maglev guideline when the maglev train stops freely.

  17. Covalent magnetism, exchange interactions and anisotropy of the high temperature layered antiferromagnet MnB₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmelevskyi, S; Mohn, P

    2012-01-11

    The investigation of the electronic structure and magnetism for the compound MnB(2) with crystal structure type AlB(2) has been revisited to resolve contradictions between various experimental and theoretical results present in the literature. We find that MnB(2) exhibits an interesting example of a Kübler's covalent magnetism (Williams et al 1981 J. Appl. Phys. 52 2069). The covalent magnetism also appears to be the source of some disagreement between the calculated values of the magnetic moments and those given by neutron diffraction experiments. We show that this shortcoming is due to the atomic sphere approximation applied in earlier calculations. The application of the disordered local moment approach and the calculation of the inter-atomic exchange interactions within the Liechtenstein formalism reveal strong local moment antiferromagnetism with a high Néel temperature predicted from Monte Carlo simulations. A fully relativistic band structure calculation and then the application of the torque method yields a strong in-plane anisotropy of the Mn magnetic moments. The agreement of these results with neutron diffraction studies rules out any possible weak itinerant electron magnetism scenarios as proposed earlier for MnB(2).

  18. Percolation temperature and the 'instability' of the effective potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, C.A. de; Bazeia Filho, D.; Eboli, O.J.P.; Marques, G.C.; Silva, A.J. da; Ventura, I.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that in spontaneously broken lambda phi 4 theory the percolation temperature coincides with the temperature at which the semiclassical (loop) expansion of the effective potential (free energy) of the system around a uniform field configuration fails. This allows us to extract the percolation temperature directly from the effective potential. The addition of fermions or gauge fields does not alter the result as long as they are weakly coupled to the scalars. The coincidence holds in the high temperature limit at every order in the loop expansion. (Author) [pt

  19. Determination of an instability temperature for alloys in the cooling gas of a high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimmer, H.; Grman, D.; Krompholz, K.; Zimmermann, U.; Ullrich, G.

    1985-05-01

    High temperature alloys designed to be used for components in the primary circuit of a helium cooled high temperature nuclear reactor show massive CO production above a certain temperature, called the instability temperature T/sub i/, which increases with increasing partial pressure of CO in the cooling gas. At p/sub CO/ = 15 microbar, T/sub i/ lies between 900 and 950 degrees C for the four alloys under investigation: T/sub i/ is lowest for the iron base alloy Incoloy 800 H and increases for the nickel base alloys in the order Inconel 617, HDA 230 and Nimonic 86. Measurements of T/sub i/ made at 3 different laboratories were compared and shown to agree for p/sub CO/ 25 microbar, compatible with CO production by a reaction of Cr2O3 with carbides. Some measurements of T/sub i/ on HDA 230 and Nimonic 86 were performed in the course of simulated reactor disturbances. They showed that the oxide layer looses its protective properties above T/sub i/. A highlight of the examinations was the detection of eta-carbides (M6C) with unusual properties. M6C is the only type of carbide occuring in HDA 230. An eta-carbide with a lattice constant of 1088.8 pm had developed at the surface of Nimonic 86 during pre-oxidation before the disturbance simulation. Its composition is estimated at Ni3SiMo2C. Eta-carbides containing Si and especially eta-carbides with lattice constants as low as 1088.8 pm have been described only rarely until now. (author)

  20. A Bayesian approach to infer the radial distribution of temperature and anisotropy in the transition zone from seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drilleau, M.; Beucler, E.; Mocquet, A.; Verhoeven, O.; Moebs, G.; Burgos, G.; Montagner, J.

    2013-12-01

    Mineralogical transformations and matter transfers within the Earth's mantle make the 350-1000 km depth range (considered here as the mantle transition zone) highly heterogeneous and anisotropic. Most of the 3-D global tomographic models are anchored on small perturbations from 1-D models such as PREM, and are secondly interpreted in terms of temperature and composition distributions. However, the degree of heterogeneity in the transition zone can be strong enough so that the concept of a 1-D reference seismic model may be addressed. To avoid the use of any seismic reference model, we developed a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to directly interpret surface wave dispersion curves in terms of temperature and radial anisotropy distributions, considering a given composition of the mantle. These interpretations are based on laboratory measurements of elastic moduli and Birch-Murnaghan equation of state. An originality of the algorithm is its ability to explore both smoothly varying models and first-order discontinuities, using C1-Bézier curves, which interpolate the randomly chosen values for depth, temperature and radial anisotropy. This parameterization is able to generate a self-adapting parameter space exploration while reducing the computing time. Using a Bayesian exploration, the probability distributions on temperature and anisotropy are governed by uncertainties on the data set. The method was successfully applied to both synthetic data and real dispersion curves. Surface wave measurements along the Vanuatu- California path suggest a strong anisotropy above 400 km depth which decreases below, and a monotonous temperature distribution between 350 and 1000 km depth. On the contrary, a negative shear wave anisotropy of about 2 % is found at the top of the transition zone below Eurasia. Considering compositions ranging from piclogite to pyrolite, the overall temperature profile and temperature gradient are higher for the continental path than for the oceanic

  1. Crystalline instability of Bi-2212 superconducting whiskers near room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cagliero, Stefano; Khan, Mohammad Mizanur Rahman [Torino Universita, ' NIS' Centre of Excellence, Dip. Chimica Generale e Chimica Organica, and CNISM UdR, Turin (Italy); Torino Universita, ' NIS' Centre of Excellence, Dip. Fisica Sperimentale, and CNISM UdR, Turin (Italy); Agostino, Angelo [Torino Universita, ' NIS' Centre of Excellence, Dip. Chimica Generale e Chimica Organica, and CNISM UdR, Turin (Italy); Truccato, Marco [Torino Universita, ' NIS' Centre of Excellence, Dip. Fisica Sperimentale, and CNISM UdR, Turin (Italy); Orsini, Francesco; Marinone, Massimo; Poletti, Giulio [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Istituto di Fisiologia Generale e Chimica Biologica, Milan (Italy); CNR-INFM-S3 NRC, Modena (Italy); Lascialfari, Alessandro [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Istituto di Fisiologia Generale e Chimica Biologica, Milan (Italy); CNR-INFM-S3 NRC, Modena (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Pavia, INFM-CNR c/o Dipartimento di Fisica A. Volta, Pavia (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    We report new evidences for the thermodynamic instability of whisker crystals in the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BSCCO) system. Annealing treatments at 90 C have been performed on two sets of samples, which were monitored by means of X-rays diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, respectively. Two main crystalline domains of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CuCa{sub 2}O{sub 8+x} (Bi-2212) were identified in the samples by the XRD data, which underwent an evident crystalline segregation after about 60 hours. Very fast dynamics of the surface modifications was also described by the AFM monitoring. Two typologies of surface structures formed after about 3 annealing hours: continuous arrays of dome shaped bodies were observed along the edges of the whiskers, while in the central regions a dense texture of flat bodies was found. These modifications are described in terms of the formation of simple oxide clusters involving a degradation of the internal layers. (orig.)

  2. Instability and transport driven by an electron temperature gradient close to critical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, J.Q.; Jian, G.D.; Wang, A.K.; Sanuki, H.; Itoh, K.

    2003-01-01

    Electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven instability in toroidal plasmas is studied with gyrokinetic theory. The full electron kinetics is considered. The upgraded numerical scheme for solving the integral eigenvalue equations allows the study of both growing and damping modes, and thus direct calculation of critical gradient. Algebraic formulas for the critical gradient with respect to ratio of electron temperature over ion temperature and to toroidicity are given. An estimation for turbulence induced transport is presented. (author)

  3. Finite-temperature dynamic structure factor of the spin-1 XXZ chain with single-ion anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Florian; Ejima, Satoshi; Fehske, Holger

    2018-02-01

    Improving matrix-product state techniques based on the purification of the density matrix, we are able to accurately calculate the finite-temperature dynamic response of the infinite spin-1 XXZ chain with single-ion anisotropy in the Haldane, large-D , and antiferromagnetic phases. Distinct thermally activated scattering processes make a significant contribution to the spectral weight in all cases. In the Haldane phase, intraband magnon scattering is prominent, and the on-site anisotropy causes the magnon to split into singlet and doublet branches. In the large-D phase response, the intraband signal is separated from an exciton-antiexciton continuum. In the antiferromagnetic phase, holons are the lowest-lying excitations, with a gap that closes at the transition to the Haldane state. At finite temperatures, scattering between domain-wall excitations becomes especially important and strongly enhances the spectral weight for momentum transfer π .

  4. General kinetic solution for the Biermann battery with an associated pressure anisotropy generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeffler, K. M.; Silva, L. O.

    2018-01-01

    Fully kinetic analytic calculations of an initially Maxwellian distribution with arbitrary density and temperature gradients exhibit the development of temperature anisotropies and magnetic field growth associated with the Biermann battery. The calculation, performed by taking a small order expansion of the ratio of the Debye length to the gradient scale, predicts anisotropies and magnetic fields as a function of space given an arbitrary temperature and density profile. These predictions are shown to qualitatively match the values measured from particle-in-cell simulations, where the development of the Weibel instability occurs at the same location and with a wavenumber aligned with the predicted temperature anisotropy.

  5. The electron temperature gradient instability in presence of a limiter with tilted plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, D.; Pozzoli, R.; Ryutov, D.

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of the electron temperature gradient instability in the scrape-off layer is generalized to the case of non-orthogonal intersections of the magnetic field with the wall surface, a situation which is most typical for a tokamak with a limiter. (orig.)

  6. Temperature dependence of the anisotropy of fluorescence in ring molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, Pavel; Barvik, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    The time dependence of the anisotropy of fluorescence after an impulsive excitation in the molecular ring (resembling the B850 ring of the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila) is calculated. Fast fluctuations of the environment are simulated by dynamic disorder and slow fluctuations by uncorrelated static disorder. Without dynamic disorder modest degrees of static disorder are sufficient to cause the experimentally found initial drop of the anisotropy on a sub-100 fs time scale. In the present investigation we are comparing results for the time-dependent optical anisotropy of the molecular ring for four models of the uncorrelated static disorder: Gaussian disorder in the local energies (model A), Gaussian disorder in the transfer integrals (model B), Gaussian disorder in radial positions of molecules (model C) and Gaussian disorder in angular positions of molecules (model D). Both types of disorder-static and dynamic-are taken into account simultaneously

  7. Effects of a Guide Field on the Larmor Electric Field and Upstream Electron Temperature Anisotropy in Collisionless Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ek-In, Surapat; Ruffolo, David [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Malakit, Kittipat [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Techonology, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani (Thailand); Shay, Michael A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Cassak, Paul A., E-mail: kmalakit@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2017-08-20

    We perform the first study of the properties of the Larmor electric field (LEF) in collisionless asymmetric magnetic reconnection in the presence of an out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field for different sets of representative upstream parameters at Earth’s dayside magnetopause with an ion temperature greater than the electron temperature (the ion-to-electron temperature ratio fixed at 2) using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We show that the LEF does persist in the presence of a guide field. We study how the LEF thickness and strength change as a function of guide field and the magnetospheric temperature and reconnecting magnetic field strength. We find that the thickness of the LEF structure decreases, while its magnitude increases when a guide field is added to the reconnecting magnetic field. The added guide field makes the Larmor radius smaller, so the scaling with the magnetospheric ion Larmor radius is similar to that reported for the case without a guide field. Note, however, that the physics causing the LEF is not well understood, so future work in other parameter regimes is needed to fully predict the LEF for arbitrary conditions. We also find that a previously reported upstream electron temperature anisotropy arises in the vicinity of the LEF region both with and without a guide field. We argue that the generation of the anisotropy is linked to the existence of the LEF. The LEF can be used in combination with the electron temperature anisotropy as a signature to effectively identify dayside reconnection sites in observations.

  8. Effects of a Guide Field on the Larmor Electric Field and Upstream Electron Temperature Anisotropy in Collisionless Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ek-In, Surapat; Ruffolo, David; Malakit, Kittipat; Shay, Michael A.; Cassak, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    We perform the first study of the properties of the Larmor electric field (LEF) in collisionless asymmetric magnetic reconnection in the presence of an out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field for different sets of representative upstream parameters at Earth’s dayside magnetopause with an ion temperature greater than the electron temperature (the ion-to-electron temperature ratio fixed at 2) using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We show that the LEF does persist in the presence of a guide field. We study how the LEF thickness and strength change as a function of guide field and the magnetospheric temperature and reconnecting magnetic field strength. We find that the thickness of the LEF structure decreases, while its magnitude increases when a guide field is added to the reconnecting magnetic field. The added guide field makes the Larmor radius smaller, so the scaling with the magnetospheric ion Larmor radius is similar to that reported for the case without a guide field. Note, however, that the physics causing the LEF is not well understood, so future work in other parameter regimes is needed to fully predict the LEF for arbitrary conditions. We also find that a previously reported upstream electron temperature anisotropy arises in the vicinity of the LEF region both with and without a guide field. We argue that the generation of the anisotropy is linked to the existence of the LEF. The LEF can be used in combination with the electron temperature anisotropy as a signature to effectively identify dayside reconnection sites in observations.

  9. Growth anisotropy effect of bulk high temperature superconductors on the levitation performance in the applied magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Liao, X. L.; Jing, H. L.; Deng, Z. G.; Yen, F.; Wang, S. Y.; Wang, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    Growth anisotropies of bulk high temperature superconductors (HTSCs) fabricated by a top-seeded melt texture growth process, that is, different pinning effect in the growth sectors (GSs) and growth sector boundaries (GSBs), possess effect on the macro flux trapping and levitation performance of bulk HTSCs. Previous work (Physics Procedia, 36 (2012) 1043) has found that the bulk HTSC array with aligned GSB pattern (AGSBP) exhibits better capability for levitation and suppression of levitation force decay above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG) compared with misaligned GSB pattern (MGSBP). In this paper, we further examine this growth anisotropy effect on the maglev performance of a double-layer bulk HTSC. In contrast to reported trapped flux cases (Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 (2006) S466), the two superposed bulk HTSCs with same AGSBP with PMG are found to show better maglev performance. These series of results are helpful and support a new way for the performance optimization of present HTS maglev systems.

  10. High-temperature and low-stress creep anisotropy of single-crystal superalloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jacome, L. A.; Nortershauser, P.; Heyer, J. K.; Lahni, A.; Frenzel, J.; Dlouhý, Antonín; Somsen, C.; Eggeler, G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 8 (2013), s. 2926-2943 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/09/2073 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : superalloy single crystals * creep anisotropy * rafting * dislocations * deformation mechanisms Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.940, year: 2013

  11. Electron-temperature-gradient-induced instability in tokamak scrape-off layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Ryutov, D.D.; Tsidulko, Y.A.; Xu, X.Q.

    1992-08-01

    An electron temperature instability driven by the Kunkel-Guillory sheath impedance, has been applied to the scrape-off layer of tokamaks. The formalism has been generalized to more fully account for parallel wavelength dynamics, to differentiate between electromagnetic and electrostatic perturbations and to account for particle recycling effects. It is conjectured that this conducting wall instability leads to edge fluctuations in tokamaks that produce scrape-off widths of many ion Larmor radii ≅10. The predicted instability characteristics correlate somewhat with DIII-D edge fluctuation data, and the scrape-off layer width in the DIII-D experiment agrees with theoretical estimates that can be derived from mixing lenght theory

  12. Elevated Temperature Effects on the Plastic Anisotropy of an Extruded Mg-4 Wt Pct Li Alloy: Experiments and Polycrystal Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risse, Marcel; Lentz, Martin; Fahrenson, Christoph; Reimers, Walter; Knezevic, Marko; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we study the deformation behavior of Mg-4 wt pct Li in uniaxial tension as a function of temperature and loading direction. Standard tensile tests were performed at temperatures in the range of 293 K (20 °C) ≤ T ≤ 473 K (200 °C) and in two in-plane directions: the extrusion and the transverse. We find that while the in-plane plastic anisotropy (PA) decreases with temperature, the anisotropy in failure strain and texture development increases. To uncover the temperature dependence in the critical stresses for slip and in the amounts of slip and twinning systems mediating deformation, we employ the elastic-plastic self-consistent polycrystal plasticity model with a thermally activated dislocation density based hardening law for activating slip with individual crystals. We demonstrate that the model, with a single set of intrinsic material parameters, achieves good agreement with the stress-strain curves, deformation textures, and intragranular misorientation axis analysis for all test directions and temperatures. With the model, we show that at all temperatures the in-plane tensile behavior is driven primarily by analysis explains that the in-plane PA decreases and failure strains increase with temperature as a result of a significant reduction in the activation stress for pyramidal multiple types of < a rangle and < {c + a} rangle slip. The results also show that because of the strong initial texture, in-plane texture development is anisotropic since prismatic slip dominates the deformation in one test, although it is not the easiest slip mode, and basal slip in the other. These findings reveal the relationship between the temperature-sensitive thresholds needed to activate crystallographic slip and the development of texture and macroscopic PA.

  13. Mirror Instability in the Turbulent Solar Wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellinger, Petr [Astronomical Institute, CAS, Bocni II/1401,CZ-14100 Prague (Czech Republic); Landi, Simone; Verdini, Andrea; Franci, Luca [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Firenze Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Matteini, Lorenzo, E-mail: petr.hellinger@asu.cas.cz [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-01

    The relationship between a decaying strong turbulence and the mirror instability in a slowly expanding plasma is investigated using two-dimensional hybrid expanding box simulations. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field perpendicular to the simulation box, and we start with a spectrum of large-scale, linearly polarized, random-phase Alfvénic fluctuations that have energy equipartition between kinetic and magnetic fluctuations and a vanishing correlation between the two fields. A turbulent cascade rapidly develops, magnetic field fluctuations exhibit a Kolmogorov-like power-law spectrum at large scales and a steeper spectrum at sub-ion scales. The imposed expansion (taking a strictly transverse ambient magnetic field) leads to the generation of an important perpendicular proton temperature anisotropy that eventually drives the mirror instability. This instability generates large-amplitude, nonpropagating, compressible, pressure-balanced magnetic structures in a form of magnetic enhancements/humps that reduce the perpendicular temperature anisotropy.

  14. Fire Hose Instability in the Multiple Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrova, A.; Retino, A.; Divin, A. V.; Le Contel, O.; Matteini, L.; Breuillard, H.; Deca, J.; Catapano, F.; Cozzani, G.; Nakamura, R.; Panov, E. V.; Voros, Z.

    2017-12-01

    We present observations of multiple reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail. In particular, we observe an ion temperature anisotropy characterized by large temperature along the magnetic field, between the two active X-lines. The anisotropy is associated with right-hand polarized waves at frequencies lower than the ion cyclotron frequency and propagating obliquely to the background magnetic field. We show that the observed anisotropy and the wave properties are consistent with linear kinetic theory of fire hose instability. The observations are in agreement with the particle-in-cell simulations of multiple reconnection. The results suggest that the fire hose instability can develop during multiple reconnection as a consequence of the ion parallel anisotropy that is produced by counter-streaming ions trapped between the X-lines.

  15. Anisotropy influence on the failure of Ti6Al4V sheets deformed at room and elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q. L.; Ghiotti, A.; Bruschi, S.

    2018-05-01

    Ti6Al4V sheets are usually difficult-to-form at room temperature as a consequence of their strong basal texture and hcp crystal lattice. The heating of the alloy below the beta transus temperature is recognized to enhance its formability, reducing the flow stress and increasing the ductility. However, the influence of the sheet anisotropy on the material failure hasn't been studied yet. To this aim, the paper presents the anisotropy influence on the failure characteristics of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy sheets making use of tensile tests carried out at room temperature and 600°C on smooth, notched and shear samples in order to have various stress states. The fracture strain is measured and the effect of the sample orientation and stress state is identified. To determine the actual stress state for each sample geometry, a numerical model is set up and calibrated using elasto-plastic data from uni-axial tensile tests on smooth samples. Finally, the fracture surfaces are observed through SEM analysis to explain the failure characteristics.

  16. Unified theory of ballooning instabilities and temperature gradient driven trapped ion modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.Q.

    1990-08-01

    A unified theory of temperature gradient driven trapped ion modes and ballooning instabilities is developed using kinetic theory in banana regimes. All known results, such as electrostatic and purely magnetic trapped particle modes and ideal MHD ballooning modes (or shear Alfven waves) are readily derived from our single general dispersion relation. Several new results from ion-ion collision and trapped particle modification of ballooning modes are derived and discussed and the interrelationship between those modes is established. 24 refs

  17. Temperature factor for magnetic instability conditions of type – II superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanovskii, V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Electrodynamics and thermal diffusion phenomena in superconductors have the fission-chain-reaction nature. • There exist nontrivial relations between stability conditions, allowable losses and stable superconductor’s overheating. • The magnetic stability conditions are direct consequence of the states when the heat releases exceeds the critical energy. • The critical energy of magnetic instability depends on the nature of an external disturbance. • The non-isothermal magnetic instability conditions of the critical state are formulated. - Abstract: The macroscopic development of interrelated electrodynamics and thermal states taking place both before and after instability onset in type-II superconductors are studied using the critical state and the flux creep concepts. The physical mechanisms of the non-isothermal formation of the critical state are discussed solving the set of unsteady thermo-electrodynamics equations taking into consideration the unknown moving penetration boundary of the magnetic flux. To make it, the numerical method, which allows to study diffusion phenomena with unknown moving phase-two boundary, is developed. The corresponding non-isothermal flux jump criteria are written. It is proved for the first time that, first, the diffusion phenomena in superconductors have the fission-chain-reaction nature, second, the stability conditions, losses in superconductor and its stable overheating before instability onset are mutually dependent. The results are compared with those following from the existing magnetic instability theory, which does not take into consideration the stable temperature increase of superconductor before the instability onset. It is shown that errors of isothermal approximation are significant for modes closed to adiabatic ones. Therefore, the well-known adiabatic flux jump criterion limits the range of possible stable superconducting states since a correct determination of their stability states must

  18. Calculation of the magnetic anisotropy energy and finite-temperature magnetic properties of transition-metal films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibay-Alonso, R; Villasenor-Gonzalez, P; Dorantes-Davila, J; Pastor, G M

    2004-01-01

    The magnetic anisotropy energy at the interface (IMAE) of Co films deposited on the Pd(111) surface are determined in the framework of a self-consistent, real-space tight-binding method at zero temperature. Significant spin moments are induced at the Pd atoms at the interface which have an important influence on the observed reorientation transitions as a function of Co film thickness. Film-substrate hybridizations are therefore crucial for the magneto-anisotropic behaviour of thin transition-metal films deposited on metallic non-magnetic substrates. Furthermore, using a real-space recursive expansion of the local Green function and within the virtual-crystal approximation we calculate the magnetization curves and the Curie temperature T C for free-standing Fe films

  19. Instability of hydrophobic and viscoelastic polymer thin films in water at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dan; Wang Tao

    2013-01-01

    The instability of a polyisoprene (PI) thin film on a silicon substrate at room temperature in an aqueous environment was investigated by atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy. The instability mechanism changes from spinodal dewetting to hole nucleation with increasing film thickness, with the transitional thickness found to be around 46–50 nm. For PI films ≥50 nm, the dewetting was observed to proceed via successive stages of hole nucleation and growth, hole coalescence, cellular pattern formation and droplet formation. There is also a slowing down in the rate of the PI dewetting process and an increase in the pattern size as the film thickness is increased. In those films with observable holes, we also observed the coexistence of fine cellular cracking that is on a much smaller scale of hundreds of nanometres and extends only a few nanometres in depth from the film surface. (paper)

  20. Electron-phonon coupling, gap anisotropy and multigap structure in the high transition temperature cuprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kresin, V.Z.; Wolf, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the authors report on several important properties of the high t c cuprates. Firstly, the authors have developed a method for evaluating the electron-phonon coupling strength λ using an analysis of the heat capacity data. The authors estimate λ to be about 2.0 for La-Sr-Cu-O, which indicates that phonons are important but are not sufficient to explain the measured T c . Secondly, the authors have demonstrated that these materials exhibit gap anisotropy and multigap structure (the latter in the Re-Ba-Cu-O materials) which is responsible for the experimental difficulties in analyzing tunnelling and infrared data. Finally the authors have explained the anomalous results on the Pr substituted Y-Ba-Cu-O by its effects on the two dimensional Cu-O band in the framework of a two band multigap structure

  1. Growth anisotropy effect of bulk high temperature superconductors on the levitation performance in the applied magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, J.; Liao, X.L.; Jing, H.L.; Deng, Z.G.; Yen, F.; Wang, S.Y.; Wang, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The single-layer bulk HTSC with AGSBP obtains better levitation performance than that of MGSBP. • The double-layer bulk with AGSBP obtains better levitation performance than that of MGSBP too. • The double-layer bulk finding is contrast to MGSBP if pursuing high trapped field. • The optimization is highlighted by simple and easy operation, thus economical in the practice. -- Abstract: Growth anisotropies of bulk high temperature superconductors (HTSCs) fabricated by a top-seeded melt texture growth process, that is, different pinning effect in the growth sectors (GSs) and growth sector boundaries (GSBs), possess effect on the macro flux trapping and levitation performance of bulk HTSCs. Previous work (Physics Procedia, 36 (2012) 1043) has found that the bulk HTSC array with aligned GSB pattern (AGSBP) exhibits better capability for levitation and suppression of levitation force decay above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG) compared with misaligned GSB pattern (MGSBP). In this paper, we further examine this growth anisotropy effect on the maglev performance of a double-layer bulk HTSC. In contrast to reported trapped flux cases (Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 (2006) S466), the two superposed bulk HTSCs with same AGSBP with PMG are found to show better maglev performance. These series of results are helpful and support a new way for the performance optimization of present HTS maglev systems

  2. Growth anisotropy effect of bulk high temperature superconductors on the levitation performance in the applied magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, J., E-mail: jzheng@swjtu.edu.cn; Liao, X.L.; Jing, H.L.; Deng, Z.G.; Yen, F.; Wang, S.Y.; Wang, J.S.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The single-layer bulk HTSC with AGSBP obtains better levitation performance than that of MGSBP. • The double-layer bulk with AGSBP obtains better levitation performance than that of MGSBP too. • The double-layer bulk finding is contrast to MGSBP if pursuing high trapped field. • The optimization is highlighted by simple and easy operation, thus economical in the practice. -- Abstract: Growth anisotropies of bulk high temperature superconductors (HTSCs) fabricated by a top-seeded melt texture growth process, that is, different pinning effect in the growth sectors (GSs) and growth sector boundaries (GSBs), possess effect on the macro flux trapping and levitation performance of bulk HTSCs. Previous work (Physics Procedia, 36 (2012) 1043) has found that the bulk HTSC array with aligned GSB pattern (AGSBP) exhibits better capability for levitation and suppression of levitation force decay above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG) compared with misaligned GSB pattern (MGSBP). In this paper, we further examine this growth anisotropy effect on the maglev performance of a double-layer bulk HTSC. In contrast to reported trapped flux cases (Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 (2006) S466), the two superposed bulk HTSCs with same AGSBP with PMG are found to show better maglev performance. These series of results are helpful and support a new way for the performance optimization of present HTS maglev systems.

  3. Room-temperature superparamagnetism due to giant magnetic anisotropy in Mo S defected single-layer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. A.; Leuenberger, Michael N.

    2018-04-01

    Room-temperature superparamagnetism due to a large magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of a single atom magnet has always been a prerequisite for nanoscale magnetic devices. Realization of two dimensional (2D) materials such as single-layer (SL) MoS2, has provided new platforms for exploring magnetic effects, which is important for both fundamental research and for industrial applications. Here, we use density functional theory (DFT) to show that the antisite defect (Mo S ) in SL MoS2 is magnetic in nature with a magnetic moment μ of  ∼2 μB and, remarkably, exhibits an exceptionally large atomic scale MAE =\\varepsilon\\parallel-\\varepsilon\\perp of  ∼500 meV. Our calculations reveal that this giant anisotropy is the joint effect of strong crystal field and significant spin–orbit coupling (SOC). In addition, the magnetic moment μ can be tuned between 1 μB and 3 μB by varying the Fermi energy \\varepsilonF , which can be achieved either by changing the gate voltage or by chemical doping. We also show that MAE can be raised to  ∼1 eV with n-type doping of the MoS2:Mo S sample. Our systematic investigations deepen our understanding of spin-related phenomena in SL MoS2 and could provide a route to nanoscale spintronic devices.

  4. Study of tertiary creep instability in several elevated-temperature structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, M.K.; Sikka, V.K.

    1978-01-01

    Data for a number of common elevated temperature structural materials have been analyzed to yield mathematical predictions for the time and strain to tertiary creep at various rupture lives and temperatures. Materials examined include types 304 and 316 stainless steel, 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, alloy 800H, alloy 718, Hastelloy alloy X, and ERNiCr--3 weld metal. Data were typically examined over a range of creep temperatures for rupture lives ranging from less than 100 to greater than 10,000 hours. Within a given material, trends in these quantities can be consistently described, but it is difficult to directly relate the onset of tertiary creep to failure-inducing instabilities. A series of discontinued tests for alloy 718 at 649 and 620 0 C showed that the material fails by intergranular cracking but that no significant intergranular cracking occurs until well after the onset of tertiary creep

  5. Energy distribution extraction of negative charges responsible for positive bias temperature instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Shang-Qing; Yang Hong; Wang Wen-Wu; Tang Bo; Tang Zhao-Yun; Wang Xiao-Lei; Xu Hao; Luo Wei-Chun; Zhao Chao; Yan Jiang; Chen Da-Peng; Ye Tian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    A new method is proposed to extract the energy distribution of negative charges, which results from electron trapping by traps in the gate stack of nMOSFET during positive bias temperature instability (PBTI) stress based on the recovery measurement. In our case, the extracted energy distribution of negative charges shows an obvious dependence on energy, and the energy level of the largest energy density of negative charges is 0.01 eV above the conduction band of silicon. The charge energy distribution below that energy level shows strong dependence on the stress voltage. (paper)

  6. Comparisons of theoretically predicted transport from ion temperature gradient instabilities to L-mode tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotschenreuther, M.; Wong, H.V.; Lyster, P.L.; Berk, H.L.; Denton, R.; Miner, W.H.; Valanju, P.

    1991-12-01

    The theoretical transport from kinetic micro-instabilities driven by ion temperature gradients is a sheared slab is compared to experimentally inferred transport in L-mode tokamaks. Low noise gyrokinetic simulation techniques are used to obtain the ion thermal transport coefficient X. This X is much smaller than in experiments, and so cannot explain L-mode confinement. Previous predictions based on fluid models gave much greater X than experiments. Linear and nonlinear comparisons with the fluid model show that it greatly overestimates transport for experimental parameters. In addition, disagreements among previous analytic and simulation calculations of X in the fluid model are reconciled

  7. Ion temperature anisotropy in high power helium neutral beam fuelling experiments in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, A C; Core, W G.F.; Gerstel, U C; Von Hellermann, M G; Koenig, R W.T.; Marcus, F B [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    During helium beam fuelling experiments in JET, distinctive anisotropic features have been observed in the velocity distribution function describing both fast and thermal alpha particle populations. During the initial fuelling phase the central helium ion temperature observed perpendicular to the magnetic field is higher than the central electron temperature, while the central helium ion temperature observed parallel to the magnetic field is lower than or equal to the central electron temperature. In order to verify temperature measurements of both perpendicular and parallel lines of sight, other independent methods of deducing the ion temperature are investigated: deuterium ion temperature, deuterium density, comparison with neutron rates and profiles (influence of a possible metastable population of helium). 6 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Reorientational Dynamics of Enzymes Adsorbed on Quartz: A Temperature-Dependent Time-Resolved TIRF Anisotropy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeslik, C.; Royer, C.; Hazlett, T.; Mantulin, W.

    2003-01-01

    The preservation of enzyme activity and protein binding capacity upon protein adsorption at solid interfaces is important for biotechnological and medical applications. Because these properties are partly related to the protein flexibility and mobility, we have studied the internal dynamics and the whole-body reorientational rates of two enzymes, staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) and hen egg white lysozyme, over the temperature range of 20–80°C when the proteins are adsorbed at the silica/water interface and, for comparison, when they are dissolved in buffer. The data were obtained using a combination of two experimental techniques, total internal reflection fluorescence spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements in the frequency domain, with the protein Trp residues as intrinsic fluorescence probes. It has been found that the internal dynamics and the whole-body rotation of SNase and lysozyme are markedly reduced upon adsorption over large temperature ranges. At elevated temperatures, both protein molecules appear completely immobilized and the fractional amplitudes for the whole-body rotation, which are related to the order parameter for the local rotational freedom of the Trp residues, remain constant and do not approach zero. This behavior indicates that the angular range of the Trp reorientation within the adsorbed proteins is largely restricted even at high temperatures, in contrast to that of the dissolved proteins. The results of this study thus provide a deeper understanding of protein activity at solid surfaces. PMID:12668461

  9. Temperature dependence of the magnetostriction and the induced anisotropy in nanocrystalline FeCuNbSiB alloys, and their fluxgate properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Otto V; Petersen, Jan Raagaard

    1994-01-01

    Making use of the stress induced magnetic anisotropy in some iron-rich FeCuNbSiB nanocrystalline materials we studied the thermal dependence of their magnetostriction which becomes zero below the Curie temperature. The choice of a suitable composition and annealing temperature results in materials...... with zero magnetostriction at room temperature. Due to the low magnetostriction these materials have very promising fluxgate properties which were studied as well...

  10. TIMTEM - a digital program for the calculation of two-dimensional, non-linear temperature fields of reactor components of complex structure taking into account inhomogeneity and anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon-Weidner, J.

    1975-05-01

    The digital program TIMTEM calculates twodimensional, nonlinear temperature fields of reactor components of complex structure; inhomogeneity and anisotropy are taken into account. Systems consisting of different materials and therefore having different temperature- and/or time-dependent material characteristics are allowed. Various local, time- and/or temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be considered, too, which may be locally different from each other or can be interconnected. (orig.) [de

  11. Curvature and temperature gradient driven instabilities in tokomak edge plasmas with SOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovskii, S.V.; Guzdar, P.N.; Drake, J.F.; Liu, C.S.

    1996-01-01

    Curvature driven resistive ballooning modes (RBM) as well as the electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes have been investigated in the tokomak edge region and the SOL, with the help of the numerical code open-quotes 2D-BALLOONclose quotes. This is an initial value code, which determines the stability properties and estimates the quasi-linear transport for given density, temperature, the magnetic and electric field profiles, taking into account the SOL geometry as well as a closed flux region. The results related to the following issues will be presented: (1) Comparative analysis of the ETG and the RBM instabilities in the SOL and their influence on the transport in the edge region (inside the Last Closed Magnetic Surface). (2) The influence of the effective Debye sheath current. (3) Different poloidal positions of the toroidal limiter and their effect on the instabilities. Other aspects of the edge plasma turbulence, such as finite β effects, flow-shear of the poloidal rotation etc. will also be discussed

  12. Direct Experimental Evidence of Hole Trapping in Negative Bias Temperature Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Xiao-Li; Liao Yi-Ming; Yan Feng; Shi Yi; Zhang Guan; Guo Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) in ultrathin-plasma-nitrided-oxide (PNO) based p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (pMOSFETs) is investigated at temperatures ranging from 220K to 470K. It is found that the threshold voltage V T degradation below 290 K is dominated by the hole trapping process. Further studies unambiguously show that this process is unnecessarily related to nitrogen but the incorporation of nitrogen in the gate dielectric increases the probability of hole trapping in the NBTI process as it introduces extra trap states located in the upper half of the Si band gap. The possible hole trapping mechanism in NBTI stressed PNO pMOSFETs is suggested by taking account of oxygen and nitrogen related trap centers. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  13. Effects of stress conditions on the generation of negative bias temperature instability-associated interface traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yue; Pu Shi; Lei Xiao-Yi; Chen Qing; Ma Xiao-Hua; Hao Yue

    2013-01-01

    The exponent n of the generation of an interface trap (N it ), which contributes to the power-law negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) degradation, and the exponent's time evolution are investigated by simulations with varying the stress voltage V g and temperature T. It is found that the exponent n in the diffusion-limited phase of the degradation process is irrelevant to both V g and T. The time evolution of the exponent n is affected by the stress conditions, which is reflected in the shift of the onset of the diffusion-limited phase. According to the diffusion profiles, the generation of the atomic hydrogen species, which is equal to the buildup of N it , is strongly correlated with the stress conditions, whereas the diffusion of the hydrogen species shows V g -unaffected but T-affected relations through the normalized results

  14. Observation of Various and Spontaneous Magnetic Skyrmionic Bubbles at Room Temperature in a Frustrated Kagome Magnet with Uniaxial Magnetic Anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Zhipeng

    2017-06-07

    The quest for materials hosting topologically protected skyrmionic spin textures continues to be fueled by the promise of novel devices. Although many materials have demonstrated the existence of such spin textures, major challenges remain to be addressed before devices based on magnetic skyrmions can be realized. For example, being able to create and manipulate skyrmionic spin textures at room temperature is of great importance for further technological applications because they can adapt to various external stimuli acting as information carriers in spintronic devices. Here, the first observation of skyrmionic magnetic bubbles with variable topological spin textures formed at room temperature in a frustrated kagome Fe3 Sn2 magnet with uniaxial magnetic anisotropy is reported. The magnetization dynamics are investigated using in situ Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, revealing that the transformation between different magnetic bubbles and domains is via the motion of Bloch lines driven by an applied external magnetic field. These results demonstrate that Fe3 Sn2 facilitates a unique magnetic control of topological spin textures at room temperature, making it a promising candidate for further skyrmion-based spintronic devices.

  15. Minimizing temperature instability of heat recovery hot water system utilizing optimized thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suamir, I. N.; Sukadana, I. B. P.; Arsana, M. E.

    2018-01-01

    One energy-saving technology that starts gaining attractive for hotel industry application in Indonesia is the utilization of waste heat of a central air conditioning system to heat water for domestic hot water supply system. Implementing the technology for such application at a hotel was found that hot water capacity generated from the heat recovery system could satisfy domestic hot water demand of the hotel. The gas boilers installed in order to back up the system have never been used. The hot water supply, however, was found to be instable with hot water supply temperature fluctuated ranging from 45 °C to 62 °C. The temperature fluctuations reaches 17 °C, which is considered instable and can reduce hot water usage comfort level. This research is aimed to optimize the thermal energy storage in order to minimize the temperature instability of heat recovery hot water supply system. The research is a case study approach based on cooling and hot water demands of a hotel in Jakarta-Indonesia that has applied water cooled chillers with heat recovery systems. The hotel operation with 329 guest rooms and 8 function rooms showed that hot water production in the heat recovery system completed with 5 m3 thermal energy storage (TES) could not hold the hot water supply temperature constantly. The variations of the cooling demand and hot water demands day by day were identified. It was found that there was significant mismatched of available time (hours) between cooling demand which is directly correlated to the hot water production from the heat recovery system and hot water usage. The available TES system could not store heat rejected from the condenser of the chiller during cooling demand peak time between 14.00 and 18.00 hours. The extra heat from the heat recovery system consequently increases the temperature of hot water up to 62 °C. It is about 12 K above 50 °C the requirement hot water temperature of the hotel. In contrast, the TES could not deliver proper

  16. Shock-induced spall in copper: the effects of anisotropy, temperature, loading pulse and defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; An, Qi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Han, Li - Bo [USTC

    2009-07-28

    Shock-induced spall in Cu is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. We examine spallation in initially perfect crystals and defective solids with grain boundaries (columnar bicrystals), stacking faults or vacancies, as well as the effect of temperature and loading pulses. Spall in single crystal Cu is anisotropic, and defects and high temperature may reduce the spall strength. Taylor-wave (triangular shock-release wave) loading is explored in comparison with square wave shock loading.

  17. Structural instabilities of high temperature alloys and their use in advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.; Nickel, H.; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A.

    1989-01-01

    High-temperature, iron-nickel and nickel based alloys are the candidate heat exchanger materials for advanced high temperature gas-cooled reactors supplying process heat for coal gasification, where operation temperatures can reach 850-950 deg. C and service lives of more than 100,000 h are necessary. In the present paper, typical examples of structural changes which occur in two representative alloys (Alloy 800 H, Fe-32Ni-20Cr and Alloy 617, Ni-22Cr-12Co-9Mo-1Al) during high temperature exposure will be given and the effects on the creep rupture properties discussed. At service temperatures, precipitation of carbides occurs which has a significant effect on the creep behaviour, especially in the early stages of creep when the precipitate particles are very fine. During coarsening of the carbides, carbides at grain boundaries restrict grain boundary sliding which retards the development of creep damage. In the service environments, enhanced carbide precipitation may occur due to the ingress of carbon from the environment (carburization). Although the creep rate is not adversely affected, the ductility of the carburized material at low and intermediate temperatures is very low. During simulated service exposures, the formation of surface corrosion scales, the precipitation of carbides and the formation of internal oxides below the surface leads to depletion of the matrix in the alloying elements involved in the corrosion processes. In thin-walled tubes the depletion of Cr due to Cr 2 O 3 formation on the surface can lead to a loss of creep strength. An additional depletion effect resulting from environmental-metal reactions is the loss of carbon (decarburization) which may occur in specific environments. The compositions of the cooling gases which decarburize the material have been determined; they are to be avoided during reactor operation

  18. CνB Damping of Primordial Gravitational Waves and the Fine-Tuning of the CγB Temperature Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Bernardini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Damping of primordial gravitational waves due to the anisotropic stress contribution owing to the cosmological neutrino background (CνB is investigated in the context of a radiation-to-matter dominated universe. Besides its inherent effects on the gravitational wave propagation, the inclusion of the CνB anisotropic stress into the dynamical equations also affects the tensor mode contribution to the anisotropy of the cosmological microwave background (CγB temperature. The mutual effects on the gravitational waves and on the CγB are obtained through a unified prescription for a radiation-to-matter dominated scenario. The results are confronted with some preliminary results for the radiation dominated scenario. Both scenarios are supported by a simplified analytical framework, in terms of a scale independent dynamical variable, kη, that relates cosmological scales, k, and the conformal time, η. The background relativistic (hot dark matter essentially works as an effective dispersive medium for the gravitational waves such that the damping effect is intensified for the universe evolving to the matter dominated era. Changes on the temperature variance owing to the inclusion of neutrino collision terms into the dynamical equations result in spectral features that ratify that the multipole expansion coefficients ClT’s die out for l~100.

  19. Nonlinear theory for the parametric instability with comparable electron and ion temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberman, C.

    1972-01-01

    The basic linear theory of the parametric instability driven by a pump E 0 sin ω 0 t oscillating near the electron plasma frequency is reviewed. An expression is derived for the temporal nonlinear development of the fluctuation spectrum of the excited waves. For plasma with comparable electron and ion temperatures nonlinear Landau damping of electron plasma waves on ions provides the dominant nonlinearity. The steady state solutions are examined both analytically and numerically in the limit when the spontaneous emission term is small. The characteristics of the plasma wave spectrum agrees well with the general features of ionospheric observations. The enhanced dissipation rate of the pump due to the presence of the fluctuations agrees with laboratory observations. (U.S.)

  20. A probabilistic method for determining effluent temperature limits for flow instability for SRS reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, B.J.; White, A.M.

    1990-06-01

    This manual describes the uncertainty analysis used to determine the effluent temperature limits for a Mark 22 charge in the Savannah River Site production reactors. The postulated accident scenario is a DEGB/LOCA resulting from a coolant pipe break at the plenum inlet accompanied by the safety rod failure described in the previous chapter. The analysis described in this manual is used to calculate the limits for the flow instability phase of the accident. For this phase of the accident, the limits criterion is that the Stanton number does not exceed 0.00455 [1]. The limits are determined for a specified 84% probability that the Stanton number will not exceed 0.00455 in any assembly in the core.

  1. A probabilistic method for determining effluent temperature limits for flow instability for SRS reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, B.J.; White, A.M.

