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Sample records for telomere-associated protein trf2

  1. Accumulation and altered localization of telomere-associated protein TRF2 in immortally transformed and tumor-derived human breast cells

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    Nijjar, Tarlochan; Bassett, Ekaterina; Garbe, James; Takenaka, Yasuhiro; Stampfer, Martha R.; Gilley, David; Yaswen, Paul

    2004-12-23

    We have used cultured human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and breast tumor-derived lines to gain information on defects that occur during breast cancer progression. HMEC immortalized by a variety of agents (the chemical carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene, oncogenes c-myc and ZNF217, and/or dominant negative p53 genetic suppressor element GSE22) displayed marked up regulation (10-15 fold) of the telomere binding protein, TRF2. Up-regulation of TRF2 protein was apparently due to differences in post-transcriptional regulation, as mRNA levels remained comparable in finite life span and immortal HMEC. TRF2 protein was not up-regulated by the oncogenic agents alone in the absence of immortalization, nor by expression of exogenously introduced hTERT genes. We found TRF2 levels to be at least 2-fold higher than in control cells in 11/15 breast tumor cell lines, suggesting that elevated TRF2 levels are a frequent occurrence during the transformation of breast tumor cells in vivo. The dispersed distribution of TRF2 throughout the nuclei in some immortalized and tumor-derived cells indicated that not all the TRF2 was associated with telomeres in these cells. The process responsible for accumulation of TRF2 in immortalized HMEC and breast tumor-derived cell lines may promote tumorigenesis by contributing to the cells ability to maintain an indefinite life span.

  2. TRF2 functions as a protein hub and regulates telomere maintenance by recognizing specific peptide motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeung; Lee, Ok-Hee; Xin, Huawei; Chen, Liuh-Yow; Qin, Jun; Chae, Heekyung Kate; Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Safari, Amin; Liu, Dan; Songyang, Zhou

    2009-04-01

    In mammalian cells, the telomeric repeat binding factor (TRF) homology (TRFH) domain-containing telomeric proteins TRF1 and TRF2 associate with a collection of molecules necessary for telomere maintenance and cell-cycle progression. However, the specificity and the mechanisms by which TRF2 communicates with different signaling pathways remain largely unknown. Using oriented peptide libraries, we demonstrate that the TRFH domain of human TRF2 recognizes [Y/F]XL peptides with the consensus motif YYHKYRLSPL. Disrupting the interactions between the TRF2 TRFH domain and its targets resulted in telomeric DNA-damage responses. Furthermore, our genome-wide target analysis revealed phosphatase nuclear targeting subunit (PNUTS) and microcephalin 1 (MCPH1) as previously unreported telomere-associated proteins that directly interact with TRF2 via the [Y/F]XL motif. PNUTS and MCPH1 can regulate telomere length and the telomeric DNA-damage response, respectively. Our findings indicate that an array of TRF2 molecules functions as a protein hub and regulates telomeres by recruiting different signaling molecules via a linear sequence code.

  3. DNA-PKcs-interacting protein KIP binding to TRF2 is required for the maintenance of functional telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadka, Prabhat; Lee, Ji Hoon; Baek, Seung Han; Oh, Sue Young; Chung, In Kwon

    2014-10-01

    Human telomeres associate with shelterin, a six-protein complex that protects chromosome ends from being recognized as sites of DNA damage. The shelterin subunit TRF2 (telomeric repeat-binding factor 2) protects telomeres by facilitating their organization into the protective capping structure. We have reported previously that the DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit)-interacting protein KIP associates with telomerase through an interaction with hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase). In the present study, we identify KIP as a novel interacting partner of TRF2. KIP is able to interact with both TRF2 and DNA-PKcs at telomeres. Because KIP is required for the association between TRF2 and DNA-PKcs, the interplay of these three proteins may provide a mechanism for the recruitment of DNA-PKcs to telomeres. We also show that KIP binding to TRF2 enhances the telomere-binding activity of TRF2, suggesting that KIP acts as a positive regulator of TRF2 function. Furthermore, depletion of KIP induces DNA-damage response foci at telomeres, thereby leading to induction of growth arrest, cellular senescence and altered cell cycle distribution. Collectively, our findings suggest that KIP, in addition to its association with catalytically active telomerase, plays important roles in the maintenance of functional telomeres and the regulation of telomere-associated DNA-damage response. Thus KIP represents a new pathway for modulating telomerase and telomere function in cancer.

  4. The telomere binding protein TRF2 induces chromatin compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Asmaa M; Fu, Qiang; Hayward, William; Victoria, Samuel; Pedroso, Ilene M; Lindsay, Stuart M; Fletcher, Terace M

    2011-04-19

    Mammalian telomeres are specialized chromatin structures that require the telomere binding protein, TRF2, for maintaining chromosome stability. In addition to its ability to modulate DNA repair activities, TRF2 also has direct effects on DNA structure and topology. Given that mammalian telomeric chromatin includes nucleosomes, we investigated the effect of this protein on chromatin structure. TRF2 bound to reconstituted telomeric nucleosomal fibers through both its basic N-terminus and its C-terminal DNA binding domain. Analytical agarose gel electrophoresis (AAGE) studies showed that TRF2 promoted the folding of nucleosomal arrays into more compact structures by neutralizing negative surface charge. A construct containing the N-terminal and TRFH domains together altered the charge and radius of nucleosomal arrays similarly to full-length TRF2 suggesting that TRF2-driven changes in global chromatin structure were largely due to these regions. However, the most compact chromatin structures were induced by the isolated basic N-terminal region, as judged by both AAGE and atomic force microscopy. Although the N-terminal region condensed nucleosomal array fibers, the TRFH domain, known to alter DNA topology, was required for stimulation of a strand invasion-like reaction with nucleosomal arrays. Optimal strand invasion also required the C-terminal DNA binding domain. Furthermore, the reaction was not stimulated on linear histone-free DNA. Our data suggest that nucleosomal chromatin has the ability to facilitate this activity of TRF2 which is thought to be involved in stabilizing looped telomere structures.

  5. The telomere binding protein TRF2 induces chromatin compaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa M Baker

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian telomeres are specialized chromatin structures that require the telomere binding protein, TRF2, for maintaining chromosome stability. In addition to its ability to modulate DNA repair activities, TRF2 also has direct effects on DNA structure and topology. Given that mammalian telomeric chromatin includes nucleosomes, we investigated the effect of this protein on chromatin structure. TRF2 bound to reconstituted telomeric nucleosomal fibers through both its basic N-terminus and its C-terminal DNA binding domain. Analytical agarose gel electrophoresis (AAGE studies showed that TRF2 promoted the folding of nucleosomal arrays into more compact structures by neutralizing negative surface charge. A construct containing the N-terminal and TRFH domains together altered the charge and radius of nucleosomal arrays similarly to full-length TRF2 suggesting that TRF2-driven changes in global chromatin structure were largely due to these regions. However, the most compact chromatin structures were induced by the isolated basic N-terminal region, as judged by both AAGE and atomic force microscopy. Although the N-terminal region condensed nucleosomal array fibers, the TRFH domain, known to alter DNA topology, was required for stimulation of a strand invasion-like reaction with nucleosomal arrays. Optimal strand invasion also required the C-terminal DNA binding domain. Furthermore, the reaction was not stimulated on linear histone-free DNA. Our data suggest that nucleosomal chromatin has the ability to facilitate this activity of TRF2 which is thought to be involved in stabilizing looped telomere structures.

  6. Essential role for the TRF2 telomere protein in adult skin homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Paula; Ferrara-Romeo, Iole; Flores, Juana M; Blasco, Maria A

    2014-08-01

    TRF2 is a component of shelterin, the protein complex that protects the ends of mammalian chromosomes. TRF2 is essential for telomere capping owing to its roles in suppressing an ATM-dependent DNA damage response (DDR) at chromosome ends and inhibiting end-to-end chromosome fusions. Mice deficient for TRF2 are early embryonic lethal. However, the role of TRF2 in later stages of development and in the adult organism remains largely unaddressed, with the exception of liver, where TRF2 was found to be dispensable for maintaining tissue function. Here, we study the impact of TRF2 conditional deletion in stratified epithelia by generating the TRF2(∆/∆) -K5-Cre mouse model, which targets TRF2 deletion to the skin from embryonic day E11.5. In marked contrast to TRF2 deletion in the liver, TRF2(∆/∆) -K5-Cre mice show lethality in utero reaching 100% lethality perinataly. At the molecular and cellular level, TRF2 deletion provokes induction of an acute DDR at telomeres, leading to activation of p53 signaling pathways and to programed cell death since the time of Cre expression at E11.5. Unexpectedly, neither inhibition of the NHEJ pathway by abrogation of 53BP1 nor inhibition of DDR by p53 deficiency rescued these severe phenotypes. Instead, TRF2 deletion provokes an extensive epidermal cell death accompanied by severe inflammation already at E16.5 embryos, which are independent of p53. These results are in contrast with conditional deletion of TRF1 and TPP1 in the skin, where p53 deficiency rescued the associated skin phenotypes, highlighting the comparatively more essential role of TRF2 in skin homeostasis. © 2014 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Ku80 facilitates chromatin binding of the telomere binding protein, TRF2.

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    Fink, Lauren S; Lerner, Chad A; Torres, Paulina F; Sell, Christian

    2010-09-15

    The Ku70/80 heterodimer is central to non-homologous end joining repair of DNA double-strand breaks and the Ku80 gene appears to be essential for human but not rodent cell survival. The Ku70/80 heterodimer is located at telomeres but its precise function in telomere maintenance is not known. In order to examine the role of Ku80 beyond DNA repair in more detail, we have taken a knockdown approach using a human fibroblast strain. Following targeted Ku80 knockdown, telomere defects are observed and the steady state levels of the TRF2 protein are reduced. Inhibitor studies indicate that this loss of TRF2 is mediated by the proteasome and degradation of TRF2 following Ku depletion appears to involve a decrease in chromatin binding of TRF2, suggesting that the Ku heterodimer enhances TRF2 chromatin association and that non-chromatin bound TRF2 is targeted to the proteasome.

  8. PIAS1-mediated sumoylation promotes STUbL-dependent proteasomal degradation of the human telomeric protein TRF2.

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    Her, Joonyoung; Jeong, Yu Young; Chung, In Kwon

    2015-10-24

    The human telomeric protein TRF2 protects chromosome ends by facilitating their organization into the protective capping structure. Here we show that the stability of TRF2 is regulated via modification by the small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMO). TRF2 specifically interacts with and is sumoylated by PIAS1 in mammalian cells. The proteasome inhibitor stabilizes SUMO-conjugated TRF2 without affecting the level of unmodified TRF2, suggesting that SUMO conjugation is required for proteasomal degradation of TRF2. We also show that RNF4, a mammalian SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase, interacts with TRF2 in a SUMO-dependent manner and preferentially targets SUMO-conjugated TRF2 for ubiquitination. Collectively, our data demonstrate that the PIAS1-mediated sumoylation status of TRF2 serves as a molecular switch that controls the level of TRF2 at telomeres. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. TRF2, but not TBP, mediates the transcription of ribosomal protein genes.

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    Wang, Yuan-Liang; Duttke, Sascha H C; Chen, Kai; Johnston, Jeff; Kassavetis, George A; Zeitlinger, Julia; Kadonaga, James T

    2014-07-15

    The TCT core promoter element is present in most ribosomal protein (RP) genes in Drosophila and humans. Here we show that TBP (TATA box-binding protein)-related factor TRF2, but not TBP, is required for transcription of the TCT-dependent RP genes. In cells, TCT-dependent transcription, but not TATA-dependent transcription, increases or decreases upon overexpression or depletion of TRF2. In vitro, purified TRF2 activates TCT but not TATA promoters. ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP] combined with deep sequencing) experiments revealed the preferential localization of TRF2 at TCT versus TATA promoters. Hence, a specialized TRF2-based RNA polymerase II system functions in the synthesis of RPs and complements the RNA polymerase I and III systems. © 2014 Wang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  10. The Myb/SANT domain of the telomere-binding protein TRF2 alters chromatin structure.

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    Baker, Asmaa M; Fu, Qiang; Hayward, William; Lindsay, Stuart M; Fletcher, Terace M

    2009-08-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged into chromatin, which regulates genome activities such as telomere maintenance. This study focuses on the interactions of a myb/SANT DNA-binding domain from the telomere-binding protein, TRF2, with reconstituted telomeric nucleosomal array fibers. Biophysical characteristics of the factor-bound nucleosomal arrays were determined by analytical agarose gel electrophoresis (AAGE) and single molecules were visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The TRF2 DNA-binding domain (TRF2 DBD) neutralized more negative charge on the surface of nucleosomal arrays than histone-free DNA. Binding of TRF2 DBD at lower concentrations increased the radius and conformational flexibility, suggesting a distortion of the fiber structure. Additional loading of TRF2 DBD onto the nucleosomal arrays reduced the flexibility and strongly blocked access of micrococcal nuclease as contour lengths shortened, consistent with formation of a unique, more compact higher-order structure. Mirroring the structural results, TRF2 DBD stimulated a strand invasion-like reaction, associated with telomeric t-loops, at lower concentrations while inhibiting the reaction at higher concentrations. Full-length TRF2 was even more effective at stimulating this reaction. The TRF2 DBD had less effect on histone-free DNA structure and did not stimulate the t-loop reaction with this substrate, highlighting the influence of chromatin structure on the activities of DNA-binding proteins.

  11. Telomere-binding Protein TRF2 Binds to and Stimulates the Werner and Bloom Syndrome Helicases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patricia L. Opresko; Cayetano von Kobbe; Jean-Philippe Laine; Jeanine Harrigan; Ian D. Hickson; Vilhelm A. Bohr

    2002-01-01

    .... This interaction is mediated by the RecQ conserved C-terminal region of WRN. In vitro , TRF2 demonstrates high affinity for WRN and for another RecQ family member, the Bloom syndrome protein (BLM...

  12. TRF2 Protein Interacts with Core Histones to Stabilize Chromosome Ends*

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    Izumi, Takashi; Shimizu, Shigeomi

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian chromosome ends are protected by a specialized nucleoprotein complex called telomeres. Both shelterin, a telomere-specific multi-protein complex, and higher order telomeric chromatin structures combine to stabilize the chromosome ends. Here, we showed that TRF2, a component of shelterin, binds to core histones to protect chromosome ends from inappropriate DNA damage response and loss of telomeric DNA. The N-terminal Gly/Arg-rich domain (GAR domain) of TRF2 directly binds to the globular domain of core histones. The conserved arginine residues in the GAR domain of TRF2 are required for this interaction. A TRF2 mutant with these arginine residues substituted by alanine lost the ability to protect telomeres and induced rapid telomere shortening caused by the cleavage of a loop structure of the telomeric chromatin. These findings showed a previously unnoticed interaction between the shelterin complex and nucleosomal histones to stabilize the chromosome ends. PMID:27514743

  13. Novel RNA- and FMRP-binding protein TRF2-S regulates axonal mRNA transport and presynaptic plasticity.

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    Zhang, Peisu; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Liu, Yong; Tominaga-Yamanaka, Kumiko; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Ioannis, Grammatikakis; Martindale, Jennifer L; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G; Yang, In Hong; Gorospe, Myriam; Mattson, Mark P

    2015-11-20

    Despite considerable evidence that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) regulate mRNA transport and local translation in dendrites, roles for axonal RBPs are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that a non-telomeric isoform of telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2-S) is a novel RBP that regulates axonal plasticity. TRF2-S interacts directly with target mRNAs to facilitate their axonal delivery. The process is antagonized by fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Distinct from the current RNA-binding model of FMRP, we show that FMRP occupies the GAR domain of TRF2-S protein to block the assembly of TRF2-S-mRNA complexes. Overexpressing TRF2-S and silencing FMRP promotes mRNA entry to axons and enhances axonal outgrowth and neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals. Our findings suggest a pivotal role for TRF2-S in an axonal mRNA localization pathway that enhances axon outgrowth and neurotransmitter release.

  14. A Shared Docking Motif in TRF1 and TRF2 Used for Differential Recruitment of Telomeric Proteins

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    Chen, Yong; Yang, Yuting; van Overbeek, Megan; Donigian, Jill R.; Baciu, Paul; de Lange, Titia; Lei, Ming (Michigan-Med); (Rockefeller)

    2008-05-01

    Mammalian telomeres are protected by a six-protein complex: shelterin. Shelterin contains two closely related proteins (TRF1 and TRF2), which recruit various proteins to telomeres. We dissect the interactions of TRF1 and TRF2 with their shared binding partner (TIN2) and other shelterin accessory factors. TRF1 recognizes TIN2 using a conserved molecular surface in its TRF homology (TRFH) domain. However, this same surface does not act as a TIN2 binding site in TRF2, and TIN2 binding to TRF2 is mediated by a region outside the TRFH domain. Instead, the TRFH docking site of TRF2 binds a shelterin accessory factor (Apollo), which does not interact with the TRFH domain of TRF1. Conversely, the TRFH domain of TRF1, but not of TRF2, interacts with another shelterin-associated factor: PinX1.

  15. TRF2 Protein Interacts with Core Histones to Stabilize Chromosome Ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Akimitsu; Izumi, Takashi; Shimizu, Shigeomi

    2016-09-23

    Mammalian chromosome ends are protected by a specialized nucleoprotein complex called telomeres. Both shelterin, a telomere-specific multi-protein complex, and higher order telomeric chromatin structures combine to stabilize the chromosome ends. Here, we showed that TRF2, a component of shelterin, binds to core histones to protect chromosome ends from inappropriate DNA damage response and loss of telomeric DNA. The N-terminal Gly/Arg-rich domain (GAR domain) of TRF2 directly binds to the globular domain of core histones. The conserved arginine residues in the GAR domain of TRF2 are required for this interaction. A TRF2 mutant with these arginine residues substituted by alanine lost the ability to protect telomeres and induced rapid telomere shortening caused by the cleavage of a loop structure of the telomeric chromatin. These findings showed a previously unnoticed interaction between the shelterin complex and nucleosomal histones to stabilize the chromosome ends. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Telomeric protein TRF2 protects Holliday junctions with telomeric arms from displacement by the Werner syndrome helicase.

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    Nora, Gerald J; Buncher, Noah A; Opresko, Patricia L

    2010-07-01

    WRN protein loss causes Werner syndrome (WS), which is characterized by premature aging as well as genomic and telomeric instability. WRN prevents telomere loss, but the telomeric protein complex must regulate WRN activities to prevent aberrant telomere processing. Telomere-binding TRF2 protein inhibits telomere t-loop deletion by blocking Holliday junction (HJ) resolvase cleavage activity, but whether TRF2 also modulates HJ displacement at t-loops is unknown. In this study, we used multiplex fluorophore imaging to track the fate of individual strands of HJ substrates. We report the novel finding that TRF2 inhibits WRN helicase strand displacement of HJs with telomeric repeats in duplex arms, but unwinding of HJs with a telomeric center or lacking telomeric sequence is unaffected. These data, together with results using TRF2 fragments and TRF2 HJ binding assays, indicate that both the TRF2 B- and Myb domains are required to inhibit WRN HJ activity. We propose a novel model whereby simultaneous binding of the TRF2 B-domain to the HJ core and the Myb domain to telomeric arms promote and stabilize HJs in a stacked arm conformation that is unfavorable for unwinding. Our biochemical study provides a mechanistic basis for the cellular findings that TRF2 regulates WRN activity at telomeres.

  17. Enhanced electrostatic force microscopy reveals higher-order DNA looping mediated by the telomeric protein TRF2.

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    Kaur, Parminder; Wu, Dong; Lin, Jiangguo; Countryman, Preston; Bradford, Kira C; Erie, Dorothy A; Riehn, Robert; Opresko, Patricia L; Wang, Hong

    2016-02-09

    Shelterin protein TRF2 modulates telomere structures by promoting dsDNA compaction and T-loop formation. Advancement of our understanding of the mechanism underlying TRF2-mediated DNA compaction requires additional information regarding DNA paths in TRF2-DNA complexes. To uncover the location of DNA inside protein-DNA complexes, we recently developed the Dual-Resonance-frequency-Enhanced Electrostatic force Microscopy (DREEM) imaging technique. DREEM imaging shows that in contrast to chromatin with DNA wrapping around histones, large TRF2-DNA complexes (with volumes larger than TRF2 tetramers) compact DNA inside TRF2 with portions of folded DNA appearing at the edge of these complexes. Supporting coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations uncover the structural requirement and sequential steps during TRF2-mediated DNA compaction and result in folded DNA structures with protruding DNA loops as seen in DREEM imaging. Revealing DNA paths in TRF2 complexes provides new mechanistic insights into structure-function relationships underlying telomere maintenance pathways.

  18. Expression of Telomere-Associated Proteins is Interdependent to Stabilize Native Telomere Structure and Telomere Dysfunction by G-Quadruplex Ligand Causes TERRA Upregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Ratan; Chowdhury, Priyanka; Ghosh, Sourav; Ghosh, Utpal

    2017-11-13

    Telomere DNA can form specialized nucleoprotein structure with telomere-associated proteins to hide free DNA ends or G-quadruplex structures under certain conditions especially in presence of G-quadruplex ligand. Telomere DNA is transcribed to form non-coding telomere repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) whose biogenesis and function is poorly understood. Our aim was to find the role of telomere-associated proteins and telomere structures in TERRA transcription. We silenced four [two shelterin (TRF1, TRF2) and two non-shelterin (PARP-1, SLX4)] telomere-associated genes using siRNA and verified depletion in protein level. Knocking down of one gene modulated expression of other telomere-associated genes and increased TERRA from 10q, 15q, XpYp and XqYq chromosomes in A549 cells. Telomere was destabilized or damaged by G-quadruplex ligand pyridostatin (PDS) and bleomycin. Telomere dysfunction-induced foci (TIFs) were observed for each case of depletion of proteins, treatment with PDS or bleomycin. TERRA level was elevated by PDS and bleomycin treatment alone or in combination with depletion of telomere-associated proteins.

  19. The telomeric protein TRF2 binds the ATM kinase and can inhibit the ATM-dependent DNA damage response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Karlseder

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The telomeric protein TRF2 is required to prevent mammalian telomeres from activating DNA damage checkpoints. Here we show that overexpression of TRF2 affects the response of the ATM kinase to DNA damage. Overexpression of TRF2 abrogated the cell cycle arrest after ionizing radiation and diminished several other readouts of the DNA damage response, including phosphorylation of Nbs1, induction of p53, and upregulation of p53 targets. TRF2 inhibited autophosphorylation of ATM on S1981, an early step in the activation of this kinase. A region of ATM containing S1981 was found to directly interact with TRF2 in vitro, and ATM immunoprecipitates contained TRF2. We propose that TRF2 has the ability to inhibit ATM activation at telomeres. Because TRF2 is abundant at chromosome ends but not elsewhere in the nucleus, this mechanism of checkpoint control could specifically block a DNA damage response at telomeres without affecting the surveillance of chromosome internal damage.

  20. Molecular basis and quantitative assessment of TRF1 and TRF2 protein interactions with TIN2 and Apollo peptides.

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    Kalathiya, Umesh; Padariya, Monikaben; Baginski, Maciej

    2017-03-01

    Shelterin is a six-protein complex (TRF1, TRF2, POT1, RAP1, TIN2, and TPP1) that also functions in smaller subsets in regulation and protection of human telomeres. Two closely related proteins, TRF1 and TRF2, make high-affinity contact directly with double-stranded telomeric DNA and serve as a molecular platform. Protein TIN2 binds to TRF1 and TRF2 dimer-forming domains, whereas Apollo makes interaction only with TRF2. To elucidate the molecular basis of these interactions, we employed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of TRF1TRFH-TIN2TBM and TRF2TRFH-TIN2TBM/ApolloTBM complexes and of the isolated proteins. MD enabled a structural and dynamical comparison of protein-peptide complexes including H-bond interactions and interfacial residues that may regulate TRF protein binding to the given peptides, especially focusing on interactions described in crystallographic data. Residues with a selective function in both TRF1TRFH and TRF2TRFH and forming a stable hydrogen bond network with TIN2TBM or ApolloTBM peptides were traced. Our study revealed that TIN2TBM forms a well-defined binding mode with TRF1TRFH as compared to TRF2TRFH, and that the binding pocket of TIN2TBM is deeper for TRF2TRFH protein than ApolloTBM. The MD data provide a basis for the reinterpretation of mutational data obtained in crystallographic work for the TRF proteins. Together, the previously determined X-ray structure and our MD provide a detailed view of the TRF-peptide binding mode and the structure of TRF1/2 binding pockets. Particular TRF-peptide interactions are very specific for the formation of each protein-peptide complex, identifying TRF proteins as potential targets for the design of inhibitors/drugs modulating telomere machinery for anticancer therapy.

  1. A sequence-specific core promoter-binding transcription factor recruits TRF2 to coordinately transcribe ribosomal protein genes.

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    Baumann, Douglas G; Gilmour, David S

    2017-10-13

    Ribosomal protein (RP) genes must be coordinately expressed for proper assembly of the ribosome yet the mechanisms that control expression of RP genes in metazoans are poorly understood. Recently, TATA-binding protein-related factor 2 (TRF2) rather than the TATA-binding protein (TBP) was found to function in transcription of RP genes in Drosophila. Unlike TBP, TRF2 lacks sequence-specific DNA binding activity, so the mechanism by which TRF2 is recruited to promoters is unclear. We show that the transcription factor M1BP, which associates with the core promoter region, activates transcription of RP genes. Moreover, M1BP directly interacts with TRF2 to recruit it to the RP gene promoter. High resolution ChIP-exo was used to analyze in vivo the association of M1BP, TRF2 and TFIID subunit, TAF1. Despite recent work suggesting that TFIID does not associate with RP genes in Drosophila, we find that TAF1 is present at RP gene promoters and that its interaction might also be directed by M1BP. Although M1BP associates with thousands of genes, its colocalization with TRF2 is largely restricted to RP genes, suggesting that this combination is key to coordinately regulating transcription of the majority of RP genes in Drosophila. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. The Telomeric Protein TRF2 Regulates Angiogenesis by Binding and Activating the PDGFRβ Promoter.

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    El Maï, Mounir; Wagner, Kay-Dietrich; Michiels, Jean-François; Ambrosetti, Damien; Borderie, Arnaud; Destree, Sandrine; Renault, Valerie; Djerbi, Nadir; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Gilson, Eric; Wagner, Nicole

    2014-11-06

    Telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2), which plays a central role in telomere capping, is frequently increased in human tumors. We reveal here that TRF2 is expressed in the vasculature of most human cancer types, where it colocalizes with the Wilms' tumor suppressor WT1. We further show that TRF2 is a transcriptional target of WT1 and is required for proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial cells. These angiogenic effects of TRF2 are uncoupled from its function in telomere capping. Instead, TRF2 binds and transactivates the promoter of the angiogenic tyrosine kinase platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ). These findings reveal an unexpected role of TRF2 in neoangiogenesis and delineate a distinct function of TRF2 as a transcriptional regulator. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Telomeric Protein TRF2 Regulates Angiogenesis by Binding and Activating the PDGFRβ Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounir El Maï

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2, which plays a central role in telomere capping, is frequently increased in human tumors. We reveal here that TRF2 is expressed in the vasculature of most human cancer types, where it colocalizes with the Wilms’ tumor suppressor WT1. We further show that TRF2 is a transcriptional target of WT1 and is required for proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial cells. These angiogenic effects of TRF2 are uncoupled from its function in telomere capping. Instead, TRF2 binds and transactivates the promoter of the angiogenic tyrosine kinase platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ. These findings reveal an unexpected role of TRF2 in neoangiogenesis and delineate a distinct function of TRF2 as a transcriptional regulator.

  4. Strand exchange of telomeric DNA catalyzed by the Werner syndrome protein (WRN) is specifically stimulated by TRF2.

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    Edwards, Deanna N; Orren, David K; Machwe, Amrita

    2014-07-01

    Werner syndrome (WS), caused by loss of function of the RecQ helicase WRN, is a hereditary disease characterized by premature aging and elevated cancer incidence. WRN has DNA binding, exonuclease, ATPase, helicase and strand annealing activities, suggesting possible roles in recombination-related processes. Evidence indicates that WRN deficiency causes telomeric abnormalities that likely underlie early onset of aging phenotypes in WS. Furthermore, TRF2, a protein essential for telomere protection, interacts with WRN and influences its basic helicase and exonuclease activities. However, these studies provided little insight into WRN's specific function at telomeres. Here, we explored the possibility that WRN and TRF2 cooperate during telomeric recombination processes. Our results indicate that TRF2, through its interactions with both WRN and telomeric DNA, stimulates WRN-mediated strand exchange specifically between telomeric substrates; TRF2's basic domain is particularly important for this stimulation. Although TRF1 binds telomeric DNA with similar affinity, it has minimal effects on WRN-mediated strand exchange of telomeric DNA. Moreover, TRF2 is displaced from telomeric DNA by WRN, independent of its ATPase and helicase activities. Together, these results suggest that TRF2 and WRN act coordinately during telomeric recombination processes, consistent with certain telomeric abnormalities associated with alteration of WRN function. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. The Telomeric Protein TRF2 Regulates Angiogenesis by Binding and Activating the PDGFRβ Promoter

    OpenAIRE

    El Maï, Mounir; Wagner, Kay-Dietrich; Michiels, Jean-François; Ambrosetti, Damien; Borderie, Arnaud; Destree, Sandrine; Renault, Valerie; Djerbi, Nadir; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Gilson, Eric; Wagner, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2), which plays a central role in telomere capping, is frequently increased in human tumors. We reveal here that TRF2 is expressed in the vasculature of most human cancer types, where it colocalizes with the Wilms’ tumor suppressor WT1. We further show that TRF2 is a transcriptional target of WT1 and is required for proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial cells. These angiogenic effects of TRF2 are uncoupled from its function in telome...

  6. Novel RNA- and FMRP-binding protein TRF2-S regulates axonal mRNA transport and presynaptic plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Peisu; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Liu, Yong; Tominaga-Yamanaka, Kumiko; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Ioannis, Grammatikakis; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Yongqing; Kevin G Becker; Yang, In Hong; Gorospe, Myriam; Mark P Mattson

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable evidence that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) regulate mRNA transport and local translation in dendrites, roles for axonal RBPs are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that a non-telomeric isoform of telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2-S) is a novel RBP that regulates axonal plasticity. TRF2-S interacts directly with target mRNAs to facilitate their axonal delivery. The process is antagonized by fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Distinct from the current RNA-...

  7. p300-mediated acetylation of TRF2 is required for maintaining functional telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Her, Yoon Ra; Chung, In Kwon

    2013-02-01

    The human telomeric protein TRF2 is required to protect chromosome ends by facilitating their organization into the protective capping structure. Post-translational modifications of TRF2 such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, methylation and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation have been shown to play important roles in telomere function. Here we show that TRF2 specifically interacts with the histone acetyltransferase p300, and that p300 acetylates the lysine residue at position 293 of TRF2. We also report that p300-mediated acetylation stabilizes the TRF2 protein by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and is required for efficient telomere binding of TRF2. Furthermore, overexpression of the acetylation-deficient mutant, K293R, induces DNA-damage response foci at telomeres, thereby leading to induction of impaired cell growth, cellular senescence and altered cell cycle distribution. A small but significant number of metaphase chromosomes show no telomeric signals at chromatid ends, suggesting an aberrant telomere structure. These findings demonstrate that acetylation of TRF2 by p300 plays a crucial role in the maintenance of functional telomeres as well as in the regulation of the telomere-associated DNA-damage response, thus providing a new route for modulating telomere protection function.

  8. Recruitment of TRF2 to laser-induced DNA damage sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Nazmul; Abe, Satoshi; Gu, Ling; Mendonca, Marc S; Mohanty, Samarendra; Gilley, David

    2012-09-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the telomere-associated protein TRF2 plays critical roles in the DNA damage response. TRF2 is rapidly and transiently phosphorylated by an ATM-dependent pathway in response to DNA damage and this DNA damage-induced phosphoryation is essential for the DNA-PK-dependent pathway of DNA double-strand break repair (DSB). However, the type of DNA damage that induces TRF2 localization to the damage sites, the requirement for DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of TRF2 for its recruitment, as well as the detailed kinetics of TRF2 accumulation at DNA damage sites have not been fully investigated. In order to address these questions, we used an ultrafast femtosecond multiphoton laser and a continuous wave 405-nm single photon laser to induce DNA damage at defined nuclear locations. Our results showed that DNA damage produced by a femtosecond multiphoton laser was sufficient for localization of TRF2 to these DNA damage sites. We also demonstrate that ectopically expressed TRF2 was recruited to DNA lesions created by a 405-nm laser. Our data suggest that ATM and DNA-PKcs kinases are not required for TRF2 localization to DNA damage sites. Furthermore, we found that phosphorylation of TRF2 at residue T188 was not essential for its recruitment to laser-induced DNA damage sites. Thus, we provide further evidence that a protein known to function in telomere maintenance, TRF2, is recruited to sites of DNA damage and plays critical roles in the DNA damage response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cockayne Syndrome group B protein interacts with TRF2 and regulates telomere length and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batenburg, Nicole L; Mitchell, Taylor R H; Leach, Derrik M; Rainbow, Andrew J; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2012-10-01

    The majority of Cockayne syndrome (CS) patients carry a mutation in Cockayne Syndrome group B (CSB), a large nuclear protein implicated in DNA repair, transcription and chromatin remodeling. However, whether CSB may play a role in telomere metabolism has not yet been characterized. Here, we report that CSB physically interacts with TRF2, a duplex telomeric DNA binding protein essential for telomere protection. We find that CSB localizes at a small subset of human telomeres and that it is required for preventing the formation of telomere dysfunction-induced foci (TIF) in CS cells. We find that CS cells or CSB knockdown cells accumulate telomere doublets, the suppression of which requires CSB. We find that overexpression of CSB in CS cells promotes telomerase-dependent telomere lengthening, a phenotype that is associated with a decrease in the amount of telomere-bound TRF1, a negative mediator of telomere length maintenance. Furthermore, we show that CS cells or CSB knockdown cells exhibit misregulation of TERRA, a large non-coding telomere repeat-containing RNA important for telomere maintenance. Taken together, these results suggest that CSB is required for maintaining the homeostatic level of TERRA, telomere length and integrity. These results further imply that CS patients carrying CSB mutations may be defective in telomere maintenance.

  10. The protein network surrounding the human telomere repeat binding factors TRF1, TRF2, and POT1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannone, Richard J [ORNL; McDonald, W Hayes [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Shen, Rong-Fong [National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health; Wang, Yisong [ORNL; Liu, Yie [National Institute on Aging, Baltimore

    2010-01-01

    Telomere integrity (including telomere length and capping) is critical in overall genomic stability. Telomere repeat binding factors and their associated proteins play vital roles in telomere length regulation and end protection. In this study, we explore the protein network surrounding telomere repeat binding factors, TRF1, TRF2, and POT1 using dual-tag affinity purification in combination with multidimensional protein identification technology liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (MudPIT LC-MS/MS). After control subtraction and data filtering, we found that TRF2 and POT1 co-purified all six members of the telomere protein complex, while TRF1 identified five of six components at frequencies that lend evidence towards the currently accepted telomere architecture. Many of the known TRF1 or TRF2 interacting proteins were also identified. Moreover, putative associating partners identified for each of the three core components fell into functional categories such as DNA damage repair, ubiquitination, chromosome cohesion, chromatin modification/remodeling, DNA replication, cell cycle and transcription regulation, nucleotide metabolism, RNA processing, and nuclear transport. These putative protein-protein associations may participate in different biological processes at telomeres or, intriguingly, outside telomeres.

  11. The protein network surrounding the human telomere repeat binding factors TRF1, TRF2, and POT1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Giannone

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Telomere integrity (including telomere length and capping is critical in overall genomic stability. Telomere repeat binding factors and their associated proteins play vital roles in telomere length regulation and end protection. In this study, we explore the protein network surrounding telomere repeat binding factors, TRF1, TRF2, and POT1 using dual-tag affinity purification in combination with multidimensional protein identification technology liquid chromatography--tandem mass spectrometry (MudPIT LC-MS/MS. After control subtraction and data filtering, we found that TRF2 and POT1 co-purified all six members of the telomere protein complex, while TRF1 identified five of six components at frequencies that lend evidence towards the currently accepted telomere architecture. Many of the known TRF1 or TRF2 interacting proteins were also identified. Moreover, putative associating partners identified for each of the three core components fell into functional categories such as DNA damage repair, ubiquitination, chromosome cohesion, chromatin modification/remodeling, DNA replication, cell cycle and transcription regulation, nucleotide metabolism, RNA processing, and nuclear transport. These putative protein-protein associations may participate in different biological processes at telomeres or, intriguingly, outside telomeres.

  12. Strand exchange of telomeric DNA catalyzed by the Werner syndrome protein (WRN) is specifically stimulated by TRF2

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Deanna N.; Orren, David K.; Machwe, Amrita

    2014-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS), caused by loss of function of the RecQ helicase WRN, is a hereditary disease characterized by premature aging and elevated cancer incidence. WRN has DNA binding, exonuclease, ATPase, helicase and strand annealing activities, suggesting possible roles in recombination-related processes. Evidence indicates that WRN deficiency causes telomeric abnormalities that likely underlie early onset of aging phenotypes in WS. Furthermore, TRF2, a protein essential for telomere protec...

  13. The telomeric protein TRF2 is critical for the protection of A549 cells from both telomere erosion and DNA double-strand breaks driven by salvicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Xiang; Miao, Ze-Hong; Ding, Jian

    2008-03-01

    Telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) has been increasingly recognized to be involved in DNA damage response and telomere maintenance. Our previous report found that salvicine (SAL), a novel topoisomerase II poison, elicited DNA double-strand breaks and telomere erosion in separate experimental systems. However, it remains to be clarified whether they share a common response to these two events and in particular whether TRF2 is involved in this process. In this study, we found that SAL concurrently induced DNA double-strand breaks, telomeric DNA damage, and telomere erosion in lung carcinoma A549 cells. It was unexpected to find that SAL led to disruption of TRF2, independently of either its transcription or proteasome-mediated degradation. By overexpressing the full-length trf2 gene and transfecting TRF2 small interfering RNAs, we showed that TRF2 protein protected both telomeric and genomic DNA from the SAL-elicited events. It is noteworthy that although both the Ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and the ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR) kinases responded to the SAL-induced DNA damages, only ATR was essential for the telomere erosion. The study also showed that the activated ATR augmented the SAL-triggered TRF2 disruption, whereas TRF2 reduction in turn enhanced ATR function. All of these findings suggest the emerging significance of TRF2 protecting both telomeric DNA and genomic DNA on the one hand and reveal the mutual modulation between ATR and TRF2 in sensing DNA damage signaling during cancer development on the other hand.

  14. [Functions of transcription factor TRF2 in Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytova, D V; Kopantseva, M R; Nabirochkina, E N; Vorob'eva, N E; Georgieva, S G; Krasnov, A N

    2008-03-01

    A study was made of the function of the Drosophila melanogaster TRF2 protein. Expression analysis of the trf2(P1) mutation implicated TRF2 in the D. melanogaster embryo development. High-level expression of the trf2 gene was observed in female germline cells. A high level of TRF2 was detected in primary spermatocytes and trophocytes, characterized by intense transcription. In the female gonads, TRF2 was detected in both nurse cells with intense transcription and transcriptionally inactive oocyte nuclei. In addition, TRF2 proved to be necessary for premeiotic chromatin condensation and further differentiation of germline cells.

  15. Telomerase abrogation dramatically accelerates TRF2-induced epithelial carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco, Raquel; Muñoz, Purificación; Flores, Juana M.; Klatt, Peter; Blasco, María A.

    2007-01-01

    TRF2 is a telomere-binding protein with roles in telomere protection and telomere-length regulation. The fact that TRF2 is up-regulated in some human tumors suggests a role of TRF2 in cancer. Mice that overexpress TRF2 in the skin, K5TRF2 mice, show critically short telomeres and are susceptible to UV-induced carcinogenesis as a result of deregulated XPF/ERCC1 activity, a nuclease involved in UV damage repair. Here we demonstrate that, when in combination with telomerase deficiency, TRF2 acts...

  16. The shelterin protein TRF2 inhibits Chk2 activity at telomeres in the absence of DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscemi, Giacomo; Zannini, Laura; Fontanella, Enrico; Lecis, Daniele; Lisanti, Sofia; Delia, Domenico

    2009-05-26

    The shelterin complex [1] shapes and protects telomeric DNA from being processed as double strand breaks (DSBs) [2, 3]. Here we show that in human undamaged cells, a fraction of the kinase Chk2, a downstream target of ATM and mediator of checkpoint responses and senescence [4, 5], physically interacts with the shelterin subunit TRF2 and colocalizes with this complex at chromosome ends. This interaction, enhanced by TRF2 binding to telomeric DNA, inhibits the activation and senescence-induced function of Chk2 by a mechanism in which TRF2 binding to the N terminus of Chk2 surrounding Thr68 hinders the phosphorylation of this priming site. In response to radiation-induced DSBs, but not chromatin-remodelling agents, the telomeric Chk2-TRF2 binding dissociates in a Chk2 activity-dependent manner. Moreover, active Chk2 phosphorylates TRF2 and decreases its binding to telomeric DNA repeats, corroborating the evidences on the specific TRF2 relocalization in presence of DSBs [6]. Altogether, the capacity of TRF2 to locally repress Chk2 provides an additional level of control by which shelterin restrains the DNA damage response from an unwanted activation [6, 7] and may explain why TRF2 overexpression acts as a telomerase-independent oncogenic stimulus [8].

  17. Human Rap1 modulates TRF2 attraction to telomeric DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoušková, Eliška; Nečasová, Ivona; Pavloušková, Jana; Zimmermann, Michal; Hluchý, Milan; Marini, Victoria; Nováková, Monika; Hofr, Ctirad

    2015-03-11

    More than two decades of genetic research have identified and assigned main biological functions of shelterin proteins that safeguard telomeres. However, a molecular mechanism of how each protein subunit contributes to the protecting function of the whole shelterin complex remains elusive. Human Repressor activator protein 1 (Rap1) forms a multifunctional complex with Telomeric Repeat binding Factor 2 (TRF2). Rap1-TRF2 complex is a critical part of shelterin as it suppresses homology-directed repair in Ku 70/80 heterodimer absence. To understand how Rap1 affects key functions of TRF2, we investigated full-length Rap1 binding to TRF2 and Rap1-TRF2 complex interactions with double-stranded DNA by quantitative biochemical approaches. We observed that Rap1 reduces the overall DNA duplex binding affinity of TRF2 but increases the selectivity of TRF2 to telomeric DNA. Additionally, we observed that Rap1 induces a partial release of TRF2 from DNA duplex. The improved TRF2 selectivity to telomeric DNA is caused by less pronounced electrostatic attractions between TRF2 and DNA in Rap1 presence. Thus, Rap1 prompts more accurate and selective TRF2 recognition of telomeric DNA and TRF2 localization on single/double-strand DNA junctions. These quantitative functional studies contribute to the understanding of the selective recognition of telomeric DNA by the whole shelterin complex. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Design of High-Affinity Stapled Peptides To Target the Repressor Activator Protein 1 (RAP1)/Telomeric Repeat-Binding Factor 2 (TRF2) Protein-Protein Interaction in the Shelterin Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Xu; Liu, Liu; Yang, Chao-Yie; Lu, Jianfeng; Chen, Yong; Lei, Ming; Wang, Shaomeng

    2016-01-14

    Shelterin, a six-protein complex, plays a fundamental role in protecting both the length and the stability of telomeres. Repressor activator protein 1 (RAP1) and telomeric repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) are two subunits in shelterin that interact with each other. Small-molecule inhibitors that block the RAP1/TRF2 protein-protein interaction can disrupt the structure of shelterin and may be employed as pharmacological tools to investigate the biology of shelterin. On the basis of the cocrystal structure of RAP1/TRF2 complex, we have developed first-in-class triazole-stapled peptides that block the protein-protein interaction between RAP1 and TRF2. Our most potent stapled peptide binds to RAP1 protein with a Ki value of 7 nM and is >100 times more potent than the corresponding wild-type TRF2 peptide. On the basis of our high-affinity peptides, we have developed and optimized a competitive, fluorescence polarization (FP) assay for accurate and rapid determination of the binding affinities of our designed compounds and this assay may also assist in the discovery of non-peptide, small-molecule inhibitors capable of blocking the RAP1/TRF2 protein-protein interaction.

  19. Sp1 upregulates expression of TRF2 and TRF2 inhibition reduces tumorigenesis in human colorectal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjie; Shen, Ruizhe; Wang, Qi; Gao, Yabo; Qi, Xiaoguang; Jiang, He; Yao, Jingjing; Lin, Xiaolin; Wu, Yunlin; Wang, Lifu

    2009-11-01

    Telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) plays a key role in the protective activity of telomere and is overexpression in several kinds of solid cancer cells. However, the role of overexpressed TRF2 in colorectal carcinoma remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of TRF2, address the mechanism of TRF2 overexpression in human colorectal carcinoma. In present study, we examined the expression of TRF2 in colorectal cancer tissues from 39 patients, peritumoral normal tissues from 21 patients, and colon carcinoma SW480 cell line by quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot. After siRNA silencing TRF2 expression in SW480, tumorigenesis of TRF2 was tested by cell proliferation, soft agar assay, cytofluorimetric analysis and cytogenetic analysis. To discover transcription factor that mediated TRF2 expression, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (Chip) Assay and Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) were employed. Overexpression of TRF2 protein was detected in SW480 cells and 19 of 39 colorectal carcinoma tissues (49%), no overexpression was observed in 21 of 21 adjacent peritumoral normal colorectal tissues. After siRNA silencing TRF2 expression, the proliferation and colony formation of SW480 cells were significantly inhibited. Defective TRF2 induced apoptosis and increased chromosomal instability in SW480 cells, in which there were more end-to-end fusions and ring chromosomes. Chip assay and EMSA showed that transcription factor Sp1 is involved in upregulation of TRF2. These results indicate that TRF2 is overexpressed in colorectal carcinoma, Sp1 upregulates TRF2 expression, TRF2 inhibition reduces tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer, which suggests that TRF2 and SP1 may become new targets for the development of anti-cancer therapy in colorectal carcinoma.

  20. TRF1 and TRF2 use different mechanisms to find telomeric DNA but share a novel mechanism to search for protein partners at telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiangguo; Countryman, Preston; Buncher, Noah; Kaur, Parminder; E, Longjiang; Zhang, Yiyun; Gibson, Greg; You, Changjiang; Watkins, Simon C; Piehler, Jacob; Opresko, Patricia L; Kad, Neil M; Wang, Hong

    2014-02-01

    Human telomeres are maintained by the shelterin protein complex in which TRF1 and TRF2 bind directly to duplex telomeric DNA. How these proteins find telomeric sequences among a genome of billions of base pairs and how they find protein partners to form the shelterin complex remains uncertain. Using single-molecule fluorescence imaging of quantum dot-labeled TRF1 and TRF2, we study how these proteins locate TTAGGG repeats on DNA tightropes. By virtue of its basic domain TRF2 performs an extensive 1D search on nontelomeric DNA, whereas TRF1's 1D search is limited. Unlike the stable and static associations observed for other proteins at specific binding sites, TRF proteins possess reduced binding stability marked by transient binding (∼ 9-17 s) and slow 1D diffusion on specific telomeric regions. These slow diffusion constants yield activation energy barriers to sliding ∼ 2.8-3.6 κ(B)T greater than those for nontelomeric DNA. We propose that the TRF proteins use 1D sliding to find protein partners and assemble the shelterin complex, which in turn stabilizes the interaction with specific telomeric DNA. This 'tag-team proofreading' represents a more general mechanism to ensure a specific set of proteins interact with each other on long repetitive specific DNA sequences without requiring external energy sources.

  1. The long and the short of TRF2 in neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikakis, Ioannis; Zhang, Peisu; Mattson, Mark P; Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-11-16

    Gene expression patterns change dramatically during neuronal development. Proliferating cells, including neural stem cells (NSCs), express telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2), a nuclear protein that associates with telomeric proteins, DNA, and RNA telomeres. In NSCs TRF2 also binds to the transcription regulator REST to facilitate repression of numerous neuron-specific genes, thereby keeping the NSCs in a self-renewing state. Upon neuronal differentiation, TRF2 levels decline, REST-regulated neuronal genes are derepressed, and a short isoform of TRF2 arises (TRF2-S) which localizes in the cytoplasm, associates with different subsets of proteins and transcripts, and mobilizes axonal G-rich mRNAs. We recently identified two RNA-binding proteins, HNRNPH1 and H2 (referred to jointly as HNRNPH due to their high homology), which mediate the alternative splicing of an exon required for the expression of full-length TRF2. As HNRNPH levels decline during neurogenesis, TRF2 abundance decreases and TRF2-S accumulates. Here, we discuss the shared and unique functions of TRF2 and TRF2-S, the distinct subcellular compartment in which each isoform resides, the subsets of proteins and nucleic acids with which each interacts, and the functional consequences of these ribonucleoprotein interactions. This paradigm illustrates the dynamic mechanisms through which splicing regulation by factors like HNRNPH enable distinct protein functions as cells adapt to developmental programs such as neurogenesis.

  2. The telomere-binding protein TRF2 is required for metronomic therapeutic effects of gemcitabine and capecitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Ping; Lan, Keng-Hsin; Li, Chung-Pin; Chao, Yee; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2017-04-01

    Gemcitabine and capecitabine are two effective anticancer agents against solid tumors. The pharmacological mechanisms have been known as incorporation into DNA and thereby inhibition of DNA synthesis. When used as metronomic chemotherapy, they may inhibit angiogenesis and induce immunity. In our previous study, we showed that low-dose gemcitabine caused telomere shortening by stabilizing TRF2 that was required for XPF-dependent telomere loss. In this report, we established a SKOV3.ip1 ascites cell model. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with low-dose gemcitabine (GEM) or capecitabine (CAP). Both GEM and CAP caused telomere shortening and increased expression of TRF2 with improved ascites in nude mice and decreased in vitro clonogenic activity. TRF2 knockdown altered telomeres to a shortened but new status that may evade XPF-dependent telomere loss and conferred resistance of SKOV3.ip1 ascites cells to low-dose GEM and CAP. Our study provides a new mechanism of metronomic chemotherapy i.e. TRF2 is required for metronomic therapeutic effects of gemcitabine and capecitabine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The long and the short of TRF2 in neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Grammatikakis, Ioannis; Zhang, Peisu; Mark P Mattson; Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression patterns change dramatically during neuronal development. Proliferating cells, including neural stem cells (NSCs), express telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2), a nuclear protein that associates with telomeric proteins, DNA, and RNA telomeres. In NSCs TRF2 also binds to the transcription regulator REST to facilitate repression of numerous neuron-specific genes, thereby keeping the NSCs in a self-renewing state. Upon neuronal differentiation, TRF2 levels decline, REST-regula...

  4. Upregulation and CpG island hypomethylation of the TRF2 gene in human gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjie; Wang, Lifu; Chen, Xiaobing; Sun, Pinghu; Wu, Yunlin

    2010-04-01

    The telomere-binding protein TRF2 regulates both telomere protection and telomere length. The fact that TRF2 is up-regulated in some tumors indicates that TRF2 plays a role in cancer. However, the role of TRF2 in gastric cancer has not been fully understood. The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression pattern of TRF2 in gastric cancer and examine the potential mechanism of TRF2 regulation. Our study revealed that the expression of TRF2 analyzed by immunohistochemistry was significantly higher in gastric cancers compared to noncancerous tissues. Moreover, TRF2 methylation was detected in six of 30 (20%) primary gastric cancers and 18 of 30 (60%) paired normal tissues, and the downregulation of TRF2 was strongly correlated with the methylation status (P TRF2 in gastric cancers and this overexpression may play a role in the pathogenesis of gastric cancers.

