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Sample records for telluride nanocrystals fabricated

  1. Nanocrystal thin film fabrication methods and apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagan, Cherie R.; Kim, David K.; Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Lai, Yuming

    2018-01-09

    Nanocrystal thin film devices and methods for fabricating nanocrystal thin film devices are disclosed. The nanocrystal thin films are diffused with a dopant such as Indium, Potassium, Tin, etc. to reduce surface states. The thin film devices may be exposed to air during a portion of the fabrication. This enables fabrication of nanocrystal-based devices using a wider range of techniques such as photolithography and photolithographic patterning in an air environment.

  2. Fabrication of Nanovoid-Imbedded Bismuth Telluride with Low Dimensional System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A new fabrication method for nanovoids-imbedded bismuth telluride (Bi--Te) material with low dimensional (quantum-dots, quantum-wires, or quantum-wells) structure was conceived during the development of advanced thermoelectric (TE) materials. Bismuth telluride is currently the best-known candidate material for solid-state TE cooling devices because it possesses the highest TE figure of merit at room temperature. The innovative process described here allows nanometer-scale voids to be incorporated in Bi--Te material. The final nanovoid structure such as void size, size distribution, void location, etc. can be also controlled under various process conditions.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of cadmium telluride, lead telluride and cadmium telluride/lead telluride superlattice thin films on Indium Tin Oxide (ITO)/glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Fei

    The objective of this work was to fabricate nanolayer films CdTe, PbTe and CdTe/PbTe superlattice structures on Indium Tin Oxide (ITO)/glass substrates. The purpose of this work is aimed at improving the efficiency of solar cells by enhanced optical absorption of light. The optical bandgap properties of the CdTe/PbTe superlattice structures were engineered to be employed as an absorber layer of a solar cell in order to optimize the absorption of the solar spectrum. Electrochemical Atomic Layer Deposition (EC-ALD) has been used to fabricate CdTe, PbTe and three different superlattice structures of CdTe/PbTe thin films on ITO-coated glass: (CdTe20/PbTe20)3, (CdTe10/PbTe20)3 and (CdTe5/PbTe20)3. These are intended to serve as the absorber layer of a solar cell. In our experiments, Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and current monitoring helped us obtain appropriate deposition potentials. The grain sizes of the superlattices were studied by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The chemical composition of the films was determined by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Optical absorption measurements were made in order to determine the band gap energy of the deposited films. We successfully shifted the bandgaps of CdTe/PbTe superlattices on ITO from 1.9 eV to 3.2 eV by changing the proportion of CdTe in the CdTe/PbTe films.

  4. Acetic acid-confined synthesis of uniform three-dimensional (3D) bismuth telluride nanocrystals consisting of few-quintuple-layer nanoplatelets

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    High-selectivity, uniform three-dimensional (3D) flower-like bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) nanocrystals consisting of few-quintuple-layer nanoplatelets with a thickness down to 4.5 nm were synthesized for the first time by a facile, one-pot polyol method with acetic acid as the structure-director. Micrometre-sized 2D films and honeycomb-like spheres can be obtained using the uniform 3D Bi2Te3 nanocrystals as building blocks. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011.

  5. Microfluidic Fabrication of Hydrocortisone Nanocrystals Coated with Polymeric Stabilisers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Odetade

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocortisone (HC nanocrystals intended for parenteral administration of HC were produced by anti-solvent crystallisation within coaxial assemblies of pulled borosilicate glass capillaries using either co-current flow of aqueous and organic phases or counter-current flow focusing. The organic phase was composed of 7 mg/mL of HC in a 60:40 (v/v mixture of ethanol and water and the anti-solvent was milli-Q water. The microfluidic mixers were fabricated with an orifice diameter of the inner capillary ranging from 50 µm to 400 µm and operated at the aqueous to organic phase flow rate ratio ranging from 5 to 25. The size of the nanocrystals decreased with increasing aqueous to organic flow rate ratio. The counter-current flow microfluidic mixers provided smaller nanocrystals than the co-current flow devices under the same conditions and for the same geometry, due to smaller diameter of the organic phase stream in the mixing zone. The Z-average particle size of the drug nanocrystals increased from 210–280 nm to 320–400 nm after coating the nanocrystals with 0.2 wt % aqueous solution of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC in a stirred vial. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD analyses carried out on the dried nanocrystals stabilized with HPMC, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP, and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS were investigated and reported. The degree of crystallinity for the processed sample was lowest for the sample stabilised with HPMC and the highest for the raw HC powder.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of cellulose nanocrystal based transparent electroactive polyurethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyun-U.; Kim, Hyun Chan; Kim, Jung Woong; Zhai, Lindong; Jayaramudu, Tippabattini; Kim, Jaehwan

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) based transparent and electroactive polyurethane (CPPU), suitable for actively tunable optical lens. CNC is used for high dielectric filler to improve electromechanical behavior of CPPU. For high transparency and homogeneous distribution of CNC in polyurethane, CNC-poly[di(ethylene glycol) adipate] is used to play a role of polyol and isocyanate salt. The fabricated CPPU exhibits high transparency (>90%) and 10% of electromechanical strain under 3 V μm-1 electric field. Mechanical, dielectric properties as well as physical and chemical characteristics are investigated to prove the electromechanical behavior of CPPU.

  7. Cadmium telluride quantum dots advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Donegan, John

    2013-01-01

    Optical Properties of Bulk and Nanocrystalline Cadmium Telluride, Núñez Fernández and M.I. VasilevskiyAqueous Synthesis of Colloidal CdTe Nanocrystals, V. Lesnyak, N. Gaponik, and A. EychmüllerAssemblies of Thiol-Capped CdTe Nanocrystals, N. GaponikFörster Resonant Energy Transfer in CdTe Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Structures, M. Lunz and A.L. BradleyEmission of CdTe Nanocrystals Coupled to Microcavities, Y.P. Rakovich and J.F. DoneganBiological Applications of Cadmium Telluride Semiconductor Quantum Dots, A. Le Cign

  8. Fabrication of multilayered Ge nanocrystals embedded in SiOxGeNy films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Fei; Green, Martin A.; Conibeer, Gavin; Cho, Eun-Chel; Huang Yidan; Perez-Wurfl, Ivan; Flynn, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Multilayered Ge nanocrystals embedded in SiO x GeN y films have been fabricated on Si substrate by a (Ge + SiO 2 )/SiO x GeN y superlattice approach, using a rf magnetron sputtering technique with a Ge + SiO 2 composite target and subsequent thermal annealing in N 2 ambient at 750 deg. C for 30 min. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement indicated the formation of Ge nanocrystals with an average size estimated to be 5.4 nm. Raman scattering spectra showed a peak of the Ge-Ge vibrational mode downward shifted to 299.4 cm -1 , which was caused by quantum confinement of phonons in the Ge nanocrystals. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that Ge nanocrystals were confined in (Ge + SiO 2 ) layers. This superlattice approach significantly improved both the size uniformity of Ge nanocrystals and their uniformity of spacing on the 'Z' growth direction

  9. Fabrication and evaluation of smart nanocrystals of artemisinin for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nanocrystals have the potential to substantially increase dissolution rate, solubility with subsequent enhanced bioavailability via the oral route of a range of poor water soluble drugs. Regardless of other issues, scale up of the batch size is the main issue associated with bottom up approach. Material and ...

  10. Fabrication of Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts by Deposition of Iron Nanocrystals on Carbon Nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casavola, Marianna; Hermannsdoerfer, Justus; de Jonge, Niels; Dugulan, A. Iulian; de Jong, Krijn P.

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of supported catalysts consisting of colloidal iron oxide nanocrystals with tunable size, geometry, and loadinghomogeneously dispersed on carbon nanotube (CNT) supportsis described herein. The catalyst synthesis is performed in a two-step approach. First, colloidal iron and iron

  11. Fabrication of worm-like Ag2S nanocrystals under mediation of protein

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fabrication of worm-like Ag2S nanocrystals under mediation of protein. DEZHI QIN1, LI ZHANG1,∗, XIAN DU1, GUANGRUI YANG2 and QIUXIA ZHANG1. 1College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Pingdingshan University, Pingdingshan 467000, China. 2Institute of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, North ...