    1990-06-01

    This manual describes the uncertainty analysis used to determine the effluent temperature limits for a Mark 22 charge in the Savannah River Site production reactors. The postulated accident scenario is a DEGB/LOCA resulting from a coolant pipe break at the plenum inlet accompanied by the safety rod failure described in the previous chapter. The analysis described in this manual is used to calculate the limits for the flow instability phase of the accident. For this phase of the accident, the limits criterion is that the Stanton number does not exceed 0.00455 [1]. The limits are determined for a specified 84% probability that the Stanton number will not exceed 0.00455 in any assembly in the core

  2. Motion induced second order temperature and y-type anisotropies after the subtraction of linear dipole in the CMB maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Khatri, Rishi

    2013-01-01

    y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background allow us to detect clusters and groups of galaxies, filaments of hot gas and the non-uniformities in the warm hot intergalactic medium. Several CMB experiments (on small areas of sky) and theoretical groups (for full sky) have recently published y-type distortion maps. We propose to search for two artificial hot spots in such y-type maps resulting from the incomplete subtraction of the effect of the motion induced dipole on the cosmic microwave background sky. This dipole introduces, at second order, additional temperature and y-distortion anisotropy on the sky of amplitude few μK which could potentially be measured by Planck HFI and Pixie experiments and can be used as a source of cross channel calibration by CMB experiments. This y-type distortion is present in every pixel and is not the result of averaging the whole sky. This distortion, calculated exactly from the known linear dipole, can be subtracted from the final y-type maps, if desired

  3. Anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CBR) are reviewed, focusing on intrinsic anisotropies caused by primordial matter fluctuations. The basic elements of the CBR are outlined and the contributions to anisotropy at different angular scales are discussed. Possible fluctuation spectra that can generate the observed large-scale structure of the universe through gravitational instability and nonlinear evolution are examined and compared with observational searches for cosmic microwave anisotropies. 21 refs

  4. Cycle-by-cycle exhaust temperature monitoring for detection of misfiring and combustion instability in reciprocating natural gas engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiner, D.P. [Nexum Research Corp., Kingston, ON (Canada); Bardon, M.F. [Royal Military Coll. of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    The effectiveness of a cycle-by-cycle exhaust temperature monitoring system on engines operating at or near their fully rate load capacity was examined. Tests were conducted on stationary industrial natural gas engines. The study evaluated the monitoring system's ability to detect isolated single misfires, as well as combustion instability during misfire-free operations when the air/fuel ratio of the engine was adjusted to progressively lower settings. The combustion instability level of the engines was quantified by determining the relative variability of the groups of consecutive cycles. The coefficient of variation of indicated mean effective pressure (COV of IMEP) was used to examine cyclic variability. A combustion instability index was used to quantify cyclic variability with cycle-by-cycle exhaust temperature monitoring. Two engines were tested, notably a Cummins QSK 19G turbocharged natural gas engine; and a Waukesha VHP L5790G industrial natural gas engine. The tests demonstrated that cycle-by-cycle exhaust temperature monitoring system was capable of detecting misfiring and combustion instabilities in natural gas engines. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  5. Marangoni instability in a thin film heated from below: Effect of nonmonotonic dependence of surface tension on temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Rajkumar; Mondal, Pranab Kumar

    2018-04-01

    We investigate Marangoni instability in a thin liquid film resting on a substrate of low thermal conductivity and separated from the surrounding gas phase by a deformable free surface. Considering a nonmonotonic variation of surface tension with temperature, here we analytically derive the neutral stability curve for the monotonic and oscillatory modes of instability (for both the long-wave and short-wave perturbations) under the framework of linear stability analysis. For the long-wave instability, we derive a set of amplitude equations using the scaling k ˜(Bi) 1 /2 , where k is the wave number and Bi is the Biot number. Through this investigation, we demonstrate that for such a fluid layer upon heating from below, both monotonic and oscillatory instability can appear for a certain range of the dimensionless parameters, viz., Biot number (Bi ) , Galileo number (Ga ) , and inverse capillary number (Σ ) . Moreover, we unveil, through this study, the influential role of the above-mentioned parameters on the stability of the system and identify the critical values of these parameters above which instability initiates in the liquid layer.

  6. Effects of finite electron temperature on gradient drift instabilities in partially magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhin, V. P.; Ilgisonis, V. I.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Sorokina, E. A.; Marusov, N. A.

    2018-01-01

    The gradient-drift instabilities of partially magnetized plasmas in plasma devices with crossed electric and magnetic fields are investigated in the framework of the two-fluid model with finite electron temperature in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. The finite electron Larmor radius (FLR) effects are also included via the gyroviscosity tensor taking into account the magnetic field gradient. This model correctly describes the electron dynamics for k⊥ρe>1 in the sense of Padé approximants (here, k⊥ and ρe are the wavenumber perpendicular to the magnetic field and the electron Larmor radius, respectively). The local dispersion relation for electrostatic plasma perturbations with the frequency in the range between the ion and electron cyclotron frequencies and propagating strictly perpendicular to the magnetic field is derived. The dispersion relation includes the effects of the equilibrium E ×B electron current, finite ion velocity, electron inertia, electron FLR, magnetic field gradients, and Debye length effects. The necessary and sufficient condition of stability is derived, and the stability boundary is found. It is shown that, in general, the electron inertia and FLR effects stabilize the short-wavelength perturbations. In some cases, such effects completely suppress the high-frequency short-wavelength modes so that only the long-wavelength low-frequency (with respect to the lower-hybrid frequency) modes remain unstable.

  7. On the pressure and temperature dependence of the magnetization and anisotropy behavior of YCo.sub.4./sub.B

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mayot, H.; Isnard, O.; Arnold, Zdeněk; Kamarád, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 13 (2008), 135207/1-135207/8 ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010315 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : rare-earth compound * high pressure * spin reorientation * anisotropy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.900, year: 2008

  8. Suppression of temperature instability in InGaZnO thin-film transistors by in situ nitrogen doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, Jayapal; Jang, Kyungsoo; Yi, Junsin; Balaji, Nagarajan

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of nitrogen doping on the behavior of hysteresis curve and its suppression of temperature instability in amorphous InGaZnO thin-film transistors (a-IGZO TFTs). The in situ nitrogen doping reduced the temperature induced abnormal sub threshold leakage current and traps generation. Large falling-rate (F R ) ∼ 0.26 eV V −1 , low activation energy (E a ) ∼ 0.617 eV and a small hysteresis compared to the pure a-IGZO TFTs, shows the best immunity to thermal instability. This is mainly attributed to the reduction of interface trap density and oxygen vacancies due to the passivation of defects and/dangling bonds. (paper)

  9. Process of long-term tunnel instability by temperature and humidity variation in sedimentary rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Masataka; Okada, Tetsuji; Nakata, Eiji

    2009-01-01

    It is concerned that tunnels in the sedimentary rock are seriously damaged during the long operation after excavation, while there are various plans to construct significant underground facilities such as a high-level radioactive waste disposal facility. A case history study on tunnel instability is important in order to assess and evaluate tunnel instability behavior. In this respect, an accelerated tunnel deformation test by removing tunnel supports was conducted. Instability of tunnel wall was observed before and after this test in the summer, when it is warm and humid in the test tunnel. Fiber optic sensing detected the instability. Scale of collapsed rock was evaluated from the variation of shape of tunnel cross-section measured by a 3-D lazar measurement tool. The maximum size of collapsed rock block is 1m in diameter. Surrounding sandstone has such a characteristic that crack growth is much faster and its strength decreases gradually in the condition of high relative humidity. Numerical simulation considering this decrease of rock strength reproduced the instable zone around the test tunnel. (author)

  10. Hydrodynamic and thermal mechanisms of filtration combustion inclinational instability based on non-uniform distribution of initial preheating temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yongfang; Shi, Junrui; Xu, Youning; Ma, Rui

    2018-03-01

    Filtration combustion (FC) is one style of porous media combustion with inert matrix, in which the combustion wave front propagates, only downstream or reciprocally. In this paper, we investigate the FC flame front inclinational instability of lean methane/air mixtures flowing through a packed bed as a combustion wave front perturbation of the initial preheating temperature non-uniformity is assumed. The predicted results show that the growth rate of the flame front inclinational angle is proportional to the magnitude of the initial preheating temperature difference. Additionally, depending on gas inlet gas velocity and equivalence ratio, it is demonstrated that increase of gas inlet gas velocity accelerates the FC wave front deformation, and the inclinational instability evolves faster at lower equivalence ratio. The development of the flame front inclinational angle may be regarded as a two-staged evolution, which includes rapid increase, and approaching maximum value of inclinational angle due to the quasi-steady condition of the combustion system. The hydrodynamic and thermal mechanisms of the FC inclinational instability are analyzed. Consequently, the local propagation velocity of the FC wave front is non-uniform to result in the development of inclinational angle at the first stage of rapid increase.

  11. Oblique electron fire hose instability: Particle-in-cell simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Decyk, V.; Schriver, D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 1 (2014), s. 59-68 ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/12/2041 Grant - others:European Commission(XE) 284515 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : electron temperature anisotropy * fire hose instability Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.426, year: 2014 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2013JA019227/abstract

  12. Quarkonium dissociation by anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernicoff, Mariano; Fernández, Daniel; Mateos, David; Trancanelli, Diego

    2013-01-01

    We compute the screening length for quarkonium mesons moving through an anisotropic, strongly coupled mathcal{N} = 4 super Yang-Mills plasma by means of its gravity dual. We present the results for arbitrary velocities and orientations of the mesons, as well as for arbitrary values of the anisotropy. The anisotropic screening length can be larger or smaller than the isotropic one, and this depends on whether the comparison is made at equal temperatures or at equal entropy densities. For generic motion we find that: (i) mesons dissociate above a certain critical value of the anisotropy, even at zero temperature; (ii) there is a limiting velocity for mesons in the plasma, even at zero temperature; (iii) in the ultra-relativistic limit the screening length scales as (1 - v 2)ɛ with ɛ = 1 /2, in contrast with the isotropic result ɛ = 1 /4.

  13. Ordinary mode instability associated with thermal ring distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, F.; Yoon, P. H.; Qamar, A.

    2015-02-01

    The purely growing ordinary (O) mode instability driven by excessive parallel temperature anisotropy has recently received renewed attention owing to its potential applicability to the solar wind plasma. Previous studies of O mode instability have assumed either bi-Maxwellian or counter-streaming velocity distributions. For solar wind plasma trapped in magnetic mirror-like geometry such as magnetic clouds or in the vicinity of the Earth's collisionless bow shock environment, however, the velocity distribution function may possess a loss-cone feature. The O-mode instability in such a case may be excited for cyclotron harmonics as well as the purely growing branch. The present paper investigates the O-mode instability for plasmas characterized by the parallel Maxwellian distribution and perpendicular thermal ring velocity distribution in order to understand the general stability characteristics.

  14. On the ordinary mode instability for low beta plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadi, F.; Qamar, A. [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar (Pakistan); Bashir, M. F. [Department of Physics, G. C. University, Lahore (Pakistan); Salam Chair in Physics, G. C. University, Lahore (Pakistan); Yoon, P. H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-2431 (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Schlickeiser, R. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- and Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universität, Bochum (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    The purely growing ordinary (O) mode instability, first discussed by Davidson and Wu [Phys. Fluids 13, 1407 (1970)], has recently received renewed attention owing to its potential applicability to the solar wind plasma. In a series of papers, Ibscher, Schlickeiser, and their colleagues [Phys. Plasmas 19, 072116 (2012); ibid. 20, 012103 (2013); ibid. 20, 042121 (2013); ibid. 21, 022110 (2014)] revisited the O mode instability and extended it to the low-beta plasma regime by considering a counter-streaming bi-Maxwellian model. However, the O-mode instability is, thus, far discussed only on the basis of the marginal stability condition rather than actual numerical solutions of the dispersion relation. The present paper revisits the O-mode instability by considering the actual complex roots. The marginal stability condition as a function of the (electron) temperature anisotropy and beta naturally emerges in such a scheme.

  15. Ordinary mode instability associated with thermal ring distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadi, F.; Qamar, A. [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan); Yoon, P. H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    The purely growing ordinary (O) mode instability driven by excessive parallel temperature anisotropy has recently received renewed attention owing to its potential applicability to the solar wind plasma. Previous studies of O mode instability have assumed either bi-Maxwellian or counter-streaming velocity distributions. For solar wind plasma trapped in magnetic mirror-like geometry such as magnetic clouds or in the vicinity of the Earth's collisionless bow shock environment, however, the velocity distribution function may possess a loss-cone feature. The O-mode instability in such a case may be excited for cyclotron harmonics as well as the purely growing branch. The present paper investigates the O-mode instability for plasmas characterized by the parallel Maxwellian distribution and perpendicular thermal ring velocity distribution in order to understand the general stability characteristics.

  16. Structural and elastic anisotropy of crystals at high pressures and temperatures from quantum mechanical methods: The case of Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} forsterite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erba, A., E-mail: alessandro.erba@unito.it; Dovesi, R. [Dipartimento di Chimica and Centre of Excellence NIS (Nanostructured Interfaces and Surfaces), Università di Torino, via Giuria 5, IT-10125 Torino (Italy); Maul, J. [Dipartimento di Chimica and Centre of Excellence NIS (Nanostructured Interfaces and Surfaces), Università di Torino, via Giuria 5, IT-10125 Torino (Italy); Laboratório de Combustíveis e Materiais, INCTMN-UFPB, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, CEP 58051-900 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); De La Pierre, M. [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin Institute for Computation, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2015-05-28

    We report accurate ab initio theoretical predictions of the elastic, seismic, and structural anisotropy of the orthorhombic Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} forsterite crystal at high pressures (up to 20 GPa) and temperatures (up to its melting point, 2163 K), which constitute earth’s upper mantle conditions. Single-crystal elastic stiffness constants are evaluated up to 20 GPa and their first- and second-order pressure derivatives reported. Christoffel’s equation is solved at several pressures: directional seismic wave velocities and related properties (azimuthal and polarization seismic anisotropies) discussed. Thermal structural and average elastic properties, as computed within the quasi-harmonic approximation of the lattice potential, are predicted at high pressures and temperatures: directional thermal expansion coefficients, first- and second-order pressure derivatives of the isothermal bulk modulus, and P-V-T equation-of-state. The effect on computed properties of five different functionals, belonging to three different classes of approximations, of the density functional theory is explicitly investigated.

  17. Instabilities in strongly coupled plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kalman, G J

    2003-01-01

    The conventional Vlasov treatment of beam-plasma instabilities is inappropriate when the plasma is strongly coupled. In the strongly coupled liquid state, the strong correlations between the dust grains fundamentally affect the conditions for instability. In the crystalline state, the inherent anisotropy couples the longitudinal and transverse polarizations, and results in unstable excitations in both polarizations. We summarize analyses of resonant and non-resonant, as well as resistive instabilities. We consider both ion-dust streaming and dust beam-plasma instabilities. Strong coupling, in general, leads to an enhancement of the growth rates. In the crystalline phase, a resonant transverse instability can be excited.

  18. Modified electron-acoustic and lower-hybrid drift dissipative instability in a two-electron temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, M.

    1989-01-01

    It is often found, in fusion devices as well as in the auroral ionosphere, that the electrons consist of two distinct group, viz., hot and cold. These two-temperature electron model is sometimes convenient for analytical purposes. Thus the authors have considered a two-temperature electron plasma. In this paper, they investigated analytically the drift dissipative instabilities of modified electron-acoustic and lower-hybrid wve in a two-electron temperature plasma. It is found that the modified electron-acoustic drift dissipative mode are strongly dependent on the number density of cold electrons. From the expression of the growth rate, it is clear that these cold electrons can control the growth of this mode as well

  19. Effects of the instability enhanced friction on relative ion densities in a two-ion species low-temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Mirko

    2011-10-01

    The instability enhanced friction theory of Baalrud & Hegna (Phys. Plasmas 18, 023505 (2011)) predicts that for comparable ion densities the ions nearly reach a common velocity near the sheath edge in a low temperature plasma. The theory was experimentally confirmed by Yip, Hershkowitz, & Severn (Phys. Rev. Letters 104, 225003 (2010)). We will explore the effects of the theory on relative ion densities in a numerical simulation of an Ar/Xe plasma. Results for a 0D plasma model (Lieberman, Lichtenberg, Principles of Plasma Discharges and Materials Processing, 2005) will be presented.

  20. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of non-epitaxial hexagonal Co{sub 50}Pt{sub 50} thin films prepared at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, F.T., E-mail: ftyuan@gmail.com [iSentek Ltd., Advanced Sensor Laboratory, New Taipei City 22101, Taiwan (China); Chang, H.W., E-mail: wei0208@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Tunghai University, Taichung 40704, Taiwan (China); Lee, P.Y.; Chang, C.Y. [Department of Applied Physics, Tunghai University, Taichung 40704, Taiwan (China); Chi, C.C. [Department of Materials Sciences and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Ouyang, H., E-mail: houyang@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Sciences and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • In this paper, we propose a non-epitaxially grown PMA thin film of disorder hexagonal Co{sub 50}Pt{sub 50} which can satisfy all the requirements at once. • Although the preparation temperature is at room temperature and no post annealing is required, the film also shows good thermal stability up to 400 °C. • Moreover, the easy-controlling single layer deposition process of the film largely enhances the feasibility of practical production. • Significant PMA is achieved in a wide range of film thickness from 2 nm to 20 nm, which expands the usage form a GMR or TMR magnetic junctions to perpendicular spin polarizer for spin current related engineering. • The presented results may open new opportunities for advanced spintronic devices. - Abstract: Non-epitaxially induced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) of Co{sub 50}Pt{sub 50} thin films at room temperature (RT) is reported. The CoPt film having a disordered hcp structure shows a magnetocrystalline anisotropy (K{sub u}{sup RT}) of 1–2 × 10{sup 6} erg/cm{sup 3} in a wide range of layer thickness from 2 to 20 nm. K{sub u}{sup RT} of about 1 × 10{sup 6} erg/cm{sup 3} can be preserved after a 400 °C-thermal cycle in the 5-nm-thick sample. Moderate PMA, large thickness range, simple preparation process, low formation temperature but good thermal stability make presented hcp CoPt become a remarkable option for advanced spintronic devices.

  1. Flat-roof phenomenon of dynamic equilibrium phase in the negative bias temperature instability effect on a power MOSFET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yue; Zhuo Qing-Qing; Liu Hong-Xia; Ma Xiao-Hua; Hao Yue

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the static negative bias temperature (NBT) stress on a p-channel power metal—oxide—semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) is investigated by experiment and simulation. The time evolution of the negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) degradation has the trend predicted by the reaction—diffusion (R—D) model but with an exaggerated time scale. The phenomena of the flat-roof section are observed under various stress conditions, which can be considered as the dynamic equilibrium phase in the R—D process. Based on the simulated results, the variation of the flat-roof section with the stress condition can be explained. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  2. Electron temperature gradient mode instability and stationary vortices with elliptic and circular boundary conditions in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, Q. [Theoretical Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Zakir, U. [Department of Physics, University of Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtun Khwa 25000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Khyber Pakhtun Khwa 18800 (Pakistan); Qamar, A. [Department of Physics, University of Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtun Khwa 25000 (Pakistan)

    2015-12-15

    Linear and nonlinear dynamics of electron temperature gradient mode along with parallel electron dynamics is investigated by considering hydrodynamic electrons and non-Maxwellian ions. It is noticed that the growth rate of η{sub e}-mode driven linear instability decreases by increasing the value of spectral index and increases by reducing the ion/electron temperature ratio along the magnetic field lines. The eigen mode dispersion relation is also found in the ballooning mode limit. Stationary solutions in the form of dipolar vortices are obtained for both circular and elliptic boundary conditions. It is shown that the dynamics of both circular and elliptic vortices changes with the inclusion of inhomogeneity and non-Maxwellian effects.

  3. Electron temperature gradient mode instability and stationary vortices with elliptic and circular boundary conditions in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Q.; Zakir, U.; Qamar, A.

    2015-12-01

    Linear and nonlinear dynamics of electron temperature gradient mode along with parallel electron dynamics is investigated by considering hydrodynamic electrons and non-Maxwellian ions. It is noticed that the growth rate of ηe-mode driven linear instability decreases by increasing the value of spectral index and increases by reducing the ion/electron temperature ratio along the magnetic field lines. The eigen mode dispersion relation is also found in the ballooning mode limit. Stationary solutions in the form of dipolar vortices are obtained for both circular and elliptic boundary conditions. It is shown that the dynamics of both circular and elliptic vortices changes with the inclusion of inhomogeneity and non-Maxwellian effects.

  4. An upper bound for the proton temperature anisotrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, S.P.

    1994-01-01

    This tutorial describes recent research concerning the upper bound on the hot proton temperature anisotropy imposed by wave-particle scattering due to enhanced fluctuations from the electromagnetic proton cyclotron anisotropy instability. This upper bound, which has been observed in both the magnetosheath and the outer magnetosphere, represents a limited closure relation for the equations of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamics. Such a closure relation has the potential to improve the predictive capability of large-scale anisotropic models of the magnetosphere

  5. Micromechanical properties of single crystals and polycrystals of pure α-titanium: anisotropy of microhardness, size effect, effect of the temperature (77-300 K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubenets, S. V.; Rusakova, A. V.; Fomenko, L. S.; Moskalenko, V. A.

    2018-01-01

    The anisotropy of microhardness of pure α-Ti single crystals, indentation size effect in single-crystal, course grained (CG) pure and nanocrystalline (NC) VT1-0 titanium, as well as the temperature dependences of the microhardness of single-crystal and CG Ti in the temperature range 77-300 K were studied. The minimum value of hardness was obtained when indenting into the basal plane (0001). The indentation size effect (ISE) was clearly observed in the indentation of soft high-purity single-crystal iodide titanium while it was the least pronounced in a sample of nanocrystalline VT1-0 titanium. It has been demonstrated that the ISE can be described within the model of geometrically necessary dislocations (GND), which follows from the theory of strain gradient plasticity. The true hardness and others parameters of the GND model were determined for all materials. The temperature dependence of the microhardness is in agreement with the idea of the governing role of Peierls relief in the dislocation thermally-activated plastic deformation of pure titanium as has been earlier established and justified in macroscopic tensile investigations at low temperatures. The activation energy and activation volume of dislocation motion in the strained region under the indenter were estimated.

  6. Generation of Pc 1 waves by the ion temperature anisotropy associated with fast shocks caused by sudden impulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandt, M.E.; Lee, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    Observations have reported on the high correlation of Pc 1 events with magnetospheric compressions. A number of mechanisms have been suggested for the generation of the Pc 1 waves. In this paper, the authors propose a new mechanism which leads to the generation of Pc 1 waves. The interaction of a dynamic pressure pulse (Δρυ 2 ) with the Earth's bow shock leads to the formation of a weak fast mode shock propagating into the magnetosheath. The shock wave can pass right through a tangential discontinuity (magnetopause) and into the magnetosphere, without disturbing either of the structures. In a quasi-perpendicular geometry, the shock wave exhibits anisotropic heating with T perpendicular > T parallel . This anisotropy drives unstable ion cyclotron waves which they believe can contribute to the generation of the Pc 1 waves which are detected. The viability of the mechanism is demonstrated with simulations. This mechanism could explain peak in the occurrence of observed Pc 1 waves in the postnoon sector where a field-aligned discontinuity in the solar wind would most often be parallel to the magnetopause surface due to the average Parker spiral magnetic field configuration

  7. Rayleigh-Bénard convection instability in the presence of temperature variation at the lower wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Miloš M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the two-dimensional viscous fluid flow between two parallel plates, where the lower plate is heated and the upper one is cooled. The temperature difference between the plates is gradually increased during a certain time period, and afterwards it is temporarily constant. The temperature distribution on the lower plate is not constant in x-direction, and there is longitudinal sinusoidal temperature variation imposed on the mean temperature. We investigate the wave number and amplitude influence of this variation on the stability of Rayleigh-Benard convective cells, by direct numerical simulation of 2-D Navier-Stokes and energy equation.

  8. The mechanism behind redox instability of anodes in high-temperature SOFCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemensø, Trine; Chung, Charissa; Larsen, Peter Halvor

    2005-01-01

    Bulk expansion of the anode upon oxidation is considered to be responsible for the lack of redox stability in high-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The bulk expansion of nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode materials was measured by dilatometry as a function of sample geometry......, ceramic component, temperature, and temperature cycling. The strength of the ceramic network and the degree of Ni redistribution appeared to be key parameters of the redox behavior. A model of the redox mechanism in nickel-YSZ anodes was developed based on the dilatometry data and macro...

  9. Self-organized profile relaxation by ion temperature gradient instability in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Y.; Tajima, T.; LeBrun, M.J.; Gray, M.G.; Kim, J.Y.; Horton, W.

    1993-02-01

    Toroidal effects on the ion-temperature gradient mode are found to dictate the temperature evolution and the subsequent relaxed profile realization according to our toroidal particle simulation. Both in the strongly unstable fluid regime as well as in the near-marginal kinetic regime we observe that the plasma maintains an exponential temperature profile and forces the heat flux to be radially independent. The self-organized critical relaxed state is sustained slightly above the marginal stability, where the weak wave growth balances the wave decorrelation

  10. Non-dissipative kinetic simulation and analytical solution of three-mode equations of ion temperature gradient instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.; Sato, T.

    1999-12-01

    A non-dissipative drift kinetic simulation scheme, which rigorously satisfies the time-reversibility, is applied to the three-mode coupling problem of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability. It is found from the simulation that the three-mode ITG system repeats growth and decay with a period which shows a logarithmic divergence for infinitesimal initial perturbations. Accordingly, time average of the mode amplitude vanishes, as the initial amplitude approaches to zero. An exact solution is analytically given for a class of initial conditions. An excellent agreement is confirmed between the analytical solution and numerical results. The results obtained here provide a useful reference for basic benchmarking of theories and simulation of the ITG modes. (author)

  11. Fundamentals of bias temperature instability in MOS transistors characterization methods, process and materials impact, DC and AC modeling

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book aims to cover different aspects of Bias Temperature Instability (BTI). BTI remains as an important reliability concern for CMOS transistors and circuits. Development of BTI resilient technology relies on utilizing artefact-free stress and measurement methods and suitable physics-based models for accurate determination of degradation at end-of-life, and understanding the gate insulator process impact on BTI. This book discusses different ultra-fast characterization techniques for recovery artefact free BTI measurements. It also covers different direct measurements techniques to access pre-existing and newly generated gate insulator traps responsible for BTI. The book provides a consistent physical framework for NBTI and PBTI respectively for p- and n- channel MOSFETs, consisting of trap generation and trapping. A physics-based compact model is presented to estimate measured BTI degradation in planar Si MOSFETs having differently processed SiON and HKMG gate insulators, in planar SiGe MOSFETs and also...

  12. Observation of Various and Spontaneous Magnetic Skyrmionic Bubbles at Room Temperature in a Frustrated Kagome Magnet with Uniaxial Magnetic Anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Zhipeng; Ren, Weijun; Ding, Bei; Xu, Guizhou; Wang, Yue; Yang, Bing; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Enke; Xu, Feng; Wang, Wenhong; Wu, Guangheng; Zhang, Xixiang; Shen, Baogen; Zhang, Zhidong

    2017-01-01

    to various external stimuli acting as information carriers in spintronic devices. Here, the first observation of skyrmionic magnetic bubbles with variable topological spin textures formed at room temperature in a frustrated kagome Fe3 Sn2 magnet with uniaxial

  13. Current sharing effect on the current instability and allowable temperature rise of composite high-TC superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanovskii, V.R.; Watanabe, K.; Awaji, S.; Nishijima, G.; Takahashi, Ken-ichiro

    2004-01-01

    To understand the basic mechanisms of the thermal runaway phenomenon, the limiting margin of the current instability, which may spontaneously occur in composite high-T C superconductors like multifilament Bi-based wire or tape, is derived under DC magnetic field. The current sharing and allowable temperature rise effects were considered. A static zero-dimensional model was utilized to describe the basic formulae dealing with the peculiarities of the non-isothermal change of superconducting composite voltage-current characteristic. The boundary of allowable stable values of the temperature, electric field and current are derived analytically. It was shown that permissible values of the current and electric field might be higher than those determined by use of the standard critical current criterion. In consequence of this feature, the noticeable allowable temperature rise of the composite superconductor before its transition to the normal state may be seen. The criterion for complete thermal stability condition is written describing the state when temperature of the composite equals critical temperature of a superconductor and the transport current flows stably only in matrix. The performed analysis also proves the existence of value of the volume fraction of a superconductor in composite at which its current-carrying capacity has minimum. These peculiarities are due to the stable current redistribution between superconductor and stabilizing matrix. Therefore, the current sharing not only leads to the matrix/superconductor ratio effect on the stable operating characteristics of the composite high-T C superconductors but also becomes important in the adequate description of quench process in the high-T C superconducting magnets

  14. High Temperature Magneto-Elastic Instability of Dislocations in bcc Iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudarev, S.; Bullough, R.; Gilbert, M.; Derlet, P.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Density functional calculations show that the low temperature structure of self-interstitial defects in iron is fundamentally different from the structure of self-interstitial defects in all the other bcc metals. The origin of this anomaly is associated with the magnetic part of the cohesive energy of iron, where the Stoner exchange term stabilizes the body centred cubic phase, and where the magnetic part of energy is strongly affected by the large strain associated with the core region of an interstitial defect. At elevated temperatures magnetic excitations erode the stability of the bcc phase, giving rise to the gradual softening of the 110 transverse acoustic phonon modes and to the α-γ bcc-fcc martensitic phase transition occurring at 912 deg. C at normal pressure. Elastic moduli of bcc iron vary as a function of temperature with c' = (C 11 - c 12 )/2 vanishing at the α-γ transition point. This has significant effects on the magnitude of both the elastic interactions between dislocations and other defects in the material and on the intrinsic structural stability of the dislocations and other defects themselves. To evaluate structural stability of defects at elevated temperatures we investigate elastic self-energies of dislocations in the continuum anisotropic elasticity approximation. We also develop atomistic models of dislocations and point defects based on a generalised form of the magnetic potential. By varying the magnetic part of the potential we are able to reproduce the experimentally observed variation of elastic moduli as a function of temperature, and assess relative stability of various types of defect structures. Our analysis shows that, in complete contrast to other straight dislocations, the elastic self-energy of straight 100 edge dislocations actually sharply decreases as we approach the α-γ transition, indicating that this surprising fact is a probable explanation of the frequent observation of the 100

  15. Finite Atwood Number Effects on Deceleration-Phase Instability in Room-Temperature Direct-Drive Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S.; Knauer, J. P.; Radha, P. B.; Goncharov, V. N.

    2017-10-01

    Performance degradation in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions can be caused by several effects, one of which is Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth during the deceleration phase. In room-temperature plastic target implosions, this deceleration-phase RT growth is enhanced by the density discontinuity and finite Atwood numbers at the fuel-pusher interface. For the first time, an experimental campaign at the Omega Laser Facility systematically varied the ratio of deuterium-to-tritium (D-to-T) within the DT gas fill to change the Atwood number. The goal of the experiment was to understand the effects of Atwood number variation on observables like apparent ion temperature, yield, and variations in areal density and bulk fluid motion, which lead to broadening of neutron spectra along different lines of sight. Simulations by the hydrodynamic codes LILAC and DRACO were used to study growth rates for different D-to-T ratios and identify observable quantities effected by Atwood number variation. Results from simulations and the experiment are presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  16. Surface energy anisotropy of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R; Grenga, H E [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta (USA). School of Chemical Engineering

    1976-10-01

    Field-ion microscopy was used to study the faceting behavior and/or surface energy anisotropy of tungsten in vacuum and in hydrogen. In vacuum below 1700 K the activation energy for (110) facet growth agreed with values previously reported for surface diffusion on tungsten. The observed anisotropy values at 0.5 Tsub(m), where Tsub(m) is the absolute melting temperature of tungsten (approximately 3680 K), were different from those previously reported at higher temperatures and more nearly agreed with broken bond calculations based on Mie potential using m=5, n=8, and a 1.5% lattice expansion. Hydrogen appeared to have a negligible effect on surface energy anisotropy, but did preferentially increase surface diffusion rates on (310) regions.

  17. Instabilities in inhomogeneous plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailovsky, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    The plasma inhomogeneity across the magnetic field causes a wide class of instabilities which are called instabilities of an inhomogeneous plasma or gradient instabilities. The instabilities that can be studied in the approximation of a magnetic field with parallel straight field lines are treated first, followed by a discussion of the influence of shear on these instabilities. The instabilities of a weakly inhomogeneous plasma with the Maxwellian velocity distribution of particles caused by the density and temperature gradients are often called drift instabilities, and the corresponding types of perturbations are the drift waves. An elementary theory of drift instabilities is presented, based on the simplest equations of motion of particles in the field of low-frequency and long-wavelength perturbations. Following that is a more complete theory of inhomogeneous collisionless plasma instabilities which uses the permittivity tensor and, in the case of electrostatic perturbations, the scalar of permittivity. The results are used to study the instabilities of a strongly inhomogeneous plasma. The instabilities of a plasma in crossed fields are discussed and the electromagnetic instabilities of plasma with finite and high pressure are described. (Auth.)

  18. Elastic anisotropy and low-temperature thermal expansion in the shape memory alloy Cu-Al-Zn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvilla, Santhosh Potharay; Menon, C S

    2008-04-01

    Cu-based shape memory alloys are known for their technologically important pseudo-elastic and shapememory properties, which are intimately associated with the martensitic transformation. A combination of deformation theory and finite-strain elasticity theory has been employed to arrive at the expressions for higher order elastic constants of Cu-Al-Zn based on Keating's approach. The second- and third-order elastic constants are in good agreement with the measurements. The aggregate elastic properties like bulk modulus, pressure derivatives, mode Grüneisen parameters of the elastic waves, low temperature limit of thermal expansion, and the Anderson-Grüneisen parameter are also presented.

  19. Skewness of the cosmic microwave background temperature fluctuations due to the non-linear gravitational instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munshi, D.; Souradeep, T.; Starobinsky, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    The skewness of the temperature fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) produced by initially Gaussian adiabatic perturbations with the flat (Harrison-Zeldovich) spectrum, which arises due to non-linear corrections to a gravitational potential at the matter-dominated stage, is calculated quantitatively. For the standard CDM model, the effect appears to be smaller than expected previously and lies below the cosmic variance limit even for small angles. The sign of the skewness is opposite to that of the skewness of density perturbations. (author)

  20. Impact of the structural anisotropy of La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} on on high temperature surface modifications and diffusion of oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauquelin, Nicolas

    2010-11-29

    La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} was first studied due to its structural similarities with the High Temperature superconductor La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} and more recently due to its promise as a cathode material in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells as well as an oxygen exchange membrane. It crystallizes in the K{sub 2}NiF{sub 4} layered structure and accommodates highly mobile oxygen at its ground state and is therefore overstoichiometric. During this thesis, pure single crystals of La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} were successfully grown using the floating-zone method, subsequently characterized using neutron and Laue Backscattering diffraction and oriented pieces of single crystal with [100] and [001] orientation were prepared. The surface morphology behavior after long term exposure to high temperature in different atmospheres was observed using microscopy techniques because stability at high temperature is required for application purposes and it was discovered a structural change to nickel-rich phases at T>1173 K. The sensibility of the oxygen non-stoichiometry to cooling was studied and subsequently a new {sup 18}O-{sup 18}O exchange apparatus allowing quenching of the samples using liquid nitrogen was developed. Oxygen selfdiffusion was studied using SIMS in the range 673-873K in both [100] and [001] crystallographic directions. The effect of the disorientation of the sample surface on the determination of the slowest diffusion coefficient was discovered and revealed the very strong anisotropy (>5 orders of magnitude difference) between the different diffusion paths. Finally using HTXRD and oxygen release experiments, it was shown that oxygen diffusion from interstitial oxygen starts to be relevant at 550-600 K and a change of behavior is observed around 700 K, corresponding to a possible change in the diffusion mechanism from interstitial to interstitialcy.

  1. Impact of the structural anisotropy of La2NiO4+δ on on high temperature surface modifications and diffusion of oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauquelin, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    La 2 NiO 4+δ was first studied due to its structural similarities with the High Temperature superconductor La 2 NiO 4+δ and more recently due to its promise as a cathode material in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells as well as an oxygen exchange membrane. It crystallizes in the K 2 NiF 4 layered structure and accommodates highly mobile oxygen at its ground state and is therefore overstoichiometric. During this thesis, pure single crystals of La 2 NiO 4+δ were successfully grown using the floating-zone method, subsequently characterized using neutron and Laue Backscattering diffraction and oriented pieces of single crystal with [100] and [001] orientation were prepared. The surface morphology behavior after long term exposure to high temperature in different atmospheres was observed using microscopy techniques because stability at high temperature is required for application purposes and it was discovered a structural change to nickel-rich phases at T>1173 K. The sensibility of the oxygen non-stoichiometry to cooling was studied and subsequently a new 18 O- 18 O exchange apparatus allowing quenching of the samples using liquid nitrogen was developed. Oxygen selfdiffusion was studied using SIMS in the range 673-873K in both [100] and [001] crystallographic directions. The effect of the disorientation of the sample surface on the determination of the slowest diffusion coefficient was discovered and revealed the very strong anisotropy (>5 orders of magnitude difference) between the different diffusion paths. Finally using HTXRD and oxygen release experiments, it was shown that oxygen diffusion from interstitial oxygen starts to be relevant at 550-600 K and a change of behavior is observed around 700 K, corresponding to a possible change in the diffusion mechanism from interstitial to interstitialcy.

  2. Measuring significant inhomogeneity and anisotropy in indoor convective air turbulence in the presence of 2D temperature gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razi, E Mohammady; Rasouli, Saifollah

    2014-01-01

    Using a novel set up, experimental study of the statistical properties of a light beam propagating horizontally through indoor convective air turbulence in the presence of a 2D temperature gradient (TG) is presented. A laser beam enters a telescope from its back focal point by virtue of an optical fiber and is expanded and recollimated by it and then passes through the turbulent area. Then the beam enters another telescope’s aperture. A mask consisting of four similar widely separated small subapertures was installed in front of the second telescope’s aperture. The subapertures were equidistant from the optical axis of the telescope and located at the corners of a square. A flat plane heater is used to produce a vertical TG in the medium. Due to the limited width of the heater, a horizontal component for the TG appeared. Near the focal plane of the second telescope, four distinct images of the source are formed and recorded by a CCD camera. Due to the turbulence all the images (spots) in the successive frames fluctuate. Using the four spot displacements we have calculated the fluctuations of the angle of arrival (AA) over the subapertures. The statistical properties of the optical turbulence are investigated using variance analysis of the AA component fluctuations at horizontal and vertical directions over the subapertures for different temperatures of the heater at different heights of the beam path from the heater. Experimental results show that when the heater is turned off, the variances of horizontal and vertical components of the AA fluctuations are approximately equal to zero over all the subapertures. When it is turned on, the variance of the horizontal component of the AA fluctuations over all of the subapertures are larger than those from the vertical one. In addition, in this case, we find a significant dependence of the variance of the AA components on the height from the heater. (paper)

  3. A quasilinear kinetic model for solar wind electrons and protons instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.

    2017-12-01

    In situ measurements confirm the anisotropic behavior in temperatures of solar wind species. These anisotropies associated with charge particles are observed to be relaxed. In collionless limit, kinetic instabilities play a significant role to reshape particles distribution. The linear analysis results are encapsulated in inverse relationship between anisotropy and plasma beta based observations fittings techniques, simulations methods, or solution of linearized Vlasov equation. Here amacroscopic quasilinear technique is adopted to confirm inverse relationship through solutions of set of self-consistent kinetic equations. Firstly, for a homogeneous and non-collisional medium, quasilinear kinetic model is employed to display asymptotic variations of core and halo electrons temperatures and saturations of wave energy densities for electromagnetic electron cyclotron (EMEC) instability sourced by, T⊥}>T{∥ . It is shown that, in (β ∥ , T⊥}/T{∥ ) phase space, the saturations stages of anisotropies associated with core and halo electrons lined up on their respective marginal stability curves. Secondly, for case of electrons firehose instability ignited by excessive parallel temperature i.e T⊥}>T{∥ , both electrons and protons are allowed to dynamically evolve in time. It is also observed that, the trajectories of protons and electrons at saturation stages in phase space of anisotropy and plasma beta correspond to proton cyclotron and firehose marginal stability curves, respectively. Next, the outstanding issue that most of observed proton data resides in nearly isotropic state in phase space is interpreted. Here, in quasilinear frame-work of inhomogeneous solar wind system, a set of self-consistent quasilinear equations is formulated to show a dynamical variations of temperatures with spatial distributions. On choice of different initial parameters, it is shown that, interplay of electron and proton instabilities provides an counter-balancing force to slow

  4. On MHD waves, fire-hose and mirror instabilities in anisotropic plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.-N. Hau

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Temperature or pressure anisotropies are characteristic of space plasmas, standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD model for describing large-scale plasma phenomena however usually assumes isotropic pressure. In this paper we examine the characteristics of MHD waves, fire-hose and mirror instabilities in anisotropic homogeneous magnetized plasmas. The model equations are a set of gyrotropic MHD equations closed by the generalized Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL laws with two polytropic exponents representing various thermodynamic conditions. Both ions and electrons are allowed to have separate plasma beta, pressure anisotropy and energy equations. The properties of linear MHD waves and instability criteria are examined and numerical examples for the nonlinear evolutions of slow waves, fire-hose and mirror instabilities are shown. One significant result is that slow waves may develop not only mirror instability but also a new type of compressible fire-hose instability. Their corresponding nonlinear structures thus may exhibit anticorrelated density and magnetic field perturbations, a property used for identifying slow and mirror mode structures in the space plasma environment. The conditions for nonlinear saturation of both fire-hose and mirror instabilities are examined.

  5. Ion-cyclotron instability in magnetic mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearlstein, L.D.

    1987-01-01

    This report reviews the role of ion-cyclotron frequency instability in magnetic mirrors. The modes discussed here are loss-cone or anisotropy driven. The discussion includes quasilinear theory, explosive instabilities of 3-wave interaction and non-linear Landau damping, and saturation due to non-linear orbits

  6. Flow stress anisotropy in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, D.; Hansen, N.

    1990-01-01

    The plastic anisotropy of cold-rolled high purity aluminum (99.996%) and commercially pure aluminum (99.6%) has been investigated. Sample parameters were the initial grain size and the degree of plastic strain (ϵ < 3.00). Flow stresses (0.2% offset) were measured at room temperature by uniaxial t...

  7. On the nature of γ′ phase cutting and its effect on high temperature and low stress creep anisotropy of Ni-base single crystal superalloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jácome, L. A.; Nörtershäuser, P.; Somsen, C.; Dlouhý, Antonín; Eggeler, G.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 69, MAY (2014), s. 246-264 ISSN 1359-6454 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Ni-base single crystal superalloys * Creep * Anisotropy * Dislocation * Rafting Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 4.465, year: 2014

  8. A New Method for Negative Bias Temperature Instability Assessment in P-Channel Metal Oxide Semiconductor Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djezzar, Boualem; Tahi, Hakim; Benabdelmoumene, Abdelmadjid; Chenouf, Amel; Kribes, Youcef

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we present a new method, named on the fly oxide trap (OTFOT), to extract the bias temperature instability (BTI) in MOS transistors. The OTFOT method is based on charge pumping technique (CP) at low and high frequencies. We emphasize on the theoretical-based concept, giving a clear insight on the easy-use of the OTFOT methodology and demonstrating its viability to characterize the negative BTI (NBTI). Using alternatively high and low frequencies, OTFOT method separates the interface-traps (ΔNit) and border-trap (ΔNbt) (switching oxide-trap) densities independently and also their contributions to the threshold voltage shift (ΔVth), without needing additional methods. The experimental results, from two experimental scenarios, showing the extraction of NBTI-induced shifts caused by interface- and oxide-trap increases are also presented. In the first scenario, all stresses are performed on the same transistor. It exhibits an artifact value of exponent n. In the second scenario, each voltage stress is applied only on one transistor. Its results show an average n of 0.16, 0.05, and 0.11 for NBTI-induced ΔNit, ΔNbt, ΔVth, respectively. Therefore, OTFOT method can contribute to further understand the behavior of the NBTI degradation, especially through the threshold voltage shift components such as ΔVit and ΔVot caused by interface-trap and border-trap, respectively.

  9. Reliability characterization of SiON and MGHK MOSFETs using flicker noise and its correlation with the bias temperature instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samnakay, Rameez; Balandin, Alexander A.; Srinivasan, Purushothaman

    2017-09-01

    Bias temperature instability (BTI) is one of the critical device degradation mechanisms in poly-Si/SiON and metal gate/high-k complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technologies. Using the pre- and post-BTI flicker noise measurements, we investigated the bulk trap density, Nt, in both of these technologies. The low-frequency noise spectra were predominantly of 1/fγ type with γ engineering team at Globalfoundries, Inc. during the summer of 2014. He has currently authored or co-authored 10 journal publications and numerous conference presentations. His current research interests include 1/f noise in high-k dielectrics and fabricated 2D van der Waal thin-film devices Mr. Samnakay's awards and honors include the Dean's Distinguished Fellowship Award (University of California-Riverside) and induction into the IEEE-HKN honors society. He also serves as a reviewer for 6 journals including Applied Physics Letters, Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and Nanotechnology journals.

  10. Nonequilibrium segregation and phase instability in alloy films during elevated-temperature irradiation in a high-voltage electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.

    1984-05-01

    The effects of defect-production rate gradients, caused by the radial nonuniformity in the electron flux distribution, on solute segregation and phase stability in alloy films undergoing high-voltage electron-microscope (HVEM) irradiation at high temperatures are assessed. Two-dimensional (axially symmetric) compositional redistributions were calculated, taking into account both axial and transverse radial defect fluxes. It was found that when highly focused beams were employed radiation-induced segregation consisted of two stages: dominant axial segregation at the film surfaces at short irradiation times and competitive radial segregation at longer times. The average alloy composition within the irradiated region could differ greatly from that irradiated with a uniform beam, because of the additional atom transport from or to the region surrounding the irradiated zone under the influence of radial fluxes. As a result, damage-rate gradient effects must be taken into account when interpreting in-situ HVEM observations of segregation-induced phase instabilities. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental observations of the temporal and spatial dependence of segregation-induced precipitation in thin films of Ni-Al, Ni-Ge and Ni-Si solid solutions

  11. Nonequilibrium segregation and phase instability in alloy films during elevated-temperature irradiation in a high-voltage electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, N. Q.; Okamoto, P. R.