  5. Ndj1, a telomere-associated protein, regulates centrosome separation in budding yeast meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Shao, Yize; Jin, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Yeast centrosomes (called spindle pole bodies [SPBs]) remain cohesive for hours during meiotic G2 when recombination takes place. In contrast, SPBs separate within minutes after duplication in vegetative cells. We report here that Ndj1, a previously known meiosis-specific telomere-associated protein, is required for protecting SPB cohesion. Ndj1 localizes to the SPB but dissociates from it ∼16 min before SPB separation. Without Ndj1, meiotic SPBs lost cohesion prematurely, whereas overproduction of Ndj1 delayed SPB separation. When produced ectopically in vegetative cells, Ndj1 caused SPB separation defects and cell lethality. Localization of Ndj1 to the SPB depended on the SUN domain protein Mps3, and removal of the N terminus of Mps3 allowed SPB separation and suppressed the lethality of NDJ1-expressing vegetative cells. Finally, we show that Ndj1 forms oligomeric complexes with Mps3, and that the Polo-like kinase Cdc5 regulates Ndj1 protein stability and SPB separation. These findings reveal the underlying mechanism that coordinates yeast centrosome dynamics with meiotic telomere movement and cell cycle progression. PMID:25897084

  6. Elevated TRF2 in advanced breast cancers with short telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Malissa C; Idowu, Michael O; Kimmelshue, Katherine N; York, Timothy P; Jackson-Cook, Colleen K; Turner, Kristi C; Holt, Shawn E; Elmore, Lynne W

    2011-06-01

    Telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) binds directly to telomeres and preserves the structural integrity of chromosome ends. In vitro models suggest that expression of TRF2 protein increases during mammary cancer progression. However, a recent study has reported that TRF2 mRNA levels tend to be lower in clinical specimens of malignant breast tissue. Here, we conduct the first large-scale investigation to assess the levels and cellular localization of the TRF2 protein in normal, pre-malignant and malignant breast tissues. Breast tissue arrays, containing normal, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive carcinoma specimens, were used to assess the expression and localization of TRF2 protein. Telomere lengths were semi-quantitatively measured using a pantelomeric peptide nucleic acid probe. A mixed effects modeling approach was used to assess the relationship between TRF2 expression and telomeric signal scores across disease states or clinical staging. We demonstrate that TRF2 is exclusively nuclear with a trend toward lower expression with increased malignancy. More case-to-case variability of TRF2 immunostaining intensity was noted amongst the invasive carcinomas than the other disease groups. Invasive carcinomas also displayed variable telomere lengths while telomeres in normal mammary epithelium were generally longer. Statistical analyses revealed that increased TRF2 immunostaining intensity in invasive carcinomas is associated with shorter telomeres and shorter telomeres correlate with a higher TNM stage. All immortalized and cancer cell lines within the array displayed strong, nuclear TRF2 expression. Our data indicate that elevated expression of TRF2 is not a frequent occurrence during the transformation of breast cancer cells in vivo, but higher levels of this telomere-binding protein may be important for protecting advanced cancer cells with critically short telomeres. Our findings also reinforce the concept that serially propagated cancer cells

  7. Heat shock-induced dissociation of TRF2 from telomeres does not initiate a telomere-dependent DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Nadezhda V; Velichko, Artem K; Kantidze, Omar L; Razin, Sergey V

    2014-05-01

    Telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) is a well-studied shelterin complex subunit that plays a major role in the protection of chomosome ends and the prevention of the telomere-associated DNA damage response. We show that heat shock induces the dissociation of TRF2 from telomeres in human primary and cancer cell cultures. TRF2 is not simply degraded in response to heat shock, but redistributed thoughout the nucleoplasm. This TRF2 depletion/redistribution does not initiate the DNA damage response at chomosome termini. © 2014 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  8. Expression of TRF1, TRF2, TIN2, TERT, KU70, and BRCA1 proteins is associated with telomere shortening and may contribute to multistage carcinogenesis of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hua; Zhang, Yang; Zou, Mei; Yang, Shuai; Liang, Xiao-Qiu

    2010-09-01

    Telomere dysfunction is believed to be a significant factor in carcinogenesis. To elucidate the carcinogenesis mechanism in gastric cancer, the expression of telomeric proteins and changes in telomere length were investigated during multistage carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. Tissue samples were obtained during surgical operations from the normal gastric mucosa of 10 patients, the precancerous lesions of 15 patients, the gastric cancer tissues (GC) of 20 patients, and of tumors due to gastric cancer with lymph node metastasis (GCLM) from 5 patients. The expression of TRF1, TRF2, and TIN2 proteins was measured by Western blotting, while the expression of TERT, KU70, and BRCA1 proteins was detected using the immunohistochemical method. The mean telomere length was determined by Southern blotting. Compared with normal gastric mucosa tissues, the expression of TRF1, TRF2, and TIN2 proteins was significantly higher in precancerous lesions, GC, and GCLM (P TRF2, and TIN2 proteins was significantly higher in GC and GCLM than in precancerous lesions (P TRF2, TIN2, TERT, and Ku70 proteins. Our results suggest that the over-expression of telomeric proteins, TRF1, TRF2, TIN2, TERT, and Ku70, and the transposition of the BRCA1 protein may work together to reduce the telomere length in precancerous lesions and gastric cancer, and could contribute to the multistage carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. These findings offer new insight into the mechanism of carcinogenesis in gastric cancer.

  9. Mouse CCDC79 (TERB1) is a meiosis-specific telomere associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Katrin; Tränkner, Daniel; Wojtasz, Lukasz; Shibuya, Hiroki; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Alsheimer, Manfred; Tóth, Attila

    2014-05-22

    Telomeres have crucial meiosis-specific roles in the orderly reduction of chromosome numbers and in ensuring the integrity of the genome during meiosis. One such role is the attachment of telomeres to trans-nuclear envelope protein complexes that connect telomeres to motor proteins in the cytoplasm. These trans-nuclear envelope connections between telomeres and cytoplasmic motor proteins permit the active movement of telomeres and chromosomes during the first meiotic prophase. Movements of chromosomes/telomeres facilitate the meiotic recombination process, and allow high fidelity pairing of homologous chromosomes. Pairing of homologous chromosomes is a prerequisite for their correct segregation during the first meiotic division. Although inner-nuclear envelope proteins, such as SUN1 and potentially SUN2, are known to bind and recruit meiotic telomeres, these proteins are not meiosis-specific, therefore cannot solely account for telomere-nuclear envelope attachment and/or for other meiosis-specific characteristics of telomeres in mammals. We identify CCDC79, alternatively named TERB1, as a meiosis-specific protein that localizes to telomeres from leptotene to diplotene stages of the first meiotic prophase. CCDC79 and SUN1 associate with telomeres almost concurrently at the onset of prophase, indicating a possible role for CCDC79 in telomere-nuclear envelope interactions and/or telomere movements. Consistent with this scenario, CCDC79 is missing from most telomeres that fail to connect to SUN1 protein in spermatocytes lacking the meiosis-specific cohesin SMC1B. SMC1B-deficient spermatocytes display both reduced efficiency in telomere-nuclear envelope attachment and reduced stability of telomeres specifically during meiotic prophase. Importantly, CCDC79 associates with telomeres in SUN1-deficient spermatocytes, which strongly indicates that localization of CCDC79 to telomeres does not require telomere-nuclear envelope attachment. CCDC79 is a meiosis-specific telomere

  10. Drosophila TRF2 is a preferential core promoter regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedmi, Adi; Zehavi, Yonathan; Glick, Yair; Orenstein, Yaron; Ideses, Diana; Wachtel, Chaim; Doniger, Tirza; Waldman Ben-Asher, Hiba; Muster, Nemone; Thompson, James; Anderson, Scott; Avrahami, Dorit; Yates, John R; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2014-10-01

    Transcription of protein-coding genes is highly dependent on the RNA polymerase II core promoter. Core promoters, generally defined as the regions that direct transcription initiation, consist of functional core promoter motifs (such as the TATA-box, initiator [Inr], and downstream core promoter element [DPE]) that confer specific properties to the core promoter. The known basal transcription factors that support TATA-dependent transcription are insufficient for in vitro transcription of DPE-dependent promoters. In search of a transcription factor that supports DPE-dependent transcription, we used a biochemical complementation approach and identified the Drosophila TBP (TATA-box-binding protein)-related factor 2 (TRF2) as an enriched factor in the fractions that support DPE-dependent transcription. We demonstrate that the short TRF2 isoform preferentially activates DPE-dependent promoters. DNA microarray analysis reveals the enrichment of DPE promoters among short TRF2 up-regulated genes. Using primer extension analysis and reporter assays, we show the importance of the DPE in transcriptional regulation of TRF2 target genes. It was previously shown that, unlike TBP, TRF2 fails to bind DNA containing TATA-boxes. Using microfluidic affinity analysis, we discovered that short TRF2-bound DNA oligos are enriched for Inr and DPE motifs. Taken together, our findings highlight the role of short TRF2 as a preferential core promoter regulator. © 2014 Kedmi et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  11. Human Rap1 modulates TRF2 attraction to telomeric DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Janoušková Eliška; Nečasová Ivona; Pavloušková Jana; Zimmermann Michal; Hluchý Milan; Marini Palomeque María Victoria; Nováková Monika; Hofr Ctirad

    2015-01-01

    More than two decades of genetic research have identified and assigned main biological functions of shelterin proteins that safeguard telomeres. However, a molecular mechanism of how each protein subunit contributes to the protecting function of the whole shelterin complex remains elusive. Human Repressor activator protein 1 (Rap1) forms a multifunctional complex with Telomeric Repeat binding Factor 2 (TRF2). Rap1-TRF2 complex is a critical part of shelterin as it suppresses homology-directed...

  12. dTrf2 is required for transcriptional and developmental responses to ecdysone during Drosophila metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashirullah, Arash; Lam, Geanette; Yin, Viravuth P; Thummel, Carl S

    2007-11-01

    The TATA box-binding protein (TBP) related factor 2 (TRF2) has been well characterized at a biochemical level and in cultured cells. Relatively little, however, is known about how TRF2 functions in specific biological pathways during development. Here, we show that Drosophila TRF2 (dTRF2) plays an essential role in responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone during the onset of metamorphosis. Hypomorphic dTrf2 mutations lead to developmental arrest during prepupal and early pupal stages with defects in major ecdysone-triggered biological responses, including puparium formation, anterior spiracle eversion, gas bubble translocation, adult head eversion, and larval salivary gland cell death. The transcription of key ecdysone-regulated target genes is delayed and reduced in dTrf2 mutants. dTrf2 appears to be required for the proper timing and levels of ecdysone-regulated gene expression required for entry into metamorphosis. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. TRF2 promotes, remodels and protects telomeric Holliday junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, Anaïs; Buisson, Rémi; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Koelblen, Mélanie; Amiard, Simon; Montel, Fabien; Cuesta-Lopez, Santiago; Bornet, Olivier; Guerlesquin, Françoise; Godet, Thomas; Moukhtar, Julien; Argoul, Françoise; Déclais, Anne-Cécile; Lilley, David M J; Ip, Stephen C Y; West, Stephen C; Gilson, Eric; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe

    2009-03-18

    The ability of the telomeric DNA-binding protein, TRF2, to stimulate t-loop formation while preventing t-loop deletion is believed to be crucial to maintain telomere integrity in mammals. However, little is known on the molecular mechanisms behind these properties of TRF2. In this report, we show that TRF2 greatly increases the rate of Holliday junction (HJ) formation and blocks the cleavage by various types of HJ resolving activities, including the newly identified human GEN1 protein. By using potassium permanganate probing and differential scanning calorimetry, we reveal that the basic domain of TRF2 induces structural changes to the junction. We propose that TRF2 contributes to t-loop stabilisation by stimulating HJ formation and by preventing resolvase cleavage. These findings provide novel insights into the interplay between telomere protection and homologous recombination and suggest a general model in which TRF2 maintains telomere integrity by controlling the turnover of HJ at t-loops and at regressed replication forks.

  14. Functional Interaction between Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 2 (PARP-2) and TRF2: PARP Activity Negatively Regulates TRF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantzer, Françoise; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Jaco, Isabel; Amé, Jean-Christophe; Schultz, Inès; Blasco, Maria; Koering, Catherine-Elaine; Gilson, Eric; Ménissier-de Murcia, Josiane; de Murcia, Gilbert; Schreiber, Valérie

    2004-01-01

    The DNA damage-dependent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) is, together with PARP-1, an active player of the base excision repair process, thus defining its key role in genome surveillance and protection. Telomeres are specialized DNA-protein structures that protect chromosome ends from being recognized and processed as DNA strand breaks. In mammals, telomere protection depends on the T2AG3 repeat binding protein TRF2, which has been shown to remodel telomeres into large duplex loops (t-loops). In this work we show that PARP-2 physically binds to TRF2 with high affinity. The association of both proteins requires the N-terminal domain of PARP-2 and the myb domain of TRF2. Both partners colocalize at promyelocytic leukemia bodies in immortalized telomerase-negative cells. In addition, our data show that PARP activity regulates the DNA binding activity of TRF2 via both a covalent heteromodification of the dimerization domain of TRF2 and a noncovalent binding of poly(ADP-ribose) to the myb domain of TRF2. PARP-2−/− primary cells show normal telomere length as well as normal telomerase activity compared to wild-type cells but display a spontaneously increased frequency of chromosome and chromatid breaks and of ends lacking detectable T2AG3 repeats. Altogether, these results suggest a functional role of PARP-2 activity in the maintenance of telomere integrity. PMID:14749375

  15. Mir-23a induces telomere dysfunction and cellular senescence by inhibiting TRF2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhenhua; Feng, Xuyang; Wang, Haoli; Xu, Weiyi; Zhao, Yong; Ma, Wenbin; Jiang, Songshan; Liu, Dan; Huang, Junjiu; Songyang, Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) is essential for telomere maintenance and has been implicated in DNA damage response and aging. Telomere dysfunction induced by TRF2 inhibition can accelerate cellular senescence in human fibroblasts. While previous work has demonstrated that a variety of factors can regulate TRF2 expression transcriptionally and post-translationally, whether microRNAs (miRNAs) also participate in post-transcriptionally modulating TRF2 levels remains largely unknown. To better understand the regulatory pathways that control TRF2, we carried out a large-scale luciferase reporter screen using a miRNA expression library and identified four miRNAs that could target human TRF2 and significantly reduce the level of endogenous TRF2 proteins. In particular, our data revealed that miR-23a could directly target the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of TRF2. Overexpression of miR-23a not only reduced telomere-bound TRF2 and increased telomere dysfunction-induced foci (TIFs), but also accelerated senescence of human fibroblast cells, which could be rescued by ectopically expressed TRF2. Our findings demonstrate that TRF2 is a specific target of miR-23a, and uncover a previously unknown role for miR-23a in telomere regulation and cellular senescence. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. De novo digenic mutations of telomere-associated proteins and inflammasomes initiate many chronic human diseases: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Vincent T

    2017-09-01

    Many age-related human diseases have inflammatory components of uncertain causes. It has been proposed that some may be initiated or sustained by doubly mutated immune cells that have both inappropriately activated inflammasomes and enhanced replicative potential. Genes of cells that express mutant TERT and NLRP3 proteins are presumed to be at increased risk for mutagenesis because they reside in subtelomeric regions of chromatin that are deficient in DNA repair mechanisms. Expanded clones of proinflammatory cells can occur throughout one's lifetime and could represent an alternative explanation for some forms of pathologic scarring that are now attributed to truncated telomeres.-Marchesi, V. T. De novo digenic mutations of telomere-associated proteins and inflammasomes initiate many chronic human diseases: a hypothesis. © FASEB.

  17. Moderate expression of TRF2 in the hematopoietic system increases development of large cell blastic T-cell lymphomas

    OpenAIRE

    Begemann, Sebastian; Galimi, Francesco; Karlseder, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) plays a central role in the protection of chromosome ends by inhibiting telomeres from initiating a DNA damage cascade. TRF2 overexpression has been suggested to induce tumor development in the mouse, and TRF2 levels have been found increased in human tumors. Here we tested whether moderate expression of TRF2 in the hematopoietic system leads to cancer development in the mouse. TRF2 and a GFP-TRF2 fusion protein were introduced into hematopoietic p...

  18. TRF2 recruits ORC through TRFH domain dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, Mitsunori; Kushiyama, Tatsunori; Kurashige, Seiichiro; Kohmon, Daisuke; Enokitani, Kouki; Iwahori, Satoko; Sugimoto, Nozomi; Yoshida, Kazumasa; Fujita, Masatoshi

    2017-01-01

    Telomeres are specialized chromatin structures that prevent the degradation and instability of the ends of linear chromosomes. While telomerase maintains long stretches of the telomeric repeat, the majority of telomeric DNA is duplicated by conventional DNA replication. A fundamental step in eukaryotic DNA replication involves chromatin binding of the origin recognition complex (ORC). In human cells, telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) is thought to play a role in the recruitment of ORC onto telomeres. To better understand the mechanism of TRF2-mediated ORC recruitment, we utilized a lacO-LacI protein tethering system in U2OS cells and found that ectopically targeted TRF2, but not TRF1, can recruit ORC onto the lacO array. We further found that the TRF homology (TRFH) dimerization domain of TRF2, but not its mutant defective in dimerization, is sufficient for ORC and minichromosome maintenance (MCM) recruitment. Mutations impairing the dimerization also compromised ORC recruitment by full-length TRF2. Similar results were obtained using immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays. Together, these results suggest that dimerized TRF2 recruits ORC and stimulates pre-replication complex (pre-RC) formation at telomeres through the TRFH domain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. TATA box-binding protein (TBP)-related factor 2 (TRF2), a third member of the TBP family

    OpenAIRE

    Rabenstein, Mark D.; Zhou, Sharleen; Lis, John T.; Tjian, Robert

    1999-01-01

    The TATA box-binding protein (TBP) is an essential component of the RNA polymerase II transcription apparatus in eukaryotic cells. Until recently, it was thought that the general transcriptional machinery was largely invariant and relied on a single TBP, whereas a large and diverse collection of activators and repressors were primarily responsible for imparting specificity to transcription initiation. However, it now appears that the “basal” transcriptional machinery also contributes to speci...

  20. Nontelomeric TRF2-REST interaction modulates neuronal gene silencing and fate of tumor and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peisu; Pazin, Michael J; Schwartz, Catherine M; Becker, Kevin G; Wersto, Robert P; Dilley, Caroline M; Mattson, Mark P

    2008-10-14

    Removal of TRF2, a telomere shelterin protein, recapitulates key aspects of telomere attrition including the DNA-damage response and cell-cycle arrest [1]. Distinct from the response of proliferating cells to loss of TRF2 [2, 3], in rodent noncycling cells, TRF2 inhibition promotes differentiation and growth [4, 5]. However, the mechanism that couples telomere gene-silencing features [6-8] to differentiation programs has yet to be elucidated. Here we describe an extratelomeric function of TRF2 in the regulation of neuronal genes mediated by the interaction of TRF2 with repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master repressor of gene networks devoted to neuronal functions [9-12]. TRF2-REST complexes are readily detected by coimmunoprecipitation assays and are localized to aggregated PML-nuclear bodies in undifferentiated pluripotent human NTera2 stem cells. Inhibition of TRF2, either by a dominant-negative mutant or by RNA interference, dissociates TRF2-REST complexes resulting in ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation of REST. Consequentially, REST-targeted neural genes (L1CAM, beta3-tubulin, synaptophysin, and others) are derepressed, resulting in acquisition of neuronal phenotypes. Notably, selective damage to telomeres without affecting TRF2 levels causes neither REST degradation nor cell differentiation. Thus, in addition to protecting telomeres, TRF2 possesses a novel role in stabilization of REST thereby controlling neural tumor and stem cell fate.

  1. Human Rap1 interacts directly with telomeric DNA and regulates TRF2 localization at the telomere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arat, N Özlem; Griffith, Jack D

    2012-12-07

    The TRF2-Rap1 complex suppresses non-homologous end joining and interacts with DNAPK-C to prevent end joining. We previously demonstrated that hTRF2 is a double strand telomere binding protein that forms t-loops in vitro and recognizes three- and four-way junctions independent of DNA sequence. How the DNA binding characteristics of hTRF2 to DNA is altered in the presence of hRap1 however is not known. Here we utilized EM and quantitative gel retardation to characterize the DNA binding properties of hRap1 and the TRF2-Rap1 complex. Both gel filtration chromatography and mass analysis from two-dimensional projections showed that the TRF2-Rap1 complex exists in solution and binds to DNA as a complex consisting of four monomers each of hRap1 and hTRF2. EM revealed for the first time that hRap1 binds to DNA templates in the absence of hTRF2 with a preference for double strand-single strand junctions in a sequence independent manner. When hTRF2 and hRap1 are in a complex, its affinity for ds telomeric sequences is 2-fold higher than TRF2 alone and more than 10-fold higher for telomeric 3' ends. This suggests that as hTRF2 recruits hRap1 to telomeric sequences, hRap1 alters the affinity of hTRF2 and its binding preference on telomeric DNA. Moreover, the TRF2-Rap1 complex has higher ability to re-model telomeric DNA than either component alone. This finding underlies the importance of complex formation between hRap1 and hTRF2 for telomere function and end protection.

  2. Human Rap1 Interacts Directly with Telomeric DNA and Regulates TRF2 Localization at the Telomere*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arat, N. Özlem; Griffith, Jack D.

    2012-01-01

    The TRF2-Rap1 complex suppresses non-homologous end joining and interacts with DNAPK-C to prevent end joining. We previously demonstrated that hTRF2 is a double strand telomere binding protein that forms t-loops in vitro and recognizes three- and four-way junctions independent of DNA sequence. How the DNA binding characteristics of hTRF2 to DNA is altered in the presence of hRap1 however is not known. Here we utilized EM and quantitative gel retardation to characterize the DNA binding properties of hRap1 and the TRF2-Rap1 complex. Both gel filtration chromatography and mass analysis from two-dimensional projections showed that the TRF2-Rap1 complex exists in solution and binds to DNA as a complex consisting of four monomers each of hRap1 and hTRF2. EM revealed for the first time that hRap1 binds to DNA templates in the absence of hTRF2 with a preference for double strand-single strand junctions in a sequence independent manner. When hTRF2 and hRap1 are in a complex, its affinity for ds telomeric sequences is 2-fold higher than TRF2 alone and more than 10-fold higher for telomeric 3′ ends. This suggests that as hTRF2 recruits hRap1 to telomeric sequences, hRap1 alters the affinity of hTRF2 and its binding preference on telomeric DNA. Moreover, the TRF2-Rap1 complex has higher ability to re-model telomeric DNA than either component alone. This finding underlies the importance of complex formation between hRap1 and hTRF2 for telomere function and end protection. PMID:23086976

  3. TRF2 and the evolution of the bilateria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duttke, Sascha H C; Doolittle, Russell F; Wang, Yuan-Liang; Kadonaga, James T

    2014-10-01

    The development of a complex body plan requires a diversity of regulatory networks. Here we consider the concept of TATA-box-binding protein (TBP) family proteins as "system factors" that each supports a distinct set of transcriptional programs. For instance, TBP activates TATA-box-dependent core promoters, whereas TBP-related factor 2 (TRF2) activates TATA-less core promoters that are dependent on a TCT or downstream core promoter element (DPE) motif. These findings led us to investigate the evolution of TRF2. TBP occurs in Archaea and eukaryotes, but TRF2 evolved prior to the emergence of the bilateria and subsequent to the evolutionary split between bilaterians and nonbilaterian animals. Unlike TBP, TRF2 does not bind to the TATA box and could thus function as a new system factor that is largely independent of TBP. We postulate that this TRF2-based system served as the foundation for new transcriptional programs, such as those involved in triploblasty and body plan development, that facilitated the evolution of bilateria. © 2014 Duttke et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  4. Alternative Splicing of Neuronal Differentiation Factor TRF2 Regulated by HNRNPH1/H2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Grammatikakis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During neuronal differentiation, use of an alternative splice site on the rat telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2 mRNA generates a short TRF2 protein isoform (TRF2-S capable of derepressing neuronal genes. However, the RNA-binding proteins (RBPs controlling this splicing event are unknown. Here, using affinity pull-down analysis, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins H1 and H2(HNRNPH as RBPs specifically capable of interacting with the spliced RNA segment (exon 7 of Trf2 pre-mRNA. HNRNPH proteins prevent the production of the short isoform of Trf2 mRNA, as HNRNPH silencing selectively elevates TRF2-S levels. Accordingly, HNRNPH levels decline while TRF2-S levels increase during neuronal differentiation. In addition, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of hnRNPH2 selectively accelerates the NGF-triggered differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma cells into neurons. In sum, HNRNPH is a splicing regulator of Trf2 pre-mRNA that prevents the expression of TRF2-S, a factor implicated in neuronal differentiation.

  5. Alternative Splicing of Neuronal Differentiation Factor TRF2 Regulated by HNRNPH1/H2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikakis, Ioannis; Zhang, Peisu; Panda, Amaresh C; Kim, Jiyoung; Maudsley, Stuart; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Yang, Xiaoling; Martindale, Jennifer L; Motiño, Omar; Hutchison, Emmette R; Mattson, Mark P; Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-05-03

    During neuronal differentiation, use of an alternative splice site on the rat telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) mRNA generates a short TRF2 protein isoform (TRF2-S) capable of derepressing neuronal genes. However, the RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) controlling this splicing event are unknown. Here, using affinity pull-down analysis, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins H1 and H2(HNRNPH) as RBPs specifically capable of interacting with the spliced RNA segment (exon 7) of Trf2 pre-mRNA. HNRNPH proteins prevent the production of the short isoform of Trf2 mRNA, as HNRNPH silencing selectively elevates TRF2-S levels. Accordingly, HNRNPH levels decline while TRF2-S levels increase during neuronal differentiation. In addition, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of hnRNPH2 selectively accelerates the NGF-triggered differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma cells into neurons. In sum, HNRNPH is a splicing regulator of Trf2 pre-mRNA that prevents the expression of TRF2-S, a factor implicated in neuronal differentiation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. SIRT6 interacts with TRF2 and promotes its degradation in response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Angela; Iachettini, Sara; Salvati, Erica; Zizza, Pasquale; Maresca, Carmen; D'Angelo, Carmen; Benarroch-Popivker, Delphine; Capolupo, Angela; Del Gaudio, Federica; Cosconati, Sandro; Di Maro, Salvatore; Merlino, Francesco; Novellino, Ettore; Amoreo, Carla Azzurra; Mottolese, Marcella; Sperduti, Isabella; Gilson, Eric; Biroccio, Annamaria

    2017-02-28

    Telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) has been increasingly recognized to be involved in telomere maintenance and DNA damage response. Here, we show that TRF2 directly binds SIRT6 in a DNA independent manner and that this interaction is increased upon replication stress. Knockdown of SIRT6 up-regulates TRF2 protein levels and counteracts its down-regulation during DNA damage response, leading to cell survival. Moreover, we report that SIRT6 deactetylates in vivo the TRFH domain of TRF2, which in turn, is ubiquitylated in vivo activating the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. Notably, overexpression of the TRF2cT mutant failed to be stabilized by SIRT6 depletion, demonstrating that the TRFH domain is required for its post-transcriptional modification. Finally, we report an inverse correlation between SIRT6 and TRF2 protein expression levels in a cohort of colon rectal cancer patients. Taken together our findings describe TRF2 as a novel SIRT6 substrate and demonstrate that acetylation of TRF2 plays a crucial role in the regulation of TRF2 protein stability, thus providing a new route for modulating its expression level during oncogenesis and damage response. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. No DDRama at chromosome ends: TRF2 takes centre stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerhahn, Sascha; Chen, Liuh-yow; Luke, Brian; Porro, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures capping the natural termini of eukaryotic linear chromosomes. Telomeres possess an inherent ability to circumvent the activation of a full-blown DNA damage response (DDR), and hence fusion reactions, by limiting inappropriate double-strand break (DSB) repair and processing activities at eukaryotic chromosome ends. A telomere-specific protein complex, termed shelterin, has a crucial function in safeguarding and securing telomere integrity. Within this complex, TRF2 has emerged as the key player, dictating different states of telomere protection during the replicative lifespan of a cell. How TRF2 prevents activation of DSB repair activities at functional telomeres has now been extensively investigated. In this review we aim at exploring the complex and multi-faceted mechanisms underlying the TRF2-mediated protection of eukaryotic chromosome ends. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Taf7l cooperates with Trf2 to regulate spermiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haiying; Grubisic, Ivan; Zheng, Ke; He, Ying; Wang, P Jeremy; Kaplan, Tommy; Tjian, Robert

    2013-10-15

    TATA-binding protein (TBP)-associated factor 7l (Taf7l; a paralogue of Taf7) and TBP-related factor 2 (Trf2) are components of the core promoter complex required for gene/tissue-specific transcription of protein-coding genes by RNA polymerase II. Previous studies reported that Taf7l knockout (KO) mice exhibit structurally abnormal sperm, reduced sperm count, weakened motility, and compromised fertility. Here we find that continued backcrossing of Taf7l(-/Y) mice from N5 to N9 produced KO males that are essentially sterile. Genome-wide expression profiling by mRNA-sequencing analysis of wild-type (WT) and Taf7l(-/Y) (KO) testes revealed that Taf7l ablation impairs the expression of many postmeiotic spermatogenic-specific as well as metabolic genes. Importantly, histological analysis of testes revealed that Taf7l(-/Y) mice develop postmeiotic arrest at the first stage of spermiogenesis, phenotypically similar to Trf2(-/-) mice, but distinct from Taf4b(-/-) mice. Indeed, we find that Taf7l and Trf2 coregulate postmeiotic genes, but none of Taf4b-regulated germ stem cell genes in testes. Genome-wide ChIP-sequencing studies indicate that TAF7L binds to promoters of activated postmeiotic genes in testis. Moreover, biochemical studies show that TAF7L associates with TRF2 both in vitro and in testis, suggesting that TAF7L likely cooperates directly with TRF2 at promoters of a subset of postmeiotic genes to regulate spermiogenesis. Our findings thus provide a previously undescribed mechanism for cell-type-specific transcriptional control involving an interaction between a "nonprototypic" core promoter recognition factor (Trf2) and an orphan TAF subunit (Taf7l) in mammalian testis-specific gene transcription.

  9. Caspase-Dependent Apoptosis Induced by Telomere Cleavage and TRF2 Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha S. Multani

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities involving telomeric associations (TAs often precede replicative senescence and abnormal chromosome configurations. We report here that telomere cleavage following exposure to proapoptotic agents is an early event in apoptosis. Exposure of human and murine cancer cells to a variety of pro-apoptotic stimuli (staurosporine, thapsigargin, anti-Fas antibody, cancer chemotherapeutic agents resulted in telomere cleavage and aggregation, finally their extrusion from the nuclei. Telomere loss was associated with arrest of cells in G2/M phase and preceded DNA fragmentation. Telomere erosion and subsequent large-scale chromatin cleavage were inhibited by overexpression of the anti -apoptotic protein, bcl-2, two peptide caspase inhibitors (BACMK and zVADfmk, indicating that both events are regulated by caspase activation. The results demonstrate that telomere cleavage is an early chromatin alteration detected in various cancer cell lines leading to drug-induced apoptosis, suggest that this event contributes to mitotic catastrophe and induction of cell death. Results also suggest that the decrease of telomeric-repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2 may be the earliest event in the ara-C-induced telomere shortening, induction of endoreduplication and chromosomal fragmentation leading to cell death.

  10. Elevated levels of TRF2 induce telomeric ultrafine anaphase bridges and rapid telomere deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nera, Bernadette; Huang, Hui-Shun; Lai, Thao; Xu, Lifeng

    2015-12-07

    The shelterin protein TRF2 is essential for chromosome-end protection. Depletion of TRF2 causes chromosome end-to-end fusions, initiating genomic instability that can be cancer promoting. Paradoxically, significant increased levels of TRF2 are observed in a subset of human cancers. Experimental overexpression of TRF2 has also been shown to induce telomere shortening, through an unknown mechanism. Here we report that TRF2 overexpression results in replication stalling in duplex telomeric repeat tracts and the subsequent formation of telomeric ultrafine anaphase bridges (UFBs), ultimately leading to stochastic loss of telomeric sequences. These TRF2 overexpression-induced telomere deletions generate chromosome fusions resembling those detected in human cancers and in mammalian cells containing critically shortened telomeres. Therefore, our findings have uncovered a second pathway by which altered TRF2 protein levels can induce end-to-end fusions. The observations also provide mechanistic insight into the molecular basis of genomic instability in tumour cells containing significantly increased TRF2 levels.

  11. Molecular targeting of TRF2 suppresses the growth and tumorigenesis of glioblastoma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yun; Lathia, Justin D; Zhang, Peisu; Flavahan, William; Rich, Jeremy N; Mattson, Mark P

    2014-10-01

    Glioblastoma is the most prevalent primary brain tumor and is essentially universally fatal within 2 years of diagnosis. Glioblastomas contain cellular hierarchies with self-renewing glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) that are often resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. GSCs express high amounts of repressor element 1 silencing transcription factor (REST), which may contribute to their resistance to standard therapies. Telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) stablizes telomeres and REST to maintain self-renewal of neural stem cells and tumor cells. Here we show viral vector-mediated delivery of shRNAs targeting TRF2 mRNA depletes TRF2 and REST from GSCs isolated from patient specimens. As a result, GSC proliferation is reduced and the level of proteins normally expressed by postmitotic neurons (L1CAM and β3-tubulin) is increased, suggesting that loss of TRF2 engages a cell differentiation program in the GSCs. Depletion of TRF2 also sensitizes GSCs to temozolomide, a DNA-alkylating agent currently used to treat glioblastoma. Targeting TRF2 significantly increased the survival of mice bearing GSC xenografts. These findings reveal a role for TRF2 in the maintenance of REST-associated proliferation and chemotherapy resistance of GSCs, suggesting that TRF2 is a potential therapeutic target for glioblastoma. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Platination of telomeric DNA by cisplatin disrupts recognition by TRF2 and TRF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ourliac-Garnier, Isabelle; Poulet, Anaïs; Charif, Razan; Amiard, Simon; Magdinier, Frédérique; Rezaï, Keyvan; Gilson, Eric; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Bombard, Sophie

    2010-06-01

    Telomeres, the nucleoprotein complexes located at the ends of chromosomes, are involved in chromosome protection and genome stability. Telomeric repeat binding factor 1 (TRF1) and telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) are the two telomeric proteins that bind to duplex telomeric DNA through interactions between their C-terminal domain and several guanines of the telomeric tract. Since the antitumour drug cisplatin binds preferentially to two adjacent guanines, we have investigated whether cisplatin adducts could affect the binding of TRF1 and TRF2 to telomeric DNA and the property of TRF2 to stimulate telomeric invasion, a process that is thought to participate in the formation of the t-loop. We show that the binding of TRF1 and TRF2 to telomeric sequences selectively modified by one GG chelate of cisplatin is markedly affected by cisplatin but that the effect is more drastic for TRF2 than for TRF1 (3-5-fold more sensitivity for TRF2 than for TRF1). We also report that platinum adducts cause a decrease in TRF2-dependent stimulation of telomeric invasion in vitro. Finally, in accordance with in vitro data, analysis of telomeric composition after cisplatin treatment reveals that 60% of TRF2 dissociate from telomeres.

  13. TRF2 associates with DREF and directs promoter-selective gene expression in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochheimer, Andreas; Zhou, Sharleen; Zheng, Shuang; Holmes, Michael C; Tjian, Robert

    2002-11-28

    Drosophila TATA-box-binding protein (TBP)-related factor 2 (TRF2) is a member of a family of TBP-related factors present in metazoan organisms. Recent evidence suggests that TRF2s are required for proper embryonic development and differentiation. However, true target promoters and the mechanisms by which TRF2 operates to control transcription remain elusive. Here we report the antibody affinity purification of a Drosophila TRF2-containing complex that contains components of the nucleosome remodelling factor (NURF) chromatin remodelling complex as well as the DNA replication-related element (DRE)-binding factor DREF. This latter finding led us to potential target genes containing TRF2-responsive promoters. We have used a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays to show that the DREF-containing TRF2 complex directs core promoter recognition of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene. We also identified additional TRF2-responsive target genes involved in DNA replication and cell proliferation. These data suggest that TRF2 functions as a core promoter-selectivity factor responsible for coordinating transcription of a subset of genes in Drosophila.

  14. Telomere protection and TRF2 expression are enhanced by the canonical Wnt signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diala, Irmina; Wagner, Nicole; Magdinier, Frédérique; Shkreli, Marina; Sirakov, Maria; Bauwens, Serge; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; Simonet, Thomas; Renault, Valérie M; Ye, Jing; Djerbi, Abdelnnadir; Pineau, Pascal; Choi, Jinkuk; Artandi, Steven; Dejean, Anne; Plateroti, Michelina; Gilson, Eric

    2013-04-01

    The DNA-binding protein TRF2 is essential for telomere protection and chromosome stability in mammals. We show here that TRF2 expression is activated by the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway in human cancer and normal cells as well as in mouse intestinal tissues. Furthermore, β-catenin binds to TRF2 gene regulatory regions that are functional in a luciferase transactivating assay. Reduced β-catenin expression in cancer cells triggers a marked increase in telomere dysfunction, which can be reversed by TRF2 overexpression. We conclude that the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway maintains a level of TRF2 critical for telomere protection. This is expected to have an important role during development, adult stem cell function and oncogenesis.

  15. Rap1 is indispensable for TRF2 function in etoposide-induced DNA damage response in gastric cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Liu, W; Wang, H; Yang, L; Li, Y; Wen, H; Ning, H; Wang, J; Zhang, L; Li, J; Fan, D

    2015-03-30

    The telomeric protein TRF2, involving in telomeric and extratelomeric DNA damage response, has been previously reported to facilitate multidrug resistance (MDR) in gastric cancer cells by interfering ATM-dependent DNA damage response induced by anticancer drugs. Rap1 is the TRF2-interacting protein in the shelterin complex. Complex formation between Rap1 and TRF2 is essential for their function in telomere and end protection. Here we focus on the effects of Rap1 on TRF2 function in DNA damage response induced by anticancer drugs. Both Rap1 and TRF2 expression were upregulated in SGC7901 and its MDR variant SGC7901/VCR after etoposide treatment, which was more marked in SGC7901/VCR than in SGC7901. Rap1 silencing by siRNA in SGC7901/VCR partially reversed the etoposide resistance. And Rap1 silencing partially reversed the TRF2-mediated resistance to etoposide in SGC7901. Rap1 silencing did not affect the TRF2 upregulation induced by etoposide, but eliminated the inhibition effect of TRF2 on ATM expression and ATM phosphorylation at serine 1981 (ATM pS1981). Furthermore, phosphorylation of ATM targets, including γH2AX and serine 15 (S15) on p53, were increased in Rap1 silencing cells in response to etoposide. Thus, we confirm that Rap1, interacting with TRF2 in the shelterin complex, also has an important role in TRF2-mediated DNA damage response in gastric cancer cells treated by etoposide.

  16. Moderate expression of TRF2 in the hematopoietic system increases development of large cell blastic T-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begemann, Sebastian; Galimi, Francesco; Karlseder, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) plays a central role in the protection of chromosome ends by inhibiting telomeres from initiating a DNA damage cascade. TRF2 overexpression has been suggested to induce tumor development in the mouse, and TRF2 levels have been found increased in human tumors. Here we tested whether moderate expression of TRF2 in the hematopoietic system leads to cancer development in the mouse. TRF2 and a GFP-TRF2 fusion protein were introduced into hematopoietic precursors, and tested for function. TRF2 overexpressing cells were integrated into the hematopoietic system of C57BL/6J recipient mice, and animals were put on tumor watch. An increase in the development of T-cell lymphomas was observed in secondary recipient animals, however, overexpression of the TRF2 transgene was not detectable anymore in the tumors. The tumors were characterized as large cell blastic T-cell lymphomas and displayed signs of genome instability as evidenced by chromosome fusions. However, the rate of lymphoma development in TRF2-overexpressing animals was low, suggesting the TRF2 does not serve as a dominant oncogene in the system used.

  17. Alternative splicing of neuronal differentiation factor TRF2 regulated by HNRNPH1/H2

    OpenAIRE

    Grammatikakis, Ioannis; Zhang, Peisu; Panda, Amaresh C.; Kim, Jiyoung; Maudsley, Stuart; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Yang, Xiaoling; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Motiño, Omar; Hutchison, Emmette R.; Mattson, Mark P.; Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    During neuronal differentiation, use of an alternative splice site on the rat telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) mRNA generates a short TRF2 protein isoform (TRF2-S) capable of derepressing neuronal genes. However, the RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) controlling this splicing event are unknown. Here, using affinity pull-down analysis, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins H1 and H2(HNRNPH) as RBPs specifically capable of interacting with the spliced RNA segment (exon 7) of T...

  18. Drosophila TRF2 and TAF9 regulate lipid droplet size and phospholipid fatty acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Lam, Sin Man; Xin, Jingxue; Yang, Xiao; Liu, Zhonghua; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Yong; Shui, Guanghou; Huang, Xun

    2017-03-01

    The general transcription factor TBP (TATA-box binding protein) and its associated factors (TAFs) together form the TFIID complex, which directs transcription initiation. Through RNAi and mutant analysis, we identified a specific TBP family protein, TRF2, and a set of TAFs that regulate lipid droplet (LD) size in the Drosophila larval fat body. Among the three Drosophila TBP genes, trf2, tbp and trf1, only loss of function of trf2 results in increased LD size. Moreover, TRF2 and TAF9 regulate fatty acid composition of several classes of phospholipids. Through RNA profiling, we found that TRF2 and TAF9 affects the transcription of a common set of genes, including peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation-related genes that affect phospholipid fatty acid composition. We also found that knockdown of several TRF2 and TAF9 target genes results in large LDs, a phenotype which is similar to that of trf2 mutants. Together, these findings provide new insights into the specific role of the general transcription machinery in lipid homeostasis.

  19. Drosophila TRF2 and TAF9 regulate lipid droplet size and phospholipid fatty acid composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The general transcription factor TBP (TATA-box binding protein and its associated factors (TAFs together form the TFIID complex, which directs transcription initiation. Through RNAi and mutant analysis, we identified a specific TBP family protein, TRF2, and a set of TAFs that regulate lipid droplet (LD size in the Drosophila larval fat body. Among the three Drosophila TBP genes, trf2, tbp and trf1, only loss of function of trf2 results in increased LD size. Moreover, TRF2 and TAF9 regulate fatty acid composition of several classes of phospholipids. Through RNA profiling, we found that TRF2 and TAF9 affects the transcription of a common set of genes, including peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation-related genes that affect phospholipid fatty acid composition. We also found that knockdown of several TRF2 and TAF9 target genes results in large LDs, a phenotype which is similar to that of trf2 mutants. Together, these findings provide new insights into the specific role of the general transcription machinery in lipid homeostasis.

  20. Nontelomeric TRF2-REST Interaction Modulates Neuronal Gene Silencing and Fate of Tumor and Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Peisu; Pazin, Michael J.; Schwartz, Catherine M.; Kevin G Becker; Robert P Wersto; Dilley, Caroline M.; Mark P Mattson

    2008-01-01

    Removal of TRF2, a telomere shelterin protein, recapitulates key aspects of telomere attrition including the DNA-damage response and cell-cycle arrest [1]. Distinct from the response of proliferating cells to loss of TRF2 [2, 3], in rodent non-cycling cells, TRF2 inhibition promotes differentiation and growth [4, 5]. However, the mechanism that couples telomere gene-silencing features [6-8] to differentiation programs has yet to be elucidated. Here we describe an extra-telomeric function of T...

  1. Involvement of human ORC and TRF2 in pre-replication complex assembly at telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Yasutoshi; Ezura, Kai; Yoshida, Kazumasa; Yugawa, Takashi; Narisawa-Saito, Mako; Kiyono, Tohru; Ohta, Satoshi; Obuse, Chikashi; Fujita, Masatoshi

    2008-10-01

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) binds to replication origins to regulate the cell cycle-dependent assembly of pre-replication complexes (pre-RCs). We have found a novel link between pre-RC assembly regulation and telomere homeostasis in human cells. Biochemical analyses showed that human ORC binds to TRF2, a telomere sequence-binding protein that protects telomeres and functions in telomere length homeostasis, via the ORC1 subunit. Immunostaining further revealed that ORC and TRF2 partially co-localize in nuclei, whereas chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses confirmed that pre-RCs are assembled at telomeres in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Over-expression of TRF2 stimulated ORC and MCM binding to chromatin and RNAi-directed TRF2 silencing resulted in reduced ORC binding and pre-RC assembly at telomeres. As expected from previous reports, TRF2 silencing induced telomere elongation. Interestingly, ORC1 silencing by RNAi weakened the TRF2 binding as well as the pre-RC assembly at telomeres, suggesting that ORC and TRF2 interact with each other to achieve stable binding. Furthermore, ORC1 silencing also resulted in modest telomere elongation. These data suggest that ORC might be involved in telomere homeostasis in human cells.

  2. Human XPF controls TRF2 and telomere length maintenance through distinctive mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yili; Mitchell, Taylor R H; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2008-10-01

    XPF-ERCC1, a structure-specific endonuclease, is involved in nucleotide excision repair, crosslink repair and homologous recombination. XPF-ERCC1 is also found to interact with TRF2, a duplex telomeric DNA binding protein. We have previously shown that XPF-ERCC1 is required for TRF2-promoted telomere shortening. However, whether XPF-ERCC1 by itself has a role in telomere length maintenance has not been determined. Here we report that overexpression of XPF induces telomere shortening in XPF-proficient cells whereas XPF complementation suppresses telomere lengthening in XPF-deficient cells. These results suggest that XPF-ERCC1 can function as a negative mediator of telomere length maintenance. In addition, we find that introduction of wild type XPF into XPF-deficient cells leads to over 40% reduction in TRF2 association with telomeric DNA, indicating that XPF-ERCC1 negatively regulates TRF2 binding to telomeric DNA. Furthermore, we show that XPF carrying mutations in the conserved nuclease domain fails to control TRF2 association with telomeric DNA but it is competent for modulating telomere length maintenance. These results imply that XPF-ERCC1 controls TRF2 and telomere length maintenance through two distinctive mechanisms, with the former requiring its nuclease activity. Our results further imply that TRF2 association with telomeres may be deregulated in cells derived from XPF patients.

  3. A balanced transcription between telomerase and the telomeric DNA-binding proteins TRF1, TRF2 and Pot1 in resting, activated, HTLV-1-transformed and Tax-expressing human T lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilson Eric

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The functional state of human telomeres is controlled by telomerase and by a protein complex named shelterin, including the telomeric DNA-binding proteins TRF1, TRF2 and Pot1 involved in telomere capping functions. The expression of hTERT, encoding the catalytic subunit of telomerase, plays a crucial role in the control of lymphocyte proliferation by maintaining telomere homeostasis. It has been previously found that hTERT activity is down-regulated by the human T cell leukaemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 Tax protein in HTLV-1 transformed T lymphocytes. In this study, we have examined the effects of Tax expression on the transcriptional profile of telomerase and of shelterin in human T lymphocytes. Results We first provide evidence that the up-regulation of hTERT transcription in activated CD4+ T lymphocytes is associated with a down-regulation of that of TERF1, TERF2 and POT1 genes. Next, the down-regulation of hTERT transcription by Tax in HTLV-1 transformed or in Tax-expressing T lymphocytes is found to correlate with a significant increase of TRF2 and/or Pot1 mRNAs. Finally, ectopic expression of hTERT in one HTLV-1 T cell line induces a marked decrease in the transcription of the POT1 gene. Collectively, these observations predict that the increased transcriptional expression of shelterin genes is minimizing the impact on telomere instability induced by the down-regulation of hTERT by Tax. Conclusion These findings support the notion that Tax, telomerase and shelterin play a critical role in the proliferation of HTLV-1 transformed T lymphocytes.

  4. The effect of the TRF2 N-terminal and TRFH regions on telomeric G-quadruplex structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, Ilene M; Hayward, William; Fletcher, Terace M

    2009-04-01

    The sequence of human telomeric DNA consists of tandem repeats of 5'-d(TTAGGG)-3'. This guanine-rich DNA can form G-quadruplex secondary structures which may affect telomere maintenance. A current model for telomere protection by the telomere-binding protein, TRF2, involves the formation of a t-loop which is stabilized by a strand invasion-like reaction. This type of reaction may be affected by G-quadruplex structures. We analyzed the influence of the arginine-rich, TRF2 N-terminus (TRF2(B)), as well as this region plus the TRFH domain of TRF2 (TRF2(BH)), on the structure of G-quadruplexes. Circular dichroism results suggest that oligonucleotides with 4, 7 and 8 5'-d(TTAGGG)-3' repeats form hybrid structures, a mix of parallel/antiparallel strand orientation, in K(+). TRF2(B) stimulated the formation of parallel-stranded structures and, in some cases, intermolecular structures. TRF2(BH) also stimulated intermolecular but not parallel-stranded structures. Only full-length TRF2 and TRF2(BH) stimulated uptake of a telomeric single-stranded oligonucleotide into a plasmid containing telomeric DNA in the presence of K(+). The results in this study suggest that G-quadruplex formation inhibits oligonucleotide uptake into the plasmid, but the inhibition can be overcome by TRF2. This study is the first analysis of the effects of TRF2 domains on G-quadruplex structures and has implications for the role of G-quadruplexes and TRF2 in the formation of t-loops.

  5. Basic domain of telomere guardian TRF2 reduces D-loop unwinding whereas Rap1 restores it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necasová, Ivona; Janoušková, Eliška; Klumpler, Tomáš; Hofr, Ctirad

    2017-09-13

    Telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) folds human telomeres into loops to prevent unwanted DNA repair and chromosome end-joining. The N-terminal basic domain of TRF2 (B-domain) protects the telomeric displacement loop (D-loop) from cleavage by endonucleases. Repressor activator protein 1 (Rap1) binds TRF2 and improves telomeric DNA recognition. We found that the B-domain of TRF2 stabilized the D-loop and thus reduced unwinding by BLM and RPA, whereas the formation of the Rap1-TRF2 complex restored DNA unwinding. To understand how the B-domain of TRF2 affects DNA binding and D-loop processing, we analyzed DNA binding of full-length TRF2 and a truncated TRF2 construct lacking the B-domain. We quantified how the B-domain improves TRF2's interaction with DNA via enhanced long-range electrostatic interactions. We developed a structural envelope model of the B-domain bound on DNA. The model revealed that the B-domain is flexible in solution but becomes rigid upon binding to telomeric DNA. We proposed a mechanism for how the B-domain stabilizes the D-loop. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Expression of TRF2 and its prognostic relevance in advanced stage cervical cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, Sevgi; Tiber, Pinar Mega; Ozgen, Zerrin; Ozyurt, Hazan; Serakinci, Nedime; Orun, Oya

    2014-11-25

    Telomeres are protective caps consisted of specific tandem repeats (5'-TTAGGG-3'). Shortening of telomeres at each cell division is known as "mitotic clock" of the cells, which renders telomeres as important regulators of lifespan. TRF2 is one of the critical members of shelterin complex, which is a protein complex responsible from the preservation of cap structure, and loss or mutation of TRF2 results in DNA damage, senescence or apoptosis. Since cancer is frequently associated with aberrant cell cycle progression, defective DNA repair or apoptosis pathways, TRF2 could be one likely candidate for cancer therapy. Here we investigated the prognostic role of TRF2 levels in cervical cancer patients. Fold-induction rates were evaluated with respect to median values after real-time PCR analysis. Overall survival, distant disease-free and local recurrence-free survival rates were calculated using Kaplan-Meier long rank test. Both five year overall- and disease-free survival rates were longer in patients with higher TRF2 expression compared to lower expression, but results were not statistically significant (69.2% vs 28.9%, respectively). Mean local recurrence-free survivals (LRF) were very close ( 58.6, CI: 44.3-72.9 vs 54.5, CI: 32.1-76.9 months) for high and low expressions, respectively. Cumulative proportion of LRF at the end of five year period was 76.9% for high and 57.1% for low TRF2 expression (P = 0.75). Statistically significant difference was found between survival ratios and Bcl-xL and p53 gene expressions, but not with TRF2. A respectable correlation between TRF2 expression and apoptosis along with distant metastasis was noted (P = 0.045 and 0.036, respectively). Additionally, high TRF2 expression levels had a positive impact in five year survival rate of stage IIIB-IVA patients (P = 0.04). Our results support the role of TRF2 in apoptosis and imply a positive relation with distant metastases and survival in advanced stage patients. The

  7. The basic N-terminal domain of TRF2 limits recombination endonuclease action at human telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Léger, Adélaïde; Koelblen, Melanie; Civitelli, Livia; Bah, Amadou; Djerbi, Nadir; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina; Gilson, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The stability of mammalian telomeres depends upon TRF2, which prevents inappropriate repair and checkpoint activation. By using a plasmid integration assay in yeasts carrying humanized telomeres, we demonstrated that TRF2 possesses the intrinsic property to both stimulate initial homologous recombination events and to prevent their resolution via its basic N-terminal domain. In human cells, we further showed that this TRF2 domain prevents telomere shortening mediated by the resolvase-associated protein SLX4 as well as GEN1 and MUS81, 2 different types of endonucleases with resolvase activities. We propose that various types of resolvase activities are kept in check by the basic N-terminal domain of TRF2 in order to favor an accurate repair of the stalled forks that occur during telomere replication.