  12. Colloidal Sb2S3 Nanocrystals: Synthesis, Characterization and Fabrication of Solid-State Semiconductor Sensitized Solar Cell

    KAUST Repository

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu

    2015-12-26

    Inorganic nanocrystals composed of earth-abundant and non-toxic elements are crucial to fabricated sustainable photovoltaic devices in large scale. In this study, various-shaped and different phases of antimony sulfide nanocrystals, which is composed of non-scarce and non-toxic elements, are synthesized using hot-injection colloidal method. The effect of various synthetic parameters on the final morphology is explored. Also, foreign ion (Chlorine) effects on the morphology of Sb2S3 nanocrystals have been observed. Structural, optical and morphological properties of the nanocrystals were investigated, and Sb2S3 nanocrystal-based solid-state semiconductor-sensitized solar cells were fabricated using as-prepared nanocrystals. We achieved promising power conversion efficiencies of 1.48%.

  13. Fabrication of core-shell MIL-101(Cr)@UiO-66(Zr) nanocrystals for hydrogen storage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ren, Jianwei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of coreeshell nanocrystals by incorporating microporous UiO-66 into mesoporous MIL-101 is reported. The growth of the coreeshell MIL-101@UiO-66 nanocrystals was observed and supported by TEM and PXRD. The accessible pore volumes...

  14. Fabrication of Ge nanocrystals doped silica-on-silicon waveguides and observation of their strong quantum confinement effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Germanium (Ge) nanocrystals embedded in silica matrix is an interesting material for new optoelectronic devices. In this paper, standard silica-on-silicon waveguides with a core doped by Ge nanocrystals were fabricated using plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition and reactive ion etching...

  15. Fabrication of Thermoelectric Sensor and Cooling Devices Based on Elaborated Bismuth-Telluride Alloy Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellah Boulouz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The principal motivation of this work is the development and realization of smart cooling and sensors devices based on the elaborated and characterized semiconducting thermoelectric thin film materials. For the first time, the details design of our sensor and the principal results are published. Fabrication and characterization of Bi/Sb/Te (BST semiconducting thin films have been successfully investigated. The best values of Seebeck coefficient (α(T at room temperature for Bi2Te3, and (Bi1−xSbx2Te3 with x = 0.77 are found to be −220 µV/K and +240 µV/K, respectively. Fabrication and evaluation of performance devices are reported. 2.60°C of cooling of only one Peltier module device for an optimal current of Iopt=2.50 mA is obtained. The values of temperature measured by infrared camera, by simulation, and those measured by the integrated and external thermocouple are reported. A sensitivity of the sensors of 5 mV Torr−1 mW−1 for the pressure sensor has been found with a response time of about 600 ms.

  16. Mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) thin films fabricated by close spaced sublimation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannan, M.A.; Basharat, M.; Ali, A.; Shah, N.A.; Maqsood, A.

    2007-01-01

    Thin films of HgCdTe were fabricated by deposition of HgTe on the CdTe thin film substrates. Both depositions were carried out through close spaced sublimation (CSS) technique. The structural investigation performed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed that the deposited films exhibit a polycrystalline structure with large number of sharp grain boundaries. The samples were then characterized optically to determine the refractive index. Absorption coefficient and the optical band gaps. The estimated band gap decreased, typically from 1.46 to 1.43 Ev as Hg content in the films increased from 1.41 to 3.29-wt. the deposited films showed high value of resistivity. Which decreased with increasing temperature showing the semiconducting behavior of the films. The prepared films gave response to infrared radiation. (author)

  17. Polycrystalline thin-film cadmium telluride solar cells fabricated by electrodeposition. Annual technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trefny, J.U.; Mao, D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1998-01-01

    During the past year, Colorado School of Mines (CSM) researchers performed systematic studies of the growth and properties of electrodeposition CdS and back-contact formation using Cu-doped ZnTe, with an emphasis on low Cu concentrations. CSM also started to explore the stability of its ZnTe-Cu contacted CdTe solar cells. Researchers investigated the electrodeposition of CdS and its application in fabricating CdTe/CdS solar cells. The experimental conditions they explored in this study were pH from 2.0 to 3.0; temperatures of 80 and 90 C; CdCl{sub 2} concentration of 0.2 M; deposition potential from {minus}550 to {minus}600 mV vs. Ag/AgCl electrode; [Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4}] concentration between 0.005 and 0.05 M. The deposition rate increases with increase of the thiosulfate concentration and decrease of solution pH. Researchers also extended their previous research of ZnTe:Cu films by investigating films doped with low Cu concentrations (< 5 at. %). The low Cu concentration enabled them to increase the ZnTe:Cu post-annealing temperature without causing excessive Cu diffusion into CdTe or formation of secondary phases. The effects of Cu doping concentration and post-deposition annealing temperature on the structural, compositional, and electrical properties of ZnTe were studied systematically using X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, electron microprobe, Hall effect, and conductivity measurements.

  18. Plasmonic doped semiconductor nanocrystals: Properties, fabrication, applications and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Ilka; Scotognella, Francesco; Manna, Liberato

    2017-02-01

    Degenerately doped semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are of recent interest to the NC community due to their tunable localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in the near infrared (NIR). The high level of doping in such materials with carrier densities in the range of 1021cm-3 leads to degeneracy of the doping levels and intense plasmonic absorption in the NIR. The lower carrier density in degenerately doped semiconductor NCs compared to noble metals enables LSPR tuning over a wide spectral range, since even a minor change of the carrier density strongly affects the spectral position of the LSPR. Two classes of degenerate semiconductors are most relevant in this respect: impurity doped semiconductors, such as metal oxides, and vacancy doped semiconductors, such as copper chalcogenides. In the latter it is the density of copper vacancies that controls the carrier concentration, while in the former the introduction of impurity atoms adds carriers to the system. LSPR tuning in vacancy doped semiconductor NCs such as copper chalcogenides occurs by chemically controlling the copper vacancy density. This goes in hand with complex structural modifications of the copper chalcogenide crystal lattice. In contrast the LSPR of degenerately doped metal oxide NCs is modified by varying the doping concentration or by the choice of host and dopant atoms, but also through the addition of capacitive charge carriers to the conduction band of the metal oxide upon post-synthetic treatments, such as by electrochemical- or photodoping. The NIR LSPRs and the option of their spectral fine-tuning make accessible important new features, such as the controlled coupling of the LSPR to other physical signatures or the enhancement of optical signals in the NIR, sensing application by LSPR tracking, energy production from the NIR plasmon resonance or bio-medical applications in the biological window. In this review we highlight the recent advances in the synthesis of various different plasmonic

  19. Examining the Roles of Emulsion Droplet Size and Surfactant in the Interfacial Instability-Based Fabrication Process of Micellar Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuxiang; Mei, Ling; Han, Ning; Ding, Xinyi; Yu, Caihao; Yang, Wenjuan; Ruan, Gang

    2017-06-01

    The interfacial instability process is an emerging general method to fabricate nanocrystal-encapsulated micelles (also called micellar nanocrystals) for biological detection, imaging, and therapy. The present work utilized fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots or QDs) as the model nanocrystals to investigate the interfacial instability-based fabrication process of nanocrystal-encapsulated micelles. Our experimental results suggest intricate and intertwined roles of the emulsion droplet size and the surfactant poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) used in the fabrication process of QD-encapsulated poly (styrene-b-ethylene glycol) (PS-PEG) micelles. When no PVA is used, no emulsion droplet and thus no micelle is successfully formed; Emulsion droplets with large sizes ( 25 μm) result in two types of QD-encapsulated micelles, one of which is colloidally stable QD-encapsulated PS-PEG micelles while the other of which is colloidally unstable QD-encapsulated PVA micelles; In contrast, emulsion droplets with small sizes ( 3 μm or smaller) result in only colloidally stable QD-encapsulated PS-PEG micelles. The results obtained in this work not only help to optimize the quality of nanocrystal-encapsulated micelles prepared by the interfacial instability method for biological applications but also offer helpful new knowledge on the interfacial instability process in particular and self-assembly in general.