    1984-05-01

    The effects of defect-production rate gradients, caused by the radial nonuniformity in the electron flux distribution, on solute segregation and phase stability in alloy films undergoing high-voltage electron-microscope (HVEM) irradiation at high temperatures are assessed. Two-dimensional (axially symmetric) compositional redistributions were calculated, taking into account both axial and transverse radial defect fluxes. It was found that when highly focused beams were employed radiation-induced segregation consisted of two stages: dominant axial segregation at the film surfaces at short irradiation times and competitive radial segregation at longer times. The average alloy composition within the irradiated region could differ greatly from that irradiated with a uniform beam, because of the additional atom transport from or to the region surrounding the irradiated zone under the influence of radial fluxes. Damage-rate gradient effects must be taken into account when interpreting in-situ HVEM observations of segregation-induced phase instabilities. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental observations of the temporal and spatial dependence of segregation-induced precipitation in thin films of Ni-Al, Ni-Ge and Ni-Si solid solutions.

  12. Momentum anisotropy at freeze out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feld, S.; Borghini, N.; Lang, C.

    2017-01-01

    The transition from a hydrodynamical modeling to a particle-based approach is a crucial element of the description of high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Assuming this “freeze out” happens instantaneously at each point of the expanding medium, we show that the local phase-space distribution of the emitted particles is asymmetric in momentum space. This suggests the use of anisotropic hydrodynamics for the last stages of the fluid evolution. We discuss how observables depend on the amount of momentum-space anisotropy at freeze out and how smaller or larger anisotropies allow for different values of the freeze-out temperature. (paper)

  13. Elastic anisotropy of crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Kube

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An anisotropy index seeks to quantify how directionally dependent the properties of a system are. In this article, the focus is on quantifying the elastic anisotropy of crystalline materials. Previous elastic anisotropy indices are reviewed and their shortcomings discussed. A new scalar log-Euclidean anisotropy measure AL is proposed, which overcomes these deficiencies. It is based on a distance measure in a log-Euclidean space applied to fourth-rank elastic tensors. AL is an absolute measure of anisotropy where the limiting case of perfect isotropy yields zero. It is a universal measure of anisotropy applicable to all crystalline materials. Specific examples of strong anisotropy are highlighted. A supplementary material provides an anisotropy table giving the values of AL for 2,176 crystallite compounds.

  14. Ionization and acoustical instability of a low temperature magnetized plasma in a combined (direct and alternating) electrical field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andropov, V.G.; Sinkevich, O.A.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that the ionization front which moves through a gas along a magnetic field in a combined electrical field, which lies in the plane of the front, may be unstable, as a result of the development of an ionization instability in the plasma behind the front. The criterion of instability of the ionization front does not greatly differ from the criterion of instability of an infinite plasma. The ionization front in the magnetic field is stable only in an electrical field of circular polarization or in a combined field in which the direct and alternating electrical fields are orthogonal and the Joule heat liberation from them is equal. The generation of sound is possible in a magnetized plasma in an alternating electrical field orthogonal to a magnetic due to the parametric acoustical instability at the frequency of the external electrical field. 8 refs

  15. Destabilization of TAE modes by particle anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, H.V.; Berk, H.L.

    1998-01-01

    Plasmas heated by ICRF produce energetic particle distribution functions which are sharply peaked in pitch-angle, and the authors show that at moderate toroidal mode numbers, this anisotropy is a competitive and even dominant instability drive when compared with the universal instability drive due to spatial gradient. The universal drive, acting along, destabilizes only co-propagating waves (i.e., waves propagating in the same toroidal direction as the diamagnetic flow of the energetic particles), but stabilizes counter-propagating waves (i.e., waves propagating in the opposite toroidal direction as the diamagnetic flow of the energetic particles). Nonetheless, the authors show that in a tokamak, it is possible that particle anisotropy can produce a larger linear growth rate for counter-propagating waves, and provide a mechanism for preferred destabilization of the counter-propagating TAE modes that are sometimes experimentally observed

  16. Studies at IBM on anisotropy in single crystals of the high-temperature oxide superconductor Y1Ba2Cu3O7/sub -//sub x/ (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    A series of studies carried out at IBM on the magnetic, transport, and optical properties of single crystal Y 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-//sub x/ demonstrate the overriding importance of anisotropy in its superconducting and normal-state properties

  17. Microstructure and anisotropy of the mechanical properties in commercially pure titanium after equal channel angular pressing with back pressure at room temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jäger, Aleš; Gärtnerová, Viera; Tesař, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 644, Sep (2015), s. 114-120 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP108/12/G043 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : equal channel angular processing * nanostructured materials * phase transformation * grain refinement * mechanical anisotropy * high pressure omega phase Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.647, year: 2015

  18. Marginal instability threshold of magnetosonic waves in kappa distributed plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, M. F.; Manzoor, M. Z.; Ilie, R.; Yoon, P. H.; Miasli, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    The dispersion relation of magnetosonic wave is studied taking the non-extensive anisotropic counter-streaming distribution which follows the Tsallis statistics. The effects of non-extensivity parameter (q), counter-streaming parameter (P) and the wave-particle interaction is analyzed on the growth rate and the marginal instability threshold condition of Magnetosonic (MS) mode to provide the possible explanation of different regions the Bale-diagram obtained from the solar wind data at 1 AU as represented by the temperature anisotropy ( ) vs plasma beta ( ) solar wind data plot. It is shown that the most of the regions of Bale-diagram is bounded by the MS instability under different condition and best fitted by the non-extesnive distribution. The results for the bi-kappa distribution and bi- Maxwellian distribution are also obtained in the limits and respectively.

  19. Effects of a Mixed Zone on TGO Displacement Instabilities of Thermal Barrier Coatings at High Temperature in Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermally grown oxide (TGO, commonly pure α-Al2O3, formed on protective coatings acts as an insulation barrier shielding cooled reactors from high temperatures in nuclear energy systems. Mixed zone (MZ oxide often grows at the interface between the alumina layer and top coat in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs at high temperature dwell times accompanied by the formation of alumina. The newly formed MZ destroys interface integrity and significantly affects the displacement instabilities of TGO. In this work, a finite element model based on material property changes was constructed to investigate the effects of MZ on the displacement instabilities of TGO. MZ formation was simulated by gradually changing the metal material properties into MZ upon thermal cycling. Quantitative data show that MZ formation induces an enormous stress in TGO, resulting in a sharp change of displacement compared to the alumina layer. The displacement instability increases with an increase in the MZ growth rate, growth strain, and thickness. Thus, the formation of a MZ accelerates the failure of TBCs, which is in agreement with previous experimental observations. These results provide data for the understanding of TBC failure mechanisms associated with MZ formation and of how to prolong TBC working life.

  20. Majority of Solar Wind Intervals Support Ion-Driven Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, K. G.; Alterman, B. L.; Stevens, M. L.; Vech, D.; Kasper, J. C.

    2018-05-01

    We perform a statistical assessment of solar wind stability at 1 AU against ion sources of free energy using Nyquist's instability criterion. In contrast to typically employed threshold models which consider a single free-energy source, this method includes the effects of proton and He2 + temperature anisotropy with respect to the background magnetic field as well as relative drifts between the proton core, proton beam, and He2 + components on stability. Of 309 randomly selected spectra from the Wind spacecraft, 53.7% are unstable when the ion components are modeled as drifting bi-Maxwellians; only 4.5% of the spectra are unstable to long-wavelength instabilities. A majority of the instabilities occur for spectra where a proton beam is resolved. Nearly all observed instabilities have growth rates γ slower than instrumental and ion-kinetic-scale timescales. Unstable spectra are associated with relatively large He2 + drift speeds and/or a departure of the core proton temperature from isotropy; other parametric dependencies of unstable spectra are also identified.

  1. About the magneto-acoustic instabilities in mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvonkov, A.V.; Timofeev, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that the characteristic of a plasma in mirrors anisotropy of io on distribution function versus velocities may results in the drive of magneto-acoustic instabilities. This instability, in contast to the well known Alyven oscillation instability, is driven on ion cyclotron frequency harmonics The instability in question has been possibly observed during the experiments a at the tmx device, where the oscillations have been excited both at the ion cycl tron frequency and harmonics

  2. Shape anisotropy: tensor distance to anisotropy measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldeselassie, Yonas T.; El-Hilo, Saba; Atkins, M. S.

    2011-03-01

    Fractional anisotropy, defined as the distance of a diffusion tensor from its closest isotropic tensor, has been extensively studied as quantitative anisotropy measure for diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images (DT-MRI). It has been used to reveal the white matter profile of brain images, as guiding feature for seeding and stopping in fiber tractography and for the diagnosis and assessment of degenerative brain diseases. Despite its extensive use in DT-MRI community, however, not much attention has been given to the mathematical correctness of its derivation from diffusion tensors which is achieved using Euclidean dot product in 9D space. But, recent progress in DT-MRI has shown that the space of diffusion tensors does not form a Euclidean vector space and thus Euclidean dot product is not appropriate for tensors. In this paper, we propose a novel and robust rotationally invariant diffusion anisotropy measure derived using the recently proposed Log-Euclidean and J-divergence tensor distance measures. An interesting finding of our work is that given a diffusion tensor, its closest isotropic tensor is different for different tensor distance metrics used. We demonstrate qualitatively that our new anisotropy measure reveals superior white matter profile of DT-MR brain images and analytically show that it has a higher signal to noise ratio than fractional anisotropy.

  3. Modeling elastic anisotropy in strained heteroepitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Gopal Krishna; Ranganathan, Madhav

    2017-09-20

    Using a continuum evolution equation, we model the growth and evolution of quantum dots in the heteroepitaxial Ge on Si(0 0 1) system in a molecular beam epitaxy unit. We formulate our model in terms of evolution due to deposition, and due to surface diffusion which is governed by a free energy. This free energy has contributions from surface energy, curvature, wetting effects and elastic energy due to lattice mismatch between the film and the substrate. In addition to anisotropy due to surface energy which favors facet formation, we also incorporate elastic anisotropy due to an underlying crystal lattice. The complicated elastic problem of the film-substrate system subjected to boundary conditions at the free surface, interface and the bulk substrate is solved by perturbation analysis using a small slope approximation. This permits an analysis of effects at different orders in the slope and sheds new light on the observed behavior. Linear stability analysis shows the early evolution of the instability towards dot formation. The elastic anisotropy causes a change in the alignment of dots in the linear regime, whereas the surface energy anisotropy changes the dot shapes at the nonlinear regime. Numerical simulation of the full nonlinear equations shows the evolution of the surface morphology. In particular, we show, for parameters of the [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] on Si(0 0 1), the surface energy anisotropy dominates the shapes of the quantum dots, whereas their alignment is influenced by the elastic energy anisotropy. The anisotropy in elasticity causes a further elongation of the islands whose coarsening is interrupted due to [Formula: see text] facets on the surface.

  4. Modeling elastic anisotropy in strained heteroepitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Dixit, Gopal; Ranganathan, Madhav

    2017-09-01

    Using a continuum evolution equation, we model the growth and evolution of quantum dots in the heteroepitaxial Ge on Si(0 0 1) system in a molecular beam epitaxy unit. We formulate our model in terms of evolution due to deposition, and due to surface diffusion which is governed by a free energy. This free energy has contributions from surface energy, curvature, wetting effects and elastic energy due to lattice mismatch between the film and the substrate. In addition to anisotropy due to surface energy which favors facet formation, we also incorporate elastic anisotropy due to an underlying crystal lattice. The complicated elastic problem of the film-substrate system subjected to boundary conditions at the free surface, interface and the bulk substrate is solved by perturbation analysis using a small slope approximation. This permits an analysis of effects at different orders in the slope and sheds new light on the observed behavior. Linear stability analysis shows the early evolution of the instability towards dot formation. The elastic anisotropy causes a change in the alignment of dots in the linear regime, whereas the surface energy anisotropy changes the dot shapes at the nonlinear regime. Numerical simulation of the full nonlinear equations shows the evolution of the surface morphology. In particular, we show, for parameters of the Ge0.25 Si0.75 on Si(0 0 1), the surface energy anisotropy dominates the shapes of the quantum dots, whereas their alignment is influenced by the elastic energy anisotropy. The anisotropy in elasticity causes a further elongation of the islands whose coarsening is interrupted due to facets on the surface.

  5. Collisional effect on the Weibel instability in the limit of high plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Davidson and Hammer [12] studied the wave instabilities which included transverse electromagnetic WI driven by kinetic energy anisotropy in an unmag- netized plasma (e.g., electromagnetic instabilities driven by thermal anisotropy or directed counter-streaming motion). Zaki [13] studied the excitation of electromagnetic ...

  6. Anisotropy of domain wall resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viret; Samson; Warin; Marty; Ott; Sondergard; Klein; Fermon

    2000-10-30

    The resistive effect of domain walls in FePd films with perpendicular anisotropy was studied experimentally as a function of field and temperature. The films were grown directly on MgO substrates, which induces an unusual virgin magnetic configuration composed of 60 nm wide parallel stripe domains. This allowed us to carry out the first measurements of the anisotropy of domain wall resistivity in the two configurations of current perpendicular and parallel to the walls. At 18 K, we find 8.2% and 1.3% for the domain wall magnetoresistance normalized to the wall width (8 nm) in these two respective configurations. These values are consistent with the predictions of Levy and Zhang.

  7. Temperature dependence of parametric instabilities in the context of the shock-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weber, Stefan A.; Riconda, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 3, Feb (2015), e6 ISSN 2095-4719 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : inertial confinement fusion * shock ignition * laser- plasma interaction * parametric instabilities Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  8. Effects of aging and sheet thickness on the room temperature deformation behavior and in-plane anisotropy of cold rolled and solution treated Nimonic C-263 alloy sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankamma, Kandula; Chandra Mohan Reddy, Gangireddy [Mahatma Ghandi Institute of Technology, Hyderabad (India). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Singh, Ashok Kumar; Prasad, Konduri Satya [Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), Hyderabad (India). Defence Metallurgical Research Lab.; Komaraiah, Methuku [Malla Reddy College of Engineering and Technology, Secunderabad (India); Eswara Prasad, Namburi [Regional Centre for Military Airworthiness (Materials), Hyderabad (India)

    2011-10-15

    The deformation behavior under uni-axial tensile loading is investigated and reported in the case of cold rolled Nimonic C-263 alloy sheet products of different thicknesses (0.5 mm and 1 mm) in the solution treated and aged conditions. The studies conducted include (i) Microstructure, (ii) X-ray diffraction, (iii) Texture and (iv) Tensile properties and inplane anisotropy in the yield behavior (both tensile yield strength and ultimate tensile strength as well as ductility). The results of the present study showed that despite the presence of weak crystallographic texture in this crystal symmetric material, the degrees of in-plane anisotropy in strength as well as plastic deformation properties are found to be significant in both solution treated and aged conditions, thus having significant technological relevance for both further processing and design purposes. Further, the influence of aging and sheet thickness on the tensile deformation behaviour is also found to be considerable. A brief discussion on the technological implications of these results is also included. (orig.)

  9. Anisotropy of self-diffusion and α-zirconium radiation growth problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, E.A.; Subbotin, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    Temperature dependence of α-zirconium seft-diffusion anisotropy coefficients is obtained within the framework of linear extrapolation of self-diffusion anisotropy characteristics for metal HCP with c/a ration of [ru

  10. BUOYANCY INSTABILITIES IN A WEAKLY COLLISIONAL INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, Matthew W.; Stone, James M. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bogdanovic, Tamara; Reynolds, Christopher S., E-mail: kunz@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: jstone@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: tamarab@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: chris@astro.umd.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters is a weakly collisional plasma in which the transport of heat and momentum occurs primarily along magnetic-field lines. Anisotropic heat conduction allows convective instabilities to be driven by temperature gradients of either sign: the magnetothermal instability (MTI) in the outskirts of clusters and the heat-flux buoyancy-driven instability (HBI) in their cooling cores. We employ the Athena magnetohydrodynamic code to investigate the nonlinear evolution of these instabilities, self-consistently including the effects of anisotropic viscosity (i.e., Braginskii pressure anisotropy), anisotropic conduction, and radiative cooling. We find that, in all but the innermost regions of cool-core clusters, anisotropic viscosity significantly impairs the ability of the HBI to reorient magnetic-field lines orthogonal to the temperature gradient. Thus, while radio-mode feedback appears necessary in the central few Multiplication-Sign 10 kpc, heat conduction may be capable of offsetting radiative losses throughout most of a cool core over a significant fraction of the Hubble time. Magnetically aligned cold filaments are then able to form by local thermal instability. Viscous dissipation during cold filament formation produces accompanying hot filaments, which can be searched for in deep Chandra observations of cool-core clusters. In the case of MTI, anisotropic viscosity leads to a nonlinear state with a folded magnetic field structure in which field-line curvature and field strength are anti-correlated. These results demonstrate that, if the HBI and MTI are relevant for shaping the properties of the ICM, one must self-consistently include anisotropic viscosity in order to obtain even qualitatively correct results.

  11. A Deeper Understanding of Stability in the Solar Wind: Applying Nyquist's Instability Criterion to Wind Faraday Cup Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterman, B. L.; Klein, K. G.; Verscharen, D.; Stevens, M. L.; Kasper, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Long duration, in situ data sets enable large-scale statistical analysis of free-energy-driven instabilities in the solar wind. The plasma beta and temperature anisotropy plane provides a well-defined parameter space in which a single-fluid plasma's stability can be represented. Because this reduced parameter space can only represent instability thresholds due to the free energy of one ion species - typically the bulk protons - the true impact of instabilities on the solar wind is under estimated. Nyquist's instability criterion allows us to systematically account for other sources of free energy including beams, drifts, and additional temperature anisotropies. Utilizing over 20 years of Wind Faraday cup and magnetic field observations, we have resolved the bulk parameters for three ion populations: the bulk protons, beam protons, and alpha particles. Applying Nyquist's criterion, we calculate the number of linearly growing modes supported by each spectrum and provide a more nuanced consideration of solar wind stability. Using collisional age measurements, we predict the stability of the solar wind close to the sun. Accounting for the free-energy from the three most common ion populations in the solar wind, our approach provides a more complete characterization of solar wind stability.

  12. Current sheets and pressure anisotropy in the reconnection exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, A.; Karimabadi, H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Egedal, J.; Ng, J.; Scudder, J.; Daughton, W.; Liu, Y.-H.

    2014-01-01

    A particle-in-cell simulation shows that the exhaust during anti-parallel reconnection in the collisionless regime contains a current sheet extending 100 inertial lengths from the X line. The current sheet is supported by electron pressure anisotropy near the X line and ion anisotropy farther downstream. Field-aligned electron currents flowing outside the magnetic separatrices feed the exhaust current sheet and generate the out-of-plane, or Hall, magnetic field. Existing models based on different mechanisms for each particle species provide good estimates for the levels of pressure anisotropy. The ion anisotropy, which is strong enough to reach the firehose instability threshold, is also important for overall force balance. It reduces the outflow speed of the plasma

  13. Current sheets and pressure anisotropy in the reconnection exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, A.; Karimabadi, H.; Roytershteyn, V. [SciberQuest, Inc., Del Mar, California 92014 (United States); Egedal, J. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Ng, J. [PPPL, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Scudder, J. [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Daughton, W.; Liu, Y.-H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    A particle-in-cell simulation shows that the exhaust during anti-parallel reconnection in the collisionless regime contains a current sheet extending 100 inertial lengths from the X line. The current sheet is supported by electron pressure anisotropy near the X line and ion anisotropy farther downstream. Field-aligned electron currents flowing outside the magnetic separatrices feed the exhaust current sheet and generate the out-of-plane, or Hall, magnetic field. Existing models based on different mechanisms for each particle species provide good estimates for the levels of pressure anisotropy. The ion anisotropy, which is strong enough to reach the firehose instability threshold, is also important for overall force balance. It reduces the outflow speed of the plasma.

  14. Measurements of magnetic anisotropy in sickle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvo Souza, L.H. de.

    1982-03-01

    Room temperature magnetic measurements in deoxigenated sickle cells showed the existence of magnetic anisotropy, Δchi=1,29 x 10 -3 . This effect was supposed paramagnetic and considered to be due to the iron atoms of the hemoglobin molecules which are one over the other, forming ordered chains inside the erythrocytes. Low temperature (liquid He - 4,2K) measurements of the magnetic anisotropy of sickle cells and normal red blood cells diluted in a cryoprotector was made to confirm the paramagnetic origin of the fenomena. For that purpose it was used a superconductor magnetometer coupled to a SQUID, developed in the 'Laboratorio do Estado Solido do Departamento de Fisica da PUC-RJ'. The results obtained seem to confirm the expected paramagnetic anisotropy and, furthermore, suggest the presence of magnetic interactions among the iron atoms in the sickle cells samples. (Author) [pt

  15. Phase instability and toughness change during high temperature exposure of various steels for the first wall structural materials of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, K.; Shimoide, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the present research is to clarify the phase instability, particularly, the precipitation behavior of carbide and nitride during the long term aging in the non-irradiation state of the materials proposed for the first wall structural component of fusion reactors, such as a type 316 austenitic steel, its modified steels, ferritic heat resisting steels and reduced radio-activation materials. The effect of the precipitation behavior on the toughness is also investigated. It is noticed that the toughness was much deteriorated by the formation of large amounts of coarse carbides within grains and on grain boundaries during 2.88x10 4 ks (8000 h) aging at 873 K and that intergranular fracture occurred by the impact test at room temperature even in the type 316 steel. (orig.)

  16. Revisited study of fluorine implantation impact on negative bias temperature instability for input/output device of automotive micro controller unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tetsuya; Maekawa, Keiichi; Tsuda, Shibun; Shimizu, Tatsuo; Ogasawara, Makoto; Aono, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the effect of fluorine implanted in the polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) gate and source/drain (S/D) region on negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) improvement. It is found that there is a trade-off implantation energy dependence of NBTI between fluorine in the poly-Si gate and that in the S/D region. Fluorine implanted in the poly-Si gate contributes to NBTI improvement under low energy implantation. On the other hand, NBTI is improved by fluorine implanted in the S/D region under high energy. We propose that the two-step implantation process with high and low energy is the optimum condition for NBTI improvement.

  17. Critical Role of Crystalline Anisotropy in the Stability of Cellular Array Structures in Directional Solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopczynski, P.; Rappel, W.; Karma, A.

    1996-01-01

    We calculate numerically the full Floquet-Bloch stability spectrum of cellular array structures in a symmetric model of directional solidification. Our results demonstrate that crystalline anisotropy critically influences the stability of these structures. Without anisotropy, the stability balloon of cells in the plane of wave number and velocity closes near the onset of morphological instability. With a finite, but even small, amount of anisotropy this balloon remains open and a band of stable solutions persists for higher velocities into a deep cell regime. The width of the balloon depends critically on the anisotropy strength. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. Carpal instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.; Froehner, S.; Coblenz, G.; Christopoulos, G.

    2006-01-01

    This review addresses the pathoanatomical basics as well as the clinical and radiological presentation of instability patterns of the wrist. Carpal instability mostly follows an injury; however, other diseases, like CPPD arthropathy, can be associated. Instability occurs either if the carpus is unable to sustain physiologic loads (''dyskinetics'') or suffers from abnormal motion of its bones during movement (''dyskinematics''). In the classification of carpal instability, dissociative subcategories (located within proximal carpal row) are differentiated from non-dissociative subcategories (present between the carpal rows) and combined patterns. It is essential to note that the unstable wrist initially does not cause relevant signs in standard radiograms, therefore being ''occult'' for the radiologic assessment. This paper emphasizes the high utility of kinematographic studies, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR arthrography for detecting these predynamic and dynamic instability stages. Later in the natural history of carpal instability, static malalignment of the wrist and osteoarthritis will develop, both being associated with significant morbidity and disability. To prevent individual and socio-economic implications, the handsurgeon or orthopedist, as well as the radiologist, is challenged for early and precise diagnosis. (orig.)

  19. Kinetic instabilities in the solar wind: A short review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matteini, Lorenzo, E-mail: l.matteini@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-25

    We know from in situ measurements that solar wind plasma is far from thermal equilibrium. Distribution functions of its main constituents -electrons, protons, and alpha particles-show several departures from Maxwellian, including temperature anisotropy, relative drifts and secondary populations streaming along the local magnetic field. We present a short review of recent solar wind observations of these non-thermal features and associated signatures of wave-particle interactions. Several kinetic instabilities are expected to be at work in the solar wind during its expansion, playing a role in the continuous shaping of particle distributions with distance, and regulating the macroscopic behavior of the plasma. Over the past years, modeling of these processes by means of numerical simulations has been successful in reproducing and explaining the observations; these include the evolution of the plasma due to radial expansion and the response of individual species to different kinetic instabilities. Finally, the impact of local inhomogeneities, like current sheets and turbulence, on the development of kinetic instabilities is also discussed.

  20. Daytime Thermal Anisotropy of Urban Neighbourhoods: Morphological Causation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Scott Krayenhoff

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface temperature is a key variable in boundary-layer meteorology and is typically acquired by remote observation of emitted thermal radiation. However, the three-dimensional structure of cities complicates matters: uneven solar heating of urban facets produces an “effective anisotropy” of surface thermal emission at the neighbourhood scale. Remotely-sensed urban surface temperature varies with sensor view angle as a consequence. The authors combine a microscale urban surface temperature model with a thermal remote sensing model to predict the effective anisotropy of simplified neighbourhood configurations. The former model provides detailed surface temperature distributions for a range of “urban” forms, and the remote sensing model computes aggregate temperatures for multiple view angles. The combined model’s ability to reproduce observed anisotropy is evaluated against measurements from a neighbourhood in Vancouver, Canada. As in previous modeling studies, anisotropy is underestimated. Addition of moderate coverages of small (sub-facet scale structure can account for much of the missing anisotropy. Subsequently, over 1900 sensitivity simulations are performed with the model combination, and the dependence of daytime effective thermal anisotropy on diurnal solar path (i.e., latitude and time of day and blunt neighbourhood form is assessed. The range of effective anisotropy, as well as the maximum difference from nadir-observed brightness temperature, peak for moderate building-height-to-spacing ratios (H/W, and scale with canyon (between-building area; dispersed high-rise urban forms generate maximum anisotropy. Maximum anisotropy increases with solar elevation and scales with shortwave irradiance. Moreover, it depends linearly on H/W for H/W < 1.25, with a slope that depends on maximum off-nadir sensor angle. Decreasing minimum brightness temperature is primarily responsible for this linear growth of maximum anisotropy. These

  1. Plasma sheet pressure anisotropies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiles, G.S.; Hones, E.W. Jr; Bame, S.J.; Asbridge, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    The ecliptic plane components of the pressure tensors for low-energy ( or =1.2 approximately 25% of the time. Due to the low energy density of the electrons, however, this anisotropy is not itself sufficient to balance the tension of the magnetic field

  2. CMB anisotropies interpolation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zinger, S.; Delabrouille, Jacques; Roux, Michel; Maitre, Henri

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of the interpolation of irregularly spaced spatial data, applied to observation of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies. The well-known interpolation methods and kriging are compared to the binning method which serves as a reference approach. We analyse kriging

  3. Instabilities of collisionless current sheets revisited: The role of anisotropic heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muñoz, P. A.; Kilian, P.; Büchner, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the influence of the anisotropic heating on the spontaneous instability and evolution of thin Harris-type collisionless current sheets, embedded in antiparallel magnetic fields. In particular, we explore the influence of the macroparticle shape-function using a 2D version of the PIC code ACRONYM. We also investigate the role of the numerical collisionality due to the finite number of macroparticles in PIC codes. It is shown that it is appropriate to choose higher order shape functions of the macroparticles compared to a larger number of macroparticles per cell. This allows to estimate better the anisotropic electron heating due to the collisions of macroparticles in a PIC code. Temperature anisotropies can stabilize the tearing mode instability and trigger additional current sheet instabilities. We found a good agreement between the analytically derived threshold for the stabilization of the anisotropic tearing mode and other instabilities, either spontaneously developing or initially triggered ones. Numerical effects causing anisotropic heating at electron time scales become especially important for higher mass ratios (above m i /m e =180). If numerical effects are carefully taken into account, one can recover the theoretical estimated linear growth rates of the tearing instability of thin isotropic collisionless current sheets, also for higher mass ratios

  4. On the Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Lean Partially Premixed Combustion, Burning Speed, Flame Instability and Plasma Formation of Alternative Fuels at High Temperatures and Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Omid

    composition and thermodynamic properties. The method was applied to compute the thermodynamic properties of hydrogen/air and methane/air plasma mixtures for a wide range of temperatures (1,000-100,000 K), pressures (10-6-100 atm) and different equivalence ratios within flammability limit. In calculating the individual thermodynamic properties of the atomic species, the Debye-Huckel cutoff criterion has been used for terminating the series expression of the electronic partition function. A new differential-based multi-shell model was developed in conjunction with Schlieren photography to measure laminar burning speed and to study the flame instabilities for different alternative fuels such as syngas and GTL. Flame instabilities such as cracking and wrinkling were observed during flame propagation and discussed in terms of the hydrodynamic and thermo-diffusive effects. Laminar burning speeds were measured using pressure rise data during flame propagation and power law correlations were developed over a wide range of temperatures, pressures and equivalence ratios. As a part of this work, the effect of EGR addition and substitution of nitrogen with helium in air on flame morphology and laminar burning speed were extensively investigated. The effect of cell formation on flame surface area of syngas fuel in terms of a newly defined parameter called cellularity factor was also evaluated. In addition to that the experimental onset of auto-ignition and theoretical ignition delay times of premixed GTL/air mixture were determined at high pressures and low temperatures over a wide range of equivalence ratios.

  5. Nonlinear behavior of the radiative condensation instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, D.; Drake, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the nonlinear behavior of the radiative condensation instability is presented in a simple one-dimensional magnetized plasma. It is shown that the radiative condensation is typically a nonlinear instability---the growth of the instability is stronger once the disturbance reaches finite amplitude. Moreover, classical parallel thermal conduction is insufficient by itself to saturate the instability. Radiative collapse continues until the temperature in the high density condensation falls sufficiently to reduce the radiation rate

  6. Large Magnetic Anisotropy in HfMnP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David; Lamichhane, Tej; Taufour, Valentin; Masters, Morgan; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; Bud'Ko, Ser'gey; Canfield, Paul

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of two little-studied manganese phosphide ferromagnets, HfMnP and ZrMnP, with Curie temperatures above room temperature. We find an anisotropy field in HfMnP approaching 10 T - larger than that of the permanent magnet workhorse NdFeB magnets. From theory we determine the source of this anisotropy. Our results show the potential of 3d-element-based magnetic materials for magnetic applications.

  7. Elastic Anisotropy of Basalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, K.; Shapiro, S.; Stanchits, S.; Dresen, G.; Kaselow, A.; Vinciguerra, S.

    2005-12-01

    Elastic properties of rocks are sensitive to changes of the in-situ stress and damage state. In particular, seismic velocities are strongly affected by stress-induced formation and deformation of cracks or shear-enhanced pore collapse. The effect of stress on seismic velocities as a result of pore space deformation in isotropic rock at isostatic compression may be expressed by the equation: A+K*P-B*exp (-D*P) (1), where P=Pc-Pp is the effective pressure, the pure difference between confining pressure and pore pressure. The parameter A, K, B and D describe material constants determined using experimental data. The physical meaning of the parameters is given by Shapiro (2003, in Geophysics Vol.68(Nr.2)). Parameter D is related to the stress sensitivity of the rock. A similar relation was derived by Shapiro and Kaselow (2005, in Geophysics in press) for weak anisotropic rocks under arbitrary load. They describe the stress dependent anisotropy in terms of Thomson's (1986, in Geophysics, Vol. 51(Nr.10)) anisotropy parameters ɛ and γ as a function of stress in the case of an initially isotropic rock: ɛ ∝ E2-E3, γ ∝ E3-E2 (2) with Ei=exp (D*Pi). The exponential terms Ei are controlled by the effective stress components Pi. To test this relation, we have conducted a series of triaxial compression tests on dry samples of initially isotropic Etnean Basalt in a servo-controlled MTS loading frame equipped with a pressure cell. Confining pressure was 60, 40 and 20 MPa. Samples were 5 cm in diameter and 10 cm in length. Elastic anisotropy was induced by axial compression of the samples through opening and growth of microcracks predominantly oriented parallel to the sample axis. Ultrasonic P- and S- wave velocities were monitored parallel and normal to the sample axis by an array of 20 piezoceramic transducers glued to the surface. Preamplified full waveform signals were stored in two 12 channel transient recorders. According to equation 2 the anisotropy parameters are

  8. Supernovae anisotropy power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghodsi, Hoda; Baghram, Shant [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Habibi, Farhang, E-mail: h.ghodsi@mehr.sharif.ir, E-mail: baghram@sharif.edu, E-mail: habibi@lal.in2p3.fr [LAL-IN2P3/CNRS, BP 34, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2017-10-01

    We contribute another anisotropy study to this field of research using Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). In this work, we utilise the power spectrum calculation method and apply it to both the current SNe Ia data and simulation. Using the Union2.1 data set at all redshifts, we compare the spectrum of the residuals of the observed distance moduli to that expected from an isotropic universe affected by the Union2.1 observational uncertainties at low multipoles. Through this comparison we find a dipolar anisotropy with tension of less that 2σ towards l = 171° ± 21° and b = −26° ± 28° which is mainly induced by anisotropic spatial distribution of the SNe with z > 0.2 rather than being a cosmic effect. Furthermore, we find a tension of ∼ 4σ at ℓ = 4 between the two spectra. Our simulations are constructed with the characteristics of the upcoming surveys like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which shall bring us the largest SNe Ia collection to date. We make predictions for the amplitude of a possible dipolar anisotropy that would be detectable by future SNe Ia surveys.

  9. Magnetic anisotropies in SmCo thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.

    1993-01-01

    A systemic study of the deposition processes and magnetic properties for the Sm-Co film system has been carried out. Films of Sm-Co system with various magnetic anisotropies have been synthesized through sputter deposition in both crystalline and amorphous phases. The origins of various anisotropies have been studied. Thermalized sputter deposition process control was used to synthesize Fe enriched Sm-Co films with rhombohedral Th 2 Zn 17 type structure. The film exhibited unusually strong textures with the crystallographic c axes of the crystallites aligned in the film plane. A large anisotropy was resulted with easy axis in the film plane. A well defined and large in-the-film-plane anisotropy of exceptionally high value of 3.3 x 10 6 erg/cm 3 has been obtained in the amorphous SmCo films by applying a magnetic field in the film plane during deposition. It was found that the in-the-film-plane anisotropy depended essentially on the applied field and Sm concentration. For films not synthesized through thermallized sputtering, the easy axis of the film could reoriented. A perpendicular anisotropy was also presented in the film synthesized through thermallized sputtering deposition. A large in-plane anisotropy was obtained in films deposited above ambient temperatures. It was concluded that the surface induced short range ordering was the origin of the in-the-film-phase anisotropy observed in amorphous film deposited in the presence of a magnetic field. The formation mechanism was different from that of the short range ordering induced by field annealing. The perpendicular anisotropy was shown to be growth induced. Large in-plane anisotropy in amorphous films was resulted form partial crystallization in the film. Both the formation of growth induced structure and partial crystallization in the film prevented the formation of the pair ordering and decreased in-the-film-plane anisotropy

  10. Electron/electron acoustic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    The electron acoustic wave becomes a normal mode of an unmagnetized collisionless plasma in the presence of two electron components with similar densities, but strongly disparate temperatures. The characteristic frequency of this mode is the plasma frequency of the cooler electron component. If these two electron components have a relative drift speed several times the thermal speed of the cooler component, the electron/electron acoustic instability may arise. This paper describes the parametric dependences of the threshold drift speed and maximum growth rate of this instability, and compares these with the same properties of the electron/ion acoustic instability. Under the condition of zero current, the electron/ion acoustic instability typically has the lower threshold drift speed, so that observation of the electron/electron acoustic instability is a strong indication of the presence of an electrical current in the plasma

  11. The Effects of Plastic Anisotropy in Warm and Hot Forming of Magnesium Sheet Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleff, Eric M.; Antoniswamy, Aravindha R.; Carpenter, Alexander J.; Yavuz, Emre

    Mg alloy sheet materials often exhibit plastic anisotropy at room temperature as a result of the limited slip systems available in the HCP lattice combined with a commonly strong basal texture. Less well studied is plastic anisotropy developed at the elevated temperatures associated with warm and hot forming. At these elevated temperatures, particularly above 200°C, the activation of additional slip systems significantly increases ductility. However, plastic anisotropy is also induced at elevated temperatures by a strong crystallographic texture, and it can require an accounting in material constitutive models to achieve accurate forming simulations. The type and degree of anisotropy under these conditions depend on both texture and deformation mechanism. The current understanding of plastic anisotropy in Mg AZ31B and ZEK100 sheet materials at elevated temperatures is reviewed in this article. The recent construction of material forming cases is also reviewed with strategies to account for plastic anisotropy in forming simulations.

  12. Study on the drain bias effect on negative bias temperature instability degradation of an ultra-short p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan-Rong, Cao; Xiao-Hua, Ma; Yue, Hao; Shi-Gang, Hu

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of drain bias on ultra-short p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (PMOSFET) degradation during negative bias temperature (NBT) stress. When a relatively large gate voltage is applied, the degradation magnitude is much more than the drain voltage which is the same as the gate voltage supplied, and the time exponent gets larger than that of the NBT instability (NBTI). With decreasing drain voltage, the degradation magnitude and the time exponent all get smaller. At some values of the drain voltage, the degradation magnitude is even smaller than that of NBTI, and when the drain voltage gets small enough, the exhibition of degradation becomes very similar to the NBTI degradation. When a relatively large drain voltage is applied, with decreasing gate voltage, the degradation magnitude gets smaller. However, the time exponent becomes larger. With the help of electric field simulation, this paper concludes that the degradation magnitude is determined by the vertical electric field of the oxide, the amount of hot holes generated by the strong channel lateral electric field at the gate/drain overlap region, and the time exponent is mainly controlled by localized damage caused by the lateral electric field of the oxide in the gate/drain overlap region where hot carriers are produced. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  13. Measurements of Electron Temperature and Density Profiles of Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser for Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Karasik, M.; Chan, L.-Y.; Serlin, V.; Phillips, L.

    2012-10-01

    ExperimentsfootnotetextJ. Oh, et al, GO5.4, APS DPP (2010).^,footnotetextJ. L. Weaver, et al, GO5.3, APS DPP (2010). using Nike KrF laser observed LPI signatures from CH plasmas at the laser intensities above ˜1x10^15 W/cm^2. Knowing spatial profiles of temperature (Te) and density (ne) in the underdense coronal region (0 Nike LPI experiment, a side-on grid imaging refractometer (GIR)footnotetextR. S. Craxton, et al, Phys. Fluids B 5, 4419 (1993). is being deployed for measuring the underdense plasma profiles. The GIR will resolve Te and ne in space taking a 2D snapshot of probe laser (λ= 263 nm, δt = 10 psec) beamlets (50μm spacing) refracted by the plasma at a selected time during the laser illumination. Time-resolved spectrometers with an absolute-intensity-calibrated photodiode array and a streak camera will simultaneously monitor light emission from the plasma in spectral ranges relevant to Raman (SRS) and two plasmon decay (TDP) instabilities. The experimental study of effects of the plasma profiles on the LPI initiation will be presented.

  14. Characterization of Electron Temperature and Density Profiles of Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser for Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Phillips, L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Chan, L.-Y.; Serlin, V.

    2011-10-01

    Previous experiments with Nike KrF laser (λ = 248 nm , Δν ~ 1 THz) observed LPI signatures near quarter critical density (nc / 4) in CH plasmas, however, detailed measurement of the temperature (Te) and density (ne) profiles was missing. The current Nike LPI campaign will perform experimental determination of the plasma profiles. A side-on grid imaging refractometer (GIR) is the main diagnostic to resolve Te and ne in space taking 2D snapshots of probe laser (λ = 266 nm , Δt = 8 psec) beamlets (50 μm spacing) refracted by the plasma at laser peak time. Ray tracing of the beamlets through hydrodynamically simulated (FASTRAD3D) plasma profiles estimates the refractometer may access densities up to ~ 0 . 2nc . With the measured Te and ne profiles in the plasma corona, we will discuss analysis of light data radiated from the plasmas in spectral ranges relevant to two plasmon decay and convective Raman instabilities. Validity of the (Te ,ne) data will also be discussed for the thermal transport study. Work supported by DoE/NNSA and ONR and performed at NRL.

  15. Annealing, temperature, and bias-induced threshold voltage instabilities in integrated E/D-mode InAlN/GaN MOS HEMTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaho, M.; Gregušová, D.; Haščík, Š.; Ťapajna, M.; Fröhlich, K.; Šatka, A.; Kuzmík, J.

    2017-07-01

    Threshold voltage instabilities are examined in self-aligned E/D-mode n++ GaN/InAlN/GaN MOS HEMTs with a gate length of 2 μm and a source-drain spacing of 10 μm integrated in a logic invertor. The E-mode MOS HEMT technology is based on selective dry etching of the cap layer which is combined with Al2O3 grown by atomic-layer deposition at 380 K. In the D-mode MOS HEMT, the gate recessing is skipped. The nominal threshold voltage (VT) of E/D-mode MOS HEMTs was 0.6 and -3.4 V, respectively; the technology invariant maximal drain current was about 0.45 A/mm. Analysis after 580 K/15 min annealing step and at an elevated temperature up to 430 K reveals opposite device behavior depending on the HEMT operational mode. It was found that the annealing step decreases VT of the D-mode HEMT due to a reduced electron injection into the modified oxide. On the other hand, VT of the E-mode HEMT increases with reduced density of surface donors at the oxide/InAlN interface. Operation at the elevated temperature produces reversible changes: increase/decrease in the VT of the respective D-/E-mode HEMTs. Additional bias-induced experiments exhibit complex trapping phenomena in the devices: Coaction of shallow (˜0.1 eV below EC) traps in the GaN buffer and deep levels at the oxide/InAlN interface was identified for the E-mode device, while trapping in the D-mode HEMTs was found to be consistent with a thermo-ionic injection of electrons into bulk oxide traps (˜0.14 eV above EF) and trapping at the oxide/GaN cap interface states.

  16. Instability of ties in compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Thomas Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    Masonry cavity walls are loaded by wind pressure and vertical load from upper floors. These loads results in bending moments and compression forces in the ties connecting the outer and the inner wall in a cavity wall. Large cavity walls are furthermore loaded by differential movements from...... the temperature gradient between the outer and the inner wall, which results in critical increase of the bending moments in the ties. Since the ties are loaded by combined compression and moment forces, the loadbearing capacity is derived from instability equilibrium equations. Most of them are iterative, since...... exact instability solutions are complex to derive, not to mention the extra complexity introducing dimensional instability from the temperature gradients. Using an inverse variable substitution and comparing an exact theory with an analytical instability solution a method to design tie...

  17. Thermodynamics of strong coupling superconductors including the effect of anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daams, J. M.; Carbotte, J. P.

    1981-05-01

    The thermodynamics of several elemental superconductors is computed from isotropic Eliashberg theory formulated on the imaginary frequency axis. A symmary of the available experimental literature is presented and a comparison with theory is given. The small disagreements that are found are all in the direction expected from anisotropy effects. We calculate the effect of a small amount of model anisotropy on the critical temperature, critical field, and high-temperature specific heat from an exact solution of the anisotropic Eliashberg equations. These are the first such results below the critical temperature; unlike previous analytical work, we include retardation, anisotropy in the mass enhancement, and the effect of the Coulomb repulsion in enhancing anisotropy, all of which are significant. We derive a new formula independent of any model anisotropy for the rate of decrease with impurity lifetime of the critical temperature. Finally we demonstrate how the commonly used formulas of Markowitz and Kadanoff and of Clem may give entirely misleading estimates of the gap anisotropy when used to interpret certain experiments.

  18. Transfer anisotropy effect in a turbulent plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychenkov, V.Yu.; Gradov, O.M.; Silin, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    A theory is developed of transfer phenomena with pronounced ion-sound turbulence. A transfer anisotropy effect is observed which is due to the temperature gradient. The corresponding fluxes across the effective force vector generating the turbulence are found to be considerably greater than the longitudinal fluxes in a plasma with a comparatively low degree of nonisothermality. In a strongly nonisothermal plasma the suppression of transverse fluxes occurs, corresponding to the growth of thermal insulation of the current-carrying plasma filaments

  19. Flow stress anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, G.

    1996-01-01

    stress Variation in the rolling plane, which may be as high as 20%, are presented. The traditional Taylor model is applied to the data to account for the effect of texture. However, texture effects alone are not enough to explain all of the observed anisotropy. New models which take the combined effects...... of texture and deformation microstructure into account are presented. The models are based on the Taylor and Sachs models but modified with an anisotropic critical shear stress to account for the effect of the microstructure. The agreement between experimental data and model predictions is definitely better...

  20. CMB anisotropies at all orders: the non-linear Sachs-Wolfe formula

    OpenAIRE

    Roldan, Omar

    2017-01-01

    We obtain the non-linear generalization of the Sachs-Wolfe + integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) formula describing the CMB temperature anisotropies. Our formula is valid at all orders in perturbation theory, is also valid in all gauges and includes scalar, vector and tensor modes. A direct consequence of our results is that the maps of the logarithmic temperature anisotropies are much cleaner than the usual CMB maps, because they automatically remove many secondary anisotropies. This can for instan...