  8. TRF2-tethered TIN2 can mediate telomere protection by TPP1/POT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frescas, David; de Lange, Titia

    2014-04-01

    The shelterin protein TIN2 is required for the telomeric accumulation of TPP1/POT1 heterodimers and for the protection of telomeres by the POT1 proteins (POT1a and POT1b in the mouse). TIN2 also binds to TRF1 and TRF2, improving the telomeric localization of TRF2 and its function. Here, we ask whether TIN2 needs to interact with both TRF1 and TRF2 to mediate the telomere protection afforded by TRF2 and POT1a/b. Using a TIN2 allele deficient in TRF1 binding (TIN2-L247E), we demonstrate that TRF1 is required for optimal recruitment of TIN2 to telomeres and document phenotypes associated with the TIN2-L247E allele that are explained by insufficient TIN2 loading onto telomeres. To bypass the requirement for TRF1-dependent recruitment, we fused TIN2-L247E to the TRF2-interacting (RCT) domain of Rap1. The RCT-TIN2-L247E fusion showed improved telomeric localization and was fully functional in terms of chromosome end protection by TRF2, TPP1/POT1a, and TPP1/POT1b. These data indicate that when sufficient TIN2 is loaded onto telomeres, its interaction with TRF1 is not required to mediate the function of TRF2 and the TPP1/POT1 heterodimers. We therefore conclude that shelterin can protect chromosome ends as a TRF2-tethered TIN2/TPP1/POT1 complex that lacks a physical connection to TRF1.

  9. Partial knockdown of TRF2 increase radiosensitivity of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orun, O; Tiber, P Mega; Serakinci, N

    2016-09-01

    Telomere repeat binding factor TRF2 is a member of shelterin complex with an important role in protecting and stabilizing chromosomal ends. In the present study, we investigated the effect of partial knockdown of TRF2 on radiosensitivity of telomerase immortalized human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-telo1), which have a higher radioresistance compared to non telomerized counterpart. Partial knockdown of the protein achieved 15-20% reduction in TRF2 protein levels. The study compared the effect of 2.5Gy radiation in two-four days after irradiation for hMSC-telo1 cells and the cells transfected with siTRF2 and null control vector. Radio-response of the cells were examined using senescence associated β-Gal assay (β-Gal), colony forming assay (CFU) and γ-H2AX phosphorylation. TRF2 deficiency substantially increased radiosensitivity of cells compared to controls in both proliferation and senescence assay (2.4 fold increase in β-Gal, 1.6 fold decrease in CFU). In addition, it increased the γ-H2AX foci as revealed by both immunfluorescence and Western blot analysis. Our data suggests that partial knockdown of TRF2 in hMSC-telo1 cells cause increased γ-H2AX foci which led to fail TRF2 to protect telomeres from radiation thus TRF2 deficiency led to a 1,5-2 fold increase in the radiosensitivity of hMSC-telo1 cells through telomere destabilization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Effect of mutations in lawc/Trf2 gene on development of chromocenter and chromosome disjunction in Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorontsova, Yu E; Cherezov, R O; Simonova, O B

    2013-06-01

    In Drosophila, one of the genes of the lawc/Trf2 (leg-arista-wing complex/TBP-related factor 2) complex encodes an alternative basic transcription factor homologous to the TRF2 protein in vertebrates and human and belongs to a conservative Tbp (TATA box-binding protein) gene family. In the present study, reasons for the high frequency of chromosome nondisjunction were studied among descendants of mutants from 18 lines with a decreased expression of the TRF2 protein. It was determined that the suppression of the TRF2 expression violates the development of a compact chromocenter and the correct approach of homologous chromosomes (in germinative and somatic cells). The possibility of the participation of TRF2 in the evolutionary genetically programmed process of sex-ratio violation, which is typical of a number of animal species, is discussed.

  11. TRF2-mediated stabilization of hREST4 is critical for the differentiation and maintenance of neural progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovando-Roche, Patrick; Yu, Jason S L; Testori, Sarah; Ho, Chloe; Cui, Wei

    2014-08-01

    Telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) is a component of the shelterin complex that is known to bind and protect telomeric DNA, yet the detection of TRF2 in extra-telomeric regions of chromosomes suggests other roles for TRF2 besides telomere protection. Here, we demonstrate that TRF2 plays a critical role in antagonizing the repressive function of neuron-restrictive silencer factor, also known as repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST), during the neural differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) by enhancing the expression of a truncated REST splice isoform we term human REST4 (hREST4) due to its similarity to rodent REST4. We show that TRF2 is specifically upregulated during hESC neural differentiation concordantly with an increase in the expression of hREST4 and that both proteins are highly expressed in NPCs. Overexpression of TRF2 in hESCs increases hREST4 levels and induces their neural differentiation, whereas TRF2 knockdown in hESCs and NPCs reduces hREST4 expression, hindering their ability to differentiate to the neural lineage. Concurrently, we show that TRF2 directly interacts with the C-terminal of hREST4 through its TRF2 core binding motif [F/Y]xL, protecting hREST4 from ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation and consequently furthering neural induction. Thus, the TRF2-mediated counterbalance between hREST4 and REST is vital for both the generation and maintenance of NPCs, suggesting an important role for TRF2 in both neurogenesis and function of the central nervous system. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  12. Positive feedback between p53 and TRF2 during telomere-damage signalling and cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kaori; Horikawa, Izumi; Mondal, Abdul M; Jenkins, Lisa M Miller; Appella, Ettore; Vojtesek, Borivoj; Bourdon, Jean-Christophe; Lane, David P; Harris, Curtis C

    2010-12-01

    The telomere-capping complex shelterin protects functional telomeres and prevents the initiation of unwanted DNA-damage-response pathways. At the end of cellular replicative lifespan, uncapped telomeres lose this protective mechanism and DNA-damage signalling pathways are triggered that activate p53 and thereby induce replicative senescence. Here, we identify a signalling pathway involving p53, Siah1 (a p53-inducible E3 ubiquitin ligase) and TRF2 (telomere repeat binding factor 2; a component of the shelterin complex). Endogenous Siah1 and TRF2 were upregulated and downregulated, respectively, during replicative senescence with activated p53. Experimental manipulation of p53 expression demonstrated that p53 induces Siah1 and represses TRF2 protein levels. The p53-dependent ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation of TRF2 are attributed to the E3 ligase activity of Siah1. Knockdown of Siah1 stabilized TRF2 and delayed the onset of cellular replicative senescence, suggesting a role for Siah1 and TRF2 in p53-regulated senescence. This study reveals that p53, a downstream effector of telomere-initiated damage signalling, also functions upstream of the shelterin complex.

  13. Positive feedback between p53 and TRF2 in telomere damage signaling and cellular senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kaori; Horikawa, Izumi; Mondal, Abdul M.; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M.; Appella, Ettore; Vojtesek, Borivoj; Bourdon, Jean-Christophe; Lane, David P.; Harris, Curtis C.

    2012-01-01

    The telomere-capping complex (shelterin) protects functional telomeres from initiating unwanted DNA damage response. Uncapped telomeres at the end of cellular replicative lifespan lose this protective mechanism and trigger DNA damage signaling to activate p53 and thereby induce replicative senescence. Here we identify a signaling pathway involving p53, Siah-1, a p53-inducible E3 ubiquitin ligase, and TRF2, a component of the shelterin complex. Endogenous Siah-1 and TRF2 were up- and down-regulated, respectively, at replicative senescence with activated p53. A series of experimental manipulations of p53 showed that p53 induced Siah-1 and repressed TRF2 protein levels. The p53-dependent ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TRF2 were attributed to the E3 ligase activity of Siah-1. Siah-1 knockdown stabilized TRF2 and delayed the onset of cellular replicative senescence, suggesting the role of Siah-1 and TRF2 in p53-regulated senescence. This study reveals that p53, a downstream effector of the telomere-initiated damage signaling, also functions upstream of the shelterin complex. PMID:21057505

  14. A two-step mechanism for TRF2-mediated chromosome-end protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Keiji; Bartocci, Cristina; Ouzounov, Iliana; Diedrich, Jolene K; Yates, John R; Denchi, Eros Lazzerini

    2013-02-28

    Mammalian telomeres repress DNA-damage activation at natural chromosome ends by recruiting specific inhibitors of the DNA-damage machinery that form a protective complex termed shelterin. Within this complex, TRF2 (also known as TERF2) has a crucial role in end protection through the suppression of ATM activation and the formation of end-to-end chromosome fusions. Here we address the molecular properties of TRF2 that are both necessary and sufficient to protect chromosome ends in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Our data support a two-step mechanism for TRF2-mediated end protection. First, the dimerization domain of TRF2 is required to inhibit ATM activation, the key initial step involved in the activation of a DNA-damage response (DDR). Next, TRF2 independently suppresses the propagation of DNA-damage signalling downstream of ATM activation. This novel modulation of the DDR at telomeres occurs at the level of the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF168 (ref. 3). Inhibition of RNF168 at telomeres involves the deubiquitinating enzyme BRCC3 and the ubiquitin ligase UBR5, and is sufficient to suppress chromosome end-to-end fusions. This two-step mechanism for TRF2-mediated end protection helps to explain the apparent paradox of frequent localization of DDR proteins at functional telomeres without concurrent induction of detrimental DNA-repair activities.

  15. Analysis list: Trf2 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Trf2 Embryo + dm3 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/Trf2.1.tsv ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/Trf2.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/Trf...2.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Trf2.Embryo.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Embryo.gml ...

  16. TIPT, a male germ cell-specific partner of TRF2, is chromatin-associated and interacts with HP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancorsini, Stefano; Davidson, Irwin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2008-05-15

    The differentiation process of spermatogenesis is based on a finely timed program of transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. Male germ cells utilize specialized transcription complexes, which display specific differences in the components of the general transcription machinery. The TATA-binding protein (TBP)-related protein 2 (TRF2) is essential for progression in spermiogenesis and for the structuring of the chromocenter, an heterochromatic structure unique of round spermatids. To decipher the molecular pathways of TRF2 action, we have searched for TRF2 partners in male germ cells. We have isolated TIPT (TRF2 interacting protein in testis), a relatively small protein that associates with TRF2 with affinity comparable to TFIIA. TIPT is uniquely expressed in testis, with a developmental pattern that temporally parallels the one of TRF2. Importantly, TIPT interacts also with HP1 proteins, thereby establishing an intriguing link between transcription and chromatin condensation. Association of TIPT with either TRF2 or HP1 occurs through the C-terminal domain in a mutually exclusive manner. These findings indicate that TIPT could contribute to the precise timing of the molecular events in male germ cells, specifically by linking transcription to chromatin remodeling in round spermatids.

  17. Scanning probe microscope visualization of t-loop assembly by TRF2 in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, En-Hua; Guo, Xiao-Fe; Wang, Ju-Jun; Qin, Jing-Fen

    2005-02-01

    Telomeres are essential nucleoprotein structure at the ends of all eukaryotic chromosomes. Our previous work demonstrated that mammalian telomeres were shown to end in a large t-loop structure in vitro and the formation of t-loops was dependent on the presence of TRF2. In this work, the telomere DNA and its complex of TRF2 in HeLa cells has been direct observed in the nanometer resolution regime by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). AFM images showed that the looped structures exited in cell extract containing TRF2, but it disappeared in the protein-deleted samples. When cells were pretreated by UV light plus psoralen, the looped structure could be observed in the protein-deleted samples. SNOM images further demonstrated TRF2 and p53 proteins in cell was bound at the loop junction. Above results suggest that the telomere t-loop structure by TRF2 play a important role in cell-senescence, and might signals p53 protein directly through association with the t-loop junction in cells.

  18. [Recovery of genomic regions affecting lawc/Trf2 expression during Drosophila melanogaster development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonova, O B; Modestova, E A; Vorontsova, Iu E; Cherezov, R O

    2012-01-01

    Leg-arista-wing complex (lawc) mutations affect the expression of D. melanogaster proteins homologous to a human basic transcription factor, TBP (TATA-box binding protein) Related Factor 2 (TRF2), specifically involved in development. The paper for the first time reports the application of genetic screens for various genomic regions to recover genetic interactions between the lawc/Trf2 gene and other genes and genetic loci by using Deficiency Kit lines with small deletions in total providing maximal coverage of the genome. The deletion mapping allowed us to recover 26 genomic regions that, when deleted, are lethal or modify the mutant phenotype due to a decreased TRF2 expression level. These deletions could be useful in identifying both novel TRF2 targets and its positive and negative regulators. There is evidence that TRF2 can be a component of high molecular DNA Replication-related Element Factor (DREF)- and Nucleosome Remodeling Factor (NURF)-containing complexes. The present study for the first time reports new genetic interactions of lawc/Trf2 with genes that encode basic and specific transcription factors. In most cases, if mutated, those genes caused developmental defects or death of progeny. However, in the case of the e(y) 1 gene, coding for the Taf9 transcription factor, only the male reproductive system is impaired when the lawc/Trf2 phenotype is associated with a e(y)l gene mutation. Mutant lawc(p1)e(y)1(u1) males become infertile due to primary spermatocyte maturation arrest and impaired premeiotic chromosome condensation in germ cells.

  19. TRF2 controls telomeric nucleosome organization in a cell cycle phase-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Galati

    Full Text Available Mammalian telomeres stabilize chromosome ends as a result of their assembly into a peculiar form of chromatin comprising a complex of non-histone proteins named shelterin. TRF2, one of the shelterin components, binds to the duplex part of telomeric DNA and is essential to fold the telomeric chromatin into a protective cap. Although most of the human telomeric DNA is organized into tightly spaced nucleosomes, their role in telomere protection and how they interplay with telomere-specific factors in telomere organization is still unclear. In this study we investigated whether TRF2 can regulate nucleosome assembly at telomeres.By means of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP and Micrococcal Nuclease (MNase mapping assay, we found that the density of telomeric nucleosomes in human cells was inversely proportional to the dosage of TRF2 at telomeres. This effect was not observed in the G1 phase of the cell cycle but appeared coincident of late or post-replicative events. Moreover, we showed that TRF2 overexpression altered nucleosome spacing at telomeres increasing internucleosomal distance. By means of an in vitro nucleosome assembly system containing purified histones and remodeling factors, we reproduced the short nucleosome spacing found in telomeric chromatin. Importantly, when in vitro assembly was performed in the presence of purified TRF2, nucleosome spacing on a telomeric DNA template increased, in agreement with in vivo MNase mapping.Our results demonstrate that TRF2 negatively regulates the number of nucleosomes at human telomeres by a cell cycle-dependent mechanism that alters internucleosomal distance. These findings raise the intriguing possibility that telomere protection is mediated, at least in part, by the TRF2-dependent regulation of nucleosome organization.

  20. TRF2 controls telomeric nucleosome organization in a cell cycle phase-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galati, Alessandra; Magdinier, Frédérique; Colasanti, Valentina; Bauwens, Serge; Pinte, Sébastien; Ricordy, Ruggero; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Pusch, Miriam Caroline; Savino, Maria; Cacchione, Stefano; Gilson, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian telomeres stabilize chromosome ends as a result of their assembly into a peculiar form of chromatin comprising a complex of non-histone proteins named shelterin. TRF2, one of the shelterin components, binds to the duplex part of telomeric DNA and is essential to fold the telomeric chromatin into a protective cap. Although most of the human telomeric DNA is organized into tightly spaced nucleosomes, their role in telomere protection and how they interplay with telomere-specific factors in telomere organization is still unclear. In this study we investigated whether TRF2 can regulate nucleosome assembly at telomeres.By means of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and Micrococcal Nuclease (MNase) mapping assay, we found that the density of telomeric nucleosomes in human cells was inversely proportional to the dosage of TRF2 at telomeres. This effect was not observed in the G1 phase of the cell cycle but appeared coincident of late or post-replicative events. Moreover, we showed that TRF2 overexpression altered nucleosome spacing at telomeres increasing internucleosomal distance. By means of an in vitro nucleosome assembly system containing purified histones and remodeling factors, we reproduced the short nucleosome spacing found in telomeric chromatin. Importantly, when in vitro assembly was performed in the presence of purified TRF2, nucleosome spacing on a telomeric DNA template increased, in agreement with in vivo MNase mapping.Our results demonstrate that TRF2 negatively regulates the number of nucleosomes at human telomeres by a cell cycle-dependent mechanism that alters internucleosomal distance. These findings raise the intriguing possibility that telomere protection is mediated, at least in part, by the TRF2-dependent regulation of nucleosome organization.

  1. ERK1/2/MAPK pathway-dependent regulation of the telomeric factor TRF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picco, Vincent; Coste, Isabelle; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Renno, Toufic; Gilson, Eric; Pagès, Gilles

    2016-07-19

    Telomere stability is a hallmark of immortalized cells, including cancer cells. While the telomere length is maintained in most cases by the telomerase, the activity of a protein complex called Shelterin is required to protect telomeres against unsuitable activation of the DNA damage response pathway. Within this complex, telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) plays an essential role by blocking the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein (ATM) signaling pathway at telomeres and preventing chromosome end fusion. We showed that TRF2 was phosphorylated in vitro and in vivo on serine 323 by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) in both normal and cancer cells. Moreover, TRF2 and activated ERK1/2 unexpectedly interacted in the cytoplasm of tumor cells and human tumor tissues. The expression of non-phosphorylatable forms of TRF2 in melanoma cells induced the DNA damage response, leading to growth arrest and tumor reversion. These findings revealed that the telomere stability is under direct control of one of the major pro-oncogenic signaling pathways (RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK) via TRF2 phosphorylation.

  2. Higher order nuclear organization in growth arrest of humanmammary epithelial cells: A novel role for telomere-associated proteinTIN2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminker, Patrick; Plachot, Cedric; Kim, Sahn-Ho; Chung, Peter; Crippen, Danielle; Petersen, Ole W.; Bissell, Mina J.; Campisi, Judith; Lelievre, Sophie A.

    2004-12-15

    Nuclear organization, such as the formation of specific nuclear subdomains, is generally thought to be involved in the control of cellular phenotype; however, there are relatively few specific examples of how mammalian nuclei organize during radical changes in phenotype, such as those which occur during differentiation and growth arrest. Using human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) in which growth arrest is essential for morphological differentiation, we show that the arrest of cell proliferation is accompanied by a reorganization of the telomere-associated protein, TIN2, into one to three large nuclear subdomains. The large TIN2 domains do not contain telomeres and occur concomitant with the continued presence of TIN2 at telomeres. The TIN2 domains were sensitive to DNAse, but not RNAse, occurred frequently, but not exclusively near nucleoli, and overlapped often with dense domains containing heterochromatin protein l{gamma}. Expression of truncated forms of TIN2 simultaneously prevented the formation of TIN2 domains and relaxed the stringent morphogenesis-induced growth arrest in HMECs. Our findings reveal a novel extra-telomeric organization of TIN2 associated with the control of cell proliferation and identify TIN2 as an important regulator of mammary epithelial differentiation.

  3. A G-quadruplex structure within the 5'-UTR of TRF2 mRNA represses translation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Dennis; Guédin, Aurore; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Salles, Bernard; Riou, Jean-François; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Calsou, Patrick

    2010-11-01

    Telomeres protect chromosome ends from being recognized as double-stranded breaks. Telomeric function is ensured by the shelterin complex in which TRF2 protein is an essential player. The G-rich strand of telomere DNA can fold into G-quadruplex (G4) structure. Small molecules stabilizing G4 structures, named G4 ligands, have been shown to alter telomeric functions in human cells. In this study, we show that a guanine-rich RNA sequence located in the 5'-UTR region of the TRF2 mRNA (hereafter 91TRF2G) is capable of forming a stable quadruplex that causes a 2.8-fold decrease in the translation of a reporter gene in human cells, as compared to a mutant 5'-UTR unable to fold into G4. We also demonstrate that several highly selective G4 ligands, the pyridine dicarboxamide derivative 360A and bisquinolinium compounds Phen-DC(3) and Phen-DC(6), are able to bind the 91TRF2G:RNA sequence and to modulate TRF2 protein translation in vitro. Since the naturally occurring 5'-UTR TRF2:RNA G4 element was used here, which is conserved in several vertebrate orthologs, the present data substantiate a potential translational mechanism mediated by a G4 RNA motif for the downregulation of TRF2 expression.

  4. TRF2 binds branched DNA to safeguard telomere integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutz, Isabelle; Timashev, Leonid; Xie, Wei; Patel, Dinshaw J; de Lange, Titia

    2017-09-01

    Although t-loops protect telomeres, they are at risk of cleavage by Holliday junction (HJ) resolvases if branch migration converts the three-way t-loop junction into four-way HJs. T-loop cleavage is repressed by the TRF2 basic domain, which binds three- and four-way junctions and protects HJs in vitro. By replacing the basic domain with bacterial-protein domains binding three- and four-way junctions, we demonstrated the in vivo relevance of branched-DNA binding. Branched-DNA binding also repressed PARP1, presumably by masking the PARP1 site in the t-loop junction. Although PARP1 recruits HJ resolvases and promotes t-loop cleavage, PARP1 activation alone did not result in t-loop cleavage, thus suggesting that the basic domain also prevents formation of HJs. Concordantly, removal of HJs by BLM helicase mitigated t-loop cleavage in response to loss of the basic domain. We propose that TRF2 masks and stabilizes the t-loop three-way junction, thereby protecting telomeres from detrimental deletions and PARP1 activation.

  5. TRF2 acts as a transcriptional regulator in tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maï, Mounir El; Wagner, Kay-Dietrich; Michiels, Jean-François; Gilson, Eric; Wagner, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    We recently showed that telomeric repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) regulates gene expression to promote angiogenesis. We found that TRF2 is highly expressed in tumor vessels and transcriptionally activates platelet-derived growth factor receptor β to promote endothelial cell angiogenic properties independently of its function in telomere protection. This work identifies TRF2 as a promising dual target for cancer therapy.

  6. TRF2: TRansForming the view of general transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehavi, Yonathan; Kedmi, Adi; Ideses, Diana; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is pivotal for development and differentiation of organisms. Transcription of eukaryotic protein-coding genes by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) initiates at the core promoter. Core promoters, which encompass the transcription start site, may contain functional core promoter elements, such as the TATA box, initiator, TCT and downstream core promoter element. TRF2 (TATA-box-binding protein-related factor 2) does not bind TATA box-containing promoters. Rather, it is recruited to core promoters via sequences other than the TATA box. We review the recent findings implicating TRF2 as a basal transcription factor in the regulation of diverse biological processes and specialized transcriptional programs.

  7. TRF2 recruits RTEL1 to telomeres in S phase to promote t-loop unwinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarek, Grzegorz; Vannier, Jean-Baptiste; Panier, Stephanie; Petrini, John H J; Boulton, Simon J

    2015-02-19

    The helicase RTEL1 promotes t-loop unwinding and suppresses telomere fragility to maintain the integrity of vertebrate telomeres. An interaction between RTEL1 and PCNA is important to prevent telomere fragility, but how RTEL1 engages with the telomere to promote t-loop unwinding is unclear. Here, we establish that the shelterin protein TRF2 recruits RTEL1 to telomeres in S phase, which is required to prevent catastrophic t-loop processing by structure-specific nucleases. We show that the TRF2-RTEL1 interaction is mediated by a metal-coordinating C4C4 motif in RTEL1, which is compromised by the Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome (HHS) mutation, RTEL1(R1264H). Conversely, we define a TRF2(I124D) substitution mutation within the TRFH domain of TRF2, which eliminates RTEL1 binding and phenocopies the RTEL1(R1264H) mutation, giving rise to aberrant t-loop excision, telomere length heterogeneity, and loss of the telomere as a circle. These results implicate TRF2 in the recruitment of RTEL1 to facilitate t-loop disassembly at telomeres in S phase. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of the TRF2 N-terminal and TRFH regions on telomeric G-quadruplex structures

    OpenAIRE

    Pedroso, Ilene M.; Hayward, William; Fletcher, Terace M.

    2009-01-01

    The sequence of human telomeric DNA consists of tandem repeats of 5?-d(TTAGGG)-3?. This guanine-rich DNA can form G-quadruplex secondary structures which may affect telomere maintenance. A current model for telomere protection by the telomere-binding protein, TRF2, involves the formation of a t-loop which is stabilized by a strand invasion-like reaction. This type of reaction may be affected by G-quadruplex structures. We analyzed the influence of the arginine-rich, TRF2 N-terminus (TRF2B), a...

  9. XPF with mutations in its conserved nuclease domain is defective in DNA repair but functions in TRF2-mediated telomere shortening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yili; Zacal, Natalie J; Rainbow, Andrew J; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2007-02-04

    TRF2, a telomere-binding protein, is a crucial player in telomere length maintenance. Overexpression of TRF2 results in telomere shortening in both normal primary fibroblasts and telomerase-positive cancer cells. TRF2 is found to be associated with XPF-ERCC1, a structure-specific endonuclease involved in nucleotide excision repair, crosslink repair and DNA recombination. XPF-ERCC1 is implicated in TRF2-dependent telomere loss in mouse keratinocytes, however, whether XPF-ERCC1 and its nuclease activity are required for TRF2-mediated telomere shortening in human cells is unknown. Here we report that TRF2-induced telomere shortening is abrogated in human cells deficient in XPF, demonstrating that XPF-ERCC1 is required for TRF2-promoted telomere shortening. To further understand the role of XPF in TRF2-dependent telomere shortening, we generated constructs containing either wild type XPF or mutant XPF proteins carrying amino acid substitutions in its conserved nuclease domain. We show that wild type XPF can complement XPF-deficient cells for repair of UV-induced DNA damage whereas the nuclease-inactive XPF proteins fail to do so, indicating that the nuclease activity of XPF is essential for nucleotide excision repair. In contrast, both wild type XPF and nuclease-inactive XPF proteins, when expressed in XPF-deficient cells, are able to rescue TRF2-mediated telomere shortening. Thus, our results suggest that the function of XPF in TRF2-mediated telomere shortening is conserved between mouse and human. Furthermore, our findings reveal an unanticipated nuclease-independent function of XPF in TRF2-mediated telomere shortening.

  10. The N-terminal domains of TRF1 and TRF2 regulate their ability to condense telomeric DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, Anaïs; Pisano, Sabrina; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Pei, Bei; Tauran, Yannick; Haftek-Terreau, Zofia; Brunet, Frédéric; Le Bihan, Yann-Vaï; Ledu, Marie-Hélène; Montel, Fabien; Hugo, Nicolas; Amiard, Simon; Argoul, Françoise; Chaboud, Annie; Gilson, Eric; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe

    2012-03-01

    TRF1 and TRF2 are key proteins in human telomeres, which, despite their similarities, have different behaviors upon DNA binding. Previous work has shown that unlike TRF1, TRF2 condenses telomeric, thus creating consequential negative torsion on the adjacent DNA, a property that is thought to lead to the stimulation of single-strand invasion and was proposed to favor telomeric DNA looping. In this report, we show that these activities, originating from the central TRFH domain of TRF2, are also displayed by the TRFH domain of TRF1 but are repressed in the full-length protein by the presence of an acidic domain at the N-terminus. Strikingly, a similar repression is observed on TRF2 through the binding of a TERRA-like RNA molecule to the N-terminus of TRF2. Phylogenetic and biochemical studies suggest that the N-terminal domains of TRF proteins originate from a gradual extension of the coding sequences of a duplicated ancestral gene with a consequential progressive alteration of the biochemical properties of these proteins. Overall, these data suggest that the N-termini of TRF1 and TRF2 have evolved to finely regulate their ability to condense DNA.

  11. A higher-order entity formed by the flexible assembly of RAP1 with TRF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaullier, Guillaume; Miron, Simona; Pisano, Sabrina; Buisson, Rémi; Le Bihan, Yann-Vaï; Tellier-Lebègue, Carine; Messaoud, Wala; Roblin, Pierre; Guimarães, Beatriz G; Thai, Robert; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Gilson, Eric; Le Du, Marie-Hélène

    2016-02-29

    Telomere integrity is essential to maintain genome stability, and telomeric dysfunctions are associated with cancer and aging pathologies. In human, the shelterin complex binds TTAGGG DNA repeats and provides capping to chromosome ends. Within shelterin, RAP1 is recruited through its interaction with TRF2, and TRF2 is required for telomere protection through a network of nucleic acid and protein interactions. RAP1 is one of the most conserved shelterin proteins although one unresolved question is how its interaction may influence TRF2 properties and regulate its capacity to bind multiple proteins. Through a combination of biochemical, biophysical and structural approaches, we unveiled a unique mode of assembly between RAP1 and TRF2. The complete interaction scheme between the full-length proteins involves a complex biphasic interaction of RAP1 that directly affects the binding properties of the assembly. These results reveal how a non-DNA binding protein can influence the properties of a DNA-binding partner by mutual conformational adjustments. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Post-translational modifications of TRF1 and TRF2 and their roles in telomere maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, John R; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2012-06-01

    Telomeres, heterochromatic structures, found at the ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes, function to protect natural chromosome ends from nucleolytic attack. Human telomeric DNA is bound by a telomere-specific six-subunit protein complex, termed shelterin/telosome. The shelterin subunits TRF1 and TRF2 bind in a sequence-specific manner to double-stranded telomeric DNA, providing a vital platform for recruitment of additional shelterin proteins as well as non-shelterin factors crucial for the maintenance of telomere length and structure. Both TRF1 and TRF2 are engaged in multiple roles at telomeres including telomere protection, telomere replication, sister telomere resolution and telomere length maintenance. Regulation of TRF1 and TRF2 in these various processes is controlled by post-translational modifications, at times in a cell-cycle-dependent manner, affecting key functions such as DNA binding, dimerization, localization, degradation and interactions with other proteins. Here we review the post-translational modifications of TRF1 and TRF2 and discuss the mechanisms by which these modifications contribute to the function of these two proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Super-resolution fluorescence imaging of telomeres reveals TRF2-dependent T-loop formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doksani, Ylli; Wu, John Y; de Lange, Titia; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2013-10-10

    We have applied a super-resolution fluorescence imaging method, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), to visualize the structure of functional telomeres and telomeres rendered dysfunctional through removal of shelterin proteins. The STORM images showed that functional telomeres frequently exhibit a t-loop configuration. Conditional deletion of individual components of shelterin showed that TRF2 was required for the formation and/or maintenance of t-loops, whereas deletion of TRF1, Rap1, or the POT1 proteins (POT1a and POT1b) had no effect on the frequency of t-loop occurrence. Within the shelterin complex, TRF2 uniquely serves to protect telomeres from two pathways that are initiated on free DNA ends: classical nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and ATM-dependent DNA damage signaling. The TRF2-dependent remodeling of telomeres into t-loop structures, which sequester the ends of chromosomes, can explain why NHEJ and the ATM signaling pathway are repressed when TRF2 is present. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. TRF2-Mediated Control of Telomere DNA Topology as a Mechanism for Chromosome-End Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benarroch-Popivker, Delphine; Pisano, Sabrina; Mendez-Bermudez, Aaron; Lototska, Liudmyla; Kaur, Parminder; Bauwens, Serge; Djerbi, Nadir; Latrick, Chrysa M; Fraisier, Vincent; Pei, Bei; Gay, Alexandre; Jaune, Emilie; Foucher, Kevin; Cherfils-Vicini, Julien; Aeby, Eric; Miron, Simona; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Ye, Jing; Le Du, Marie-Hélène; Wang, Hong; Gilson, Eric; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe

    2016-01-21

    The shelterin proteins protect telomeres against activation of the DNA damage checkpoints and recombinational repair. We show here that a dimer of the shelterin subunit TRF2 wraps ∼ 90 bp of DNA through several lysine and arginine residues localized around its homodimerization domain. The expression of a wrapping-deficient TRF2 mutant, named Top-less, alters telomeric DNA topology, decreases the number of terminal loops (t-loops), and triggers the ATM checkpoint, while still protecting telomeres against non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). In Top-less cells, the protection against NHEJ is alleviated if the expression of the TRF2-interacting protein RAP1 is reduced. We conclude that a distinctive topological state of telomeric DNA, controlled by the TRF2-dependent DNA wrapping and linked to t-loop formation, inhibits both ATM activation and NHEJ. The presence of RAP1 at telomeres appears as a backup mechanism to prevent NHEJ when topology-mediated telomere protection is impaired. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. TRF2 and the evolution of the bilateria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duttke, Sascha H C; Doolittle, Russell F; Wang, Yuan-Liang; Kadonaga, James T

    2014-01-01

    .... For instance, TBP activates TATA-box-dependent core promoters, whereas TBP-related factor 2 (TRF2) activates TATA-less core promoters that are dependent on a TCT or downstream core promoter element...

  16. TRF2 is recruited to the pre-initiation complex as a testis-specific subunit of TFIIA/ALF to promote haploid cell gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martianov, Igor; Velt, Amandine; Davidson, Guillaume; Choukrallah, Mohamed-Amin; Davidson, Irwin

    2016-08-31

    Mammalian genomes encode two genes related to the TATA-box binding protein (TBP), TBP-related factors 2 and 3 (TRF2 and TRF3). Male Trf2(-/-) mice are sterile and characterized by arrested spermatogenesis at the transition from late haploid spermatids to early elongating spermatids. Despite this characterization, the molecular function of murine Trf2 remains poorly characterized and no direct evidence exists to show that it acts as a bona fide chromatin-bound transcription factor. We show here that Trf2 forms a stable complex with TFIIA or the testis expressed paralogue ALF chaperoned in the cytoplasm by heat shock proteins. We demonstrate for the first time that Trf2 is recruited to active haploid cell promoters together with Tbp, Taf7l and RNA polymerase II. RNA-seq analysis identifies a set of genes activated in haploid spermatids during the first wave of spermatogenesis whose expression is down-regulated by Trf2 inactivation. We therefore propose that Trf2 is recruited to the preinitiation complex as a testis-specific subunit of TFIIA/ALF that cooperates with Tbp and Taf7l to promote haploid cell gene expression.

  17. Expression of Telomere Repeat Binding Factor 1 and TRF2 in Prostate Cancer and Correlation with Clinical Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Wang, Yong; Li, Fei; Lin, Wei; Liang, Yong; Ma, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of telomere repeat binding factor 1 (TRF1) and TRF2 in prostate cancer and their relationships with clinicopathological features. In total 50 prostate cancer tissues and paired benign prostate hyperplasia tissues were analyzed. The telomere-binding proteins TRF1 and TRF2 were measured using immunohistochemical method. Correlation analyses were used to evaluate the association between immunohistochemical score and clinical parameters. The expression of TRF1 was significantly higher in prostate cancer tissue than in benign prostate hyperplasia tissue (χ(2) = 62.69, P TRF2 were observed in both prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia tissue (χ(2) = 1.13, P = 0.76). TRF1 expression was significantly positively correlated with surgical capsular invasion (Spearman's r = 0.43, P = 0.002), seminal vesicle invasion (Spearman's r = 0.35, P = 0.01), lymph nodes metastases (Spearman's r = 0.41, P = 0.003), total prostate specific antigen (r = 0.61, P TRF2 were overexpressed in prostate cancer. There was no specificity of TRF2 in prostate cancer, while TRF1 may be associated with prostate cancer progression.

  18. TRF1 and TRF2 binding to telomeres is modulated by nucleosomal organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galati, Alessandra; Micheli, Emanuela; Alicata, Claudia; Ingegnere, Tiziano; Cicconi, Alessandro; Pusch, Miriam Caroline; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Gilson, Eric; Cacchione, Stefano

    2015-07-13

    The ends of eukaryotic chromosomes need to be protected from the activation of a DNA damage response that leads the cell to replicative senescence or apoptosis. In mammals, protection is accomplished by a six-factor complex named shelterin, which organizes the terminal TTAGGG repeats in a still ill-defined structure, the telomere. The stable interaction of shelterin with telomeres mainly depends on the binding of two of its components, TRF1 and TRF2, to double-stranded telomeric repeats. Tethering of TRF proteins to telomeres occurs in a chromatin environment characterized by a very compact nucleosomal organization. In this work we show that binding of TRF1 and TRF2 to telomeric sequences is modulated by the histone octamer. By means of in vitro models, we found that TRF2 binding is strongly hampered by the presence of telomeric nucleosomes, whereas TRF1 binds efficiently to telomeric DNA in a nucleosomal context and is able to remodel telomeric nucleosomal arrays. Our results indicate that the different behavior of TRF proteins partly depends on the interaction with histone tails of their divergent N-terminal domains. We propose that the interplay between the histone octamer and TRF proteins plays a role in the steps leading to telomere deprotection. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Disruption of direct 3D telomere-TRF2 interaction through two molecularly disparate mechanisms is a hallmark of primary Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Hans; Johnson, Nathalie A; Haliotis, Tina; Lichtensztejn, Daniel; Mai, Sabine

    2017-07-01

    In classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL), specific changes in the 3D telomere organization cause progression from mononuclear Hodgkin cells (H) to multinucleated Reed-Sternberg cells (RS). In a post-germinal center B-cell in vitro model, permanent latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) expression, as observed in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated cHL, results in multinuclearity and complex chromosomal aberrations through downregulation of key element of the shelterin complex, the telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2). Thus, we hypothesized that the three-dimensional (3D) telomere-TRF2 interaction was progressively disturbed during transition from H to RS cells. To this end, we developed and applied for the first time a combined quantitative 3D TRF2-telomere immune fluorescent in situ hybridization (3D TRF2/Telo-Q-FISH) technique to monolayers of primary H and RS cells, and adjacent benign internal control lymphocytes of lymph node biopsy suspensions from diagnostic lymph node biopsies of 14 patients with cHL. We show that H and RS cells are characterized by two distinct patterns of disruption of 3D telomere-TRF2 interaction. Disruption pattern A is defined by massive attrition of telomere signals and a considerable increase of TRF2 signals not associated with telomeres. This pattern is restricted to EBV-negative cHL. Disruption pattern B is defined by telomere de-protection due to an impressive loss of TRF2 signals, physically linked to telomeres. This pattern is typical of, but is not restricted to, LMP1+EBV-associated cHL. In the disruption pattern B group, so-called 'ghost' end-stage RS cells, void of both TRF2 and telomere signals, were identified, whether or not associated with EBV. Our findings demonstrate that two molecularly disparate mechanisms converge on the level of 3D telomere-TRF2 interaction in the formation of RS cells.

  20. Cleavage of TFIIA by Taspase1 activates TRF2-specified mammalian male germ cell programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Toshinao; Sasagawa, Satoru; Takeda, Shugaku; Hess, Rex A; Lieberman, Paul M; Cheng, Emily H; Hsieh, James J

    2013-10-28

    The evolution of tissue-specific general transcription factors (GTFs), such as testis-specific TBP-related factor 2 (TRF2), enables the spatiotemporal expression of highly specialized genetic programs. Taspase1 is a protease that cleaves nuclear factors MLL1, MLL2, TFIIAα-β, and ALFα-β (TFIIAτ). Here, we demonstrate that Taspase1-mediated processing of TFIIAα-β drives mammalian spermatogenesis. Both Taspase1(-/-) and noncleavable TFIIAα-βnc/nc testes release immature germ cells with impaired transcription of Transition proteins (Tnp) and Protamines (Prm), exhibiting chromatin compaction defects and recapitulating those observed with TRF2(-/-) testes. Although the unprocessed TFIIA still complexes with TRF2, this complex is impaired in targeting and thus activating Tnp1 and Prm1 promoters. The current study presents a paradigm in which a protease (Taspase1) cleaves a ubiquitously expressed GTF (TFIIA) to enable tissue-specific (testis) transcription, meeting the demand for sophisticated regulation of distinct subsets of genes in higher organisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. DNA damage accumulation and TRF2 degradation in atypical Werner syndrome fibroblasts with LMNA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bidisha; Zitnik, Galynn; Johnson, Simon; Nguyen, Quyen; Risques, Rosa A; Martin, George M; Oshima, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase), did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, γ-H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage) in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening.

  2. DNA Damage Accumulation and TRF2 Degradation in Atypical Werner Syndrome Fibroblasts with LMNA mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidisha eSaha

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome (AWS, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT, did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, -H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening.

  3. TRF2-RAP1 is required to protect telomeres from engaging in homologous recombination-mediated deletions and fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Rekha; Chen, Yong; Lei, Ming; Chang, Sandy

    2016-03-04

    Repressor/activator protein 1 (RAP1) is a highly conserved telomere-interacting protein. Yeast Rap1 protects telomeres from non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), plays important roles in telomere length control and is involved in transcriptional gene regulation. However, a role for mammalian RAP1 in telomere end protection remains controversial. Here we present evidence that mammalian RAP1 is essential to protect telomere from homology directed repair (HDR) of telomeres. RAP1 cooperates with the basic domain of TRF2 (TRF2(B)) to repress PARP1 and SLX4 localization to telomeres. Without RAP1 and TRF2(B), PARP1 and SLX4 HR factors promote rapid telomere resection, resulting in catastrophic telomere loss and the generation of telomere-free chromosome fusions in both mouse and human cells. The RAP1 Myb domain is required to repress both telomere loss and formation of telomere-free fusions. Our results highlight the importance of the RAP1-TRF2 heterodimer in protecting telomeres from inappropriate processing by the HDR pathway.

  4. [Inhibitory effect of interference hTERT and TRF2 gene on the growth of breast cancer MCF-7 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-kun; Liu, Lan; Shui, Qin-lin; Yu, Hong; Zeng, Yong-qiu; Zhao, Jiao

    2010-02-01

    To explore the effect of combined gene therapy with interference hTERT and TRF2 gene on the treatment of breast cancer. Recombinant adenovirus rAd-hTERT and rAd-TRF2 expressing siRNA-hTERT and siRNA-TRF2 was constructed, and the vectors were transfected into MCF-7 cells. Than the expressions of hTERT and TRF2 proteins were detected by Western blot, the inhibition of MCF-7 cell proliferation by MTT colorimetry, and the changes of MCF-7 cell cycle by flow cytometry and the colony forming ability of MCF-7 cells by clone form test. At 48 h after transfection, the relative expression amounts of hTERT protein of the PBS control group, rAd-blank group, rAd-HK control group, rAd-hTERT group, rAd-TRF2 group and rAd-hTERT and rAd-TRF2 group were 1.00, 0.94 +/- 0.02, 0.95 +/- 0.04, 0.18 +/- 0.04, 0.95 +/- 0.01 and 0.18 +/- 0.04, respectively. The relative expression amounts of TRF2 protein were 1.00, 1.01 +/- 0.08, 0.96 +/- 0.02, 0.95 +/- 0.08, 0.22 +/- 0.01 and 0.26 +/- 0.02, respectively. After transfection of rAd-hTERT or rAd-TRF2 into MCF-7 cells separately, the inhibition rate of cell proliferation was only 54.6% and 48.4%, there was 8.9% +/- 1.2% or 9.2% +/- 2.3% of MCF-7 cells into M phase, 66.4% +/- 1.5% or 64.6% +/- 1.9% of MCF-7 cells was arrested at G(0)/G(1) phase, and the cell colony forming ability was decreased significantly (cell colony number from 100 in PBS control group down to 41.3 +/- 5.1 and 43.7 +/- 6.4). But after transfection by rAd-hTERT and rAd-TRF2 simultaneously, the inhibition rate of cell proliferation was about 82.1%, and M phase cells was significantly reduced to 4.4% +/- 1.2%. Large numbers of cells were arrested at G(0)/G(1) phase (81.4% +/- 1.3%), and the cell colony forming ability was more significantly decreased (cell colony number there were only 29.2 +/- 3.9). More effective effect of tumor gene therapy can be achieved by combination of interference hTERT and TRF2 genes as compared with interference by either of the single gene alone.

  5. Nucleolar and coiled-body phosphoprotein 1 (NOLC1) regulates the nucleolar retention of TRF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fuwen; Li, Guodong; Tong, Tanjun

    2017-01-01

    Telomeric repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) was reported to localize in the nucleolus of human cells in a cell cycle-dependent manner; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we found that nucleolar and coiled-body phosphoprotein 1 (NOLC1) interacted with TRF2 and mediated the shuttling of TRF2 between the nucleolus and nucleus in human 293T and HepG2 cells. Ablation of NOLC1 expression increased the number of nuclear TRF2 foci and decreased the nucleolar level of TRF2. Conversely, NOLC1 overexpression promoted the nucleolar accumulation of TRF2. NOLC1 overexpression also increased the number of 53BP1 foci and induced the DNA damage response. In addition, co-expression of TRF2 rescued NOLC1 overexpression-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  6. Expression of Telomere Repeat Binding Factor 1 and TRF2 in Prostate Cancer and Correlation with Clinical Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of telomere repeat binding factor 1 (TRF1 and TRF2 in prostate cancer and their relationships with clinicopathological features. Methods. In total 50 prostate cancer tissues and paired benign prostate hyperplasia tissues were analyzed. The telomere-binding proteins TRF1 and TRF2 were measured using immunohistochemical method. Correlation analyses were used to evaluate the association between immunohistochemical score and clinical parameters. Results. The expression of TRF1 was significantly higher in prostate cancer tissue than in benign prostate hyperplasia tissue (χ2 = 62.69, P<0.01. Elevated levels of TRF2 were observed in both prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia tissue (χ2 = 1.13, P=0.76. TRF1 expression was significantly positively correlated with surgical capsular invasion (Spearman’s r=0.43, P=0.002, seminal vesicle invasion (Spearman’s r=0.35, P=0.01, lymph nodes metastases (Spearman’s r=0.41, P=0.003, total prostate specific antigen (r=0.61, P<0.05, and Gleason score (r=0.47, P=0.01. However, there were no significant statistical differences between prostate volume (r=0.06, P=0.75 and age (r=0.14, P=0.09. Conclusion. Both TRF1 and TRF2 were overexpressed in prostate cancer. There was no specificity of TRF2 in prostate cancer, while TRF1 may be associated with prostate cancer progression.

  7. TRF1 and TRF2 differentially modulate Rad51-mediated telomeric and nontelomeric displacement loop formation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Brian D; Griffith, Jack D

    2014-09-02

    A growing body of literature suggests that the homologous recombination/repair (HR) pathway cooperates with components of the shelterin complex to promote both telomere maintenance and nontelomeric HR. This may be due to the ability of both HR and shelterin proteins to promote strand invasion, wherein a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) substrate base pairs with a homologous double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) template displacing a loop of ssDNA (D-loop). Rad51 recombinase catalyzes D-loop formation during HR, and telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) catalyzes the formation of a telomeric D-loop that stabilizes a looped structure in telomeric DNA (t-loop) that may facilitate telomere protection. We have characterized this functional interaction in vitro using a fluorescent D-loop assay measuring the incorporation of Cy3-labeled 90-nucleotide telomeric and nontelomeric substrates into telomeric and nontelomeric plasmid templates. We report that preincubation of a telomeric template with TRF2 inhibits the ability of Rad51 to promote telomeric D-loop formation upon preincubation with a telomeric substrate. This suggests Rad51 does not facilitate t-loop formation and suggests a mechanism whereby TRF2 can inhibit HR at telomeres. We also report a TRF2 mutant lacking the dsDNA binding domain promotes Rad51-mediated nontelomeric D-loop formation, possibly explaining how TRF2 promotes nontelomeric HR. Finally, we report telomere repeat binding factor 1 (TRF1) promotes Rad51-mediated telomeric D-loop formation, which may facilitate HR-mediated replication fork restart and explain why TRF1 is required for efficient telomere replication.

  8. TRF2 is required for repair of nontelomeric DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiyong; Seluanov, Andrei; Jiang, Ying; Gorbunova, Vera

    2007-08-07

    TRF2 (telomeric repeat binding factor 2) is an essential component of the telomeric cap, where it forms and stabilizes the T-loop junctions. TRF2 forms the T-loops by stimulating strand invasion of the 3' overhang into duplex DNA. TRF2 also has been shown to localize to nontelomeric DNA double-strand breaks, but its functional role in DNA repair has not been examined. Here, we present evidence that TRF2 is involved in homologous recombination (HR) repair of nontelomeric double-strand breaks. Depletion of TRF2 strongly inhibited HR and delayed the formation of Rad51 foci after gamma-irradiation, whereas overexpression of TRF2 stimulated HR. Depletion of TRF2 had no effect on nonhomologous end-joining, and overexpression of TRF2 inhibited nonhomologous end-joining. We propose, based on our results and on the ability of TRF2 to mediate strand invasion, that TRF2 plays an essential role in HR by facilitating the formation of early recombination intermediates.

  9. Methylated TRF2 associates with the nuclear matrix and serves as a potential biomarker for cellular senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Taylor R. H.; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Methylation of N-terminal arginines of the shelterin component TRF2 is important for cellular proliferation. While TRF2 is found at telomeres, where it plays an essential role in maintaining telomere integrity, little is known about the cellular localization of methylated TRF2. Here we report that the majority of methylated TRF2 is resistant to extraction by high salt buffer and DNase I treatment, indicating that methylated TRF2 is tightly associated with the nuclear matrix. We show that meth...

  10. TRF2 is required for repair of nontelomeric DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Zhiyong; Seluanov, Andrei; Jiang, Ying; Gorbunova, Vera

    2007-01-01

    TRF2 (telomeric repeat binding factor 2) is an essential component of the telomeric cap, where it forms and stabilizes the T-loop junctions. TRF2 forms the T-loops by stimulating strand invasion of the 3′ overhang into duplex DNA. TRF2 also has been shown to localize to nontelomeric DNA double-strand breaks, but its functional role in DNA repair has not been examined. Here, we present evidence that TRF2 is involved in homologous recombination (HR) repair of nontelomeric double-strand breaks. ...

  11. Over-expression of telomere binding factors (TRF1 & TRF2) in renal cell carcinoma and their inhibition by using SiRNA induce apoptosis, reduce cell proliferation and migration invitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Deeksha; Sharma, Ujjawal; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Kakkar, Nandita; Prasad, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    Telomere binding factors viz. TRF1 and TRF2 are a part of sheltrin complex that are present exclusively at the ends of chromosomes. These factors play an important role in maintaining chromosomal integrity at the ends. However, their status and role are not clear in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Therefore, the present study was conducted to evaluate TRF1 and TRF2 expressions in RCC tissues. Further, the role of these factors involved in tumorigenesis was elucidated by gene silencing using siRNA in RCC cell line (A498). The present study documented a significant over-expression of TRF1 (P = 0.005) and TRF2 (P = 0.0048) mRNAs by real time PCR in RCC tissues as compared with adjacent normal kidney tissues. Immunohistochemistry studies also revealed higher expression of TRF1 and TRF2 proteins in RCC. Moreover, TRF1 or TRF2 gene silencing using siRNA showed marked reduction in proliferation of RCC cells (P = 0.000). Further, significantly induced cell cycle arrest (P = 0.000) and apoptosis of RCC cells (P = 0.000) was documented upon TRF1 or TRF2 gene silencing. Henceforth, the results deduce that TRF1 or TRF2 inhibitions play an important role in the induction of apoptosis in A498 cells, which may serve as a potential therapeutic target in RCC.

  12. Over-expression of telomere binding factors (TRF1 & TRF2 in renal cell carcinoma and their inhibition by using SiRNA induce apoptosis, reduce cell proliferation and migration invitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeksha Pal

    Full Text Available Telomere binding factors viz. TRF1 and TRF2 are a part of sheltrin complex that are present exclusively at the ends of chromosomes. These factors play an important role in maintaining chromosomal integrity at the ends. However, their status and role are not clear in renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Therefore, the present study was conducted to evaluate TRF1 and TRF2 expressions in RCC tissues. Further, the role of these factors involved in tumorigenesis was elucidated by gene silencing using siRNA in RCC cell line (A498. The present study documented a significant over-expression of TRF1 (P = 0.005 and TRF2 (P = 0.0048 mRNAs by real time PCR in RCC tissues as compared with adjacent normal kidney tissues. Immunohistochemistry studies also revealed higher expression of TRF1 and TRF2 proteins in RCC. Moreover, TRF1 or TRF2 gene silencing using siRNA showed marked reduction in proliferation of RCC cells (P = 0.000. Further, significantly induced cell cycle arrest (P = 0.000 and apoptosis of RCC cells (P = 0.000 was documented upon TRF1 or TRF2 gene silencing. Henceforth, the results deduce that TRF1 or TRF2 inhibitions play an important role in the induction of apoptosis in A498 cells, which may serve as a potential therapeutic target in RCC.

  13. Expression of TRF2 and GAPDH in the aging of the in vitro ovarian surface epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Chuaire-Noack

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available GAPDH can bind single-strand telomere DNA both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, it was hypothesised that GAPDH has an important role in protecting the telomeres, role that could be shared with TRF2, a well-known telomeric protein involved in a myriad of functions related to telomere homeostasis. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine if there was a correlation between the expression of these genes in the in vitro ovarian surface epithelium. Materials and methods: The relative expression of each gene was established by qRT-PCR in primary cell cultures of the ovarian surface epithelium from 22 healthy mestizo Colombian donors. Results: The Kendall and Spearman non-parametric tests established a significant correlation between the levels of expression in subsequent passages of the cell line, in an age-independent way. Conclusion: Our findings suggest a synergistic effect between TRF2 and GAPDH that could counter telomere shortening in vitro.