  20. FABRICATION AND EVALUATION OF SMART NANOCRYSTALS OF ARTEMISININ FOR ANTIMALARIAL AND ANTIBACTERIAL EFFICACY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed Muhammad Hassan; Ullah, Farhat; Khan, Shahzeb; Shah, Syed Muhammad Mukarram; Isreb, Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Background: Nanocrystals have the potential to substantially increase dissolution rate, solubility with subsequent enhanced bioavailability via the oral route of a range of poor water soluble drugs. Regardless of other issues, scale up of the batch size is the main issue associated with bottom up approach. Material and Methods: Smart nanocrystals of artemisinin (ARM) was produced relatively at large batch sizes (100, 200, 300 and 400ml) compared to our previously reported study by (Shah, et al., 2016). ARM nanosuspensions/nanocrystals were characterised using zeta sizer, SEM, TEM, DSC, PXRD and RP-HPLC. The nanosuspensions were finally subjected to in vitro antimalarial and antimicrobial activity. Results: The average particle size (PS) for 400 ml batches was 126.5 ±1.02 nm, and the polydispersity index (PI) was 0.194 ± 0.04. The saturation solubility of the ARM nanocrystals was substantially increased to (725.4± 2.0 μg/ml) compared to the raw ARM in water 177.4± 1.3 μg/ml and stabilizer solution (385.3± 2.0 μg/ml). The IC50 value of ARM nanosuspension against P. vivax was 65 and 21 folds lower than micronized 19.5 ng/mL and unprocessed drug (6.4 ng/mL) respectively. The ARM nanosuspension was found highly effective compared to unprocessed drug against all the tested microorganism except E. coli, Shigella and C. albican. Conclusion: The simple precipitation-ultrasonication approach was efficiently employed for fabrication of ARM nanosuspension to scale up the batch size. Similarly, the solubility, antimalarial potential and antimicrobial efficacy of ARM in the form of nanosuspension were significantly enhanced. Findings from this study can persuade research interest for further comprehensive studies using animals model. PMID:28480403

  1. Fabrication of Ge Nanocrystals Doped Silica-on-Silicon Waveguides and Observation of Their Strong Quantum Confinement Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    Standard silica-on-silicon waveguides with a core doped by Ge nanocrystals were fabricated using PECVD and RIE. Transmission of the waveguide was measured, and strong absorption peaks at 1056.8 nm, 1406 nm and 1263.2 nm were observed.......Standard silica-on-silicon waveguides with a core doped by Ge nanocrystals were fabricated using PECVD and RIE. Transmission of the waveguide was measured, and strong absorption peaks at 1056.8 nm, 1406 nm and 1263.2 nm were observed....

  2. Cost-effective fabrication of thermal- and chemical-stable ZIF-9 nanocrystals at ammonia atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Arash; Mansournia, Mohammadreza

    2017-12-01

    In this study, room temperature synthesis of zeolitic imidazolate framework-9 (ZIF-9) nanocrystals is reported for the first time at ammonia atmosphere in the absence of any organic additive. High thermal stability of the as-fabricated ZIF-9 up to 300 °C is illustrated by TG and XRD data. Also, the chemical resistance of product to harsh and severe solvothermal conditions introduces it to be an objective as potential material in many applications. Besides, the modest microporosity of the as-obtained ZIF-9 materials attracts more attentions for further investigation compared to those fabricated in organic solvents. By and large, the represented low-cost and room temperature synthetic method can be applicable in the large scale preparation of ZIF-9 for potentially practical utilization.

  3. Mesoporous spherical aggregates of anatase nanocrystals with wormhole-like framework structures: their chemical fabrication, characterization, and photocatalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Miao, Jian-Jun; Zhu, Jian-Min; Ma, Hong-Min; Zhu, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2004-12-21

    A facile and efficient approach for the fabrication of mesoporous spherical aggregates of anatase nanocrystals is reported in this paper. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide was used as the structure-directing agent, and the interaction between cyclohexane microdroplets and the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide self-assemblies led to the assembly of 4-5-nm-sized anatase nanocrystals into spherical aggregates with mesoporous structures. The as-prepared anatase powders exhibited high photocatalytic activity and could be effectively used as the catalyst for the room-temperature photodegradation of a variety of organic dye pollutants in aqueous media including methyl orange, bromopyrogallol red, and methylene blue.

  4. Atomic retention and near infrared photoluminescence from PbSe nanocrystals fabricated by sequential ion implantation and electron beam annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carder, D.A.; Markwitz, A.; Reeves, R.J.; Kennedy, J.; Fang, F.

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystals of PbSe have been fabricated in a silicon dioxide matrix by sequential low energy ion implantation followed by an electron beam annealing step. Transmission electron microscopy reveals PbSe nanocrystals with typical sizes between 3 and 10 nm in the sub-surface region. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry has been used to study the total atomic retention, as a function of implanted atoms, following annealing. Photoluminescence was observed in various samples, at 4 K, as a broad peak between 1.4 and 2.0 μm, with observation of a dependence of the peak wavelength on annealing temperature. Room temperature photoluminescence was observed for samples with a high retention of implanted atoms, demonstrating the importance of nanocrystal density for achieving ambient temperature emission in these systems

  5. Comparison of discrete-storage nonvolatile memories: advantage of hybrid method for fabrication of Au nanocrystal nonvolatile memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qin; Jia Rui; Guan Weihua; Li Weilong; Liu Qi; Hu Yuan; Long Shibing; Chen Baoqin; Liu Ming; Ye Tianchun; Lu Wensheng; Jiang Long

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the memory characteristics of two kinds of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors embedded with Au nanocrytals are investigated: hybrid MOS with nanocrystals (NCs) fabricated by chemical syntheses and rapid thermal annealing (RTA) MOS with NCs fabricated by RTA. For both kinds of devices, the capacitance versus voltage (C-V) curves clearly indicate the charge storage in the NCs. The hybrid MOS, however, shows a larger memory window, as compared with RTA MOS. The retention characteristics of the two MOS devices are also investigated. The capacitance versus time (C-t) measurement shows that the hybrid MOS capacitor embedded with Au nanocrystals has a longer retention time. The mechanism of longer retention time for hybrid MOS capacitor is qualitatively discussed

  6. 3D Printing of Photocurable Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite for Fabrication of Complex Architectures via Stereolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaganas, Napolabel B; Mangadlao, Joey Dacula; de Leon, Al Christopher C; Palaganas, Jerome O; Pangilinan, Katrina D; Lee, Yan Jie; Advincula, Rigoberto C

    2017-10-04

    The advantages of 3D printing on cost, speed, accuracy, and flexibility have attracted several new applications in various industries especially in the field of medicine where customized solutions are highly demanded. Although this modern fabrication technique offers several benefits, it also poses critical challenges in materials development suitable for industry use. Proliferation of polymers in biomedical application has been severely limited by their inherently weak mechanical properties despite their other excellent attributes. Earlier works on 3D printing of polymers focus mainly on biocompatibility and cellular viability and lack a close attention to produce robust specimens. Prized for superior mechanical strength and inherent stiffness, cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) from abaca plant is incorporated to provide the necessary toughness for 3D printable biopolymer. Hence, this work demonstrates 3D printing of CNC-filled biomaterial with significant improvement in mechanical and surface properties. These findings may potentially pave the way for an alternative option in providing innovative and cost-effective patient-specific solutions to various fields in medical industry. To the best of our knowledge, this work presents the first successful demonstration of 3D printing of CNC nanocomposite hydrogel via stereolithography (SL) forming a complex architecture with enhanced material properties potentially suited for tissue engineering.