  1. Consequences of elastic anisotropy in patterned substrate heteroepitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Gopal Krishna; Ranganathan, Madhav

    2018-06-13

    The role of elastic anisotropy on quantum dot formation and evolution on a pre-patterned substrate is evaluated within the framework of a continuum model. We first extend the formulation for surface evolution to take elastic anisotropy into account. Using a small slope approximation, we derive the evolution equation and show how it can be numerically implemented up to linear and second order for stripe and egg-carton patterned substrates using an accurate and efficient procedure. The semi--infinite nature of the substrate is used to solve the elasticity problem subject to other boundary conditions at the free surface and at the film--substrate interface. The positioning of the quantum dots with respect to the peaks and valleys of the pattern is explained by a competition between the length scale of the pattern and the wavelength of the Asaro--Tiller--Grinfeld instability, which is also affected by the elastic anisotropy. The alignment of dots is affected by a competition between the elastic anisotropy of the film and the pattern orientation. A domain of pattern inversion, wherein the quantum dots form exclusively in the valleys of the patterns is identified as a function of the average film thickness and the elastic anisotropy, and the time--scale for this inversion as function of height is analyzed. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  2. Magnetic anisotropy of ultrafine 316L stainless steel fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shyr, Tien-Wei, E-mail: twshyr@fcu.edu.tw [Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, Feng Chia University, No. 100, Wenhwa Road, Seatwen, Taichung 40724, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Shih-Ju [Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, Feng Chia University, No. 100, Wenhwa Road, Seatwen, Taichung 40724, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wur, Ching-Shuei [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2016-12-01

    An as-received 316L stainless steel fiber with a diameter of 20 μm was drawn using a bundle drawing process at room temperature to form ultrafine stainless steel fibers with diameters of 12, 8, and 6 μm. The crystalline phases of the fibers were analyzed using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile fitting technique. The grain sizes of γ-austenite and α′-martensite were reduced to nanoscale sizes after the drawing process. XRD analysis and focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope observations showed that the newly formed α′-martensitic grains were closely arrayed in the drawing direction. The magnetic property was measured using a superconducting quantum interference device vibrating sample magnetometer. The magnetic anisotropy of the fibers was observed by applying a magnetic field parallel and perpendicular to the fiber axis. The results showed that the microstructure anisotropy including the shape anisotropy, magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and the orientation of the crystalline phases strongly contributed to the magnetic anisotropy. - Highlights: • The martensitic transformation of the 316L SS fiber occurred during the cold drawn. • The grain sizes of γ-austenite and α′-martensite were reduced to the nanoscale. • The newly formed martensitic grains were closely arrayed in the drawing direction. • The drawing process caused the magnetic easy axis to be aligned with the fiber axis. • The microstructure anisotropy strongly contributed to the magnetic anisotropy.

  3. Edge instabilities of topological superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Johannes S. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Assaad, Fakher F. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany); Schnyder, Andreas P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Nodal topological superconductors display zero-energy Majorana flat bands at generic edges. The flatness of these edge bands, which is protected by time-reversal and translation symmetry, gives rise to an extensive ground state degeneracy and a diverging density of states. Therefore, even arbitrarily weak interactions lead to an instability of the flat-band edge states towards time-reversal and translation-symmetry broken phases, which lift the ground-state degeneracy. Here, we employ Monte Carlo simulations combined with mean-field considerations to examine the instabilities of the flat-band edge states of d{sub xy}-wave superconductors. We find that attractive interactions induce a complex s-wave pairing instability together with a density wave instability. Repulsive interactions, on the other hand, lead to ferromagnetism mixed with spin-triplet pairing at the edge. We discuss the implications of our findings for experiments on cuprate high-temperature superconductors.

  4. High temperature deformation behavior of gradually pressurized zircaloy-4 tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoye

    1982-03-01

    In order to obtain preliminary perspectives on fuel cladding deformation behavior under changing temperature and pressure conditions in a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident of PWR, a Zircaloy-4 tube burst test was conducted in both air and 99.97% Ar atomospheres. The tubes were directly heated by AC-current and maintained at various temperatures, and pressurized gradually until rupture occurred. Rupture circumferential strains were generally larger in Ar gas than in air and attained a maximum around 1100 K in both atmospheres. Some tube tested in air produced axially-extended long balloons, which proved not to be explained by such properties or ideas as effect of cooling on strain rate, superplasticity, geometrical plastic instability and stresses generated by surface oxide layer. A cause of the long balloon may be obtained in the anisotropy of the material structure. But even a qualitative analysis based on this property can not be made due to insufficient data of the anisotropy. (author)

  5. Kinetic theory of tearing instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, J.F.; Lee, Y.C.

    1977-01-01

    The transition of the tearing instability from the collisional to the collisionless regime is investigated kinetically using a Fokker--Planck collision operator to represent electron-ion collisions. As a function of the collisionality of the plasma, the tearing instability falls into three regions, which are referred to as collisionless, semi-collisional, and collisional. The width Δ of the singular layer around kxB 0 =0 is limited by electron thermal motion along B 0 in the collisional and semi-collisional regimes and is typically smaller than rho/sub i/, the ion Larmor radius. Previously accepted theories, which are based on the assumption Δvery-much-greater-thanrho/sub i/, are found to be valid only in the collisional regime. The effects of density and temperature gradients on the instabilities are also studied. The tearing instability is only driven by the temperature gradient in the collisional and semi-collisional regimes. Numerical calculations indicate that the semi-collisional tearing instability is particularly relevant to present day high temperature tokamak discharges

  6. Geodynamic Constraints on the Sources of Seismic Anisotropy Beneath Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaonarison, T. A.; Stamps, D. S.; Fishwick, S.

    2017-12-01

    The rheological structure of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system controls the degree in which the mantle drives surface motions. Seismic anisotropy is a proxy to infer information about previous tectonic events imprinted in lithospheric structures and/or asthenospheric flow pattern in regions absent of active volcanism, however, distinguishing between the shallow and deeper sources, respectively, remains ambiguous. Madagascar is an ideal natural laboratory to study the sources of anisotropy and the rheological implications for lithosphere-asthenosphere system because 1) active volcanism is minimal or absent, 2) there are well-exposed tectonic fabrics for comparison, and 3) numerous geological and geophysical observations provides evidence of present-day tectonic activities. Recent studies suggest new seismic anisotropy observations in southern Madagascar are sourced from both fossilized lithospheric structure and asthenospheric flow driven by rigid lithospheric plate motion. In this work we compare geodynamic simulations of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system with seismic anisotropy data set that includes all of Madagascar. We use the numerical code Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth's ConvecTion (ASPECT) to calculate instantaneous deformation in the lithosphere and edge-driven convective flow in the asthenosphere accounting for variations in buoyancy forces and temperature dependent viscosity. The initial temperature conditions are based on interpretations from high resolution regional surface wave tomography. We assume visco-plastic rheology for a uniform crust, dislocation creep for a laterally varying mantle lithospheric structure, and diffusion creep for the asthenosphere. To test for the source of anisotropy we compare our velocity solution azimuths with azimuths of anisotropy at 25 km depth intervals. Calculated asthenospheric flow aligns with measured seismic anisotropy with a 15° WRMS at 175 km depth and possibly down to 250 km suggesting the

  7. Model of coordination melting of crystals and anisotropy of physical and chemical properties of the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokarev, Valery P.; Krasnikov, Gennady Ya

    2018-02-01

    Based on the evaluation of the properties of crystals, such as surface energy and its anisotropy, the surface melting temperature, the anisotropy of the work function of the electron, and the anisotropy of adsorption, were shown the advantages of the model of coordination melting (MCM) in calculating the surface properties of crystals. The model of coordination melting makes it possible to calculate with an acceptable accuracy the specific surface energy of the crystals, the anisotropy of the surface energy, the habit of the natural crystals, the temperature of surface melting of the crystal, the anisotropy of the electron work function and the anisotropy of the adhesive properties of single-crystal surfaces. The advantage of our model is the simplicity of evaluating the surface properties of the crystal based on the data given in the reference literature. In this case, there is no need for a complex mathematical tool, which is used in calculations using quantum chemistry or modeling by molecular dynamics.

  8. 3-D nonlinear evolution of MHD instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, G.; Hicks, H.R.; Wooten, J.W.

    1977-03-01

    The nonlinear evolution of ideal MHD internal instabilities is investigated in straight cylindrical geometry by means of a 3-D initial-value computer code. These instabilities are characterized by pairs of velocity vortex cells rolling off each other and helically twisted down the plasma column. The cells persist until the poloidal velocity saturates at a few tenths of the Alfven velocity. The nonlinear phase is characterized by convection around these essentially fixed vortex cells. For example, the initially centrally peaked temperature profile is convected out and around to form an annulus of high temperature surrounding a small region of lower temperature. Weak, centrally localized instabilities do not alter the edge of the plasma. Strong, large-scale instabilities, resulting from a stronger longitudinal equilibrium current, drive the plasma against the wall. After three examples of instability are analyzed in detail, the numerical methods and their verification are discussed

  9. Effect of Pressure Anisotropy on the m = 1 Small Wavelength Modes in Z-Pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, M.

    1987-05-01

    A generalization of Freidberg's perpendicular MHD model is used to investigate the effect of pressure anisotropy on the small wavelength internal kink (m = 1) mode instability in a Z-Pinch. A normal mode analysis of perturbed motion of an incompressible, collisionless and cylindrical plasma is performed. The stability criterion is (rΣB2)' = 0.

  10. Pearling Instabilities of a Viscoelastic Thread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deblais, A.; Velikov, K. P.; Bonn, D.

    2018-05-01

    Pearling instabilities of slender viscoelastic threads have received much attention, but remain incompletely understood. We study the instabilities in polymer solutions subject to uniaxial elongational flow. Two distinctly different instabilites are observed: beads on a string and blistering. The beads-on-a-string structure arises from a capillary instability whereas the blistering instability has a different origin: it is due to a coupling between stress and polymer concentration. By varying the temperature to change the solution properties we elucidate the interplay between flow and phase separation.

  11. Analysis of fluid structural instability in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccirillo, N.

    1997-02-01

    Recent flow testing of stainless steel hardware in a high pressure/high temperature water environment produced an apparent fluid-structural instability. The source of instability was investigated by studying textbook theory and by performing NASTRAN finite element analyses. The modal analyses identified the mode that was being excited, but the flutter instability analysis showed that the design is stable if minimal structural damping is present. Therefore, it was suspected that the test hardware was the root cause of the instability. Further testing confirmed this suspicion

  12. Role of the magnetic anisotropy in organic spin valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kalappattil

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic anisotropy plays an important role in determining the magnetic functionality of thin film based electronic devices. We present here, the first systematic study of the correlation between magnetoresistance (MR response in organic spin valves (OSVs and magnetic anisotropy of the bottom ferromagnetic electrode over a wide temperature range (10 K–350 K. The magnetic anisotropy of a La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO film epitaxially grown on a SrTiO3 (STO substrate was manipulated by reducing film thickness from 200 nm to 20 nm. Substrate-induced compressive strain was shown to drastically increase the bulk in-plane magnetic anisotropy when the LSMO became thinner. In contrast, the MR response of LSMO/OSC/Co OSVs for many organic semiconductors (OSCs does not depend on either the in-plane magnetic anisotropy of the LSMO electrodes or their bulk magnetization. All the studied OSV devices show a similar temperature dependence of MR, indicating a similar temperature-dependent spinterface effect irrespective of LSMO thickness, resulting from the orbital hybridization of carriers at the OSC/LSMO interface.

  13. Determination of the out-of-plane anisotropy contributions (first and second anisotropy terms) in amorphous Nd-Co thin films by micromagnetic numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Prado, L. M.; Cid, R.; Morales, R.; Diaz, J.; Vélez, M.; Rubio, H.; Hierro-Rodriguez, A.; Alameda, J. M.

    2018-06-01

    Amorphous Nd-Co thin films exhibit stripe shaped periodic magnetic domains with local out-of-plane magnetization components due to their perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. This anisotropy has been quantified in a fairly simple way by reproducing the experimental magnetization curves by means of micromagnetic numerical simulations. The simulations show that the first (K1) and second (K2) anisotropy constants must be used to properly describe the variation of the stripe domains with the in plane applied magnetic field. A strong temperature dependence of both K1 and K2 has been obtained between 10 K and room temperature. This anisotropy behavior is characteristic of two magnetically coupled 3d-4f sublattices with competing anisotropies.

  14. Magnetic anisotropies of (Ga,Mn)As films and nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Frank

    2011-02-02

    In this work the magnetic anisotropies of the diluted magnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As were investigated experimentally. (Ga,Mn)As films show a superposition of various magnetic anisotropies which depend sensitively on various parameters such as temperature, carrier concentration or lattice strain. However, the anisotropies of lithographically prepared (Ga,Mn)As elements differ significantly from an unpatterned (Ga,Mn)As film. In stripe-shaped structures this behaviour is caused by anisotropic relaxation of the compressive lattice strain. In order to determine the magnetic anisotropies of individual (Ga,Mn)As nanostructures a combination of ferromagnetic resonance and time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy was employed in this thesis. In addition, local changes of the magnetic anisotropy in circular and rectangular structures were visualized by making use of spatially resolved measurements. Finally, also the influence of the laterally inhomogeneous magnetic anisotropies on the static magnetic properties, such as coercive fields, was investigated employing spatially resolved static MOKE measurements on individual (Ga,Mn)As elements. (orig.)

  15. Transfer anisotropy in a turbulent plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychenkov, V.Y.; Gradov, O.M.; Silin, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    We formulate a theory for transfer phenomena in a plasma with developed ion-sound turbulence. A transfer anisotropy effect caused by a temperature gradient is revealed. The corresponding fluxes transverse to the effective force vector (1) which generates the turbulence turn out to be considerably larger than the longitudinal fluxes in a plasma with a relatively small degree of nonisothermality. For a strongly nonisothermal plasma a suppression of the transverse fluxes takes place and corresponds to a growth of the thermal insulation of the current-carrying plasma filaments

  16. A statistical model for instable thermodynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2003-01-01

    A generic model is presented for statistical systems which display thermodynamic features in contrast to our everyday experience, such as infinite and negative heat capacities. Such system are instable in terms of classical equilibrium thermodynamics. Using our statistical model, we are able to investigate states of instable systems which are undefined in the framework of equilibrium thermodynamics. We show that a region of negative heat capacity in the adiabatic environment, leads to a first order like phase transition when the system is coupled to a heat reservoir. This phase transition takes place without a phase coexistence. Nevertheless, all intermediate states are stable due to fluctuations. When two instable system are brought in thermal contact, the temperature of the composed system is lower than the minimum temperature of the individual systems. Generally, the equilibrium states of instable system cannot be simply decomposed into equilibrium states of the individual systems. The properties of instable system depend on the environment, ensemble equivalence is broken

  17. Measurement of the anisotropy ratios in MgB2 single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Heon-Jung; Kang, Byeongwon; Lee, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Sung-Ik

    2006-01-01

    We present our recent measurements on the anisotropy ratios of MgB 2 single crystals. Our measurements indicate that the anisotropy ratios of the penetration depth and of the upper critical field have different magnitudes and temperature dependences, as predicted by theoretical calculations. These results imply that the two-gap nature can strongly influence the superconducting properties of MgB 2

  18. On the Origin of the Large Magnetic Anisotropy of Rare Earth-Cobalt Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szpunar, B.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1979-01-01

    Experimental data on the magnetocrystalline anisotropy in Co, YCo5, GdCo5, SmCo5 and Y2Co17 is analysed using a single-ion crystal field and isotropic exchange interaction. The large magnetic anisotropy at high temperatures in the alloys is due to significant deviations in the alloy lattices...

  19. Anisotropy analysis of low cement concrete by ultrasonic measurements and image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinović Sanja P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The analized material was high alumina low cement castable sintered at three different temperatures. Influence of initial material anisotropy on the thermal shock resistance as well as changes of anisotropy level during the thermal shock were studied. Water quench test was used as an experimental method for the thermal stability testing. Surface anisotropy was analysed by image analysis and structural anisotropy using ultrasonic measurements. The results pointed out that the highest homogeinity and the lowest surface and structural anisotropy was for the samples sintered at 1600ºC. Surface anistoropy had prevailing infuence on behavior of material during the thermal shock, but the structural anisotropy should not be neglected. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 33007

  20. Anisotropic gravitational instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyachenko, V.L.; Fridman, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Exact solutions of stability problems are obtained for two anisotropic gravitational systems of different geometries - a layer of finite thickness at rest and a rotating cylinder of finite radius. It is shown that the anisotropic gravitational instability which develops in both cases is of Jeans type. However, in contrast to the classical aperiodic Jeans instability, this instability is oscillatory. The physics of the anisotropic gravitational instability is investigated. It is shown that in a gravitating layer this instability is due, in particular, to excitation of previously unknown interchange-Jeans modes. In the cylinder, the oscillatory Jeans instability is associated with excitation of a rotational branch, this also being responsible for the beam gravitational instability. This is the reason why this instability and the anisotropic gravitational instability have so much in common

  1. Electrothermal instability growth in magnetically driven pulsed power liners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Kyle J.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Yu, Edmund P.; Herrmann, Mark C.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Smith, Ian C.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Knudson, Marcus D.; Nakhleh, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the role of electro-thermal instabilities on the dynamics of magnetically accelerated implosion systems. Electro-thermal instabilities result from non-uniform heating due to temperature dependence in the conductivity of a material. Comparatively little is known about these types of instabilities compared to the well known Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. We present simulations that show electrothermal instabilities form immediately after the surface material of a conductor melts and can act as a significant seed to subsequent MRT instability growth. We also present the results of several experiments performed on Sandia National Laboratories Z accelerator to investigate signatures of electrothermal instability growth on well characterized initially solid aluminum and copper rods driven with a 20 MA, 100 ns risetime current pulse. These experiments show excellent agreement with electrothermal instability simulations and exhibit larger instability growth than can be explained by MRT theory alone.

  2. Kinetic theory of tearing instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R.D.; Dobrott, D.; Wang, T.S.

    1975-01-01

    The guiding-center kinetic equation with Fokker-Planck collision term is used to study, in cylindrical geometry, a class of dissipative instabilities of which the classical tearing mode is an archetype. Variational solution of the kinetic equation obviates the use of an approximate Ohm's law or adiabatic assumption, as used in previous studies, and it provides a dispersive relation which is uniformly valid for any ratio of wave frequency to collision frequency. One result of using the rigorous collision operator is the prediction of a new instability. This instability, driven by the electron temperature gradient, is predicted to occur under the long mean-free path conditions of present tokamak experiments, and has significant features in common with the kink-like oscillations observed in such experiments

  3. Ballooning-mirror instability and internally driven Pc 4--5 wave events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Qian, Q.; Takahashi, K.; Lui, A.T.Y.

    1994-03-01

    A kinetic-MHD field-aligned eigenmode stability analysis of low frequency ballooning-mirror instabilities has been performed for anisotropic pressure plasma sin the magnetosphere. The ballooning mode is mainly a transverse wave driven unstable by pressure gradient in the bad curvature region. The mirror mode with a dominant compressional magnetic field perturbation is excited when the product of plasma beta and pressure anisotropy (P perpendicular /P parallel > 1) is large. From the AMPTE/CCE particle and magnetic field data observed during Pc 4--5 wave events the authors compute the ballooning-mirror instability parameters and perform a correlation study with the theoretical instability threshold. They find that compressional Pc 5 waves approximately satisfy the ballooning-mirror instability condition, and transverse Pc 4--5 waves are probably related to resonant ballooning instabilities with small pressure anisotropy

  4. Plasma instabilities stimulated by HF transmitters in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, R.F.; Vinas, A.F.

    1988-01-01

    Diffuse incoherent signal returns are often observed on Alouette and ISIS topside ionograms in addition to coherent echoes of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves. These diffuse signals, which at times can be the dominant features on topside ionograms, have been attributed to sounder-induced temperature anisotropies which drive the Harris instability. Previous theoretical investigations were based on the electrostatic approximation to the dispersion equation. The present paper will present calculations indicating that when the electromagnetic terms are retained in the dispersion equation and when the sounder-stimulated perpendicular electron temperature approaches 1 keV, then the whistler mode can have a temporal growth rate larger than the electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic wave mode central to the diffuse resonance problem. Present sounders lack the power and antenna lengths to generate whistler mode waves in this manner. In addition, such waves would have large group velocities and would quickly leave the vicinity of the sounder. Experiments to investigate the wave growth, propagation, and damping of such stimulated waves are planned for the 1990s using a highly flexible sounder on the Space Shuttle and a receiver on a subsatellite. 30 references

  5. Thermal behavior for a nanoscale two ferromagnetic phase system based on random anisotropy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraca, D.; Sanchez, F.H.; Pampillo, L.G.; Saccone, F.D.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in theory that explain the magnetic behavior as function of temperature for two phase nanocrystalline soft magnetic materials are presented. The theory developed is based on the well known random anisotropy model, which includes the crystalline exchange stiffness and anisotropy energies in both amorphous and crystalline phases. The phenomenological behavior of the coercivity was obtained in the temperature range between the amorphous phase Curie temperature and the crystalline phase one.

  6. Pad-mode-induced instantaneous mode instability for simple models of brake systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberst, S.; Lai, J. C. S.

    2015-10-01

    Automotive disc brake squeal is fugitive, transient and remains difficult to predict. In particular, instantaneous mode squeal observed experimentally does not seem to be associated with mode coupling and its mechanism is not clear. The effects of contact pressures, friction coefficients as well as material properties (pressure and temperature dependency and anisotropy) for brake squeal propensity have not been systematically explored. By analysing a finite element model of an isotropic pad sliding on a plate similar to that of a previously reported experimental study, pad modes have been identified and found to be stable using conventional complex eigenvalue analysis. However, by subjecting the model to contact pressure harmonic excitation for a range of pressures and friction coefficients, a forced response analysis reveals that the dissipated energy for pad modes is negative and becomes more negative with increasing contact pressures and friction coefficients, indicating the potential for instabilities. The frequency of the pad mode in the sliding direction is within the range of squeal frequencies observed experimentally. Nonlinear time series analysis of the vibration velocity also confirms the evolution of instabilities induced by pad modes as the friction coefficient increases. By extending this analysis to a more realistic but simple brake model in the form of a pad-on-disc system, in-plane pad-modes, which a complex eigenvalue analysis predicts to be stable, have also been identified by negative dissipated energy for both isotropic and anisotropic pad material properties. The influence of contact pressures on potential instabilities has been found to be more dominant than changes in material properties owing to changes in pressure or temperature. Results here suggest that instantaneous mode squeal is likely caused by in-plane pad-mode instabilities.

  7. Angle and temperature dependence of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy and the microscopic magnetic moments of the ferromagnetic semi-metal CrO{sub 2}; Winkel- und Temperaturabhaengigkeit der magnetokristallinen Anisotropieenergie und der mikroskopischen magnetischen Momente des ferromagnetischen Halbmetalls CrO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, S.

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this work was to examine, by use of XMCD-effect and additional measurements with SQUID-magnetometer, spin moments and hysteresis loops, but also to clarify the intrinsic properties like magnetocrystalline anisotropy, magnetic dipole term, and the nearly quenched orbital moment. The XMCD-measurements were done at the Cr L{sub 2,3}- and the O K-edge. The results for CrO{sub 2} show a strong dependence of the orbital, the sum of spin moment and magnetic dipole term, and the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy from the angle between rutile a- and c-axis. Even more than the complete orbital moment, two separable and different spectral features show strong alterations of the different orbital moments. In a second part of this work the temperature dependence was investigated. The aim was to clarify the origin of the orbital moment, dipole term, and MAE in dependence of the spin moment and compare the results to different theoretical models. The extracted orbital moments and the magnetic dipole term show the same temperature dependence as the spin moment. In the following a dependence of the squared measured spin moment could be found for the MAE. For the first time the magnetic dipole term could be identified as the reason of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy. A strong Cr-O hybridisation was found, which shows in a similar structure and temperature dependence of the orbital moments for Cr L{sub 2,3} and the XMCD effect at O-K edge. (orig.)

  8. Secondary instabilities of hypersonic stationary crossflow waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Joshua B.

    A sharp, circular 7° half-angle cone was tested in the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel at 6° angle of attack. Using a variety of roughness configurations, measurements were made using temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) and fast pressure sensors. High-frequency secondary instabilities of the stationary crossflow waves were detected near the aft end of the cone, from 110° to 163° from the windward ray. At least two frequency bands of the secondary instabilities were measured. The secondary instabilities have high coherence between upstream and downstream sensor pairs. In addition, the amplitudes of the instabilities increase with the addition of roughness elements near the nose of the cone. Two of the measured instabilities were captured over a range of axial Reynolds numbers of about 1 - 2 million, with amplitudes ranging from low to turbulent breakdown. For these instabilities, the wave speed and amplitude growth can be calculated. The wave speeds were all near the edge velocity. Measured growth before breakdown for the two instabilities are between e3 and e4 from background noise levels. The initial linear growth rates for the instabilities are near 50 /m. Simultaneous measurement of two frequency bands of the secondary instabilities was made during a single run. It was found that each mode was spatially confined within a small azimuthal region, and that the regions of peak amplitude for one mode correspond to regions of minimal amplitude for the other.

  9. Solar diurnal anisotropy measured using muons in GRAPES-3 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mean energy of muons at sea level is ∼4 GeV with a rel- .... of decays of mesons and muons work against each other resulting in temperature coef- ..... The mean muon rate of 16 modules measured every 15 min for one week interval from .... 4. 8. 12. 16. 20. 24. Hours. Figure 12. Solar diurnal anisotropy measured in ...

  10. Influence of magnetic anisotropy on the superferromagnetic ordering in nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Christiansen, Gunnar Dan

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic interaction between ultrafine particles may result in superferromagnetism, i.e., ordering of the magnetic moments of particles which would be superparamagnetic if they were noninteracting. In this article we discuss the influence of the magnetic anisotropy on the temperature dependence o...

  11. Anisotropy in the deep Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowicz, Barbara; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2017-08-01

    Seismic anisotropy has been found in many regions of the Earth's interior. Its presence in the Earth's crust has been known since the 19th century, and is due in part to the alignment of anisotropic crystals in rocks, and in part to patterns in the distribution of fractures and pores. In the upper mantle, seismic anisotropy was discovered 50 years ago, and can be attributed for the most part, to the alignment of intrinsically anisotropic olivine crystals during large scale deformation associated with convection. There is some indication for anisotropy in the transition zone, particularly in the vicinity of subducted slabs. Here we focus on the deep Earth - the lower mantle and core, where anisotropy is not yet mapped in detail, nor is there consensus on its origin. Most of the lower mantle appears largely isotropic, except in the last 200-300 km, in the D″ region, where evidence for seismic anisotropy has been accumulating since the late 1980s, mostly from shear wave splitting measurements. Recently, a picture has been emerging, where strong anisotropy is associated with high shear velocities at the edges of the large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in the central Pacific and under Africa. These observations are consistent with being due to the presence of highly anisotropic MgSiO3 post-perovskite crystals, aligned during the deformation of slabs impinging on the core-mantle boundary, and upwelling flow within the LLSVPs. We also discuss mineral physics aspects such as ultrahigh pressure deformation experiments, first principles calculations to obtain information about elastic properties, and derivation of dislocation activity based on bonding characteristics. Polycrystal plasticity simulations can predict anisotropy but models are still highly idealized and neglect the complex microstructure of polyphase aggregates with strong and weak components. A promising direction for future progress in understanding the origin of seismic anisotropy in the deep mantle

  12. Measuring the cosmological lepton asymmetry through the CMB anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Kinney, W H; Kinney, William H.; Riotto, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    A large lepton asymmetry in the Universe is still a viable possibility and leads to many interesting phenomena such as gauge symmetry nonrestoration at high temperature. We show that a large lepton asymmetry changes the predicted cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy and that any degeneracy in the relic neutrino sea will be measured to a precision of 1% or better when the CMB anisotropy is measured at the accuracy expected to result from the planned satellite missions MAP and Planck. In fact, the current measurements already put an upper limit on the lepton asymmetry of the Universe which is stronger than the one coming from considerations of primordial nucleosynthesis and structure formation.

  13. Magnetic anisotropy of nonmodulated Ni-Mn-Ga martensite revisited

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heczko, Oleg; Straka, L.; Novák, Václav; Fähler, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 9 (2010), 09A914/1-09A914/3 ISSN 0021-8979 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100100913 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic anisotropy of non-modulated martensite * temperature dependence of anisotropy * Ni-Mn-Ga * adaptive martensite Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.064, year: 2010 http://jap.aip.org/resource/1/japiau/v107/i9/p09A914_s1

  14. From instabilities to multifragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, P.; Jacquot, B.; Colonna, M.; Guarnera, A.

    1994-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to show that, in many physical situations, the spinodal decomposition of unstable systems can be correctly described by stochastic mean-field approaches. Such theories predict that the occurrence of spinodal instability leading the multifragmentation of an expended nuclear system, can be signed through the observation of time scales for the fragment formation of the order of 100 fm/c and of typical fragment size around A=20. We will finally discuss the fact that these fragments are formed at finite temperature and so can subsequently decay in flight. Finally, we will give some hints about possible experimental signals of such first order phase transitions. (authors). 12 refs., 5 figs

  15. From instabilities to multifragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, P.; Jacquot, B. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Colonna, M.; Guarnera, A. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France)]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy)

    1994-12-31

    The main purpose of this article is to show that, in many physical situations, the spinodal decomposition of unstable systems can be correctly described by stochastic mean-field approaches. Such theories predict that the occurrence of spinodal instability leading the multifragmentation of an expended nuclear system, can be signed through the observation of time scales for the fragment formation of the order of 100 fm/c and of typical fragment size around A=20. We will finally discuss the fact that these fragments are formed at finite temperature and so can subsequently decay in flight. Finally, we will give some hints about possible experimental signals of such first order phase transitions. (authors). 12 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Magnetic anisotropy of (Sm, Y)2Fe17Ny compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Y.; Tegus, O.; Li, Q.A.; Tang, N.; Yu, M.J.; Zhao, R.W.; Kuang, J.P.; Yang, F.M.; Zhou, G.F.; Li, X.; Boer, F.R. de

    1992-01-01

    A study of the crystal structure and the magnetic properties, especially the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of (Sm 1-x Y x ) 2 Fe 17 N y compounds (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0, 2 2 Zn 17 - or Th 2 Ni 17 -type structure as the original compounds. The Curie temperatures decrease from 750 to 700 K as x increases from 0 to 1. The anisotropy field decreases linearly with increasing yttrium content. The spin reorientation has been investigated by means of high field magnetization measurements, AC-susceptibility measurements and thermomagnetic analysis, combined with X-ray diffraction. The anisotropy constants K 1 , K 2 and K 3 were derived by a phenomenological analysis, using magnetization curves measured in high fields, applied perpendicular to the alignment direction of the powder samples. A tentative spin phase diagram of the series is presented. (orig.)

  17. Eckhaus and Benjamin-Feir instabilities near a weakly inverted bifurcation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brand, H.R.; Deissler, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    We investigate how the criteria for two prototype instabilities in one-dimensional pattern-forming systems, namely for the Eckhaus instability and for the Benjamin-Feir instability, change as one goes from a continuous bifurcation to a spatially periodic or spatially and/or time-periodic state to the corresponding weakly inverted, i.e., hysteretic, cases. We also give the generalization to two-dimensional patterns in systems with anisotropy as they arise, for example, for hydrodynamic instabilities in nematic liquid crystals

  18. Collective instabilities of self-gravitating systems, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Takahara, Fumio; Ikeuchi, Satoru

    1975-01-01

    The instability modes of rotating self-gravitating systems are investigated on the assumption of infinitely long cylinder. The systems under consideration are a collisionless stellar system with anisotropic velocity dispersion and a gaseous system with anisotropic pressure. In the collisionless stellar system, the Jeans instability mode and the Harris instability mode exist. The dispersion relation is solved numerically and the following results are obtained: the Harris instability occurs even in the region where Wu did not treat, and although its growth rate amounts to the order of angular velocity of the system for sufficient anisotropy, the Harris instability always accompanies the Jeans instability and the latter is always greater than the former in growth rate. In the gaseous system exist the Jeans instability mode and a certain overstable mode, which are different from the Harris instability mode. It is shown that the overstable mode occurs due to coupling of modes. In relation to these results, some problems in galactic structure are discussed. (auth.)

  19. An estimator for statistical anisotropy from the CMB bispectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartolo, N.; Dimastrogiovanni, E.; Matarrese, S.; Liguori, M.; Riotto, A.

    2012-01-01

    Various data analyses of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) provide observational hints of statistical isotropy breaking. Some of these features can be studied within the framework of primordial vector fields in inflationary theories which generally display some level of statistical anisotropy both in the power spectrum and in higher-order correlation functions. Motivated by these observations and the recent theoretical developments in the study of primordial vector fields, we develop the formalism necessary to extract statistical anisotropy information from the three-point function of the CMB temperature anisotropy. We employ a simplified vector field model and parametrize the bispectrum of curvature fluctuations in such a way that all the information about statistical anisotropy is encoded in some parameters λ LM (which measure the anisotropic to the isotropic bispectrum amplitudes). For such a template bispectrum, we compute an optimal estimator for λ LM and the expected signal-to-noise ratio. We estimate that, for f NL ≅ 30, an experiment like Planck can be sensitive to a ratio of the anisotropic to the isotropic amplitudes of the bispectrum as small as 10%. Our results are complementary to the information coming from a power spectrum analysis and particularly relevant for those models where statistical anisotropy turns out to be suppressed in the power spectrum but not negligible in the bispectrum

  20. Phenomenological description of anisotropy effects in some ferromagnetic superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shopova, Diana V., E-mail: sho@issp.bas.bg [TCCM Research Group, Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Todorov, Michail D. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Sofia, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-07-03

    We study phenomenologically the role of anisotropy in ferromagnetic superconductors UGe{sub 2}, URhGe, and UCoGe for the description of their phase diagrams. We use the Ginzburg–Landau free energy in its uniform form as we will consider only spatially independent solutions. This is an expansion of previously derived results where the effect of Cooper-pair and crystal anisotropies is not taken into account. The three compounds are separately discussed with the special stress on UGe{sub 2}. The main effect comes from the strong uniaxial anisotropy of magnetization while the anisotropy of Cooper pairs and crystal anisotropy only slightly change the phase diagram in the vicinity of Curie temperature. The limitations of this approach are also discussed. - Highlights: • Anisotropic Landau energy for description of ferromagnetic superconductors is proposed. • Meissner phases are described with their existence and stability conditions. • The application of the model to UGe{sub 2} is discussed. • The limitations to apply the model for description of experimental data are explained.

  1. The Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C. L.

    1994-12-01

    The properties of the cosmic microwave background radiation provide unique constraints on the history and evolution of the universe. The first detection of anisotropy of the microwave radiation was reported by the COBE Team in 1992, based on the first year of flight data. The latest analyses of the first two years of COBE data are reviewed in this talk, including the amplitude of the microwave anisotropy as a function of angular scale and the statistical nature of the fluctuations. The two-year results are generally consistent with the earlier first year results, but the additional data allow for a better determination of the key cosmological parameters. In this talk the COBE results are compared with other observational anisotropy results and directions for future cosmic microwave anisotropy observations will be discussed. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) is responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE). Scientific guidance is provided by the COBE Science Working Group.

  2. Alfven-ion-cyclotron instability in the central cell of TMX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, D.C.; Baldwin, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    The central cell of TMX may require hot-ion injection. The resulting velocity-space anisotropy together with the length of the central homogeneous region raise the possibility of convective AIC instability. In this report we demonstrate that the Rosenbluth criterion of less than a thousand-fold amplitude amplification per pass can be satisfied by ion distributions which nevertheless have sufficient anisotropy to be confined within the central cell

  3. Helical instability in film blowing process: Analogy to buckling instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo Sung; Kwon, Ilyoung; Jung, Hyun Wook; Hyun, Jae Chun

    2017-12-01

    The film blowing process is one of the most important polymer processing operations, widely used for producing bi-axially oriented film products in a single-step process. Among the instabilities observed in this film blowing process, i.e., draw resonance and helical motion occurring on the inflated film bubble, the helical instability is a unique phenomenon portraying the snake-like undulation motion of the bubble, having the period on the order of few seconds. This helical instability in the film blowing process is commonly found at the process conditions of a high blow-up ratio with too low a freezeline position and/or too high extrusion temperature. In this study, employing an analogy to the buckling instability for falling viscous threads, the compressive force caused by the pressure difference between inside and outside of the film bubble is introduced into the simulation model along with the scaling law derived from the force balance between viscous force and centripetal force of the film bubble. The simulation using this model reveals a close agreement with the experimental results of the film blowing process of polyethylene polymers such as low density polyethylene and linear low density polyethylene.

  4. Anisotropy of acoustic properties in paratellurite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parygin, Vladimir N.

    1996-01-01

    One of the peculiarities of the TeO 2 crystal consists of its strong acoustic anisotropy. This anisotropy demonstrates itself by acoustic energy walk-off and anisotropic distortion of an acoustic beam. Four constants completely characterise the acoustic anisotropy of the medium. In this paper these constants are calculated for various directions of the acoustic beam in crystal. (authors)

  5. Ginzburg-Landau theory of the superheating field anisotropy of layered superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liarte, Danilo B.; Transtrum, Mark K.; Sethna, James P.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the effects of material anisotropy on the superheating field of layered superconductors. We provide an intuitive argument both for the existence of a superheating field, and its dependence on anisotropy, for κ =λ /ξ (the ratio of magnetic to superconducting healing lengths) both large and small. On the one hand, the combination of our estimates with published results using a two-gap model for MgB2 suggests high anisotropy of the superheating field near zero temperature. On the other hand, within Ginzburg-Landau theory for a single gap, we see that the superheating field shows significant anisotropy only when the crystal anisotropy is large and the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ is small. We then conclude that only small anisotropies in the superheating field are expected for typical unconventional superconductors near the critical temperature. Using a generalized form of Ginzburg Landau theory, we do a quantitative calculation for the anisotropic superheating field by mapping the problem to the isotropic case, and present a phase diagram in terms of anisotropy and κ , showing type I, type II, or mixed behavior (within Ginzburg-Landau theory), and regions where each asymptotic solution is expected. We estimate anisotropies for a number of different materials, and discuss the importance of these results for radio-frequency cavities for particle accelerators.

  6. Texture and Elastic Anisotropy of Mantle Olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, A. N.; Ivankina, T. I.; Bourilitchev, D. E.; Klima, K.; Locajicek, T.; Pros, Z.

    Eight olivine rock samples from different European regions were collected for neu- tron texture analyses and for P-wave velocity measurements by means of ultrasonic sounding at various confining pressures. The orientation distribution functions (ODFs) of olivine were determined and pole figures of the main crystallographic planes were calculated. The spatial P-wave velocity distributions were determined at confining pressures from 0.1 to 400 MPa and modelled from the olivine textures. In dependence upon the type of rock (xenolith or dunite) different behavior of both the P-wave veloc- ity distributions and the anisotropy coefficients with various confining pressures was observed. In order to explain the interdependence of elastic anisotropy and hydrostatic pressure, a model for polycrystalline olivine rocks was suggested, which considers the influence of the crystallographic and the mechanical textures on the elastic behaviour of the polycrystal. Since the olivine texture depends upon the active slip systems and the deformation temperature, neutron texture analyses enable us to estimate depth and thermodynamical conditions during texture formation.

  7. Site-specific magnetic anisotropies in R2Fe14B systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, T.; Tsuchiura, H.

    2018-04-01

    The local magnetic anisotropy of R ions in R2Fe14B (R = Dy, Ho) systems is studied based on a microscopic effective spin model constructed from the information obtained by using first-principles calculations. By taking into account up to 6-th order crystal electric field parameters, the model satisfactory describes the observed magnetization curves and the temperature dependence of anisotropy constants. We found that at low temperatures, the noncollinear structure appears in the Ho2Fe14B system reflecting the local magnetic anisotropy.

  8. Analysis of the magnetic anisotropy in SmCo5 and GdCo5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, T.; Jin, H.; Groessinger, R.; Kou, X.; Kirchmayr, H.R.

    1991-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the magnetic anisotropy constant K 1 for SmCo 5 and GdCo 5 is well reproduced by calculations based on a single-ion model taking into account the anisotropies of the R--Co exchange interaction and the Co-sublattice magnetic moment. The anisotropy of the R--Co exchange interaction plays an important role in reproducing the experimental K 1 (T) for SmCo 5 and GdCo 5 . It is found that the absolute value of the second order crystalline electric field parameter A 0 2 in SmCo 5 decreases monotonically with increasing temperature

  9. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation for S=1 Heisenberg model with uniaxial anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Mitsuaki; Batista, Cristian; Kawashima, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    We perform quantum Monte Carlo simulations for S=1 Heisenberg model with an uniaxial anisotropy. The system exhibits a phase transition as we vary the anisotropy and a long range order appears at a finite temperature when the exchange interaction J is comparable to the uniaxial anisotropy D. We investigate quantum critical phenomena of this model and obtain the line of the phase transition which approaches a power-law with logarithmic corrections at low temperature. We derive the form of logarithmic corrections analytically and compare it to our simulation results

  10. Buneman instability in hot electron plasma (Te>>Ti)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, S.M.; Sayed, Y.A.; Sayed, R.A.

    1986-07-01

    We shall investigate the linear excitation of electrostatic current Buneman instability in both unmagnetized and magnetized homogeneous plasma. The frequency, growth rate and conditions of excitation of such instability are obtained analytically. We consider that the current velocity u (due to relative streaming of ions and electrons) slightly exceeds the instability threshold velocity u cr and that the electron temperature is much higher than the ion temperature (T e >>T i ). (author)

  11. Tailoring of magnetic anisotropy of Fe-rich microwires by stress induced anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukov, A.; Zhukova, V.; Larin, V.; Gonzalez, J.

    2006-01-01

    We report on tailoring of magnetic properties and GMI of Fe 69 B 12 Si 14 C 5 glass-coated microwires by stress annealing. The induced magnetic anisotropy field depend on temperature and time of annealing and applied stress. At certain conditions considerable GMI effect (up to 65%) has been achieved. Application of the tensile stress drastically affects the shape of the hysteresis loop of stress-annealed sample and its GMI effect. In this way the shape of the hysteresis loop and GMI effect can by tailored by controllable way

  12. Numerical analysis of anisotropic diffusion effect on ICF hydrodynamic instabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olazabal-Loumé M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of anisotropic diffusion on hydrodynamic instabilities in the context of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF flows is numerically assessed. This anisotropy occurs in indirect-drive when laminated ablators are used to modify the lateral transport [1,2]. In direct-drive, non-local transport mechanisms and magnetic fields may modify the lateral conduction [3]. In this work, numerical simulations obtained with the code PERLE [4], dedicated to linear stability analysis, are compared with previous theoretical results [5]. In these approaches, the diffusion anisotropy can be controlled by a characteristic coefficient which enables a comprehensive study. This work provides new results on the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT, ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM and Darrieus-Landau (DL instabilities.

  13. Magnetic anisotropy of lecithin membranes. A new anisotropy susceptometer

    OpenAIRE

    Scholz, F.; Boroske, E.; Helfrich, W.

    1984-01-01

    Cylindrical giant vesicles prepared from egg lecithin and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) are oriented in an external magnetic field and observed by phase contrast microscopy. The anisotropic part of the diamagnetic susceptibility of the lecithin membrane is determined from the distribution of angles between the magnetic field and the long cylinder axis due to thermal fluctuations. The anisotropy of DMPC is found to be larger by a factor of 2 than that of egg lecithin. This...

  14. New instability strip for hot degenerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starrfield, S.G.; Cox, A.N.; Hodson, S.W.

    1980-01-01

    A new kind of variable star, designated as PG1159-035 is distinguished not only by the complete lack of hydrogen in its spectrum but also by an effective temperature that exceeds 8 x 10 4 K. The star does not fall near any of the known regions of instability in the HR diagram which suggests that the instability mechanism will not be helium and hydrogen ionization as in the Cepheid variables. The more unusual compositions are examined in order to discover the cause of the instability in PG1159-035

  15. Evolution of anisotropy in bcc Fe distorted by interstitial boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gölden, Dominik; Zhang, Hongbin; Radulov, Iliya; Dirba, Imants; Komissinskiy, Philipp; Hildebrandt, Erwin; Alff, Lambert

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of magnetic anisotropy in bcc Fe as a function of interstitial boron atoms was investigated in thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The thermodynamic nonequilibrium conditions during film growth allowed one to stabilize an interstitial boron content of about 14 at .% accompanied by lattice tetragonalization. The c /a ratio scaled linearly with the boron content up to a maximum value of 1.05 at 300 °C substrate growth temperature, with a room-temperature magnetization of. In contrast to nitrogen interstitials, the magnetic easy axis remained in-plane with an anisotropy of approximately -5.1 ×106erg /cm3 . Density functional theory calculations using the measured lattice parameters confirm this value and show that boron local ordering indeed favors in-plane magnetization. Given the increased temperature stability of boron interstitials as compared to nitrogen interstitials, this study will help to find possible ways to manipulate boron interstitials into a more favorable local order.