  14. TRF2 inhibits a cell-extrinsic pathway through which natural killer cells eliminate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biroccio, Annamaria; Cherfils-Vicini, Julien; Augereau, Adeline; Pinte, Sébastien; Bauwens, Serge; Ye, Jing; Simonet, Thomas; Horard, Béatrice; Jamet, Karine; Cervera, Ludovic; Mendez-Bermudez, Aaron; Poncet, Delphine; Grataroli, Renée; de Rodenbeeke, Claire T'kint; Salvati, Erica; Rizzo, Angela; Zizza, Pasquale; Ricoul, Michelle; Cognet, Céline; Kuilman, Thomas; Duret, Helene; Lépinasse, Florian; Marvel, Jacqueline; Verhoeyen, Els; Cosset, François-Loïc; Peeper, Daniel; Smyth, Mark J; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Sabatier, Laure; Picco, Vincent; Pages, Gilles; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Stoppacciaro, Antonella; Leonetti, Carlo; Vivier, Eric; Gilson, Eric

    2013-07-01

    Dysfunctional telomeres suppress tumour progression by activating cell-intrinsic programs that lead to growth arrest. Increased levels of TRF2, a key factor in telomere protection, are observed in various human malignancies and contribute to oncogenesis. We demonstrate here that a high level of TRF2 in tumour cells decreased their ability to recruit and activate natural killer (NK) cells. Conversely, a reduced dose of TRF2 enabled tumour cells to be more easily eliminated by NK cells. Consistent with these results, a progressive upregulation of TRF2 correlated with decreased NK cell density during the early development of human colon cancer. By screening for TRF2-bound genes, we found that HS3ST4--a gene encoding for the heparan sulphate (glucosamine) 3-O-sulphotransferase 4--was regulated by TRF2 and inhibited the recruitment of NK cells in an epistatic relationship with TRF2. Overall, these results reveal a TRF2-dependent pathway that is tumour-cell extrinsic and regulates NK cell immunity.

  15. Molecular adaptation of telomere associated genes in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Claire C; Mc Cartney, Ann M; Donoghue, Mark T A; Loughran, Noeleen B; Spillane, Charles; Teeling, Emma C; O'Connell, Mary J

    2013-11-15

    Placental mammals display a huge range of life history traits, including size, longevity, metabolic rate and germ line generation time. Although a number of general trends have been proposed between these traits, there are exceptions that warrant further investigation. Species such as naked mole rat, human and certain bat species all exhibit extreme longevity with respect to body size. It has long been established that telomeres and telomere maintenance have a clear role in ageing but it has not yet been established whether there is evidence for adaptation in telomere maintenance proteins that could account for increased longevity in these species. Here we carry out a molecular investigation of selective pressure variation, specifically focusing on telomere associated genes across placental mammals. In general we observe a large number of instances of positive selection acting on telomere genes. Although these signatures of selection overall are not significantly correlated with either longevity or body size we do identify positive selection in the microbat species Myotis lucifugus in functionally important regions of the telomere maintenance genes DKC1 and TERT, and in naked mole rat in the DNA repair gene BRCA1. These results demonstrate the multifarious selective pressures acting across the mammal phylogeny driving lineage-specific adaptations of telomere associated genes. Our results show that regardless of the longevity of a species, these proteins have evolved under positive selection thereby removing increased longevity as the single selective force driving this rapid rate of evolution. However, evidence of molecular adaptations specific to naked mole rat and Myotis lucifugus highlight functionally significant regions in genes that may alter the way in which telomeres are regulated and maintained in these longer-lived species.

  16. TRF2 and apollo cooperate with topoisomerase 2alpha to protect human telomeres from replicative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jing; Lenain, Christelle; Bauwens, Serge; Rizzo, Angela; Saint-Léger, Adelaïde; Poulet, Anaïs; Benarroch, Delphine; Magdinier, Frédérique; Morere, Julia; Amiard, Simon; Verhoeyen, Els; Britton, Sébastien; Calsou, Patrick; Salles, Bernard; Bizard, Anna; Nadal, Marc; Salvati, Erica; Sabatier, Laure; Wu, Yunlin; Biroccio, Annamaria; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Gilson, Eric

    2010-07-23

    Human telomeres are protected from DNA damage by a nucleoprotein complex that includes the repeat-binding factor TRF2. Here, we report that TRF2 regulates the 5' exonuclease activity of its binding partner, Apollo, a member of the metallo-beta-lactamase family that is required for telomere integrity during S phase. TRF2 and Apollo also suppress damage to engineered interstitial telomere repeat tracts that were inserted far away from chromosome ends. Genetic data indicate that DNA topoisomerase 2alpha acts in the same pathway of telomere protection as TRF2 and Apollo. Moreover, TRF2, which binds preferentially to positively supercoiled DNA substrates, together with Apollo, negatively regulates the amount of TOP1, TOP2alpha, and TOP2beta at telomeres. Our data are consistent with a model in which TRF2 and Apollo relieve topological stress during telomere replication. Our work also suggests that cellular senescence may be caused by topological problems that occur during the replication of the inner portion of telomeres. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. TRF2 and lamin A/C interact to facilitate the functional organization of chromosome ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ashley M; Rendtlew Danielsen, Jannie M; Lucas, Catherine A; Rice, Ellen L; Scalzo, David; Shimi, Takeshi; Goldman, Robert D; Smith, Erica D; Le Beau, Michelle M; Kosak, Steven T

    2014-11-17

    Telomeres protect the ends of linear genomes, and the gradual loss of telomeres is associated with cellular ageing. Telomere protection involves the insertion of the 3' overhang facilitated by telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) into telomeric DNA, forming t-loops. We present evidence suggesting that t-loops can also form at interstitial telomeric sequences in a TRF2-dependent manner, forming an interstitial t-loop (ITL). We demonstrate that TRF2 association with interstitial telomeric sequences is stabilized by co-localization with A-type lamins (lamin A/C). We also find that lamin A/C interacts with TRF2 and that reduction in levels of lamin A/C or mutations in LMNA that cause an autosomal dominant premature ageing disorder--Hutchinson Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS)-lead to reduced ITL formation and telomere loss. We propose that cellular and organismal ageing are intertwined through the effects of the interaction between TRF2 and lamin A/C on chromosome structure.

  18. Methylated TRF2 associates with the nuclear matrix and serves as a potential biomarker for cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Taylor R H; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2014-04-01

    Methylation of N-terminal arginines of the shelterin component TRF2 is important for cellular proliferation. While TRF2 is found at telomeres, where it plays an essential role in maintaining telomere integrity, little is known about the cellular localization of methylated TRF2. Here we report that the majority of methylated TRF2 is resistant to extraction by high salt buffer and DNase I treatment, indicating that methylated TRF2 is tightly associated with the nuclear matrix. We show that methylated TRF2 drastically alters its nuclear staining as normal human primary fibroblast cells approach and enter replicative senescence. This altered nuclear staining, which is found to be overwhelmingly associated with misshapen nuclei and abnormal nuclear matrix folds, can be suppressed by hTERT and it is barely detectable in transformed and cancer cell lines. We find that dysfunctional telomeres and DNA damage, both of which are potent inducers of cellular senescence, promote the altered nuclear staining of methylated TRF2, which is dependent upon the ATM-mediated DNA damage response. Collectively, these results suggest that the altered nuclear staining of methylated TRF2 may represent ATM-mediated nuclear structural alteration associated with cellular senescence. Our data further imply that methylated TRF2 can serve as a potential biomarker for cellular senescence.

  19. The topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor ICRF-193 preferentially targets telomeres that are capped by TRF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lianxiang; Zhu, Xiaowei; Zou, Yaru; Xing, Jun; Gilson, Eric; Lu, Yiming; Ye, Jing

    2015-03-01

    The increased level of chromosome instability in cancer cells is not only a driving force for oncogenesis but also can be the Achille's heel of the disease since many chemotherapies kill cells by inducing a nontolerable rate of DNA damage. A wealth of published evidence showed that telomere stability can be more affected than the bulk of the genome by several conventional antineoplastic drugs. In the present study, HT1080 cell lines compromised for either telomere repeats binding factor 2 (TRF2) or POT1 were treated with ICRF-193 (3 μM, 24 h) or bleomycin (1 μM, 24 h). DNA damage was assayed by combining telomeric DNA staining of a (CCCTAA)n PNA probe with immunofluorescence of 53BP1 to score the rate of telomere colocalization with 53BP1 foci. We found that ICRF-193, but not bleomycin, leads to DNA damage preferentially at telomeres, which can be rescued by TRF2 inhibition. POT1 inhibition exacerbates telomere dysfunction induced by ICRF-193. Thus, ICRF-193 induces damage at telomeres properly capped by TRF2 but not by POT1. These findings are expected to broaden our view on the mechanism by which conventional therapeutic molecules act to eliminate cancer cells and how to use TRF2 and POT1 levels as surrogate markers for anti-topoisomerase II sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. REST-dependent expression of TRF2 renders non-neuronal cancer cells resistant to DNA damage during oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jung-Hee; Shin, Ji Hye; Kim, Eung-Sam; Lee, Namgyu; Park, Jin Young; Koo, Bonik Samuel; Hong, Sun Mi; Park, Chang Wook; Choi, Kwan Yong

    2013-02-15

    REST is a neuronal gene silencing factor ubiquitously expressed in non-neuronal tissues. REST is additionally believed to serve as a tumor suppressor in non-neuronal cancers. Conversely, recent findings on REST-dependent tumorigenesis in non-neuronal cells consistently suggest a potential role of REST as a tumor promoter. Here, we have uncovered for the first time the mechanism by which REST contributes to cancer cell survival in non-neuronal cancers. We observed abundant expression of REST in various types of non-neuronal cancer cells compared to normal tissues. The delicate roles of REST were further evaluated in HCT116 and HeLa, non-neuronal cancer cell lines expressing REST. REST silencing resulted in decreased cell survival and activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) through a decrease in the level of TRF2, a telomere-binding protein. These responses were correlated with reduced colony formation ability and accelerated telomere shortening in cancer cells upon the stable knockdown of REST. Interestingly, REST was down-regulated under oxidative stress conditions via ubiquitin proteasome system, suggesting that sustainability of REST expression is critical to determine cell survival during oxidative stress in a tumor microenvironment. Our results collectively indicate that REST-dependent TRF2 expression renders cancer cells resistant to DNA damage during oxidative stress, and mechanisms to overcome oxidative stress, such as high levels of REST or the stress-resistant REST mutants found in specific human cancers, may account for REST-dependent tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  1. PARP1 is a TRF2-associated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and protects eroded telomeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Marla V [ORNL; Wu, Jun [ORNL; Wang, Yisong [ORNL; Liu, Yie [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP1) is well characterized for its role in base excision repair (BER), where it is activated by and binds to DNA breaks and catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of several substrates involved in DNA damage repair. Here we demonstrate that PARP1 associates with telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) and is capable of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of TRF2, which affects binding of TRF2 to telomeric DNA. Immunostaining of interphase cells or metaphase spreads shows that PARP1 is detected sporadically at normal telomeres, but it appears preferentially at eroded telomeres caused by telomerase deficiency or damaged telomeres induced by DNA-damaging reagents. Although PARP1 is dispensable in the capping of normal telomeres, Parp1 deficiency leads to an increase in chromosome end-to-end fusions or chromosome ends without detectable telomeric DNA in primary murine cells after induction of DNA damage. Our results suggest that upon DNA damage, PARP1 is recruited to damaged telomeres, where it can help protect telomeres against chromosome end-to-end fusions and genomic instability.

  2. PARP1 Is a TRF2-associated Poly(ADP-Ribose)Polymerase and Protects Eroded Telomeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yie [ORNL; Wu, Jun [ORNL; Schreiber, Valerie [Universite Louis Pasteur, France; Dunlap, John [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dantzer, Francoise [Universite Louis Pasteur, France; Wang, Yisong [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2006-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP1) is well characterized for its role in base excision repair (BER), where it is activated by and binds to DNA breaks and catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of several substrates involved in DNA damage repair. Here we demonstrate that PARP1 associates with telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) and is capable of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of TRF2, which affects binding of TRF2 to telomeric DNA. Immunostaining of interphase cells or metaphase spreads shows that PARP1 is detected sporadically at normal telomeres, but it appears preferentially at eroded telomeres caused by telomerase deficiency or damaged telomeres induced by DNA-damaging reagents. Although PARP1 is dispensable in the capping of normal telomeres, Parp1 deficiency leads to an increase in chromosome end-to-end fusions or chromosome ends without detectable telomeric DNA in primary murine cells after induction of DNA damage. Our results suggest that upon DNA damage, PARP1 is recruited to damaged telomeres, where it can help protect telomeres against chromosome end-to-end fusions and genomic instability.

  3. The N-terminal domains of TRF1 and TRF2 regulate their ability to condense telomeric DNA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Poulet, Anaïs; Pisano, Sabrina; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Pei, Bei; Tauran, Yannick; Haftek-Terreau, Zofia; Brunet, Frédéric; Le Bihan, Yann-Vaï; Ledu, Marie-Hélène; Montel, Fabien; Hugo, Nicolas; Amiard, Simon; Argoul, Françoise; Chaboud, Annie; Gilson, Eric; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe

    2012-01-01

    .... Previous work has shown that unlike TRF1, TRF2 condenses telomeric, thus creating consequential negative torsion on the adjacent DNA, a property that is thought to lead to the stimulation of single...

  4. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-telomere association correlates with redox status in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Pariona-Llanos

    Full Text Available Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH is a classical metabolic enzyme involved in energy production and plays a role in additional nuclear functions, including transcriptional control, recognition of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA and maintenance of telomere structure. Here, we show that the recombinant protein T. cruzi GAPDH (rTcGAPDH binds single-stranded telomeric DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of GAPDH to telomeric DNA correlates with the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+/NADH. We observed that GAPDH-telomere association and NAD+/NADH balance changed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle. For example, in replicative epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, which show similar intracellular concentrations of NAD+ and NADH, GAPDH binds to telomeric DNA in vivo and this binding activity is inhibited by exogenous NAD+. In contrast, in the T. cruzi non-proliferative trypomastigote forms, which show higher NAD+ concentration, GAPDH was absent from telomeres. In addition, NAD+ abolishes physical interaction between recombinant GAPDH and synthetic telomere oligonucleotide in a cell free system, mimicking exogenous NAD+ that reduces GAPDH-telomere interaction in vivo. We propose that the balance in the NAD+/NADH ratio during T. cruzi life cycle homeostatically regulates GAPDH telomere association, suggesting that in trypanosomes redox status locally modulates GAPDH association with telomeric DNA.

  5. Transcription regulation of CDKN1A (p21/CIP1/WAF1) by TRF2 is epigenetically controlled through the REST repressor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Tabish; Saha, Dhurjhoti; Purohit, Gunjan; Kar, Anirban; Kishore Mukherjee, Anand; Sharma, Shalu; Sengupta, Suman; Dhapola, Parashar; Maji, Basudeb; Vedagopuram, Sreekanth; Horikoshi, Nobuko T; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Pandita, Raj K; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Bajaj, Avinash; Riou, Jean-François; Pandita, Tej K; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2017-09-14

    We observed extra-telomeric binding of the telomere repeat binding factor TRF2 within the promoter of the cyclin-dependent kinase CDKNIA (p21/CIP1/WAF1). This result in TRF2 induced transcription repression of p21. Interestingly, p21 repression was through engagement of the REST-coREST-LSD1-repressor complex and altered histone marks at the p21 promoter in a TRF2-dependent fashion. Furthermore, mutational analysis shows p21 repression requires interaction of TRF2 with a p21 promoter G-quadruplex. Physiologically, TRF2-mediated p21 repression attenuated drug-induced activation of cellular DNA damage response by evading G2/M arrest in cancer cells. Together these reveal for the first time role of TRF2 in REST- repressor complex mediated transcription repression.

  6. Transcription factor Sp1 prevents TRF2(ΔBΔM)-induced premature senescence in human diploid fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hyun Ju; Lee, Hyeon Ju; Jang, Suhwa; Jung, Yu-Jin; Choi, Sun Shim; Park, Sang Chul; Han, Jeong A

    2016-03-01

    Telomere uncapping is thought to be the fundamental cause of replicative cellular senescence, but the cellular machineries mediating this process have not been fully understood. In the present study, we present the role of Sp1 transcription factor in the state of telomere uncapping using the TRF2(ΔBΔM)-induced senescence model in human diploid fibroblasts. We observed that the expression of Sp1 is down-regulated in the TRF2(ΔBΔM)-induced senescence, which was mediated by ATM and p38 MAPK. In addition, overexpression of Sp1 prevented the TRF2(ΔBΔM)-induced senescence. Among transcriptional targets of Sp1, expression levels of nuclear transport genes such as karyopherin α, Nup107, and Nup50 were down-regulated in the TRF2(ΔBΔM)-induced senescence, which was prevented by Sp1 overexpression. Moreover, inhibition of the nuclear transport by wheat germ agglutinin (an import inhibitor) and leptomycin B (an export inhibitor) induced premature senescence. These results suggest that Sp1 is an anti-senescence transcription factor in the telomere uncapping-induced senescence and that down-regulation of Sp1 leads to the senescence via down-regulation of the nuclear transport.

  7. TRF2 Interaction with Ku Heterotetramerization Interface Gives Insight into c-NHEJ Prevention at Human Telomeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Ribes-Zamora

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres are protected from nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ to avoid deleterious chromosome fusions, yet they associate with the Ku heterodimer that is principal in the classical NHEJ (c-NHEJ pathway. T-loops have been proposed to inhibit Ku’s association with telomeric ends, thus inhibiting c-NHEJ; however, deficiencies in the t-loop model suggest additional mechanisms are in effect. We demonstrate that TRF2 interacts with Ku at telomeres and via residues in Ku70 helix 5 (α5, which are vital for NHEJ. We show that Ku’s interaction with a TRF2 mutant that induces telomeric fusions is significantly impaired. Additionally, we demonstrate that Ku70 α5 is required for Ku self-association in live cells, which can bridge DNA ends. Together, these findings lead us to propose a model in which telomeres are directly protected from c-NHEJ via TRF2 impeding Ku’s ability to synapse telomere ends.

  8. Urokinase receptor mediates doxorubicin-induced vascular smooth muscle cell senescence via proteasomal degradation of TRF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodjat, Mahshid; Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna; Kiyan, Yulia

    2013-01-01

    The anthracycline doxorubicin is a widely used effective anti-cancer drug. However, its application and dosage are severely limited due to its cardiotoxicity. The exact mechanisms of doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxic side effects remain poorly understood. Even less is known about the impact of doxorubicin treatment on vascular damage. We found that low doses of doxorubicin induced a senescent response in human primary vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). We observed that expression of urokinase receptor (uPAR) was upregulated in response to doxorubicin. Furthermore, the level of uPAR expression played a decisive role in developing doxorubicin-induced senescence. uPAR silencing in human VSMC by means of RNA interference as well as uPAR knockout in mouse VSMC resulted in abrogation of doxorubicin-induced cellular senescence. On the contrary, uPAR overexpression promoted VSMC senescence. We further found that proteasomal degradation of telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) mediates doxorubicin-induced VSMC senescence. Our results demonstrate that uPAR controls the ubiquitin-proteasome system in VSMC and regulates doxorubicin-induced TRF2 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation via this mechanism. Therefore, VSMC senescence induced by low doses of doxorubicin may contribute to vascular damage upon doxorubicin treatment. uPAR-mediated TRF2 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation are further identified as a molecular mechanism underlying this process. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Nucleolus-like body of mouse oocytes contains lamin A and B and TRF2 but not actin and topo II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochukalina, Galina N; Ilicheva, Nadya V; Podgornaya, Olga I; Voronin, Alexey P

    2016-01-01

    During the final stages of oocyte development, all chromosomes join in a limited nuclear volume for the final formation of a single complex chromatin structure - the karyosphere. In the majority of mammalian species, the chromosomes surround a round protein/fibrillar body known as the central body, or nucleolus-like body (NLB). Nothing seems to unite the inner portion of the karyosphere with the nucleolus except position at its remnants. Nevertheless, in this study we will use term NLB as the conventional one for karyosphere with the central body. At the morphological level, NLBs consist of tightly-packed fibres of 6-10 nm. The biochemical structure of this dense, compact NLB fibre centre remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to determine which proteins represent the NLB components at final stages of karyosphere formation in mouse oogenesis. To determine this, three antibodies (ABs) have been examined against different actin epitopes. Examination of both ABs against the actin N-end provided similar results: spots inside the nucleus. Double staining with AB against SC35 and actin revealed the colocalization of these proteins in IGCs (interchromatin granule clusters/nuclear speckles/SC35 domains). In contrast, examination of polyclonal AB against peptide at the C-end reveals a different result: actin is localized exclusively in connection with the chromatin. Surprisingly, no forms of actin or topoisomerase II are present as components of the NLB. It was discovered that: (1) lamin B is an NLB component from the beginning of NLB formation, and a major portion of it resides in the NLB at the end of oocyte development; (2) lamin A undergoes rapid movement into the NLB, and a majority of it remains in the NLB; (3) the telomere-binding protein TRF2 resides in the IGCs/nuclear speckles until the end of oocyte development, when significant part of it transfers to the NLB. NLBs do not contain actin or topo II. Lamin B is involved from the beginning of NLB formation

  10. [Expression of TRF1, TRF2 and RAP1 mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with acquired aplastic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Xu, Rui-Rong; Zhou, Yan-Feng; Liu, Zhao-Xia

    2012-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the expression levels of TRF1, TRF2 and RAP1 mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with acquired aplastic anemia, and to explore their relation with onset of acquired aplastic anemia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 40 patients with acquired aplastic anemia and 20 normal subjects as control were collected to detect mRNA expression of TRF1, TRF2 and RAP1 by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that the expression levels of TRF1 and RAP1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with acquired aplastic anemia were significantly higher than that in normal controls (P TRF2 was lower than that in normal controls (P TRF2 and RAP1 expressions level (r = 0.522, P = 0.001). It is concluded that the changes in expression levels of TRF1, TRF2 and RAP1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of acquired aplastic anemia.

  11. Power dependent study of kinetics of TRF2 recruitment in cells due to DNA damage caused by ultrafast near-IR Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalerao, Manas; Huda, Nazmul; Gilley, David; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2011-03-01

    Ultrafast laser microbeam is finding widespread applications in eliciting highly localized damage to cellular components allowing study of in-situ repair machinery. While the high peak power density that exists in ultrafast laser can cause various types of DNA damage including double strand breaks (DSB), tuning the power of these laser microbeams may cause specific type of DNA damage. Here, we report wavelength and dose dependent parametric study of kinetics of TRF2 recruitment in cells due to DNA damage caused by ultrafast near-IR Laser. A tunable Ti: Sapphire laser beam was coupled via laser port of an inverted microscope. Spot and line laser micro-irradiation pattern in nuclear sites of HT1080 cells expressing YFP-tagged TRF2 was achieved by piezo-scanning mechanism. The recruitment of TRF2-YFP was found to depend highly on the peak irradiance of the near-IR laser microbeam, the required threshold irradiance being much higher than that observed for DSB. Further, recruitment kinetics revealed that the time constant for TRF2 recruitment depends on the laser irradiance parameters. The time required for TRF2 recruitment was found to decrease with increased peak irradiance. We will present these results and also elucidate on physical mechanism of DNA damage caused by ultrafast laser microbeam.

  12. NBS1 knockdown by small interfering RNA increases ionizing radiation mutagenesis and telomere association in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Lim, Chang U K.; Williams, Eli S.; Zhou, Junqing; Zhang, Qinming; Fox, Michael H.; Bailey, Susan M.; Liber, Howard L.

    2005-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations which lead to decreased function of the NBS1 gene are responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disorder that imparts an increased predisposition to development of malignancy. The NBS1 protein is a component of the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex that plays a critical role in cellular responses to DNA damage and the maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Using small interfering RNA transfection, we have knocked down NBS1 protein levels and analyzed relevant phenotypes in two closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines with different p53 status, namely wild-type TK6 and mutated WTK1. Both TK6 and WTK1 cells showed an increased level of ionizing radiation-induced mutation at the TK and HPRT loci, impaired phosphorylation of H2AX (gamma-H2AX), and impaired activation of the cell cycle checkpoint regulating kinase, Chk2. In TK6 cells, ionizing radiation-induced accumulation of p53/p21 and apoptosis were reduced. There was a differential response to ionizing radiation-induced cell killing between TK6 and WTK1 cells after NBS1 knockdown; TK6 cells were more resistant to killing, whereas WTK1 cells were more sensitive. NBS1 deficiency also resulted in a significant increase in telomere association that was independent of radiation exposure and p53 status. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that NBS1 deficiency in human cells leads to hypermutability and telomere associations, phenotypes that may contribute to the cancer predisposition seen among patients with this disease.

  13. High expression of TRF2, SOX10, and CD10 in circulating tumor microemboli detected in metastatic melanoma patients. A potential impact for the assessment of disease aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Elodie; Ilie, Marius; Bence, Coraline; Butori, Catherine; Selva, Eric; Lalvée, Salomé; Bonnetaud, Christelle; Poissonnet, Gilles; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Bahadoran, Philippe; Brest, Patrick; Gilson, Eric; Ballotti, Robert; Hofman, Véronique; Hofman, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Circulating tumors cells (CTCs) can be detected in the blood of metastatic melanoma patients (MMPs) both as isolated circulating tumor cells (iCTCs) and circulating tumor microemboli (CTMs), but their clinical significance remains unknown. The aim of this work was to evaluate the prognostic impact in metastatic cutaneous melanoma of CTMs and iCTCs identified by a cytomorphological approach using the isolation by size of tumor cell (ISET) method. We characterized the phenotype of CTCs using anti-PS100, anti-SOX10, anti-CD10, and anti-TRF2 antibodies. 128 MMPs and 37 control healthy individuals with benign nevi were included in this study. Results were compared to the follow-up of patients. 109/128 (85%) MMPs showed CTCs, 44/128 (34%) with 2 to 6 CTMs and 65/128 (51%) with 4 to 9 iCTCs. PS100 expression was homogeneous in iCTCs and heterogeneous in CTMs. SOX10, CD10, and TRF2 were mainly expressed in CTMs. None of the control subjects demonstrated circulating malignant tumor cells. Overall survival was significantly decreased in patients with CTMs, independently of the therapeutic strategies. In conclusion, the presence of CTMs is an independent predictor of shorter survival from the time of diagnosis of MMPs. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Telomere-associated endonuclease-deficient Penelope-like retroelements in diverse eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladyshev, Eugene A.; Arkhipova, Irina R.

    2007-01-01

    The evolutionary origin of telomerases, enzymes that maintain the ends of linear chromosomes in most eukaryotes, is a subject of debate. Penelope-like elements (PLEs) are a recently described class of eukaryotic retroelements characterized by a GIY-YIG endonuclease domain and by a reverse transcriptase domain with similarity to telomerases and group II introns. Here we report that a subset of PLEs found in bdelloid rotifers, basidiomycete fungi, stramenopiles, and plants, representing four different eukaryotic kingdoms, lack the endonuclease domain and are located at telomeres. The 5′ truncated ends of these elements are telomere-oriented and typically capped by species-specific telomeric repeats. Most of them also carry several shorter stretches of telomeric repeats at or near their 3′ ends, which could facilitate utilization of the telomeric G-rich 3′ overhangs to prime reverse transcription. Many of these telomere-associated PLEs occupy a basal phylogenetic position close to the point of divergence from the telomerase-PLE common ancestor and may descend from the missing link between early eukaryotic retroelements and present-day telomerases. PMID:17483479

  15. Characterization of RUSI, a telomere-associated satellite DNA, in the genus Rumex (Polygonaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navajas-Pérez, R; Schwarzacher, T; Ruiz Rejón, M; Garrido-Ramos, M A

    2009-01-01

    A satellite-DNA family (RUSI) has been isolated and characterized in Rumexinduratus Boiss and Reuter (Polygonaceae), an Iberian endemic polygamous sorrel. The RUSI repeats are 170 bp in length and approximately 68% AT-rich containing different variants of degenerate telomere motifs--(TT)(n)AN(GG)(n) -, a typical feature of subtelomeric DNA repeats adjacent to telomeres, which have been referred to as telomere-associated sequences or TASs. In fact, fluorescent in situhybridization showed that this satellite DNA is located in subtelomeric positions of most of the chromosomes of R. induratus, with some centromeric loci. PCR and Southern-blot hybridization assays for sequence conservation in the genus Rumex, indicated that the RUSI sequences are restricted to the genomes of R. induratus and R. scutatus, both species of the section Scutati, suggesting that they are recently evolved. Sequence variation within the two species is high (mean value of sequence differences between repeats of 15% for R. induratus and 7.5% for R. scutatus) and the degree of sequence differentiation between species is low with no species-specific variants, postulated to be due to slowed rates of spreading of sequence variants by molecular homogenizing mechanisms. Characteristics of RUSI sequences are discussed in the light of their chromosomal location and analyzed for their evolutionary and phylogenetic implications. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Deletion/inversion in the X-chromosome and increased telomeric associations in a female with primary amenorrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Multani, Asha S; Shah, Vinod C.; Singh, Divya; Chakravarty, Nivedita; Chinoy, Niloufer J.; Pathak, Sen

    1997-01-01

    We describe a new case of a partial interstitial deletion and inversion of the long arm of the X-chromosome associated with a high incidence of telomeric associations in an 18-year old female who showed underdeveloped secondary sex characteristics, including small breasts and primary amenorrhea. Her karyotype was considered to be 46,X,del(Xq13 -> q22)inv(X)(q23-q27). The buccal mucosal cells showed absence of a typical Barr body, and the 5’-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation studies revealed ...

  17. HP1-mediated formation of alternative lengthening of telomeres-associated PML bodies requires HIRA but not ASF1a.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Qin Jiang

    Full Text Available Approximately 10% of cancers use recombination-mediated Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT instead of telomerase to prevent telomere shortening. A characteristic of cells that utilize ALT is the presence of ALT-associated PML nuclear bodies (APBs containing (TTAGGGn DNA, telomere binding proteins, DNA recombination proteins, and heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1. The function of APBs is unknown and it is possible that they are functionally heterogeneous. Most ALT cells lack functional p53, and restoration of the p53/p21 pathway in these cells results in growth arrest/senescence and a substantial increase in the number of large APBs that is dependent on two HP1 isoforms, HP1α and HP1γ. Here we investigated the mechanism of HP1-mediated APB formation, and found that histone chaperones, HIRA and ASF1a, are present in APBs following activation of the p53/p21 pathway in ALT cells. HIRA and ASF1a were also found to colocalize inside PML bodies in normal fibroblasts approaching senescence, providing evidence for the existence of a senescence-associated ASF1a/HIRA complex inside PML bodies, consistent with a role for these proteins in induction of senescence in both normal and ALT cells. Moreover, knockdown of HIRA but not ASF1a significantly reduced p53-mediated induction of large APBs, with a concomitant reduction of large HP1 foci. We conclude that HIRA, in addition to its physical and functional association with ASF1a, plays a unique, ASF1a-independent role, which is required for the localization of HP1 to PML bodies and thus for APB formation.

  18. Dual-tagging system for the affinity purification of mammalian protein complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannone, Richard J [ORNL; McDonald, W Hayes [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Huang, Ying [ORNL; Wu, Jun [ORNL; Liu, Yie [National Institute on Aging, Baltimore; Wang, Yisong [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Although affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) provides a powerful tool to study protein-protein interactions, this strategy has encountered numerous difficulties when adapted to mammalian cells. Here we describe a Gateway{reg_sign}-compatible dual-tag affinity purification system that integrates regulatable expression, tetracysteine motifs, and various combinations of affinity tags to facilitate the cloning, detection, and purification of bait proteins and their interacting partners. Utilizing the human telomere binding protein TRF2 as a benchmark, we demonstrate bait protein recoveries upwards of approximately 16% from as little as 1-7 x 10{sup 7} cells and successfully identify known TRF2 interacting proteins, suggesting that our dual-tag affinity purification approach is a capable new tool for expanding the capacity to explore mammalian proteomic networks.

  19. The Monitoring and Affinity Purification of Proteins Using Dual-Tags with Tetracysteine Motifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannone, Richard J [ORNL; Liu, Yie [ORNL; Wang, Yisong [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Identification and characterization of protein-protein interaction networks is essential for the elucidation of biochemical mechanisms and cellular function. Affinity purification in combination with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has emerged as a very powerful tactic for the identification of specific protein-protein interactions. In this chapter we describe a comprehensive methodology that utilizes our recently developed dual-tag affinity purification system for the enrichment and identification of mammalian protein complexes. The protocol covers a series of separate but sequentially related techniques focused on the facile monitoring and purification of a dual-tagged protein of interest and its interacting partners via a system built with tetracysteine motifs and various combinations of affinity tags. Using human telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) as an example, we have demonstrated the power of the system in terms of bait protein recovery after dual-tag affinity purification, detection of bait protein subcellular localization and expression, and successful identification of known and potentially novel TRF2 interacting proteins. Although the protocol described here has been optimized for the identification and characterization of TRF2-associated proteins, it is, in principle, applicable to the study of any other mammalian protein complexes that may be of interest to the research community.

  20. Encephalitozoon cuniculi (Microspora) genome: physical map and evidence for telomere-associated rDNA units on all chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugère, Jean-François; Cornillot, Emmanuel; Méténier, Guy; Bensimon, Aaron; Vivarès, Christian P.

    2000-01-01

    A restriction map of the 2.8-Mb genome of the unicellular eukaryote Encephalitozoon cuniculi (phylum Microspora), a mammal-infecting intracellular parasite, has been constructed using two restriction enzymes with 6 bp recognition sites (BssHII and MluI). The fragments resulting from either single digestions of the whole molecular karyotype or double digestions of 11 individual chromosomes have been separated by two-dimensional pulsed field gel electrophoresis (2D-PFGE) procedures. The average distance between successive restriction sites is ~19 kb. The terminal regions of the chromosomes show a common pattern covering ~15 kb and including one 16S–23S rDNA unit. Results of hybridisation and molecular combing experiments indicate a palindromic-like orientation of the two subtelomeric rDNA copies on each chromosome. We have also located 67 DNA markers (clones from a partial E.cuniculi genomic library) by hybridisation to restriction fragments. Partial or complete sequencing has revealed homologies with known protein-coding genes for 32 of these clones. Evidence for two homologous chromosomes III, with a size difference (3 kb) related to a subtelomeric deletion/insertion event, argues for diploidy of E.cuniculi. The physical map should be useful for both the whole genome sequencing project and studies on genome plasticity of this widespread parasite. PMID:10773069

  1. Molecular recognition in complexes of TRF proteins with telomeric DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miłosz Wieczór

    Full Text Available Telomeres are specialized nucleoprotein assemblies that protect the ends of linear chromosomes. In humans and many other species, telomeres consist of tandem TTAGGG repeats bound by a protein complex known as shelterin that remodels telomeric DNA into a protective loop structure and regulates telomere homeostasis. Shelterin recognizes telomeric repeats through its two major components known as Telomere Repeat-Binding Factors, TRF1 and TRF2. These two homologous proteins are therefore essential for the formation and normal function of telomeres. Indeed, TRF1 and TRF2 are implicated in a plethora of different cellular functions and their depletion leads to telomere dysfunction with chromosomal fusions, followed by apoptotic cell death. More specifically, it was found that TRF1 acts as a negative regulator of telomere length, and TRF2 is involved in stabilizing the loop structure. Consequently, these proteins are of great interest, not only because of their key role in telomere maintenance and stability, but also as potential drug targets. In the current study, we investigated the molecular basis of telomeric sequence recognition by TRF1 and TRF2 and their DNA binding mechanism. We used molecular dynamics (MD to calculate the free energy profiles for binding of TRFs to telomeric DNA. We found that the predicted binding free energies were in good agreement with experimental data. Further, different molecular determinants of binding, such as binding enthalpies and entropies, the hydrogen bonding pattern and changes in surface area, were analyzed to decompose and examine the overall binding free energies at the structural level. With this approach, we were able to draw conclusions regarding the consecutive stages of sequence-specific association, and propose a novel aspartate-dependent mechanism of sequence recognition. Finally, our work demonstrates the applicability of computational MD-based methods to studying protein-DNA interactions.

  2. Abnormal mRNA Expression Levels of Telomere-Binding Proteins Represent Biomarkers in Myelodysplastic Syndromes: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoshan Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: As evidence was shown that abnormal shortening of telomeres begins to accumulate in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS patients, this study was conducted to determine the relationship between the mRNA expression levels of telomere-binding proteins (TRF1/TRF2/TIN2/TPP1/POT1/RAP1 and the risk level in MDS. Materials and Methods: There were 40 patients with MDS and 40 normal controls in this study. Methods including telomere content assays and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to examine the mRNA levels of TRF1/TRF2/TIN2/ TPP1/POT1/RAP1 in patients with MDS. Results: Compared to the normal group used as a control, the mRNA expression levels of RAP1/POT1/TPP1 of the patients with MDS were decreased, whereas their levels of TRF1/TRF2 and TIN2 were increased. A positive correlation was found between the TRF1, TRF2, and TIN2 mRNA expression levels and the risk level of the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS and the World Health Organization Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS criteria; however, a negative correlation was found between RAP1/POT1/TPP1 mRNA expression levels and the risk levels of IPSS and WPSS criteria. Conclusion: Because the reduction of TRF1/TRF2/TIN2 mRNA expression and the increase of RAP1/POT1/TPP1 mRNA expression are closely related to the risk levels of the IPSS and WPSS criteria in MDS, it is thought that these telomere-binding proteins could lead to abnormal telomere length and function, which cause chromosomal abnormalities in MDS. With this evidence, we suggest that those proteins’ mRNA expressions could be used as biomarkers for the assessment of the risk degree of MDS patients.

  3. A C-terminal Myb extension domain defines a novel family of double-strand telomeric DNA-binding proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamysheva, Zemfira N; Surovtseva, Yulia V; Vespa, Laurent; Shakirov, Eugene V; Shippen, Dorothy E

    2004-11-12

    Little is known about the protein composition of plant telomeres. We queried the Arabidopsis thaliana genome data base in search of genes with similarity to the human telomere proteins hTRF1 and hTRF2. hTRF1/hTRF2 are distinguished by the presence of a single Myb-like domain in their C terminus that is required for telomeric DNA binding in vitro. Twelve Arabidopsis genes fitting this criterion, dubbed TRF-like (TRFL), fell into two distinct gene families. Notably, TRFL family 1 possessed a highly conserved region C-terminal to the Myb domain called Myb-extension (Myb-ext) that is absent in TRFL family 2 and hTRF1/hTRF2. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that recombinant proteins from TRFL family 1, but not those from family 2, formed homodimers and heterodimers in vitro. DNA binding studies with isolated C-terminal fragments from TRFL family 1 proteins, but not family 2, showed specific binding to double-stranded plant telomeric DNA in vitro. Removal of the Myb-ext domain from TRFL1, a family 1 member, abolished DNA binding. However, when the Myb-ext domain was introduced into the corresponding region in TRFL3, a family 2 member, telomeric DNA binding was observed. Thus, Myb-ext is required for binding plant telomeric DNA and defines a novel class of proteins in Arabidopsis.

  4. An H2A Histone Isotype, H2ac, Associates with Telomere and Maintains Telomere Integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hsin Su

    Full Text Available Telomeres are capped at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes and are composed of TTAGGG repeats bound to the shelterin complex. Here we report that a replication-dependent histone H2A isotype, H2ac, was associated with telomeres in human cells and co-immunoprecipitates with telomere repeat factor 2 (TRF2 and protection of telomeres protein 1 (POT1, whereas other histone H2A isotypes and mutations of H2ac did not bind to telomeres or these two proteins. The amino terminal basic domain of TRF2 was necessary for the association with H2ac and for the recruitment of H2ac to telomeres. Depletion of H2ac led to loss of telomeric repeat sequences, the appearance of dysfunctional telomeres, and chromosomal instability, including chromosomal breaks and anaphase bridges, as well as accumulation of telomere-associated DNA damage factors in H2ac depleted cells. Additionally, knockdown of H2ac elicits an ATM-dependent DNA damage response at telomeres and depletion of XPF protects telomeres against H2ac-deficiency-induced G-strand overhangs loss and DNA damage response, and prevents chromosomal instability. These findings suggest that the H2A isotype, H2ac, plays an essential role in maintaining telomere functional integrity.

  5. Localization-Dependent and -Independent Roles of SLX4 in Regulating Telomeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie S.J. Wilson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available SLX4, a scaffold for structure-specific DNA repair nucleases, is important for several types of DNA repair. Many repair proteins bind to sites of DNA damage, resulting in subnuclear “foci,” but SLX4 forms foci in human cells even without DNA damage. Using several approaches, we show that most, but not all, SLX4 foci localize to telomeres in a range of human cell lines irrespective of the mechanisms used to maintain telomere length. The SLX1 Holliday-junction-processing enzyme is recruited to telomeres by SLX4, and SLX4, in turn, is recruited by a motif that binds to the shelterin subunit TRF2 directly. We also show that TRF2-dependent recruitment of SLX4 prevents telomere damage. Furthermore, SLX4 prevents telomere lengthening and fragility in a manner that appears to be independent of telomere association. These findings reveal that SLX4 plays multiple roles in regulating telomere homeostasis.

  6. Isolation of Chromatin from Dysfunctional Telomeres Reveals an Important Role for Ring1b in NHEJ-Mediated Chromosome Fusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Bartocci

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When telomeres become critically short, DNA damage response factors are recruited at chromosome ends, initiating a cellular response to DNA damage. We performed proteomic isolation of chromatin fragments (PICh in order to define changes in chromatin composition that occur upon onset of acute telomere dysfunction triggered by depletion of the telomere-associated factor TRF2. This unbiased purification of telomere-associated proteins in functional or dysfunctional conditions revealed the dynamic changes in chromatin composition that take place at telomeres upon DNA damage induction. On the basis of our results, we describe a critical role for the polycomb group protein Ring1b in nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ-mediated end-to-end chromosome fusions. We show that cells with reduced levels of Ring1b have a reduced ability to repair uncapped telomeric chromatin. Our data represent an unbiased isolation of chromatin undergoing DNA damage and are a valuable resource to map the changes in chromatin composition in response to DNA damage activation.

  7. Nontelomeric splice variant of telomere repeat-binding factor 2 maintains neuronal traits by sequestering repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peisu; Casaday-Potts, Rebecca; Precht, Patricia; Jiang, Haiyang; Liu, Yie; Pazin, Michael J.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2011-01-01

    Telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) is critical for telomere integrity in dividing stem and somatic cells, but its role in postmitotic neurons is unknown. Apart from protecting telomeres, nuclear TRF2 interacts with the master neuronal gene-silencer repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST), and disruption of this interaction induces neuronal differentiation. Here we report a developmental switch from the expression of TRF2 in proliferating neural progenitor cells to expression of a unique short nontelomeric isoform of TRF2 (TRF2-S) as neurons establish a fully differentiated state. Unlike nuclear TRF2, which enhances REST-mediated gene repression, TRF2-S is located in the cytoplasm where it sequesters REST, thereby maintaining the expression of neuronal genes, including those encoding glutamate receptors, cell adhesion, and neurofilament proteins. In neurons, TRF2-S–mediated antagonism of REST nuclear activity is greatly attenuated by either overexpression of TRF2 or administration of the excitatory amino acid kainic acid. Overexpression of TRF2-S rescues kainic acid-induced REST nuclear accumulation and its gene-silencing effects. Thus, TRF2-S acts as part of a unique developmentally regulated molecular switch that plays critical roles in the maintenance and plasticity of neurons. PMID:21903926

  8. DNA and RNA Quadruplex-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Brázda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Four-stranded DNA structures were structurally characterized in vitro by NMR, X-ray and Circular Dichroism spectroscopy in detail. Among the different types of quadruplexes (i-Motifs, minor groove quadruplexes, G-quadruplexes, etc., the best described are G-quadruplexes which are featured by Hoogsteen base-paring. Sequences with the potential to form quadruplexes are widely present in genome of all organisms. They are found often in repetitive sequences such as telomeric ones, and also in promoter regions and 5' non-coding sequences. Recently, many proteins with binding affinity to G-quadruplexes have been identified. One of the initially portrayed G-rich regions, the human telomeric sequence (TTAGGGn, is recognized by many proteins which can modulate telomerase activity. Sequences with the potential to form G-quadruplexes are often located in promoter regions of various oncogenes. The NHE III1 region of the c-MYC promoter has been shown to interact with nucleolin protein as well as other G-quadruplex-binding proteins. A number of G-rich sequences are also present in promoter region of estrogen receptor alpha. In addition to DNA quadruplexes, RNA quadruplexes, which are critical in translational regulation, have also been predicted and observed. For example, the RNA quadruplex formation in telomere-repeat-containing RNA is involved in interaction with TRF2 (telomere repeat binding factor 2 and plays key role in telomere regulation. All these fundamental examples suggest the importance of quadruplex structures in cell processes and their understanding may provide better insight into aging and disease development.

  9. Zebrafish as a model system to study the physiological function of telomeric protein TPP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiying Xie

    Full Text Available Telomeres are specialized chromatin structures at the end of chromosomes. Telomere dysfunction can lead to chromosomal abnormalities, DNA damage responses, and even cancer. In mammalian cells, a six-protein complex (telosome/shelterin is assembled on the telomeres through the interactions between various domain structures of the six telomere proteins (POT1, TPP1, TIN2, TRF1, TRF2 and RAP1, and functions in telomere maintenance and protection. Within the telosome, TPP1 interacts directly with POT1 and TIN2 and help to mediate telosome assembly. Mechanisms of telomere regulation have been extensively studied in a variety of model organisms. For example, the physiological roles of telomere-targeted proteins have been assessed in mice through homozygous inactivation. In these cases, early embryonic lethality has prevented further studies of these proteins in embryogenesis and development. As a model system, zebrafish offers unique advantages such as genetic similarities with human, rapid developmental cycles, and ease of manipulation of its embryos. In this report, we detailed the identification of zebrafish homologues of TPP1, POT1, and TIN2, and showed that the domain structures and interactions of these telosome components appeared intact in zebrafish. Importantly, knocking down TPP1 led to multiple abnormalities in zebrafish embryogenesis, including neural death, heart malformation, and caudal defect. And these embryos displayed extensive apoptosis. These results underline the importance of TPP1 in zebrafish embryogenesis, and highlight the feasibility and advantages of investigating the signaling pathways and physiological function of telomere proteins in zebrafish.

  10. cDNA Library Screening Identifies Protein Interactors Potentially Involved in Non-telomeric Roles of Arabidopsis Telomerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav eDokládal

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase-reverse transcriptase (TERT plays an essential catalytic role in maintaining telomeres. However, in animal systems telomerase plays additional non-telomeric functional roles. We previously screened an Arabidopsis cDNA library for proteins that interact with the C-terminal extension (CTE TERT domain and identified a nuclear-localized protein that contains a RNA recognition motif (RRM. This RRM-protein forms homodimers in both plants and yeast. Mutation of the gene encoding the RRM-protein had no detectable effect on plant growth and development, nor did it affect telomerase activity or telomere length in vivo, suggesting a non-telomeric role for TERT/RRM-protein complexes. The gene encoding the RRM-protein is highly expressed in leaf and reproductive tissues. We further screened an Arabidopsis cDNA library for proteins that interact with the RRM-protein and identified five interactors. These proteins are involved in numerous non-telomere-associated cellular activities. In plants, the RRM-protein, both alone and in a complex with its interactors, localizes to nuclear speckles. Transcriptional analyses in wild-type and rrm mutant plants, as well as transcriptional co-analyses, suggest that TERT, the RRM-protein, and the RRM-protein interactors may play important roles in non-telomeric cellular functions.

  11. EST Table: FS810858 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS810858 E_FL_fmgV_33C07_F_0 10/09/28 54 %/184 aa ref|XP_002428298.1| trf2 protein,... putative [Pediculus humanus corporis] gb|EEB15560.1| trf2 protein, putative [Pediculus humanus corporis] 10

  12. EST Table: FS916962 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS916962 E_FL_fufe_39O05_F_0 10/09/28 53 %/188 aa ref|XP_002428298.1| trf2 protein,... putative [Pediculus humanus corporis] gb|EEB15560.1| trf2 protein, putative [Pediculus humanus corporis] 10

  13. EST Table: FS909423 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS909423 E_FL_fufe_17D12_F_0 10/09/28 57 %/173 aa ref|XP_002428298.1| trf2 protein,... putative [Pediculus humanus corporis] gb|EEB15560.1| trf2 protein, putative [Pediculus humanus corporis] 10

  14. E-type cyclins modulate telomere integrity in mammalian male meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manterola, Marcia; Sicinski, Piotr; Wolgemuth, Debra J

    2016-06-01

    We have shown that E-type cyclins are key regulators of mammalian male meiosis. Depletion of cyclin E2 reduced fertility in male mice due to meiotic defects, involving abnormal pairing and synapsis, unrepaired DNA, and loss of telomere structure. These defects were exacerbated by additional loss of cyclin E1, and complete absence of both E-type cyclins produces a meiotic catastrophe. Here, we investigated the involvement of E-type cyclins in maintaining telomere integrity in male meiosis. Spermatocytes lacking cyclin E2 and one E1 allele (E1+/-E2-/-) displayed a high rate of telomere abnormalities but can progress to pachytene and diplotene stages. We show that their telomeres exhibited an aberrant DNA damage repair response during pachynema and that the shelterin complex proteins TRF2 and RAP2 were significantly decreased in the proximal telomeres. Moreover, the insufficient level of these proteins correlated with an increase of γ-H2AX foci in the affected telomeres and resulted in telomere associations involving TRF1 and telomere detachment in later prophase-I stages. These results suggest that E-type cyclins are key modulators of telomere integrity during meiosis by, at least in part, maintaining the balance of shelterin complex proteins, and uncover a novel role of E-type cyclins in regulating chromosome structure during male meiosis.

  15. Protective role of klotho protein on epithelial cells upon co-culture with activated or senescent monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mytych, Jennifer, E-mail: jennifermytych@gmail.com [Institute of Applied Biotechnology and Basic Sciences, University of Rzeszow, Werynia 502, 36-100 Kolbuszowa (Poland); Centre of Applied Biotechnology and Basic Sciences, University of Rzeszow, Werynia 502, 36-100 Kolbuszowa (Poland); Wos, Izabela; Solek, Przemyslaw; Koziorowski, Marek [Institute of Applied Biotechnology and Basic Sciences, University of Rzeszow, Werynia 502, 36-100 Kolbuszowa (Poland); Centre of Applied Biotechnology and Basic Sciences, University of Rzeszow, Werynia 502, 36-100 Kolbuszowa (Poland)

    2017-01-15

    Monocytes ensure proper functioning and maintenance of epithelial cells, while good condition of monocytes is a key factor of these interactions. Although, it was shown that in some circumstances, a population of altered monocytes may appear, there is no data regarding their effect on epithelial cells. In this study, using direct co-culture model with LPS-activated and Dox-induced senescent THP-1 monocytes, we reported for the first time ROS-induced DNA damage, reduced metabolic activity, proliferation inhibition and cell cycle arrest followed by p16-, p21- and p27-mediated DNA damage response pathways activation, premature senescence and apoptosis induction in HeLa cells. Also, we show that klotho protein possessing anti-aging and anti-inflammatory characteristics reduced cytotoxic and genotoxic events by inhibition of insulin/IGF-IR and downregulation of TRF1 and TRF2 proteins. Therefore, klotho protein could be considered as a protective factor against changes caused by altered monocytes in epithelial cells. - Highlights: • Activated and senescent THP-1 monocytes induced cyto- and genotoxicity in HeLa cells. • Altered monocytes provoked oxidative and nitrosative stress-induced DNA damage. • DNA damage activated DDR pathways and lead to premature senescence and apoptosis. • Klotho reduced ROS/RNS-mediated toxicity through insulin/IGF-IR pathway inhibition. • Klotho protects HeLa cells from cyto- and genotoxicity induced by altered monocytes.

  16. SLX4 Assembles a Telomere Maintenance Toolkit by Bridging Multiple Endonucleases with Telomeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingbing Wan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available SLX4 interacts with several endonucleases to resolve structural barriers in DNA metabolism. SLX4 also interacts with telomeric protein TRF2 in human cells. The molecular mechanism of these interactions at telomeres remains unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of the TRF2-binding motif of SLX4 (SLX4TBM in complex with the TRFH domain of TRF2 (TRF2TRFH and map the interactions of SLX4 with endonucleases SLX1, XPF, and MUS81. TRF2 recognizes a unique HxLxP motif on SLX4 via the peptide-binding site in its TRFH domain. Telomeric localization of SLX4 and associated nucleases depend on the SLX4-endonuclease and SLX4-TRF2 interactions and the protein levels of SLX4 and TRF2. SLX4 assembles an endonuclease toolkit that negatively regulates telomere length via SLX1-catalyzed nucleolytic resolution of telomere DNA structures. We propose that the SLX4-TRF2 complex serves as a double-layer scaffold bridging multiple endonucleases with telomeres for recombination-based telomere maintenance.