  7. Thermal degradation kinetics of polylactic acid/acid fabricated cellulose nanocrystal based bionanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monika; Dhar, Prodyut; Katiyar, Vimal

    2017-11-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) are fabricated from filter paper (as cellulosic source) by acid hydrolysis using different acids such as sulphuric (H 2 SO 4 ), phosphoric (H 3 PO 4 ), hydrochloric (HCl) and nitric (HNO 3 ) acid. The resulting acid derived CNC are melt mixed with Polylactic acid (PLA) using extruder at 180°C. Thermogravimetric (TGA) result shows that increase in 10% and 50% weight loss (T 10 , T 50 ) temperature for PLA-CNC film fabricated with HNO 3 , H 3 PO 4 and HCl derived CNC have improved thermal stability in comparison to H 2 SO 4 -CNC. Nonisothermal kinetic studies are carried out with modified-Coats-Redfern (C-R), Ozawa-Flynn-Wall (OFW) and Kissinger method to predict the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. Subsequently prediction of these parameter leads to the proposal of thermal induced degradation mechanism of nanocomposites using Criado method. The distribution of E a calculated from OFW model are (PLA-H 3 PO 4 -CNC: 125-139 kJmol -1 ), (PLA-HNO 3 -CNC: 126-145 kJmol -1 ), (PLA-H 2 SO 4 -CNC: 102-123 kJmol -1 ) and (PLA-HCl-CNC: 140-182 kJmol -1 ). This difference among E a for the decomposition of PLA-CNC bionanocomposite is probably due to various acids used in this study. The E a calculated by these two methods are found in consonance with that observed from Kissinger method. Further, hyphenated TG-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) result shows that gaseous products such as CO 2 , CO, lactide, aldehydes and other compounds are given off during the thermal degradation of PLA-CNC nanocomposite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Facile fabrication and electrochemical behaviors of Mn:ZnS nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Ruishi [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, 621010 (China); Li, Yuanli, E-mail: yuanlyl@foxmail.com [Department of Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, 621010 (China); Liu, Haifeng; Guo, Baogang [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, 621010 (China)

    2016-07-05

    Here, we demonstrate the rational design and synthesis of Mn:ZnS nanocrystals with adjustable doping concentrations utilizing a facile, cost effective, and environmentally benign chemical protocol. These nanostructures were investigated as electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Compared with pristine ZnS nanocrystals, the Mn:ZnS nanocrystals exhibit significantly improved electrochemical performances in terms of specific capacity and cycling performance. The Mn:ZnS nanocrystal sample with doping concentration of 1 at% displays second discharge capacity of 789.9 mA h g{sup −1} at a current density of 24 mA g{sup −1}, about 2.39 times higher than that of the pure ZnS nanocrystal. Furthermore, the Mn:ZnS nanocrystal electrodes represent much better capacity retention than that of the undoped one. The greatly improved electrochemical performances of the Mn:ZnS nanocrystal samples could be attributed to the following factors. The large specific surface area can significantly enhance structural integrity by acting as mechanical buffer, effectively alleviating the volume changes generated during the lithiation/delithiation process. The incorporation of Mn into the lattice of ZnS improves charge transfer kinetics and results in a faster Li{sup +} diffusion rate during the charge–discharge process. It is of great significance to incorporate guest metal ions into nanostructured materials to display especial electrochemical characteristics triggering an effective approach to improve the electrochemical properties.

  9. Cadmium telluride photovoltaic radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agouridis, D.C.; Fox, R.J.

    A dosimetry-type radiation detector is provided which employs a polycrystalline, chlorine-compensated cadmium telluride wafer fabricated to operate as a photovoltaic current generator used as the basic detecting element. A photovoltaic junction is formed in the wafer by painting one face of the cadmium telluride wafer with an n-type semi-conductive material. The opposite face of the wafer is painted with an electrically conductive material to serve as a current collector. The detector is mounted in a hermetically sealed vacuum containment. The detector is operated in a photovoltaic mode (zero bias) while DC coupled to a symmetrical differential current amplifier having a very low input impedance. The amplifier converts the current signal generated by radiation impinging upon the barrier surface face of the wafer to a voltage which is supplied to a voltmeter calibrated to read quantitatively the level of radiation incident upon the detecting wafer.

  10. Brightly luminescent organically capped silicon nanocrystals fabricated at room temperature and atmospheric pressure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kůsová, Kateřina; Cibulka, Ondřej; Dohnalová, Kateřina; Pelant, Ivan; Valenta, J.; Fučíková, A.; Žídek, Karel; Lang, J.; Englich, J.; Matějka, P.; Štěpánek, Petr; Bakardjieva, Snejana

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 8 (2010), s. 4495-4504 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA101120804; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z40320502; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * organic capping * photoluminescence * NMR * single-nanocrystal spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 9.855, year: 2010

  11. Properties of silicon nanocrystals with boron and phosphorus doping fabricated via silicon rich oxide and silicon dioxide bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien-Jen Yang, Terry; Nomoto, Keita; Puthen-Veettil, Binesh; Lin, Ziyun; Wu, Lingfeng; Zhang, Tian; Jia, Xuguang; Conibeer, Gavin; Perez-Wurfl, Ivan

    2017-07-01

    Effects of boron and phosphorus doping on the structural, electrical, and optical properties of silicon nanocrystals in superlattice thin films were investigated. Silicon nanocrystals were fabricated via magnetron sputtering of stoichiometric silicon rich oxide and silicon dioxide bilayers followed by high temperature annealing at 1100 degrees Celsius. The characterization techniques used include: high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with energy filtering, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, Raman, photoluminescence, and photothermal deflection spectroscopy, as well as electrical measurements. Results showed that phosphorus doping causes the loss of the bilayer structure and an increase in the average size of the silicon nanocrystals due to softening of the silicon dioxide matrix during post-sputter annealing. The result was a decrease in quantum confinement and a redshift in photoluminescence spectrum with an absorption profile similar to crystalline silicon. The undoped (intrinsic) sample maintained its bilayer structure and displayed stronger quantum confinement with higher photoluminescence peak energy and higher absorption coefficient. In-between, the boron doped sample was more similar structurally to the intrinsic sample, although merging between bilayers resulted in an extensive silicon nanocrystalline network. Optically, it displayed different effects due to photoluminescence quenching and free carrier absorption. Finally, both doped samples exhibited a decrease in electrical resistivity.

  12. Uniform fabrication of Ge nanocrystals embedded into SiO2 film via neutron transmutation doping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline 74Ge embedded SiO2 films were prepared by employing ion implantation and neutron transmutation doping methods. Transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and photoluminescence of the obtained samples were measured. The existence of As dopants transmuted from 74Ge is significant to guarantee the uniformity and higher volume density of Ge nanocrystals by tuning the system׳s crystallinity and activating mass transfer process. It was observed that the photoluminescence intensity of Ge nanocrystals increased first then decreased with the increase of arsenic concentration. The optimized fluence of neutron transmutation doping was found to be 5.5×1017 cm−2 to achieve maximum photoluminescence emission in Ge embedded SiO2 film. This work opens a route in the three-dimensional nanofabrication of uniform Ge nanocrystals.

  13. Increase in cell adhesiveness on a poly(ethylene terephthalate) fabric by sintered hydroxyapatite nanocrystal coating in the development of an artificial blood vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuzono, Tsutomu; Masuda, Miwa; Okada, Masahiro; Yasuda, Shoji; Kadono, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Miyatake, Kunio

    2006-01-01

    Nano-scaled sintered hydroxyapatite (HAp) crystals were covalently linked onto a poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabric substrate chemically modified by graft polymerization with gamma-methacryloxypropyl triethoxysilane (MPTS) for development of an artificial blood vessel. The weight gain of graft polymerization with poly(MPTS) on PET in benzyl alcohol containing H2O2 as an initiator increased as increasing the reaction time and finally reached a plateau value of about 3.5 wt%. The surface characterization of surface modification with poly(MPTS)-grafting was conducted by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. HAp nanocrystals of approximately 50 nm in diameter, monodispersed in pure ethanol, were coupled with alkoxysilyl groups of the poly(MPTS)-grafted PET substrate. The HAp nanocrystals were uniformly and strongly coated on the surface of the PET fabrics, although HAp particles adsorbed physically on the original PET without poly(MPTS) grafting were almost removed by ultrasonic wave treatment. More human umbilical vein endothelial cells adhered to the HAp/PET composite fabric compared with original PET after only 4 hours of initial incubation, and the same was observed on the collagen-coated PET. The coating of sintered HAp nanocrystals imparted bioactivity to the polyester substrate, which is a widely used biomedical polymer, without a coating of adhesion proteins derived from animals, such as collagen or gelatin. A prototype of an artificial blood vessel was finally fabricated by use of HAp/PET composite.