  16. High-pressure mechanical instability in rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byerlee, J D; Brace, W F

    1969-05-09

    At a confining pressure of a few kilobars, deformation of many sedimentary rocks, altered mafic rocks, porous volcanic rocks, and sand is ductile, in that instabilities leading to audible elastic shocks are absent. At pressures of 7 to 10 kilobars, however, unstable faulting and stick-slip in certain of these rocks was observed. This high pressure-low temperature instability might be responsible for earthquakes in deeply buried sedimentary or volcanic sequences.

  17. A Comparative Study for Modeling Displacement Instabilities due to TGO Formation in TBCs of High-Temperature Components in Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports two numerical simulation methods for modeling displacement instabilities around a surface groove in a metal substrate used in nuclear power plant. The amplitude change in the groove, the downward displacement at the base node, and the groove displacement at the periphery were simulated using ABAQUS to compare the results from two methods, as well as the tangential stress in the elements at the groove base and periphery. The comparison showed that for the tangential stress two methods were in close agreement for all thermal cycles. For the amplitude change, the downward displacement, the groove displacement, and the stress distribution, the two methods were in close agreement for the first 3 to 6 thermal cycles. After that, inconsistency increased with the number of thermal cycles. It is interesting that the thermal cycle at which the discrepancy between the two methods began to occur corresponded to a thermally grown oxide (TGO thickness of 1 μm, which showed the accuracy of the present work over the classic method. It is concluded that the present work’s numerical simulation scheme worked better with a thinner TGO layer than the classic method and could overcome the limitation of TGO thickness by simulating any thickness.

  18. Regulation of ion drifts and anisotropies by parametrically unstable finite-amplitude Alfvén-cyclotron waves in the fast solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maneva, Y. G. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Araneda, J. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción, 4070386 (Chile); Marsch, E., E-mail: yana.g.maneva@nasa.gov [Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics, Christian Albrechts University at Kiel, D-24118 Kiel (Germany)

    2014-03-10

    We study the preferential heating and differential acceleration of minor ions by dissipation of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) generated by parametric instabilities of a finite-amplitude monochromatic Alfvén-cyclotron pump wave. We consider the associated kinetic effects of Landau damping and nonlinear pitch-angle scattering of protons and α particles in the tenuous plasma of coronal holes and the fast solar wind. Various data collected by Wind spacecraft show signatures for a local transverse heating of the minor ions, presumably by Alfvén-cyclotron wave dissipation, and an unexpected parallel heating by a so far unknown mechanism. Here, we present the results from a set of 1.5 dimensional hybrid simulations in search for a plausible explanation for the observed field-aligned kinetic features in the fast solar wind minor ions. We investigate the origin and regulation of ion relative drifts and temperature anisotropies in low plasma β, fast solar wind conditions. Depending on their initial drifts, both ion species can heat up not only transversely through cyclotron resonance and non-resonant wave-particle interactions, but also strongly in the parallel direction by Landau damping of the daughter IAWs. We discuss the dependence of the relative ion drifts and temperature anisotropies on the plasma β of the individual species and we describe the effect of the pump wave amplitude on the ion heating and acceleration.

  19. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10(exp -7), where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  20. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darryl Blalock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA. Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA.

  1. Joint instability and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA.

  2. Generalized laser filamentation instability coupled to cooling instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, E.P.; Wong, J.; Garrison, J.

    1984-01-01

    We consider the propagation of laser light in an initially slightly nonuniform plasma. The classical dispersion relation for the laser filamentation growth rate (see e.g., B. Langdon, in the 1980 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Laser Program Annual Report, pp. 3-56, UCRL-50021-80, 1981) can be generalized to include other acoustical effects. For example, we find that the inclusion of potential imbalances in the heating and cooling rates of the ambient medium due to density and temperature perturbations can cause the laser filamentation mode to bifurcate into a cooling instability mode at long acoustic wavelengths. We also attempt to study semi-analytically the nonlinear evolution of this and related instabilities. These results have wide applications to a variety of chemical gas lasers and phenomena related to laser-target interactions (e.g., jet-like behavior)

  3. Development and anisotropy of three-dimensional turbulence in a current sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofri, M.; Veltri, P.; Malara, F.

    2007-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of three-dimensional reconnection instabilities are studied in a current sheet where many resonant surfaces are simultaneously present at different locations of the simulation domain. The nonlinear evolution produces the development of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The development of the energy spectrum is followed until the energy is transported to the dissipative length scale and the anisotropy of the spectrum is analyzed. The energy cascade is affected by the Alfven effect and it takes place mainly in the direction perpendicular to the local average magnetic field. Anisotropy is also affected by propagation of perturbations across the main magnetic field, due to the growth of a transverse component related to reconnection. The direction of anisotropy varies with the position in space. The spectral index is different both from what is found in homogeneous isotropic turbulence and from the values predicted for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with a uniform large-scale magnetic field

  4. Thickness and angular dependent magnetic anisotropy of La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 thin films by Vectorial Magneto Optical Kerr Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaluvadi, S. K.; Perna, P.; Ajejas, F.; Camarero, J.; Pautrat, A.; Flament, S.; Méchin, L.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the in-plane magnetic anisotropy in La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 thin films grown on SrTiO3 (001) substrate using angular dependent room temperature Vectorial Magneto-Optical Kerr Magnetometry. The experimental data reveals that the magnetic anisotropy symmetry landscape significantly changes depending upon the strain and thickness. At low film thickness (12 and 25 nm) the dominant uniaxial anisotropy is due to interface effects, step edges due to mis-cut angle of SrTiO3 substrate. At intermediate thickness, the magnetic anisotropy presents a competition between magnetocrystalline (biaxial) and substrate step induced (uniaxial) anisotropy. Depending upon their relative strengths, a profound biaxial or uniaxial or mixed anisotropy is favoured. Above the critical thickness, magnetocrystalline anisotropy dominates all other effects and shows a biaxial anisotropy.

  5. Influence of carbonization conditions on the development of different types of optical anisotropy in cokes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, J W; Reynolds, M J; Shaw, F H

    1975-01-01

    The vitrain components of a series of coal samples were carbonized at temperatures from 400 to 1000/sup 0/C at different rates of heating ranging from 0.5 to 10/sup 0/K/min and utilizing soaking times up to 24 hr. Polished specimens prepared from the carbonized products were examined microscopically under polarized light in order to determine the proportions of the various types of optical anisotropy present in them. The variations in heating rate and soaking time were found to exert little significant influence on the anisotropy developed in high-temperature cokes. But in semicokes produced at carbonization temperatures within the plastic range the influence of the carbonization conditions was much more pronounced with the effects being interrelated. Decreasing the heating rate or increasing the soaking time led to the optical anisotropy generally becoming detectable at lower carbonization temperatures. Fast heating rates caused an increase in the rate of transformation of the fine-grain mosaic anisotropy into coarser-grained types of anisotropy and increased soaking time led to enhanced anisotropic development in the semicokes produced at temperatures within the plastic range. The type of anisotropy developed in cokes is closely related to the release of volatile matter and the plasticity developed during carbonization and the conclusion is drawn that the balance between these factors controls the extent of the anisotropic development.

  6. Magnetic anisotropy in (Ga,Mn)As: Influence of epitaxial strain and hole concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glunk, M.; Daeubler, J.; Dreher, L.; Schwaiger, S.; Schoch, W.; Sauer, R.; Limmer, W.; Brandlmaier, A.; Goennenwein, S. T. B.; Bihler, C.; Brandt, M. S.

    2009-05-01

    We present a systematic study on the influence of epitaxial strain and hole concentration on the magnetic anisotropy in (Ga,Mn)As at 4.2 K. The strain was gradually varied over a wide range from tensile to compressive by growing a series of (Ga,Mn)As layers with 5% Mn on relaxed graded (In,Ga)As/GaAs templates with different In concentration. The hole density, the Curie temperature, and the relaxed lattice constant of the as-grown and annealed (Ga,Mn)As layers turned out to be essentially unaffected by the strain. Angle-dependent magnetotransport measurements performed at different magnetic-field strengths were used to probe the magnetic anisotropy. The measurements reveal a pronounced linear dependence of the uniaxial out-of-plane anisotropy on both strain and hole density. Whereas the uniaxial and cubic in-plane anisotropies are nearly constant, the cubic out-of-plane anisotropy changes sign when the magnetic easy axis flips from in-plane to out-of-plane. The experimental results for the magnetic anisotropy are quantitatively compared with calculations of the free energy based on a mean-field Zener model. Almost perfect agreement between experiment and theory is found for the uniaxial out-of-plane and cubic in-plane anisotropy parameters of the as-grown samples. In addition, magnetostriction constants are derived from the anisotropy data.

  7. Hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses topics on hydrodynamics instabilities in inertial confinement: linear analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor instability; ablation-surface instability; bubble rise in late-stage Rayleigh-Taylor instability; and saturation and multimode interactions in intermediate-stage Rayleigh-Taylor instability

  8. Genomic instability following irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker-Klom, U.B.; Goehde, W.

    2001-01-01

    Ionising irradiation may induce genomic instability. The broad spectrum of stress reactions in eukaryontic cells to irradiation complicates the discovery of cellular targets and pathways inducing genomic instability. Irradiation may initiate genomic instability by deletion of genes controlling stability, by induction of genes stimulating instability and/or by activating endogeneous cellular viruses. Alternatively or additionally it is discussed that the initiation of genomic instability may be a consequence of radiation or other agents independently of DNA damage implying non nuclear targets, e.g. signal cascades. As a further mechanism possibly involved our own results may suggest radiation-induced changes in chromatin structure. Once initiated the process of genomic instability probably is perpetuated by endogeneous processes necessary for proliferation. Genomic instability may be a cause or a consequence of the neoplastic phenotype. As a conclusion from the data available up to now a new interpretation of low level radiation effects for radiation protection and in radiotherapy appears useful. The detection of the molecular mechanisms of genomic instability will be important in this context and may contribute to a better understanding of phenomenons occurring at low doses <10 cSv which are not well understood up to now. (orig.)

  9. Studies of anisotropy of iron based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Jason A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To study the electronic anisotropy in iron based superconductors, the temperature dependent London penetration depth, Δλ(T), have been measured in several compounds, along with the angular dependent upper critical field, Hc2(T). Study was undertaken on single crystals of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 with x=0.108 and x=0.127, in the overdoped range of the doping phase diagram, characterized by notable modulation of the superconducting gap. Heavy ion irradiation with matching field doses of 6 T and 6.5 T respectively, were used to create columnar defects and to study their effect on the temperature Δλ(T). The variation of the low-temperature penetration depth in both pristine and irradiated samples was fitted with a power-law function Δλ(T) = ATn. Irradiation increases the magnitude of the pre-factor A and decreases the exponent n, similar to the effect on the optimally doped samples. This finding supports the universal s ± scenario for the whole doping range.

  10. CMB statistical anisotropy from noncommutative gravitational waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Ricciardone, Angelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' ' G. Galilei' ' , Università degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy); Mota, David F. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Arroja, Frederico, E-mail: maresuke.shiraishi@pd.infn.it, E-mail: d.f.mota@astro.uio.no, E-mail: angelo.ricciardone@pd.infn.it, E-mail: arroja@pd.infn.it [INFN, Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    Primordial statistical anisotropy is a key indicator to investigate early Universe models and has been probed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. In this paper, we examine tensor-mode CMB fluctuations generated from anisotropic gravitational waves, parametrised by P{sub h}(k) = P{sub h}{sup (0)}(k) [ 1 + ∑{sub LM} f{sub L}(k) g{sub LM} Y{sub LM} ( k-circumflex )], where P{sub h}{sup (0)}(k) is the usual scale-invariant power spectrum. Such anisotropic tensor fluctuations may arise from an inflationary model with noncommutativity of fields. It is verified that in this model, an isotropic component and a quadrupole asymmetry with f{sub 0}(k) = f{sub 2}(k) ∝ k{sup -2} are created and hence highly red-tilted off-diagonal components arise in the CMB power spectra, namely ℓ{sub 2} = ℓ{sub 1} ± 2 in TT, TE, EE and BB, and ℓ{sub 2} = ℓ{sub 1} ± 1 in TB and EB. We find that B-mode polarisation is more sensitive to such signals than temperature and E-mode polarisation due to the smallness of large-scale cosmic variance and we can potentially measure g{sub 00} = 30 and g{sub 2M} = 58 at 68% CL in a cosmic-variance-limited experiment. Such a level of signal may be measured in a PRISM like experiment, while the instrumental noise contaminates it in the Planck experiment. These results imply that it is impossible to measure the noncommutative parameter if it is small enough for the perturbative treatment to be valid. Our formalism and methodology for dealing with the CMB tensor statistical anisotropy are general and straightforwardly applicable to other early Universe models.

  11. Solar Wind Electron Scattering by Kinetic Instabilities and Whistler Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    The expansion of the solar wind away from the Sun drives electron velocity distributions away from the thermal Maxwellian form, yielding distributions near 1 AU which typically can be characterized as consisting of three anisotropic components: a more dense, relatively cool core, a relatively tenuous , relatively warm halo and a similarly tenuous, warm strahl. Each of these nonthermal components are potential sources of kinetic plasma instabilities; the enhanced waves from each instability can scatter the electrons, acting to reduce the various anisotropies and making their overall velocity distribution more nearly (but not completely) thermal. In contrast, simulations are demonstrating that the forward decay of whistler turbulence can lead to the development of a T||> T_perp electron anisotropy. This presentation will review linear theories of electron-driven kinetic instabilities (following the presentation by Daniel Verscharen at the 2015 SHINE Workshop), and will further consider the modification of electron velocity distributions as obtained from particle-in-cell simulations of such instabilities as well as from the decay of whistler turbulence.

  12. Influence of ultra-thin TiN thickness (1.4 nm and 2.4 nm) on positive bias temperature instability (PBTI) of high-k/metal gate nMOSFETs with gate-last process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Lu-Wei; Yang Hong; Ren Shang-Qing; Xu Ye-Feng; Luo Wei-Chun; Xu Hao; Wang Yan-Rong; Tang Bo; Wang Wen-Wu; Yan Jiang; Zhu Hui-Long; Zhao Chao; Chen Da-Peng; Ye Tian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The positive bias temperature instability (PBTI) degradations of high-k/metal gate (HK/MG) nMOSFETs with thin TiN capping layers (1.4 nm and 2.4 nm) are systemically investigated. In this paper, the trap energy distribution in gate stack during PBTI stress is extracted by using ramped recovery stress, and the temperature dependences of PBTI (90 °C, 125 °C, 160 °C) are studied and activation energy (E a ) values (0.13 eV and 0.15 eV) are extracted. Although the equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) values of two TiN thickness values are almost similar (0.85 nm and 0.87 nm), the 2.4-nm TiN one (thicker TiN capping layer) shows better PBTI reliability (13.41% at 0.9 V, 90 °C, 1000 s). This is due to the better interfacial layer/high-k (IL/HK) interface, and HK bulk states exhibited through extracting activation energy and trap energy distribution in the high-k layer. (paper)

  13. Influence of anisotropy and pinning centers on critical current properties in Bi-2212 superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haraguchi, T.; Takayama, S.; Kiuchi, M.; Otabe, E.S.; Matsushita, T.; Yasuda, T.; Okayasu, S.; Uchida, S.; Shimoyama, J.; Kishio, K.

    2006-01-01

    The critical current density in Bi-2212 superconductors with various anisotropies irradiated by heavy ions was investigated in the medium temperature region to understand the effects of defect size and the anisotropy of the superconductor. It was found that the critical current density and the irreversibility field were larger for the specimen with larger defect and/or with smaller anisotropy. Introduction of stronger pinning centers and the optimization of the doping condition to improve the dimensionality are desired for further improvement of the critical current properties

  14. Thermal effects and in-plane magnetic anisotropy in thin-film recording media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajan, Antony; Abarra, E.N.; Acharya, B.R.; Inomata, A.; Okamoto, I.; Shinohara, M.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of thermal activation on the in-plane magnetic anisotropy [measured as orientation ratio (OR)] of granular longitudinal magnetic recording media is investigated. Temperature and time dependent studies were made on media with different magnetic layer thicknesses. We find that OR is independent of temperature for a stable medium but shows a large increase with temperature for thermally unstable media. At low temperatures and high field sweep rates, the OR values are found to be the same, independent of the magnetic layer thickness. The unique value when thermal activation is reduced is consistent with the high population of the cobalt c axes along the texturing direction as the origin of anisotropy

  15. Fluctuations and instabilities of a holographic metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, Niko; Järvinen, Matti; Lippert, Matthew

    2013-02-01

    We analyze the quasinormal modes of the D2-D8' model of 2+1-dimensional, strongly-coupled, charged fermions in a background magnetic field and at non-zero density. The model is known to include a quantum Hall phase with integer filling fraction. As expected, we find a hydrodynamical diffusion mode at small momentum and the nonzero-temperature holographic zero sound, which becomes massive above a critical magnetic field. We confirm the previously-known thermodynamic instability. In addition, we discover an instability at low temperature, large mass, and in a charge density and magnetic field range near the quantum Hall phase to an inhomogeneous striped phase.

  16. Magnetic anisotropy of Ni/Cr multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S.; Xia, H.

    1997-01-01

    The magnetic anisotropy of Ni/Cr multilayers has been investigated by using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and ferromagnetic resonance techniques (FMR). The FMR spectra are obtained as a function of the orientation of the applied magnetic field from in-plane to out-of-plane. The results are fitted theoretically to determine the magnetic anisotropy. From VSM and FMR, a positive value for Ni/Cr interface anisotropy is obtained, which favours a perpendicular easy axis. The possible mechanism for the perpendicular anisotropy has been discussed and it may be attributed to the magnetostriction, caused by intrinsic stress due to lattice mismatch. (orig.). With 005 figs., 001 tabs

  17. Seismic anisotropies of the Songshugou peridotites (Qinling orogen, central China) and their seismic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yi; Jung, Haemyeong; Song, Shuguang

    2018-01-01

    Though extensively studied, the roles of olivine crystal preferred orientations (CPOs or fabrics) in affecting the seismic anisotropies in the Earth's upper mantle are rather complicated and still not fully known. In this study, we attempted to address this issue by analyzing the seismic anisotropies [e.g., P-wave anisotropy (AVp), S-wave polarization anisotropy (AVs), radial anisotropy (ξ), and Rayleigh wave anisotropy (G)] of the Songshugou peridotites (dunite dominated) in the Qinling orogen in central China, based on our previously reported olivine CPOs. The seismic anisotropy patterns of olivine aggregates in our studied samples are well consistent with the prediction for their olivine CPO types; and the magnitude of seismic anisotropies shows a striking positive correlation with equilibrium pressure and temperature (P-T) conditions. Significant reductions of seismic anisotropies (AVp, max. AVs, and G) are observed in porphyroclastic dunite compared to coarse- and fine-grained dunites, as the results of olivine CPO transition (from A-/D-type in coarse-grained dunite, through AG-type-like in porphyroclastic dunite, to B-type-like in fine-grained dunite) and strength variation (weakening: A-/D-type → AG-type-like; strengthening: AG-type-like → B-type-like) during dynamic recrystallization. The transition of olivine CPOs from A-/D-type to B-/AG-type-like in the forearc mantle may weaken the seismic anisotropies and deviate the fast velocity direction and the fast S-wave polarization direction from trench-perpendicular to trench-oblique direction with the cooling and aging of forearc mantle. Depending on the size and distribution of the peridotite body such as the Songshugou peridotites, B- and AG-type-like olivine CPOs can be an additional (despite minor) local contributor to the orogen-parallel fast velocity direction and fast shear-wave polarization direction in the orogenic crust such as in the Songshugou area in Qinling orogen.

  18. Anisotropy of the Mechanical Properties of TbF3 Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimov, D. N.; Lisovenko, D. S.; Sizova, N. L.; Sobolev, B. P.

    2018-01-01

    TbF3 (sp. gr. Pnma) crystals up to 40 mm in diameter have been grown from melt by a Bridgman technique. The anisotropy of their mechanical properties is studied for the first time. the technical elasticity constants are calculated, and room-temperature values of Vickers microhardness for the (010) and (100) planes are measured. The shape of indentation impressions is found to correlate with Young's modulus anisotropy for TbF3 crystals.

  19. Azimuthal anisotropy measurements by STAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Li

    2014-06-01

    The recent study of centrality and transverse momentum (pT) dependence of inclusive charged hardron elliptic anisotropy (v2) at midrapidity (|η|<1.0) in Au+Au collision at √{sNN}=7.7,11.5,19.6,27, and 39 GeV in STAR Beam Energy Scan program is presented. We show that the observed increase of inclusive v2 is mainly due to the average pT increase with energy. In Au+Au 200 GeV collisions, the triangular anisotropy (v3) measurements highly depend on measurement methods; v3 is strongly dependent on Δη. The difference between two- and four-particle cumulants v2{2} and v2{4} for Au+Au and Cu+Cu collision at √{sNN}=62.4 and 200 GeV is used to explore flow fluctuations. Furthermore, by exploiting the symmetry of average flow in pseudorapidity η about midrapidity, the Δη-dependent and independent components are separated using v2{2} and v2{4}.

  20. Azimuthal anisotropy measurements by STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Li

    2014-06-15

    The recent study of centrality and transverse momentum (p{sub T}) dependence of inclusive charged hardron elliptic anisotropy (v{sub 2}) at midrapidity (|η|<1.0) in Au+Au collision at √(s{sub NN})=7.7,11.5,19.6,27, and39 GeV in STAR Beam Energy Scan program is presented. We show that the observed increase of inclusive v{sub 2} is mainly due to the average p{sub T} increase with energy. In Au+Au 200 GeV collisions, the triangular anisotropy (v{sub 3}) measurements highly depend on measurement methods; v{sub 3} is strongly dependent on Δη. The difference between two- and four-particle cumulants v{sub 2}{2} and v{sub 2}{4} for Au+Au and Cu+Cu collision at √(s{sub NN})=62.4 and 200 GeV is used to explore flow fluctuations. Furthermore, by exploiting the symmetry of average flow in pseudorapidity η about midrapidity, the Δη-dependent and independent components are separated using v{sub 2}{2} and v{sub 2}{4}.

  1. Azimuthal anisotropy measurements by STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Li

    2014-01-01

    The recent study of centrality and transverse momentum (p T ) dependence of inclusive charged hardron elliptic anisotropy (v 2 ) at midrapidity (|η|<1.0) in Au+Au collision at √(s NN )=7.7,11.5,19.6,27, and39 GeV in STAR Beam Energy Scan program is presented. We show that the observed increase of inclusive v 2 is mainly due to the average p T increase with energy. In Au+Au 200 GeV collisions, the triangular anisotropy (v 3 ) measurements highly depend on measurement methods; v 3 is strongly dependent on Δη. The difference between two- and four-particle cumulants v 2 {2} and v 2 {4} for Au+Au and Cu+Cu collision at √(s NN )=62.4 and 200 GeV is used to explore flow fluctuations. Furthermore, by exploiting the symmetry of average flow in pseudorapidity η about midrapidity, the Δη-dependent and independent components are separated using v 2 {2} and v 2 {4}

  2. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sheppard, E.J. [Tuskeggee Univ., Tuskegee, AL (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors. The present study represents a coordinated effort between industry, government and academia to investigate gas turbine combustion dynamics. Specific study areas include development of advanced diagnostics, definition of controlling phenomena, advancement of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities, and assessment of the current status of our ability to apply these tools to practical gas turbine combustors. The present work involves four tasks which address, respectively, (1) the development of a fiber-optic probe for fuel-air ratio measurements, (2) the study of combustion instability using laser-based diagnostics in a high pressure, high temperature flow reactor, (3) the development of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities for describing combustion instability which will be validated against experimental data, and (4) the preparation of a literature survey and establishment of a data base on practical experience with combustion instability.

  3. Tearing instabilities in turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizawa, A.; Nakajima, N.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Effects of micro-turbulence on tearing instabilities are investigated by numerically solving a reduced set of two-fluid equations. Micro-turbulence excites both large-scale and small-scale Fourier modes through energy transfer due to nonlinear mode coupling. The energy transfer to large scale mode does not directly excite tearing instability but it gives an initiation of tearing instability. When tearing instability starts to grow, the excited small scale mode plays an important role. The mixing of magnetic flux by micro-turbulence is the dominant factor of non-ideal MHD effect at the resonant surface and it gives rise to magnetic reconnection which causes tearing instability. Tearing instabilities were investigated against static equilibrium or flowing equilibrium so far. On the other hand, the recent progress of computer power allows us to investigate interactions between turbulence and coherent modes such as tearing instabilities in magnetically confined plasmas by means of direct numerical simulations. In order to investigate effects of turbulence on tearing instabilities we consider a situation that tearing mode is destabilized in a quasi-equilibrium including micro-turbulence. We choose an initial equilibrium that is unstable against kinetic ballooning modes and tearing instabilities. Tearing instabilities are current driven modes and thus they are unstable for large scale Fourier modes. On the other hand kinetic ballooning modes are unstable for poloidal Fourier modes that are characterized by ion Larmor radius. The energy of kinetic ballooning modes spreads over wave number space through nonlinear Fourier mode coupling. We present that micro-turbulence affects tearing instabilities in two different ways by three-dimensional numerical simulation of a reduced set of two-fluid equations. One is caused by energy transfer to large scale modes, the other is caused by energy transfer to small scale modes. The former is the excitation of initial

  4. Prediction of flow instability during natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhadi, Kazem

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of flow excursion instability during passive heat removal for Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) has been analyzed at low-pressure and low-mass rate of flow conditions without boiling taking place. Pressure drop-flow rate characteristics in the general case are determined upon a developed code for this purpose. The code takes into account variations of different pressure drop components caused by different powers as well as different core inlet temperatures. The analysis revealed the fact that the instability can actually occur in the natural convection mode for a range of powers per fuel plates at a predetermined inlet temperature with fixed geometry of the core. Low mass rate of flow and high sub-cooling are the two important conditions for the occurrence of static instability in the TRR. The calculated results are compared with the existing data in the literature. (author)

  5. Thermal conductivity of carbon felts, insulating materials with a high anisotropy; Conductivite thermique des feutres de carbone, isolants a forte anisotropie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danes, F.E.; Bardon, J.P. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France). Lab. de Thermocinetique

    1996-12-31

    Because of their high temperature resistance, carbon felts are used as thermal insulating materials for high temperature applications. The aim of this paper is to present a model that allows to calculate the thermal conductivity of felt fibers taking into account their high anisotropy and the contact resistance of fibers generated by the 3-D constriction phenomena which develop in fibers around each contact point. The study is divided in two parts: the first part concerns the bibliographic study of the different anisotropies of fibers and felts, while the second part presents the proposed conductivity model. (J.S.) 12 refs.

  6. Measurements of Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) and Electron Density/Temperature Profiles in Plasmas Produced by the Nike KrF Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    We will present results of simultaneous measurements of LPI-driven light scattering and density/temperature profiles in CH plasmas produced by the Nike krypton fluoride laser (λ = 248 nm). The primary diagnostics for the LPI measurement are time-resolved spectrometers with absolute intensity calibration in spectral ranges relevant to the optical detection of stimulated Raman scattering or two plasmon decay. The spectrometers are capable of monitoring signal intensity relative to thermal background radiation from plasma providing a useful way to analyze LPI initiation. For further understanding of LPI processes, the recently implemented grid image refractometer (Nike-GIR)a is used to measure the coronal plasma profiles. In this experiment, Nike-GIR is equipped with a 5th harmonic probe laser (λ = 213 nm) in attempt to probe into a high density region over the previous peak density with λ = 263 nm probe light ( 4 ×1021 cm-3). The LPI behaviors will be discussed with the measured data sets. Work supported by DoE/NNSA.

  7. Measurements of electron density and temperature profiles in plasma produced by Nike KrF laser for laser plasma instability research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Karasik, M.; Chan, L. Y.

    2015-08-01

    A grid image refractometer (GIR) has been implemented at the Nike krypton fluoride laser facility of the Naval Research Laboratory. This instrument simultaneously measures propagation angles and transmissions of UV probe rays (λ = 263 nm, Δt = 10 ps) refracted through plasma. We report results of the first Nike-GIR measurement on a CH plasma produced by the Nike laser pulse (˜1 ns FWHM) with the intensity of 1.1 × 1015 W/cm2. The measured angles and transmissions were processed to construct spatial profiles of electron density (ne) and temperature (Te) in the underdense coronal region of the plasma. Using an inversion algorithm developed for the strongly refracted rays, the deployed GIR system probed electron densities up to 4 × 1021 cm-3 with the density scale length of 120 μm along the plasma symmetry axis. The resulting ne and Te profiles are verified to be self-consistent with the measured quantities of the refracted probe light.

  8. Higher-order anisotropies in the blast-wave model: Disentangling flow and density field anisotropies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimerman, Jakub [Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Prague (Czech Republic); Comenius University, FMPI, Bratislava (Slovakia); Tomasik, Boris [Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Prague (Czech Republic); Univerzita Mateja Bela, FPV, Banska Bystrica (Slovakia); Csanad, Mate; Loekoes, Sandor [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2017-08-15

    We formulate a generalisation of the blast-wave model which is suitable for the description of higher-order azimuthal anisotropies of the hadron production. The model includes anisotropy in the density profile as well as an anisotropy in the transverse expansion velocity field. We then study how these two kinds of anisotropies influence the single-particle distributions and the correlation radii of two-particle correlation functions. Particularly we focus on the third-order anisotropy and consideration is given averaging over different orientations of the event plane. (orig.)

  9. Relativistic gravitational instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schutz, B.F.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to review and explain what is known about the stability of relativistic stars and black holes, with particular emphases on two instabilities which are due entirely to relativistic effects. The first of these is the post-Newtonian pulsational instability discovered independently by Chandrasekhar (1964) and Fowler (1964). This effectively ruled out the then-popular supermassive star model for quasars, and it sets a limit to the central density of white dwarfs. The second instability was also discovered by Chandrasekhar (1970): the gravitational wave induced instability. This sets an upper bound on the rotation rate of neutron stars, which is near that of the millisecond pulsar PSR 1937+214, and which is beginning to constrain the equation of state of neutron matter. 111 references, 5 figures

  10. Character of decay instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polovin, R.V.; Demutskii, V.P.

    1981-01-01

    If the initial wave is unstable in the upper half plane Im ω>0 and there are no branch points of the quasiwave number, or if waves traveling in the same direction coalesce at a branch point, the instability is convective. On the other hand, if a branch point k(ω) does exist in the upper half-plane Im ω>0, and not all the waves that merge at this point travel in the same direction, the instability is absolute. A Green's function that describes the evolution of the perturbations of the initial wave in space and in time is constructed. The growth rates of the decay instability of the harmonics are determined. The produced waves are richer in harmonics than the initial waves. It is shown that the decay instability of an Alfven wave is absolute

  11. Spondylolisthesis and Posterior Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niggemann, P.; Beyer, H.K.; Frey, H.; Grosskurth, D.; Simons, P.; Kuchta, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with a spondylolisthesis of L5 on S1 due to spondylolysis at the level L5/S1. The vertebral slip was fixed and no anterior instability was found. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an upright MRI scanner, posterior instability at the level of the spondylolytic defect of L5 was demonstrated. A structure, probably the hypertrophic ligament flava, arising from the spondylolytic defect was displaced toward the L5 nerve root, and a bilateral contact of the displaced structure with the L5 nerve root was shown in extension of the spine. To our knowledge, this is the first case described of posterior instability in patients with spondylolisthesis. The clinical implications of posterior instability are unknown; however, it is thought that this disorder is common and that it can only be diagnosed using upright MRI

  12. Spondylolisthesis and Posterior Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niggemann, P.; Beyer, H.K.; Frey, H.; Grosskurth, D. (Privatpraxis fuer Upright MRT, Koeln (Germany)); Simons, P.; Kuchta, J. (Media Park Klinik, Koeln (Germany))

    2009-04-15

    We present the case of a patient with a spondylolisthesis of L5 on S1 due to spondylolysis at the level L5/S1. The vertebral slip was fixed and no anterior instability was found. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an upright MRI scanner, posterior instability at the level of the spondylolytic defect of L5 was demonstrated. A structure, probably the hypertrophic ligament flava, arising from the spondylolytic defect was displaced toward the L5 nerve root, and a bilateral contact of the displaced structure with the L5 nerve root was shown in extension of the spine. To our knowledge, this is the first case described of posterior instability in patients with spondylolisthesis. The clinical implications of posterior instability are unknown; however, it is thought that this disorder is common and that it can only be diagnosed using upright MRI.

  13. Effect of anisotropy on anomalous Hall effect in Tb-Fe thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, V. Hari; Markandeyulu, G.; Subrahmanyam, A.

    2009-01-01

    The electrical and Hall resistivities of Tb x Fe 100-x thin films in the temperature range 13-300 K were investigated. The sign of Hall resistivity at 300 K is found to change from positive for x=28 film to negative for x=30 film, in accordance with the compensation of Tb and Fe moments. All the films are seen to have planar magnetic anisotropy at 13 K. The temperature coefficients of electrical resistivities of the amorphous films with 19≤x≤51 are seen to be negative. The temperature dependence of Hall resistivity of these films is explained on the basis of random magnetic anisotropy model. The temperature dependences of Hall resistivities of the x=22 and 41 films are seen to exhibit a nonmonotonous behavior due to change in anisotropy from perpendicular to planar. The same behavior is considered for the explanation regarding the probable formation of Berry phase curvature in these films.

  14. Streaming gravity mode instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shui.

    1989-05-01

    In this paper, we study the stability of a current sheet with a sheared flow in a gravitational field which is perpendicular to the magnetic field and plasma flow. This mixing mode caused by a combined role of the sheared flow and gravity is named the streaming gravity mode instability. The conditions of this mode instability are discussed for an ideal four-layer model in the incompressible limit. (author). 5 refs

  15. Magnetic anisotropy and quantized spin waves in hematite nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Stine Nyborg; Lefmann, Kim; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    2004-01-01

    We report on the observation of high-frequency collective magnetic excitations, (h) over bar omegaapproximate to1.1 meV, in hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) nanoparticles. The neutron scattering experiments include measurements at temperatures in the range 6-300 K and applied fields up to 7.5 T as well...... as polarization analysis. We give an explanation for the field- and temperature dependence of the excitations, which are found to have strongly elliptical out-of-plane precession. The frequency of the excitations gives information on the magnetic anisotropy constants in the system. We have in this way determined...

  16. Genomic instability and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, John B [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer cells, and is thought to be involved in the process of carcinogenesis. Indeed, a number of rare genetic disorders associated with a predisposition to cancer are characterised by genomic instability occurring in somatic cells. Of particular interest is the observation that transmissible instability can be induced in somatic cells from normal individuals by exposure to ionising radiation, leading to a persistent enhancement in the rate at which mutations and chromosomal aberrations arise in the progeny of the irradiated cells after many generations of replication. If such induced instability is involved in radiation carcinogenesis, it would imply that the initial carcinogenic event may not be a rare mutation occurring in a specific gene or set of genes. Rather, radiation may induce a process of instability in many cells in a population, enhancing the rate at which the multiple gene mutations necessary for the development of cancer may arise in a given cell lineage. Furthermore, radiation could act at any stage in the development of cancer by facilitating the accumulation of the remaining genetic events required to produce a fully malignant tumour. The experimental evidence for such induced instability is reviewed. (review)

  17. Genomic instability and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, John B

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer cells, and is thought to be involved in the process of carcinogenesis. Indeed, a number of rare genetic disorders associated with a predisposition to cancer are characterised by genomic instability occurring in somatic cells. Of particular interest is the observation that transmissible instability can be induced in somatic cells from normal individuals by exposure to ionising radiation, leading to a persistent enhancement in the rate at which mutations and chromosomal aberrations arise in the progeny of the irradiated cells after many generations of replication. If such induced instability is involved in radiation carcinogenesis, it would imply that the initial carcinogenic event may not be a rare mutation occurring in a specific gene or set of genes. Rather, radiation may induce a process of instability in many cells in a population, enhancing the rate at which the multiple gene mutations necessary for the development of cancer may arise in a given cell lineage. Furthermore, radiation could act at any stage in the development of cancer by facilitating the accumulation of the remaining genetic events required to produce a fully malignant tumour. The experimental evidence for such induced instability is reviewed. (review)

  18. Late time CMB anisotropies constrain mini-charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrage, C.; Redondo, J.; Ringwald, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Jaeckel, J. [Univ. of Durham, Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    Observations of the temperature anisotropies induced as light from the CMB passes through large scale structures in the late universe are a sensitive probe of the interactions of photons in such environments. In extensions of the Standard Model which give rise to mini-charged particles, photons propagating through transverse magnetic fields can be lost to pair production of such particles. Such a decrement in the photon flux would occur as photons from the CMB traverse the magnetic fields of galaxy clusters. Therefore late time CMB anisotropies can be used to constrain the properties of mini- charged particles. We outline how this test is constructed, and present new constraints on mini-charged particles from observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the Coma cluster. (orig.)

  19. Polarimetric study of the optical anisotropy of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinyavsky, N; Korneva, I

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an optical anisotropy study of a polymer film and the effect of temperature on birefringence. A method using a polariscope for the quantitative determination of the optical path difference is offered. The research findings are useful to students of physical and engineering specialities studying electromagnetic theory and optics. The described experiments and theoretical approaches are based on prominent aspects of modern optics. This work can be used to teach students the methods of polarimetry, the method of measuring optical anisotropy, and the basics of colorimetry. Students will learn a color description system to demonstrate the interference of polarized light, as well as being able to make a comparison between the numerical simulation and experiment of the interference pattern. (paper)

  20. Optical and mechanical anisotropy of oxide glass fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deubener, J.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2012-01-01

    products [1], whereas stretching (frozen-in strain) results in optical and mechanical anisotropy of glass fibers, which is quantified inter alia by the specific birefringence [2]. The paper will stress the later effects by combining previous results on the structural origins of birefringence...... and anisotropic shrinkage in silica and phosphate fibers with recent studies on relaxation of optical anisotropy in E-glass fibers [3,4].......Upon fiber drawing, glass forming oxide melts are thermally quenched and mechanically stretched. High cooling rates (up to 106 K/min) of quenched glass fibres lead to higher enthalpy state of liquids, thereby, to higher fictive temperature than regular quenching (e.g. 20 K/min) of bulk glass...

  1. Uniaxial anisotropy in magnetite thin film-Magnetization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiechec, A.; Korecki, J.; Handke, B.; Kakol, Z.; Owoc, D.; Antolak, D.A.; Kozlowski, A.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetization and electrical resistivity measurements have been performed on a stoichiometric single crystalline magnetite Fe 3 O 4 thin film (thickness of ca. 500 nm) MBE deposited on MgO (1 0 0) substrate. The aim of these studies was to check the influence of preparation method and sample form (bulk vs. thin film) on magnetic anisotropy properties in magnetite. The film magnetization along versus applied magnetic field has been determined both in the direction parallel and perpendicular to the film surface, and at temperatures above and below the Verwey transition. We have found, in agreement with published results, that the in-plane field of 10 kOe was not sufficient to saturate the sample. This can be understood if some additional factor, on top of the bulk magnetocrystalline anisotropy, is taken into account

  2. PIC Simulations of Velocity-space Instabilities in a Decreasing Magnetic Field: Viscosity and Thermal Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, Mario; Quataert, Eliot; Verscharen, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    We use particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a collisionless, electron–ion plasma with a decreasing background magnetic field, {\\boldsymbol{B}}, to study the effect of velocity-space instabilities on the viscous heating and thermal conduction of the plasma. If | {\\boldsymbol{B}}| decreases, the adiabatic invariance of the magnetic moment gives rise to pressure anisotropies with {p}| | ,j> {p}\\perp ,j ({p}| | ,j and {p}\\perp ,j represent the pressure of species j (electron or ion) parallel and perpendicular to B ). Linear theory indicates that, for sufficiently large anisotropies, different velocity-space instabilities can be triggered. These instabilities in principle have the ability to pitch-angle scatter the particles, limiting the growth of the anisotropies. Our simulations focus on the nonlinear, saturated regime of the instabilities. This is done through the permanent decrease of | {\\boldsymbol{B}}| by an imposed plasma shear. We show that, in the regime 2≲ {β }j≲ 20 ({β }j\\equiv 8π {p}j/| {\\boldsymbol{B}}{| }2), the saturated ion and electron pressure anisotropies are controlled by the combined effect of the oblique ion firehose and the fast magnetosonic/whistler instabilities. These instabilities grow preferentially on the scale of the ion Larmor radius, and make {{Δ }}{p}e/{p}| | ,e≈ {{Δ }}{p}i/{p}| | ,i (where {{Δ }}{p}j={p}\\perp ,j-{p}| | ,j). We also quantify the thermal conduction of the plasma by directly calculating the mean free path of electrons, {λ }e, along the mean magnetic field, finding that {λ }e depends strongly on whether | {\\boldsymbol{B}}| decreases or increases. Our results can be applied in studies of low-collisionality plasmas such as the solar wind, the intracluster medium, and some accretion disks around black holes.

  3. Evaluation of electrical resistivity anisotropy in geological mapping ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Key words: Electrical resistivity anisotropy, radial vertical electrical sounding, anisotropy polygons. INTRODUCTION ... electrical resistivity survey in the geological interpretation ... resistivity and other electrical or electromagnetic based.

  4. Determination of anisotropy constants of protein encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles by electron magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongyan; Klem, Michael T.; Sebby, Karl B.; Singel, David J.; Young, Mark; Douglas, Trevor; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2009-01-01

    Angle-dependent electron magnetic resonance was performed on 4.9, 8.0, and 19 nm iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulated within protein capsids and suspended in water. Measurements were taken at liquid nitrogen temperature after cooling in a 1 T field to partially align the particles. The angle dependence of the shifts in the resonance field for the iron oxide nanoparticles (synthesized within Listeria-Dps, horse spleen ferritin, and cowpea chlorotic mottle virus) all show evidence of a uniaxial anisotropy. Using a Boltzmann distribution for the particles' easy-axis direction, we are able to use the resonance field shifts to extract a value for the anisotropy energy, showing that the anisotropy energy density increases with decreasing particle size. This suggests that surface anisotropy plays a significant role in magnetic nanoparticles of this size

  5. Determination of anisotropy constants of protein encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles by electron magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hongyan [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Center for Bio-Inspired Nanomaterials, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Klem, Michael T.; Sebby, Karl B.; Singel, David J. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Center for Bio-Inspired Nanomaterials, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Young, Mark [Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Center for Bio-Inspired Nanomaterials, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Douglas, Trevor [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Center for Bio-Inspired Nanomaterials, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Idzerda, Yves U. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Center for Bio-Inspired Nanomaterials, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)], E-mail: Idzerda@montana.edu

    2009-02-15

    Angle-dependent electron magnetic resonance was performed on 4.9, 8.0, and 19 nm iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulated within protein capsids and suspended in water. Measurements were taken at liquid nitrogen temperature after cooling in a 1 T field to partially align the particles. The angle dependence of the shifts in the resonance field for the iron oxide nanoparticles (synthesized within Listeria-Dps, horse spleen ferritin, and cowpea chlorotic mottle virus) all show evidence of a uniaxial anisotropy. Using a Boltzmann distribution for the particles' easy-axis direction, we are able to use the resonance field shifts to extract a value for the anisotropy energy, showing that the anisotropy energy density increases with decreasing particle size. This suggests that surface anisotropy plays a significant role in magnetic nanoparticles of this size.

  6. Primordial anisotropies in gauged hybrid inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar Abolhasani, Ali; Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan

    2014-05-01

    We study primordial anisotropies generated in the model of gauged hybrid inflation in which the complex waterfall field is charged under a U(1)gauge field. Primordial anisotropies are generated either actively during inflation or from inhomogeneities modulating the surface of end of inflation during waterfall transition. We present a consistent δN mechanism to calculate the anisotropic power spectrum and bispectrum. We show that the primordial anisotropies generated at the surface of end of inflation do not depend on the number of e-folds and therefore do not produce dangerously large anisotropies associated with the IR modes. Furthermore, one can find the parameter space that the anisotropies generated from the surface of end of inflation cancel the anisotropies generated during inflation, therefore relaxing the constrains on model parameters imposed from IR anisotropies. We also show that the gauge field fluctuations induce a red-tilted power spectrum so the averaged power spectrum from the gauge field can change the total power spectrum from blue to red. Therefore, hybrid inflation, once gauged under a U(1) field, can be consistent with the cosmological observations.