  17. Suppression of telomere-binding protein TPP1 resulted in telomere dysfunction and enhanced radiation sensitivity in telomerase-negative osteosarcoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Weiguang [Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Department of Oncology, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Soochow University, Changzhou (China); Wu, Qinqin [Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Changzhou Tumor Hospital, Soochow University, Changzhou (China); Zhou, Fuxiang; Xie, Conghua [Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Wu, Changping, E-mail: wcpzlk@163.com [Department of Oncology, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Soochow University, Changzhou (China); Zhou, Yunfeng, E-mail: yfzhouwhu@163.com [Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China)

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • Down-regulation of TPP1 shortened telomere length in telomerase-negative cells. • Down-regulation of TPP1 induced cell apoptosis in telomerase-negative cells. • Down-regulation of TPP1 increased radiosensitivity in telomerase-negative cells. - Abstract: Mammalian telomeres are protected by the shelterin complex that contains the six core proteins POT1, TPP1, TIN2, TRF1, TRF2 and RAP1. TPP1, formerly known as TINT1, PTOP, and PIP1, is a key factor that regulates telomerase recruitment and activity. In addition to this, TPP1 is required to mediate the shelterin assembly and stabilize telomere. Previous work has found that TPP1 expression was elevated in radioresistant cells and that overexpression of TPP1 led to radioresistance and telomere lengthening in telomerase-positive cells. However, the exact effects and mechanism of TPP1 on radiosensitivity are yet to be precisely defined in the ALT cells. Here we report on the phenotypes of the conditional deletion of TPP1 from the human osteosarcoma U2OS cells using ALT pathway to extend the telomeres.TPP1 deletion resulted in telomere shortening, increased apoptosis and radiation sensitivity enhancement. Together, our findings show that TPP1 plays a vital role in telomere maintenance and protection and establish an intimate relationship between TPP1, telomere and cellular response to ionizing radiation, but likely has the specific mechanism yet to be defined.

  18. T-oligo as an anticancer agent in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojdyla, Luke; Stone, Amanda L. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, IL (United States); Sethakorn, Nan [Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Uppada, Srijayaprakash B.; Devito, Joseph T. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, IL (United States); Bissonnette, Marc [Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Puri, Neelu, E-mail: neelupur@uic.edu [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, IL (United States)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • T-oligo induces cell cycle arrest, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation in CRC. • Treatment with T-oligo downregulates telomere-associated proteins. • T-oligo combined with an EGFR-TKI additively inhibits cellular proliferation. • T-oligo has potential as an effective therapeutic agent for CRC. - Abstract: In the United States, there will be an estimated 96,830 new cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) and 50,310 deaths in 2014. CRC is often detected at late stages of the disease, at which point there is no effective chemotherapy. Thus, there is an urgent need for effective novel therapies that have minimal effects on normal cells. T-oligo, an oligonucleotide homologous to the 3′-telomere overhang, induces potent DNA damage responses in multiple malignant cell types, however, its efficacy in CRC has not been studied. This is the first investigation demonstrating T-oligo-induced anticancer effects in two CRC cell lines, HT-29 and LoVo, which are highly resistant to conventional chemotherapies. In this investigation, we show that T-oligo may mediate its DNA damage responses through the p53/p73 pathway, thereby inhibiting cellular proliferation and inducing apoptosis or senescence. Additionally, upregulation of downstream DNA damage response proteins, including E2F1, p53 or p73, was observed. In LoVo cells, T-oligo induced senescence, decreased clonogenicity, and increased expression of senescence associated proteins p21, p27, and p53. In addition, downregulation of POT1 and TRF2, two components of the shelterin protein complex which protects telomeric ends, was observed. Moreover, we studied the antiproliferative effects of T-oligo in combination with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Gefitinib, which resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation. Collectively, these data provide evidence that T-oligo alone, or in combination with other molecularly targeted therapies, has potential as an anti-cancer agent in CRC.

  19. AKTIP/Ft1, a New Shelterin-Interacting Factor Required for Telomere Maintenance.

    KAUST Repository

    Burla, Romina

    2015-06-25

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes that protect the ends of linear chromosomes from incomplete replication, degradation and detection as DNA breaks. Mammalian telomeres are protected by shelterin, a multiprotein complex that binds the TTAGGG telomeric repeats and recruits a series of additional factors that are essential for telomere function. Although many shelterin-associated proteins have been so far identified, the inventory of shelterin-interacting factors required for telomere maintenance is still largely incomplete. Here, we characterize AKTIP/Ft1 (human AKTIP and mouse Ft1 are orthologous), a novel mammalian shelterin-bound factor identified on the basis of its homology with the Drosophila telomere protein Pendolino. AKTIP/Ft1 shares homology with the E2 variant ubiquitin-conjugating (UEV) enzymes and has been previously implicated in the control of apoptosis and in vesicle trafficking. RNAi-mediated depletion of AKTIP results in formation of telomere dysfunction foci (TIFs). Consistent with these results, AKTIP interacts with telomeric DNA and binds the shelterin components TRF1 and TRF2 both in vivo and in vitro. Analysis of AKTIP- depleted human primary fibroblasts showed that they are defective in PCNA recruiting and arrest in the S phase due to the activation of the intra S checkpoint. Accordingly, AKTIP physically interacts with PCNA and the RPA70 DNA replication factor. Ft1-depleted p53-/- MEFs did not arrest in the S phase but displayed significant increases in multiple telomeric signals (MTS) and sister telomere associations (STAs), two hallmarks of defective telomere replication. In addition, we found an epistatic relation for MST formation between Ft1 and TRF1, which has been previously shown to be required for replication fork progression through telomeric DNA. Ch-IP experiments further suggested that in AKTIP-depleted cells undergoing the S phase, TRF1 is less tightly bound to telomeric DNA than in controls. Thus, our results collectively

  20. Identification of the functional domains of the telomere protein Rap1 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikumi Fujita

    Full Text Available The telomere at the end of a linear chromosome plays crucial roles in genome stability. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the Rap1 protein, one of the central players at the telomeres, associates with multiple proteins to regulate various telomere functions, such as the maintenance of telomere DNA length, telomere end protection, maintenance of telomere heterochromatin, and telomere clustering in meiosis. The molecular bases of the interactions between Rap1 and its partners, however, remain largely unknown. Here, we describe the identification of the interaction domains of Rap1 with its partners. The Bqt1/Bqt2 complex, which is required for normal meiotic progression, Poz1, which is required for telomere length control, and Taz1, which is required for the recruitment of Rap1 to telomeres, bind to distinct domains in the C-terminal half of Rap1. Intriguingly, analyses of a series of deletion mutants for rap1(+ have revealed that the long N-terminal region (1-456 a.a. [amino acids] of Rap1 (full length: 693 a.a. is not required for telomere DNA length control, telomere end protection, and telomere gene silencing, whereas the C-terminal region (457-693 a.a. containing Poz1- and Taz1-binding domains plays important roles in those functions. Furthermore, the Bqt1/Bqt2- and Taz1-binding domains are essential for normal spore formation after meiosis. Our results suggest that the C-terminal half of Rap1 is critical for the primary telomere functions, whereas the N-terminal region containing the BRCT (BRCA1 C-terminus and Myb domains, which are evolutionally conserved among the Rap1 family proteins, does not play a major role at the telomeres.

  1. Curcusone C induces telomeric DNA-damage response in cancer cells through inhibition of telomeric repeat factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxue; Cao, Jiaojiao; Zhu, Jian-Yong; Qiu, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Shu, Bing; Ou, Tian-Miao; Tan, Jia-Heng; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu; Yin, Sheng; Li, Ding

    2017-11-01

    Telomeric repeat factor 2 (known as TRF2 or TERF2) is a key component of telomere protection protein complex named as Shelterin. TRF2 helps the folding of telomere to form T-loop structure and the suppression of ATM-dependent DNA damage response activation. TRF2 has been recognized as a potentially new therapeutic target for cancer treatment. In our routine screening of small molecule libraries, we found that Curcusone C had significant effect in disrupting the binding between TRF2 and telomeric DNA, with potent antitumor activity against cancer cells. Our result showed that Curcusone C could bind with TRF2 without binding interaction with TRF1 (telomeric repeat factor 1) although these two proteins share high sequence homology, indicating that their binding conformations and biological functions in telomere could be different. Our mechanistic studies showed that Curcusone C bound with TRF2 possibly through its DNA binding site causing blockage of its interaction with telomeric DNA. Further in cellular studies indicated that the interaction of TRF2 with Curcusone C could activate DNA-damage response, inhibit tumor cell proliferation, and cause cell cycle arrest, resulting in tumor cell apoptosis. Our studies showed that Curcusone C could become a promising lead compound for further development for cancer treatment. Here, TRF2 was firstly identified as a target of Curcusone C. It is likely that the anti-cancer activity of some other terpenes and terpenoids are related with their possible effect for telomere protection proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Protein Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Protein Foods Foods high in protein such as fish, ... for the vegetarian proteins, whether they have carbohydrate. Protein Choices Plant-Based Proteins Plant-based protein foods ...

  3. Protein-protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byron, Olwyn; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Responsive formation of protein:protein interaction (PPI) upon diverse stimuli is a fundament of cellular function. As a consequence, PPIs are complex, adaptive entities, and exist in structurally heterogeneous interplays defined by the energetic states of the free and complexed protomers. The bi...

  4. High Mobility Group A2 protects cancer cells against telomere dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Suchitra; Begum, Farhana; Gim, Jeonga; Wark, Landon; Henderson, Dana; Davie, James R.

    2016-01-01

    The non-histone chromatin binding protein High Mobility Group AT-hook protein 2 (HMGA2) plays important roles in the repair and protection of genomic DNA in embryonic stem cells and cancer cells. Here we show that HMGA2 localizes to mammalian telomeres and enhances telomere stability in cancer cells. We present a novel interaction of HMGA2 with the key shelterin protein TRF2. We found that the linker (L1) region of HMGA2 contributes to this interaction but the ATI-L1-ATII molecular region of HMGA2 is required for strong interaction with TRF2. This interaction was independent of HMGA2 DNA-binding and did not require the TRF2 interacting partner RAP1 but involved the homodimerization and hinge regions of TRF2. HMGA2 retained TRF2 at telomeres and reduced telomere-dysfunction despite induced telomere stress. Silencing of HMGA2 resulted in (i) reduced binding of TRF2 to telomere DNA as observed by ChIP, (ii) increased telomere instability and (iii) the formation of telomere dysfunction-induced foci (TIF). This resulted in increased telomere aggregation, anaphase bridges and micronuclei. HMGA2 prevented ATM-dependent pTRF2T188 phosphorylation and attenuated signaling via the telomere specific ATM-CHK2-CDC25C DNA damage signaling axis. In summary, our data demonstrate a unique and novel role of HMGA2 in telomere protection and promoting telomere stability in cancer cells. This identifies HMGA2 as a new therapeutic target for the destabilization of telomeres in HMGA2+ cancer cells. PMID:26799419

  5. Total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  6. Protein Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  7. The G-quadruplex ligand telomestatin impairs binding of topoisomerase IIIalpha to G-quadruplex-forming oligonucleotides and uncaps telomeres in ALT cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassima Temime-Smaali

    Full Text Available In Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT cell lines, specific nuclear bodies called APBs (ALT-associated PML bodies concentrate telomeric DNA, shelterin components and recombination factors associated with telomere recombination. Topoisomerase IIIalpha (Topo III is an essential telomeric-associated factor in ALT cells. We show here that the binding of Topo III to telomeric G-overhang is modulated by G-quadruplex formation. Topo III binding to G-quadruplex-forming oligonucleotides was strongly inhibited by telomestatin, a potent and specific G-quadruplex ligand. In ALT cells, telomestatin treatment resulted in the depletion of the Topo III/BLM/TRF2 complex and the disruption of APBs and led to the segregation of PML, shelterin components and Topo III. Interestingly, a DNA damage response was observed at telomeres in telomestatin-treated cells. These data indicate the importance of G-quadruplex stabilization during telomere maintenance in ALT cells. The function of TRF2/Topo III/BLM in the resolution of replication intermediates at telomeres is discussed.

  8. AKTIP/Ft1, a New Shelterin-Interacting Factor Required for Telomere Maintenance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Burla

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes that protect the ends of linear chromosomes from incomplete replication, degradation and detection as DNA breaks. Mammalian telomeres are protected by shelterin, a multiprotein complex that binds the TTAGGG telomeric repeats and recruits a series of additional factors that are essential for telomere function. Although many shelterin-associated proteins have been so far identified, the inventory of shelterin-interacting factors required for telomere maintenance is still largely incomplete. Here, we characterize AKTIP/Ft1 (human AKTIP and mouse Ft1 are orthologous, a novel mammalian shelterin-bound factor identified on the basis of its homology with the Drosophila telomere protein Pendolino. AKTIP/Ft1 shares homology with the E2 variant ubiquitin-conjugating (UEV enzymes and has been previously implicated in the control of apoptosis and in vesicle trafficking. RNAi-mediated depletion of AKTIP results in formation of telomere dysfunction foci (TIFs. Consistent with these results, AKTIP interacts with telomeric DNA and binds the shelterin components TRF1 and TRF2 both in vivo and in vitro. Analysis of AKTIP- depleted human primary fibroblasts showed that they are defective in PCNA recruiting and arrest in the S phase due to the activation of the intra S checkpoint. Accordingly, AKTIP physically interacts with PCNA and the RPA70 DNA replication factor. Ft1-depleted p53-/- MEFs did not arrest in the S phase but displayed significant increases in multiple telomeric signals (MTS and sister telomere associations (STAs, two hallmarks of defective telomere replication. In addition, we found an epistatic relation for MST formation between Ft1 and TRF1, which has been previously shown to be required for replication fork progression through telomeric DNA. Ch-IP experiments further suggested that in AKTIP-depleted cells undergoing the S phase, TRF1 is less tightly bound to telomeric DNA than in controls. Thus, our results

  9. Whey Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... protein daily for 2 years does not improve bone density in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Weight loss. Most research suggests that taking whey protein alone, along with diet modifications, or while following an exercise plan does not seem to reduce weight for ...

  10. Protein Extractability

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    limited to high oleic acid oil and water purification property (Katayon et al., 2006; Foid et al., 2001 and. Folkard et al., 1993), whereas it contains up to. 332.5 g of crude protein per kg of sample (Jose et al., 1999). Studies to characterize the interaction effects of pH and salts on the extraction of. PROTEIN EXTRACTABILITY ...

  11. Tau protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini; Kristensen, Kim; Bahl, Jmc

    2011-01-01

    Background: Tau protein has been proposed as biomarker of axonal damage leading to irreversible neurological impairment in MS. CSF concentrations may be useful when determining risk of progression from ON to MS. Objective: To investigate the association between tau protein concentration and 14......-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) versus patients with monosymptomatic onset who progressed to multiple sclerosis (MS). To evaluate results against data found in a complete literature review. Methods: A total of 66 patients with MS and/or ON from...... the Department of Neurology of Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, were included. CSF samples were analysed for tau protein and 14-3-3 protein, and clinical and paraclinical information was obtained from medical records. Results: The study shows a significantly increased concentration of tau...

  12. Protein-Protein Interaction Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szklarczyk, Damian; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2015-01-01

    of research are explored. Here we present an overview of the most widely used protein-protein interaction databases and the methods they employ to gather, combine, and predict interactions. We also point out the trade-off between comprehensiveness and accuracy and the main pitfall scientists have to be aware...

  13. A major role for the Plasmodium falciparum ApiAP2 protein PfSIP2 in chromosome end biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Flueck

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The heterochromatic environment and physical clustering of chromosome ends at the nuclear periphery provide a functional and structural framework for antigenic variation and evolution of subtelomeric virulence gene families in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. While recent studies assigned important roles for reversible histone modifications, silent information regulator 2 and heterochromatin protein 1 (PfHP1 in epigenetic control of variegated expression, factors involved in the recruitment and organization of subtelomeric heterochromatin remain unknown. Here, we describe the purification and characterization of PfSIP2, a member of the ApiAP2 family of putative transcription factors, as the unknown nuclear factor interacting specifically with cis-acting SPE2 motif arrays in subtelomeric domains. Interestingly, SPE2 is not bound by the full-length protein but rather by a 60kDa N-terminal domain, PfSIP2-N, which is released during schizogony. Our experimental re-definition of the SPE2/PfSIP2-N interaction highlights the strict requirement of both adjacent AP2 domains and a conserved bipartite SPE2 consensus motif for high-affinity binding. Genome-wide in silico mapping identified 777 putative binding sites, 94% of which cluster in heterochromatic domains upstream of subtelomeric var genes and in telomere-associated repeat elements. Immunofluorescence and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays revealed co-localization of PfSIP2-N with PfHP1 at chromosome ends. Genome-wide ChIP demonstrated the exclusive binding of PfSIP2-N to subtelomeric SPE2 landmarks in vivo but not to single chromosome-internal sites. Consistent with this specialized distribution pattern, PfSIP2-N over-expression has no effect on global gene transcription. Hence, contrary to the previously proposed role for this factor in gene activation, our results provide strong evidence for the first time for the involvement of an ApiAP2 factor in heterochromatin formation

  14. Dietary Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because your body doesn't store it the way it stores fats or carbohydrates. How much you need depends on your age, sex, health, and level of physical activity. Most Americans eat enough protein in their diet.

  15. Nucleolar organization, ribosomal DNA array stability, and acrocentric chromosome integrity are linked to telomere function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin M Stimpson

    Full Text Available The short arms of the ten acrocentric human chromosomes share several repetitive DNAs, including ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA. The rDNA arrays correspond to nucleolar organizing regions that coalesce each cell cycle to form the nucleolus. Telomere disruption by expressing a mutant version of telomere binding protein TRF2 (dnTRF2 causes non-random acrocentric fusions, as well as large-scale nucleolar defects. The mechanisms responsible for acrocentric chromosome sensitivity to dysfunctional telomeres are unclear. In this study, we show that TRF2 normally associates with the nucleolus and rDNA. However, when telomeres are crippled by dnTRF2 or RNAi knockdown of TRF2, gross nucleolar and chromosomal changes occur. We used the controllable dnTRF2 system to precisely dissect the timing and progression of nucleolar and chromosomal instability induced by telomere dysfunction, demonstrating that nucleolar changes precede the DNA damage and morphological changes that occur at acrocentric short arms. The rDNA repeat arrays on the short arms decondense, and are coated by RNA polymerase I transcription binding factor UBF, physically linking acrocentrics to one another as they become fusogenic. These results highlight the importance of telomere function in nucleolar stability and structural integrity of acrocentric chromosomes, particularly the rDNA arrays. Telomeric stress is widely accepted to cause DNA damage at chromosome ends, but our findings suggest that it also disrupts chromosome structure beyond the telomere region, specifically within the rDNA arrays located on acrocentric chromosomes. These results have relevance for Robertsonian translocation formation in humans and mechanisms by which acrocentric-acrocentric fusions are promoted by DNA damage and repair.

  16. Specialized and redundant roles of TBP and a vertebrate-specific TBP paralog in embryonic gene regulation in Xenopus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jallow, Z.; Jacobi, U.G.; Weeks, D.L.; Dawid, IB; Veenstra, G.J.C.

    2004-01-01

    The general transcription factor TATA-binding protein (TBP) is a key initiation factor involved in transcription by all three eukaryotic RNA polymerases. In addition, the related metazoan-specific TBP-like factor (TLF/TRF2) is essential for transcription of a distinct subset of genes. Here we

  17. Increased shelterin mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and skeletal muscle following an ultra-long-distance running event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laye, Matthew J; Solomon, Thomas; Karstoft, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    telomere length, telomerase activity, hTert mRNA, or hterc mRNAs found in PBMCs. Higher protein concentrations of TRF2 were found in skeletal muscle vs. PBMCs at rest. Mean telomere length in skeletal muscle did not change and did not contain detectable levels of htert mRNA or telomerase activity...

  18. Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  19. Aquaporin Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Virginia Roche

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins are tetrameric membrane-bound channels that facilitate transport of water and other small solutes across cell membranes. In eukaryotes, they are frequently regulated by gating or trafficking, allowing for the cell to control membrane permeability in a specific manner. Protein–protein interactions play crucial roles in both regulatory processes and also mediate alternative functions such as cell adhesion. In this review, we summarize recent knowledge about aquaporin protein–protein interactions; dividing the interactions into three types: (1 interactions between aquaporin tetramers; (2 interactions between aquaporin monomers within a tetramer (hetero-tetramerization; and (3 transient interactions with regulatory proteins. We particularly focus on the structural aspects of the interactions, discussing the small differences within a conserved overall fold that allow for aquaporins to be differentially regulated in an organism-, tissue- and trigger-specific manner. A deep knowledge about these differences is needed to fully understand aquaporin function and regulation in many physiological processes, and may enable design of compounds targeting specific aquaporins for treatment of human disease.

  20. Protein immobilization strategies for protein biochips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusmini, F.; Rusmini, Federica; Zhong, Zhiyuan; Feijen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    In the past few years, protein biochips have emerged as promising proteomic and diagnostic tools for obtaining information about protein functions and interactions. Important technological innovations have been made. However, considerable development is still required, especially regarding protein

  1. Interaction entropy for protein-protein binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhaoxi; Yan, Yu N.; Yang, Maoyou; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2017-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are at the heart of signal transduction and are central to the function of protein machine in biology. The highly specific protein-protein binding is quantitatively characterized by the binding free energy whose accurate calculation from the first principle is a grand challenge in computational biology. In this paper, we show how the interaction entropy approach, which was recently proposed for protein-ligand binding free energy calculation, can be applied to computing the entropic contribution to the protein-protein binding free energy. Explicit theoretical derivation of the interaction entropy approach for protein-protein interaction system is given in detail from the basic definition. Extensive computational studies for a dozen realistic protein-protein interaction systems are carried out using the present approach and comparisons of the results for these protein-protein systems with those from the standard normal mode method are presented. Analysis of the present method for application in protein-protein binding as well as the limitation of the method in numerical computation is discussed. Our study and analysis of the results provided useful information for extracting correct entropic contribution in protein-protein binding from molecular dynamics simulations.

  2. Femtosecond near-infrared laser microirradiation reveals a crucial role for PARP signaling on factor assemblies at DNA damage sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saquilabon Cruz, Gladys Mae; Kong, Xiangduo; Silva, Bárbara Alcaraz; Khatibzadeh, Nima; Thai, Ryan; Berns, Michael W.; Yokomori, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Laser microirradiation is a powerful tool for real-time single-cell analysis of the DNA damage response (DDR). It is often found, however, that factor recruitment or modification profiles vary depending on the laser system employed. This is likely due to an incomplete understanding of how laser conditions/dosages affect the amounts and types of damage and the DDR. We compared different irradiation conditions using a femtosecond near-infrared laser and found distinct damage site recruitment thresholds for 53BP1 and TRF2 correlating with the dose-dependent increase of strand breaks and damage complexity. Low input-power microirradiation that induces relatively simple strand breaks led to robust recruitment of 53BP1 but not TRF2. In contrast, increased strand breaks with complex damage including crosslinking and base damage generated by high input-power microirradiation resulted in TRF2 recruitment to damage sites with no 53BP1 clustering. We found that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation distinguishes between the two damage states and that PARP activation is essential for rapid TRF2 recruitment while suppressing 53BP1 accumulation at damage sites. Thus, our results reveal that careful titration of laser irradiation conditions allows induction of varying amounts and complexities of DNA damage that are gauged by differential PARP activation regulating protein assembly at the damage site. PMID:26424850

  3. Learning about Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Learning About Proteins KidsHealth / For Kids / Learning About Proteins What's in ... from the foods you eat. Different Kinds of Protein Protein from animal sources, such as meat and ...

  4. Efficient protein alignment algorithm for protein search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zaixin; Zhao, Zhiyu; Fu, Bin

    2010-01-18

    Proteins show a great variety of 3D conformations, which can be used to infer their evolutionary relationship and to classify them into more general groups; therefore protein structure alignment algorithms are very helpful for protein biologists. However, an accurate alignment algorithm itself may be insufficient for effective discovering of structural relationships among tens of thousands of proteins. Due to the exponentially increasing amount of protein structural data, a fast and accurate structure alignment tool is necessary to access protein classification and protein similarity search; however, the complexity of current alignment algorithms are usually too high to make a fully alignment-based classification and search practical. We have developed an efficient protein pairwise alignment algorithm and applied it to our protein search tool, which aligns a query protein structure in the pairwise manner with all protein structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) to output similar protein structures. The algorithm can align hundreds of pairs of protein structures in one second. Given a protein structure, the tool efficiently discovers similar structures from tens of thousands of structures stored in the PDB always in 2 minutes in a single machine and 20 seconds in our cluster of 6 machines. The algorithm has been fully implemented and is accessible online at our webserver, which is supported by a cluster of computers. Our algorithm can work out hundreds of pairs of protein alignments in one second. Therefore, it is very suitable for protein search. Our experimental results show that it is more accurate than other well known protein search systems in finding proteins which are structurally similar at SCOP family and superfamily levels, and its speed is also competitive with those systems. In terms of the pairwise alignment performance, it is as good as some well known alignment algorithms.

  5. Small heat shock proteins, protein degradation and protein aggregation diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Michel J.; Zijlstra, Marianne P.; Carra, Serena; Sibon, Ody C. M.; Kampinga, Harm H.

    Small heat shock proteins have been characterized in vitro as ATP-independent molecular chaperones that can prevent aggregation of un- or misfolded proteins and assist in their refolding with the help of ATP-dependent chaperone machines (e. g., the Hsp70 proteins). Comparison of the functionality of

  6. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  7. Protein docking prediction using predicted protein-protein interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many important cellular processes are carried out by protein complexes. To provide physical pictures of interacting proteins, many computational protein-protein prediction methods have been developed in the past. However, it is still difficult to identify the correct docking complex structure within top ranks among alternative conformations. Results We present a novel protein docking algorithm that utilizes imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction for guiding protein docking. Since the accuracy of protein binding site prediction varies depending on cases, the challenge is to develop a method which does not deteriorate but improves docking results by using a binding site prediction which may not be 100% accurate. The algorithm, named PI-LZerD (using Predicted Interface with Local 3D Zernike descriptor-based Docking algorithm, is based on a pair wise protein docking prediction algorithm, LZerD, which we have developed earlier. PI-LZerD starts from performing docking prediction using the provided protein-protein binding interface prediction as constraints, which is followed by the second round of docking with updated docking interface information to further improve docking conformation. Benchmark results on bound and unbound cases show that PI-LZerD consistently improves the docking prediction accuracy as compared with docking without using binding site prediction or using the binding site prediction as post-filtering. Conclusion We have developed PI-LZerD, a pairwise docking algorithm, which uses imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction to improve docking accuracy. PI-LZerD consistently showed better prediction accuracy over alternative methods in the series of benchmark experiments including docking using actual docking interface site predictions as well as unbound docking cases.

  8. Our interests in protein-protein interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    protein interactions. Evolution of P-P partnerships. Evolution of P-P structures. Evolutionary dynamics of P-P interactions. Dynamics of P-P interaction network. Host-pathogen interactions. CryoEM mapping of gigantic protein assemblies.

  9. Evolution of protein-protein interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Evolution of protein-protein interactions · Our interests in protein-protein interactions · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19 · Slide 20.

  10. 24-hour urine protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine protein - 24 hour; Chronic kidney disease - urine protein; Kidney failure - urine protein ... Bladder tumor Heart failure High blood pressure during pregnancy ( preeclampsia ) Kidney disease caused by diabetes, high blood pressure, autoimmune disorders, ...

  11. Protein in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - protein ... Protein foods are broken down into parts called amino acids during digestion. The human body needs a ... to eat animal products to get all the protein you need in your diet. Amino acids are ...

  12. Protein-losing enteropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  13. Nanotechnologies in protein microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizkova, Sona; Heger, Zbynek; Zalewska, Marta; Moulick, Amitava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology became an important research tool for study and detection of proteins, protein-protein interactions and a number of other applications. The utilization of nanoparticle-based materials and nanotechnology-based techniques for immobilization allows us not only to extend the surface for biomolecule immobilization resulting in enhanced substrate binding properties, decreased background signals and enhanced reporter systems for more sensitive assays. Generally in contemporarily developed microarray systems, multiple nanotechnology-based techniques are combined. In this review, applications of nanoparticles and nanotechnologies in creating protein microarrays, proteins immobilization and detection are summarized. We anticipate that advanced nanotechnologies can be exploited to expand promising fields of proteins identification, monitoring of protein-protein or drug-protein interactions, or proteins structures.

  14. The Leishmania amazonensis TRF (TTAGGG repeat-binding factor homologue binds and co-localizes with telomeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freitas Lucio de H

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomeres are specialized structures at the end of chromosomes essential for maintaining genome stability and cell viability. The importance of telomeric proteins for telomere maintenance has increased our interest in the identification of homologues within the genus Leishmania. The mammalian TRF1 and TRF2 proteins, for example, bind double-stranded telomeres via a Myb-like DNA-binding domain and are involved with telomere length regulation and chromosome end protection. In addition, TRF2 can modulate the activity of several enzymes and influence the conformation of telomeric DNA. In this work, we identified and characterized a Leishmania protein (LaTRF homologous to both mammalian TRF1 and TRF2. Results LaTRF was cloned using a PCR-based strategy. ClustalW and bl2seq sequence analysis showed that LaTRF shared sequence identity with the Trypanosoma brucei TRF (TbTRF protein and had the same degree of sequence similarities with the dimerization (TRFH and the canonical DNA-binding Myb-like domains of both mammalian TRFs. LaTRF was predicted to be an 82.5 kDa protein, indicating that it is double the size of the trypanosome TRF homologues. Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that LaTRF, similarly to hTRF2, is a nuclear protein that also associates with parasite telomeres. Native and full length LaTRF and a mutant bearing the putative Myb-like domain expressed in bacteria bound double-stranded telomeric DNA in vitro. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that LaTRF interacted specifically with telomeres in vivo. Conclusion The nuclear localization of LaTRF, its association and co-localization with parasite telomeres and its high identity with TbTRF protein, support the hypothesis that LaTRF is a Leishmania telomeric protein.

  15. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, W.R. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  16. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  17. Comparing side chain packing in soluble proteins, protein-protein interfaces, and transmembrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, J C; Acebes, S; Virrueta, A; Butler, M; Regan, L; O'Hern, C S

    2018-02-10

    We compare side chain prediction and packing of core and non-core regions of soluble proteins, protein-protein interfaces, and transmembrane proteins. We first identified or created comparable databases of high-resolution crystal structures of these 3 protein classes. We show that the solvent-inaccessible cores of the 3 classes of proteins are equally densely packed. As a result, the side chains of core residues at protein-protein interfaces and in the membrane-exposed regions of transmembrane proteins can be predicted by the hard-sphere plus stereochemical constraint model with the same high prediction accuracies (>90%) as core residues in soluble proteins. We also find that for all 3 classes of proteins, as one moves away from the solvent-inaccessible core, the packing fraction decreases as the solvent accessibility increases. However, the side chain predictability remains high (80% within 30°) up to a relative solvent accessibility, rSASA≲0.3, for all 3 protein classes. Our results show that ≈40% of the interface regions in protein complexes are "core", that is, densely packed with side chain conformations that can be accurately predicted using the hard-sphere model. We propose packing fraction as a metric that can be used to distinguish real protein-protein interactions from designed, non-binding, decoys. Our results also show that cores of membrane proteins are the same as cores of soluble proteins. Thus, the computational methods we are developing for the analysis of the effect of hydrophobic core mutations in soluble proteins will be equally applicable to analyses of mutations in membrane proteins. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. IGSF9 Family Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria; Walmod, Peter Schledermann

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Turtle and the vertebrate proteins immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF), member 9 (IGSF9/Dasm1) and IGSF9B are members of an evolutionarily ancient protein family. A bioinformatics analysis of the protein family revealed that invertebrates contain only a single IGSF9 family gene......, whereas vertebrates contain two to four genes. In cnidarians, the gene appears to encode a secreted protein, but transmembrane isoforms of the protein have also evolved, and in many species, alternative splicing facilitates the expression of both transmembrane and secreted isoforms. In most species......, the longest isoforms of the proteins have the same general organization as the neural cell adhesion molecule family of cell adhesion molecule proteins, and like this family of proteins, IGSF9 family members are expressed in the nervous system. A review of the literature revealed that Drosophila Turtle...

  19. Peptide segments in protein-protein interfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2006-09-06

    Sep 6, 2006 ... contact surface from the rest of the protein surface have been used to identify the interaction sites (Jones and Thornton. 1997; Neuvirth et al 2004). Protein antigenic sites (epitopes that are recognized by antibodies) could be generally confined to continuous motifs of about 8–24 amino acid residues, or may ...

  20. Surface Mediated Protein Disaggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-03-01

    Preventing protein aggregation is of both biological and industrial importance. Biologically these aggregates are known to cause amyloid type diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Protein aggregation leads to reduced activity of the enzymes in industrial applications. Inter-protein interactions between the hydrophobic residues of the protein are known to be the major driving force for protein aggregation. In the current paper we show how surface chemistry and curvature can be tuned to mitigate these inter-protein interactions. Our results calculated in the framework of the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) lattice model show that, inter-protein interactions can be drastically reduced by increasing the surface hydrophobicity to a critical value corresponding to the adsorption transition of the protein. At this value of surface hydrophobicity, proteins lose inter-protein contacts to gain surface contacts and thus the surface helps in reducing the inter-protein interactions. Further, we show that the adsorption of the proteins inside hydrophobic pores of optimal sizes are most efficient both in reducing inter-protein contacts and simultaneously retaining most of the native-contacts due to strong protein-surface interactions coupled with stabilization due to the confinement. Department of Energy (Grant No DE-FG02-11ER46811).

  1. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2013-09-01

    Motor proteins are enzymatic molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical motion and work. They are critically important for supporting various cellular activities and functions. In the last 15 years significant progress in understanding the functioning of motor proteins has been achieved due to revolutionary breakthroughs in single-molecule experimental techniques and strong advances in theoretical modelling. However, microscopic mechanisms of protein motility are still not well explained, and the collective efforts of many scientists are needed in order to solve these complex problems. In this special section the reader will find the latest advances on the difficult road to mapping motor proteins dynamics in various systems. Recent experimental developments have allowed researchers to monitor and to influence the activity of single motor proteins with a high spatial and temporal resolution. It has stimulated significant theoretical efforts to understand the non-equilibrium nature of protein motility phenomena. The latest results from all these advances are presented and discussed in this special section. We would like to thank the scientists from all over the world who have reported their latest research results for this special section. We are also grateful to the staff and editors of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for their invaluable help in handling all the administrative and refereeing activities. The field of motor proteins and protein motility is fast moving, and we hope that this collection of articles will be a useful source of information in this highly interdisciplinary area. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins contents Physics of protein motility and motor proteinsAnatoly B Kolomeisky Identification of unique interactions between the flexible linker and the RecA-like domains of DEAD-box helicase Mss116 Yuan Zhang, Mirkó Palla, Andrew Sun and Jung-Chi Liao The load dependence of the physical properties of a molecular motor

  2. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick van Rijn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e.g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is dictated by poly-nucleotides namely RNA or DNA. This “biopolymer” directs the proteins and imposes limitations on the structure like the length or diameter of the particle. Not only do these bionanoparticles use polymer-directed self-assembly, also processes like amyloid formation are in a way a result of directed protein assembly by partial unfolded/misfolded biopolymers namely, polypeptides. The combination of proteins and synthetic polymers, inspired by the natural processes, are therefore regarded as a highly promising area of research. Directed protein assembly is versatile with respect to the possible interactions which brings together the protein and polymer, e.g., electrostatic, v.d. Waals forces or covalent conjugation, and possible combinations are numerous due to the large amounts of different polymers and proteins available. The protein-polymer interacting behavior and overall morphology is envisioned to aid in clarifying protein-protein interactions and are thought to entail some interesting new functions and properties which will ultimately lead to novel bio-hybrid materials.

  3. Protein Data Bank (PDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive is the single worldwide repository of information about the 3D structures of large biological molecules, including proteins and...

  4. Urine protein electrophoresis test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine protein electrophoresis; UPEP; Multiple myeloma - UPEP; Waldenström macroglobulinemia - UPEP; Amyloidosis - UPEP ... special paper and apply an electric current. The proteins move and form visible bands. These reveal the ...

  5. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003540.htm Protein electrophoresis - serum To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. This lab test measures the types of protein in the fluid (serum) part of a blood ...

  6. Statistical Properties of Protein-Protein Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaly Mezei

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The properties of 1172 protein complexes (downloaded from the Protein Data Bank (PDB have been studied based on the concept of circular variance as a buriedness indicator and the concept of mutual proximity as a parameter-free definition of contact. The propensities of residues to be in the protein, on the surface or form contact, as well as residue pairs to form contact were calculated. In addition, the concept of circular variance has been used to compare the ruggedness and shape of the contact surface with the overall surface.

  7. Destabilized bioluminescent proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Michael S. (Knoxville, TN); Rakesh, Gupta (New Delhi, IN); Gary, Sayler S. (Blaine, TN)

    2007-07-31

    Purified nucleic acids, vectors and cells containing a gene cassette encoding at least one modified bioluminescent protein, wherein the modification includes the addition of a peptide sequence. The duration of bioluminescence emitted by the modified bioluminescent protein is shorter than the duration of bioluminescence emitted by an unmodified form of the bioluminescent protein.

  8. CSF total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) ...

  9. The human TTAGGG repeat factors 1 and 2 bind to a subset of interstitial telomeric sequences and satellite repeats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas Simonet; Elena Giulotto; Frederique Magdinier; Béatrice Horard; Pascal Barbry; Rainer Waldmann; Eric Gison; Laure-Emmanuelle Zaragosi; Claude Philippe; Kevin Lebrigand; Clémentine Schouteden; Adeline Augereau; Serge Bauwens; Jing Ye; Marco Santagostino

    2011-01-01

    The study of the proteins that bind to telomeric DNA in mammals has provided a deep understanding of the mech anisms involved in chromosome-end protection. However, very little is known on the binding of these proteins to nontelomeric DNA sequences. The TTAGGG DNA repeat proteins 1 and 2 (TRF1 and TRF2) bind to mammalian telomeres as part of the shelterin complex and are essential for maintaining chromosome end stability. In this study, we combined chromatin immunoprecipitation with high-throughput sequencing to map at high sensitivity and resolution the human chromosomal sites to which TRF1 and TRF2 bind. While most of the identified sequences correspond to telomeric regions, we showed that these two proteins also bind to extratelomeric sites. The vast majority of these extratelomeric sites contains interstitial telomeric sequences (or ITSs). However, we also identified non-iTS sites, which correspond to centromeric and pericentromeric satellite DNA. Interestingly, the TRF-binding sites are often located in the proximity of genes or within introns. We propose that TRF1 and TRF2 couple the functional state of telomeres to the long-range organization of chromosomes and gene regulation networks by binding to extratelomeric sequences.

  10. Protein - Which is Best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jay R; Falvo, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    Protein intake that exceeds the recommended daily allowance is widely accepted for both endurance and power athletes. However, considering the variety of proteins that are available much less is known concerning the benefits of consuming one protein versus another. The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze key factors in order to make responsible recommendations to both the general and athletic populations. Evaluation of a protein is fundamental in determining its appropriateness in the human diet. Proteins that are of inferior content and digestibility are important to recognize and restrict or limit in the diet. Similarly, such knowledge will provide an ability to identify proteins that provide the greatest benefit and should be consumed. The various techniques utilized to rate protein will be discussed. Traditionally, sources of dietary protein are seen as either being of animal or vegetable origin. Animal sources provide a complete source of protein (i.e. containing all essential amino acids), whereas vegetable sources generally lack one or more of the essential amino acids. Animal sources of dietary protein, despite providing a complete protein and numerous vitamins and minerals, have some health professionals concerned about the amount of saturated fat common in these foods compared to vegetable sources. The advent of processing techniques has shifted some of this attention and ignited the sports supplement marketplace with derivative products such as whey, casein and soy. Individually, these products vary in quality and applicability to certain populations. The benefits that these particular proteins possess are discussed. In addition, the impact that elevated protein consumption has on health and safety issues (i.e. bone health, renal function) are also reviewed. Key PointsHigher protein needs are seen in athletic populations.Animal proteins is an important source of protein, however potential health concerns do exist from a diet of protein

  11. Antimicrobial proteins : from old proteins, new tricks

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Val; Dyrynda, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the main types of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) synthesised by crustaceans, primarily those identified in shrimp, crayfish, crab and lobster. It includes an overview of their range of microbicidal activities and the current landscape of our understanding of their gene expression patterns in different body tissues. It further summarises how their expression might change following various types of immune challenges. Included in the review are proteins or protein fragments ...

  12. Protein utilization in correlation to protein intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcovicová, M; Dibák, O

    1980-01-01

    In a 14-day experiment, weaned and adult rats were given ad libitum isocaloric diets with a mounting casein content (5, 10, 15, 25 and 40% by weight) and growth parameters of protein biological value, PER and NPR, and the utilization parameters NPU (body protein) and LPU (liver protein) were determined together with phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (gluconeogenetic enzyme) and pyruvate kinase (glycolytic enzyme) activity in the animals' liver. The decrease in all the biological value parameters in weaned rats on 25% and 40% casein diets and in adult rats on 15%, 25% and 40% casein diets shows that these concentrations are too high for the organism. The decrease in PER and diminished weight and body and liver nitrogen increments in both age groups in animals with a low protein intake is evidence that 5% casein is an inadequate concentration. The optimum diet for weaned rats is thus a 15% casein diet and for adult rats a 10% casein diet, as confirmed by the linear correlation between weight increments, body and liver nitrogen and protein intake and also by gluconeogenetic enzyme activity. Under the given experimental conditions the study is a contribution to the determination of optimum physiological doses of proteins.

  13. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  14. Protein Function Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Leonardo Magalhães; Trefflich, Sheyla; Weiss, Vinícius Almir; Castro, Mauro Antônio Alves

    2017-01-01

    Protein function is a concept that can have different interpretations in different biological contexts, and the number and diversity of novel proteins identified by large-scale "omics" technologies poses increasingly new challenges. In this review we explore current strategies used to predict protein function focused on high-throughput sequence analysis, as for example, inference based on sequence similarity, sequence composition, structure, and protein-protein interaction. Various prediction strategies are discussed together with illustrative workflows highlighting the use of some benchmark tools and knowledge bases in the field.

  15. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  16. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function....... Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides...

  17. Pigment-protein complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegelman, H W

    1980-01-01

    The photosynthetically-active pigment protein complexes of procaryotes and eucaryotes include chlorophyll proteins, carotenochlorophyll proteins, and biliproteins. They are either integral components or attached to photosynthetic membranes. Detergents are frequently required to solubilize the pigment-protein complexes. The membrane localization and detergent solubilization strongly suggest that the pigment-protein complexes are bound to the membranes by hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic interactions of proteins are characterized by an increase in entropy. Their bonding energy is directly related to temperature and ionic strength. Hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, a relatively new separation procedure, can furnish an important method for the purification of pigment-protein complexes. Phycobilisome purification and properties provide an example of the need to maintain hydrophobic interactions to preserve structure and function.

  18. Protein solubility modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agena, S. M.; Pusey, M. L.; Bogle, I. D.

    1999-01-01

    A thermodynamic framework (UNIQUAC model with temperature dependent parameters) is applied to model the salt-induced protein crystallization equilibrium, i.e., protein solubility. The framework introduces a term for the solubility product describing protein transfer between the liquid and solid phase and a term for the solution behavior describing deviation from ideal solution. Protein solubility is modeled as a function of salt concentration and temperature for a four-component system consisting of a protein, pseudo solvent (water and buffer), cation, and anion (salt). Two different systems, lysozyme with sodium chloride and concanavalin A with ammonium sulfate, are investigated. Comparison of the modeled and experimental protein solubility data results in an average root mean square deviation of 5.8%, demonstrating that the model closely follows the experimental behavior. Model calculations and model parameters are reviewed to examine the model and protein crystallization process. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Packing in protein cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, J. C.; Clark, A. H.; Regan, L.; O'Hern, C. S.

    2017-07-01

    Proteins are biological polymers that underlie all cellular functions. The first high-resolution protein structures were determined by x-ray crystallography in the 1960s. Since then, there has been continued interest in understanding and predicting protein structure and stability. It is well-established that a large contribution to protein stability originates from the sequestration from solvent of hydrophobic residues in the protein core. How are such hydrophobic residues arranged in the core; how can one best model the packing of these residues, and are residues loosely packed with multiple allowed side chain conformations or densely packed with a single allowed side chain conformation? Here we show that to properly model the packing of residues in protein cores it is essential that amino acids are represented by appropriately calibrated atom sizes, and that hydrogen atoms are explicitly included. We show that protein cores possess a packing fraction of φ ≈ 0.56 , which is significantly less than the typically quoted value of 0.74 obtained using the extended atom representation. We also compare the results for the packing of amino acids in protein cores to results obtained for jammed packings from discrete element simulations of spheres, elongated particles, and composite particles with bumpy surfaces. We show that amino acids in protein cores pack as densely as disordered jammed packings of particles with similar values for the aspect ratio and bumpiness as found for amino acids. Knowing the structural properties of protein cores is of both fundamental and practical importance. Practically, it enables the assessment of changes in the structure and stability of proteins arising from amino acid mutations (such as those identified as a result of the massive human genome sequencing efforts) and the design of new folded, stable proteins and protein-protein interactions with tunable specificity and affinity.

  20. Expressed protein ligation for a large dimeric protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karagöz, G.E.; Sinnige, T; Hsieh, O.; Rüdiger, S.G.D.

    2011-01-01

    Expressed protein ligation (EPL) is a protein engineering tool for post-translational ligation of protein or peptide fragments. This technique allows modification of specific parts of proteins, opening possibilities for incorporating probes for biophysical applications such as nuclear magnetic

  1. Toxic proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Liuyi; Van Damme, Els J M

    2015-09-01

    Plants have evolved to synthesize a variety of noxious compounds to cope with unfavorable circumstances, among which a large group of toxic proteins that play a critical role in plant defense against predators and microbes. Up to now, a wide range of harmful proteins have been discovered in different plants, including lectins, ribosome-inactivating proteins, protease inhibitors, ureases, arcelins, antimicrobial peptides and pore-forming toxins. To fulfill their role in plant defense, these proteins exhibit various degrees of toxicity towards animals, insects, bacteria or fungi. Numerous studies have been carried out to investigate the toxic effects and mode of action of these plant proteins in order to explore their possible applications. Indeed, because of their biological activities, toxic plant proteins are also considered as potentially useful tools in crop protection and in biomedical applications, such as cancer treatment. Genes encoding toxic plant proteins have been introduced into crop genomes using genetic engineering technology in order to increase the plant's resistance against pathogens and diseases. Despite the availability of ample information on toxic plant proteins, very few publications have attempted to summarize the research progress made during the last decades. This review focuses on the diversity of toxic plant proteins in view of their toxicity as well as their mode of action. Furthermore, an outlook towards the biological role(s) of these proteins and their potential applications is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. PROTEIN - WHICH IS BEST?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Falvo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein intake that exceeds the recommended daily allowance is widely accepted for both endurance and power athletes. However, considering the variety of proteins that are available much less is known concerning the benefits of consuming one protein versus another. The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze key factors in order to make responsible recommendations to both the general and athletic populations. Evaluation of a protein is fundamental in determining its appropriateness in the human diet. Proteins that are of inferior content and digestibility are important to recognize and restrict or limit in the diet. Similarly, such knowledge will provide an ability to identify proteins that provide the greatest benefit and should be consumed. The various techniques utilized to rate protein will be discussed. Traditionally, sources of dietary protein are seen as either being of animal or vegetable origin. Animal sources provide a complete source of protein (i.e. containing all essential amino acids, whereas vegetable sources generally lack one or more of the essential amino acids. Animal sources of dietary protein, despite providing a complete protein and numerous vitamins and minerals, have some health professionals concerned about the amount of saturated fat common in these foods compared to vegetable sources. The advent of processing techniques has shifted some of this attention and ignited the sports supplement marketplace with derivative products such as whey, casein and soy. Individually, these products vary in quality and applicability to certain populations. The benefits that these particular proteins possess are discussed. In addition, the impact that elevated protein consumption has on health and safety issues (i.e. bone health, renal function are also reviewed

  3. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  4. Protein flexibility as a biosignal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qinyi

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic properties of a protein are crucial for all protein functions, and those of signaling proteins are closely related to the biological function of living beings. The protein flexibility signal concept can be used to analyze this relationship. Protein flexibility controls the rate of protein conformational change and influences protein function. The modification of protein flexibility results in a change of protein activity. The logical nature of protein flexibility cannot be explained by applying the principles of protein three-dimensional structure theory or conformation concept. Signaling proteins show high protein flexibility. Many properties of signaling can be traced back to the dynamic natures of signaling protein. The action mechanism of volatile anesthetics and universal cellular reactions are related to flexibility in the change of signaling proteins. We conclude that protein dynamics is an enzyme-enhanced process, called dynamicase.

  5. Supramolecular Chemistry Targeting Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dun, Sam; Ottmann, Christian; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Brunsveld, Luc

    2017-10-11

    The specific recognition of protein surface elements is a fundamental challenge in the life sciences. New developments in this field will form the basis of advanced therapeutic approaches and lead to applications such as sensors, affinity tags, immobilization techniques, and protein-based materials. Synthetic supramolecular molecules and materials are creating new opportunities for protein recognition that are orthogonal to classical small molecule and protein-based approaches. As outlined here, their unique molecular features enable the recognition of amino acids, peptides, and even whole protein surfaces, which can be applied to the modulation and assembly of proteins. We believe that structural insights into these processes are of great value for the further development of this field and have therefore focused this Perspective on contributions that provide such structural data.

  6. Computational Protein Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Kristoffer Enøe

    Proteins are the major functional group of molecules in biology. The impact of protein science on medicine and chemical productions is rapidly increasing. However, the greatest potential remains to be realized. The fi eld of protein design has advanced computational modeling from a tool of support...... to a central method that enables new developments. For example, novel enzymes with functions not found in natural proteins have been de novo designed to give enough activity for experimental optimization. This thesis presents the current state-of-the-art within computational design methods together...... with a novel method based on probability theory. With the aim of assembling a complete pipeline for protein design, this work touches upon several aspects of protein design. The presented work is the computational half of a design project where the other half is dedicated to the experimental part...

  7. [Erythrocyte membrane proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunay, J

    1977-01-01

    Proteins are important constituents of the red blood cell plasma membrane. Several important breakthroughs have occurred in their analysis over the past few years. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis lead to the separation of the major proteins and glycoproteins. Location of most of these proteins -- either on the external, the internal or both surfaces of the membrane -- was determined. The strenght of the binding of the protein to the membrane was established. Hydrophobicity of membrane proteins has so far hindered their purification. However, the major glycoprotein (glycophorin A) was isolated and recently sequenced. The description of several membrane-associated enzyme activities has been followed by some understanding of their specific role in the red blood cell physiology. Abnormalities of glycoproteins, Ca2+-ATPase and of membrane protein phosphorylation have been reported under various conditions: sickle cell disease, hereditary spherocytoses, progressive muscular dystrophy.

  8. Algorithms for protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainza, Pablo; Nisonoff, Hunter M; Donald, Bruce R

    2016-08-01

    Computational structure-based protein design programs are becoming an increasingly important tool in molecular biology. These programs compute protein sequences that are predicted to fold to a target structure and perform a desired function. The success of a program's predictions largely relies on two components: first, the input biophysical model, and second, the algorithm that computes the best sequence(s) and structure(s) according to the biophysical model. Improving both the model and the algorithm in tandem is essential to improving the success rate of current programs, and here we review recent developments in algorithms for protein design, emphasizing how novel algorithms enable the use of more accurate biophysical models. We conclude with a list of algorithmic challenges in computational protein design that we believe will be especially important for the design of therapeutic proteins and protein assemblies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mayaro virus proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. S. Mezencio

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available Mayaro virus was grown in BHK-21 cells and purified by centrifugation in a potassium-tartrate gradient (5-50%. The electron microscopy analyses of the purified virus showed an homogeneous population of enveloped particles with 69 ñ 2.3 nm in diameter. Three structural virus proteins were identified and designated pl, p2 and p3. Their average molecular weight were p1, 54 KDa; p2, 50 KDa and p3, 34 KDa. In Mayaro virus infected. Aedes albopictus cells and in BHK-21 infected cells we detected six viral proteins, in wich three of them are the structural virus proteins and the other three were products from processing of precursors of viral proteins, whose molecular weights are 62 KDa, 64 KDa and 110 KDa. The 34 KDa protein was the first viral protein sinthesized at 5 hours post-infection in both cell lines studied.

  10. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un [Ithaca, NY; Gruner, Sol M [Ithaca, NY

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  11. Protein carbonylation in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Havelund, Jesper; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2017-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the current knowledge on protein carbonylation in plants and its role in plant physiology. It starts with a brief outline of the turnover and production sites of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants and the causes of protein carbonylation. This is followed...... by a description of the methods used to study protein carbonylation in plants, which is also very brief as the methods are similar to those used in studies on animals. The chapter also focuses on protein carbonylation in plants in general and in mitochondria and in seeds in particular, as case stories where...