  14. Hydrothermal etching fabrication of TiO2@graphene hollow structures: mutually independent exposed {001} and {101} facets nanocrystals and its synergistic photocaltalytic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Zhiling; Dong, Xiaonan; Liu, Tingting

    2016-09-20

    Highly exposed facets TiO2 attracts enormous attention due to its excellent separation effect of photogenerated electron-hole pairs and induced high performance of photocatalytic activity. Herein, a novel hydrothermal etching reaction was used to synthesize graphene-wrapped TiO2 hollow core-shell structures. Different with the reported co-exposed facets TiO2 single crystal nanoparticles, the present TiO2 core layer is composed by the mutually independent exposed {001} and {101} facets nanocrystals. Combined with the reduced graphene oxide shell layer, this graphene-wrapped TiO2 hollow core-shell structures formed a Z-scheme photocatalytic system, which possess simultaneously the high charge-separation efficiency and strong redox ability. Additionally, the as-prepared samples show a higher absorption property for organic molecules and visible light due to the presence of graphene. All of these unique properties ensure the excellent photocatalytic activity for the graphene-wrapped TiO2 hollow structures in the synergistic photo-oxidation of organic molecules and photo-reduced of Cr(VI) process. The TiO2 core composed with mutually independent exposed {001} and {101} facets nanocrystals is propose to play an important role in the fabrication of this Z-scheme photocatalytic system. Fabrication of Z-scheme photocatalytic system based on this unique exposed facets TiO2 nanocrystals will provides a new insight into the design and fabrication of advanced photocatalytic materials.

  15. Synthesis and Fabrication of Nanocomposite Fibers of Collagen-Cellulose Nanocrystals by Coelectrocompaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudjoe, Elvis; Younesi, Mousa; Cudjoe, Edward; Akkus, Ozan; Rowan, Stuart J

    2017-04-10

    An electrochemical process has been used to compact cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and access aligned micron-sized CNC fibers. Placing a current across aqueous solutions of carboxylic acid functionalized CNCs (t-CNC-COOH) or carboxylic acid/primary amine functionalized CNCs (t-CNC-COOH-NH 2 ) creates a pH gradient between the electrodes, which results in the migration and concentration of the CNC fibers at their isoelectric point. By matching the carboxylic acid/amine ratio of CNCs and collagen (ca. 30:70 carboxylic acid:amine ratio), it is possible to coelectrocompact both nanofibers and access aligned nanocomposite fibers. t-CNC-COOH-NH 2 /collagen fibers showed a maximum increase in mechanical properties at 5 wt % of t-CNC-COOH-NH 2 . Compared to collagen/CNC films which have no alignment in the plane of the films, the tensile properties of the aligned fibers show a significant enhancement in the wet mechanical properties (40 MPa vs 230 MPa) for the 5 wt % of t-CNC-COOH-NH 2 /collagen films and fiber, respectively.

  16. Size and composition-controlled fabrication of VO2 nanocrystals by terminated cluster growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Slack, Jonathan

    2013-05-14

    A physical vapor deposition-based route for the fabrication of VO2 nanoparticles is demonstrated, consisting of reactive sputtering and vapor condensation at elevated pressures. The oxidation of vanadium atoms is an efficient heterogeneous nucleation method, leading to high nanoparticle throughtput. Fine control of the nanoparticle size and composition is obtained. Post growth annealing leads to crystalline VO2 nanoparticles with optimum thermocromic and plasmonic properties.

  17. High-mobility transparent thin-film transistors with an Sb-doped SnO2 nanocrystal channel fabricated at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jia; Lu Aixia; Wang Liping; Hu Yu; Wan Qing

    2009-01-01

    Transparent thin-film transistors with bottom-gate figure are fabricated by sputter deposition of an Sb-doped SnO 2 nanocrystal channel layer onto glass substrates at room temperature with plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition SiO 2 gate dielectrics and sputtering ITO electrodes. These devices exhibit high-performance n-type transistor characteristics operating in depletion mode with an ultrahigh field-effect mobility of 158 cm 2 V -1 s -1 . The current on/off ratio and the subthreshold swing are found to be 3 x 10 4 and 0.2 V/decade, respectively. These achievements demonstrate that SnO 2 -based nanocrystal thin-film transistors are promising for high-speed transparent and flexible electronics on temperature-sensitive substrates.

  18. High-mobility transparent thin-film transistors with an Sb-doped SnO{sub 2} nanocrystal channel fabricated at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Jia; Lu Aixia; Wang Liping; Hu Yu; Wan Qing, E-mail: wanqing7686@hotmail.co [Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Optoelectronic Devices of Ministry of Education, and State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2009-08-19

    Transparent thin-film transistors with bottom-gate figure are fabricated by sputter deposition of an Sb-doped SnO{sub 2} nanocrystal channel layer onto glass substrates at room temperature with plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition SiO{sub 2} gate dielectrics and sputtering ITO electrodes. These devices exhibit high-performance n-type transistor characteristics operating in depletion mode with an ultrahigh field-effect mobility of 158 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The current on/off ratio and the subthreshold swing are found to be 3 x 10{sup 4} and 0.2 V/decade, respectively. These achievements demonstrate that SnO{sub 2}-based nanocrystal thin-film transistors are promising for high-speed transparent and flexible electronics on temperature-sensitive substrates.

  19. Megapixel mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays for infrared imaging out to 12 microns, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the fabrication of large format, long wave infrared (LWIR) mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe or MCT) detector arrays where the cutoff wavelength is...

  20. High luminescent fibers with hybrid SiO2-coated CdTe nanocrystals fabricated by electrospinning technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Yongqiang; Liu, Ning; Yang, Ping; Shi, Ruixia; Ma, Qian; Zhang, Aiyu; Zhu, Yuanna; Wang, Junpeng; Wang, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    The polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) hybrid luminescent micro-/nanofibers doped with the novel hybrid SiO 2 -coated CdTe nanocrystals (HS-CdTe NCs) have been fabricated for the first time via the electrospinning technique. The morphologies and photoluminescence (PL) emissions of HS-CdTe/PVP micro-/nanofibers prepared by doping the HS-CdTe NCs with the different PL peak wavelength (571, 616, and 643 nm) in PVP fibers were investigated by optical and PL microscope. The results revealed that all the HS-CdTe/PVP hybrid fibers showed an ultralong length for several hundreds of micrometers and a relatively uniform diameter of 1000 ∼ 1200 nm. The hybrid fibers displayed a wavelength-tunable PL emission, determining by the PL of doped HS-CdTe NCs. Moreover, similar to the original PL properties of HS-CdTe NCs before the electrospinning, the HS-CdTe/PVP fibers also showed a series of superior PL properties, such as narrow and symmetry PL spectrum, high, and uniform brightness. For comparison purpose, we also prepared three CdTe/PVP hybrid fibers by doping the 553 nm, 600 nm, and 633 nm PL-emitting CdTe NCs respectively in PVP electrospinning fibers. The characterization results showed that, the obtained three CdTe/PVP hybrid fibers had a basically satisfactory micro-/nanofiber morphology with a long length and relatively uniform diameter, but all the fibers exhibited very weak PL emissions. The enormous contrast in PL properties between HS-CdTe/PVP and CdTe/PVP fibers should mainly be ascribed to the different connection modes of ligands with the NCs and the passivation effect of inert hybrid silica shell on HS-CdTe. It is hopeful that the high luminescent HS-CdTe/PVP micro-/nanofibers with the tunable PL peak wavelength would be a good candidate in the optical sensor, light-emitting devices (LEDs), nanometer-scale waveguides, and the other related photonic materials. - Highlights: • The HS-CdTe/PVP electrospun hybrid fibers were fabricated for the first time. • The

  1. Alternate current magnetic property characterization of nonstoichiometric zinc ferrite nanocrystals for inductor fabrication via a solution based process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hongseok [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Kim, Jungkwun; Allen, Mark G. [Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Paik, Taejong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); School of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 06974 (Korea, Republic of); Meng, Lingyao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Jo, Pil Sung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Complex Assemblies of Soft Matter, CNRS-SOLVAY-PENN UMI 3254, Bristol, Pennsylvania 19007-3624 (United States); Kikkawa, James M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Kagan, Cherie R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Murray, Christopher B., E-mail: cbmurray@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2016-03-21

    We investigate the ac magnetic behavior of solution processable, non-stoichiometric zinc ferrite nanocrystals with a series of sizes and zinc concentrations. Nearly monodisperse Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} nanocrystals (x = 0–0.25) with an average size ranging from 7.4 nm to 13.8 nm are synthesized by using a solvothermal method. All the nanocrystals are in a superparamagnetic state at 300 K, which is confirmed by Superconductive Quantum Interference Device magnetometry. Due to the doping of non-magnetic Zn{sup 2+} into A site of ferrite, the saturation magnetization of nanocrystals increases as the size and Zn concentration increases. The ac magnetic permeability measurements at radio frequencies reveal that the real part of the magnetic permeability of similarly sized ferrite nanocrystals can be enhanced by almost twofold as the Zn{sup 2+} doping level increases from 0 to 0.25. The integration of 12.3 nm Zn{sub 0.25}Fe{sub 2.75}O{sub 4} nanocrystals into a toroidal inductor and a solenoid inductor prepared via a simple solution cast process yields a higher quality factors than air core inductors with the same geometries up to 5 MHz and 9 MHz, respectively, which is in the regime of the switching frequencies for the advanced integrated power converters.