  7. Primordial anisotropies in gauged hybrid inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    We study primordial anisotropies generated in the model of gauged hybrid inflation in which the complex waterfall field is charged under a U(1)gauge field. Primordial anisotropies are generated either actively during inflation or from inhomogeneities modulating the surface of end of inflation during waterfall transition. We present a consistent δN mechanism to calculate the anisotropic power spectrum and bispectrum. We show that the primordial anisotropies generated at the surface of end of inflation do not depend on the number of e-folds and therefore do not produce dangerously large anisotropies associated with the IR modes. Furthermore, one can find the parameter space that the anisotropies generated from the surface of end of inflation cancel the anisotropies generated during inflation, therefore relaxing the constrains on model parameters imposed from IR anisotropies. We also show that the gauge field fluctuations induce a red-tilted power spectrum so the averaged power spectrum from the gauge field can change the total power spectrum from blue to red. Therefore, hybrid inflation, once gauged under a U(1) field, can be consistent with the cosmological observations

  8. HIGH FREQUENCY ELECTROSTATIC INSTABILITIES IN A PLASMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, M W; Auer, P L

    1963-06-15

    The dispersion relation is examined for a collisionless infinite plasma in the presence of an anisotropic Maxwellian velocity distribution and a uniform external magnetic field. Unstable solutions exist below the muitiples of the electron cyclotron frequency provided the temperature anisotropy is sufficiently large. The dependence of the growth rate upon harmonic number, density, angle of propagation with respect to the magnetic field, and frequency is discussed for zero as well as non-zero parallel temperatures. In the latter case, the waves are strongly damped as their frequency approaches a multiple of the gyro- frequency. (auth)

  9. Composition driven structural instability in perovskite ferroelectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Xu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ferroelectric solid solutions usually exhibit enhanced functional properties at the morphotropic phase boundary separating two ferroelectric phases with different orientations of polarization. The underlying mechanism is generally associated with polarization rotational instability and the flattened free energy profile. In this work we show that the polarization extensional instability can also be induced at the morphotropic phase boundary beyond the reported polar-nonpolar phase boundary. The piezoelectricity enhanced by this mechanism exhibits excellent thermal stability, which helps to develop high performance piezoelectric materials with good temperature stability.

  10. Plasma physics and instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashmore-Davies, C.N.

    1981-01-01

    These lectures procide an introduction to the theory of plasmas and their instabilities. Starting from the Bogoliubov, Born, Green, Kirkwood, and Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy of kinetic equations, the additional concept of self-consistent fields leads to the fundamental Vlasov equation and hence to the warm two-fluid model and the one-fluid MHD, or cold, model. The properties of small-amplitude waves in magnetized (and unmagnetized) plasmas, and the instabilities to which they give rise, are described in some detail, and a complete chapter is devoted to Landau damping. The linear theory of plasma instabilities is illustrated by the current-driven electrostatic kind, with descriptions of the Penrose criterion and the energy principle of ideal MHD. There is a brief account of the application of feedback control. The non-linear theory is represented by three examples: quasi-linear velocity-space instabilities, three-wave instabilities, and the stability of an arbitrarily largeamplitude wave in a plasma. (orig.)

  11. A perturbative DFT approach for magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoo, Khoong Hong; Laskowski, Robert, E-mail: rolask@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg

    2017-04-15

    We develop a perturbative formalism for computing magnetocrystalline anisotropy within density functional theory and the magnetic force theorem. Instead of computing eigenvalues of the spin–orbit Hamiltonian for selected spin polarizations, as in the conventional “force theorem” approach, we show that the effect can be cast into a redefined form of the spin–orbit operator. This allows to separate the large eigenvalue shift due to spin-orbit interaction common for both polarizations from the much smaller magnetic anisotropy splitting. As a consequence the anisotropy splitting may by considered as a perturbation.

  12. H I anisotropies associated with radio-polarimetric filaments . Steep power spectra associated with cold gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Kerp, J.; Haud, U.; Haverkorn, M.

    2017-10-01

    Context. LOFAR detected toward 3C 196 linear polarization structures which were found subsequently to be closely correlated with cold filamentary H I structures. The derived direction-dependent H I power spectra revealed marked anisotropies for narrow ranges in velocity, sharing the orientation of the magnetic field as expected for magneto-hydrodynamical (MHD) turbulence. Aims: Using the Galactic portion of the Effelsberg-Bonn H I Survey (EBHIS) we continue our study of such anisotropies in the H I distribution in direction of two WSRT fields, Horologium and Auriga; both are well known for their prominent radio-polarimetric depolarization canals. At 349 MHz the observed pattern in total intensity is insignificant but polarized intensity and polarization angle show prominent ubiquitous structures with so far unknown origin. Methods: Apodizing the H I survey data by applying a rotational symmetric 50% Tukey window, we derive average and position angle dependent power spectra. We fit power laws and characterize anisotropies in the power distribution. We used a Gaussian analysis to determine relative abundances for the cold and warm neutral medium. Results: For the analyzed radio-polarimetric targets significant anisotropies are detected in the H I power spectra; their position angles are aligned to the prominent depolarization canals, initially detected by WSRT. H I anisotropies are associated with steep power spectra. Steep power spectra, associated with cold gas, are detected also in other fields. Conclusions: Radio-polarimetric depolarization canals are associated with filamentary H I structures that belong to the cold neutral medium (CNM). Anisotropies in the CNM are in this case linked to a steepening of the power-spectrum spectral index, indicating that phase transitions in a turbulent medium occur on all scales. Filamentary H I structures, driven by thermal instabilities, and radio-polarimetric filaments are associated with each other. The magneto-ionic medium

  13. Nonlinear Evolution of Observed Fast Streams in the Solar Wind - Micro-instabilities and Energy Exchange between Protons and Alpha Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneva, Y. G.; Poedts, S.

    2017-12-01

    Non-thermal kinetic components such as deformed velocity distributions, temperature anisotropies and relative drifts between the multiple ion populations are frequently observed features in the collisionless fast solar wind streams near the Earth whose origin is still to be better understood. Some of the traditional models consider the formation of the temperature anisotropies through the effect of the solar wind expansion, while others assume in situ heating and particle acceleration by local fluctuations, such as plasma waves, or by spacial structures, such as advected or locally generated current sheets. In this study we consider the evolution of initial ion temperature anisotropies and relative drifts in the presence of plasma oscillations, such as ion-cyclotron and kinetic Alfven waves. We perform 2.5D hybrid simulations to study the evolution of observed fast solar wind plasma parcels, including the development of the plasma micro-instabilities, the field-particle correlations and the energy transfer between the multiple ion species. We consider two distinct cases of highly anisotropic and quickly drifting protons which excite ion-cyclotron waves and of moderately anisotropic slower protons, which co-exist with kinetic Alfven waves. The alpha particles for both cases are slightly anisotropic in the beginning and remain anisotropic throughout the simulation time. Both the imposed magnetic fluctuations and the initial differential streaming decrease in time for both cases, while the minor ions are getting heated. Finally we study the effects of the solar wind expansion and discuss its implications for the nonlinear evolution of the system.

  14. Creep-induced anisotropy in covalent adaptable network polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzon, Drew W; He, Xu; Yang, Hua; Shi, Qian; Yu, Kai

    2017-10-11

    Anisotropic polymers with aligned macromolecule chains exhibit directional strengthening of mechanical and physical properties. However, manipulating the orientation of polymer chains in a fully cured thermoset is almost impossible due to its permanently crosslinked nature. In this paper, we demonstrate that rearrangeable networks with bond exchange reactions (BERs) can be utilized to tailor the anisotropic mechanical properties of thermosetting polymers. When a constant force is maintained at BER activated temperatures, the malleable thermoset creeps in the direction of stress, and macromolecule chains align themselves in the same direction. The aligned polymer chains result in an anisotropic network with a stiffer mechanical behavior in the direction of creep, while with a more compliant behavior in the transverse direction. The degree of network anisotropy is proportional to the amount of creep strain. A multi-length scale constitutive model is developed to study the creep-induced anisotropy of thermosetting polymers. The model connects the micro-scale BER kinetics, orientation of polymer chains, and directional mechanical properties of network polymers. Without any fitting parameters, it is able to predict the evolution of creep strain at different temperatures and anisotropic stress-strain behaviors of CANs after creep. Predictions on the chain orientation are verified by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Based on parametric studies, it is shown that the influences of creep time and temperature on the network anisotropy can be generalized into a single parameter, and the evolution of directional modulus follows an Arrhenius type time-temperature superposition principle (TTSP). The presented work provides a facile approach to transform isotropic thermosets into anisotropic ones using simple heating, and their directional properties can be readily tailored by the processing conditions.

  15. Buckling instability in ordered bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Denis; Mather, William; Mondragón-Palomino, Octavio; Orozco-Fuentes, Sirio; Danino, Tal; Hasty, Jeff; Tsimring, Lev S.

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial colonies often exhibit complex spatio-temporal organization. This collective behavior is affected by a multitude of factors ranging from the properties of individual cells (shape, motility, membrane structure) to chemotaxis and other means of cell-cell communication. One of the important but often overlooked mechanisms of spatio-temporal organization is direct mechanical contact among cells in dense colonies such as biofilms. While in natural habitats all these different mechanisms and factors act in concert, one can use laboratory cell cultures to study certain mechanisms in isolation. Recent work demonstrated that growth and ensuing expansion flow of rod-like bacteria Escherichia coli in confined environments leads to orientation of cells along the flow direction and thus to ordering of cells. However, the cell orientational ordering remained imperfect. In this paper we study one mechanism responsible for the persistence of disorder in growing cell populations. We demonstrate experimentally that a growing colony of nematically ordered cells is prone to the buckling instability. Our theoretical analysis and discrete-element simulations suggest that the nature of this instability is related to the anisotropy of the stress tensor in the ordered cell colony.

  16. Buckling instability in ordered bacterial colonies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, Denis; Mather, William; Mondragón-Palomino, Octavio; Danino, Tal; Hasty, Jeff; Orozco-Fuentes, Sirio; Tsimring, Lev S

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial colonies often exhibit complex spatio-temporal organization. This collective behavior is affected by a multitude of factors ranging from the properties of individual cells (shape, motility, membrane structure) to chemotaxis and other means of cell–cell communication. One of the important but often overlooked mechanisms of spatio-temporal organization is direct mechanical contact among cells in dense colonies such as biofilms. While in natural habitats all these different mechanisms and factors act in concert, one can use laboratory cell cultures to study certain mechanisms in isolation. Recent work demonstrated that growth and ensuing expansion flow of rod-like bacteria Escherichia coli in confined environments leads to orientation of cells along the flow direction and thus to ordering of cells. However, the cell orientational ordering remained imperfect. In this paper we study one mechanism responsible for the persistence of disorder in growing cell populations. We demonstrate experimentally that a growing colony of nematically ordered cells is prone to the buckling instability. Our theoretical analysis and discrete-element simulations suggest that the nature of this instability is related to the anisotropy of the stress tensor in the ordered cell colony

  17. Fingerprints of dynamical instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.; Colonna, M.; Guarnera, A.

    1993-01-01

    It is explained why any reduced descriptions, such as mean field approximation, are stochastic in nature. It is shown that the introduction of this stochastic dynamics leads to a predictive theory in a statistical sens whatever the individual trajectories are characterized by the occurrence of bifurcations, instabilities or phase transitions. Concerning nuclear matter, the spinodal instability is discussed. In such a critical situation, the possibility to replace the stochastic part of the collision integral in the Boltzmann-Langevin model by the numerical noise associated with the finite number of test particles in ordinary BUU treatment is studied. It is shown that the fingerprints of these instabilities are kept during the evolution because of the relatively long recombination time compared with the typical time scales imposed by the Coulomb repulsion and the possible collective expansion. (author) 5 refs., 12 figs

  18. Instability and star evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzoyan, L.V.

    1981-01-01

    The observational data are discussed which testify that the phenomena of dynamical instability of stars and stellar systems are definite manifestations of their evolution. The study of these phenomena has shown that the instability is a regular phase of stellar evolution. It has resulted in the recognition of the most important regularities of the process of star formation concerning its nature. This became possible due to the discovery in 1947 of stellar associations in our Galaxy. The results of the study of the dynamical instability of stellar associations contradict the predictions of classical hypothesis of stellar condensation. These data supplied a basis for a new hypothesis on the formation of stars and nebulae by the decay of superdense protostars [ru

  19. The coalescence instability in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, T.; Brunel, F.; Sakai, J.-I.; Vlahos, L.; Kundu, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    The nonlinear coalescence instability of current carrying solar loops can explain many of the characteristics of the solar flares such as their impulsive nature, heating and high energy particle acceleration, amplitude oscillations of electromagnetic and emission as well as the characteristics of two-dimensional microwave images obtained during a flare. The plasma compressibility leads to the explosive phase of loop coalescence and its overshoot results in amplitude oscillations in temperatures by adiabatic compression and decompression. It is noted that the presence of strong electric fields and super-Alfvenic flows during the course of the instability play an important role in the production of nonthermal particles. A qualitative explanation on the physical processes taking place during the nonlinear stages of the instability is given.

  20. Magnetic anisotropy of some R2CO17 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, W.I.; Melville, D.

    1978-01-01

    The singular-point detection technique, in which the second derivative of the magnetization with respect to field is examined, has been used to determine the anisotropy field Bsub(A) = (2/Msub(s)) (K 1 + 2K 2 ) for Sm 2 Co 17 , Er 2 Co 17 , and Tm 2 Co 17 over the temperature range 77 - 300 K. Exrapolation of the initial part of the hard-direction magnetization curve for aligned powders enables K 1 and K 2 to be estimated. For Er 2 Co 17 and Tm 2 Co 17 the rare-earth (R) and cobalt sublattices are oppositely aligned, so that the onset of ordering of the R sublattice leads to a decrease in saturation magnetization as the temperature is lowered. This is in sharp contrast to the rapid increase in K 1 at low temperatures. By subtracting the corresponding Msub(s) values from that of Y 2 Co 17 the temperature dependence of the R sublattice can be determined. It is found that K 1 is directly proportional to the cube of this quantity, indicating the dominance of the rare-earth sublattice in determining the anisotropic properties of these compounds. For Sm 2 Co 17 the anisotropy constant varies very strongly with the reduced magnetization. (author)

  1. Causes of genome instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langie, Sabine A S; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    function, chromosome segregation, telomere length). The purpose of this review is to describe the crucial aspects of genome instability, to outline the ways in which environmental chemicals can affect this cancer hallmark and to identify candidate chemicals for further study. The overall aim is to make......Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome's integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus...

  2. Instabilities and nonequilibrium structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirapegui, E.; Villarroel, D.

    1987-01-01

    Physical systems can be studied both near to and far from equilibrium where instabilities appear. The behaviour in these two regions is reviewed in this book, from both the theoretical and application points of view. The influence of noise in these situations is an essential feature which cannot be ignored. It is therefore discussed using phenomenological and theoretical approaches for the numerous problems which still remain in the field. This volume should appeal to mathematicians and physicists interested in the areas of instability, bifurcation theory, dynamical systems, pattern formation, nonequilibrium structures and statistical mechanics. (Auth.)

  3. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: INSTABILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z., E-mail: d.pugliese.physics@gmail.com, E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz [Institute of Physics and Research Centre of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Silesian University in Opava, Bezručovo náměstí 13, CZ-74601 Opava (Czech Republic)

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the possibility that several instability points may be formed, due to the Paczyński mechanism of violation of mechanical equilibrium, in the orbiting matter around a supermassive Kerr black hole. We consider a recently proposed model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several tori (rings) that can be corotating or counter-rotating relative to the Kerr attractor due to the history of the accretion process. Each torus is governed by the general relativistic hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. We prove that the number of the instability points is generally limited and depends on the dimensionless spin of the rotating attractor.

  4. The effect of pressure anisotropy on ballooning modes in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, A.; Hole, M. J.; Qu, Z. S.; Hezaveh, H.

    2018-06-01

    Edge Localised Modes are thought to be caused by a spectrum of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, including the ballooning mode. While ballooning modes have been studied extensively both theoretically and experimentally, the focus of the vast majority of this research has been on isotropic plasmas. The prevalence of pressure anisotropy in modern tokamaks thus motivates further study of these modes. This paper presents a numerical analysis of ballooning modes in anisotropic equilibria. The investigation was conducted using the newly-developed codes HELENA+ATF and MISHKA-A, which adds anisotropic physics to equilibria and stability analysis. We have examined the impact of anisotropy on the stability of an n = 30 ballooning mode, confirming results conform to previous calculations in the isotropic limit. Growth rates of ballooning modes in equilibria with different levels of anisotropy were then calculated using the stability code MISHKA-A. The key finding was that the level of anisotropy had a significant impact on ballooning mode growth rates. For {T}\\perp > {T}| | , typical of ICRH heating, the growth rate increases, while for {T}\\perp < {T}| | , typical of neutral beam heating, the growth rate decreases.

  5. On the Acceleration and Anisotropy of Ions Within Magnetotail Dipolarizing Flux Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu-Zhi; Runov, Andrei; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Artemyev, Anton V.; Birn, Joachim

    2018-01-01

    Dipolarizing flux bundles (DFBs), earthward propagating structures with enhanced northward magnetic field Bz, are usually believed to carry a distinctly different plasma population from that in the ambient magnetotail plasma sheet. The ion distribution functions within the DFB, however, have been recently found to be largely controlled by the ion adiabaticity parameter κ in the ambient plasma sheet outside the DFB. According to these observations, the ambient κ values of 2-3 usually correspond to a strong perpendicular anisotropy of suprathermal ions within the DFB, whereas for lower κ values the DFB ions become more isotropic. Here we utilize a simple, test particle model to explore the nature of the anisotropy and its dependence on the ambient κ values. We find that the anisotropy originates from successive ion reflections and reentries to the DFB, during which the ions are consecutively accelerated in the perpendicular direction by the DFB-associated electric field. This consecutive acceleration may be interrupted, however, when magnetic field lines are highly curved in the ambient plasma sheet. In this case, the ion trajectories become stochastic outside the DFB, which makes the reflected ions less likely to return to the DFB for another cycle of acceleration; as a consequence, the perpendicular ion anisotropy does not appear. Given that the DFB ions are a free energy source for instabilities when they are injected toward Earth, our simple model (that reproduces most observational features on the anisotropic DFB ion distributions) may shed new lights on the coupling process between magnetotail and inner magnetosphere.

  6. Solvent induced supramolecular anisotropy in molecular gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Michael A., E-mail: mroger09@uoguelph.ca [Department of Food Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N3C3X9 (Canada); Corradini, Maria G. [Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, 01003 (United States); Emge, Thomas [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 08901 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Herein is the first report of solvent induced anisotropy in 12-hydroxystearic acid self-assembled fibrillar networks. Increasing the chain length of polar solvent, such as nitriles and ketones, tailored the anisotropy of the fibrillar aggregates. 12HSA molecular gels, comprised of alkanes, exhibited an isotropic fibrillar network irrespective of the alkane chain length. In polar solvents, anisotropy, observed using 2D powder x-ray diffraction profiles, is correlated to a fibrillar supramolecular morphologies in long chain nitriles and ketones while sphereulitic crystals are correlated to x-ray diffraction patterns with an isotropic scatter intensity in short chain ketones and nitriles. These changes directly modify the final physical properties of the gels. - Highlights: • 12-HSA self-assembles into crystalline supramolecular morphologies depending on the solvent. • Alkanes, short chain nitriles and ketones led to 12-HSA displaying supramolecular isotropy. • In long chain nitriles and ketones, 12-HSA displays supramolecular anisotropy.

  7. Solvent induced supramolecular anisotropy in molecular gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, Michael A.; Corradini, Maria G.; Emge, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Herein is the first report of solvent induced anisotropy in 12-hydroxystearic acid self-assembled fibrillar networks. Increasing the chain length of polar solvent, such as nitriles and ketones, tailored the anisotropy of the fibrillar aggregates. 12HSA molecular gels, comprised of alkanes, exhibited an isotropic fibrillar network irrespective of the alkane chain length. In polar solvents, anisotropy, observed using 2D powder x-ray diffraction profiles, is correlated to a fibrillar supramolecular morphologies in long chain nitriles and ketones while sphereulitic crystals are correlated to x-ray diffraction patterns with an isotropic scatter intensity in short chain ketones and nitriles. These changes directly modify the final physical properties of the gels. - Highlights: • 12-HSA self-assembles into crystalline supramolecular morphologies depending on the solvent. • Alkanes, short chain nitriles and ketones led to 12-HSA displaying supramolecular isotropy. • In long chain nitriles and ketones, 12-HSA displays supramolecular anisotropy.

  8. Texture and anisotropy analysis of Qusaiba shales

    KAUST Repository

    Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Kets, Frans; Lehr, Christian; Wirth, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopy, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, microtomography and ultrasonic velocity measurements were used to characterize microstructures and anisotropy of three deeply buried Qusaiba shales from the Rub

  9. Cellulose and the Control of Growth Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias I. Baskin

    2004-04-01

    The authors research aims to understand morphogenesis, focusing on growth anisotropy, a process that is crucial to make organs with specific and heritable shapes. For the award, the specific aims were to test hypotheses concerning how growth anisotropy is controlled by cell wall structure, particularly by the synthesis and alignment of cellulose microfibrils, the predominant mechanical element in the cell wall. This research has involved characterizing the basic physiology of anisotropic expansion, including measuring it at high resolution; and second, characterizing the relationship between growth anisotropy, and cellulose microfibrils. Important in this relationship and also to the control of anisotropic expansion are structures just inside the plasma membrane called cortical microtubules, and the research has also investigated their contribution to controlling anisotropy and microfibril alignment. In addition to primary experimental papers, I have also developed improved methods relating to these objectives as well as written relevant reviews. Major accomplishments in each area will now be described.

  10. Hydrodynamic instabilities in astrophysics and ICF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul Drake, R.

    2005-01-01

    Inertial fusion systems and astrophysical systems both involve hydrodynamic effects, including sources of pressure, shock waves, rarefactions, and plasma flows. In the evolution of such systems, hydrodynamic instabilities naturally evolve. As a result, a fundamental understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities is necessary to understand their behavior. In addition, high-energy-density facilities designed for ICF purposes can be used to provide and experimental basis for understanding astrophysical processes. In this talk. I will discuss the instabilities that appear in astrophysics and ICF from the common perspective of the basic mechanisms at work. Examples will be taken from experiments aimed at ICF, from astrophysical systems, and from experiments using ICF systems to address issues in astrophysics. The high-energy-density research facilities of today can accelerate small but macroscopic amounts of material to velocities above 100 km/s, can heat such material to temperature above 100 eV, can produce pressures far above a million atmospheres (10''12 dybes/cm''2 or 0.1 TPascal), and can do experiments under these conditions that address basic physics issues. This enables on to devise experiments aimed directly at important process such as the Rayleigh Taylor instability at an ablating surface or at an embedded interface that is accelerating, the Richtmeyer Meshkov evolution of shocked interfaces, and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of shear flows. The talk will include examples of such phenomena from the laboratory and from astrophysics, and will discuss experiments to study them. (Author)

  11. Giant anisotropy of magnetocaloric effect in TbMnO3 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jin-Ling; Zhang, Xiang-Qun; Li, Guo-Ke; Cheng, Zhao-Hua; Zheng, Lin; Lu, Yi

    2011-05-01

    The magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in TbMnO3 single crystals was investigated by isothermal magnetization curves for the ab plane at low temperatures. Large magnetic entropy change, ΔSM = -18.0 J/kg K, and the refrigerant capacity, RC = 390.7 J/kg, are achieved near the ordering temperature of Tb3+ moment (TNTb) under 70 kOe along the a axis. Furthermore, the TbMnO3 single crystal exhibits a giant MCE anisotropy. The difference of ΔSMand RC between the a and b axes is field and temperature dependent, which reaches maximum values of 11.4 J/kg K and 304.1 J/kg, respectively. By taking magnetocrystalline anisotropy into account, the rotating ΔSMwithin the ab plane can be well simulated, indicating that the anisotropy of ΔSMis directly contributed from the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Our finding for giant MCE anisotropy in TbMnO3 single crystals explores the possibility of using this material for magnetic refrigerators by rotating its magnetization vector rather than moving it in and out of the magnet.

  12. Higher-order anisotropies in the Buda-Lund model: Disentangling flow and density field anisotropies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loekoes, Sandor [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary); Csanad, Mate [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Tomasik, Boris [Univerzita Mateja Bela, Banska Bystrica (Slovakia); Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Prague (Czech Republic); Csoergo, Tamas [Wigner RCP, Budapest (Hungary); KRF, Gyoengyoes (Hungary)

    2016-10-15

    The Buda-Lund hydro model describes an expanding ellipsoidal fireball, and fits the observed elliptic flow and oscillating HBT radii successfully. Due to fluctuations in energy depositions, the fireball shape however fluctuates on an event-by-event basis. The transverse plane asymmetry can be translated into a series of multipole anisotropy coefficients. These anisotropies then result in measurable momentum-space anisotropies, to be measured with respect to their respective symmetry planes. In this paper we detail an extension of the Buda-Lund model to multipole anisotropies and investigate the resulting flow coefficients and oscillations of HBT radii. (orig.)

  13. Impact of momentum anisotropy and turbulent chromo-fields on thermal particle production in quark-gluon-plasma medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Vinod [Indian Institute of Technology Gandhinagar, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Sreekanth, V. [Indian Institute of Science, Centre for High Energy Physics, Bangalore (India)

    2017-06-15

    Momentum anisotropy present during the hydrodynamic evolution of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) in RHIC may lead to the chromo-Weibel instability and turbulent chromo-fields.The dynamics of the quark and gluon momentum distributions in this case is governed by an effective diffusive Vlasov equation (linearized). The solution of this linearized transport equation for the modified momentum distribution functions lead to the mathematical form of non-equilibrium momentum distribution functions of quarks/antiquarks and gluons. The modifications to these distributions encode the physics of turbulent color fields and momentum anisotropy. In the present manuscript, we employ these distribution functions to estimate the thermal dilepton production rate in the QGP medium. The production rate is seen to have appreciable sensitivity to the strength of the anisotropy. (orig.)

  14. Slow electron contribution to inelastic reflection anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podsvirov, O.A.; Kuznetsov, Yu.A.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated is electron contribution with low energy (up to 1 keV) to the anisotropy of electron inelastic reflection (IRE) from silicon monocrystal (111) within 12-50 keV energy range of primary electrons. Experimental data on IRE anisotropy are presented: delay curves for silicon monocrystal, permitting to separate electrons with the energy up to 1 keV, dependences of IRE anisotropy on the energy of primary electrons for the systems - monocrystalline silicon-amorphous silicon film and delay curves for such systems (film thickness varies from 20 to 2000 A). Suggested is a phenomenologic model, permitting to take into account the contribution of slow electrons to IRE anisotropy: it is supposed, that three groups of electrons take part in the formation of the latter: elastic and inelastic reflected electrons, slow electrons, excited by primary electrons and slow electrons, generated by the reverse flow of the scattered electrons. Contribution of electrons, different by origin, to IRE anisotropy is evaluated in accordance with the experimental data on the basis of this model. It is stated, that slow electrons constitute approximately one half of the IRE anisotropy value, the contribution of both groups of slow electrons being approximately equal

  15. Instabilities in the plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaeppeler, H.J.

    1975-03-01

    The plasma focus was studied by many research teams in view of a possible approach to controlled thermonuclear fusion. Though it is questionable whether the plasma focus will ever lead to a fusion reactor, it nevertheless constitutes a strong source of neutron, X- and gamma radiation for simulating fusion reactor conditions. Furthermore, the plasma focus yields very high temperatures (10 7 K) and densities (> 10 19 cm -3 ) and thus provides interesting conditions for the study of high density plasmas. This review paper starts with a description of the compression stage of the focussing plasma, using a snow-plough model. It is shown that sophisticated MHD calculations substantiate the snowplough theory, but are not suited to describe the phenomena in the final compressed stage. For this purpose, a particle-in-cell calculation is employed, yielding a beam-beam collision model for the neutron production. Experimental evidence indicates that neutron production is associated with the appearence of m = O instabilities and is the direct result of collisions between anomalously accelerated ions. One of the mechanisms of ion acceleration are strong local electric fields. Another possible mechanism can bee seen in beam-plasma instabilities caused by runaway electrons. The analytical derivation of the dispersion relation for plasma focus conditions including runaway effect is discussed (orig.) [de

  16. Buneman instability and Pierce instability in a collisionless bounded plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizuka, Satoru; Saeki, Koichi; Sato, Noriyoshi; Hatta, Yoshisuke

    1983-01-01

    A systematic experiment is performed on the Buneman instability and the Pierce instability in a bounded plasma consisting of beam electrons and stationary ions. Current fluctuations are confirmed to be induced by the Buneman instability. On the other hand, the Pierce instability gives rise to a current limitation. The phenomena are well explained by Mikhailovskii's theory taking account of ion motion in a bounded plasma. (author)

  17. Interpretation of the cosmic microwave background radiation anisotropy detected by the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, E. L.; Meyer, S. S.; Bennett, C. L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Hauser, M. G.; Kogut, A.; Lineweaver, C.; Mather, J. C.; Smoot, G. F.

    1992-01-01

    The large-scale cosmic background anisotropy detected by the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument is compared to the sensitive previous measurements on various angular scales, and to the predictions of a wide variety of models of structure formation driven by gravitational instability. The observed anisotropy is consistent with all previously measured upper limits and with a number of dynamical models of structure formation. For example, the data agree with an unbiased cold dark matter (CDM) model with H0 = 50 km/s Mpc and Delta-M/M = 1 in a 16 Mpc radius sphere. Other models, such as CDM plus massive neutrinos (hot dark matter (HDM)), or CDM with a nonzero cosmological constant are also consistent with the COBE detection and can provide the extra power seen on 5-10,000 km/s scales.

  18. Measurement of the distribution of anisotropy constants in magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhie, A. A.; Marquina, C.; O'Grady, K.; Vallejo-Fernandez, G.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we have applied theoretical calculations to new experimental measurements of the effect of the anisotropy distribution in magnetite nanoparticles, which in turn controls hysteresis heating for hyperthermia applications. Good agreement between theory and experiment is reported where the theoretical calculation is based upon the detailed measurement of the particle elongation generally observed in the nanoparticles. The elongation has been measured from studies via transmission electron microscopy. We find that particle elongation is responsible for the anisotropy dispersion, which can be obtained by analysis and fitting to a measurement of the temperature decay of remanence. A median value of the anisotropy constant of 1.5  ×  105 erg/cc was obtained. A very wide distribution of anisotropy constants is present with a Gaussian standard deviation of 1.5  ×  105 erg/cc. From our measurements, deviations in the value of the saturation magnetisation from particle to particle are most likely the main factor giving rise to this large distribution, with 33% arising from the error in the measured elongation. The lower limit to the anisotropy constant of the nanoparticles is determined by the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the material, 1.1  ×  105 erg/cc for magnetite, which was studied in this work.

  19. Synergy and destructive interferences between local magnetic anisotropies in binuclear complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guihéry, Nathalie; Ruamps, Renaud [Laboratoire de Chimie et Physique Quantiques, UMR5625, University of Toulouse 3, Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); Maurice, Rémi [SUBATECH, IN2P3/EMN Nantes/University of Nantes, 4 rue Alfred Kastler, BP 20722 44307, Nantes, Cedex 3 (France); Graaf, Coen de [University Rovira i Virgili, Marcelli Domingo s/n, 43007 Tarragona (Spain)

    2015-12-31

    Magnetic anisotropy is responsible for the single molecule magnet behavior of transition metal complexes. This behavior is characterized by a slow relaxation of the magnetization for low enough temperatures, and thus for a possible blocking of the magnetization. This bistable behavior can lead to possible technological applications in the domain of data storage or quantum computing. Therefore, the understanding of the microscopic origin of magnetic anisotropy has received a considerable interest during the last two decades. The presentation focuses on the determination of the anisotropy parameters of both mono-nuclear and bi-nuclear types of complexes and on the control and optimization of the anisotropic properties. The validity of the model Hamiltonians commonly used to characterize such complexes has been questioned and it is shown that neither the standard multispin Hamiltonian nor the giant spin Hamiltonian are appropriate for weakly coupled ions. Alternative models have been proposed and used to properly extract the relevant parameters. Rationalizations of the magnitude and nature of both local anisotropies of single ions and the molecular anisotropy of polynuclear complexes are provided. The synergy and interference effects between local magnetic anisotropies are studied in a series of binuclear complexes.

  20. Anisotropy effect of the clay soil masses on the stress-strain state of transport tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushkov Boris Semenovich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the kinds of clay soil mass anisotropy in the form of the spatial heterogeneity of properties of thawed and frozen soils, ambiguity of the frost heaving values and shrinkage in different directions. The questions of anisotropy of the clay soil properties at the positive temperatures are reported. The dependence of the heterogeneity of the physical and mechanical properties of frozen soils from the cryogenic texture, natural arrangement, different types of stratification and interbedding is considered. Indexes of the strength and strain anisotropy are noted. The accounting possibilities of the basic numerical indexes of heaving phenomena from the standpoint of anisotropy of the properties and processes inherent in the freezing through soil are analyzed by substitution in the heaving strain formula. The unevenness of thawed soil shrinkage in vertical and horizontal directions is noted during the freezing of the top layer. The unevenness of shrinkage in different directions is connected with kind of stress and cryogenic texture. Anisotropy of the frost heaving process is considered in the context of one-dimensional and non-one-dimensional problem depending on the amount of the freezing fronts and their direction. There is summarized the effect of anisotropy appearances on the stress-strain state of the transport tunnel. One can conclude that the resulting non-uniformity of heaving and shrinkage in conjunction with anisotropic properties of frozen soils, is a significant component in the complex of power factors determining the optimal design solution of a transport tunnel.

  1. Elbow joint instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Henriksen, M G; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1994-01-01

    The effect of simultaneous ulnar and radial collateral ligament division on the kinematics of the elbow joint is studied in a cadaveric model. Severance of the anterior part of the ulnar collateral ligament and the annular ligament led to significant elbow joint instability in valgus and varus...

  2. Structural and Material Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cifuentes, Gustavo Cifuentes

    This work is a small contribution to the general problem of structural and material instability. In this work, the main subject is the analysis of cracking and failure of structural elements made from quasi-brittle materials like concrete. The analysis is made using the finite element method. Three...

  3. Agricultural Markets Instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrido, A.; Brümmer, B.; M'Barek, R.; Gielen-Meuwissen, M.P.M.; Morales-Opazo, C.

    2016-01-01

    Since the financial and food price crises of 2007, market instability has been a topic of major concern to agricultural economists and policy professionals. This volume provides an overview of the key issues surrounding food prices volatility, focusing primarily on drivers, long-term implications of

  4. Comment on critical instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, S.F.; Suzuki, Mahiko

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the problem of the mass splitting between top and bottom quarks, within the context of Nambu-Jona-Lasinio type models involving top and bottom quark condensates. We interpret the phenomenon of 'critical instability' recently proposed to account for such a mass splitting as the fine-tuning of two vacuum expectation values in a composite two-Higgs doublet model. (orig.)

  5. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Radhika, R.; Kozakov, A.T.; Pandian, R.; Chakravarty, S.; Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient

  6. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  7. Magnetic anisotropy of YNi2B2C single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran, M.; Gladczuk, L.; Gorecka, J.; Szymczak, H.; Szymczak, R.; Drzazga, Z.; Winiarska, H.

    1994-01-01

    Reversible and irreversible magnetization processes in YNi 2 B 2 C single crystal have been measured and analysed in terms of existing theories. Performed measurements suggest that anisotropy of the effective mass in YNi 2 B 2 C superconductor is rather small and similar to that observed in conventional superconductors. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on T c is shown to be typical of low-temperature superconductors. It is suggested that the layered structure of YNi 2 B 2 C has some effect on the irreversible magnetization processes observed in this superconductor. ((orig.))

  8. Tracking Code for Microwave Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heifets, S.; SLAC

    2006-01-01

    To study microwave instability the tracking code is developed. For bench marking, results are compared with Oide-Yokoya results [1] for broad-band Q = 1 impedance. Results hint to two possible mechanisms determining the threshold of instability

  9. Instabilities in thin tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konkin, M.K.; Adler, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    Tunnel junctions prepared for inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy are often plagued by instabilities in the 0-500-meV range. This paper relates the bias at which the instability occurs to the barrier thickness

  10. The thermo magnetic instability in hot viscose plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghani, A.; Khosravi, A.; Khesali, A.

    2017-10-01

    Magnetic Rotational Instability (MRI) can not performed well in accretion disks with strong magnetic field. Studies have indicated a new type of instability called thermomagnetic instability (TMI) in systems where Nernst coefficient and gradient temperature were considered. Nernst coefficient would appear if Boltzman equation could be expanded through ω_{Be} (cyclotron frequency). However, the growth rate of this instability was two magnitude orders below MRI growth (Ωk), which could not act the same as MRI. Therefor, a higher growth rate of unstable modes was needed. In this paper, rotating viscid hot plasma with strong magnetic filed was studied. Firstly, a constant alpha viscosity was studied and then a temperature sensitive viscosity. The results showed that the temperature sensitive viscosity would be able to increase the growth rate of TMI modes significantly, hence capable of acting similar to MRI.

  11. Anisoft - Advanced Treatment of Magnetic Anisotropy Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadima, M.

    2017-12-01

    Since its first release, Anisoft (Anisotropy Data Browser) has gained a wide popularity in magnetic fabric community mainly due to its simple and user-friendly interface enabling very fast visualization of magnetic anisotropy tensors. Here, a major Anisoft update is presented transforming a rather simple data viewer into a platform offering an advanced treatment of magnetic anisotropy data. The updated software introduces new enlarged binary data format which stores both in-phase and out-of-phase (if measured) susceptibility tensors (AMS) or tensors of anisotropy of magnetic remanence (AMR) together with their respective confidence ellipses and values of F-tests for anisotropy. In addition to the tensor data, a whole array of specimen orientation angles, orientation of mesoscopic foliation(s) and lineation(s) is stored for each record enabling later editing or corrections. The input data may be directly acquired by AGICO Kappabridges (AMS) or Spinner Magnetometers (AMR); imported from various data formats, including the long-time standard binary ran-format; or manually created. Multiple anisotropy files can be combined together or split into several files by manual data selection or data filtering according to their values. Anisotropy tensors are conventionally visualized as principal directions (eigenvectors) in equal-area projection (stereoplot) together with a wide array of quantitative anisotropy parameters presented in histograms or in color-coded scatter plots showing mutual relationship of up to three quantitative parameters. When dealing with AMS in variable low fields, field-independent and field-dependent components of anisotropy can be determined (Hrouda 2009). For a group of specimens, individual principal directions can be contoured, or a mean tensor and respective confidence ellipses of its principal directions can be calculated using either the Hext-Jelinek (Jelinek 1978) statistics or the Bootstrap method (Constable & Tauxe 1990). Each graphical

  12. CMB anisotropies at all orders: the non-linear Sachs-Wolfe formula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roldan, Omar, E-mail: oaroldan@if.ufrj.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-08-01

    We obtain the non-linear generalization of the Sachs-Wolfe + integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) formula describing the CMB temperature anisotropies. Our formula is valid at all orders in perturbation theory, is also valid in all gauges and includes scalar, vector and tensor modes. A direct consequence of our results is that the maps of the logarithmic temperature anisotropies are much cleaner than the usual CMB maps, because they automatically remove many secondary anisotropies. This can for instance, facilitate the search for primordial non-Gaussianity in future works. It also disentangles the non-linear ISW from other effects. Finally, we provide a method which can iteratively be used to obtain the lensing solution at the desired order.

  13. CMB anisotropies at all orders: the non-linear Sachs-Wolfe formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roldan, Omar

    2017-01-01

    We obtain the non-linear generalization of the Sachs-Wolfe + integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) formula describing the CMB temperature anisotropies. Our formula is valid at all orders in perturbation theory, is also valid in all gauges and includes scalar, vector and tensor modes. A direct consequence of our results is that the maps of the logarithmic temperature anisotropies are much cleaner than the usual CMB maps, because they automatically remove many secondary anisotropies. This can for instance, facilitate the search for primordial non-Gaussianity in future works. It also disentangles the non-linear ISW from other effects. Finally, we provide a method which can iteratively be used to obtain the lensing solution at the desired order.

  14. Electrical resistivity anisotropy of osmium single crystals in the range 4,2 to 300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkenshtejn, N.V.; Dyakina, V.P.; Dyakin, V.V.; Startsev, V.E.; Cherepanov, V.I.; Azhazha, V.M.; Kovtun, G.P.; Elenskij, V.A.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kharkov. Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst.)

    1981-01-01

    Electrical resistivity and size effect anisotropies of pure osmium single crystals with rhosub(273.2/rhosub(4.2)2600 were investigated in the temperature range 4.2 to 300 K. It is found that the electrical resistivity anisotropy (αT)=rhosub( )/rhosub( ) is less than unit and has a maximum at T approximately 50 K; the size effect anisotropy (rho1)sub( )/(rho1)sub( ) is 0.39+-0.07 at T=4.2 K; at liquid helium temperature, the dependence of thin samples is controlled by the scattering of conduction electrons by the surface of the sample. The results are discussed for the specific shape of the Fermi surface geometry of osmium with an account for the scattering processes of conduction electrons by phonons and by surface of the sample

  15. Nonlinear evolution of MHD instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, G.; Hicks, H.R.; Wooten, J.W.; Dory, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A 3-D nonlinear MHD computer code was used to study the time evolution of internal instabilities. Velocity vortex cells are observed to persist into the nonlinear evolution. Pressure and density profiles convect around these cells for a weak localized instability, or convect into the wall for a strong instability. (U.S.)

  16. Magnetoresistance of nanogranular Ni/NiO controlled by exchange anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Bianco, L.; Spizzo, F.; Tamisari, M.; Allia, P.

    2013-01-01

    A link between exchange anisotropy and magnetoresistance has been found to occur in a Ni/NiO sample consisting of Ni nanocrystallites (mean size ∼13 nm, Ni content ∼33 vol%) dispersed in a NiO matrix. This material shows metallic-type electric conduction and isotropic spin-dependent magnetoresistance as well as exchange bias effect. The latter is the outcome of an exchange anisotropy arising from the contact interaction between the Ni phase and the NiO matrix. Combined analysis of magnetization M(H) and magnetoresistance MR(H) loops measured in the 5–250 K temperature range after zero-field-cooling (ZFC) and after field-cooling (FC) from 300 K reveals that the magnetoresistance is influenced by exchange anisotropy, which is triggered by the FC process and can be modified in strength by varying the temperature. Compared to the ZFC case, the exchange anisotropy produces a horizontal shift of the FC MR(H) loop along with a reduction of the MR response associated to the reorientation of the Ni moments. A strict connection between magnetoresistance and remanent magnetization of FC loops on one side and the exchange field on the other, ruled by exchange anisotropy, is indicated. - Highlights: • Nanogranular Ni/NiO with giant magnetoresistance (MR) and exchange bias effect. • Exchange anisotropy produces a shift of the field-cooled MR(H) loop and reduces MR. • MR, remanence of field-cooled loops and exchange field are three correlated quantities. • It is possible to control MR of nanogranular systems through the exchange anisotropy

  17. Effect of pressure anisotropy on the m=1 small wavelength modes in Z-pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faghihi, M. (Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm, Sweden. Dept. of Plasma Physics and Fusion Research)

    1987-05-01

    A generalization of Freidberg's perpendicular MHD model is used to investigate the effect of pressure anisotropy on the small wavelength internal kink (m=1) mode instability in a Z-Pinch. A normal mode analysis of perturbed motion of an incompressible, collisionless and cylindrical plasma is performed. The stability criterion is (r{SIGMA}B{sup 2})' {le} 0, where {SIGMA} = 1 - (P{sub parallel} - P{sub perpendicular} {sub to})/B/sup 2/. It cannot be fulfilled without violation of the fire hose stability condition {SIGMA} {ge} 0.

  18. Effects of pressure anisotropy on the M=1 small wavelength modes in Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, M.

    1986-05-01

    A new model is used to investigate the effect of the pressure anisotropy on the internal kink (m=1) mode instability in a Z-pinch. A normal mode analysis of perturbed motion of an incompressible, collision- less and cylindrical plasma is performed. A comparison of the derived stability criterion with that of ideal MHD is made. The conclusion is that the stability criterion (rSigmaB/sp2/) ' 0, where Sigma=1-(P/sb/(parall)-P/sb/(perpend)/ B/sp/2. (author)

  19. Effect of pressure anisotropy on the m=1 small wavelength modes in Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, M.

    1987-01-01

    A generalization of Freidberg's perpendicular MHD model is used to investigate the effect of pressure anisotropy on the small wavelength internal kink (m=1) mode instability in a Z-Pinch. A normal mode analysis of perturbed motion of an incompressible, collisionless and cylindrical plasma is performed. The stability criterion is (rΣB 2 )' ≤ 0, where Σ = 1 - (P parallel - P perpendicular to )/B 2 . It cannot be fulfilled without violation of the fire hose stability condition Σ ≥ 0. (orig.)