  12. Engineering therapeutic protein disaggregases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, James

    2016-05-15

    Therapeutic agents are urgently required to cure several common and fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by protein misfolding and aggregation, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Protein disaggregases that reverse protein misfolding and restore proteins to native structure, function, and localization could mitigate neurodegeneration by simultaneously reversing 1) any toxic gain of function of the misfolded form and 2) any loss of function due to misfolding. Potentiated variants of Hsp104, a hexameric AAA+ ATPase and protein disaggregase from yeast, have been engineered to robustly disaggregate misfolded proteins connected with ALS (e.g., TDP-43 and FUS) and PD (e.g., α-synuclein). However, Hsp104 has no metazoan homologue. Metazoa possess protein disaggregase systems distinct from Hsp104, including Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40, as well as HtrA1, which might be harnessed to reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, vicissitudes of aging, environment, or genetics conspire to negate these disaggregase systems in neurodegenerative disease. Thus, engineering potentiated human protein disaggregases or isolating small-molecule enhancers of their activity could yield transformative therapeutics for ALS, PD, and AD. © 2016 Shorter. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. Telomere dysfunction and cell survival: Roles for distinct TIN2-containing complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sahn-ho; Davalos, Albert R.; Heo, Seok-Jin; Rodier, Francis; Zou, Ying; Beausejour, Christian; Kaminker, Patrick; Yannone, Steven M.; Campisi, Judith

    2007-10-02

    Telomeres are maintained by three DNA binding proteins (TRF1, TRF2 and POT1), and several associated factors. One factor, TIN2, binds TRF1 and TRF2 directly and POT1 indirectly. Along with two other proteins, TPP1 and hRap1, these form a soluble complex that may be the core telomere maintenance complex. It is not clear whether sub-complexes also exist in vivo. We provide evidence for two TIN2 sub-complexes with distinct functions in human cells. We isolated these two TIN2 sub-complexes from nuclear lysates of unperturbed cells and cells expressing TIN2 mutants TIN2-13, TIN2-15C, which cannot bind TRF2 or TRF1, respectively. In cells with wild-type p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere uncapping and eventual growth arrest. In cells lacking p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere dysfunction and cell death. Our findings suggest that distinct TIN2 complexes exist, and that TIN2-15C-sensitive subcomplexes are particularly important for cell survival in the absence of functional p53.

  14. Modular protein domains

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cesareni, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    ... encodes not only sequence, but somehow explicitly specifies folding, structure, and biological function as well. How, then, can one learn to read this 'language of proteins'? One of the most powerful approaches to 'cracking the protein code' has involved sequence comparisons between and within species, a task now greatly simplified by the ever...

  15. Advances in Protein Precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golubovic, M.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are biological macromolecules, which are among the key components of all living organisms. Proteins are nowadays present in all fields of biotech industry, such as food and feed, synthetic and pharmaceutical industry. They are isolated from their natural sources or produced in different

  16. Amino acids and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H.; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional

  17. Poxviral Ankyrin Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Herbert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple repeats of the ankyrin motif (ANK are ubiquitous throughout the kingdoms of life but are absent from most viruses. The main exception to this is the poxvirus family, and specifically the chordopoxviruses, with ANK repeat proteins present in all but three species from separate genera. The poxviral ANK repeat proteins belong to distinct orthologue groups spread over different species, and align well with the phylogeny of their genera. This distribution throughout the chordopoxviruses indicates these proteins were present in an ancestral vertebrate poxvirus, and have since undergone numerous duplication events. Most poxviral ANK repeat proteins contain an unusual topology of multiple ANK motifs starting at the N-terminus with a C-terminal poxviral homologue of the cellular F-box enabling interaction with the cellular SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. The subtle variations between ANK repeat proteins of individual poxviruses suggest an array of different substrates may be bound by these protein-protein interaction domains and, via the F-box, potentially directed to cellular ubiquitination pathways and possible degradation. Known interaction partners of several of these proteins indicate that the NF-κB coordinated anti-viral response is a key target, whilst some poxviral ANK repeat domains also have an F-box independent affect on viral host-range.

  18. Multidomain proteins under force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Orero, Jessica; Rivas-Pardo, Jaime Andrés; Popa, Ionel

    2017-04-28

    Advancements in single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques such as atomic force microscopy and magnetic tweezers allow investigation of how domain folding under force can play a physiological role. Combining these techniques with protein engineering and HaloTag covalent attachment, we investigate similarities and differences between four model proteins: I10 and I91-two immunoglobulin-like domains from the muscle protein titin, and two α + β fold proteins-ubiquitin and protein L. These proteins show a different mechanical response and have unique extensions under force. Remarkably, when normalized to their contour length, the size of the unfolding and refolding steps as a function of force reduces to a single master curve. This curve can be described using standard models of polymer elasticity, explaining the entropic nature of the measured steps. We further validate our measurements with a simple energy landscape model, which combines protein folding with polymer physics and accounts for the complex nature of tandem domains under force. This model can become a useful tool to help in deciphering the complexity of multidomain proteins operating under force.

  19. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the post-genomic era, as more and more genome sequences are becoming known and hectic efforts are underway to decode the information content in them, it is becoming increasingly evident that flexibility in proteins plays a crucial role in many of the biological functions. Many proteins have intrinsic disorder either ...

  20. Stability of Hyperthermophilic Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiefler-Jensen, Daniel

    in the high stability of hyperthermophilic enzymes. The thesis starts with an introduction to the field of protein and enzyme stability with special focus on the thermophilic and hyperthermophilic enzymes and proteins. After the introduction three original research manuscripts present the experimental data...

  1. Protein expression-yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Klaus H

    2014-01-01

    Yeast is an excellent system for the expression of recombinant eukaryotic proteins. Both endogenous and heterologous proteins can be overexpressed in yeast (Phan et al., 2001; Ton and Rao, 2004). Because yeast is easy to manipulate genetically, a strain can be optimized for the expression of a specific protein. Many eukaryotic proteins contain posttranslational modifications that can be performed in yeast but not in bacterial expression systems. In comparison with mammalian cell culture expression systems, growing yeast is both faster and less expensive, and large-scale cultures can be performed using fermentation. While several different yeast expression systems exist, this chapter focuses on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and will briefly describe some options to consider when selecting vectors and tags to be used for protein expression. Throughout this chapter, the expression and purification of yeast eIF3 is shown as an example alongside a general scheme outline. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. MicroProteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eguen, Teinai Ebimienere; Straub, Daniel; Graeff, Moritz

    2015-01-01

    MicroProteins (miPs) are short, usually single-domain proteins that, in analogy to miRNAs, heterodimerize with their targets and exert a dominant-negative effect. Recent bioinformatic attempts to identify miPs have resulted in a list of potential miPs, many of which lack the defining characterist......MicroProteins (miPs) are short, usually single-domain proteins that, in analogy to miRNAs, heterodimerize with their targets and exert a dominant-negative effect. Recent bioinformatic attempts to identify miPs have resulted in a list of potential miPs, many of which lack the defining...... can extend beyond transcription factors (TFs) to encompass different non-TF proteins that require dimerization for full function....

  3. Protein disulfide engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombkowski, Alan A; Sultana, Kazi Zakia; Craig, Douglas B

    2014-01-21

    Improving the stability of proteins is an important goal in many biomedical and industrial applications. A logical approach is to emulate stabilizing molecular interactions found in nature. Disulfide bonds are covalent interactions that provide substantial stability to many proteins and conform to well-defined geometric conformations, thus making them appealing candidates in protein engineering efforts. Disulfide engineering is the directed design of novel disulfide bonds into target proteins. This important biotechnological tool has achieved considerable success in a wide range of applications, yet the rules that govern the stabilizing effects of disulfide bonds are not fully characterized. Contrary to expectations, many designed disulfide bonds have resulted in decreased stability of the modified protein. We review progress in disulfide engineering, with an emphasis on the issue of stability and computational methods that facilitate engineering efforts. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Artificially Engineered Protein Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun Jung; Holmberg, Angela L; Olsen, Bradley D

    2017-06-07

    Modern polymer science increasingly requires precise control over macromolecular structure and properties for engineering advanced materials and biomedical systems. The application of biological processes to design and synthesize artificial protein polymers offers a means for furthering macromolecular tunability, enabling polymers with dispersities of ∼1.0 and monomer-level sequence control. Taking inspiration from materials evolved in nature, scientists have created modular building blocks with simplified monomer sequences that replicate the function of natural systems. The corresponding protein engineering toolbox has enabled the systematic development of complex functional polymeric materials across areas as diverse as adhesives, responsive polymers, and medical materials. This review discusses the natural proteins that have inspired the development of key building blocks for protein polymer engineering and the function of these elements in material design. The prospects and progress for scalable commercialization of protein polymers are reviewed, discussing both technology needs and opportunities.

  5. Sensitizing properties of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars K.; Ladics, Gregory S; McClain, Scott

    2014-01-01

    scientists from academia, government, and industry participated in the symposium. Experts provided overviews on known mechanisms by which proteins in food may cause sensitization, discussed experimental models to predict protein sensitizing potential, and explored whether such experimental techniques may......The scope of allergy risk is diverse considering the myriad ways in which protein allergenicity is affected by physiochemical characteristics of proteins. The complexity created by the matrices of foods and the variability of the human immune system add additional challenges to understanding...... Allergenicity Technical Committee of the International Life Sciences Institute's Health and Environmental Sciences Institute, featured presentations on current methods, test systems, research trends, and unanswered questions in the field of protein sensitization. A diverse group of over 70 interdisciplinary...

  6. Sensitizing properties of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars K.; Ladics, Gregory S; McClain, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The scope of allergy risk is diverse considering the myriad ways in which protein allergenicity is affected by physiochemical characteristics of proteins. The complexity created by the matrices of foods and the variability of the human immune system add additional challenges to understanding...... the relationship between sensitization potential and allergy disease. To address these and other issues, an April 2012 international symposium was held in Prague, Czech Republic, to review and discuss the state-of-the-science of sensitizing properties of protein allergens. The symposium, organized by the Protein...... Allergenicity Technical Committee of the International Life Sciences Institute's Health and Environmental Sciences Institute, featured presentations on current methods, test systems, research trends, and unanswered questions in the field of protein sensitization. A diverse group of over 70 interdisciplinary...

  7. [Controversies around diet proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichosz, Grazyna; Czeczot, Hanna

    2013-12-01

    Critical theories regarding proteins of anima origin are still and still popularized, though they are ungrounded from scientific point of view. Predominance of soya proteins over the animal ones in relation to their influence on calcium metabolism, bone break risk or risk of osteoporosis morbidity has not been confirmed in any honest, reliable research experiment. Statement, that sulphur amino acids influence disadvantageously on calcium metabolism of human organism and bone status, is completely groundless, the more so as presence of sulphur amino acids in diet (animal proteins are their best source) is the condition of endogenic synthesis of glutathione, the key antioxidant of the organism, and taurine stimulating brain functioning. Deficiency of proteins in the diet produce weakness of intellectual effectiveness and immune response. There is no doubt that limitation of consumption of animal proteins of standard value is not good for health.

  8. Coarse-grain modelling of protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baaden, Marc; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review recent advances towards the modelling of protein-protein interactions (PPI) at the coarse-grained (CG) level, a technique that is now widely used to understand protein affinity, aggregation and self-assembly behaviour. PPI models of soluble proteins and membrane proteins are

  9. Swaps in protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliess, Amit; Motro, Benny; Unger, Ron

    2002-08-01

    An important question in protein evolution is to what extent proteins may have undergone swaps (switches of domain or fragment order) during evolution. Such events might have occurred in several forms: Swaps of short fragments, swaps of structural and functional motifs, or recombination of domains in multidomain proteins. This question is important for the theoretical understanding of the evolution of proteins, and has practical implications for using swaps as a design tool in protein engineering. In order to analyze the question systematically, we conducted a large scale survey of possible swaps and permutations among all pairs of protein from the Swissport database. A swap is defined as a specific kind of sequence mutation between two proteins in which two fragments that appear in both sequences have different relative order in the two sequences. For example, aXbYc and dYeXf are defined as a swap, where X and Y represent sequence fragments that switched their order. Identifying such swaps is difficult using standard sequence comparison packages. One of the main problems in the analysis stems from the fact that many sequences contain repeats, which may be identified as false-positive swaps. We have used two different approaches to detect pairs of proteins with swaps. The first approach is based on the predefined list of domains in Pfam. We identified all the proteins that share at least two domains and analyzed their relative order, looking for pairs in which the order of these domains was switched. We designed an algorithm to distinguish between real swaps and duplications. In the second approach, we used Blast to detect pairs of proteins that share several fragments. Then, we used an automatic procedure to select pairs that are likely to contain swaps. Those pairs were analyzed visually, using a graphical tool, to eliminate duplications. Combining these approaches, about 140 different cases of swaps in the Swissprot database were found (after eliminating

  10. Anchored design of protein-protein interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Lewis

    Full Text Available Few existing protein-protein interface design methods allow for extensive backbone rearrangements during the design process. There is also a dichotomy between redesign methods, which take advantage of the native interface, and de novo methods, which produce novel binders.Here, we propose a new method for designing novel protein reagents that combines advantages of redesign and de novo methods and allows for extensive backbone motion. This method requires a bound structure of a target and one of its natural binding partners. A key interaction in this interface, the anchor, is computationally grafted out of the partner and into a surface loop on the design scaffold. The design scaffold's surface is then redesigned with backbone flexibility to create a new binding partner for the target. Careful choice of a scaffold will bring experimentally desirable characteristics into the new complex. The use of an anchor both expedites the design process and ensures that binding proceeds against a known location on the target. The use of surface loops on the scaffold allows for flexible-backbone redesign to properly search conformational space.This protocol was implemented within the Rosetta3 software suite. To demonstrate and evaluate this protocol, we have developed a benchmarking set of structures from the PDB with loop-mediated interfaces. This protocol can recover the correct loop-mediated interface in 15 out of 16 tested structures, using only a single residue as an anchor.

  11. Antimicrobial proteins: From old proteins, new tricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Valerie J; Dyrynda, Elisabeth A

    2015-12-01

    This review describes the main types of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) synthesised by crustaceans, primarily those identified in shrimp, crayfish, crab and lobster. It includes an overview of their range of microbicidal activities and the current landscape of our understanding of their gene expression patterns in different body tissues. It further summarises how their expression might change following various types of immune challenges. The review further considers proteins or protein fragments from crustaceans that have antimicrobial properties but are more usually associated with other biological functions, or are derived from such proteins. It discusses how these unconventional AMPs might be generated at, or delivered to, sites of infection and how they might contribute to crustacean host defence in vivo. It also highlights recent work that is starting to reveal the extent of multi-functionality displayed by some decapod AMPs, particularly their participation in other aspects of host protection. Examples of such activities include proteinase inhibition, phagocytosis, antiviral activity and haematopoiesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Multidomain proteins under force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Orero, Jessica; Andrés Rivas-Pardo, Jaime; Popa, Ionel

    2017-04-01

    Advancements in single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques such as atomic force microscopy and magnetic tweezers allow investigation of how domain folding under force can play a physiological role. Combining these techniques with protein engineering and HaloTag covalent attachment, we investigate similarities and differences between four model proteins: I10 and I91—two immunoglobulin-like domains from the muscle protein titin, and two α + β fold proteins—ubiquitin and protein L. These proteins show a different mechanical response and have unique extensions under force. Remarkably, when normalized to their contour length, the size of the unfolding and refolding steps as a function of force reduces to a single master curve. This curve can be described using standard models of polymer elasticity, explaining the entropic nature of the measured steps. We further validate our measurements with a simple energy landscape model, which combines protein folding with polymer physics and accounts for the complex nature of tandem domains under force. This model can become a useful tool to help in deciphering the complexity of multidomain proteins operating under force.

  13. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    2014-01-01

    The chapter discusses general considerations about protein oxidation and reviews the mechanisms involved in protein oxidation and consequences of protein oxidation on fish proteins. It presents two case studies, the first deals with protein and lipid oxidation in frozen rainbow trout......, and the second with oxidation in salted herring. The mechanisms responsible for initiation of protein oxidation are unclear, but it is generally accepted that free radical species initiating lipid oxidation can also initiate protein oxidation. The chapter focuses on interaction between protein and lipid...... oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...

  14. Sound of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    In my group we work with Molecular Dynamics to model several different proteins and protein systems. We submit our modelled molecules to changes in temperature, changes in solvent composition and even external pulling forces. To analyze our simulation results we have so far used visual inspection...... and statistical analysis of the resulting molecular trajectories (as everybody else!). However, recently I started assigning a particular sound frequency to each amino acid in the protein, and by setting the amplitude of each frequency according to the movement amplitude we can "hear" whenever two aminoacids...

  15. PDP: protein domain parser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Nickolai; Shindyalov, Ilya

    2003-02-12

    We have developed a program for automatic identification of domains in protein three-dimensional structures. Performance of the program was assessed by three different benchmarks: (i) by comparison with the expert-curated SCOP database of structural domains; (ii) by comparison with a collection of manual domain assignments; and (iii) by comparison with a set of 55 proteins, frequently used as a benchmark for automatic domain assignment. In all these benchmarks PDP identified domains correctly in more than 80% of proteins. http://123d.ncifcrf.gov/.

  16. Alpha Shapes and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Pawel; Sterner, Henrik; Sterner, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We provide a unified description of (weighted) alpha shapes, beta shapes and the corresponding simplicialcomplexes. We discuss their applicability to various protein-related problems. We also discuss filtrations of alpha shapes and touch upon related persistence issues.We claim that the full...... potential of alpha-shapes and related geometrical constructs in protein-related problems yet remains to be realized and verified. We suggest parallel algorithms for (weighted) alpha shapes, and we argue that future use of filtrations and kinetic variants for larger proteins will need such implementation....

  17. Designing microcapsules based on protein fibrils and protein - polysaccharide complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hua, K.N.P.

    2012-01-01

    Keywords: encapsulation, microcapsule, protein, fibril, protein-polysaccharide complex, controlled release, interfacial rheology, lysozyme, ovalbumin This thesis describes the design of encapsulation systems using mesostructures from proteins and polysaccharides. The approach was to first

  18. Polymers for Protein Conjugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Pasut

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene glycol (PEG at the moment is considered the leading polymer for protein conjugation in view of its unique properties, as well as to its low toxicity in humans, qualities which have been confirmed by its extensive use in clinical practice. Other polymers that are safe, biodegradable and custom-designed have, nevertheless, also been investigated as potential candidates for protein conjugation. This review will focus on natural polymers and synthetic linear polymers that have been used for protein delivery and the results associated with their use. Genetic fusion approaches for the preparation of protein-polypeptide conjugates will be also reviewed and compared with the best known chemical conjugation ones.

  19. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  20. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  1. Interactive protein manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SNCrivelli@lbl.gov

    2003-07-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures.

  2. Parallel Computational Protein Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yichao; Donald, Bruce R; Zeng, Jianyang

    2017-01-01

    Computational structure-based protein design (CSPD) is an important problem in computational biology, which aims to design or improve a prescribed protein function based on a protein structure template. It provides a practical tool for real-world protein engineering applications. A popular CSPD method that guarantees to find the global minimum energy solution (GMEC) is to combine both dead-end elimination (DEE) and A* tree search algorithms. However, in this framework, the A* search algorithm can run in exponential time in the worst case, which may become the computation bottleneck of large-scale computational protein design process. To address this issue, we extend and add a new module to the OSPREY program that was previously developed in the Donald lab (Gainza et al., Methods Enzymol 523:87, 2013) to implement a GPU-based massively parallel A* algorithm for improving protein design pipeline. By exploiting the modern GPU computational framework and optimizing the computation of the heuristic function for A* search, our new program, called gOSPREY, can provide up to four orders of magnitude speedups in large protein design cases with a small memory overhead comparing to the traditional A* search algorithm implementation, while still guaranteeing the optimality. In addition, gOSPREY can be configured to run in a bounded-memory mode to tackle the problems in which the conformation space is too large and the global optimal solution cannot be computed previously. Furthermore, the GPU-based A* algorithm implemented in the gOSPREY program can be combined with the state-of-the-art rotamer pruning algorithms such as iMinDEE (Gainza et al., PLoS Comput Biol 8:e1002335, 2012) and DEEPer (Hallen et al., Proteins 81:18-39, 2013) to also consider continuous backbone and side-chain flexibility.

  3. Protein Nitrogen Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    The protein content of foods can be determined by numerous methods. The Kjeldahl method and the nitrogen combustion (Dumas) method for protein analysis are based on nitrogen determination. Both methods are official for the purposes of nutrition labeling of foods. While the Kjeldahl method has been used widely for over a hundred years, the recent availability of automated instrumentation for the Dumas method in many cases is replacing use of the Kjeldahl method.

  4. Disease specific protein corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2015-03-01

    It is now well accepted that upon their entrance into the biological environments, the surface of nanomaterials would be covered by various biomacromolecules (e.g., proteins and lipids). The absorption of these biomolecules, so called `protein corona', onto the surface of (nano)biomaterials confers them a new `biological identity'. Although the formation of protein coronas on the surface of nanoparticles has been widely investigated, there are few reports on the effect of various diseases on the biological identity of nanoparticles. As the type of diseases may tremendously changes the composition of the protein source (e.g., human plasma/serum), one can expect that amount and composition of associated proteins in the corona composition may be varied, in disease type manner. Here, we show that corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles (after interaction with in the plasma of the healthy individuals) could induce unfolding of fibrinogen, which promotes release of the inflammatory cytokines. However, no considerable releases of inflammatory cytokines were observed for corona coated graphene sheets. In contrast, the obtained corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles from the hypofibrinogenemia patients could not induce inflammatory cytokine release where graphene sheets do. Therefore, one can expect that disease-specific protein coronas can provide a novel approach for applying nanomedicine to personalized medicine, improving diagnosis and treatment of different diseases tailored to the specific conditions and circumstances.

  5. Fast protein folding kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  6. The effect of protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions on membrane fouling in ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, I.H.; Prádanos, P.; Hernández, A.

    2000-01-01

    It was studied how protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions influence the filtration performance during the ultrafiltration of protein solutions over polymeric membranes. This was done by measuring flux, streaming potential, and protein transmission during filtration of bovine serum albumin

  7. Protein: MPA1 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MPA1 TLR signaling molecules RSAD2 CIG5 Radical S-adenosyl methionine domain-containing protein 2 Cytomegalo...virus-induced gene 5 protein, Viperin, Virus inhibitory protein, endoplasmic reticu

  8. Protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manninen Anssi H

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been suggested that protein hydrolysates providing mainly di- and tripeptides are superior to intact (whole proteins and free amino acids in terms of skeletal muscle protein anabolism. This review provides a critical examination of protein hydrolysate studies conducted in healthy humans with special reference to sports nutrition. The effects of protein hydrolysate ingestion on blood amino acid levels, muscle protein anabolism, body composition, exercise performance and muscle glycogen resynthesis are discussed.

  9. PROTEIN SYNTHESIS GAME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C.Q. Carvalho

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical explanation of biological concepts, associated with the use of teaching games andmodels, intensify the comprehension and increase students interest, stimulating them to participateactively on the teaching-learning process. The sta of dissemination from Centro de BiotecnologiaMolecular Estrutural (CBME, in partnership with the Centro de Divulgac~ao Cientca e Cultural(CDCC, presents, in this work, a new educational resource denoted: Protein Synthesis Game. Theapproach of the game involves the cytological aspects of protein synthesis, directed to high schoolstudents. Students are presented to day-by-day facts related to the function of a given protein in thehuman body. Such task leads players to the goal of solving out a problem through synthesizing aspecied protein. The game comprises: (1 a board illustrated with the transversal section of animalcell, with its main structures and organelles and sequences of hypothetical genes; (2 cards with thedescription of steps and other structures required for protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells; (3 piecesrepresenting nucleotides, polynucleotides, ribosome, amino acids, and polypeptide chains. In order toplay the game, students take cards that sequentially permit them to acquire the necessary pieces forproduction of the protein described in each objective. Players must move the pieces on the board andsimulate the steps of protein synthesis. The dynamic of the game allows students to easily comprehendprocesses of transcription and translation. This game was presented to dierent groups of high schoolteachers and students. Their judgments have been heard and indicated points to be improved, whichhelped us with the game development. Furthermore, the opinions colleted were always favorable forthe application of this game as a teaching resource in classrooms.

  10. Bioinformatics and moonlighting proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eHernández

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Multitasking or moonlighting is the capability of some proteins to execute two or more biochemical functions. Usually, moonlighting proteins are experimentally revealed by serendipity. For this reason, it would be helpful that Bioinformatics could predict this multifunctionality, especially because of the large amounts of sequences from genome projects. In the present work, we analyse and describe several approaches that use sequences, structures, interactomics and current bioinformatics algorithms and programs to try to overcome this problem. Among these approaches are: a remote homology searches using Psi-Blast, b detection of functional motifs and domains, c analysis of data from protein-protein interaction databases (PPIs, d match the query protein sequence to 3D databases (i.e., algorithms as PISITE, e mutation correlation analysis between amino acids by algorithms as MISTIC. Programs designed to identify functional motif/domains detect mainly the canonical function but usually fail in the detection of the moonlighting one, Pfam and ProDom being the best methods. Remote homology search by Psi-Blast combined with data from interactomics databases (PPIs have the best performance. Structural information and mutation correlation analysis can help us to map the functional sites. Mutation correlation analysis can only be used in very specific situations –it requires the existence of multialigned family protein sequences - but can suggest how the evolutionary process of second function acquisition took place. The multitasking protein database MultitaskProtDB (http://wallace.uab.es/multitask/, previously published by our group, has been used as a benchmark for the all of the analyses.

  11. Direct protein-protein conjugation by genetically introducing bioorthogonal functional groups into proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanggil; Ko, Wooseok; Sung, Bong Hyun; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Hyun Soo

    2016-11-15

    Proteins often function as complex structures in conjunction with other proteins. Because these complex structures are essential for sophisticated functions, developing protein-protein conjugates has gained research interest. In this study, site-specific protein-protein conjugation was performed by genetically incorporating an azide-containing amino acid into one protein and a bicyclononyne (BCN)-containing amino acid into the other. Three to four sites in each of the proteins were tested for conjugation efficiency, and three combinations showed excellent conjugation efficiency. The genetic incorporation of unnatural amino acids (UAAs) is technically simple and produces the mutant protein in high yield. In addition, the conjugation reaction can be conducted by simple mixing, and does not require additional reagents or linker molecules. Therefore, this method may prove very useful for generating protein-protein conjugates and protein complexes of biochemical significance. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Benchtop Detection of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Varaljay, Vanessa

    2007-01-01

    A process, and a benchtop-scale apparatus for implementing the process, have been developed to detect proteins associated with specific microbes in water. The process and apparatus may also be useful for detection of proteins in other, more complex liquids. There may be numerous potential applications, including monitoring lakes and streams for contamination, testing of blood and other bodily fluids in medical laboratories, and testing for microbial contamination of liquids in restaurants and industrial food-processing facilities. A sample can be prepared and analyzed by use of this process and apparatus within minutes, whereas an equivalent analysis performed by use of other processes and equipment can often take hours to days. The process begins with the conjugation of near-infrared-fluorescent dyes to antibodies that are specific to a particular protein. Initially, the research has focused on using near-infrared dyes to detect antigens or associated proteins in solution, which has proven successful vs. microbial cells, and streamlining the technique in use for surface protein detection on microbes would theoretically render similar results. However, it is noted that additional work is needed to transition protein-based techniques to microbial cell detection. Consequently, multiple such dye/antibody pairs could be prepared to enable detection of multiple selected microbial species, using a different dye for each species. When excited by near-infrared light of a suitable wavelength, each dye fluoresces at a unique longer wavelength that differs from those of the other dyes, enabling discrimination among the various species. In initial tests, the dye/antibody pairs are mixed into a solution suspected of containing the selected proteins, causing the binding of the dye/antibody pairs to such suspect proteins that may be present. The solution is then run through a microcentrifuge that includes a membrane that acts as a filter in that it retains the dye/antibody/protein

  13. Self-Assembling Protein Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Niroshan; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Eisenstein, Samuel; Rosen, Benjamin; Lau, Albert Y.; C. Walter, Johannes; LaBaer, Joshua

    2004-07-01

    Protein microarrays provide a powerful tool for the study of protein function. However, they are not widely used, in part because of the challenges in producing proteins to spot on the arrays. We generated protein microarrays by printing complementary DNAs onto glass slides and then translating target proteins with mammalian reticulocyte lysate. Epitope tags fused to the proteins allowed them to be immobilized in situ. This obviated the need to purify proteins, avoided protein stability problems during storage, and captured sufficient protein for functional studies. We used the technology to map pairwise interactions among 29 human DNA replication initiation proteins, recapitulate the regulation of Cdt1 binding to select replication proteins, and map its geminin-binding domain.

  14. Changes in protein composition and protein phosphorylation during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in protein profiles and protein phosphorylation were studied in various stages of germinating somatic and zygotic embryos. Many proteins, which were expressed in cotyledonary stage somatic embryos, were also present in the zygotic embryos obtained from mature dry seed. The intensity of 22 kDa protein was ...

  15. Electrochemical nanomoulding through proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Daniel B.

    The continued improvements in performance of modern electronic devices are directly related to the manufacturing of smaller, denser features on surfaces. Electrochemical fabrication has played a large role in continuing this trend due to its low cost and ease of scaleability toward ever smaller dimensions. This work introduces the concept of using proteins, essentially monodisperse complex polymers whose three-dimensional structures are fixed by their encoded amino acid sequences, as "moulds" around which nanostructures can be built by electrochemical fabrication. Bacterial cell-surface layer proteins, or "S-layer" proteins, from two organisms---Deinococcus radiodurans and Sporosarcina ureae---were used as the "moulds" for electrochemical fabrication. The proteins are easily purified as micron-sized sheets of periodic molecular complexes with 18-nm hexagonal and 13-nm square unit cell lattices, respectively. Direct imaging by transmission electron microscopy on ultrathin noble metal films without sample preparation eliminates potential artifacts to the high surface energy substrates necessary for high nucleation densities. Characterization involved imaging, electron diffraction, spectroscopy, and three-dimensional reconstruction. The S-layer protein of D. radiodurans was further subjected to an atomic force microscope based assay to determine the integrity of its structure and long-range order and was found to be useful for fabrication from around pH 3 to 12.

  16. Protein Denaturation in Foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson; Cui; Darton

    1999-07-15

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism by which protein molecules become denatured in foam. It was found that damage to the protein is mainly due to surface denaturation at the gas-liquid interface. A fraction of the molecules adsorbed do not refold to their native state when they desorb. The degree of denaturation was found to correlate directly with the interfacial exposure, which, for mobile or partially mobile interfaces, is increased by drainage. Experiments with two different proteins showed that, under the conditions of the tests, around 10% of BSA molecules which had adsorbed at the surface remained denatured when they desorbed. For pepsin the figure was around 75%. Oxidation, which was previously thought to be a major cause of protein damage in foam, was found to be minimal. Neither do the high shear stresses in the liquid bulk encountered during bubble bursting cause denaturation, because energy is dissipated at a much greater length scale than that of the protein molecule. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 654346314 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein Mastigocoleus testarum MLEQIELKPNWERNQVAFLDFIVNGTSLHDQFDHPQVRDLCTVFTSDQYEFDGKSSAAIHASWFLGYGETPFPDDRIPVYICSSGDFDCGTVTAYLTVNDGTIKWSEFRIERLTEELQDQPIELTSVKQCVFERNAYEKLFQPFLRKVID

  18. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 654344406 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein Mastigocoleus testarum MNKTWRVYLSGEIHTDWREQIEAGTKAAGLPVSFAAPVTDHASSDACGAEILGPEENEFWFDNKGAKVNAIRTSTLIKDADIVVVRFGDKYKQWNAAFDAGYAAALGKPIITLHDAELRHPLKEVDGAALAWAQEPSQVVRLLKYVIEGTL

  19. Polarizable protein packing

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Albert H.

    2011-01-24

    To incorporate protein polarization effects within a protein combinatorial optimization framework, we decompose the polarizable force field AMOEBA into low order terms. Including terms up to the third-order provides a fair approximation to the full energy while maintaining tractability. We represent the polarizable packing problem for protein G as a hypergraph and solve for optimal rotamers with the FASTER combinatorial optimization algorithm. These approximate energy models can be improved to high accuracy [root mean square deviation (rmsd) < 1 kJ mol -1] via ridge regression. The resulting trained approximations are used to efficiently identify new, low-energy solutions. The approach is general and should allow combinatorial optimization of other many-body problems. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comput Chem, 2011 Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  1. Thermal hysteresis proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, J

    2001-02-01

    Extreme environments present a wealth of biochemical adaptations. Thermal hysteresis proteins (THPs) have been found in vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, bacteria and fungi and are able to depress the freezing point of water (in the presence of ice crystals) in a non-colligative manner by binding to the surface of nascent ice crystals. The THPs comprise a disparate group of proteins with a variety of tertiary structures and often no common sequence similarities or structural motifs. Different THPs bind to different faces of the ice crystal, and no single mechanism has been proposed to account for THP ice binding affinity and specificity. Experimentally THPs have been used in the cryopreservation of tissues and cells and to induce cold tolerance in freeze susceptible organisms. THPs represent a remarkable example of parallel and convergent evolution with different proteins being adapted for an anti-freeze role.

  2. Accessory Proteins at ERES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkenberg, Rafael David

    proteins. Together these components co‐operate in cargo‐selection as well as forming, loading and releasing budding vesicles from specific regions on the membrane surface of the ER. Coat components furthermore convey vesicle targeting towards the Golgi. However, not much is known about the mechanisms...... that regulate the COPII assembly at the vesicle bud site. This thesis provides the first regulatory mechanism of COPII assembly in relation to ER‐membrane lipid‐signal recognition by the accessory protein p125A (Sec23IP). The aim of the project was to characterize p125A function by dissecting two main domains...... in the protein; a putative lipid‐associating domain termed the DDHD domain that is defined by the four amino acid motif that gives the domain its name; and a ubiquitously found domain termed Sterile α‐motif (SAM), which is mostly associated with oligomerization and polymerization. We first show, that the DDHD...

  3. Matricellular proteins and biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Aaron H; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2014-07-01

    Biomaterials are essential to modern medicine as components of reconstructive implants, implantable sensors, and vehicles for localized drug delivery. Advances in biomaterials have led to progression from simply making implants that are nontoxic to making implants that are specifically designed to elicit particular functions within the host. The interaction of implants and the extracellular matrix during the foreign body response is a growing area of concern for the field of biomaterials, because it can lead to implant failure. Expression of matricellular proteins is modulated during the foreign body response and these proteins interact with biomaterials. The design of biomaterials to specifically alter the levels of matricellular proteins surrounding implants provides a new avenue for the design and fabrication of biomimetic biomaterials. Copyright © 2014 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Trisulfides in Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus W.; Tachibana, Christine; Hansen, Niels Erik

    2011-01-01

    Trisulfides and other oligosulfides are widely distributed in the biological world. In plants, e.g., garlic, trisulfides are associated with potentially beneficial properties. However, an extra neutral sulfur atom covalently bound between the two sulfur atoms of a pair of cysteines is not a commo...... post-translational modification, and the number of proteins in which a trisulfide has been unambiguously identified is small. Nevertheless, we believe that its prevalence may be underestimated, particularly with the increasing evidence for significant pools of sulfides in living tissues...... and their possible roles in cellular metabolism. This review focuses on examples of proteins that are known to contain a trisulfide bridge, and gives an overview of the chemistry of trisulfide formation, and the methods by which it is detected in proteins....

  5. Epistasis in protein evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Tyler N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The structure, function, and evolution of proteins depend on physical and genetic interactions among amino acids. Recent studies have used new strategies to explore the prevalence, biochemical mechanisms, and evolutionary implications of these interactions—called epistasis—within proteins. Here we describe an emerging picture of pervasive epistasis in which the physical and biological effects of mutations change over the course of evolution in a lineage‐specific fashion. Epistasis can restrict the trajectories available to an evolving protein or open new paths to sequences and functions that would otherwise have been inaccessible. We describe two broad classes of epistatic interactions, which arise from different physical mechanisms and have different effects on evolutionary processes. Specific epistasis—in which one mutation influences the phenotypic effect of few other mutations—is caused by direct and indirect physical interactions between mutations, which nonadditively change the protein's physical properties, such as conformation, stability, or affinity for ligands. In contrast, nonspecific epistasis describes mutations that modify the effect of many others; these typically behave additively with respect to the physical properties of a protein but exhibit epistasis because of a nonlinear relationship between the physical properties and their biological effects, such as function or fitness. Both types of interaction are rampant, but specific epistasis has stronger effects on the rate and outcomes of evolution, because it imposes stricter constraints and modulates evolutionary potential more dramatically; it therefore makes evolution more contingent on low‐probability historical events and leaves stronger marks on the sequences, structures, and functions of protein families. PMID:26833806

  6. Protein biosynthesis in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, A V; Levitskii, S A; Vinogradova, E N; Atkinson, G C; Hauryliuk, V; Zenkin, N; Kamenski, P A

    2013-08-01

    Translation, that is biosynthesis of polypeptides in accordance with information encoded in the genome, is one of the most important processes in the living cell, and it has been in the spotlight of international research for many years. The mechanisms of protein biosynthesis in bacteria and in the eukaryotic cytoplasm are now understood in great detail. However, significantly less is known about translation in eukaryotic mitochondria, which is characterized by a number of unusual features. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about mitochondrial translation in different organisms while paying special attention to the aspects of this process that differ from cytoplasmic protein biosynthesis.

  7. Water-transporting proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Transport through lipids and aquaporins is osmotic and entirely driven by the difference in osmotic pressure. Water transport in cotransporters and uniporters is different: Water can be cotransported, energized by coupling to the substrate flux by a mechanism closely associated with protein...... is not clear. It is associated with the substrate movements in aqueous pathways within the protein; a conventional unstirred layer mechanism can be ruled out, due to high rates of diffusion in the cytoplasm. The physiological roles of the various modes of water transport are reviewed in relation to epithelial...

  8. Cold gelation of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alting, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords : globular proteins, whey protein, ovalbumin, cold gelation, disulfide bonds, texture, gel hardnessProtein gelation in food products is important to obtain desirable sensory and textural properties. Cold gelation is a novel method to produce protein-based gels. It is a two step process in

  9. The Formation of Protein Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren

    1996-01-01

    Dynamically induced curvature owing to long-range excitations along the backbones of protein molecules with non-linear elastic properties may control the folding of proteins.......Dynamically induced curvature owing to long-range excitations along the backbones of protein molecules with non-linear elastic properties may control the folding of proteins....

  10. A simple dependence between protein evolution rate and the number of protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirsh Aaron E

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown for an evolutionarily distant genomic comparison that the number of protein-protein interactions a protein has correlates negatively with their rates of evolution. However, the generality of this observation has recently been challenged. Here we examine the problem using protein-protein interaction data from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and genome sequences from two other yeast species. Results In contrast to a previous study that used an incomplete set of protein-protein interactions, we observed a highly significant correlation between number of interactions and evolutionary distance to either Candida albicans or Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This study differs from the previous one in that it includes all known protein interactions from S. cerevisiae, and a larger set of protein evolutionary rates. In both evolutionary comparisons, a simple monotonic relationship was found across the entire range of the number of protein-protein interactions. In agreement with our earlier findings, this relationship cannot be explained by the fact that proteins with many interactions tend to be important to yeast. The generality of these correlations in other kingdoms of life unfortunately cannot be addressed at this time, due to the incompleteness of protein-protein interaction data from organisms other than S. cerevisiae. Conclusions Protein-protein interactions tend to slow the rate at which proteins evolve. This may be due to structural constraints that must be met to maintain interactions, but more work is needed to definitively establish the mechanism(s behind the correlations we have observed.

  11. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly...... affected by the lipid environment. Theoretical predictions are pointed out, and compared to experimental findings, if available. Among others, the following phenomena are discussed: interactions of interfacially adsorbed peptides, pore-forming amphipathic peptides, adsorption of charged proteins onto...... oppositely charged lipid membranes, lipid-induced tilting of proteins embedded in lipid bilayers, protein-induced bilayer deformations, protein insertion and assembly, and lipid-controlled functioning of membrane proteins....

  12. Protein degradation systems in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, B F; Weyrich, A S; Lindemann, S

    2013-11-01

    Protein synthesis and degradation are essential processes that allow cells to survive and adapt to their surrounding milieu. In nucleated cells, the degradation and/or cleavage of proteins is required to eliminate aberrant proteins. Cells also degrade proteins as a mechanism for cell signalling and complex cellular functions. Although the last decade has convincingly shown that platelets synthesise proteins, the roles of protein degradation in these anucleate cytoplasts are less clear. Here we review what is known about protein degradation in platelets placing particular emphasis on the proteasome and the cysteine protease calpain.

  13. Truly Absorbed Microbial Protein Synthesis, Rumen Bypass Protein, Endogenous Protein, and Total Metabolizable Protein from Starchy and Protein-Rich Raw Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parand, Ehsan; Vakili, Alireza; Mesgaran, Mohsen Danesh; Duinkerken, Van Gert; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to measure truly absorbed microbial protein synthesis, rumen bypass protein, and endogenous protein loss, as well as total metabolizable protein, from starchy and protein-rich raw feed materials with model comparisons. Predictions by the DVE2010 system as a more

  14. Protein requirements of Penaeid shrimp.

    OpenAIRE

    Kanazawa, A

    1989-01-01

    Proteins are indispensable nutrients for growth and maintenance of live of all animals. The optimum protein levels in diets for shrimps are different among the various species. Squid meal is an effective protein source for many penaeids. The effects of dietary protein, lipid, and carbohydrate levels on the growth and survival of larvae of Penaeus japonicus were examined by feeding trials using purified diet with carrageenan as a binder. As a result, the effects of protein levels on growth and...

  15. Protein oxidation and ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linton, S; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Dean, R T

    2001-01-01

    of redox-active metal ions that could catalyse oxidant formation. As a result of this decrease in antioxidant defences, and increased rate of ROS formation, it is possible that the impact of ROS increases with age. ROS are known to oxidise biological macromolecules, with proteins an important target...

  16. Thermodynamics of meat proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the water activity of meat, being a mixture of proteins, salts and water, by the Free-Volume-Flory–Huggins (FVFH) theory augmented with the equation. Earlier, the FVFH theory is successfully applied to describe the thermodynamics to glucose homopolymers like starch, dextrans and

  17. Protein digestion in ruminants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Animal Nutrition, Animal and Dairy Science Research Institute, Irene, 1675Republic of South Africa. Although the protein requirement of domestic ruminants may be calculated from a simple one-compartment model, this approach ignores factors such as microbial fermentation in the rumen and the non-equality of feed.

  18. Protein Sorting Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Many computational methods are available for predicting protein sorting in bacteria. When comparing them, it is important to know that they can be grouped into three fundamentally different approaches: signal-based, global-property-based and homology-based prediction. In this chapter, the strengt...

  19. Allosteric Regulation of Proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 1. Allosteric Regulation of Proteins: A Historical Perspective on the Development of Concepts and Techniques. General Article Volume 22 Issue 1 January 2017 pp 37-50 ...

  20. Markers of protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 gives both side-chain oxidation and backbone fragmentation. These processes can be interrelated, with initial side-chain oxidation giving rise to backbone damage via transfer reactions. We have shown previously that alkoxyl radicals formed on...

  1. Protein digestion in ruminants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acids absorbed into the circulation of the animal. Ideally, therefore, the biological value of a feed protein should be determined from the amount and type of amino acid appearing in the portal circulation of the animal, and not simplythe dissappearance of amino acids from the tract. Ruminant digestion may be more easily ...

  2. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 12. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria. M K Chattopadhyay. General Article Volume 12 Issue 12 December 2007 pp 25-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/12/0025-0030. Keywords.

  3. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2005-01-03

    Jan 3, 2005 ... deposition of data and advanced search on the pattern of PDB.12. Detailed characterization of the unfolded state and consequent identification of the folding initiation sites in a given protein provide valuable insight into its folding mechanism.18 Well-formed or transient residual structures in the unfolded ...

  4. Protein Requirements during Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda Courtney-Martin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein recommendations for elderly, both men and women, are based on nitrogen balance studies. They are set at 0.66 and 0.8 g/kg/day as the estimated average requirement (EAR and recommended dietary allowance (RDA, respectively, similar to young adults. This recommendation is based on single linear regression of available nitrogen balance data obtained at test protein intakes close to or below zero balance. Using the indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO method, we estimated the protein requirement in young adults and in both elderly men and women to be 0.9 and 1.2 g/kg/day as the EAR and RDA, respectively. This suggests that there is no difference in requirement on a gender basis or on a per kg body weight basis between younger and older adults. The requirement estimates however are ~40% higher than the current protein recommendations on a body weight basis. They are also 40% higher than our estimates in young men when calculated on the basis of fat free mass. Thus, current recommendations may need to be re-assessed. Potential rationale for this difference includes a decreased sensitivity to dietary amino acids and increased insulin resistance in the elderly compared with younger individuals.

  5. Protein: CAD [Trypanosomes Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CAD carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamylase, and dihydroorotaseCAD... trifunctional proteincarbamoylphosphate synthetase 2/aspartate transcarbamylase/dihydroorotasemultifunctional protein CAD... H.sapiens 47458828 18105007 790 P27708 CAD_(gene) 2.1.3.2|3.5.2.3|6.3.5.5 114010 2p22-p21 hsa00250|hsa00240 ...

  6. Measuring protein breakdown in individual proteins in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Kjær, Michael

    2010-01-01

    be used to determine the breakdown rate of specific proteins and, therefore, do not keep up to the preceding methodological demands in physiological research. A newly developed approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of single proteins seems promising. Its conceptual advantage......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To outline different approaches of how protein breakdown can be quantified and to present a new approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of individual slow turnover proteins in vivo. RECENT FINDINGS: None of the available methods for determining protein breakdown can...... is that the proteins of interest are the site of measurement. Hence, the application initially demands the proteins to be labeled with stable isotopically labeled amino acids. Subsequently, the loss of label from the proteins will be dependent on the protein breakdown rate when no labeled amino acids...

  7. Interaction between plate make and protein in protein crystallisation screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon J King

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein crystallisation screening involves the parallel testing of large numbers of candidate conditions with the aim of identifying conditions suitable as a starting point for the production of diffraction quality crystals. Generally, condition screening is performed in 96-well plates. While previous studies have examined the effects of protein construct, protein purity, or crystallisation condition ingredients on protein crystallisation, few have examined the effect of the crystallisation plate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a statistically rigorous examination of protein crystallisation, and evaluated interactions between crystallisation success and plate row/column, different plates of same make, different plate makes and different proteins. From our analysis of protein crystallisation, we found a significant interaction between plate make and the specific protein being crystallised. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Protein crystal structure determination is the principal method for determining protein structure but is limited by the need to produce crystals of the protein under study. Many important proteins are difficult to crystallize, so that identification of factors that assist crystallisation could open up the structure determination of these more challenging targets. Our findings suggest that protein crystallisation success may be improved by matching a protein with its optimal plate make.

  8. Minireview: protein arginine methylation of nonhistone proteins in transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Ho; Stallcup, Michael R

    2009-04-01

    Endocrine regulation frequently culminates in altered transcription of specific genes. The signal transduction pathways, which transmit the endocrine signal from cell surface to the transcription machinery, often involve posttranslational modifications of proteins. Although phosphorylation has been by far the most widely studied protein modification, recent studies have indicated important roles for other types of modification, including protein arginine methylation. Ten different protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) family members have been identified in mammalian cells, and numerous substrates are being identified for these PRMTs. Whereas major attention has been focused on the methylation of histones and its role in chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation, there are many nonhistone substrates methylated by PRMTs. This review primarily focuses on recent progress on the roles of the nonhistone protein methylation in transcription. Protein methylation of coactivators, transcription factors, and signal transducers, among other proteins, plays important roles in transcriptional regulation. Protein methylation may affect protein-protein interaction, protein-DNA or protein-RNA interaction, protein stability, subcellular localization, or enzymatic activity. Thus, protein arginine methylation is critical for regulation of transcription and potentially for various physiological/pathological processes.

  9. HIV protein sequence hotspots for crosstalk with host hub proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Sarmady

    Full Text Available HIV proteins target host hub proteins for transient binding interactions. The presence of viral proteins in the infected cell results in out-competition of host proteins in their interaction with hub proteins, drastically affecting cell physiology. Functional genomics and interactome datasets can be used to quantify the sequence hotspots on the HIV proteome mediating interactions with host hub proteins. In this study, we used the HIV and human interactome databases to identify HIV targeted host hub proteins and their host binding partners (H2. We developed a high throughput computational procedure utilizing motif discovery algorithms on sets of protein sequences, including sequences of HIV and H2 proteins. We identified as HIV sequence hotspots those linear motifs that are highly conserved on HIV sequences and at the same time have a statistically enriched presence on the sequences of H2 proteins. The HIV protein motifs discovered in this study are expressed by subsets of H2 host proteins potentially outcompeted by HIV proteins. A large subset of these motifs is involved in cleavage, nuclear localization, phosphorylation, and transcription factor binding events. Many such motifs are clustered on an HIV sequence in the form of hotspots. The sequential positions of these hotspots are consistent with the curated literature on phenotype altering residue mutations, as well as with existing binding site data. The hotspot map produced in this study is the first global portrayal of HIV motifs involved in altering the host protein network at highly connected hub nodes.

  10. Fragments of protein A eluted during protein A affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter-Franklin, Jayme N; Victa, Corazon; McDonald, Paul; Fahrner, Robert

    2007-09-07

    Protein A affinity chromatography is a common method for process scale purification of monoclonal antibodies. During protein A affinity chromatography, protein A ligand co-elutes with the antibody (commonly called leaching), which is a potential disadvantage since the leached protein A may need to be cleared for pharmaceutical antibodies. To determine the mechanism of protein A leaching and characterize the leached protein A, we fluorescently labeled the protein A ligand in situ on protein A affinity chromatography media. We found that intact protein A leaches when loading either purified antibody or unpurified antibody in harvested cell culture fluid (HCCF), and that additionally fragments of protein A leach when loading HCCF. The leaching of protein A fragments can be reduced by EDTA, suggesting that proteinases contribute to the generation of protein A fragments. We found that protein A fragments larger than about 6000 Da can be measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, and that they can be more difficult to clear than whole protein A by cation-exchange chromatography.

  11. Exploring NMR ensembles of calcium binding proteins: Perspectives to design inhibitors of protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craescu Constantin T

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disrupting protein-protein interactions by small organic molecules is nowadays a promising strategy employed to block protein targets involved in different pathologies. However, structural changes occurring at the binding interfaces make difficult drug discovery processes using structure-based drug design/virtual screening approaches. Here we focused on two homologous calcium binding proteins, calmodulin and human centrin 2, involved in different cellular functions via protein-protein interactions, and known to undergo important conformational changes upon ligand binding. Results In order to find suitable protein conformations of calmodulin and centrin for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening, we performed in silico structural/energetic analysis and molecular docking of terphenyl (a mimicking alpha-helical molecule known to inhibit protein-protein interactions of calmodulin into X-ray and NMR ensembles of calmodulin and centrin. We employed several scoring methods in order to find the best protein conformations. Our results show that docking on NMR structures of calmodulin and centrin can be very helpful to take into account conformational changes occurring at protein-protein interfaces. Conclusions NMR structures of protein-protein complexes nowadays available could efficiently be exploited for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening processes employed to design small molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  12. Inferring protein function by domain context similarities in protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zhirong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing projects generate massive amounts of sequence data but there are still many proteins whose functions remain unknown. The availability of large scale protein-protein interaction data sets makes it possible to develop new function prediction methods based on protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. Although several existing methods combine multiple information resources, there is no study that integrates protein domain information and PPI networks to predict protein functions. Results The domain context similarity can be a useful index to predict protein function similarity. The prediction accuracy of our method in yeast is between 63%-67%, which outperforms the other methods in terms of ROC curves. Conclusion This paper presents a novel protein function prediction method that combines protein domain composition information and PPI networks. Performance evaluations show that this method outperforms existing methods.

  13. High quality protein microarray using in situ protein purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleischmann Robert D

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the postgenomic era, high throughput protein expression and protein microarray technologies have progressed markedly permitting screening of therapeutic reagents and discovery of novel protein functions. Hexa-histidine is one of the most commonly used fusion tags for protein expression due to its small size and convenient purification via immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC. This purification process has been adapted to the protein microarray format, but the quality of in situ His-tagged protein purification on slides has not been systematically evaluated. We established methods to determine the level of purification of such proteins on metal chelate-modified slide surfaces. Optimized in situ purification of His-tagged recombinant proteins has the potential to become the new gold standard for cost-effective generation of high-quality and high-density protein microarrays. Results Two slide surfaces were examined, chelated Cu2+ slides suspended on a polyethylene glycol (PEG coating and chelated Ni2+ slides immobilized on a support without PEG coating. Using PEG-coated chelated Cu2+ slides, consistently higher purities of recombinant proteins were measured. An optimized wash buffer (PBST composed of 10 mM phosphate buffer, 2.7 mM KCl, 140 mM NaCl and 0.05% Tween 20, pH 7.4, further improved protein purity levels. Using Escherichia coli cell lysates expressing 90 recombinant Streptococcus pneumoniae proteins, 73 proteins were successfully immobilized, and 66 proteins were in situ purified with greater than 90% purity. We identified several antigens among the in situ-purified proteins via assays with anti-S. pneumoniae rabbit antibodies and a human patient antiserum, as a demonstration project of large scale microarray-based immunoproteomics profiling. The methodology is compatible with higher throughput formats of in vivo protein expression, eliminates the need for resin-based purification and circumvents

  14. Metabolism of minor isoforms of prion proteins: Cytosolic prion protein and transmembrane prion protein

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Zhiqi; Zhao, Deming; Yang, Lifeng

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disease is triggered by the conversion from cellular prion protein to pathogenic prion protein. Growing evidence has concentrated on prion protein configuration changes and their correlation with prion disease transmissibility and pathogenicity. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that several cytosolic forms of prion protein with specific topological structure can destroy intracellular stability and contribute to prion protein pathogenicit...