  2. Synthesis of copper telluride nanowires using template-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    using air and chloroform, acetone, ethanol, glycerol, distilled water as liquids having dielectric constants 1, 4·81,. 8·93, 21, 24·55, 42·5 and 80·1, respectively. The results unequivocally prove that copper telluride nanowires can be fabricated as chemical sensors with enhanced sensitivity and reliability. Keywords. CuTe ...

  3. Controlled fabrication of Si nanocrystal delta-layers in thin SiO{sub 2} layers by plasma immersion ion implantation for nonvolatile memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonafos, C.; Ben-Assayag, G.; Groenen, J.; Carrada, M. [CEMES-CNRS and Université de Toulouse, 29 rue J. Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Spiegel, Y.; Torregrosa, F. [IBS, Rue G Imbert Prolongée, ZI Peynier-Rousset, 13790 Peynier (France); Normand, P.; Dimitrakis, P.; Kapetanakis, E. [NCSRD, Terma Patriarchou Gregoriou, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Sahu, B. S.; Slaoui, A. [ICube, 23 Rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2013-12-16

    Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) is a promising alternative to beam line implantation to produce a single layer of nanocrystals (NCs) in the gate insulator of metal-oxide semiconductor devices. We report herein the fabrication of two-dimensional Si-NCs arrays in thin SiO{sub 2} films using PIII and rapid thermal annealing. The effect of plasma and implantation conditions on the structural properties of the NC layers is examined by transmission electron microscopy. A fine tuning of the NCs characteristics is possible by optimizing the oxide thickness, implantation energy, and dose. Electrical characterization revealed that the PIII-produced-Si NC structures are appealing for nonvolatile memories.

  4. Controlled fabrication of Si nanocrystal delta-layers in thin SiO2 layers by plasma immersion ion implantation for nonvolatile memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonafos, C.; Ben-Assayag, G.; Groenen, J.; Carrada, M.; Spiegel, Y.; Torregrosa, F.; Normand, P.; Dimitrakis, P.; Kapetanakis, E.; Sahu, B. S.; Slaoui, A.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) is a promising alternative to beam line implantation to produce a single layer of nanocrystals (NCs) in the gate insulator of metal-oxide semiconductor devices. We report herein the fabrication of two-dimensional Si-NCs arrays in thin SiO 2 films using PIII and rapid thermal annealing. The effect of plasma and implantation conditions on the structural properties of the NC layers is examined by transmission electron microscopy. A fine tuning of the NCs characteristics is possible by optimizing the oxide thickness, implantation energy, and dose. Electrical characterization revealed that the PIII-produced-Si NC structures are appealing for nonvolatile memories

  5. Use of cadmium telluride solar cells and environmental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karus, M.; Wittassek, R.; Linden, W.

    1990-05-01

    Cadmium telluride solar cells for power generation may give rise to environmental pollution with cadmium in the event of incidents during fabrication, fires during operation or inappropriate disposal after use. Fires may liberate more than 50% of cadmium contained; disposal at municipal landfills and sufficient contact with water may even release 100% of cadmium. According to the waste disposal regulations in force, cadmium telluride cells, because of their cadmium content and the high risk of cadmium liberation on contact with water, must be disposed of in underground storages of category six. (orig.) [de

  6. Nanocrystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisler, Hans J [Stoneham, MA; Sundar, Vikram C [Stoneham, MA; Walsh, Michael E [Everett, MA; Klimov, Victor I [Los Alamos, NM; Bawendi, Moungi G [Cambridge, MA; Smith, Henry I [Sudbury, MA

    2008-12-30

    A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group II-VI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

  7. Hafnium germanium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Gyung-Joo; Yun, Hoseop

    2008-01-01

    The title hafnium germanium telluride, HfGeTe4, has been synthesized by the use of a halide flux and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. HfGeTe4 is isostructural with stoichiometric ZrGeTe4 and the Hf site in this compound is also fully occupied. The crystal structure of HfGeTe4 adopts a two-dimensional layered structure, each layer being composed of two unique one-dimensional chains of face-sharing Hf-centered bicapped trigonal prisms and corner-sharing Ge-centered tetra­hedra. These layers stack on top of each other to complete the three-dimensional structure with undulating van der Waals gaps. PMID:21202163

  8. Hafnium germanium telluride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoseop Yun

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The title hafnium germanium telluride, HfGeTe4, has been synthesized by the use of a halide flux and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. HfGeTe4 is isostructural with stoichiometric ZrGeTe4 and the Hf site in this compound is also fully occupied. The crystal structure of HfGeTe4 adopts a two-dimensional layered structure, each layer being composed of two unique one-dimensional chains of face-sharing Hf-centered bicapped trigonal prisms and corner-sharing Ge-centered tetrahedra. These layers stack on top of each other to complete the three-dimensional structure with undulating van der Waals gaps.

  9. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gur, Ilan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation presents the results of a research agenda aimed at improving integration and stability in nanocrystal-based solar cells through advances in active materials and device architectures. The introduction of 3-dimensional nanocrystals illustrates the potential for improving transport and percolation in hybrid solar cells and enables novel fabrication methods for optimizing integration in these systems. Fabricating cells by sequential deposition allows for solution-based assembly of hybrid composites with controlled and well-characterized dispersion and electrode contact. Hyperbranched nanocrystals emerge as a nearly ideal building block for hybrid cells, allowing the controlled morphologies targeted by templated approaches to be achieved in an easily fabricated solution-cast device. In addition to offering practical benefits to device processing, these approaches offer fundamental insight into the operation of hybrid solar cells, shedding light on key phenomena such as the roles of electrode-contact and percolation behavior in these cells. Finally, all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells are presented as a wholly new cell concept, illustrating that donor-acceptor charge transfer and directed carrier diffusion can be utilized in a system with no organic components, and that nanocrystals may act as building blocks for efficient, stable, and low-cost thin-film solar cells.

  10. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on photoluminescence spectra from structures with Si nanocrystals fabricated in SiO2 matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuravlev, K.S.; Tyschenko, I.E.; Vandyshev, E.N.; Bulytova, N.V.; Misiuk, A.; Rebohle, L.; Skorupa, W.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure applied at high temperature on photoluminescence of Si-implanted SiO 2 films was studied. A 'blue'-shift of PL spectrum from the SiO 2 films implanted with Si + ions to total dose of 1.2x10 17 cm -2 with increase in hydrostatic pressure was observed. For the films implanted with Si + ions to a total dose of 4.8x10 16 cm -2 high temperature annealing under high hydrostatic pressure (12 kbar) causes a 'red'-shift of photoluminescence spectrum. The 'red' photoluminescence bands are attributed to Si nanocrystals while the 'blue' ones are related to Si nanocrystals of reduced size or chains of silicon atoms or Si-Si defects. A decrease in size of Si nanocluster occurs in result of the pressure-induced decrease in the diffusion of silicon atoms. (author)

  11. The fabrication and analysis of a PbS nanocrystal:C(60) bilayer hybrid photovoltaic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, D M N M; Hatton, R A; Lutz, T; Curry, R J; Silva, S R P

    2009-06-17

    A near-infrared sensitive hybrid photovoltaic system between PbS nanocrystals (PbS-NCs) and C(60) is demonstrated. Up to 0.44% power conversion efficiency is obtained under AM1.5G with a short circuit current density (J(sc)) of 5 mA cm(-2) when the PbS-NC layer is treated in anhydrous methanol. The observed J(sc) is found be approximately one-third of the maximum expected from this hybrid configuration, indicating the potential for further optimization. Crucial for device operation, a smooth film of nanocrystals is seen to form on the hole transporting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) layer deposited on the transparent electrode, facilitated through an ionic interaction between nanocrystal capping ligands and the PEDOT:PSS. The formation of the open circuit voltage in this system is seen to be influenced by an interfacial dipole formed at the hole-extracting electrode, providing insights for further optimization.