  20. Anisotropies in the cosmic neutrino background after Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe five-year data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Pagano, Luca; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Serra, Paolo; Cooray, Asantha

    2008-01-01

    We search for the presence of cosmological neutrino background (CNB) anisotropies in recent Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) five-year data using their signature imprinted on modifications to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy power spectrum. By parameterizing the neutrino background anisotropies with the speed viscosity parameter c vis , we find that the WMAP five-year data alone provide only a weak indication for CNB anisotropies with c vis 2 >0.06 at the 95% confidence level. When we combine CMB anisotropy data with measurements of galaxy clustering, the SN-Ia Hubble diagram, and other cosmological information, the detection increases to c vis 2 >0.16 at the same 95% confidence level. Future data from Planck, combined with a weak lensing survey such as the one expected with DUNE from space, will be able to measure the CNB anisotropy parameter at about 10% accuracy. We discuss the degeneracy between neutrino background anisotropies and other cosmological parameters such as the number of effective neutrinos species and the dark energy equation of state

  1. Texture and anisotropy in ferroelectric lead metaniobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Benjamin John

    Ferroelectric lead metaniobate, PbNb2O6, is a piezoelectric ceramic typically used because of its elevated Curie temperature and anisotropic properties. However, the piezoelectric constant, d33, is relatively low in randomly oriented ceramics when compared to other ferroelectrics. Crystallographic texturing is often employed to increase the piezoelectric constant because the spontaneous polarization axes of grains are better aligned. In this research, crystallographic textures induced through tape casting are distinguished from textures induced through electrical poling. Texture is described using multiple quantitative approaches utilizing X-ray and neutron time-of-flight diffraction. Tape casting lead metaniobate with an inclusion of acicular template particles induces an orthotropic texture distribution. Templated grain growth from seed particles oriented during casting results in anisotropic grain structures. The degree of preferred orientation is directly linked to the shear behavior of the tape cast slurry. Increases in template concentration, slurry viscosity, and casting velocity lead to larger textures by inducing more particle orientation in the tape casting plane. The maximum 010 texture distributions were two and a half multiples of a random distribution. Ferroelectric texture was induced by electrical poling. Electric poling increases the volume of material oriented with the spontaneous polarization direction in the material. Samples with an initial paraelectric texture exhibit a greater change in the domain volume fraction during electrical poling than randomly oriented ceramics. In tape cast samples, the resulting piezoelectric response is proportional to the 010 texture present prior to poling. This results in property anisotropy dependent on initial texture. Piezoelectric properties measured on the most textured ceramics were similar to those obtained with a commercial standard.

  2. Oblique Alfvén instabilities driven by compensated currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malovichko, P. [Main Astronomical Observatory, NASU, Kyiv (Ukraine); Voitenko, Y.; De Keyser, J., E-mail: voitenko@oma.be [Solar-Terrestrial Centre of Excellence, Space Physics Division, Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Ringlaan-3-Avenue Circulaire, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-01-10

    Compensated-current systems created by energetic ion beams are widespread in space and astrophysical plasmas. The well-known examples are foreshock regions in the solar wind and around supernova remnants. We found a new oblique Alfvénic instability driven by compensated currents flowing along the background magnetic field. Because of the vastly different electron and ion gyroradii, oblique Alfvénic perturbations react differently on the currents carried by the hot ion beams and the return electron currents. Ultimately, this difference leads to a non-resonant aperiodic instability at perpendicular wavelengths close to the beam ion gyroradius. The instability growth rate increases with increasing beam current and temperature. In the solar wind upstream of Earth's bow shock, the instability growth time can drop below 10 proton cyclotron periods. Our results suggest that this instability can contribute to the turbulence and ion acceleration in space and astrophysical foreshocks.

  3. Oblique Alfvén instabilities driven by compensated currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malovichko, P.; Voitenko, Y.; De Keyser, J.

    2014-01-01

    Compensated-current systems created by energetic ion beams are widespread in space and astrophysical plasmas. The well-known examples are foreshock regions in the solar wind and around supernova remnants. We found a new oblique Alfvénic instability driven by compensated currents flowing along the background magnetic field. Because of the vastly different electron and ion gyroradii, oblique Alfvénic perturbations react differently on the currents carried by the hot ion beams and the return electron currents. Ultimately, this difference leads to a non-resonant aperiodic instability at perpendicular wavelengths close to the beam ion gyroradius. The instability growth rate increases with increasing beam current and temperature. In the solar wind upstream of Earth's bow shock, the instability growth time can drop below 10 proton cyclotron periods. Our results suggest that this instability can contribute to the turbulence and ion acceleration in space and astrophysical foreshocks.

  4. Studies of anisotropy of iron based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Jason [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To study the electronic anisotropy in iron based superconductors, the temperature dependent London penetration depth, Δλ (T), have been measured in several compounds, along with the angular dependent upper critical field, Hc2(T). Study was undertaken on single crystals of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 with x=0.108 and x=0.127, in the overdoped range of the doping phase diagram, characterized by notable modulation of the superconducting gap. Heavy ion irradiation with matching field doses of 6 T and 6.5 T respectively, were used to create columnar defects and to study their effect on the temperature Δλ (T). The variation of the low-temperature penetration depth in both pristine and irradiated samples was fitted with a power-law function Δλ (T) = ATn. Irradiation increases the magnitude of the pre-factor A and decreases the exponent n, similar to the effect on the optimally doped samples. This finding supports the universal s± scenario for the whole doping range. Knowing that the s± gap symmetry exists across the superconducting dome for the electron doped systems, we next looked at λ (T), in optimally - doped, SrFe2(As1-xPx)2, x =0.35. Both, as-grown (Tc ~ 25 K) and annealed (Tc ~ 35 K) single crystals of SrFe2(As1-xPx)2 were measured. Annealing decreases the absolute value of the London penetration depth from λ(0) = 300 ± 10 nm in as-grown samples to λ (0) = 275±10 nm. At low temperatures, λ (T) ~ T indicates a superconducting gap with line nodes. Analysis of the full-temperature range superfluid density is consistent with the line nodes, but differs from the simple single-gap d-wave. The observed behavior is very similar to that of BaFe2(As1-xPx)2, showing that isovalently substituted pnictides are inherently different from

  5. T=0 phase diagram and nature of domains in ultrathin ferromagnetic films with perpendicular anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pighin, Santiago A.; Billoni, Orlando V.; Stariolo, Daniel A.; Cannas, Sergio A.

    2010-01-01

    We present the complete zero temperature phase diagram of a model for ultrathin films with perpendicular anisotropy. The whole parameter space of relevant coupling constants is studied in first order anisotropy approximation. Because the ground state is known to be formed by perpendicular stripes separated by Bloch walls, a standard variational approach is used, complemented with specially designed Monte Carlo simulations. We can distinguish four regimes according to the different nature of striped domains: a high anisotropy Ising regime with sharp domain walls, a saturated stripe regime with thicker walls inside which an in-plane component of the magnetization develops, a narrow canted-like regime, characterized by a sinusoidal variation of both the in-plane and the out of plane magnetization components, which upon further decrease of the anisotropy leads to an in-plane ferromagnetic state via a spin reorientation transition (SRT). The nature of domains and walls are described in some detail together with the variation of domain width with anisotropy, for any value of exchange and dipolar interactions. Our results, although strictly valid at T=0, can be valuable for interpreting data on the evolution of domain width at finite temperature, a still largely open problem.

  6. Orphans and political instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuning, Marijke; Ishiyama, John

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the security implications of growing orphan populations, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Little has been written about the security implications of this especially vulnerable group of children. Are growing orphan populations associated with increases in political instability as has been suggested? Using data from several sources, we employ regression analysis to test whether Sub-Saharan African countries with larger proportions of orphans and those with increasing orphan populations experience higher rates of political instability. We find that the increase in the orphan population is related to an increasing incidence of civil conflict, but do not find a similar relationship for the proportion of orphans. In addition, we find that the causes of orphanhood matter. We conclude that increases in orphan populations (rather than simple proportions) are destabilizing. We suggest possible avenues for mediating the security risks posed by growing orphan populations.

  7. A trickle instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossa, Benjamin

    2005-11-01

    We address the problem of the free fall of a long, horizontal and narrow liquid layer squeezed in a vertical open Hele-Shaw cell. The layer destabilizes as it falls down, evolving into a series of liquid blobs linked together by thin bridges, which ultimately break, leaving the initially connex fluid layer as a set a disjointed drops. The mechanism of this instability is the onset of a vertical pressure gradient due to the curvature difference of the moving contact line between the advancing interface and the rear interface. This instability, whose growth rate scales with a non-trivial power of the capillary number, amplifies indifferently a broad band of wavenumbers because of the flat shape of its dispersion relation in the thin layer limit. We will finally comment on the nature of the final fragmentation process and drop size distributions.

  8. Instability and internet design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Braman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Instability - unpredictable but constant change in one’s environment and the means with which one deals with it - has replaced convergence as the focal problem for telecommunications policy in general and internet policy in particular. Those who designed what we now call the internet during the first decade of the effort (1969-1979, who in essence served simultaneously as its policy-makers, developed techniques for coping with instability of value for network designers today and for those involved with any kind of large-scale sociotechnical infrastructure. Analysis of the technical document series that was medium for and record of that design process reveals coping techniques that began with defining the problem and went on to include conceptual labour, social practices, and technical approaches.

  9. Imaging of patellofemoral instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldt, S.; Rummeny, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Patellofemoral instability remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge due to its multifactorial genesis. The purpose of imaging is to systematically analyze predisposing factors, such as trochlear dysplasia, patella alta, tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance, rotational deformities of the lower limb and patellar tilt. In order to evaluate anatomical abnormalities with a sufficient diagnostic accuracy, standardized measurement methods and implementation of various imaging modalities are necessary. Diagnosis of acute and often overlooked lateral patellar dislocation can be established with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) because of its characteristic patterns of injury. Damage to the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has a significance just as high as the predisposing risk factors in relation to the cause of chronic instability. (orig.) [de

  10. Linear waves and instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bers, A.

    1975-01-01

    The electrodynamic equations for small-amplitude waves and their dispersion relation in a homogeneous plasma are outlined. For such waves, energy and momentum, and their flow and transformation, are described. Perturbation theory of waves is treated and applied to linear coupling of waves, and the resulting instabilities from such interactions between active and passive waves. Linear stability analysis in time and space is described where the time-asymptotic, time-space Green's function for an arbitrary dispersion relation is developed. The perturbation theory of waves is applied to nonlinear coupling, with particular emphasis on pump-driven interactions of waves. Details of the time--space evolution of instabilities due to coupling are given. (U.S.)

  11. Cosmic ray driven instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorfi, E.A.; Drury, L.O.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction between energetic charged particles and thermal plasma, which forms the basis of diffusive shock acceleration, leads also to interesting dynamical phenomena. For a compressional mode propagating in a system with homoeneous energetic particle pressure it is well known that friction with the energetic particles leads to damping. The linear theory of this effect has been analyzed in detail by Ptuskin. Not so obvious is that a non-uniform energetic particle pressure can in addition amplify compressional disturbances. If the pressure gradient is sufficiently steep this growth can dominate the frictional damping and lead to an instability. It is important to not that this effect results from the collective nature of the interaction between the energetic particles and the gas and is not connected with the Parker instability, nor with the resonant amplification of Alfven waves

  12. Shape-induced anisotropy in antiferromagnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomonay, O.; Kondovych, S.; Loktev, V.

    2014-01-01

    High fraction of the surface atoms considerably enhances the influence of size and shape on the magnetic and electronic properties of nanoparticles. Shape effects in ferromagnetic nanoparticles are well understood and allow us to set and control the parameters of a sample that affect its magnetic anisotropy during production. In the present paper we study the shape effects in the other widely used magnetic materials – antiferromagnets, – which possess vanishingly small or zero macroscopic magnetization. We take into account the difference between the surface and bulk magnetic anisotropy of a nanoparticle and show that the effective magnetic anisotropy depends on the particle shape and crystallographic orientation of its faces. The corresponding shape-induced contribution to the magnetic anisotropy energy is proportional to the particle volume, depends on magnetostriction, and can cause formation of equilibrium domain structure. Crystallographic orientation of the nanoparticle surface determines the type of domain structure. The proposed model allows us to predict the magnetic properties of antiferromagnetic nanoparticles depending on their shape and treatment. - Highlights: • We demonstrate that the shape effects in antiferromagnetic nanoparticles stem from the difference of surface and bulk magnetic properties combined with strong magnetoelastic coupling. • We predict shape-induced anisotropy in antiferromagnetic particles with large aspect ratio. • We predict different types of domain structures depending on the orientation of the particle faces

  13. Instability in dynamic fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineberg, J.; Marder, M.

    1999-05-01

    The fracture of brittle amorphous materials is an especially challenging problem, because the way a large object shatters is intimately tied to details of cohesion at microscopic scales. This subject has been plagued by conceptual puzzles, and to make matters worse, experiments seemed to contradict the most firmly established theories. In this review, we will show that the theory and experiments fit within a coherent picture where dynamic instabilities of a crack tip play a crucial role. To accomplish this task, we first summarize the central results of linear elastic dynamic fracture mechanics, an elegant and powerful description of crack motion from the continuum perspective. We point out that this theory is unable to make predictions without additional input, information that must come either from experiment, or from other types of theories. We then proceed to discuss some of the most important experimental observations, and the methods that were used to obtain the them. Once the flux of energy to a crack tip passes a critical value, the crack becomes unstable, and it propagates in increasingly complicated ways. As a result, the crack cannot travel as quickly as theory had supposed, fracture surfaces become rough, it begins to branch and radiate sound, and the energy cost for crack motion increases considerably. All these phenomena are perfectly consistent with the continuum theory, but are not described by it. Therefore, we close the review with an account of theoretical and numerical work that attempts to explain the instabilities. Currently, the experimental understanding of crack tip instabilities in brittle amorphous materials is fairly detailed. We also have a detailed theoretical understanding of crack tip instabilities in crystals, reproducing qualitatively many features of the experiments, while numerical work is beginning to make the missing connections between experiment and theory.

  14. Relativistic centrifugal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N.; Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2018-03-01

    Near the central engine, many astrophysical jets are expected to rotate about their axis. Further out they are expected to go through the processes of reconfinement and recollimation. In both these cases, the flow streams along a concave surface and hence, it is subject to the centrifugal force. It is well known that such flows may experience the centrifugal instability (CFI), to which there are many laboratory examples. The recent computer simulations of relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei undergoing the process of reconfinement show that in such jets CFI may dominate over the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability associated with velocity shear (Gourgouliatos & Komissarov). In this letter, we generalize the Rayleigh criterion for CFI in rotating fluids to relativistic flows using a heuristic analysis. We also present the results of computer simulations which support our analytic criterion for the case of an interface separating two uniformly rotating cylindrical flows. We discuss the difference between CFI and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in flows with curved streamlines.

  15. Analyses of MHD instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tatsuoki

    1985-01-01

    In this article analyses of the MHD stabilities which govern the global behavior of a fusion plasma are described from the viewpoint of the numerical computation. First, we describe the high accuracy calculation of the MHD equilibrium and then the analysis of the linear MHD instability. The former is the basis of the stability analysis and the latter is closely related to the limiting beta value which is a very important theoretical issue of the tokamak research. To attain a stable tokamak plasma with good confinement property it is necessary to control or suppress disruptive instabilities. We, next, describe the nonlinear MHD instabilities which relate with the disruption phenomena. Lastly, we describe vectorization of the MHD codes. The above MHD codes for fusion plasma analyses are relatively simple though very time-consuming and parts of the codes which need a lot of CPU time concentrate on a small portion of the codes, moreover, the codes are usually used by the developers of the codes themselves, which make it comparatively easy to attain a high performance ratio on the vector processor. (author)

  16. Turbulence in collisionless plasmas: statistical analysis from numerical simulations with pressure anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowal, G [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Falceta-Goncalves, D A; Lazarian, A, E-mail: kowal@astro.iag.usp.br [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    In recent years, we have experienced increasing interest in the understanding of the physical properties of collisionless plasmas, mostly because of the large number of astrophysical environments (e.g. the intracluster medium (ICM)) containing magnetic fields that are strong enough to be coupled with the ionized gas and characterized by densities sufficiently low to prevent the pressure isotropization with respect to the magnetic line direction. Under these conditions, a new class of kinetic instabilities arises, such as firehose and mirror instabilities, which have been studied extensively in the literature. Their role in the turbulence evolution and cascade process in the presence of pressure anisotropy, however, is still unclear. In this work, we present the first statistical analysis of turbulence in collisionless plasmas using three-dimensional numerical simulations and solving double-isothermal magnetohydrodynamic equations with the Chew-Goldberger-Low laws closure (CGL-MHD). We study models with different initial conditions to account for the firehose and mirror instabilities and to obtain different turbulent regimes. We found that the CGL-MHD subsonic and supersonic turbulences show small differences compared to the MHD models in most cases. However, in the regimes of strong kinetic instabilities, the statistics, i.e. the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of density and velocity, are very different. In subsonic models, the instabilities cause an increase in the dispersion of density, while the dispersion of velocity is increased by a large factor in some cases. Moreover, the spectra of density and velocity show increased power at small scales explained by the high growth rate of the instabilities. Finally, we calculated the structure functions of velocity and density fluctuations in the local reference frame defined by the direction of magnetic lines. The results indicate that in some cases the instabilities significantly increase the anisotropy of

  17. Turbulence in collisionless plasmas: statistical analysis from numerical simulations with pressure anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowal, G; Falceta-Goncalves, D A; Lazarian, A

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, we have experienced increasing interest in the understanding of the physical properties of collisionless plasmas, mostly because of the large number of astrophysical environments (e.g. the intracluster medium (ICM)) containing magnetic fields that are strong enough to be coupled with the ionized gas and characterized by densities sufficiently low to prevent the pressure isotropization with respect to the magnetic line direction. Under these conditions, a new class of kinetic instabilities arises, such as firehose and mirror instabilities, which have been studied extensively in the literature. Their role in the turbulence evolution and cascade process in the presence of pressure anisotropy, however, is still unclear. In this work, we present the first statistical analysis of turbulence in collisionless plasmas using three-dimensional numerical simulations and solving double-isothermal magnetohydrodynamic equations with the Chew-Goldberger-Low laws closure (CGL-MHD). We study models with different initial conditions to account for the firehose and mirror instabilities and to obtain different turbulent regimes. We found that the CGL-MHD subsonic and supersonic turbulences show small differences compared to the MHD models in most cases. However, in the regimes of strong kinetic instabilities, the statistics, i.e. the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of density and velocity, are very different. In subsonic models, the instabilities cause an increase in the dispersion of density, while the dispersion of velocity is increased by a large factor in some cases. Moreover, the spectra of density and velocity show increased power at small scales explained by the high growth rate of the instabilities. Finally, we calculated the structure functions of velocity and density fluctuations in the local reference frame defined by the direction of magnetic lines. The results indicate that in some cases the instabilities significantly increase the anisotropy of

  18. Magnetic anisotropy in GaMnAs; Magnetische Anisotropie in GaMnAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daeubler, Joachim

    2009-07-02

    The goal of the present work was the detailed investigation of the impact of parameters like vertical strain, hole concentration, substrate orientation and patterning on the MA in GaMnAs. At first a method is introduced enabling us to determine the MA from angle-dependent magnetotransport measurements. This method was used to analyze the impact of vertical strain {epsilon}{sub zz} on the MA in a series of GaMnAs layers with a Mn content of 5% grown on relaxed InGaAs-templates. While hole concentration and Curie temperature were found to be unaffected by vertical strain, a significant dependence of the MA on {epsilon}{sub zz} was found. The most pronounced dependence was observed for the anisotropy parameter B{sub 2} {sub perpendicular} {sub to}, representing the intrinsic contribution to the MA perpendicular to the layer plane. For this parameter a linear dependence on {epsilon}{sub zz} was found, resulting in a strain-induced transition of the magnetic easy axis with increasing strain from in-plane to out-of-plane at {epsilon}{sub zz} {approx} -0.13%. Post-growth annealing of the samples leads to an outdiffusion and/or regrouping of the highly mobile Mn interstitial donor defects, resulting in an increase in both p and T{sub C}. For the annealed samples, the transition from in-plane to out-of-plane easy axis takes place at {epsilon}{sub zz} {approx} -0.07%. From a comparison of as-grown and annealed samples, B{sub 2} {sub perpendicular} {sub to} was found to be proportional to both p and {epsilon}{sub zz}, B{sub 2} {sub perpendicular} {sub to} {proportional_to} p .{epsilon}{sub zz}. To study the influence of substrate orientation on the magnetic properties of GaMnAs, a series of GaMnAs layers with Mn contents up to 5% was grown on (001)- and (113)A-oriented GaAs substrates. The hole densities and Curie temperatures, determined from magnetotransport measurements, are drastically reduced in the (113)A layers. The differences in the magnetic properties of (113)A- and

  19. Controlling the induced anisotropy in soft magnetic films for high-frequency applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chezan, A.R.; Craus, C.B.; Chechenin, N.G.; Vystavel, T.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Niesen, L.; Boerma, D.O.

    Nanocrystalline soft magnetic Fe–Zr–N films were successfully deposited by dc magnetron reactive sputtering. The nitrogen content was controlled by varying the Ar/N2 ratio and/or the substrate temperature. The films have saturation magnetization and induced uniaxial anisotropy values in the range

  20. Planck intermediate results: XLVIII. Disentangling Galactic dust emission and cosmic infrared background anisotropies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.

    2016-01-01

    Using the Planck 2015 data release (PR2) temperature maps, we separate Galactic thermal dust emission from cosmic infrared background (CIB) anisotropies. For this purpose, we implement a specifically tailored component-separation method, the so-called generalized needlet internal linear combinati...

  1. Changes in the anisotropy of oriented membrane dynamics induced by myelin basic protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natali, F. [OGG-INFM, Grenoble (France); Gliozzi, A.; Rolandi, R.; Relini, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Genova (Italy); Cavatorta, P.; Deriu, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Parma (Italy); Fasano, A. [Dipartimento di Biochimica e Biologia Molecolare, Universita di Bari (Italy); Riccio, P. [Dipartimento di Biologia D.B.A.F., Universita della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    We report recent results showing the evidence of the effect induced by physiological amounts of myelin basic protein (MBP) on the dynamics of dimyristoyl L-a-phosphatidic acid (DMPA) membranes. Incoherent elastic neutron scattering scans, performed over a wide temperature range, have shown that the anisotropy of motions in oriented membranes is significantly enhanced by the presence of MBP. (orig.)

  2. Spin waves in two-dimensional ferromagnet with large easy-plane anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridman, Yu.A.; Spirin, D.V.

    2002-01-01

    Spin waves in easy-plane two-dimensional ferromagnet when anisotropy is much stronger than exchange are investigated. The spectra of magnons, the spin-spin and quadrupolar correlation functions have been derived. It is shown that in such a system there exist spin waves at low temperatures. Some properties of the quadrupolar ordering in ferromagnets are discussed

  3. On the single-ion Magnetic Anisotropy of the Rare-Earth Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmakova, N.P.; Tishin, A.M.; Bohr, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    The temperature dependences of the single-ion magnetic anisotropy constants for Tb and Dy metals are calculated in terms of the multipole moments of the rare-earth ions utilizing the available crystal-field parameters. The results are compared with the existing experimental data....

  4. Large Friction Anisotropy of a Polydiacetylene Monolayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, A.R.; Carpick, R.W.; Sasaki, D.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Friction force microscopy measurements of a polydiacetylene monolayer film reveal a 300% friction anisotropy that is correlated with the film structure. The film consists of a monolayer of the red form of N-(2-ethanol)- 10,12 pentacosadiynamide, prepared on a Langmuir trough and deposited on a mica substrate. As confirmed by atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy, the monolayer consists of domains of linearly oriented conjugated backbones with pendant hydrocarbon side chains above and below the backbones. Maximum friction occurs when the sliding direction is perpendicular to the backbone. We propose that the backbones impose anisotropic packing of the hydrocarbon side chains which leads to the observed friction anisotropy. Friction anisotropy is therefore a sensitive, optically-independent indicator of polymer backbone direction and monolayer structural properties

  5. COSMIC-RAY TRANSPORT AND ANISOTROPIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biermann, Peter L. [MPI for Radioastronomy, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Becker Tjus, Julia; Mandelartz, Matthias [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Theoretische Physik I, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Seo, Eun-Suk [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    We show that the large-scale cosmic-ray anisotropy at {approx}10 TeV can be explained by a modified Compton-Getting effect in the magnetized flow field of old supernova remnants. Cosmic rays arrive isotropically to the flow field and are then carried along with the flow to produce a large-scale anisotropy in the arrival direction. This approach suggests an optimum energy scale for detecting the anisotropy. Two key assumptions are that propagation is based on turbulence following a Kolmogorov law and that cosmic-ray interactions are dominated by transport via cosmic-ray-excited magnetic irregularities through the stellar wind of an exploding star and its shock shell. A prediction is that the amplitude is smaller at lower energies due to incomplete sampling of the velocity field and also smaller at larger energies due to smearing.

  6. Faraday instability of crystallization waves in 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, H; Ueda, T; Morikawa, M; Saitoh, Y; Nomura, R; Okuda, Y

    2007-01-01

    Periodic modulation of the gravity acceleration makes a flat surface of a fluid unstable and standing waves are parametrically excited on the surface. This phenomenon is called Faraday instability. Since a crystal-superfluid interface of 4 He at low temperatures is very mobile and behaves like a fluid surface, Saarloos and Weeks predicted that Faraday instability of the crystallization waves exists in 4 He and that the threshold excitation for the instability depends on the crystal growth coefficient. We successfully observed the Faraday instability of the crystal-liquid interface at 160 mK. Faraday waves were parametrically generated at one half of the driving frequency 90 Hz. Amplitude of the Faraday wave becomes smaller at higher temperature due to decrease of the crystal growth coefficient and disappears above 200 mK

  7. Plasma instabilities and turbulence in non-Abelian gauge theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffler, Sebastian Herwig Juergen

    2010-02-17

    Several aspects of the thermalisation process in non-Abelian gauge theories are investigated. Both numerical simulations in the classical statistical approximation and analytical computations in the framework of the two-particle-irreducible effective action are carried out and their results are compared to each other. The physical quantities of central importance are the correlation functions of the gauge field in Coulomb and temporal axial gauge as well as the gauge invariant energy-momentum tensor. Following a general introduction, the theoretical framework of the ensuing investigations is outlined. In doing so, the range of validity of the employed approximation schemes is discussed as well. The first main part of the thesis is concerned with the early stage of the thermalisation process where particular emphasis is on the role of plasma instabilities. These investigations are relevant to the phenomenological understanding of present heavy ion collision experiments. First, an ensemble of initial conditions motivated by the ''colour glass condensate'' is developed which captures characteristic properties of the plasma created in heavy ion collisions. Here, the strong anisotropy and the large occupation numbers of low-momentum degrees of freedom are to be highlighted. Numerical calculations demonstrate the occurrence of two kinds of instabilities. Primary instabilities result from the specific initial conditions. Secondary instabilities are caused by nonlinear fluctuation effects of the preceding primary instabilities. The time scale associated with the instabilities is of order 1 fm/c. It is shown that the plasma instabilities isotropize the initially strongly anisotropic ensemble in the domain of low momenta (instabilities in an idealised setup is investigated. In the second part, the

  8. Plasma instabilities and turbulence in non-Abelian gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffler, Sebastian Herwig Juergen

    2010-01-01

    Several aspects of the thermalisation process in non-Abelian gauge theories are investigated. Both numerical simulations in the classical statistical approximation and analytical computations in the framework of the two-particle-irreducible effective action are carried out and their results are compared to each other. The physical quantities of central importance are the correlation functions of the gauge field in Coulomb and temporal axial gauge as well as the gauge invariant energy-momentum tensor. Following a general introduction, the theoretical framework of the ensuing investigations is outlined. In doing so, the range of validity of the employed approximation schemes is discussed as well. The first main part of the thesis is concerned with the early stage of the thermalisation process where particular emphasis is on the role of plasma instabilities. These investigations are relevant to the phenomenological understanding of present heavy ion collision experiments. First, an ensemble of initial conditions motivated by the ''colour glass condensate'' is developed which captures characteristic properties of the plasma created in heavy ion collisions. Here, the strong anisotropy and the large occupation numbers of low-momentum degrees of freedom are to be highlighted. Numerical calculations demonstrate the occurrence of two kinds of instabilities. Primary instabilities result from the specific initial conditions. Secondary instabilities are caused by nonlinear fluctuation effects of the preceding primary instabilities. The time scale associated with the instabilities is of order 1 fm/c. It is shown that the plasma instabilities isotropize the initially strongly anisotropic ensemble in the domain of low momenta (< or similar 1 GeV). Essential results can be translated from the gauge group SU(2) to SU(3) by a simple rescaling procedure. Finally, the role of Nielsen-Olesen instabilities in an idealised setup is investigated. In the second part, the quasi

  9. A photoionization instability in the early intergalactic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1992-01-01

    It is argued that any fairly uniform source of ionizing photons can be the cause of an instability in the pregalactic medium on scales larger than a photon path length. Underdense regions receive more ionizing energy per atom and reach higher temperature and entropy, driving the density down still further. Fluctuations created by this instability can lead to the formation of structures resembling protogalaxies and intergalactic clouds, obviating the need for gas clouds or density perturbations of earlier cosmological provenance, as is usually assumed in theories of galaxy and structure formation. Characteristic masses for clouds produced by the instability, with log mass in solar units plotted against log radius in kpc, are illustrated.

  10. Extensional and compressional instabilities in icy satellite lithospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrick, D.L.; Stevenson, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The plausibility of invoking a lithospheric instability mechanism to account for the grooved terrains on Ganymede, Encedalus, and Miranda is presently evaluated in light of the combination of a simple mechanical model of planetary lithospheres and asthenospheres with recent experimental data for the brittle and ductile deformation of ice. For Ganymede, high surface gravity and warm temperatures render the achievement of an instability sufficiently great for the observed topographic relief virtually impossible; an instability of sufficient strength, however, may be able to develop on such smaller, colder bodies as Encedalus and Miranda. 15 refs

  11. Ultraspinning instability of rotating black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Oscar J. C.; Figueras, Pau; Monteiro, Ricardo; Santos, Jorge E.

    2010-01-01

    Rapidly rotating Myers-Perry black holes in d≥6 dimensions were conjectured to be unstable by Emparan and Myers. In a previous publication, we found numerically the onset of the axisymmetric ultraspinning instability in the singly spinning Myers-Perry black hole in d=7, 8, 9. This threshold also signals a bifurcation to new branches of axisymmetric solutions with pinched horizons that are conjectured to connect to the black ring, black Saturn and other families in the phase diagram of stationary solutions. We firmly establish that this instability is also present in d=6 and in d=10, 11. The boundary conditions of the perturbations are discussed in detail for the first time, and we prove that they preserve the angular velocity and temperature of the original Myers-Perry black hole. This property is fundamental to establishing a thermodynamic necessary condition for the existence of this instability in general rotating backgrounds. We also prove a previous claim that the ultraspinning modes cannot be pure gauge modes. Finally we find new ultraspinning Gregory-Laflamme instabilities of rotating black strings and branes that appear exactly at the critical rotation predicted by the aforementioned thermodynamic criterium. The latter is a refinement of the Gubser-Mitra conjecture.

  12. Anisotropy of dilepton emission from nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratkovskaya, E.L.; Teryaev, O.V.; Toneev, V.D.; Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna

    1994-01-01

    Attention is paid to studying the angular characteristics of e + e - pairs created in collisions with nuclear targets at intermediate and relativistic energies. Arising due to general spin and angular momentum constraints, the dilepton anisotropy seems to be quite sensitive to the contribution of different sources and may be used for disentangling these sources (or models) as well as an additional signature of a possible chiral symmetry restoration and phase transition of hadrons into the quark-gluon plasma. An anisotropy estimate for some dilepton sources is given and its relevance to the problems mentioned is discussed

  13. Anisotropy of dilepton emission from nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratkovskaya, E.L.; Teryaev, O.V. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Bogolubov Lab. of Theoretical Physics; Toneev, V.D. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory]|[Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Bogolubov Lab. of Theoretical Physics

    1994-11-07

    Attention is paid to studying the angular characteristics of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} pairs created in collisions with nuclear targets at intermediate and relativistic energies. Arising due to general spin and angular momentum constraints, the dilepton anisotropy seems to be quite sensitive to the contribution of different sources and may be used for disentangling these sources (or models) as well as an additional signature of a possible chiral symmetry restoration and phase transition of hadrons into the quark-gluon plasma. An anisotropy estimate for some dilepton sources is given and its relevance to the problems mentioned is discussed.

  14. Anisotropy of the Topopah Spring Member Tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.J. III; Boyd, P.J.; Haupt, R.W.; Price, R.H.

    1992-07-01

    Mechanical properties of the tuffaceous rocks within Yucca Mountain are needed for near and far-field modeling of the potential nuclear waste repository. If the mechanical properties are significantly anisotropic (i.e., direction-dependent), a more complex model is required. Relevant data from tuffs tested in earlier studies indicate that elastic and strength properties are anisotropic. This scoping study confirms the elastic anisotropy and concludes some tuffs are transversely isotropic. An approach for sampling and testing the rock to determine the magnitude of the anisotropy is proposed

  15. Magnetocrystalline and configurational anisotropies in Fe nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavassori, P.; Bisero, D.; Carace, F.; Liberati, M.; Di Bona, A.; Gazzadi, G.C.; Valeri, S.

    2005-01-01

    Arrays of single-crystal Fe micron and submicron squares and disks, have been fabricated using a focused ion beam apparatus from a film epitaxially grown on MgO. The hysteresis loops of the patterned areas differ from those of the continuous film as a consequence of the different reversal determined by the lateral confinement of the Fe film. By means of modulated field magneto-optical anisometry measurements we studied the symmetry and the strength of the overall anisotropy. For the smaller square elements we observed a higher-order term in the overall anisotropy with eightfold symmetry arising from the configurational contribution

  16. Hc2 of anisotropy two-band superconductors by Ginzburg-Landau approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udomsamuthirun, P.; Changjan, A.; Kumvongsa, C.; Yoksan, S.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the upper critical field H c2 of two-band superconductors by two-band Ginzburg-Landau approach. The analytical formula of H c2 included anisotropy of order parameter and anisotropy of effective-mass are found. The parameters of the upper critical field in ab-plane (H c2 - bar ab ) and c-axis (H c2 - bar c ) can be found by fitting to the experimental data. Finally, we can find the ratio of upper critical field that temperature dependent in the range of experimental result

  17. Mechanical and chemical spinodal instabilities in finite quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colonna, M.; Chomaz, Ph.; Ayik, S.

    2001-01-01

    Self consistent quantum approaches are used to study the instabilities of finite nuclear systems. The frequencies of multipole density fluctuations are determined as a function of dilution and temperature, for several isotopes. The spinodal region of the phase diagrams is determined and it appears reduced by finite size effects. The role of surface and volume instabilities is discussed. Important chemical effects are associated with mechanical disruption and may lead to isospin fractionation. (authors)

  18. Microtearing Instabilities and Electron Transport in the NSTX Spherical Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.; Kaye, S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Krommes, J.A.; Hill, K.; Bell, R.; LeBlanc, B.

    2007-01-01

    We report a successful quantitative account of the experimentally determined electron thermal conductivity χ e in a beam-heated H mode plasma by the magnetic fluctuations from microtearing instabilities. The calculated χ e based on existing nonlinear theory agrees with the result from transport analysis of the experimental data. Without using any adjustable parameter, the good agreement spans the entire region where there is a steep electron temperature gradient to drive the instability

  19. Instability of warped discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doǧan, S.; Nixon, C. J.; King, A. R.; Pringle, J. E.

    2018-05-01

    Accretion discs are generally warped. If a warp in a disc is too large, the disc can `break' apart into two or more distinct planes, with only tenuous connections between them. Further, if an initially planar disc is subject to a strong differential precession, then it can be torn apart into discrete annuli that precess effectively independently. In previous investigations, torque-balance formulae have been used to predict where and when the disc breaks into distinct parts. In this work, focusing on discs with Keplerian rotation and where the shearing motions driving the radial communication of the warp are damped locally by turbulence (the `diffusive' regime), we investigate the stability of warped discs to determine the precise criterion for an isolated warped disc to break. We find and solve the dispersion relation, which, in general, yields three roots. We provide a comprehensive analysis of this viscous-warp instability and the emergent growth rates and their dependence on disc parameters. The physics of the instability can be understood as a combination of (1) a term that would generally encapsulate the classical Lightman-Eardley instability in planar discs (given by ∂(νΣ)/∂Σ < 0) but is here modified by the warp to include ∂(ν1|ψ|)/∂|ψ| < 0, and (2) a similar condition acting on the diffusion of the warp amplitude given in simplified form by ∂(ν2|ψ|)/∂|ψ| < 0. We discuss our findings in the context of discs with an imposed precession, and comment on the implications for different astrophysical systems.

  20. Effect of anisotropy on the magnon energy gap in a two-layer ferromagnetic superlattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Rongke; Liang Jing; Li Qingfeng; Zhang Zhidong; Song Panpan; Hong Xiaomin

    2009-01-01

    The magnon energy bands or spectra in a two-layer ferromagnetic superlattice are studied. It is found that a modulated energy gap exists in the magnon energy band along K x direction perpendicular to the superlattice plane, which is different from the optical magnon gap at K x =0. The anisotropy, the spin quantum numbers and the interlayer exchange couplings all affect the magnon energy gap. If the anisotropy exists, there will be no acoustic energy branch in the system. There is a competition effect of the anisotropy and the spin quantum number on the magnon energy gap. The competition achieves a balance at the zero energy gap, at which the symmetry of the system is higher. The two energy spectra of the two-layer ferromagnetic superlattice are lowered with increasing temperature.

  1. CeCo5 thin films with perpendicular anisotropy grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S.; Hildebrandt, E.; Major, M.; Komissinskiy, P.; Radulov, I.; Alff, L.

    2018-04-01

    Buffer-free, highly textured (0 0 1) oriented CeCo5 thin films showing perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were synthesized on (0 0 1) Al2O3 substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Ce exists in a mixture of Ce3+ and Ce4+ valence states as shown by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The first anisotropy constant, K1, as measured by torque magnetometry was 0.82 MJ/m3 (8.2 ×106erg /cm3) . A maximum coercivity of 5.16 kOe with a negative temperature coefficient of -0.304%K-1 and a magnetization of 527.30 emu/cm3 was measured perpendicular to the film plane at 5 K. In addition, a large anisotropy of the magnetic moment of 15.5% was observed. These magnetic parameters make CeCo5 a potential candidate material for spintronic and magnetic recording applications.

  2. Study of the high energy Cosmic Rays large scale anisotropies with the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illuminati, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    We present the analysis method used to search for an anisotropy in the high energy Cosmic Rays arrival distribution using data collected by the ANTARES telescope. ANTARES is a neutrino detector, where the collected data are dominated by a large background of cosmic ray muons. Therefore, the background data are suitable for high-statistics studies of cosmic rays in the Northern sky. The main challenge for this analysis is accounting for those effects which can mimic an apparent anisotropy in the muon arrival direction: the detector exposure asymmetries, non-uniform time coverage, diurnal and seasonal variation of the atmospheric temperature. Once all these effects have been corrected, a study of the anisotropy profiles along the right ascension can be performed. (paper)

  3. Spin waves in terbium. III. Magnetic anisotropy at zero wave vector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houmann, Jens Christian Gylden; Jensen, J.; Touborg, P.

    1975-01-01

    The energy gap at zero wave vector in the spin-wave dispersion relation of ferromagnetic. Tb has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. The energy was measured as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field, and the dynamic anisotropy parameters were deduced from the results...... the effects of zero-point deviations from the fully aligned ground state, and we tentatively propose polarization-dependent two-ion couplings as their origin........ The axial anisotropy is found to depend sensitively on the orientation of the magnetic moments in the basal plane. This behavior is shown to be a convincing indication of considerable two-ion contributions to the magnetic anisotropy at zero wave vector. With the exception of the sixfold basal...

  4. Strain-dependent magnetic anisotropy in GaMnAs on InGaAs templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daeubler, Joachim; Glunk, Michael; Schwaiger, Stephan; Dreher, Lukas; Schoch, Wladimir; Sauer, Rolf; Limmer, Wolfgang [Institut fuer Halbleiterphysik, Universitaet Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    We have systematically studied the influence of strain on the magnetic anisotropy of GaMnAs by means of HRXRD reciprocal space mapping and angle-dependent magnetotransport. For this purpose, a series of GaMnAs layers with Mn contents of {proportional_to}5% was grown by low-temperature MBE on relaxed InGaAs/GaAs templates with different In concentrations, enabling us to vary the strain in the GaMnAs layers continuously from tensile to compressive, including the unstrained state. Considering both, as-grown and annealed samples, the anisotropy parameter describing the uniaxial out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy has been found to vary linearly with hole density and strain. As a consequence, the out-of-plane direction gradually undergoes a transition from a magnetic hard axis to a magnetic easy axis from compressive to tensile strain.

  5. System Detects Vibrational Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Sustained vibrations at two critical frequencies trigger diagnostic response or shutdown. Vibration-analyzing electronic system detects instabilities of combustion in rocket engine. Controls pulse-mode firing of engine and identifies vibrations above threshold amplitude at 5.9 and/or 12kHz. Adapted to other detection and/or control schemes involving simultaneous real-time detection of signals above or below preset amplitudes at two or more specified frequencies. Potential applications include rotating machinery and encoders and decoders in security systems.

  6. Evaporation and Antievaporation Instabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Addazi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We review (antievaporation phenomena within the context of quantum gravity and extended theories of gravity. The (antievaporation effect is an instability of the black hole horizon discovered in many different scenarios: quantum dilaton-gravity, f ( R -gravity, f ( T -gravity, string-inspired black holes, and brane-world cosmology. Evaporating and antievaporating black holes seem to have completely different thermodynamical features compared to standard semiclassical black holes. The purpose of this review is to provide an introduction to conceptual and technical aspects of (antievaporation effects, while discussing problems that are still open.

  7. Acoustic axes in weak triclinic anisotropy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavryčuk, Václav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 163, č. 2 (2005), s. 629-638 ISSN 0956-540X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3012309 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : elastic-wave theory * perturbation methods * seismic anisotropy Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.826, year: 2005

  8. Empirical evidence for inertial mass anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, M.; Siemieniec, G.

    1985-01-01

    A several attempts at measuring the possible deviations from inertial mass isotropy caused by a non-uniform distribution of matter are reviewed. A simple model of the inertial mass anisotropy and the results of the currently performed measurements concerning this effect are presented. 34 refs. (author)

  9. Anisotropy of Wood in the Microwave Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziherl, Sasa; Bajc, Jurij; Urankar, Bernarda; Cepic, Mojca

    2010-01-01

    Wood is transparent for microwaves and due to its anisotropic structure has anisotropic dielectric properties. A laboratory experiment that allows for the qualitative demonstration and quantitative measurements of linear dichroism and birefringence in the microwave region is presented. As the proposed experiments are based on the anisotropy (of…

  10. What we learn from CMB Anisotropies

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    George Smoot shared the 2006 Nobel Prize with John Mathere for the discovery of the fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background. In this talk (which will not be the same as the Nobel lecture), he will discuss what we have learned about the universe in the recent past from these anisotropies.

  11. Pseudospin anisotropy classification of quantum Hall ferromagnets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jungwirth, Tomáš; MacDonald, A. H.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 3 (2000), s. 035305-1 - 035305-9 ISSN 0163-1829 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/98/0085 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : quantum Hall ferromagnets * anisotropy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.065, year: 2000

  12. Cosmology with cosmic microwave background anisotropy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Measurements of CMB anisotropy and, more recently, polarization have played a very important role in allowing precise determination of various parameters of the `standard' cosmological model. The expectation of the paradigm of inflation and the generic prediction of the simplest realization of inflationary scenario in the ...

  13. Magnetic anisotropy in rare-earth metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mourits; Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1970-01-01

    The magnetic field dependence of the energy of long- wavelength magnons in Tb-10%Ho has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. The results agree with the `frozen-lattice' model, provided that the second-order magnetoelastic effect is taken into account. The planar anisotropy is almost...

  14. Azimuthal anisotropy of jet quenching at LHC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We analyze the azimuthal anisotropy of jet spectra due to energy loss of hard partons in quark–gluon plasma, created initially in nuclear overlap zone in collisions with non-zero impact parameter. The calculations are performed for semi-central Pb–Pb collisions at LHC energy.

  15. Relative sensitivity of formability to anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, R.W.; Maker, B.N.

    1997-01-01

    This work compares the relative importance of material anisotropy in sheet forming as compared to other material and process variables. The comparison is made quantitative by the use of normalized dependencies of depth to failure (forming limit is reached) on various measures of anisotropy, as well as strain and rate sensitivity, friction, and tooling. Comparisons are made for a variety of forming processes examined previously in the literature as well as two examples of complex stampings in this work. 7 The examples rover a range from nearly pure draw to nearly pure stretch situations, and show that for materials following a quadratic yield criterion, anisotropy is among the most sensitive parameters influencing formability. For materials following higher-exponent yield criteria, the dependency is milder but is still of the order of most other process parameters. However, depending on the particular forming operation, it is shown that in some cases anisotropy may be ignored, whereas in others its consideration is crucial to a good quality analysis

  16. Effective anisotropy through traveltime and amplitude matching

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hui

    2014-08-05

    Introducing anisotropy to seismic wave propagation reveals more realistic physics of our Earth\\'s subsurface as compared to the isotropic assumption. However wavefield modeling, the engine of seismic inverse problems, in anisotropic media still suffers from computational burdens, in particular with complex anisotropy such as transversely isotropic (TI) and Orthorhombic anisotropy. We develop effective isotropic velocity and density models to package the effects of anisotropy such that the wave propagation behavior using these effective models approximate those of the original anisotropic model. We build these effective models through the high frequency asymptotic approximation based on the eikonal and transport equations. We match the geometrical behavior of the wave-fields, given by traveltimes, from the anisotropic and isotropic eikonal equations. This matching yields the effective isotropic velocity that approximates the kinematics of the anisotropic wavefield. Equivalently, we calculate the effective densities by equating the anisotropic and isotropic transport equations. The effective velocities and densities are then fed into the isotropic acoustic variable density wave equation to obtain cheaper anisotropic wavefields. We justify our approach by testing it on an elliptical anisotropic model. The numerical results demonstrate a good matching of both traveltime and amplitude between anisotropic and effective isotropic wavefields.