  15. Shape complementarity and hydrogen bond preferences in protein-protein interfaces: implications for antibody modeling and protein-protein docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Daisuke; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2016-08-15

    Characterizing protein-protein interfaces and the hydrogen bonds is a first step to better understand proteins' structures and functions toward high-resolution protein design. However, there are few large-scale surveys of hydrogen bonds of interfaces. In addition, previous work of shape complementarity of protein complexes suggested that lower shape complementarity in antibody-antigen interfaces is related to their evolutionary origin. Using 6637 non-redundant protein-protein interfaces, we revealed peculiar features of various protein complex types. In contrast to previous findings, the shape complementarity of antibody-antigen interfaces resembles that of the other interface types. These results highlight the importance of hydrogen bonds during evolution of protein interfaces and rectify the prevailing belief that antibodies have lower shape complementarity. jgray@jhu.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Dairy Proteins and Energy Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Line Quist

    High protein diets affect energy balance beneficially through decreased hunger, enhanced satiety and increased energy expenditure. Dairy products are a major source of protein. Dairy proteins are comprised of two classes, casein (80%) and whey proteins (20%), which are both of high quality......, but casein is absorbed slowly and whey is absorbed rapidly. The present PhD study investigated the effects of total dairy proteins, whey, and casein, on energy balance and the mechanisms behind any differences in the effects of the specific proteins. The results do not support the hypothesis that dairy...... proteins, whey or casein are more beneficial than other protein sources in the regulation of energy balance, and suggest that dairy proteins, whey or casein seem to play only a minor role, if any, in the prevention and treatment of obesity....

  17. Discovering Protein-Protein Interactions Using Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yanyang; Qiu, Ji; Machner, Matthias; LaBaer, Joshua

    2017-03-03

    We have developed a protocol enabling the study of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) at the proteome level using in vitro-synthesized proteins. Assay preparation requires molecular cloning of the query gene into a vector that supports in vitro transcription/translation (IVTT) and appends a HaloTag to the query protein of interest. In parallel, protein microarrays are prepared by printing plasmids encoding glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged target proteins onto a carrier matrix/glass slide coated with antibody directed against GST. At the time of the experiment, the query protein and the target protein are produced separately through IVTT. The query protein is then applied to nucleic acid programmable protein arrays (NAPPA) that display thousands of freshly produced target proteins captured by anti-GST antibody. Interactions between the query and immobilized target proteins are detected through addition of a fluorophore-labeled HaloTag ligand. Our protocol allows the elucidation of PPIs in a high-throughput fashion using proteins produced in vitro, obviating the scientific challenges, high cost, and laborious work, as well as concerns about protein stability, which are usually present in protocols using conventional protein arrays. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, N.V.; Hink, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Krogt, van der G.N.M.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2002-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectra have been obtained from several variants of green fluorescent protein: blue fluorescent protein (BFP), enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), all from Aequorea victoria, and the red

  19. Competitive Protein Adsorption - Multilayer Adsorption and Surface Induced Protein Aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hou, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    In this study, competitive adsorption of albumin and IgG (immunoglobulin G) from human serum solutions and protein mixtures onto polymer surfaces is studied by means of radioactive labeling. By using two different radiolabels (125I and 131I), albumin and IgG adsorption to polymer surfaces...... is monitored simultaneously and the influence from the presence of other human serum proteins on albumin and IgG adsorption, as well as their mutual influence during adsorption processes, is investigated. Exploring protein adsorption by combining analysis of competitive adsorption from complex solutions...... of high concentration with investigation of single protein adsorption and interdependent adsorption between two specific proteins enables us to map protein adsorption sequences during competitive protein adsorption. Our study shows that proteins can adsorb in a multilayer fashion onto the polymer surfaces...

  20. Protein Functionalized Nanodiamond Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various nanoscale elements are currently being explored for bio-applications, such as in bio-images, bio-detection, and bio-sensors. Among them, nanodiamonds possess remarkable features such as low bio-cytotoxicity, good optical property in fluorescent and Raman spectra, and good photostability for bio-applications. In this work, we devise techniques to position functionalized nanodiamonds on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs arrays adsorbed on silicon and ITO substrates surface using electron beam lithography techniques. The nanodiamond arrays were functionalized with lysozyme to target a certain biomolecule or protein specifically. The optical properties of the nanodiamond-protein complex arrays were characterized by a high throughput confocal microscope. The synthesized nanodiamond-lysozyme complex arrays were found to still retain their functionality in interacting with E. coli.

  1. Problems in Protein Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Peter

    1966-01-01

    Outline of the steps in protein synthesis. Nature of the genetic code. The use of synthetic oligo- and polynucleotides in deciphering the code. Structure of the code: relatedness of synonym codons. The wobble hypothesis. Chain initiation and N-formyl-methionine. Chain termination and nonsense codons. Mistakes in translation: ambiguity in vitro. Suppressor mutations resulting in ambiguity. Limitations in the universality of the code. Attempts to determine the particular codons used by a species. Mechanisms of suppression, caused by (a) abnormal aminoacyl-tRNA, (b) ribosomal malfunction. Effect of streptomycin. The problem of "reading" a nucleic acid template. Different ribosomal mutants and DNA polymerase mutants might cause different mistakes. The possibility of involvement of allosteric proteins in template reading. PMID:5338560

  2. Accessory Proteins at ERES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkenberg, Rafael David

    distribution of mSec16B. We further dissect both mSec16A and mSec16B, and show that the region in human mSec16B encompassing residues 35‐194 and the region in human mSec16A comprising residues 1096‐1190 maintain membrane binding irrespective of the removal of membrane associating proteins by salt wash...... or proteolytic digestion. However, neither mSec16B (35‐194) nor mSec16A (1096‐1190) maintain ERES targeting. These findings support previous observations of the need for the membrane binding regions to be expressed in cis with a Central Conserved Domain (CCD) in both proteins to convey ERES targeting....

  3. Porcine prion protein amyloid

    OpenAIRE

    Hammarstr?m, Per; Nystr?m, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat...

  4. Engineering ancestral protein hyperstability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Romero, M Luisa; Risso, Valeria A; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2016-10-15

    Many experimental analyses and proposed scenarios support that ancient life was thermophilic. In congruence with this hypothesis, proteins encoded by reconstructed sequences corresponding to ancient phylogenetic nodes often display very high stability. Here, we show that such 'reconstructed ancestral hyperstability' can be further engineered on the basis of a straightforward approach that uses exclusively information afforded by the ancestral reconstruction process itself. Since evolution does not imply continuous progression, screening of the mutations between two evolutionarily related resurrected ancestral proteins may identify mutations that further stabilize the most stable one. To explore this approach, we have used a resurrected thioredoxin corresponding to the last common ancestor of the cyanobacterial, Deinococcus and Thermus groups (LPBCA thioredoxin), which has a denaturation temperature of ∼123°C. This high value is within the top 0.1% of the denaturation temperatures in the ProTherm database and, therefore, achieving further stabilization appears a priori as a challenging task. Nevertheless, experimental comparison with a resurrected thioredoxin corresponding to the last common ancestor of bacteria (denaturation temperature of ∼115°C) immediately identifies three mutations that increase the denaturation temperature of LPBCA thioredoxin to ∼128°C. Comparison between evolutionarily related resurrected ancestral proteins thus emerges as a simple approach to expand the capability of ancestral reconstruction to search sequence space for extreme protein properties of biotechnological interest. The fact that ancestral sequences for many phylogenetic nodes can be derived from a single alignment of modern sequences should contribute to the general applicability of this approach. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  5. Immunoprecipitation-based analysis of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Corinna; Toledo-Filho, Luis A A; Laubinger, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    Several techniques allow the detection of protein-protein interactions. In vivo co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) studies are an important complement to other commonly used techniques such as yeast two-hybrid or fluorescence complementation, as they reveal interactions between functional proteins at physiological relevant concentrations. Here, we describe an in vivo Co-IP approach using either GFP affinity matrix or specific antibodies to purify proteins of interests and their interacting partners.

  6. Neutron protein crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-10-01

    X-ray diffraction of single crystal has enriched the knowledge of various biological molecules such as proteins, DNA, t-RNA, viruses, etc. It is difficult to make structural analysis of hydrogen atoms in a protein using X-ray crystallography, whereas neutron diffraction seems usable to directly determine the location of those hydrogen atoms. Here, neutron diffraction method was applied to structural analysis of hen egg-white lysozyme. Since the crystal size of a protein to analyze is generally small (5 mm{sup 3} at most), the neutron beam at the sample position in monochromator system was set to less than 5 x 5 mm{sup 2} and beam divergence to 0.4 degree or less. Neutron imaging plate with {sup 6}Li or Gd mixed with photostimulated luminescence material was used and about 2500 Bragg reflections were recorded in one crystal setting. A total of 38278 reflections for 2.0 A resolution were collected in less than 10 days. Thus, stereo views of Trp-111 omit map around the indol ring of Trp-111 was presented and the three-dimensional arrangement of 696H and 264D atoms in the lysozyme molecules was determined using the omit map. (M.N.)

  7. Metabolism of minor isoforms of prion proteins: Cytosolic prion protein and transmembrane prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhiqi; Zhao, Deming; Yang, Lifeng

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disease is triggered by the conversion from cellular prion protein to pathogenic prion protein. Growing evidence has concentrated on prion protein configuration changes and their correlation with prion disease transmissibility and pathogenicity. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that several cytosolic forms of prion protein with specific topological structure can destroy intracellular stability and contribute to prion protein pathogenicity. In this study, the latest molecular chaperone system associated with endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation, the endoplasmic reticulum resident protein quality-control system and the ubiquitination proteasome system, is outlined. The molecular chaperone system directly correlates with the prion protein degradation pathway. Understanding the molecular mechanisms will help provide a fascinating avenue for further investigations on prion disease treatment and prion protein-induced neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25206608

  8. Understanding Protein Non-Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2010-01-01

    This review describes the family of intrinsically disordered proteins, members of which fail to form rigid 3-D structures under physiological conditions, either along their entire lengths or only in localized regions. Instead, these intriguing proteins/regions exist as dynamic ensembles within which atom positions and backbone Ramachandran angles exhibit extreme temporal fluctuations without specific equilibrium values. Many of these intrinsically disordered proteins are known to carry out important biological functions which, in fact, depend on the absence of specific 3-D structure. The existence of such proteins does not fit the prevailing structure-function paradigm, which states that unique 3-D structure is a prerequisite to function. Thus, the protein structure-function paradigm has to be expanded to include intrinsically disordered proteins and alternative relationships among protein sequence, structure, and function. This shift in the paradigm represents a major breakthrough for biochemistry, biophysics and molecular biology, as it opens new levels of understanding with regard to the complex life of proteins. This review will try to answer the following questions: How were intrinsically disordered proteins discovered? Why don't these proteins fold? What is so special about intrinsic disorder? What are the functional advantages of disordered proteins/regions? What is the functional repertoire of these proteins? What are the relationships between intrinsically disordered proteins and human diseases? PMID:20117254

  9. Regulation of protein function by ‘microProteins'

    OpenAIRE

    Staudt, Annica-Carolin; Wenkel, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Elegant post-translational regulation is achieved by ‘microProteins', which form homotypic dimers with their targets and act through the dominant–negative suppression of protein complex function. The recent identification of new microProteins suggests their role is general and has evolved in both the plant and animal kingdoms.

  10. Digestion of protein and protein gels in simulated gastric environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, Q.; Boom, R.M.; Janssen, A.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing attention to food digestion research, food scientists still need to better understand the underlying mechanisms of digestion. Most in vitro studies on protein digestion are based on experiments with protein solutions. In this study, the digestion of egg white protein and whey

  11. Molecular simulations of lipid-mediated protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meyer, F.J.M.; Venturoli, M.; Smit, B.

    2008-01-01

    Recent experimental results revealed that lipid-mediated interactions due to hydrophobic forces may be important in determining the protein topology after insertion in the membrane, in regulating the protein activity, in protein aggregation and in signal transduction. To gain insight into the

  12. The interface of protein structure, protein biophysics, and molecular evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberles, David A; Teichmann, Sarah A; Bahar, Ivet; Bastolla, Ugo; Bloom, Jesse; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Colwell, Lucy J; de Koning, A P Jason; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Echave, Julian; Elofsson, Arne; Gerloff, Dietlind L; Goldstein, Richard A; Grahnen, Johan A; Holder, Mark T; Lakner, Clemens; Lartillot, Nicholas; Lovell, Simon C; Naylor, Gavin; Perica, Tina; Pollock, David D; Pupko, Tal; Regan, Lynne; Roger, Andrew; Rubinstein, Nimrod; Shakhnovich, Eugene; Sjölander, Kimmen; Sunyaev, Shamil; Teufel, Ashley I; Thorne, Jeffrey L; Thornton, Joseph W; Weinreich, Daniel M; Whelan, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The interface of protein structural biology, protein biophysics, molecular evolution, and molecular population genetics forms the foundations for a mechanistic understanding of many aspects of protein biochemistry. Current efforts in interdisciplinary protein modeling are in their infancy and the state-of-the art of such models is described. Beyond the relationship between amino acid substitution and static protein structure, protein function, and corresponding organismal fitness, other considerations are also discussed. More complex mutational processes such as insertion and deletion and domain rearrangements and even circular permutations should be evaluated. The role of intrinsically disordered proteins is still controversial, but may be increasingly important to consider. Protein geometry and protein dynamics as a deviation from static considerations of protein structure are also important. Protein expression level is known to be a major determinant of evolutionary rate and several considerations including selection at the mRNA level and the role of interaction specificity are discussed. Lastly, the relationship between modeling and needed high-throughput experimental data as well as experimental examination of protein evolution using ancestral sequence resurrection and in vitro biochemistry are presented, towards an aim of ultimately generating better models for biological inference and prediction. PMID:22528593

  13. Utilization of soya protein as an alternative protein source in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In contrast, no significant differences were found in feed and protein utilization parameters. For carcass trait, ash, crude fat, and energy varied significantly with soya protein incorporation in fish diet. Concerning organoleptic characteristics, odour and texture in mouth were not affected by incorporation of soya protein in diet.

  14. Protein engineering techniques gateways to synthetic protein universe

    CERN Document Server

    Poluri, Krishna Mohan

    2017-01-01

    This brief provides a broad overview of protein-engineering research, offering a glimpse of the most common experimental methods. It also presents various computational programs with applications that are widely used in directed evolution, computational and de novo protein design. Further, it sheds light on the advantages and pitfalls of existing methodologies and future perspectives of protein engineering techniques.

  15. Recent excitements in protein NMR: Large proteins and biologically ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The advent of Transverse Relaxation Optimized SpectroscopY (TROSY) and perdeuteration allowed biomolecularNMR spectroscopists to overcome the size limitation barrier (~20 kDa) in de novo structure determination of proteins.The utility of these techniques was immediately demonstrated on large proteins and protein ...

  16. Protein stress and stress proteins: implications in aging and disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-04-02

    Apr 2, 2007 ... Environmantal stress induces damage that activates an adaptive response in any organism. The cellular stress response is based on the induction of cytoprotective proteins, the so called stress or heat shock proteins. The stress response as well as stress proteins are ubiquitous, highly conserved ...

  17. Protein: MPA1 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available feron stimulator, Mediator of IRF3 activation, Stimulator of interferon genes protein 9606 Homo sapiens Q86WV6 340061 ... ...MPA1 TLR signaling molecules TMEM173 ERIS, MITA, STING Transmembrane protein 173 Endoplasmic reticulum inter

  18. Epitope tagging of recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizzard, B; Chubet, R

    2001-05-01

    Epitope tagging is a method of expressing proteins whereby an epitope for a specific monoclonal antibody is fused to a target protein using recombinant DNA techniques. The fusion gene is cloned into an appropriate expression vector for the experimental cell type and host cells are transfected. The fusion protein can then be detected and/or purified using a monoclonal antibody specific for the epitope tag. This unit presents protocols for detection and purification of proteins tagged with a particular epitope, the FLAG tag, although the same general approach can be applied to other epitope tags. The protocols in this unit employ the anti-FLAG M2 antibody to detect and purify FLAG-tagged proteins. The methods presented are immunoprecipitation of FLAG fusion proteins from cells using an anti-FLAG M2 affinity gel, detection of FLAG fusion proteins by western blotting, and purification of FLAG fusion proteins by anti-FLAG M2 affinity chromatography.

  19. Protein: FBA3 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FBA3 Atg1 kinase complex TOR1 DRR1 Serine/threonine-protein kinase TOR1 Dominant rapamycin... resistance protein 1, Phosphatidylinositol kinase homolog TOR1, Target of rapamycin kinase 1 559292

  20. Functional aspects of protein flexibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Olsen, Johan G; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are dynamic entities, and they possess an inherent flexibility that allows them to function through molecular interactions within the cell, among cells and even between organisms. Appreciation of the non-static nature of proteins is emerging, but to describe and incorporate...... this into an intuitive perception of protein function is challenging. Flexibility is of overwhelming importance for protein function, and the changes in protein structure during interactions with binding partners can be dramatic. The present review addresses protein flexibility, focusing on protein-ligand interactions....... The thermodynamics involved are reviewed, and examples of structure-function studies involving experimentally determined flexibility descriptions are presented. While much remains to be understood about protein flexibility, it is clear that it is encoded within their amino acid sequence and should be viewed...

  1. Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters January 14, 2013 Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis Normal skin from a mouse (left) shows no ... that lack of a certain protein may trigger atopic dermatitis, the most common type of eczema. The finding ...

  2. Protein-ECE MEtallopincer Hybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruithof, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Modification of proteins with metal complexes is a promising and a relatively new field which conceals many challenges and potential applications. The field is a balance of contributions from the biological (protein engineering, bioconjugation) and chemical sciences (organic, inorganic and

  3. Leptospira Protein Expression During Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are characterizing protein expression in vivo during experimental leptospirosis using immunofluorescence microscopy. Coding regions for several proteins were identified through analysis of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni and L. borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo genomes. In addition, codi...

  4. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJL199C, YJL199C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d in closely related Saccharomyces species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies...cies; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies Rows with this prey as prey (4) Ro...n; not conserved in closely related Saccharomyces species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies... species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies Rows with this prey as prey Ro

  5. Protein: MPA6 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MPA6 Adionectin and its receptors Adipoq Acdc, Acrp30, Apm1 Adiponectin 30 kDa adipocyte complement-relate...d protein, Adipocyte complement-related 30 kDa protein, Adipocyte, C1q and collagen domain-containing prote...in, Adipocyte-specific protein AdipoQ 10090 Mus musculus 11450 Q60994 1C28, 1C3H Q60994 18446001, 19788607 ...

  6. Dipolar response of hydrated proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents an analytical theory and numerical simulations of the dipolar response of hydrated proteins. The effective dielectric constant of the solvated protein, representing the average dipole moment induced at the protein by a uniform external field, shows a remarkable variation among the proteins studied by numerical simulations. It changes from 0.5 for ubiquitin to 640 for cytochrome c. The former value implies a negative dipolar susceptibility of ubiquitin, that is a dia-electri...

  7. Protein corona: Opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanganeh, Saeid; Spitler, Ryan; Erfanzadeh, Mohsen; Alkilany, Alaaldin M.; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2017-01-01

    In contact with biological fluids diverse type of biomolecules (e.g., proteins) adsorb onto nanoparticles forming protein corona. Surface properties of the coated nanoparticles, in terms of type and amount of associated proteins, dictate their interactions with biological systems and thus biological fate, therapeutic efficiency and toxicity. In this perspective, we will focus on the recent advances and pitfalls in the protein corona field. PMID:26783938

  8. The papillomavirus E2 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Alison A

    2013-10-01

    The papillomavirus E2 proteins are pivotal to the viral life cycle and have well characterized functions in transcriptional regulation, initiation of DNA replication and partitioning the viral genome. The E2 proteins also function in vegetative DNA replication, post-transcriptional processes and possibly packaging. This review describes structural and functional aspects of the E2 proteins and their binding sites on the viral genome. It is intended to be a reference guide to this viral protein. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Protein corona: Opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanganeh, Saeid; Spitler, Ryan; Erfanzadeh, Mohsen; Alkilany, Alaaldin M; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2016-06-01

    In contact with biological fluids diverse type of biomolecules (e.g., proteins) adsorb onto nanoparticles forming protein corona. Surface properties of the coated nanoparticles, in terms of type and amount of associated proteins, dictate their interactions with biological systems and thus biological fate, therapeutic efficiency and toxicity. In this perspective, we will focus on the recent advances and pitfalls in the protein corona field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Novel Approach for Protein-Named Entity Recognition and Protein-Protein Interaction Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meijing Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers focus on developing protein-named entity recognition (Protein-NER or PPI extraction systems. However, the studies about these two topics cannot be merged well; then existing PPI extraction systems’ Protein-NER still needs to improve. In this paper, we developed the protein-protein interaction extraction system named PPIMiner based on Support Vector Machine (SVM and parsing tree. PPIMiner consists of three main models: natural language processing (NLP model, Protein-NER model, and PPI discovery model. The Protein-NER model, which is named ProNER, identifies the protein names based on two methods: dictionary-based method and machine learning-based method. ProNER is capable of identifying more proteins than dictionary-based Protein-NER model in other existing systems. The final discovered PPIs extracted via PPI discovery model are represented in detail because we showed the protein interaction types and the occurrence frequency through two different methods. In the experiments, the result shows that the performances achieved by our ProNER and PPI discovery model are better than other existing tools. PPIMiner applied this protein-named entity recognition approach and parsing tree based PPI extraction method to improve the performance of PPI extraction. We also provide an easy-to-use interface to access PPIs database and an online system for PPIs extraction and Protein-NER.

  11. Proteins: Chemistry, Characterization, and Quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sforza, S.; Tedeschi, T.; Wierenga, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are one of the major macronutrients in food, and several traditional food commodities are good sources of proteins (meat, egg, milk and dairy products, fish, and soya). Proteins are polymers made by 20 different amino acids. They might undergo desired or undesired chemical or enzymatic

  12. Protein: MPA3 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MPA3 NADPH oxidase regulators NOXO1 P41NOX, SH3PXD5 NOXO1 NADPH oxidase organizer 1... NADPH oxidase regulatory protein, Nox organizer 1, Nox-organizing protein 1, SH3 and PX domain-containing protein 5 9606 Homo sapiens Q8NFA2 124056 2L73 ...

  13. Protein: MPA3 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 47 kDa autosomal chronic granulomatous disease protein, 47 kDa neutrophil oxidase factor, NCF-47K, Neutro...phil NADPH oxidase factor 1, Nox organizer 2, Nox-organizing protein 2, SH3 and PX domain-containing protein

  14. Protein: MPB1 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MPB1 Related chemokines IL8 CXCL8 Interleukin_8 Interleukin-8 C-X-C motif chemokine... 8, Emoctakin, Granulocyte chemotactic protein 1, Monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor, Monocyte-d...erived neutrophil-activating peptide, Neutrophil-activating protein 1, Protein 3-10C, T-cell chemotactic fac

  15. Protein: FBA4 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ng kinase assembly factor MAT1 CDK7/cyclin-H assembly factor, Cyclin-G1-interacting protein, Menage a trois, RING finger prote...in 66, RING finger protein MAT1, p35, p36 9606 Homo sapiens P51948 4331 1G25 4331 P51948 ...

  16. Photoreceptor proteins from purple bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, J.; van der Horst, M.A.; Chua, T.K.; Ávila Pérez, M.; van Wilderen, L.J.; Alexandre, M.T.A.; Groot, M.-L.; Kennis, J.T.M.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; Hunter, C.N.; Daldal, F.; Thurnauer, M.C.; Beatty, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    Purple bacteria contain representatives of four of the six main families of photoreceptor proteins: phytochromes, BLUF domain containing proteins, xanthopsins (i.e., photoactive yellow proteins), and phototropins (containing one or more light, oxygen, or voltage (LOV) domains). Most of them have a

  17. Protein quality of pig diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, Tetske

    2016-01-01

    The increasing world population and per capita income imposes a risk for protein scarcity. It is, therefore, necessary to use current ingredients more efficiently which includes the accurate assessment of protein quality before inclusion in animal diets. Protein quality is defined in this thesis as

  18. Modeling complexes of modeled proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anishchenko, Ivan; Kundrotas, Petras J; Vakser, Ilya A

    2017-03-01

    Structural characterization of proteins is essential for understanding life processes at the molecular level. However, only a fraction of known proteins have experimentally determined structures. This fraction is even smaller for protein-protein complexes. Thus, structural modeling of protein-protein interactions (docking) primarily has to rely on modeled structures of the individual proteins, which typically are less accurate than the experimentally determined ones. Such "double" modeling is the Grand Challenge of structural reconstruction of the interactome. Yet it remains so far largely untested in a systematic way. We present a comprehensive validation of template-based and free docking on a set of 165 complexes, where each protein model has six levels of structural accuracy, from 1 to 6 Å C α RMSD. Many template-based docking predictions fall into acceptable quality category, according to the CAPRI criteria, even for highly inaccurate proteins (5-6 Å RMSD), although the number of such models (and, consequently, the docking success rate) drops significantly for models with RMSD > 4 Å. The results show that the existing docking methodologies can be successfully applied to protein models with a broad range of structural accuracy, and the template-based docking is much less sensitive to inaccuracies of protein models than the free docking. Proteins 2017; 85:470-478. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Structuring high-protein foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purwanti, N.

    2012-01-01

    Increased protein consumption gives rise to various health benefits. High-protein intake can lead to muscle development, body weight control and suppression of sarcopenia progression. However, increasing the protein content in food products leads to textural changes over time. These changes result

  20. Functional Foods Containing Whey Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whey proteins, modified whey proteins, and whey components are useful as nutrients or supplements for health maintenance. Extrusion modified whey proteins can easily fit into new products such as beverages, confectionery items (e.g., candies), convenience foods, desserts, baked goods, sauces, and in...

  1. Protein Quantitation Using Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoan; Ueberheide, Beatrix M.; Waldemarson, Sofia; Myung, Sunnie; Molloy, Kelly; Eriksson, Jan; Chait, Brian T.; Neubert, Thomas A.; Fenyö, David

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a method of choice for quantifying low-abundance proteins and peptides in many biological studies. Here, we describe a range of computational aspects of protein and peptide quantitation, including methods for finding and integrating mass spectrometric peptide peaks, and detecting interference to obtain a robust measure of the amount of proteins present in samples. PMID:20835801

  2. Biophysics of protein evolution and evolutionary protein biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikosek, Tobias; Chan, Hue Sun

    2014-01-01

    The study of molecular evolution at the level of protein-coding genes often entails comparing large datasets of sequences to infer their evolutionary relationships. Despite the importance of a protein's structure and conformational dynamics to its function and thus its fitness, common phylogenetic methods embody minimal biophysical knowledge of proteins. To underscore the biophysical constraints on natural selection, we survey effects of protein mutations, highlighting the physical basis for marginal stability of natural globular proteins and how requirement for kinetic stability and avoidance of misfolding and misinteractions might have affected protein evolution. The biophysical underpinnings of these effects have been addressed by models with an explicit coarse-grained spatial representation of the polypeptide chain. Sequence–structure mappings based on such models are powerful conceptual tools that rationalize mutational robustness, evolvability, epistasis, promiscuous function performed by ‘hidden’ conformational states, resolution of adaptive conflicts and conformational switches in the evolution from one protein fold to another. Recently, protein biophysics has been applied to derive more accurate evolutionary accounts of sequence data. Methods have also been developed to exploit sequence-based evolutionary information to predict biophysical behaviours of proteins. The success of these approaches demonstrates a deep synergy between the fields of protein biophysics and protein evolution. PMID:25165599

  3. Protein-protein interactions and cancer: targeting the central dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Amanda L; Janda, Kim D

    2011-01-01

    Between 40,000 and 200,000 protein-protein interactions have been predicted to exist within the human interactome. As these interactions are of a critical nature in many important cellular functions and their dysregulation is causal of disease, the modulation of these binding events has emerged as a leading, yet difficult therapeutic arena. In particular, the targeting of protein-protein interactions relevant to cancer is of fundamental importance as the tumor-promoting function of several aberrantly expressed proteins in the cancerous state is directly resultant of its ability to interact with a protein-binding partner. Of significance, these protein complexes play a crucial role in each of the steps of the central dogma of molecular biology, the fundamental processes of genetic transmission. With the many important discoveries being made regarding the mechanisms of these genetic process, the identification of new chemical probes are needed to better understand and validate the druggability of protein-protein interactions related to the central dogma. In this review, we provide an overview of current small molecule-based protein-protein interaction inhibitors for each stage of the central dogma: transcription, mRNA splicing and translation. Importantly, through our analysis we have uncovered a lack of necessary probes targeting mRNA splicing and translation, thus, opening up the possibility for expansion of these fields.

  4. The Proteins API: accessing key integrated protein and genome information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Andrew; Antunes, Ricardo; Alpi, Emanuele; Bursteinas, Borisas; Gonzales, Leonardo; Liu, Wudong; Luo, Jie; Qi, Guoying; Turner, Edd; Martin, Maria

    2017-07-03

    The Proteins API provides searching and programmatic access to protein and associated genomics data such as curated protein sequence positional annotations from UniProtKB, as well as mapped variation and proteomics data from large scale data sources (LSS). Using the coordinates service, researchers are able to retrieve the genomic sequence coordinates for proteins in UniProtKB. This, the LSS genomics and proteomics data for UniProt proteins is programmatically only available through this service. A Swagger UI has been implemented to provide documentation, an interface for users, with little or no programming experience, to 'talk' to the services to quickly and easily formulate queries with the services and obtain dynamically generated source code for popular programming languages, such as Java, Perl, Python and Ruby. Search results are returned as standard JSON, XML or GFF data objects. The Proteins API is a scalable, reliable, fast, easy to use RESTful services that provides a broad protein information resource for users to ask questions based upon their field of expertise and allowing them to gain an integrated overview of protein annotations available to aid their knowledge gain on proteins in biological processes. The Proteins API is available at (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/proteins/api/doc). © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. The Proteins API: accessing key integrated protein and genome information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Ricardo; Alpi, Emanuele; Gonzales, Leonardo; Liu, Wudong; Luo, Jie; Qi, Guoying; Turner, Edd

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The Proteins API provides searching and programmatic access to protein and associated genomics data such as curated protein sequence positional annotations from UniProtKB, as well as mapped variation and proteomics data from large scale data sources (LSS). Using the coordinates service, researchers are able to retrieve the genomic sequence coordinates for proteins in UniProtKB. This, the LSS genomics and proteomics data for UniProt proteins is programmatically only available through this service. A Swagger UI has been implemented to provide documentation, an interface for users, with little or no programming experience, to ‘talk’ to the services to quickly and easily formulate queries with the services and obtain dynamically generated source code for popular programming languages, such as Java, Perl, Python and Ruby. Search results are returned as standard JSON, XML or GFF data objects. The Proteins API is a scalable, reliable, fast, easy to use RESTful services that provides a broad protein information resource for users to ask questions based upon their field of expertise and allowing them to gain an integrated overview of protein annotations available to aid their knowledge gain on proteins in biological processes. The Proteins API is available at (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/proteins/api/doc). PMID:28383659

  6. Characterization of protein-protein interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Leavitt, Stephanie A; Freire, Ernesto

    2004-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful technique to study both protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions. This methods chapter is devoted to describing protein-protein interactions, in particular, the association between two different proteins and the self-association of a protein into homodimers. ITC is the only technique that determines directly the thermodynamic parameters of a given reaction: DeltaG, DeltaH, DeltaS, and DeltaCP. Isothermal titration calorimeters have evolved over the years and one of the latest models is the VP-ITC produced by Microcal, Inc. In this chapter we will be describing the general procedure for performing an ITC experiment as well as for the specific cases of porcine pancreatic trypsin binding to soybean trypsin inhibitor and the dissociation of bovine pancreatic alpha-chymotrypsin.

  7. Understanding Protein-Protein Interactions Using Local Structural Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Bonet, Jaume; García-García, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play a relevant role among the different functions of a cell. Identifying the PPI network of a given organism (interactome) is useful to shed light on the key molecular mechanisms within a biological system. In this work, we show the role of structural features...... (loops and domains) to comprehend the molecular mechanisms of PPIs. A paradox in protein-protein binding is to explain how the unbound proteins of a binary complex recognize each other among a large population within a cell and how they find their best docking interface in a short timescale. We use...... interacting and non-interacting protein pairs to classify the structural features that sustain the binding (or non-binding) behavior. Our study indicates that not only the interacting region but also the rest of the protein surface are important for the interaction fate. The interpretation...

  8. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Cabantous, Stephanie [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  9. Diffusion of Integral Membrane Proteins in Protein-Rich Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javanainen, Matti; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Metzler, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    of being protein-poor, native cell membranes are extremely crowded with proteins. On the basis of extensive molecular simulations, we here demonstrate that protein crowding of the membrane at physiological levels leads to deviations from the SD relation and to the emergence of a stronger Stokes......-like dependence D ∝ 1/R. We propose that this 1/R law mainly arises due to geometrical factors: smaller proteins are able to avoid confinement effects much better than their larger counterparts. The results highlight that the lateral dynamics in the crowded setting found in native membranes is radically different......The lateral diffusion of embedded proteins along lipid membranes in protein-poor conditions has been successfully described in terms of the Saffman-Delbrück (SD) model, which predicts that the protein diffusion coefficient D is weakly dependent on its radius R as D ∝ ln(1/R). However, instead...

  10. Protein from methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenzweig, M.; Ushio, S.

    1974-01-07

    The biosynthesis of proteins from methanol produced from natural gas can provide an attractive alternative to the already commercially proven technique of protein synthesis from gas oil and n-paraffin feedstocks if current pilot-plant tests in England and Japan prove successful. The methanol route also provides other advantages as a protein feedstock: it is water soluble, contains no polycyclic aromatic compounds, and requires less oxygen than methane. Its lower boiling point helps ease the separation of feedstock from the product stream. Finally, it will require lower investment costs. Both ICI and Mitsubishi Gas Chemical Co. are large methanol producers. ICI already has a 1000 ton/yr plant operating at Teeside, England, and expects to decide on a 100,000 m ton/yr plant later this year. Mitsubishi is constructing a large-scale pilot plant scheduled to come onstream this year. ICI will use a Pseudomona bacterium at 98.6/sup 0/F (37/sup 0/C) in the fermenter. Mitsubishi has not yet decided on a yeast or a bacteria, and is searching for a strain capable of withstanding up to 115/sup 0/F (46/sup 0/C). In the more advanced ICI process, methanol will be mixed with phosphoric acid, potassium sulfate, sodium chloride, and traces of iron, copper, zinc, and molybdenum; diluted with water; passed through a sterilization tank; and fermented at pH 7 in a pressure cycle fermenter. The product stream, containing a 3 percent suspension of cellular dry matter, is taken near the top of the fermenter riser, then passed through a flotation vessel and a centrifuge to pack the cell concentration to 20 percent. Water is recycled. Whatever methanol remains in the fermenter product stream is either used up by the microorganisms in subsequent processing or vaporized in the dryer. (auth)

  11. NMR Studies of Protein Hydration and Protein-Ligand Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yuan

    Water on the surface of a protein is called hydration water. Hydration water is known to play a crucial role in a variety of biological processes including protein folding, enzymatic activation, and drug binding. Although the significance of hydration water has been recognized, the underlying mechanism remains far from being understood. This dissertation employs a unique in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique to study the mechanism of protein hydration and the role of hydration in alcohol-protein interactions. Water isotherms in proteins are measured at different temperatures via the in-situ NMR technique. Water is found to interact differently with hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups on the protein. Water adsorption on hydrophilic groups is hardly affected by the temperature, while water adsorption on hydrophobic groups strongly depends on the temperature around 10 C, below which the adsorption is substantially reduced. This effect is induced by the dramatic decrease in the protein flexibility below 10 C. Furthermore, nanosecond to microsecond protein dynamics and the free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of protein hydration are studied as a function of hydration level and temperature. A crossover at 10 C in protein dynamics and thermodynamics is revealed. The effect of water at hydrophilic groups on protein dynamics and thermodynamics shows little temperature dependence, whereas water at hydrophobic groups has stronger effect above 10 C. In addition, I investigate the role of water in alcohol binding to the protein using the in-situ NMR detection. The isotherms of alcohols are first measured on dry proteins, then on proteins with a series of controlled hydration levels. The free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of alcohol binding are also determined. Two distinct types of alcohol binding are identified. On the one hand, alcohols can directly bind to a few specific sites on the protein. This type of binding is independent of temperature and can be

  12. Protein-Protein Interactions: Structurally Conserved Residues Distinguish between Binding Sites and Exposed Protein Surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buyong Ma; Tal Elkayam; Haim Wolfson; Ruth Nussinov

    2003-01-01

    Polar residue hot spots have been observed at protein-protein binding sites. Here we show that hot spots occur predominantly at the interfaces of macromolecular complexes, distinguishing binding sites from the remainder of the surface...

  13. Information contained in protein shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, K.; Viswanadhan, V. N.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    The sequence of local conformations at C-alpha atoms of a protein has been considered as an informational message string. The total self-information contents and self-information per letter have been evaluated for 83 globular proteins whose structures are known from X-ray crystallography. The derived information contents provide a method of quantitating structural specificity of proteins. This method of analysis enables repeating, intricate structural features to be recognized. Among the globular proteins whose structures have been solved, high potential iron protein stands out with the largest three-letter dependence.

  14. Protein-protein interaction network-based detection of functionally similar proteins within species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Baoxing; Wang, Fen; Guo, Yang; Sang, Qing; Liu, Min; Li, Dengyun; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Deli

    2012-07-01

    Although functionally similar proteins across species have been widely studied, functionally similar proteins within species showing low sequence similarity have not been examined in detail. Identification of these proteins is of significant importance for understanding biological functions, evolution of protein families, progression of co-evolution, and convergent evolution and others which cannot be obtained by detection of functionally similar proteins across species. Here, we explored a method of detecting functionally similar proteins within species based on graph theory. After denoting protein-protein interaction networks using graphs, we split the graphs into subgraphs using the 1-hop method. Proteins with functional similarities in a species were detected using a method of modified shortest path to compare these subgraphs and to find the eligible optimal results. Using seven protein-protein interaction networks and this method, some functionally similar proteins with low sequence similarity that cannot detected by sequence alignment were identified. By analyzing the results, we found that, sometimes, it is difficult to separate homologous from convergent evolution. Evaluation of the performance of our method by gene ontology term overlap showed that the precision of our method was excellent. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Tetramer formation in Arabidopsis MADS domain proteins: analysis of a protein-protein interaction network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espinosa-Soto, C.; Immink, R.G.H.; Angenent, G.C.; Alvarez-Buylla, E.R.; Folter, de S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: MADS domain proteins are transcription factors that coordinate several important developmental processes in plants. These proteins interact with other MADS domain proteins to form dimers, and it has been proposed that they are able to associate as tetrameric complexes that regulate

  16. Discover Protein Complexes in Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Using Parametric Local Modularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Kai

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in proteomic technologies have enabled us to create detailed protein-protein interaction maps in multiple species and in both normal and diseased cells. As the size of the interaction dataset increases, powerful computational methods are required in order to effectively distil network models from large-scale interactome data. Results We present an algorithm, miPALM (Module Inference by Parametric Local Modularity, to infer protein complexes in a protein-protein interaction network. The algorithm uses a novel graph theoretic measure, parametric local modularity, to identify highly connected sub-networks as candidate protein complexes. Using gold standard sets of protein complexes and protein function and localization annotations, we show our algorithm achieved an overall improvement over previous algorithms in terms of precision, recall, and biological relevance of the predicted complexes. We applied our algorithm to predict and characterize a set of 138 novel protein complexes in S. cerevisiae. Conclusions miPALM is a novel algorithm for detecting protein complexes from large protein-protein interaction networks with improved accuracy than previous methods. The software is implemented in Matlab and is freely available at http://www.medicine.uiowa.edu/Labs/tan/software.html.

  17. Detection of protein complex from protein-protein interaction network using Markov clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochieng, P. J.; Kusuma, W. A.; Haryanto, T.

    2017-05-01

    Detection of complexes, or groups of functionally related proteins, is an important challenge while analysing biological networks. However, existing algorithms to identify protein complexes are insufficient when applied to dense networks of experimentally derived interaction data. Therefore, we introduced a graph clustering method based on Markov clustering algorithm to identify protein complex within highly interconnected protein-protein interaction networks. Protein-protein interaction network was first constructed to develop geometrical network, the network was then partitioned using Markov clustering to detect protein complexes. The interest of the proposed method was illustrated by its application to Human Proteins associated to type II diabetes mellitus. Flow simulation of MCL algorithm was initially performed and topological properties of the resultant network were analysed for detection of the protein complex. The results indicated the proposed method successfully detect an overall of 34 complexes with 11 complexes consisting of overlapping modules and 20 non-overlapping modules. The major complex consisted of 102 proteins and 521 interactions with cluster modularity and density of 0.745 and 0.101 respectively. The comparison analysis revealed MCL out perform AP, MCODE and SCPS algorithms with high clustering coefficient (0.751) network density and modularity index (0.630). This demonstrated MCL was the most reliable and efficient graph clustering algorithm for detection of protein complexes from PPI networks.

  18. Human cancer protein-protein interaction network: a structural perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gozde Kar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interaction networks provide a global picture of cellular function and biological processes. Some proteins act as hub proteins, highly connected to others, whereas some others have few interactions. The dysfunction of some interactions causes many diseases, including cancer. Proteins interact through their interfaces. Therefore, studying the interface properties of cancer-related proteins will help explain their role in the interaction networks. Similar or overlapping binding sites should be used repeatedly in single interface hub proteins, making them promiscuous. Alternatively, multi-interface hub proteins make use of several distinct binding sites to bind to different partners. We propose a methodology to integrate protein interfaces into cancer interaction networks (ciSPIN, cancer structural protein interface network. The interactions in the human protein interaction network are replaced by interfaces, coming from either known or predicted complexes. We provide a detailed analysis of cancer related human protein-protein interfaces and the topological properties of the cancer network. The results reveal that cancer-related proteins have smaller, more planar, more charged and less hydrophobic binding sites than non-cancer proteins, which may indicate low affinity and high specificity of the cancer-related interactions. We also classified the genes in ciSPIN according to phenotypes. Within phenotypes, for breast cancer, colorectal cancer and leukemia, interface properties were found to be discriminating from non-cancer interfaces with an accuracy of 71%, 67%, 61%, respectively. In addition, cancer-related proteins tend to interact with their partners through distinct interfaces, corresponding mostly to multi-interface hubs, which comprise 56% of cancer-related proteins, and constituting the nodes with higher essentiality in the network (76%. We illustrate the interface related affinity properties of two cancer-related hub

  19. Molecular principles of human virus protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halehalli, Rachita Ramachandra; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu Adimurthy

    2015-04-01

    Viruses, from the human protein-protein interaction network perspective, target hubs, bottlenecks and interconnected nodes enriched in certain biological pathways. However, not much is known about the general characteristic features of the human proteins interacting with viral proteins (referred to as hVIPs) as well as the motifs and domains utilized by human-virus protein-protein interactions (referred to as Hu-Vir PPIs). Our study has revealed that hVIPs are mostly disordered proteins, whereas viral proteins are mostly ordered proteins. Protein disorder in viral proteins and hVIPs varies from one subcellular location to another. In any given viral-human PPI pair, at least one of the two proteins is structurally disordered suggesting that disorder associated conformational flexibility as one of the characteristic features of virus-host interaction. Further analyses reveal that hVIPs are (i) slowly evolving proteins, (ii) associated with high centrality scores in human-PPI network, (iii) involved in multiple pathways, (iv) enriched in eukaryotic linear motifs (ELMs) associated with protein modification, degradation and regulatory processes, (v) associated with high number of splice variants and (vi) expressed abundantly across multiple tissues. These aforementioned findings suggest that conformational flexibility, spatial diversity, abundance and slow evolution are the characteristic features of the human proteins targeted by viral proteins. Hu-Vir PPIs are mostly mediated via domain-motif interactions (DMIs) where viral proteins employ motifs that mimic host ELMs to bind to domains in human proteins. DMIs are shared among viruses belonging to different families indicating a possible convergent evolution of these motifs to help viruses to adopt common strategies to subvert host cellular pathways. Hu-Vir PPI data, DDI and DMI data for human-virus PPI can be downloaded from http://cdfd.org.in/labpages/computational_biology_datasets.html. Supplementary data are

  20. Introduction to protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Alexander; Gavira, Jose A

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystallization was discovered by chance about 150 years ago and was developed in the late 19th century as a powerful purification tool and as a demonstration of chemical purity. The crystallization of proteins, nucleic acids and large biological complexes, such as viruses, depends on the creation of a solution that is supersaturated in the macromolecule but exhibits conditions that do not significantly perturb its natural state. Supersaturation is produced through the addition of mild precipitating agents such as neutral salts or polymers, and by the manipulation of various parameters that include temperature, ionic strength and pH. Also important in the crystallization process are factors that can affect the structural state of the macromolecule, such as metal ions, inhibitors, cofactors or other conventional small molecules. A variety of approaches have been developed that combine the spectrum of factors that effect and promote crystallization, and among the most widely used are vapor diffusion, dialysis, batch and liquid-liquid diffusion. Successes in macromolecular crystallization have multiplied rapidly in recent years owing to the advent of practical, easy-to-use screening kits and the application of laboratory robotics. A brief review will be given here of the most popular methods, some guiding principles and an overview of current technologies.

  1. Bioactive proteins from pipefishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Rethna Priya

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To screen antimicrobial potence of some pipefish species collected from Tuticorin coastal environment. Methods: Antimicrobial activity of pipefishes in methanol extract was investigated against 10 bacterial and 10 fungal human pathogenic strains. Results: Among the tested strains, in Centriscus scutatus, pipefish showed maximum zone of inhibition against Vibrio cholerae (8 mm and minimum in the sample of Hippichthys cyanospilos against Klebseilla pneumoniae (2 mm. In positive control, maximum zone of inhibition was recorded in Vibrio cholerae (9 mm and minimum in Klebseilla pneumoniae, and Salmonella paratyphi (5 mm. Chemical investigation indicated the presence of peptides as evidenced by ninhydrin positive spots on thin layer chromatography and presence of peptide. In SDS PAGE, in Centriscus scutatus, four bands were detected in the gel that represented the presence of proteins in the range nearly 25.8-75 kDa. In Hippichthys cyanospilos, five bands were detected in the gel that represented the presence of proteins in the range nearly 20.5-78 kDa. The result of FT-IR spectrum revealed that the pipe fishes extracts compriseed to have peptide derivatives as their predominant chemical groups. Conclusions: It can be conclude that this present investigation suggests the tested pipe fishes will be a potential source of natural bioactive compounds.

  2. Bioactive proteins from pipefishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Rethna Priya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To screen antimicrobial potence of some pipefish species collected from Tuticorin coastal environment. Methods: Antimicrobial activity of pipefishes in methanol extract was investigated against 10 bacterial and 10 fungal human pathogenic strains. Results: Among the tested strains, in Centriscus scutatus, pipefish showed maximum zone of inhibition against Vibrio cholerae (8 mm and minimum in the sample of Hippichthys cyanospilos against Klebseilla pneumoniae (2 mm. In positive control, maximum zone of inhibition was recorded in Vibrio cholerae (9 mm and minimum in Klebseilla pneumoniae, and Salmonella paratyphi (5 mm. Chemical investigation indicated the presence of peptides as evidenced by ninhydrin positive spots on thin layer chromatography and presence of peptide. In SDS PAGE, in Centriscus scutatus, four bands were detected in the gel that represented the presence of proteins in the range nearly 25.8-75 kDa. In Hippichthys cyanospilos, five bands were detected in the gel that represented the presence of proteins in the range nearly 20.5-78 kDa. The result of FT-IR spectrum revealed that the pipe fishes extracts compriseed to have peptide derivatives as their predominant chemical groups. Conclusions: It can be conclude that this present investigation suggests the tested pipe fishes will be a potential source of natural bioactive compounds.

  3. Protein Chemical Shift Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Anders S

    2014-01-01

    The protein chemical shifts holds a large amount of information about the 3-dimensional structure of the protein. A number of chemical shift predictors based on the relationship between structures resolved with X-ray crystallography and the corresponding experimental chemical shifts have been developed. These empirical predictors are very accurate on X-ray structures but tends to be insensitive to small structural changes. To overcome this limitation it has been suggested to make chemical shift predictors based on quantum mechanical(QM) calculations. In this thesis the development of the QM derived chemical shift predictor Procs14 is presented. Procs14 is based on 2.35 million density functional theory(DFT) calculations on tripeptides and contains corrections for hydrogen bonding, ring current and the effect of the previous and following residue. Procs14 is capable at performing predictions for the 13CA, 13CB, 13CO, 15NH, 1HN and 1HA backbone atoms. In order to benchmark Procs14, a number of QM NMR calculatio...

  4. Water-transporting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeuthen, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    Transport through lipids and aquaporins is osmotic and entirely driven by the difference in osmotic pressure. Water transport in cotransporters and uniporters is different: Water can be cotransported, energized by coupling to the substrate flux by a mechanism closely associated with protein. In the K(+)/Cl(-) and the Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporters, water is entirely cotransported, while water transport in glucose uniporters and Na(+)-coupled transporters of nutrients and neurotransmitters takes place by both osmosis and cotransport. The molecular mechanism behind cotransport of water is not clear. It is associated with the substrate movements in aqueous pathways within the protein; a conventional unstirred layer mechanism can be ruled out, due to high rates of diffusion in the cytoplasm. The physiological roles of the various modes of water transport are reviewed in relation to epithelial transport. Epithelial water transport is energized by the movements of ions, but how the coupling takes place is uncertain. All epithelia can transport water uphill against an osmotic gradient, which is hard to explain by simple osmosis. Furthermore, genetic removal of aquaporins has not given support to osmosis as the exclusive mode of transport. Water cotransport can explain the coupling between ion and water transport, a major fraction of transepithelial water transport and uphill water transport. Aquaporins enhance water transport by utilizing osmotic gradients and cause the osmolarity of the transportate to approach isotonicity.

  5. Mathematical methods for protein science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, W.; Istrail, S.; Atkins, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Understanding the structure and function of proteins is a fundamental endeavor in molecular biology. Currently, over 100,000 protein sequences have been determined by experimental methods. The three dimensional structure of the protein determines its function, but there are currently less than 4,000 structures known to atomic resolution. Accordingly, techniques to predict protein structure from sequence have an important role in aiding the understanding of the Genome and the effects of mutations in genetic disease. The authors describe current efforts at Sandia to better understand the structure of proteins through rigorous mathematical analyses of simple lattice models. The efforts have focused on two aspects of protein science: mathematical structure prediction, and inverse protein folding.

  6. Metagenomics and the protein universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godzik, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Metagenomics sequencing projects have dramatically increased our knowledge of the protein universe and provided over one-half of currently known protein sequences; they have also introduced a much broader phylogenetic diversity into the protein databases. The full analysis of metagenomic datasets is only beginning, but it has already led to the discovery of thousands of new protein families, likely representing novel functions specific to given environments. At the same time, a deeper analysis of such novel families, including experimental structure determination of some representatives, suggests that most of them represent distant homologs of already characterized protein families, and thus most of the protein diversity present in the new environments are due to functional divergence of the known protein families rather than the emergence of new ones. PMID:21497084

  7. The Papillomavirus E2 proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, Alison A., E-mail: amcbride@nih.gov

    2013-10-15

    The papillomavirus E2 proteins are pivotal to the viral life cycle and have well characterized functions in transcriptional regulation, initiation of DNA replication and partitioning the viral genome. The E2 proteins also function in vegetative DNA replication, post-transcriptional processes and possibly packaging. This review describes structural and functional aspects of the E2 proteins and their binding sites on the viral genome. It is intended to be a reference guide to this viral protein. - Highlights: • Overview of E2 protein functions. • Structural domains of the papillomavirus E2 proteins. • Analysis of E2 binding sites in different genera of papillomaviruses. • Compilation of E2 associated proteins. • Comparison of key mutations in distinct E2 functions.