  12. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering by colloidal CdSe nanocrystal submonolayers fabricated by the Langmuir–Blodgett technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander G. Milekhin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of an investigation of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS by optical phonons in colloidal CdSe nanocrystals (NCs homogeneously deposited on both arrays of Au nanoclusters and Au dimers using the Langmuir–Blodgett technique. The coverage of the deposited NCs was less than one monolayer, as determined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. SERS by optical phonons in CdSe nanocrystals showed a significant enhancement that depends resonantly on the Au nanocluster and dimer size, and thus on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR energy. The deposition of CdSe nanocrystals on the Au dimer nanocluster arrays enabled us to study the polarization dependence of SERS. The maximal SERS signal was observed for light polarization parallel to the dimer axis. The polarization ratio of the SERS signal parallel and perpendicular to the dimer axis was 20. The SERS signal intensity was also investigated as a function of the distance between nanoclusters in a dimer. Here the maximal SERS enhancement was observed for the minimal distance studied (about 10 nm, confirming the formation of SERS “hot spots”.

  13. Fabrication of cellulose nanocrystal from Carex meyeriana Kunth and its application in the adsorption of methylene blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue; Liu, Hui; Han, Fuyi; Jiang, Shuai; Liu, Lifang; Xia, Zhaopeng

    2017-11-01

    Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) was extracted from Carex meyeriana Kunth (CMK) by a combination of TEMPO oxidation and mechanical homogenization method, and used to remove methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution. After alkali-oxygen treatment, the aqueous biphasic system (polyethylene glycol/inorganic salt) was applied to further remove lignin from CMK. The characteriazation of CNC, and the effects of H 2 O 2 dosage, CNC dosage, adsorption time, and initial MB concentration on the MB removal capacity of CNC were investigated. The results showed that the removal percentage of MB by CNC was raised with the increase of H 2 O 2 and CNC dosage. The adsorption kinetics of prepared CNC followed the pseudo-second-order model, and the adsorption isotherms fitted well to the Langmuir model with a calculated maximum adsoption capacity of 217.4mg/g, which was higher than those of CNC extracted by acid hydrolysis method, indicating CNC extracted from CMK had promising potentials in the field of MB adsorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Thin films and solar cells of cadmium telluride and cadmium zinc telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferekides, Christos Savva

    The objectives of this dissertation are to investigate (1) the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and properties of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (Cd(1-x)Zn(z)Te) films and junctions, and their potential application to solar cells, and (2) the fabrication and characterization of CdTe solar cells by the close spaced sublimation (CSS) technique. CdTe and Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te films have been deposited by MOCVD on a variety of substrates at 300-400 C. The effect of the deposition parameters and post deposition heat treatments on the electrical, optical, and structural properties have been investigated. Heterojunctions of the configuration CdTe/transparent conducting semiconductor (TCS) and Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te/TCS have been prepared and characterized. CdTe(MOCVD)/CdS and Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te(E sub g = 1.65eV)/Cd(1-x)Zn(x)S solar cells with efficiencies of 9.9 percent and 2.4 percent, respectively have been fabricated. The as-deposited CdTe(MOCVD)/CdS junctions exhibited high dark current densities due to deflects at the interface associated with small grain size. Their characteristics of the Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te junctions degraded with increasing Zn concentration due to the crystalline quality and very small grain size (0.3 microns) in films with high ZnTe contents (greater than 25 percent). No effective post-deposition heat treatment has been developed. CdTe/CdS solar cells have also been fabricated by the close spaced sublimation (CSS). Significant improvements in material and processing have been made, and in collaboration with fellow researchers an AM1.5 conversion efficiency of 13.4 percent has been demonstrated, the highest efficiency ever measured for such devices. The highest conversion efficiency for the CdTe(CSS)/CdS solar cell was achieved by reaching high open-circuit voltages and fill factors, while the short-circuit current densities were moderate. These results indicate that further improvements to increase the short-circuit current densities

  15. Influence of TiO2 Nanocrystals Fabricating Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell on the Absorption Spectra of N719 Sensitizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puhong Wen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The absorption spectra of N719 sensitizer anchored on the films prepared by TiO2 nanocrystals with different morphology and size were investigated for improving the performance of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC. We find that the morphology and size of TiO2 nanocrystals can affect the UV-vis and FT-IR spectra of the sensitizer anchored on their surfaces. In particular, the low-energy metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions (MLCT band in the visible absorption spectra of N719 is strongly affected, and locations of these MLCT bands revealed larger differences. The results indicate that there is a red shift of MLCT band in the spectra obtained by using TiO2 nanocrystals with long morphology and large size compared to that in solution. And it produced a larger red-shift on the MLCT band after TiO2 nanocrystals with small size mixed with some long nanocrystals. Accordingly, the utilization rate to visible light is increased. This is a reason why the DSC prepared by using such film as a photoelectrode has better performance than before mixing.

  16. Spatial mapping of cadmium zinc telluride materials properties and electrical response to improve device yield and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Van Scyoc, J M; Yoon, H; Gilbert, T S; Hilton, N R; Lund, J C; James, R B

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride has experienced tremendous growth in its application to various radiation sensing problems over the last five years. However, there are still issues with yield, particularly of the large volume devices needed for imaging and sensitivity-critical applications. Inhomogeneities of various types and on various length scales currently prevent the fabrication of large devices of high spectral performance. This paper discusses the development of a set of characterization tools for quantifying these inhomogeneities, in order to develop improvement strategies to achieve the desired cadmium zinc telluride crystals for detector fabrication.

  17. Low-cost fabrication of ternary CuInSe2 nanocrystals by colloidal route using a novel combination of volatile and non-volatile capping agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Parul; Narain Sharma, Shailesh; Singh, Son

    2014-11-01

    Wet-route synthesis of CuInSe2 (CISe) nanocrystals has been envisaged with the utilization of the unique combination of coordinating ligand and non coordinating solvent. Our work demonstrates the formation of a single-phase, nearly stoichiometric and monodispersive, stable and well-passivated colloidal ternary CISe nanocrystals (band gap (Eg)~1.16 eV) using a novel combination of ligands; viz. volatile arylamine aniline and non-volatile solvent 1-octadecene. The synthesis and growth conditions have been manoeuvred using the colligative properties of the mixture and thus higher growth temperature (~250 °C) could be attained that promoted larger grain growth. The beneficial influence of the capping agents (aniline and 1-octadecene) on the properties of chalcopyrite nanocrystals has enabled us to pictorally model the structural, morphological and optoelectronic aspects of CISe nanoparticles.

  18. Nature derived scaffolds for tissue engineering applications: Design and fabrication of a composite scaffold incorporating chitosan-g-d,l-lactic acid and cellulose nanocrystals from Lactuca sativa L. cv green leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Sung Won; Soriano, Juan Paolo E; Lee, Ji Yeon; Unnithan, Afeesh Rajan; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2017-10-18

    Through exhaustive extraction via successive alkali and bleaching treatments cellulose was isolated from lettuce. The isolated cellulose was hydrolyzed using 64wt% H 2 SO 4 at 55°C under constant stirring for 1h to obtain cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). Characterizations such as SEM, TEM, FTIR, TGA and XRD were done in order to determine differences in the physico-chemical characteristics of cellulose after each treatment step. The isolated CNCs have mean dimensions of 237±26, 33±12 and 32±7nm in length, thickness and height, respectively. These nanocrystals were incorporated to the formulations that were used to fabricate different chitosan-g-d,l-lactic acid (CgLA) scaffolds. Amide linkage formation between chitosan and lactic acid and further removal of water was facilitated by oven-drying under vacuum at 80°C. Results show that an increase in the concentration of CNCs added, increase in porosity, degradability, drug release property and cell viability were observed from the fabricated composite scaffolds. These results can provide information on how nanofillers such as CNCs can alter the properties of tissue scaffolds through the chemical properties and interactions they provide. Moreover, these characteristics can give new properties that are necessary for certain tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Low-cost fabrication of ternary CuInSe{sub 2} nanocrystals by colloidal route using a novel combination of volatile and non-volatile capping agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chawla, Parul; Narain Sharma, Shailesh, E-mail: shailesh@nplindia.org; Singh, Son