  17. Resonant Drag Instabilities in protoplanetary disks: the streaming instability and new, faster-growing instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Jonathan; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2018-04-01

    We identify and study a number of new, rapidly growing instabilities of dust grains in protoplanetary disks, which may be important for planetesimal formation. The study is based on the recognition that dust-gas mixtures are generically unstable to a Resonant Drag Instability (RDI), whenever the gas, absent dust, supports undamped linear modes. We show that the "streaming instability" is an RDI associated with epicyclic oscillations; this provides simple interpretations for its mechanisms and accurate analytic expressions for its growth rates and fastest-growing wavelengths. We extend this analysis to more general dust streaming motions and other waves, including buoyancy and magnetohydrodynamic oscillations, finding various new instabilities. Most importantly, we identify the disk "settling instability," which occurs as dust settles vertically into the midplane of a rotating disk. For small grains, this instability grows many orders of magnitude faster than the standard streaming instability, with a growth rate that is independent of grain size. Growth timescales for realistic dust-to-gas ratios are comparable to the disk orbital period, and the characteristic wavelengths are more than an order of magnitude larger than the streaming instability (allowing the instability to concentrate larger masses). This suggests that in the process of settling, dust will band into rings then filaments or clumps, potentially seeding dust traps, high-metallicity regions that in turn seed the streaming instability, or even overdensities that coagulate or directly collapse to planetesimals.

  18. Feedback stabilization of plasma instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cap, F.F.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews the theoretical and experimental aspects of feedback stabilization. After giving an outline of a general theoretical model for electrostatic instabilities the author provides a theoretical analysis of the suppression of various types of instability. Experiments which have been carried out on the feedback stabilization of various types of plasma instability are reported. An extensive list of references is given. (B.R.H.)

  19. Thermal Shrinkage for Shoulder Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Toth, Alison P.; Warren, Russell F.; Petrigliano, Frank A.; Doward, David A.; Cordasco, Frank A.; Altchek, David W.; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal capsular shrinkage was popular for the treatment of shoulder instability, despite a paucity of outcomes data in the literature defining the indications for this procedure or supporting its long-term efficacy. The purpose of this study was to perform a clinical evaluation of radiofrequency thermal capsular shrinkage for the treatment of shoulder instability, with a minimum 2-year follow-up. From 1999 to 2001, 101 consecutive patients with mild to moderate shoulder instability underwent...

  20. Political Instability and Economic Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Alesina; Sule Ozler; Nouriel Roubini; Phillip Swagel

    1992-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between political instability and per capita GDP growth in a sample of 113 countries for the period 1950-1982. We define ?political instability? as the propensity of a government collapse, and we estimate a model in which political instability and economic growth are jointly determined. The main result of this paper is that in countries and time periods with a high propensity of government collapse, growth is significantly lower than otherwise. This ef...

  1. On the molecular anisotropy of liquid crystalline and flexible polymer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Horn, Brett L.

    The demand for products of ever increasing quality or for novel applications has required increasing attention to or manipulation of the anisotropy of manufactured parts. Oriented plastics are used everywhere from recording film to automotive body parts to monofilament fishing line. Liquid crystals are also used in a wide array of applications including their dominance in the flat panel display industry, color changing temperature sensors, and woven bullet resistant fabrics. Anisotropy can also be detrimental, for instance sometimes leading to poor fracture resistance or low yield stress along specific directions. Controlling and measuring anisotropy of materials has become increasingly important, but doing so is wrought with challenges. Measuring physical properties of isotropic liquids, such as water or most oils can be done in a straightforward fashion. Their viscosities and densities, for example, have unique values under a given set of conditions. With anisotropic fluids, like liquid crystals, the viscosity, for instance, will not only depend upon temperature, concentration, etc. but also upon the direction of observation, degree of anisotropy, source of anisotropy, and so forth. This added degree of complexity complicates our ability to define the state of the material at which the measurements are made and generally necessitates the use of more sophisticated measurement strategies or techniques. This work presents techniques and tools for investigating anisotropy in liquid crystalline and stretched polymeric systems. Included are the use of conoscopy for the determination of birefringence and orientation of nematic liquid crystals and stretched polymers, the shear response of flow aligning nematic liquid crystal monodomains, and the design of a novel linear rheometer that allows for in situ optical or scattering investigations.

  2. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Flow Behavior and Anisotropy of a Medium-Manganese TRIP Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alturk, Rakan; Hector, Louis G.; Matthew Enloe, C.; Abu-Farha, Fadi; Brown, Tyson W.

    2018-06-01

    The dependence of the plastic anisotropy on the nominal strain rate for a medium-manganese (10 wt.% Mn) transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel with initial austenite volume fraction of 66% (balance ferrite) has been investigated. The material exhibited yield point elongation, propagative instabilities during hardening, and austenite transformation to α'-martensite either directly or through ɛ-martensite. Uniaxial strain rates within the range of 0.005-500 s-1 along the 0°, 45°, and 90° orientations were selected based upon their relevance to automotive applications. The plastic anisotropy ( r) and normal anisotropy ( r n) indices corresponding to each direction and strain rate were determined using strain fields obtained from stereo digital image correlation systems that enabled both quasistatic and dynamic measurements. The results provide evidence of significant, orientation-dependent strain rate effects on both the flow stress and the evolution of r and r n with strain. This has implications not only for material performance during forming but also for the development of future strain-rate-dependent anisotropic yield criteria. Since tensile data alone for the subject medium-manganese TRIP steel do not satisfactorily determine the microstructural mechanisms responsible for the macroscopic-scale behavior observed on tensile testing, additional tests that must supplement the mechanical test results presented herein are discussed.

  3. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Flow Behavior and Anisotropy of a Medium-Manganese TRIP Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alturk, Rakan; Hector, Louis G.; Matthew Enloe, C.; Abu-Farha, Fadi; Brown, Tyson W.

    2018-04-01

    The dependence of the plastic anisotropy on the nominal strain rate for a medium-manganese (10 wt.% Mn) transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel with initial austenite volume fraction of 66% (balance ferrite) has been investigated. The material exhibited yield point elongation, propagative instabilities during hardening, and austenite transformation to α'-martensite either directly or through ɛ-martensite. Uniaxial strain rates within the range of 0.005-500 s-1 along the 0°, 45°, and 90° orientations were selected based upon their relevance to automotive applications. The plastic anisotropy (r) and normal anisotropy (r n) indices corresponding to each direction and strain rate were determined using strain fields obtained from stereo digital image correlation systems that enabled both quasistatic and dynamic measurements. The results provide evidence of significant, orientation-dependent strain rate effects on both the flow stress and the evolution of r and r n with strain. This has implications not only for material performance during forming but also for the development of future strain-rate-dependent anisotropic yield criteria. Since tensile data alone for the subject medium-manganese TRIP steel do not satisfactorily determine the microstructural mechanisms responsible for the macroscopic-scale behavior observed on tensile testing, additional tests that must supplement the mechanical test results presented herein are discussed.

  4. On the in-plane uniaxial anisotropy formation by using Fe–Co–Zr–N films: A theoretical and experimental investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seemann, K., E-mail: klaus.seemann@kit.edu; Beirle, S.; Leiste, H.

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper a simple theoretical approach for the in-plane uniaxial anisotropy evolution in thin films is introduced. In order to show, what are the conditions for a uniaxial anisotropy formation during annealing a ferromagnetic film in an external static magnetic field, a Hamiltonian, i.e., mean energy balances were established with introducing their annealing temperature dependence. At this point, a 1-dimesional chain-like arrangement of Fe and Co elements for an “isotropic” and uniaxial anisotropy state for the numerical computation was assumed. It was shown that a critical energy and annealing temperature (temperature threshold) can be attained from which a uniaxial anisotropy arises. Comparatively, calculations according to the Neél theory delivered the activation energy for inducing a uniaxial anisotropy. The experimental verification of the calculations, by using Fe{sub 40}Co{sub 37}Zr{sub 11}N{sub 12} films which were produced by reactive magnetron sputtering, yielded the activation energy of about 250 meV. Annealing temperatures above 473 K (200 °C) enabled marked uniaxial anisotropies. This correlated with the numerical quantum mechanical estimations which yielded a critical annealing temperature of approximately 449 K (176 °C). The calculated critical energy of 243 meV was in a good agreement with the verified experiments if one assumes a short range order of at least 10 ferromagnetic atoms in line (5Fe+5Co) for computation. - Highlights: • Model and theoretical description of the uniaxial anisotropy in ferromagnetic films. • Critical energy and a critical temperature for inducing the uniaxial anisotropy. • Investigation of the activation energy for inducing the uniaxial anisotropy. • Comparison with the model and according to the Neél theory.

  5. Instabilities in mimetic matter perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firouzjahi, Hassan; Gorji, Mohammad Ali [School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini, E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir, E-mail: gorji@ipm.ir, E-mail: shosseini@shahroodut.ac.ir, E-mail: shossein@ipm.ir [Physics Department, Shahrood University of Technology, P.O. Box 3619995161 Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-07-01

    We study cosmological perturbations in mimetic matter scenario with a general higher derivative function. We calculate the quadratic action and show that both the kinetic term and the gradient term have the wrong sings. We perform the analysis in both comoving and Newtonian gauges and confirm that the Hamiltonians and the associated instabilities are consistent with each other in both gauges. The existence of instabilities is independent of the specific form of higher derivative function which generates gradients for mimetic field perturbations. It is verified that the ghost instability in mimetic perturbations is not associated with the higher derivative instabilities such as the Ostrogradsky ghost.

  6. Anisotropic electron distribution functions and the transition between the Weibel and the whistler instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegoraro, F.; Palodhi, L.; Califano, F.

    2013-01-01

    Electron distribution functions that are anisotropic in phase space are a common feature of collisionless plasmas both in space and in the laboratory and the investigation of the processes through which these distributions relax is of primary interest. In fact, the free energy that is made available by the unbalance of the particle “temperatures” in the different directions can be transferred, depending on the plasma conditions, to quasistatic magnetic fields, to electromagnetic or electrostatic coherent structures or to particle acceleration. The anisotropy of the electron distribution function in an unmagnetized plasma can give rise to the onset of the well known Weibel instability which generates a quasistatic magnetic field. If a magnetic field is already present in the plasma, the Weibel instability driven by the anisotropy of the electron energy distribution turns into the so called whistler instability, in which case circularly polarized whistler waves are generated by the relaxation of the electron distribution function. Whistler waves are actually ubiquitous in plasmas and their generation has been extensively studied in recent years in the laboratory. Whistler instabilities have been reported in space where bursts of whistler mode magnetic noise are found to be present in the magnetosphere, close to the magnetopause and are also a likely source of several different magnetospheric fluctuations including plasmaspheric hiss and magnetospheric chorus. In this presentation the transition between non resonant (Weibel-type) and resonant (whistler) instabilities is investigated numerically in plasma configurations with an ambient magnetic field of increasing amplitudes. The Vlasov-Maxwell system is solved in a configuration where the fields have three components but depend only on one coordinate and on time. The nonlinear evolution of these instabilities is shown to lead to the excitation of electromagnetic and electrostatic modes at the first few harmonics

  7. Effects of substrate anisotropy and edge diffusion on submonolayer growth during molecular beam epitaxy: A Kinetic Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devkota, J.; Shrestha, S.P.

    2007-12-01

    We have performed Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation work to study the effect of diffusion anisotropy, bonding anisotropy and edge diffusion on island formation at different temperatures during the sub-monolayer film growth in Molecular Beam Epitaxy. We use simple cubic solid on solid model and event based Bortz, Kalos and Labowitch (BKL) algorithm on the Kinetic Monte Carlo method to simulate the physical phenomena. We have found that the island morphology and growth exponent are found to be influenced by substrate anisotropy as well as edge diffusion, however they do not play a significant role in island elongation. The growth exponent and island size distribution are observed to be influenced by substrate anisotropy but are negligibly influenced by edge diffusion. We have found fractal islands when edge diffusion is excluded and compact islands when edge diffusion is included. (author)

  8. What does anisotropy measure? Insights from increased and decreased anisotropy in selective fiber tracts in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel A De Erausquin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a common, severe and chronically disabling mental illness of unknown cause. Recent MRI studies have focused attention on white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. Indices commonly derived from DTI include (a mean diffusivity, independent of direction, (b fractional anisotropy (FA or relative anisotropy (RA, (c axial diffusivity, and (d radial diffusivity. In cerebral white matter, contributions to these indices come from fiber arrangements, degree of myelination, and axonal integrity. Relatively pure deficits in myelin result in a modest increase in radial diffusivity, without affecting axial diffusivity and with preservation of anisotropy. Although schizophrenia is not characterized by gross abnormalities of white matter, it does involve a profound dysregulation of myelin-associated gene expression, reductions in oligodendrocyte numbers, and marked abnormalities in the ultrastructure of myelin sheaths. Since each oligodendrocyte myelinates as many as 40 axon segments, changes in the number of oligodendrocytes, and/or in the integrity of myelin sheaths, and/or axoglial contacts can have a profound impact on signal propagation and the integrity of neuronal circuits. Whereas a number of studies have revealed inconsistent decreases in anisotropy in schizophrenia, we and others have found increased fractional anisotropy in key subcortical tracts associated with the circuits underlying symptom generation in schizophrenia. We review data revealing increased anisotropy in dopaminergic tracts in the mesencephalon of schizophrenics and their unaffected relatives, and discuss the possible biological underpinnings and physiological significance of this finding.

  9. Instability characteristics of fluidelastic instability of tube rows in crossflow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.S.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1986-04-01

    An experimental study is reported to investigate the jump phenomenon in critical flow velocities for tube rows with different pitch-to-diameter ratios and the excited and intrinsic instabilities for a tube row with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.75. The experimental data provide additional insights into the instability phenomena of tube arrays in crossflow. 9 refs., 10 figs

  10. Mapping the CMB with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary F.

    2007-01-01

    The data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropy and new full-sky maps of the polarization. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. These and other aspects of the mission results will be discussed and commented on. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30,200 1. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at the Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; University of Chicago; Brown University; University of British Columbia; and University of California, Los Angeles.

  11. Tailoring perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with graphene oxide membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Ning, Keyu; Liu, Houfang; Li, Linsen; Li, Huanglong; Feng, Jiafeng; Yang, Baishun; Liu, Xiao; Li, Yuxing; Chen, Yanhui; Wei, Hongxiang; Han, Xiufeng; Mao, Shengcheng; Zhang, Xixiang; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-ling

    2017-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) membranes have been widely explored for their excellent physical and chemical properties, and abundant functional groups. In this work, we report the improvement of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) of CoFeB thin films by applying a coating of GO membranes. We observe that the PMA of the CoFeB/MgAl–O stacks is strongly enhanced by the coating of GO membranes and even reaches 0.6 mJ m−2 at room temperature after an annealing process. The critical thickness of the membrane-coated CoFeB for switching the magnetization from the out-of-plane to the in-plane axis exceeds 1.6 nm. First-principle calculations are performed to investigate the contribution of the GO membranes to the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE). Due to changes in the hybridization of 3d orbitals, varying the location of the C atomic layer with Co changes the contribution of the Co–C stacks to PMA. Thus, the large PMA achieved with GO membranes can be attributed to the orbital hybridization of the C and O atoms with the Co orbitals. These results provide a comprehensive understanding of the PMA and point towards opportunities to achieve multifunctional graphene-composite spintronic devices.

  12. Tailoring perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with graphene oxide membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Ning, Keyu

    2017-11-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) membranes have been widely explored for their excellent physical and chemical properties, and abundant functional groups. In this work, we report the improvement of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) of CoFeB thin films by applying a coating of GO membranes. We observe that the PMA of the CoFeB/MgAl–O stacks is strongly enhanced by the coating of GO membranes and even reaches 0.6 mJ m−2 at room temperature after an annealing process. The critical thickness of the membrane-coated CoFeB for switching the magnetization from the out-of-plane to the in-plane axis exceeds 1.6 nm. First-principle calculations are performed to investigate the contribution of the GO membranes to the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE). Due to changes in the hybridization of 3d orbitals, varying the location of the C atomic layer with Co changes the contribution of the Co–C stacks to PMA. Thus, the large PMA achieved with GO membranes can be attributed to the orbital hybridization of the C and O atoms with the Co orbitals. These results provide a comprehensive understanding of the PMA and point towards opportunities to achieve multifunctional graphene-composite spintronic devices.

  13. Parton self-energies for general momentum-space anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmaei, Babak S.; Strickland, Michael

    2018-03-01

    We introduce an efficient general method for calculating the self-energies, collective modes, and dispersion relations of quarks and gluons in a momentum-anisotropic high-temperature quark-gluon plasma. The method introduced is applicable to the most general classes of deformed anisotropic momentum distributions and the resulting self-energies are expressed in terms of a series of hypergeometric basis functions which are valid in the entire complex phase-velocity plane. Comparing to direct numerical integration of the self-energies, the proposed method is orders of magnitude faster and provides results with similar or better accuracy. To extend previous studies and demonstrate the application of the proposed method, we present numerical results for the parton self-energies and dispersion relations of partonic collective excitations for the case of an ellipsoidal momentum-space anisotropy. Finally, we also present, for the first time, the gluon unstable mode growth rate for the case of an ellipsoidal momentum-space anisotropy.

  14. The coalescence instability in solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.; Brunel, F.; Sakai, J.I.; Vlahos, L.; Kundu, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    The non-linear coalescence instability of current carrying solar loops can explain many of the characteristics of the solar flares such as their impulsive nature, heating and high energy particle acceleration, amplitude oscillations of electromagnetic emission as well as the characteristics of 2-D microwave images obtained during a flare. The plasma compressibility leads to the explosive phase of loop coalescence and its overshoot results in amplitude oscillations in temperatures by adiabatic compression and decompression. We note that the presence of strong electric fields and super-Alfvenic flows during the course of the instabilty paly an important role in the production of non-thermal particles. A qualitative explanation on the physical processes taking place during the non-linear stages of the instability is given. (author)

  15. PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF CONTINUOUSLY DRIVEN MIRROR AND ION CYCLOTRON INSTABILITIES IN HIGH BETA ASTROPHYSICAL AND HELIOSPHERIC PLASMAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riquelme, Mario A.; Quataert, Eliot; Verscharen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We use particle-in-cell simulations to study the nonlinear evolution of ion velocity space instabilities in an idealized problem in which a background velocity shear continuously amplifies the magnetic field. We simulate the astrophysically relevant regime where the shear timescale is long compared to the ion cyclotron period, and the plasma beta is β ∼ 1-100. The background field amplification in our calculation is meant to mimic processes such as turbulent fluctuations or MHD-scale instabilities. The field amplification continuously drives a pressure anisotropy with p > p ∥ and the plasma becomes unstable to the mirror and ion cyclotron instabilities. In all cases, the nonlinear state is dominated by the mirror instability, not the ion cyclotron instability, and the plasma pressure anisotropy saturates near the threshold for the linear mirror instability. The magnetic field fluctuations initially undergo exponential growth but saturate in a secular phase in which the fluctuations grow on the same timescale as the background magnetic field (with δB ∼ 0.3 (B) in the secular phase). At early times, the ion magnetic moment is well-conserved but once the fluctuation amplitudes exceed δB ∼ 0.1 (B), the magnetic moment is no longer conserved but instead changes on a timescale comparable to that of the mean magnetic field. We discuss the implications of our results for low-collisionality astrophysical plasmas, including the near-Earth solar wind and low-luminosity accretion disks around black holes

  16. Kinetic instabilities in relativistic plasmas: the Harris instability revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tautz, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Plasma instabilities that generate aperiodic fluctuations are of outstanding importance in the astrophysical context. Two prominent examples are the electromagnetic Weibel instability and the electrostatic Harris instability, which operate in initially non-magnetized and magnetized plasmas, respectively. In this talk, the original formulation of the Harris instability will be reviewed and generalizations will be presented such as the inclusion of (1) relativistic effects, (2) ion effects, and (3) mode coupling. It will be shown that, with these modifications, a powerful method has been developed for the determination of both the existence and the growth rate of low-frequency instabilities. Applications can be found in astrophysical jets, where the rest frame can be used and so no parallel motion is present. At the end of the talk, how the particle composition of gamma-ray burst jets can be predicted using the Harris technique. (author)

  17. Spin-reorientation and anisotropy of the magnetization in single crystalline Ho2Co15Si2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegus, O.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied the magnetic properties of a Ho 2 Co 15 Si 2 single crystal. The easy magnetization direction is parallel to the c-axis in an extended temperature region below the Curie temperature. A spin-reorientation transition takes place at 323 K, leading to an easy magnetization direction perpendicular to the c-axis below this temperature. We have compared the present results with those obtained previously on various R 2 Co 17 single crystals and found that Si substitution not only leads to a sign reversal in the Co sublattice anisotropy but also leads to a substantial anisotropy of the saturation magnetization. Sign and magnitude of the magnetization anisotropy are conserved during the spin-reorientation transition. (orig.)

  18. Instabilities in the aether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, Sean M.; Dulaney, Timothy R.; Gresham, Moira I.; Tam, Heywood

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the stability of theories in which Lorentz invariance is spontaneously broken by fixed-norm vector 'aether' fields. Models with generic kinetic terms are plagued either by ghosts or by tachyons, and are therefore physically unacceptable. There are precisely three kinetic terms that are not manifestly unstable: a sigma model (∂ μ A ν ) 2 , the Maxwell Lagrangian F μν F μν , and a scalar Lagrangian (∂ μ A μ ) 2 . The timelike sigma-model case is well defined and stable when the vector norm is fixed by a constraint; however, when it is determined by minimizing a potential there is necessarily a tachyonic ghost, and therefore an instability. In the Maxwell and scalar cases, the Hamiltonian is unbounded below, but at the level of perturbation theory there are fewer degrees of freedom and the models are stable. However, in these two theories there are obstacles to smooth evolution for certain choices of initial data.

  19. Posterolateral elbow joint instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole; Nielsen, K K

    1998-01-01

    Thirty-five osteoligamentous elbows were included in a study on the kinematics of posterolateral elbow joint instability during the pivot shift test (PST) before and after separate ligament cuttings in the lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC). Division of the annular ligament or the lateral...... ulnar collateral ligament caused no laxity during the PST. Division of the lateral collateral ligament caused maximal laxity of 4 degrees and 23 degrees during forced PST in valgus and external rotation (supination), respectively. Cutting of the LCLC at the ulnar or the humeral insertion was necessary...... for any PST stressed elbow joint laxity to occur. Total division of the LCLC induced a maximal laxity of 7.9 degrees and 37 degrees during forced PST in valgus and external rotation (supination), respectively. This study suggests the lateral collateral ligament to be the primary soft tissue constraint...

  20. Instabilities in electromagnetic quasilevitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spragg, Kirk; Letout, Sebastien; Ernst, R; Sneyd, Alfred; Fautrelle, Yves

    2014-05-01

    We investigate free-surface instabilities occurring in various industrial processes involving liquid metal. Of particular interest is the behavior of the free surface of a pool of liquid metal when it is submitted to an alternating magnetic field. Experimentally, we study the effect of a vertical alternating medium-frequency magnetic field on an initially circular pool. We observe various types of behavior according to magnetic field amplitude, e.g., axisymmetric deformations, azimuthal mode structures, slow radial oscillation of the pool perimeter, and random rotation of the pool around its center. Drop rotation could be attributed to nonsymmetric shape deformations. The effect of oxidation leads to drastic changes in pool behavior. The experimental results are then compared to a linear stability analysis of the free surface of a circular liquid drop.

  1. Saturation of equatorial inertial instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterziel, R.C.; Orlandi, P.; Carnevale, G.F.

    2015-01-01

    Inertial instability in parallel shear flows and circular vortices in a uniformly rotating system ( $f$f-plane) redistributes absolute linear momentum or absolute angular momentum in such a way as to neutralize the instability. In previous studies we showed that, in the absence of other

  2. Internal rotor friction instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, J.; Artiles, A.; Lund, J.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1990-01-01

    The analytical developments and experimental investigations performed in assessing the effect of internal friction on rotor systems dynamic performance are documented. Analytical component models for axial splines, Curvic splines, and interference fit joints commonly found in modern high speed turbomachinery were developed. Rotor systems operating above a bending critical speed were shown to exhibit unstable subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. The effect of speed, bearing stiffness, joint stiffness, external damping, torque, and coefficient of friction, was evaluated. Testing included material coefficient of friction evaluations, component joint quantity and form of damping determinations, and rotordynamic stability assessments. Under conditions similar to those in the SSME turbopumps, material interfaces experienced a coefficient of friction of approx. 0.2 for lubricated and 0.8 for unlubricated conditions. The damping observed in the component joints displayed nearly linear behavior with increasing amplitude. Thus, the measured damping, as a function of amplitude, is not represented by either linear or Coulomb friction damper models. Rotordynamic testing of an axial spline joint under 5000 in.-lb of static torque, demonstrated the presence of an extremely severe instability when the rotor was operated above its first flexible natural frequency. The presence of this instability was predicted by nonlinear rotordynamic time-transient analysis using the nonlinear component model developed under this program. Corresponding rotordynamic testing of a shaft with an interference fit joint demonstrated the presence of subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. While subsynchronous vibrations were observed, they were bounded and significantly lower in amplitude than the synchronous vibrations.

  3. Magnetic properties of magnetic liquids with iron-oxide particles - the influence of anisotropy and interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, C.; Hanson, M.; Pedersen, Michael Stanley

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic liquids containing iron-oxide particles were investigated by magnetization and Mossbauer measurements. The particles were shown to be maghemite with a spontanious saturation magentization Ms = 320 kA m-1 at 200 K and a normalized high-field susceptibility x/M0 = 5.1x10-6 mkA-1, practically...... independent of temperature. Ms increases with decreasing temperature according to an effective Bloch law with an exponent larger than 1.5, as expected for fine magnetic particles. The model of magnetic particles with uniaxial anisotropy and the actual size distribution gives a consistent description...... of independent measurements of the temperature dependence of the hyperfine field and the isothermal magnetization versus field. From this an effective anisotropy constant of about 4.5x10 4 J m-3 is estimated for a particle with diameter 7.5 nm. The magnetic relaxation, as observed in zero...

  4. Search for anisotropy in the Debye-Waller factor of HCP solid 4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ashleigh L.; Hinde, Robert J.

    2016-02-01

    The properties of hexagonal close packed (hcp) solid 4He are dominated by large atomic zero point motions. An accurate description of these motions is therefore necessary in order to accurately calculate the properties of the system, such as the Debye-Waller (DW) factors. A recent neutron scattering experiment reported significant anisotropy in the in-plane and out-of-plane DW factors for hcp solid 4He at low temperatures, where thermal effects are negligible and only zero-point motions are expected to contribute. By contrast, no such anisotropy was observed either in earlier experiments or in path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations of solid hcp 4He. However, the earlier experiments and the PIMC simulations were both carried out at higher temperatures where thermal effects could be substantial. We seek to understand the cause of this discrepancy through variational quantum Monte Carlo simulations utilizing an accurate pair potential and a modified trial wavefunction which allows for anisotropy. Near the melting density, we find no anisotropy in an ideal hcp 4He crystal. A theoretical equation of state is derived from the calculated energies of the ideal crystal over a range of molar volumes from 7.88 to 21.3 cm3, and is found to be in good qualitative agreement with experimental data.

  5. A phenomenological approach to study the effect of uniaxial anisotropy on the magnetization of ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Marín, N.; Cuchillo, A.; Knobel, M.; Vargas, P.

    2018-04-01

    We study the effect of the uniaxial anisotropy in a system of ideal, noninteracting ferromagnetic nanoparticles by means of a thermodynamical model. We show that the effect of the anisotropy can be easily assimilated in a temperature shift Ta∗, in analogy to what was proposed by Allia et al. (2001) in the case of interacting nanomagnets. The phenomenological anisotropic Ta∗ parameter can be negative, indicating an antiferromagnetic-like behavior, or positive, indicating a ferromagnetic-like character as seen in the inverse susceptibility behavior as a function of temperature. The study is done considering an easy axis distribution to take into account the anisotropy axis dispersion in real samples (texture). In the case of a volumetric uniform distribution of anisotropy axes, the net effect makes Ta∗ to vanish, and the magnetic susceptibility behaves like a conventional superparamagnetic system, whereas in the others a finite value is obtained for Ta∗ . When magnetic moment distribution is considered, the effect is to enhance the Ta∗ parameter, when the dispersion of the magnetic moments becomes wider.

  6. Dynamical Instability and Soliton Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartavenko, V.G.

    1994-01-01

    The problem of dynamical instability and clustering (stable fragments formation) in a breakup of excited nuclear systems are considered from the points of view of the soliton concept. It is noted that the volume (spinodal) instability can be associated with nonlinear terms, and the surface (Rayleigh-Taylor type) instability, with the dispersion terms in the evolution equations. The spinodal instability and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability may compensate each other and lead to stable quasi-soliton type objects. The simple analytical model is presented to illustrate this physical picture. The time evolution of an initially compressed cold nuclear system is analysed in the framework of the inverse mean-field method. It is demonstrated that the nonlinearity and dispersion terms of the evolution equations can lead to clusterization in the final channel. 8 p

  7. Beam instability Workshop - plenary sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to provide a review of the mechanisms of limiting beam instabilities, their cures, including feedback, and beam measurement for synchrotron radiation light sources. 12 plenary sessions took place whose titles are: 1) challenging brilliance and lifetime issues with increasing currents; 2) limiting instabilities in multibunch; 3) experience from high currents in B factories; 4) longitudinal dynamics in high intensity/bunch; 5) Transverse instabilities for high intensity/bunch; 6) working group introduction from ESRF experience; 7) impedance modelling: simulations, minimization; 8) report on the broadband impedance measurements and modelling workshop; 9) feedback systems for synchrotron light sources; 10) beam instabilities diagnostics; 11) harmonic cavities: the pros and cons; and 12) experimental study of fast beam-ion instabilities at PLS. This document gathers the 12 articles that were presented during these sessions

  8. Beam instability Workshop - plenary sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to provide a review of the mechanisms of limiting beam instabilities, their cures, including feedback, and beam measurement for synchrotron radiation light sources. 12 plenary sessions took place whose titles are: 1) challenging brilliance and lifetime issues with increasing currents; 2) limiting instabilities in multibunch; 3) experience from high currents in B factories; 4) longitudinal dynamics in high intensity/bunch; 5) Transverse instabilities for high intensity/bunch; 6) working group introduction from ESRF experience; 7) impedance modelling: simulations, minimization; 8) report on the broadband impedance measurements and modelling workshop; 9) feedback systems for synchrotron light sources; 10) beam instabilities diagnostics; 11) harmonic cavities: the pros and cons; and 12) experimental study of fast beam-ion instabilities at PLS. This document gathers the 12 articles that were presented during these sessions.

  9. Monte Carlo studies of two-dimensional random-anisotropy magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denholm, D. R.; Sluckin, T. J.

    1993-07-01

    We have carried out a systematic set of Monte Carlo simulations of the Harris-Plischke-Zuckermann lattice model of random magnetic anisotropy on a two-dimensional square lattice, using the classical Metropolis algorithm. We have considered varying temperature T, external magnetic field H (both in the reproducible and irreproducible limits), time scale of the simulation τ in Monte Carlo steps and anisotropy ratio D/J. In the absence of randomness this model reduces to the XY model in two dimensions, which possesses the familiar Kosterlitz-Thouless low-temperature phase with algebraic but no long-range order. In the presence of random anisotropy we find evidence of a low-temperature phase with some disordered features, which might be identified with a spin-glass phase. The low-temperature Kosterlitz-Thouless phase survives at intermediate temperatures for low randomness, but is no longer present for large D/J. We have also studied the high-H approach to perfect order, for which there are theoretical predictions due to Chudnovsky.

  10. CHF Enhancement by Surface Patterning based on Hydrodynamic Instability Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Han; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    If the power density of a device exceeds the CHF point, bubbles and vapor films will be covered on the whole heater surface. Because vapor films have much lower heat transfer capabilities compared to the liquid layer, the temperature of the heater surface will increase rapidly, and the device could be damaged due to the heater burnout. Therefore, the prediction and the enhancement of the CHF are essential to maximizing the efficient heat removal region. Numerous studies have been conducted to describe the CHF phenomenon, such as hydrodynamic instability theory, macrolayer dryout theory, hot/dry spot theory, and bubble interaction theory. The hydrodynamic instability model, proposed by Zuber, is the predominant CHF model that Helmholtz instability attributed to the CHF. Zuber assumed that the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability wavelength is related to the Helmholtz wavelength. Lienhard and Dhir proposed a CHF model that Helmholtz instability wavelength is equal to the most dangerous RT wavelength. In addition, they showed the heater size effect using various heater surfaces. Lu et al. proposed a modified hydrodynamic theory that the Helmholtz instability was assumed to be the heater size and the area of the vapor column was used as a fitting factor. The modified hydrodynamic theories were based on the change of Helmholtz wavelength related to the RT instability wavelength. In the present study, the change of the RT instability wavelength, based on the heater surface modification, was conducted to show the CHF enhancement based on the heater surface patterning in a plate pool boiling. Sapphire glass was used as a base heater substrate, and the Pt film was used as a heating source. The patterning surface was based on the change of RT instability wavelength. In the present work the study of the CHF was conducted using bare Pt and patterned heating surfaces.

  11. Gravitational Instabilities in Circumstellar Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratter, Kaitlin; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Star and planet formation are the complex outcomes of gravitational collapse and angular momentum transport mediated by protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In this review, we focus on the role of gravitational instability in this process. We begin with a brief overview of the observational evidence for massive disks that might be subject to gravitational instability and then highlight the diverse ways in which the instability manifests itself in protostellar and protoplanetary disks: the generation of spiral arms, small-scale turbulence-like density fluctuations, and fragmentation of the disk itself. We present the analytic theory that describes the linear growth phase of the instability supplemented with a survey of numerical simulations that aim to capture the nonlinear evolution. We emphasize the role of thermodynamics and large-scale infall in controlling the outcome of the instability. Despite apparent controversies in the literature, we show a remarkable level of agreement between analytic predictions and numerical results. In the next part of our review, we focus on the astrophysical consequences of the instability. We show that the disks most likely to be gravitationally unstable are young and relatively massive compared with their host star, Md/M*≥0.1. They will develop quasi-stable spiral arms that process infall from the background cloud. Although instability is less likely at later times, once infall becomes less important, the manifestations of the instability are more varied. In this regime, the disk thermodynamics, often regulated by stellar irradiation, dictates the development and evolution of the instability. In some cases the instability may lead to fragmentation into bound companions. These companions are more likely to be brown dwarfs or stars than planetary mass objects. Finally, we highlight open questions related to the development of a turbulent cascade in thin disks and the role of mode-mode coupling in setting the maximum angular

  12. Thermal shrinkage for shoulder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Alison P; Warren, Russell F; Petrigliano, Frank A; Doward, David A; Cordasco, Frank A; Altchek, David W; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2011-07-01

    Thermal capsular shrinkage was popular for the treatment of shoulder instability, despite a paucity of outcomes data in the literature defining the indications for this procedure or supporting its long-term efficacy. The purpose of this study was to perform a clinical evaluation of radiofrequency thermal capsular shrinkage for the treatment of shoulder instability, with a minimum 2-year follow-up. From 1999 to 2001, 101 consecutive patients with mild to moderate shoulder instability underwent shoulder stabilization surgery with thermal capsular shrinkage using a monopolar radiofrequency device. Follow-up included a subjective outcome questionnaire, discussion of pain, instability, and activity level. Mean follow-up was 3.3 years (range 2.0-4.7 years). The thermal capsular shrinkage procedure failed due to instability and/or pain in 31% of shoulders at a mean time of 39 months. In patients with unidirectional anterior instability and those with concomitant labral repair, the procedure proved effective. Patients with multidirectional instability had moderate success. In contrast, four of five patients with isolated posterior instability failed. Thermal capsular shrinkage has been advocated for the treatment of shoulder instability, particularly mild to moderate capsular laxity. The ease of the procedure makes it attractive. However, our retrospective review revealed an overall failure rate of 31% in 80 patients with 2-year minimum follow-up. This mid- to long-term cohort study adds to the literature lacking support for thermal capsulorrhaphy in general, particularly posterior instability. The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11420-010-9187-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  13. Friction Anisotropy with Respect to Topographic Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chengjiao; Wang, Q. Jane

    2012-01-01

    Friction characteristics with respect to surface topographic orientation were investigated using surfaces of different materials and fabricated with grooves of different scales. Scratching friction tests were conducted using a nano-indentation-scratching system with the tip motion parallel or perpendicular to the groove orientation. Similar friction anisotropy trends were observed for all the surfaces studied, which are (1) under a light load and for surfaces with narrow grooves, the tip motion parallel to the grooves offers higher friction coefficients than does that perpendicular to them, (2) otherwise, equal or lower friction coefficients are found under this motion. The influences of groove size relative to the diameter of the mating tip (as a representative asperity), surface contact stiffness, contact area, and the characteristic stiction length are discussed. The appearance of this friction anisotropy is independent of material; however, the boundary and the point of trend transition depend on material properties. PMID:23248751

  14. Anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background: Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodelson, S.

    1998-02-01

    Anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) contain a wealth of information about the past history of the universe and the present values of cosmological parameters. I online some of the theoretical advances of the last few years. In particular, I emphasize that for a wide class of cosmological models, theorists can accurately calculate the spectrum to better than a percent. The spectrum of anisotropies today is directly related to the pattern of inhomogeneities present at the time of recombination. This recognition leads to a powerful argument that will enable us to distinguish inflationary models from other models of structure formation. If the inflationary models turn out to be correct, the free parameters in these models will be determined to unprecedented accuracy by the upcoming satellite missions

  15. Microwave background anisotropies in quasiopen inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Bellido, Juan; Garriga, Jaume; Montes, Xavier

    1999-10-01

    Quasiopenness seems to be generic to multifield models of single-bubble open inflation. Instead of producing infinite open universes, these models actually produce an ensemble of very large but finite inflating islands. In this paper we study the possible constraints from CMB anisotropies on existing models of open inflation. The effect of supercurvature anisotropies combined with the quasiopenness of the inflating regions make some models incompatible with observations, and severely reduces the parameter space of others. Supernatural open inflation and the uncoupled two-field model seem to be ruled out due to these constraints for values of Ω0<~0.98. Others, such as the open hybrid inflation model with suitable parameters for the slow roll potential can be made compatible with observations.

  16. General quadrupolar statistical anisotropy: Planck limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, S. [Gran Sasso Science Institute (INFN), Viale Francesco Crispi 7, I-67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Rubtsov, G. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect of the 60th Anniversary of October 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Thorsrud, M. [Faculty of Engineering, Østfold University College, P.O. Box 700, 1757 Halden (Norway); Urban, F.R., E-mail: sabir.ramazanov@gssi.infn.it, E-mail: grisha@ms2.inr.ac.ru, E-mail: mikjel.thorsrud@hiof.no, E-mail: federico.urban@kbfi.ee [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia)

    2017-03-01

    Several early Universe scenarios predict a direction-dependent spectrum of primordial curvature perturbations. This translates into the violation of the statistical isotropy of cosmic microwave background radiation. Previous searches for statistical anisotropy mainly focussed on a quadrupolar direction-dependence characterised by a single multipole vector and an overall amplitude g {sub *}. Generically, however, the quadrupole has a more complicated geometry described by two multipole vectors and g {sub *}. This is the subject of the present work. In particular, we limit the amplitude g {sub *} for different shapes of the quadrupole by making use of Planck 2015 maps. We also constrain certain inflationary scenarios which predict this kind of more general quadrupolar statistical anisotropy.

  17. Seismic anisotropy in deforming salt bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasse, P.; Wookey, J. M.; Kendall, J. M.; Dutko, M.

    2017-12-01

    Salt is often involved in forming hydrocarbon traps. Studying salt dynamics and the deformation processes is important for the exploration industry. We have performed numerical texture simulations of single halite crystals deformed by simple shear and axial extension using the visco-plastic self consistent approach (VPSC). A methodology from subduction studies to estimate strain in a geodynamic simulation is applied to a complex high-resolution salt diapir model. The salt diapir deformation is modelled with the ELFEN software by our industrial partner Rockfield, which is based on a finite-element code. High strain areas at the bottom of the head-like strctures of the salt diapir show high amount of seismic anisotropy due to LPO development of halite crystals. The results demonstrate that a significant degree of seismic anisotropy can be generated, validating the view that this should be accounted for in the treatment of seismic data in, for example, salt diapir settings.

  18. Instability timescale for the inclination instability in the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zderic, Alexander; Madigan, Ann-Marie; Fleisig, Jacob

    2018-04-01

    The gravitational influence of small bodies is often neglected in the study of solar system dynamics. However, this is not always an appropriate assumption. For example, mutual secular torques between low mass particles on eccentric orbits can result in a self-gravity instability (`inclination instability'; Madigan & McCourt 2016). During the instability, inclinations increase exponentially, eccentricities decrease (detachment), and orbits cluster in argument of perihelion. In the solar system, the orbits of the most distant objects show all three of these characteristics (high inclination: Volk & Malhotra (2017), detachment: Delsanti & Jewitt (2006), and argument of perihelion clustering: Trujillo & Sheppard (2014)). The inclination instability is a natural explanation for these phenomena.Unfortunately, full N-body simulations of the solar system are unfeasible (N ≈ O(1012)), and the behavior of the instability depends on N, prohibiting the direct application of lower N simulations. Here we present the instability timescale's functional dependence on N, allowing us to extrapolate our simulation results to that appropriate for the solar system. We show that ~5 MEarth of small icy bodies in the Sedna region is sufficient for the inclination instability to occur in the outer solar system.

  19. Manipulating magnetic anisotropy of the ultrathin Co{sub 2}FeAl full-Heusler alloy film via growth orientation of the Pt buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, F.S., E-mail: wenfsh03@126.com [State Key Lab of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Xiang, J.Y.; Hao, C.X.; Zhang, F.; Lv, Y.F. [State Key Lab of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Wang, W.H. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100080 (China); Hu, W.T.; Liu, Z.Y. [State Key Lab of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2013-12-15

    The ultrathin films of Co{sub 2}FeAl (CFA) full-Heusler alloy were prepared between two Pt layers on MgO single crystals by magnetron sputtering. By controlling the substrate temperature, different growth orientations of the Pt underlayers were realized, and their effects were investigated on the magnetic anisotropy of the ultrathin CFA film. It was revealed that different Pt orientations lead to distinctly different magnetic anisotropy for the sandwiched ultrathin CFA films. The Pt (111) orientation favors the perpendicular anisotropy, while the appearance of partial Pt (001) orientation leads to the quick decrease of perpendicular anisotropy and the complete Pt (001) orientation gives rise to the in-plane anisotropy. With the Pt (111) orientation, the temperature and thickness-induced spin reorientation transitions were investigated in the sandwiched ultrathin CFA films. - Highlights: • Different Pt orientations lead to different magnetic anisotropy for sandwiched ultrathin CFA films. • The Pt (111) orientation favors the perpendicular anisotropy for CFA layer. • Temperature and thickness-induced spin reorientation transitions were investigated in sandwiched ultrathin CFA films. • 0.8 nm CFA film is good candidate as electrode in magnetic tunnel junctions.

  20. Manipulating magnetic anisotropy of the ultrathin Co2FeAl full-Heusler alloy film via growth orientation of the Pt buffer layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, F.S.; Xiang, J.Y.; Hao, C.X.; Zhang, F.; Lv, Y.F.; Wang, W.H.; Hu, W.T.; Liu, Z.Y.

    2013-01-01

    The ultrathin films of Co 2 FeAl (CFA) full-Heusler alloy were prepared between two Pt layers on MgO single crystals by magnetron sputtering. By controlling the substrate temperature, different growth orientations of the Pt underlayers were realized, and their effects were investigated on the magnetic anisotropy of the ultrathin CFA film. It was revealed that different Pt orientations lead to distinctly different magnetic anisotropy for the sandwiched ultrathin CFA films. The Pt (111) orientation favors the perpendicular anisotropy, while the appearance of partial Pt (001) orientation leads to the quick decrease of perpendicular anisotropy and the complete Pt (001) orientation gives rise to the in-plane anisotropy. With the Pt (111) orientation, the temperature and thickness-induced spin reorientation transitions were investigated in the sandwiched ultrathin CFA films. - Highlights: • Different Pt orientations lead to different magnetic anisotropy for sandwiched ultrathin CFA films. • The Pt (111) orientation favors the perpendicular anisotropy for CFA layer. • Temperature and thickness-induced spin reorientation transitions were investigated in sandwiched ultrathin CFA films. • 0.8 nm CFA film is good candidate as electrode in magnetic tunnel junctions