  8. Protein folding and wring resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren

    1997-01-01

    The polypeptide chain of a protein is shown to obey topological contraints which enable long range excitations in the form of wring modes of the protein backbone. Wring modes of proteins of specific lengths can therefore resonate with molecular modes present in the cell. It is suggested...... that protein folding takes place when the amplitude of a wring excitation becomes so large that it is energetically favorable to bend the protein backbone. The condition under which such structural transformations can occur is found, and it is shown that both cold and hot denaturation (the unfolding...... of proteins) are natural consequences of the suggested wring mode model. Native (folded) proteins are found to possess an intrinsic standing wring mode....

  9. Advantages of proteins being disordered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhirong; Huang, Yongqi

    2014-05-01

    The past decade has witnessed great advances in our understanding of protein structure-function relationships in terms of the ubiquitous existence of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). The structural disorder of IDPs/IDRs enables them to play essential functions that are complementary to those of ordered proteins. In addition, IDPs/IDRs are persistent in evolution. Therefore, they are expected to possess some advantages over ordered proteins. In this review, we summarize and survey nine possible advantages of IDPs/IDRs: economizing genome/protein resources, overcoming steric restrictions in binding, achieving high specificity with low affinity, increasing binding rate, facilitating posttranslational modifications, enabling flexible linkers, preventing aggregation, providing resistance to non-native conditions, and allowing compatibility with more available sequences. Some potential advantages of IDPs/IDRs are not well understood and require both experimental and theoretical approaches to decipher. The connection with protein design is also briefly discussed. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  10. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  11. Protein function prediction via graph kernels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borgwardt, Karsten M; Ong, Cheng Soon; Schönauer, Stefan; Vishwanathan, S V N; Smola, Alex J; Kriegel, Hans-Peter

    2005-01-01

    Computational approaches to protein function prediction infer protein function by finding proteins with similar sequence, structure, surface clefts, chemical properties, amino acid motifs, interaction...

  12. Protein oxidation in aging and the removal of oxidized proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhn, Annika; König, Jeannette; Grune, Tilman

    2013-10-30

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated constantly within cells at low concentrations even under physiological conditions. During aging the levels of ROS can increase due to a limited capacity of antioxidant systems and repair mechanisms. Proteins are among the main targets for oxidants due to their high rate constants for several reactions with ROS and their abundance in biological systems. Protein damage has an important influence on cellular viability since most protein damage is non-repairable, and has deleterious consequences on protein structure and function. In addition, damaged and modified proteins can form cross-links and provide a basis for many senescence-associated alterations and may contribute to a range of human pathologies. Two proteolytic systems are responsible to ensure the maintenance of cellular functions: the proteasomal (UPS) and the lysosomal system. Those degrading systems provide a last line of antioxidative protection, removing irreversible damaged proteins and recycling amino acids for the continuous protein synthesis. But during aging, both systems are affected and their proteolytic activity declines significantly. Here we highlight the recent advantages in the understanding of protein oxidation and the fate of these damaged proteins during aging. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Posttranslational Protein modifications in biology and Medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Protein-protein interaction based on pairwise similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaki Nazar

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI is essential to most biological processes. Abnormal interactions may have implications in a number of neurological syndromes. Given that the association and dissociation of protein molecules is crucial, computational tools capable of effectively identifying PPI are desirable. In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective method to detect PPI based on pairwise similarity and using only the primary structure of the protein. The PPI based on Pairwise Similarity (PPI-PS method consists of a representation of each protein sequence by a vector of pairwise similarities against large subsequences of amino acids created by a shifting window which passes over concatenated protein training sequences. Each coordinate of this vector is typically the E-value of the Smith-Waterman score. These vectors are then used to compute the kernel matrix which will be exploited in conjunction with support vector machines. Results To assess the ability of the proposed method to recognize the difference between "interacted" and "non-interacted" proteins pairs, we applied it on different datasets from the available yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae protein interaction. The proposed method achieved reasonable improvement over the existing state-of-the-art methods for PPI prediction. Conclusion Pairwise similarity score provides a relevant measure of similarity between protein sequences. This similarity incorporates biological knowledge about proteins and it is extremely powerful when combined with support vector machine to predict PPI.

  14. Bioinformatic Prediction of WSSV-Host Protein-Protein Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available WSSV is one of the most dangerous pathogens in shrimp aquaculture. However, the molecular mechanism of how WSSV interacts with shrimp is still not very clear. In the present study, bioinformatic approaches were used to predict interactions between proteins from WSSV and shrimp. The genome data of WSSV (NC_003225.1 and the constructed transcriptome data of F. chinensis were used to screen potentially interacting proteins by searching in protein interaction databases, including STRING, Reactome, and DIP. Forty-four pairs of proteins were suggested to have interactions between WSSV and the shrimp. Gene ontology analysis revealed that 6 pairs of these interacting proteins were classified into “extracellular region” or “receptor complex” GO-terms. KEGG pathway analysis showed that they were involved in the “ECM-receptor interaction pathway.” In the 6 pairs of interacting proteins, an envelope protein called “collagen-like protein” (WSSV-CLP encoded by an early virus gene “wsv001” in WSSV interacted with 6 deduced proteins from the shrimp, including three integrin alpha (ITGA, two integrin beta (ITGB, and one syndecan (SDC. Sequence analysis on WSSV-CLP, ITGA, ITGB, and SDC revealed that they possessed the sequence features for protein-protein interactions. This study might provide new insights into the interaction mechanisms between WSSV and shrimp.

  15. A new protein structure representation for efficient protein function prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghawry, Huda A; Mostafa, Mostafa G M; Gharib, Tarek F

    2014-12-01

    One of the challenging problems in bioinformatics is the prediction of protein function. Protein function is the main key that can be used to classify different proteins. Protein function can be inferred experimentally with very small throughput or computationally with very high throughput. Computational methods are sequence based or structure based. Structure-based methods produce more accurate protein function prediction. In this article, we propose a new protein structure representation for efficient protein function prediction. The representation is based on three-dimensional patterns of protein residues. In the analysis, we used protein function based on enzyme activity through six mechanistically diverse enzyme superfamilies: amidohydrolase, crotonase, haloacid dehalogenase, isoprenoid synthase type I, and vicinal oxygen chelate. We applied three different classification methods, naïve Bayes, k-nearest neighbors, and random forest, to predict the enzyme superfamily of a given protein. The prediction accuracy using the proposed representation outperforms a recently introduced representation method that is based only on the distance patterns. The results show that the proposed representation achieved prediction accuracy up to 98%, with improvement of about 10% on average.

  16. Role for protein-protein interaction databases in human genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattin, Kristine A; Moore, Jason H

    2009-12-01

    Proteomics and the study of protein-protein interactions are becoming increasingly important in our effort to understand human diseases on a system-wide level. Thanks to the development and curation of protein-interaction databases, up-to-date information on these interaction networks is accessible and publicly available to the scientific community. As our knowledge of protein-protein interactions increases, it is important to give thought to the different ways that these resources can impact biomedical research. In this article, we highlight the importance of protein-protein interactions in human genetics and genetic epidemiology. Since protein-protein interactions demonstrate one of the strongest functional relationships between genes, combining genomic data with available proteomic data may provide us with a more in-depth understanding of common human diseases. In this review, we will discuss some of the fundamentals of protein interactions, the databases that are publicly available and how information from these databases can be used to facilitate genome-wide genetic studies.

  17. Mapping Protein-Protein Interactions by Quantitative Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Joern; Kratchmarova, Irina; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2010-01-01

    Proteins exert their function inside a cell generally in multiprotein complexes. These complexes are highly dynamic structures changing their composition over time and cell state. The same protein may thereby fulfill different functions depending on its binding partners. Quantitative mass...... spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics in combination with affinity purification protocols has become the method of choice to map and track the dynamic changes in protein-protein interactions, including the ones occurring during cellular signaling events. Different quantitative MS strategies have been used...... to characterize protein interaction networks. In this chapter we describe in detail the use of stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) for the quantitative analysis of stimulus-dependent dynamic protein interactions....

  18. Revisiting the Voronoi description of protein-protein interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazals, Frédéric; Proust, Flavien; Bahadur, Ranjit P; Janin, Joël

    2006-09-01

    We developed a model of macromolecular interfaces based on the Voronoi diagram and the related alpha-complex, and we tested its properties on a set of 96 protein-protein complexes taken from the Protein Data Bank. The Voronoi model provides a natural definition of the interfaces, and it yields values of the number of interface atoms and of the interface area that have excellent correlation coefficients with those of the classical model based on solvent accessibility. Nevertheless, some atoms that do not lose solvent accessibility are part of the interface defined by the Voronoi model. The Voronoi model provides robust definitions of the curvature and of the connectivity of the interfaces, and leads to estimates of these features that generally agree with other approaches. Our implementation of the model allows an analysis of protein-water contacts that highlights the role of structural water molecules at protein-protein interfaces.

  19. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Protein-Protein Interaction Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa; OkHOVATIAN, Farshad; Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Rezaei Tavirani, Majid

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the mortal diseases, subjected to study in terms of molecular investigation. In this study, the protein interaction map of this muscle-wasting condition was generated to gain a better knowledge of interactome profile of DMD. Applying Cytoscape and String Database, the protein-protein interaction network was constructed and the gene ontology of the constructed network was analyzed for biological process, molecular function, and cellular component annotations. Among 100 proteins related to DMD, dystrophin, utrophin, caveolin 3, and myogenic differentiation 1 play key roles in DMD network. In addition, the gene ontology analysis showed that regulation processes, kinase activity, and sarcoplasmic reticulum were the highlighted biological processes, molecular function, and cell component enrichments respectively for the proteins related to DMD. The central proteins and the enriched ontologies can be suggested as possible prominent agents in DMD; however, the validation studies may be required.

  20. On the role of electrostatics on protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Witham, Shawn; Alexov, Emil

    2011-01-01

    The role of electrostatics on protein-protein interactions and binding is reviewed in this article. A brief outline of the computational modeling, in the framework of continuum electrostatics, is presented and basic electrostatic effects occurring upon the formation of the complex are discussed. The role of the salt concentration and pH of the water phase on protein-protein binding free energy is demonstrated and indicates that the increase of the salt concentration tends to weaken the binding, an observation that is attributed to the optimization of the charge-charge interactions across the interface. It is pointed out that the pH-optimum (pH of optimal binding affinity) varies among the protein-protein complexes, and perhaps is a result of their adaptation to particular subcellular compartment. At the end, the similarities and differences between hetero- and homo-complexes are outlined and discussed with respect to the binding mode and charge complementarity. PMID:21572182

  1. Methods for detection of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions using HaloTag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urh, Marjeta; Hartzell, Danette; Mendez, Jacqui; Klaubert, Dieter H; Wood, Keith

    2008-01-01

    HaloTag is a protein fusion tag which was genetically engineered to covalently bind a series of specific synthetic ligands. All ligands carry two groups, the reactive group and the functional/reporter group. The reactive group, the choloroalkane, is the same in all the ligands and is involved in binding to the HaloTag. The functional reporter group is variable and can carry many different moieties including fluorescent dyes, affinity handles like biotin or solid surfaces such as agarose beads. Thus, HaloTag can serve either as a labeling tag or as a protein immobilization tag depending on which ligand is bound to it. Here, we describe a procedure for immobilization of HaloTag fusion proteins and how immobilized proteins can be used to study protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions in vivo and in vitro.

  2. Manipulating protein adsorption using a patchy protein-resistant brush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gon, Saugata; Bendersky, Marina; Ross, Jennifer L; Santore, Maria M

    2010-07-20

    Toward the development of surfaces for the precise manipulation of proteins, this study explores the fabrication and protein-interactive behavior of a new type of surface containing extremely small (on the order of 10 nm or less) flat adhesive "patches" or islands embedded in and partially concealed by a protein-repellant PEG (poly(ethylene glycol)) brush. The adsorption of fibrinogen, the model protein chosen to probe the biomaterial interactions of these surfaces, is very sensitive to the surface density of the adhesive patches, occurring only above a threshold. This suggests that two or more adhesive patches are needed to capture each protein. When the average spacing of the adhesive patches exceeds the fibrinogen length, no adsorption occurs because individual patches are too weakly binding for protein capture, as a result of being at least partially obstructed by the brush. The small size of the adhesive patches relative to the 47 nm fibrinogen length thus defines a limiting regime of surface design, distinct from surfaces where larger features can adhere single isolated proteins or multiple proteins together. The restricted protein-surface contact may comprise a means of preserving protein structure and function in the adsorbed state. This article demonstrates several additional interesting features of PEG brushes relevant to biomaterial design. First a moderate amount of adhesive material can be buried at the base of a brush without a measurable impact on the corona density. Second, a different amount of material at the base of a brush can be rendered ineffective to capturing adhesive proteins, despite a modest compromise of the brush corona. From this will follow insight into the design of patterned biomaterial surfaces, the bioactivity of the edges of patterned features, and an understanding of how flaws in brushes compromise protein resistance or allow access to small adhesive sites.

  3. Concentration dependent model of protein-protein interaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jingshan

    2007-01-01

    The scale free structure p(k)~k^{-gamma} of protein-protein interaction networks can be produced by a static physical model. We find the earlier study of deterministic threshold models with exponential fitness distributions can be generalized to explain the apparent scale free degree distribution of the physical model, and this explanation provides a generic mechanism of "scale free" networks. We predict the dependence of gamma on experimental protein concentrations. The clustering coefficient distribution of the model is also studied.

  4. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Viral organization of human proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Wuchty

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Although maps of intracellular interactions are increasingly well characterized, little is known about large-scale maps of host-pathogen protein interactions. The investigation of host-pathogen interactions can reveal features of pathogenesis and provide a foundation for the development of drugs and disease prevention strategies. A compilation of experimentally verified interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins and a set of HIV-dependency factors (HDF allowed insights into the topology and intricate interplay between viral and host proteins on a large scale. We found that targeted and HDF proteins appear predominantly in rich-clubs, groups of human proteins that are strongly intertwined among each other. These assemblies of proteins may serve as an infection gateway, allowing the virus to take control of the human host by reaching protein pathways and diversified cellular functions in a pronounced and focused way. Particular transcription factors and protein kinases facilitate indirect interactions between HDFs and viral proteins. Discerning the entanglement of directly targeted and indirectly interacting proteins may uncover molecular and functional sites that can provide novel perspectives on the progression of HIV infection and highlight new avenues to fight this virus.

  6. Protein Adaptations in Archaeal Extremophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Reed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extremophiles, especially those in Archaea, have a myriad of adaptations that keep their cellular proteins stable and active under the extreme conditions in which they live. Rather than having one basic set of adaptations that works for all environments, Archaea have evolved separate protein features that are customized for each environment. We categorized the Archaea into three general groups to describe what is known about their protein adaptations: thermophilic, psychrophilic, and halophilic. Thermophilic proteins tend to have a prominent hydrophobic core and increased electrostatic interactions to maintain activity at high temperatures. Psychrophilic proteins have a reduced hydrophobic core and a less charged protein surface to maintain flexibility and activity under cold temperatures. Halophilic proteins are characterized by increased negative surface charge due to increased acidic amino acid content and peptide insertions, which compensates for the extreme ionic conditions. While acidophiles, alkaliphiles, and piezophiles are their own class of Archaea, their protein adaptations toward pH and pressure are less discernible. By understanding the protein adaptations used by archaeal extremophiles, we hope to be able to engineer and utilize proteins for industrial, environmental, and biotechnological applications where function in extreme conditions is required for activity.

  7. Protein detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruetel, Julie A [Livermore, CA; Fiechtner, Gregory J [Bethesda, MD; Kliner, Dahv A. V. [San Ramon, CA; McIlroy, Andrew [Livermore, CA

    2009-05-05

    The present embodiment describes a miniature, microfluidic, absorption-based sensor to detect proteins at sensitivities comparable to LIF but without the need for tagging. This instrument utilizes fiber-based evanescent-field cavity-ringdown spectroscopy, in combination with faceted prism microchannels. The combination of these techniques will increase the effective absorption path length by a factor of 10.sup.3 to 10.sup.4 (to .about.1-m), thereby providing unprecedented sensitivity using direct absorption. The coupling of high-sensitivity absorption with high-performance microfluidic separation will enable real-time sensing of biological agents in aqueous samples (including aerosol collector fluids) and will provide a general method with spectral fingerprint capability for detecting specific bio-agents.

  8. JAK protein kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James E

    2005-06-01

    In humans, the Janus protein tyrosine kinase family (JAKs) contains four members: JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK2. JAKs phosphorylate signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) simultaneously with other phosphorylations required for activation, and there are several cellular mechanisms in place to inhibit JAK/STAT signaling. That one might be able to modulate selected JAK/STAT-mediated cellular signals by inhibiting JAK kinase activity to effect a positive therapeutic outcome is a tantalizing prospect, as yet incompletely realized. While current data suggest no therapeutic use for JAK1 and TYK2 inhibition, JAK2 inhibition seems a promising but not definitively tested mechanism for treatment of leukemia. More promising, however, are data indicating a possible therapeutic use of JAK3 inhibition. The restriction of the JAK3-deficient phenotype to the hematopoietic system and the resulting profound immune suppression suggest that JAK3 could be a target for immunosuppressive therapies used to prevent organ transplant rejection.

  9. Protein Polymers and Amyloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Michael Wulff

    2014-01-01

    that inhibits its target protease through a large conformational change but mutations compromise this function and cause premature structural collapse into hyperstable polymers. Understanding the conformational disorders at a molecular level is not only important for our general knowledge on protein folding...... of this mechanism were investigated through a series of interaction experiments. Despite a very buried location in the native structure, evidence here suggest that the C-terminal tail is labile under slightly destabilizing conditions, providing new detail to this matter. A small infectious polymer unit was also...... constructed and used to show how polymerogenic seeding and polymer propagation might happen inside the body. The locking of central structural elements during α1AT folding or in the native state represents a therapeutic strategy to prevent polymerization. Using Molecular Dynamics simulations, we identified...

  10. Protein Hormones and Immunity‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Keith W.; Weigent, Douglas A.; Kooijman, Ron

    2007-01-01

    A number of observations and discoveries over the past 20 years support the concept of important physiological interactions between the endocrine and immune systems. The best known pathway for transmission of information from the immune system to the neuroendocrine system is humoral in the form of cytokines, although neural transmission via the afferent vagus is well documented also. In the other direction, efferent signals from the nervous system to the immune system are conveyed by both the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous systems. Communication is possible because the nervous and immune systems share a common biochemical language involving shared ligands and receptors, including neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, growth factors, neuroendocrine hormones and cytokines. This means that the brain functions as an immune-regulating organ participating in immune responses. A great deal of evidence has accumulated and confirmed that hormones secreted by the neuroendocrine system play an important role in communication and regulation of the cells of the immune system. Among protein hormones, this has been most clearly documented for prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I), but significant influences on immunity by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) have also been demonstrated. Here we review evidence obtained during the past 20 years to clearly demonstrate that neuroendocrine protein hormones influence immunity and that immune processes affect the neuroendocrine system. New findings highlight a previously undiscovered route of communication between the immune and endocrine systems that is now known to occur at the cellular level. This communication system is activated when inflammatory processes induced by proinflammatory cytokines antagonize the function of a variety of hormones, which then causes endocrine resistance in both the periphery and brain. Homeostasis during inflammation is achieved by a balance between cytokines and

  11. Novel protein-protein interactions inferred from literature context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman H H B M van Haagen

    Full Text Available We have developed a method that predicts Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs based on the similarity of the context in which proteins appear in literature. This method outperforms previously developed PPI prediction algorithms that rely on the conjunction of two protein names in MEDLINE abstracts. We show significant increases in coverage (76% versus 32% and sensitivity (66% versus 41% at a specificity of 95% for the prediction of PPIs currently archived in 6 PPI databases. A retrospective analysis shows that PPIs can efficiently be predicted before they enter PPI databases and before their interaction is explicitly described in the literature. The practical value of the method for discovery of novel PPIs is illustrated by the experimental confirmation of the inferred physical interaction between CAPN3 and PARVB, which was based on frequent co-occurrence of both proteins with concepts like Z-disc, dysferlin, and alpha-actinin. The relationships between proteins predicted by our method are broader than PPIs, and include proteins in the same complex or pathway. Dependent on the type of relationships deemed useful, the precision of our method can be as high as 90%. The full set of predicted interactions is available in a downloadable matrix and through the webtool Nermal, which lists the most likely interaction partners for a given protein. Our framework can be used for prioritizing potential interaction partners, hitherto undiscovered, for follow-up studies and to aid the generation of accurate protein interaction maps.

  12. Protein complexes predictions within protein interaction networks using genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Emad; Naef, Ahmed; Ahmed, Moataz

    2016-07-25

    Protein-protein interaction networks are receiving increased attention due to their importance in understanding life at the cellular level. A major challenge in systems biology is to understand the modular structure of such biological networks. Although clustering techniques have been proposed for clustering protein-protein interaction networks, those techniques suffer from some drawbacks. The application of earlier clustering techniques to protein-protein interaction networks in order to predict protein complexes within the networks does not yield good results due to the small-world and power-law properties of these networks. In this paper, we construct a new clustering algorithm for predicting protein complexes through the use of genetic algorithms. We design an objective function for exclusive clustering and overlapping clustering. We assess the quality of our proposed clustering algorithm using two gold-standard data sets. Our algorithm can identify protein complexes that are significantly enriched in the gold-standard data sets. Furthermore, our method surpasses three competing methods: MCL, ClusterOne, and MCODE in terms of the quality of the predicted complexes. The source code and accompanying examples are freely available at http://faculty.kfupm.edu.sa/ics/eramadan/GACluster.zip .

  13. Water-Protein Interactions: The Secret of Protein Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Martini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water-protein interactions help to maintain flexible conformation conditions which are required for multifunctional protein recognition processes. The intimate relationship between the protein surface and hydration water can be analyzed by studying experimental water properties measured in protein systems in solution. In particular, proteins in solution modify the structure and the dynamics of the bulk water at the solute-solvent interface. The ordering effects of proteins on hydration water are extended for several angstroms. In this paper we propose a method for analyzing the dynamical properties of the water molecules present in the hydration shells of proteins. The approach is based on the analysis of the effects of protein-solvent interactions on water protons NMR relaxation parameters. NMR relaxation parameters, especially the nonselective (R1NS and selective (R1SE spin-lattice relaxation rates of water protons, are useful for investigating the solvent dynamics at the macromolecule-solvent interfaces as well as the perturbation effects caused by the water-macromolecule interactions on the solvent dynamical properties. In this paper we demonstrate that Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy can be used to determine the dynamical contributions of proteins to the water molecules belonging to their hydration shells.

  14. Protein intake, body composition, and protein status following bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Alba; Moizé, Violeta; Rodríguez, Lucía; Flores, Lilliam; Vidal, Josep

    2010-11-01

    Daily protein intake recommendations have recently been proposed for the bariatric patient. We aimed to evaluate the accomplishment of these recommendations, and the influence of protein intake (PI) on fat free mass (FFM) and protein status changes following bariatric surgery. We examined 101 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic Roux-in-Y gastric gypass (LGBP) or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Based on 3-day food records, PI from food and supplements were quantified at 4, 8, and 12 months after surgery. The association between PI and body composition (bioelectrical impedance), plasma albumin and pre-albumin was evaluated at all study time points. A PI protein supplementation, supplements were taken only by 63.4, 50.5, and 33.7% of the participants at 4, 8, and 12 months. However, protein supplementation was effective in helping patients to achieve the daily protein intake goal. In linear regression analysis, male gender and weight loss, but not PI, were significantly associated with loss of FFM (p protein supplementation for the achievement of the recommended daily protein intake in the bariatric patient. However, our data does not help to define a PI goal as critical in determining the FFM and protein status changes following LGBP or LSG.

  15. Protein-Protein Interaction Detection: Methods and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Srinivasa Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interaction plays key role in predicting the protein function of target protein and drug ability of molecules. The majority of genes and proteins realize resulting phenotype functions as a set of interactions. The in vitro and in vivo methods like affinity purification, Y2H (yeast 2 hybrid, TAP (tandem affinity purification, and so forth have their own limitations like cost, time, and so forth, and the resultant data sets are noisy and have more false positives to annotate the function of drug molecules. Thus, in silico methods which include sequence-based approaches, structure-based approaches, chromosome proximity, gene fusion, in silico 2 hybrid, phylogenetic tree, phylogenetic profile, and gene expression-based approaches were developed. Elucidation of protein interaction networks also contributes greatly to the analysis of signal transduction pathways. Recent developments have also led to the construction of networks having all the protein-protein interactions using computational methods for signaling pathways and protein complex identification in specific diseases.

  16. Modular protein switches derived from antibody mimetic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholes, N; Date, A; Beaujean, P; Hauk, P; Kanwar, M; Ostermeier, M

    2016-02-01

    Protein switches have potential applications as biosensors and selective protein therapeutics. Protein switches built by fusion of proteins with the prerequisite input and output functions are currently developed using an ad hoc process. A modular switch platform in which existing switches could be readily adapted to respond to any ligand would be advantageous. We investigated the feasibility of a modular protein switch platform based on fusions of the enzyme TEM-1 β-lactamase (BLA) with two different antibody mimetic proteins: designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) and monobodies. We created libraries of random insertions of the gene encoding BLA into genes encoding a DARPin or a monobody designed to bind maltose-binding protein (MBP). From these libraries, we used a genetic selection system for β-lactamase activity to identify genes that conferred MBP-dependent ampicillin resistance to Escherichia coli. Some of these selected genes encoded switch proteins whose enzymatic activity increased up to 14-fold in the presence of MBP. We next introduced mutations into the antibody mimetic domain of these switches that were known to cause binding to different ligands. To different degrees, introduction of the mutations resulted in switches with the desired specificity, illustrating the potential modularity of these platforms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Noninvasive imaging of protein-protein interactions in living animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luker, Gary D.; Sharma, Vijay; Pica, Christina M.; Dahlheimer, Julie L.; Li, Wei; Ochesky, Joseph; Ryan, Christine E.; Piwnica-Worms, Helen; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2002-05-01

    Protein-protein interactions control transcription, cell division, and cell proliferation as well as mediate signal transduction, oncogenic transformation, and regulation of cell death. Although a variety of methods have been used to investigate protein interactions in vitro and in cultured cells, none can analyze these interactions in intact, living animals. To enable noninvasive molecular imaging of protein-protein interactions in vivo by positron-emission tomography and fluorescence imaging, we engineered a fusion reporter gene comprising a mutant herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase and green fluorescent protein for readout of a tetracycline-inducible, two-hybrid system in vivo. By using micro-positron-emission tomography, interactions between p53 tumor suppressor and the large T antigen of simian virus 40 were visualized in tumor xenografts of HeLa cells stably transfected with the imaging constructs. Imaging protein-binding partners in vivo will enable functional proteomics in whole animals and provide a tool for screening compounds targeted to specific protein-protein interactions in living animals.

  18. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 553733356 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ransporter family protein Lyngbya aestuarii MTQYSRYYSQTPNYPNSNHPSLENINLTIDPGKTVALVGKNGAGKTTLTKLLCRLYDPDCGKILWKGEDLRALELEDLRQKIAVVLQNYARFPLTVRENIALGNLEKLNCDRTLFKAIEKAGITRKIHSLPNPLDTPL

  19. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 515863728 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein Geminocystis herdmanii MNRINKLVSITSAIICSGITTITSQLPAVAGDVSPLCENLNMGTQILISTKEFNAAICDKYYIEPQSGCPMPLEYFYVGQSRKTGESIVLPASDVSTSNPFMRIYKAQNGNYTYQIASSGAYGGNSWTSLSVFNKGY

  20. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 515864564 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ypothetical protein Geminocystis herdmanii MASIVGNSRNNLLEGTLGNDTILGLGGNDTLDGEGGNDLLNGGDGNDLLDGGSGNDTLIGGNGNDT...LDGEGGNDLLNGGSGNDLLDGGSGNDTLIGGNGNDTLDGESGNDLLNGGSGNDLLDGEGGNDTLIGGLGRDRLDGGAGADFYLYNSPNEGRDLIDDYSVTNDTFLFRRNGFNGGLSLGTLNANQFTYGSSASDGNDRFIYNRSTGELFFDIDGTGSSSQQLIAKLIDPIGVLNRNDIVII

  1. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 504951340 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tical protein Nostoc sp. PCC 7524 MTTVVQEYELKTLQRLKEEENQGAIQFEAAIEQGLLIVVDFESEQEEESYINYAAILGDDGESATCAIAVHRQWAIATDDKRAISFIQKEASNIQILSTPEIIKNWSEVASLDNSELRNILNSIRLKGRYLPAKTHPLRNWWLGILK

  2. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 516359091 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tical protein Scytonema hofmanni MTHFFEFEADFVESLRCIPMQVRLKLDTCGIKLKLNQWNQFSEKERLALVERPCNTEETIQEYREFLRQLVQQHTGESATDLPVEEAPLWLDEQNIPNSVTSKAQEFGIEMTPNQWSNLLPVQRFALIKLSRSSHENKNFLPALKEFHVV

  3. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 515866305 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein Nodosilinea nodulosa MISFSPIPWIAVLGRLGIAVALGASIGVDREYSQKAAGLRTNMLVALGAALFILVTIQSGMAQADSTALARSLQGVITGVGFVGAGSILRTGRVRGLTSATAIWVSAGVGLAAGLGQWQLGLLGTGLALMILRLLKFAED

  4. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 515875839 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DLTATLAQNQAEDCFLVDALGTWVANGLEWSEEEWQGKVRDLLELLPTLPGVVILVGEETGWGLVPVYPLGRQFRDRLGSLLRYVGTLATSVYLVTGGYALDLTQLGIPLLGNRGGEGEGERGRGGAGE ...pothetical protein Spirulina subsalsa MIHSPTIILVTGPARSGKSEWAESLAMQSGKRVSYLATARLNPEDSEWQARIEKHQARRPPDWKTLWVPE

  5. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 441045 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hetical protein Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 9432 MKKRKIANTLRKALLEDGKMERALYEYELEEHLDYWYEGLKSDREQFVFAVTENSGDVAMVLITPDKTIYVNEEAREKLAEFWIKAYRNNINRLIPMMAENLANNIISVTGVKMVSPNQHRHWVSLRP ...

  6. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 648456548 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thetical protein Leptolyngbya boryana MSLALLEQYAMKLIDLETAVDPVLEEQLFDLLLVRDRIECLRKDYDAANLQKLLHLDQRLQQQGTRIAQFLNLPNCRTTVKPTEDAWWWWFEPAGDWRDRYDWLWSALCVPMMATSGALLLDLSGRFLSGGIDTFGALMWSVKVY

  7. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 441039 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hetical protein Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 9717 MKKRKIANTLRKALLEDGKMERALYEYELEEHIDYWYEGLKSDRDQFVFAVTENSGDVAMVLITPGKTIYVNEEAREKLSQFWIKAYENNINQLIPMMAENLANDIISVTGVKMVSPNQKRRWVSLRP ...

  8. Protein (Viridiplantae): 308798659 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available named protein product Ostreococcus tauri MAMRGMKMAAKAPTTGRRARRTRADARTPARFVAARVNADDLTDAARDKFDEVTTTLSEYWEDSDEKPALVTLGVYGIVGLVAANGTLRAVDGLPLIPDFLELVGILFSGFFVYQNLLYKPDRAALRETISKIYNKIL ...

  9. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 499441265 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thetical protein Synechococcus sp. WH 8102 MLRLVWLLPLALLQACAGSPVAEELQRSFESPELMATEAEAPIPEQPQVVDPTPIDRSQEVEVEQEAATKSDTDTNPDTDGDGIDVQQPISKSLQPPAPYRITIRLAGADPAAPAEAVTRALRQSEVVFSVERIERITP

  10. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 516316998 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cal protein Prochlorothrix hollandica MGCLLEFWGMSATETVVITFGLDETEFEDEERLRFAKKLLPLMRKECDAVERVERAEDLNPEAGSKPGIATLIGLLTAEVGLDSIKEFIGFLGDRMGDQPMTVTVGEVTITARSRHELEQLEPMALRLLDAQRQPQGEAKNV

  11. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 495464035 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein Moorea producens MTVRQPRYSKEEFARRGDEIYETQVRPKVEAGNHGKIVAIDIETGDFEVDPREIAACDRLEARNPDAQRISEKFFDTEFCPPSPPILGGTRINLLVEVPQNWGTNGGLDVANETFQTTSQIWIVRIGSRYVRRFGGRGKRTG

  12. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 516354103 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cal protein Scytonema hofmanni MTRVYLDTSIYNRPFDDQTQPKIFLETQAVILILQMIEGKSIELVSSSVLEYENSRNPFPLKQQAMQQYLQMATVRQQADETIKQRAKQLEQQGLKAIDALHVACAEASGTNYLITSDKRLINRCQKLTFRVINPTNFILEVEDDYQGT

  13. Protein (Viridiplantae): 159463846 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2036 predicted protein Chlamydomonas reinhardtii MRRLQVCACCAGAWRLVRHGGGWRLGVCQRAMKACASLFLHASTRTVSRCMPACVRPATQCDQSTGMHVNRKRDCAFIMYSKGSAGKSTARWGAARSRQAAHVYAALCLCRSELGPRPLTCCRGYRQTP ...

  14. Protein (Viridiplantae): 159468077 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein CHLREDRAFT_171030 Chlamydomonas reinhardtii MWATKLEAQLQLMFMPTRLHRRPLHQGTCRNYSTAPGITGVIELTSAFYRMYPNATFVFNKETAAKGTYRGEEETAASWWLKHVGSKLEIYLSPLLGLWAMSPPGPSGAGTR ...

  15. Protein (Viridiplantae): 159470305 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available predicted protein Chlamydomonas reinhardtii MSSRPKRAASANMANVIAAEKANKAAALHAWPKMWATKLEAQLQLMFMPTRLHRRPLHQGTCRNYSTAPGITGVIELTSAFYRMYPNATFVFNKETAAKGTYRGEEETAASWWLKHVGSKLEIYLSPLRCRPEVSR ...

  16. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 493210752 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein CheY Nodularia spumigena MNNTTAIMPIEVLLVEDNPGDAELTRIALEDSKISVNLNVVEDGVEAMAFLQKQGNYANAPHPDIVLLDLNLPKKDGREVLAEIKADKKLRRIPVVVLTTSQSEEDILKAYNLSANCFITKPVDFDQFVKIVQSIENFWFAIVKLPPE

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 295749 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ceiver protein Nostoc sp. PCC 7107 MPIEVLLVEDNPGDAELTRIALQDSKISINLNIVEDGVEAMAFLRKQDSYTRKPHPDIVLLDLNLPRKDGREVLAEMKSDDHLKRIPVVVLTTSQSEEDILKAYNLAANCYITKPVDFDQFVKIVQSIENFWFAIVKLPPE ...

  18. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 497073171 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pothetical protein Fischerella sp. JSC-11 MHYYVHPFQLELHKLENMIVHVQHVNNQEVKQIADSRLFTSQAIGEEGGDTVTTKAIGEEGGDTVTTQAIGEEGGDTVTTKAIGEEGGDTVTTQAIGEEGGDTVTTQAIGEEGGDTVTTKAIGEEGGDTVTTLAFGEEGGF

  19. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 518320325 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... hypothetical protein Calothrix sp. PCC 7103 MDYVHPFQMELHKLESMIVHVQYADIKEVDKTLASNDAVSTQAVGEEGGTKVSTRALGEEGGNILTTYAVGEEGGNILTTYAVGEEGGDKVTTQAVGEEGGTRVTTYAVGEEGGGRVTTKAVGEEGGSIIRR

  20. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 424444 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hetical protein Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 9809 MSLEENPYPNDESAEFTQAIEEVEAALASLKDRYRQISEAEQQKKDLEAQFSQIEPQWRENPLPELEKELVQIREQIQELEVILESNLLKEGELKRLFWEGIRRGLLGEVFWQIVRFGGIGVLLGWILRSCSG ...

  1. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 515881707 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thetical protein Fischerella sp. PCC 9339 MNTLIAFVKKLRLRQVLTVFLAGLLFLTGSIYTSGYAQAAQLKSQVFLADAGQQSELLYPGAETPVGRAYKEGELPIKSEKDFRPNAGNLIQNEPSVTQRAKDRIETVKEAVEEASGFLKDKGNEATKRPELQPNPAVNK

  2. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 424446 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hetical protein Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 9806 MSLEENPYPNDESAEFTQAIAEVEAAITALKDRYRQINEAERQKKDLEAQFSQIEPQWRENPLPELEKELVQIREQIQELEVILESNLLKEGELKRLFWEGIRRGLLGEVFWQIVRFGGIGVLLGWILRSCTG ...

  3. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 76081 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein Nodularia spumigena CCY9414 MNDQPVHVAIAILYQEDKFLMQLRDNIPGILYPGYWGLFGGHIELGETPDVAVKREVIEEIGYTLPSFAEFGCYADDAVVRHVFHAPLLVELDQLVLNEGWDMGLLTPEDIRQGKCYSPIADEVRLLGAIHQRIMLDFISH ...

  4. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 497312480 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available domain-containing protein Pseudanabaena biceps MKKRVNLTFPKRAISIPITYRLAKDFNIAANIIRAQVAPNKVGKMVLELSGDIDQLEEALDWMRSQDIEVSLHGREIVIDDTTCVDCGLCTGVCPTEALTLDSKTFQLNFLRSRCVVCEQCITACPVNAISINL

  5. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 499683197 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available othetical protein Synechococcus sp. CC9605 MSNHKINRYDAMPPHIIKALTLCANGSTWVDAAAAVGIKAPCLRKWYRDRRAEEFIESLVRENLNVANNLLTSAAPRLADELIQIALDPNVKAYARTQAISESFKILRENVLEAEQRRQLQEIRQTLQSLEDSKTVTV

  6. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 499682832 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available othetical protein Synechococcus sp. CC9605 MSENQLVNRFDAIPPHIIKALTLCANGSTWADAAAAVGIKAPCLRKWYRDRRAEEFIETLVRENLNVANNLLTSAAPRLADELIQIALDPNVKAYARTQAISESFKILRENVLEAEQRRQLQEIRQTLQSLEDSKTVTV

  7. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 499440544 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available othetical protein Synechococcus sp. WH 8102 MSYTEINRYDSIPPHIIKGLTLCANGSTWADAAAAVGVKAPCLRKWYRDSRAEEFIESLVRENINVANNLLTSAAPRLADELIKIALDPKVKAYARTQAISESFKILRENVLEAEQRKQLQEIRRTLQAIEDGKAVDV

  8. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 24305 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ing protein Anabaena sp. 90 MNKLIFLDTNILGMVTNPKSSNSNCQECKEWLDELPLKSYQIILPEIADYEVRRELLRAGKTKGIKRLDQLKQAITYLPITTATMLLAAQFWAEIRNTGKPTADPKSLDGDVILAAQAKIEELNGDQVIVATTNVKHLSLFVDAREWQMIN ...

  9. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 653152304 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein Aphanizomenon flos-aquae MSKVIILDSAPVGLITNPKGNPLSVQCQEWFYSLFERGYEVILPEIIDYEIRRELLRANKLSGIRKLNQLKSEIIYLPITTEVMLKAAELWAEVRNKGKSTADNKALDGDVILAAQSILVANYGNEVIIATSNKKHLSLFIDAREWQEI

  10. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 500464022 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thetical protein Synechococcus sp. WH 7803 MSRQRFRGLYLQNTGHPLCFSFVTYTPQTREQMVACGDLRADEEYFSPVLFDFLLFVSEGILGASPGVAFPFGYDDLAIVASRIRGTGVQHEYLIAINASAWNESKQAVLQQLRDILSRDLWDGARLRRGNDHPSPSE

  11. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 499305066 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ical protein Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 MFKILFDSDLILDAVMNRTELAEDVRTLLENLHPSIRLYLTDVGLQKVSTYTYCLKNSQIPEIIVDWLQEQIQICPIDQGLLQKARYSPLRDFESAVELACINHYQLNAIVTNKPEDFIVTAHPLCVWSFADLWLRVNLESQLQATIHS

  12. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 515856463 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available othetical protein Leptolyngbya boryana MLQDALTWIQNLGATGAIVFILLYMCAAVLWIPGTLLTLGAGLVYGLFLGSLYVAIGATLGAIAAFLVG...RYVARDWVSQRIEANAKWKAIDQAVAKEGLKIVILTRLSPVFPFTLLNYAFGVTQVSLKDYALGCFGMIPGIIMYVYIGSLAGNLATLGKAPLSSEAQLAQWGLRIVGLIATVVVTVYVTRIARKALQDSGVEDS

  13. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 504938346 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pothetical protein Synechococcus sp. PCC 6312 MSRKQHGLDWIVFYSDAVFAIAITLISVEIKLPFESGQLNSTELSHDLLNLFPEHQSYIFTFLIIGFFWINQYQYFTYIKHCDYKLFWLNTILLMCIDFLPFPASVLNDYRRQPVAVIFYACSMIATGLIKMVVRI

  14. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 515858423 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hetical protein Leptolyngbya boryana MFRRILVVLEDAPSQHCVFNTALRFARANQAQLCLVDLRTNPAAIAHSLAEMAIGLGIQVDISELSEKTEQALIRTARNWYADLIVIGHALHPTLSPILPCTVLIVQQEQEHTISMTMQLRPQVPDGAVRNRLERLLDLTPSS

  15. Protein (Viridiplantae): 224125616 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TPYLAHRSSFALPTAEAIKKVVAQTHAADRIRKAVEDAAATRIQAVFRSYLARKALCALRGLVKLQALVRGHQVRKQTTAT...0 predicted protein Populus trichocarpa MGKASRWMINFLLGKKEEKTKKNDISFHAEKETTPTATPAYKRRWSFGKSAKKERVYRGRRSLDSIIT

  16. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 516355738 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tical protein Scytonema hofmanni MARIRLLHAKLHQVRVTDANVNYVGSVTIDSELIDKVGILPLQEVEIWNVSNGNRLSTYVLSGEPGSGVICLNGAAAHLCEPGDFVIIAAYEERDRAEVFRTGHEARVVIADEHNRCKKFFSQTLDPCQGKLLFHAEVTEITATTNF

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 12321 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein Synechococcus sp. RCC307 MQGRSPAIGATTGLDEAYRLCRQQGLRLSRQRRLVLEILWRSGEHLSARDIFDRLNADGRRIGHTSVYQNLESLHSNGVIECLEKAQGRLYGHRADPHSHLTCLESGRISDLDIELPADLVEAIEQRTGFSIESYSLNLQGRPLP ...

  18. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 546232768 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein Crocosphaera watsonii MKLNHSLVFISLTTIGLSLITPAKADAQLRNIGPNISIPSRECIPGAINCGGEIHRENMRHNRQLYFQTPEKILQHFHRERTERACLERTMTTPPPPIKANCNQYLEQIENFNQQDAVIDQRLLQQQEIDRLYPNGSNF

  19. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 494522819 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein Crocosphaera watsonii MKLNHSLVFISLTTIGLSLITPAKADAQLRNIGPNISIPSRECIPGAINCGGEIHRENMRHNRQLYFQTPEKILQHFHRERTERACLERTMTTPPPPINANCNQYLEQIENFNQQDAVIDQRLLQQQEIDRLYPNGSNF

  20. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 654346332 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein Mastigocoleus testarum MAGINLFDMLTQTNNGAAVQQVGQQTGLQPDMAQTAIKVLLPAIAGGLQRNVQQPGGLQSLLGALQNGHHEQYLDQP...ETLGKPESIADGNAILGHLLGSKDTSRAVAAQAAQKTGLSEQVLKSVLPMVASMAMASLSKQTRKPDMAGALAGMLSGQQPQPAQAGLGGLIGGLLGGGSKSQPQSGAMGMLGGLLDADGDGNAMDEIFQMVMNRR

  1. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 504939852 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ical protein Calothrix sp. PCC 7507 MGLSDGLANPDKKAIVVEDCCSMIDAQLASKSGISGMAIKAAFGALKGVKPGYIAYVVEQILPQCFTALDPIWSEGLQTGDPVGYLNANRDRTADALLSVTDARAQNLKRQIVKGTYDKLRGSAKQNVEEAVPELAKIIDKYTKT

  2. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 499683514 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pothetical protein Synechococcus sp. CC9605 MQLEQIEQALQAPVMDAVIALSERVQTLETNPEGRIYTAYRAIDQTLSLGYSDNIDSITEQLHERDFVLLASRRGTRREQRLLLLTLKEIGIASSYSENCFTASQNTVNHLRHLGWPLGNFKQGANSTKTHKRFNLER

  3. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 493680837 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FVATGLVNKEIEKRTVYLLVAKPISRAELIVGKHLGLSAVLAVLVAAMTVIYLAILSLSRIPFPLGSILIASLFIWFELCLMAGVGILFGVFSSSLLATLLTFGVYLM...thetical protein Microcoleus vaginatus MNLRRILTVATNVFWEVIRDRILYLIIIFALLMGASVRLIPELAATTEKKIILDVGLAAMSILGLIATV

  4. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 115179 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available domain protein Calothrix sp. PCC 6303 MGTICEDKLYITNTKSTMSTMSTPTIDQLKQSDVPVIVADHEGIVVDINSNFEIIFGWTAEEIIGQPLTVILPAFFRDSHNLGFARFSATGQATVLNHPLNLKAVTKDNREIESEHFIIAEKQDGQWLFAAKLRPLEMA ...

  5. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 648292043 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein Nodosilinea nodulosa MLDTNLWISALLFGGLPAQLIKLAQDGHVEIYTSQDLLAELADVLGYPKFQSRLKRLSSTSEALLINVTRLATICESPPPLAVPELRDQDDMIVLQAAVAAQAIAIVSGDDDLLALEQIGEISILTVRAFLFRYFPDSS

  6. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 497312160 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ILYLIFSIKLPNLDWYQALFTIASTSGLIGLVIGGAIGTLYGWFFKSSLSISCRGCLERGQYLLMLEGSETLTRKGREILDNYTVKPH ...thetical protein Pseudanabaena biceps MIAVLPDESSAFEAYRLLQCHGISPEHLALVGKGYSSPDSVGLFNPTYTTWRYAKRGMFWLGVISTVTGV

  7. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 553733132 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pothetical protein Lyngbya aestuarii MKRKTRTSPARSTFNYTALAVIGGVLILGIGIGIAISSTTTFSPENVASSQFIDRSAPSTETCIKFGASAM...VTDMRVFVTLNPFNVYISQPRMQPGCVLRTSNWTILKKNNLISSEQERDCKQRMNTFGYTGELESSPEISCIYQNNSAENLFLSQPGGGGMTPARPRAESDRF

  8. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 553729546 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ypothetical protein Lyngbya aestuarii MTSLTQNSIILEKAIKYVLKKSPDKPKTEAVVEALIEQEKTASKLKEPSNFSQFLGTWRLCFITGTQKTR...RKIGTALGPGRYLPNWVKIYLSYSDSSASPQVNLEQAFEAGNVENSVKLGGLKLTLSGPVKFQEKKNILAFDFTRMKVILFGVKLYDGYIRGGAESEEKFYSDRINKQAFFAYFYIQEKAIAARGRGGGLALWGRES

  9. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 495458053 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... hypothetical protein, partial Moorea producens DASNLSRTDGVDISWSTAEGVLINATTYSIENSQLLSRFDLTQSEEQWQVQGEMQGKPVSSVLEHKGELLSDYGSYLVSLELLGSEQDVVTQNMWVAEADPISATAVKMSKIADNEHANVKMDIGTICSRIFS

  10. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 648401911 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... hypothetical protein Calothrix sp. PCC 7103 MAPTICSFGGLILMASPMLLQVPADYQKFETKRRTSDSEDINRARIKERKETANLLQKTGLLREGKTLTIRDYEDDSKEKPGISNRTLLSYLEDEEVYVYDFKRMCIGKIKSRRFYWKHHYKGICDNAPTVTDN

  11. Protein (Viridiplantae): 159472102 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4474 predicted protein, partial Chlamydomonas reinhardtii PPSPAPPSPEPGSPPPSPAPPSPQPPSPAPPSPEPGSPPPSPAPPSPKPPSPAPPSPEQPGSPPPSPPPPRPQPPSPAPPSPEPGSPPPSPAPPSPQPPSPAPPSPEPGSPPPSPAPTQP ...

  12. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 515860616 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pothetical protein Leptolyngbya boryana MHKIKNRVVGTSTASRQKENPMNTRNLLSGLALFALPMALGLAMPSLAVPNNGGSGTKMDELKKGGYTCERVSVNFIECTKDGSPTYWCTDNGECQQQARRHVTFPGQLPGAADPGRPTVVIEAQPILSPSNLGVRNGAQF

  13. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 550281717 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein Rubidibacter lacunae MDTDMSVELINLSLKPREYLKGLTTIVIAYLAVNLLSLERIGALLRKFKRSSCQELNTCEAEIIWAAIHKSSLYFPGRVACLELSLAFTIYALISKRSSIWCVGVAVDPIRAHAWVEVEQKPFHEKNDLYLYFKKILVV

  14. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 553732548 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ypothetical protein Lyngbya aestuarii MKGLRVDLSRSDVKVALDLCYYDFETILQALILWALYCEEEGKPLQFPNKTLTQAIAQQWKPREYSPWSDKILSNPRFQSPGTKWWIAAAEGLGRDVRNQLIADVDEKGSQQYVLFRNGLTLRLNTALNWDWEKIRAYGERQTR

  15. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 500469187 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pothetical protein Synechococcus sp. RCC307 MKILLSLLLLLAPTAALAQEQKKPQSMRDAADSFRICRTIPEERRDESAGRRVAQAWIDSAPSGAEERLPRRELMEAMVKAYAAYMGERKAYGAIGCSEGILDRVENQNWSSFHQGIREVLMKQGMGDLMTPGTPPGQ

  16. Protein (Viridiplantae): 159488149 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8105 predicted protein Chlamydomonas reinhardtii MSTSGLLFQRRSVTAATYKRSSNRQTRLNVVAFGGQQGAAPEHAARARTTPQASMAASTMPGPQGAELGNWLRQLDLFFSKSRDTRSLSEISDFNMSDEDHDDDHASHMYVSHLAARMAMEPLPGRE ...

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 546232644 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ypothetical protein Crocosphaera watsonii MEKQTFSGKGKAGIMGLKLPSVPRISEGNRNSSYHWYLSVICNKSDRAYDVVVEGLLQPVALEANVQQQLATANLEERIKLYQTYDLWHENLDTLATMRRSQPQNSRASQQLGQLLQSVKLDPSIGQQPLLGIQTLTSRR

  18. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 504941098 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al protein Calothrix sp. PCC 7507 MSATYQADFNLWIDKTAKLLREHRWQEIDLEHLIAEVEDLGKSERRAIISQLIRLLLHLLKWQYQPQRRSDSWLDSITDARTQIELAIQDSPSLKSYPIEQLKESYQKARRQAAKQTGMIISVFPEGCPYSLELVLDEDWLPEASE

  19. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 515871072 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GGTAYIGPHIQLPENFINVLENVFHELLENKSSAKENHIHLHTNKDINNNKSSSCLASRRILLLSANPQKTESLHRRKEIEEIENALNRATVARLKEGKGDPVFEPLL...ypothetical protein Nodosilinea nodulosa MPDPVDKLCQIIAQELRSNKNITTHELIDHVNKKISQDSELKEALISDQRIQQINRDNSVNFQTLLE

  20. Dipolar response of hydrated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2012-02-28

    The paper presents an analytical theory and numerical simulations of the dipolar response of hydrated proteins in solution. We calculate the effective dielectric constant representing the average dipole moment induced at the protein by a uniform external field. The dielectric constant shows a remarkable variation among the proteins, changing from 0.5 for ubiquitin to 640 for cytochrome c. The former value implies a negative dipolar susceptibility, that is a dia-electric dipolar response and negative dielectrophoresis. It means that ubiquitin, carrying an average dipole of ≃240 D, is expected to repel from the region of a stronger electric field. This outcome is the result of a negative cross-correlation between the protein and water dipoles, compensating for the positive variance of the intrinsic protein dipole in the overall dipolar susceptibility. In contrast to the neutral ubiquitin, charged proteins studied here show para-electric dipolar response and positive dielectrophoresis. The study suggests that the dipolar response of proteins in solution is strongly affected by the coupling of the protein surface charge to the hydration water. The protein-water dipolar cross-correlations are long-ranged, extending ~2 nm from the protein surface into the bulk. A similar correlation length of about 1 nm is seen for the electrostatic potential produced by the hydration water inside the protein. The analysis of numerical simulations suggests that the polarization of the protein-water interface is highly heterogeneous and does not follow the standard dielectric results for cavities carved in dielectrics. The polarization of the water shell gains in importance, relative to the intrinsic protein dipole, at high frequencies, above the protein Debye peak. The induced interfacial dipole can be either parallel or antiparallel to the protein dipole, depending on the distribution of the protein surface charge. As a result, the high-frequency absorption of the protein solution can