    2014-11-15

    Wet-route synthesis of CuInSe{sub 2} (CISe) nanocrystals has been envisaged with the utilization of the unique combination of coordinating ligand and non coordinating solvent. Our work demonstrates the formation of a single-phase, nearly stoichiometric and monodispersive, stable and well-passivated colloidal ternary CISe nanocrystals (band gap (E{sub g})∼1.16 eV) using a novel combination of ligands; viz. volatile arylamine aniline and non-volatile solvent 1-octadecene. The synthesis and growth conditions have been manoeuvred using the colligative properties of the mixture and thus higher growth temperature (∼250 °C) could be attained that promoted larger grain growth. The beneficial influence of the capping agents (aniline and 1-octadecene) on the properties of chalcopyrite nanocrystals has enabled us to pictorally model the structural, morphological and optoelectronic aspects of CISe nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: Without resorting to any post-selenization process and using the colligative properties of the mixture comprising of volatile aniline and non-volatile 1-octadecene to manoeuvre the growth conditions to promote Ostwald ripening, a single phase, monodispersive and nearly stoichiometric ternary CISe nanocrystals are formed by wet-synthesis route. - Highlights: • Wet-route synthesis of CISe nanocrystals reported without post-selenization process. • Single-phase, stable and well-passivated colloidal ternary CISe nanocrystals formed. • Novel combination of capping agents: volatile aniline and non-volatile 1-octadecene. • Higher growth temperature attained using the colligative properties of the mixture. • Metallic salts presence explains exp. and theoretical boiling point difference.

  20. Optimizing colloidal nanocrystals for applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sytnyk, M.

    2015-01-01

    further details of these developments were worked out by another PhD student. Thus the full story of the Ag-chalcogenide nanocrystals is presented in Appendix A. Chapter 5 of the thesis introduces another possibility to obtain non-toxic nanocrystals. It describes a procedure to transform powders of archetypical organic pigments into colloidal solutions of semiconductor nanocrystals. These nanocrystals are synthesized with controlled sizes and shapes. They are eventually covered with smart ligands, providing rapid charge separation, and exhibit emission in the visible and near-infrared spectral region. Based on them, photodetectors with responsivities up to 0.9 A/W, humidity sensors with a dynamic range of 7 orders of magnitude, and field effect transistors are demonstrated, fabricated by drop-casting or paint-brushing. These results show up an enormous potential of these colloidal pigment nanocrystals for the development of an environmentally-friendly, biocompatible, and low-cost electronics. (author)

  1. Organization of silicon nanocrystals by localized electrochemical etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayari-Kanoun, Asma; Drouin, Dominique; Beauvais, Jacques; Lysenko, Vladimir; Nychyporuk, Tetyana; Souifi, Abdelkader

    2009-01-01

    An approach to form a monolayer of organized silicon nanocrystals on a monocrystalline Si wafer is reported. Ordered arrays of nanoholes in a silicon nitride layer were obtained by combining electron beam lithography and plasma etching. Then, a short electrochemical etching current pulse led to formation of a single Si nanocrystal per each nanohole. As a result, high quality silicon nanocrystal arrays were formed with well controlled and reproducible morphologies. In future, this approach can be used to fabricate single electron devices.

  2. A facile and green preparation of high-quality CdTe semiconductor nanocrystals at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yan [Jilin Province Research Center for Engineering and Technology of Spectral Analytical Instruments, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Shen Qihui; Shi Weiguang; Li Jixue; Liu Xiaoyang [State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Yu Dongdong [1st Hopstail affiliated to Jilin University, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Zhou Jianguang [Research Center for Analytical Instrumentation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)], E-mail: liuxy@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: jgzhou70@126.com

    2008-06-18

    One chemical reagent, hydrazine hydrate, was discovered to accelerate the growth of semiconductor nanocrystals (cadmium telluride) instead of additional energy, which was applied to the synthesis of high-quality CdTe nanocrystals at room temperature and ambient conditions within several hours. Under this mild condition the mercapto stabilizers were not destroyed, and they guaranteed CdTe nanocrystal particle sizes with narrow and uniform distribution over the largest possible range. The CdTe nanocrystals (photoluminescence emission range of 530-660 nm) synthesized in this way had very good spectral properties; for instance, they showed high photoluminescence quantum yield of up to 60%. Furthermore, we have succeeded in detecting the living Borrelia burgdorferi of Lyme disease by its photoluminescence image using CdTe nanocrystals.

  3. Rise time spectroscopy in cadmium telluride detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharager, Claude; Siffert, Paul; Carnet, Bernard; Le Meur, Roger.

    1980-11-01

    By a simultaneous analysis of rise time and pulse amplitude distributions of the signals issued from various cadmium telluride detectors, it is possible to obtain informations about surface and bulk trapping, field distribution within the detectors, as well as charge collection and transport properties. These investigations have been performed on both pure and chlorine doped and materials for various surfaces preparation conditions [fr

  4. Characteristics of CdTe nanocrystals synthesized by a Na2TeO3 source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Meiping; Fu Kai; Lin Jinhui

    2011-01-01

    Water-soluble cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanocrystals were synthesized in aqueous solution with thioglycolic acid (TGA) molecules as a stabilizer. A series of TGA-stabilized CdTe nanocrystals were prepared using sodium tellurite as a tellurium source, which avoids the cumbersome processes associated with H 2 Te or NaHTe sources. The synthesized TGA-stabilized CdTe were characterized with X-ray diffraction, TEM and fluorescence spectrophotometer. The particles crystallized predominantly in cubic phase with narrow photoluminescence emission. The effects of reaction time, pH value, and precursor concentration on the photoluminescence properties were investigated in detail. (semiconductor materials)

  5. Kelvin probe studies of cesium telluride photocathode for the AWA photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velazquez, D.; Wisniewski, E. E.; Yusof, Z.; Harkay, K.; Spentzouris, L.; Terry, J. [Physics Department at Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 and High Energy Physics Division at Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); High Energy Physics Division at Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Accelerator Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department at Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    Cesium telluride is an important photocathode as an electron source for particle accelerators. It has a relatively high quantum efficiency (> 1%), is robust in a photoinjector, and long lifetime. This photocathode is fabricated in-house for a new Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) beamline to produce high charge per bunch ({approx}50 nC) in a long bunch train. We present some results from a study of the work function of cesium telluride photocathode using the Kelvin Probe technique. The study includes an investigation of the correlation between the quantum efficiency and the work function, the effect of photocathode aging, the effect of UV light exposure on the work function, and the evolution of the work function during and after photocathode rejuvenation via heating.

  6. Joining of Half-Heusler and Bismuth Tellurides for Segmented Thermoelectric Generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngan, Pham Hoang; Han, Li; Christensen, Dennis Valbjørn

    2018-01-01

    Segmented generators where the p- or n-type legs are formed by joining materials in series enables each material to operate in their most efficient temperature range. Here, we have fabricated and characterized segmented thermoelectric p- and n-type legs based on bismuth tellurides and half......-Heusler alloys p-type Hf0.5Zr0.5CoSn0.2Sb0.8 and n-type Ti0.6Hf0.4NiSn. A two-step process was introduced to join the half-Heusler to the bismuth tellurides to form a segmented structure which was then characterized for its thermoelectric and structural properties. The output power generation was characterized...

  7. Fabrication of high-performance CuInSe{sub 2} nanocrystals-modified TiO{sub 2} NTs for photocatalytic degradation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zeming; Tong, Xi; Sheng, Pengtao; Li, Weili; Yin, Xuehua; Zou, Jianmei; Cai, Qingyun, E-mail: qycai0001@hnu.edu.cn

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CuInSe{sub 2} nanocrystals with high photocatalytic activity were synthesized and immobilized onto TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays. • The highly photocatalytic activity of CuInSe{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} photoelectrode was evaluated in the hydrogen generation and photocatalytic degradation of 2,4-D and 9-AnCOOH. • The CuInSe{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} photoelectrode possesses high photoelectrical efficiency and stability over the reported ones. - Abstract: CuInSe{sub 2} nanocrystals (NCs) were prepared by colloidal synthesis and immobilized onto TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (NTs). Photoelectrical properties of the co-sensitized photoelectrode were investigated. The photocatalytic activities were investigated through the photocatalytic degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (9-AnCOOH). The high photoelectrical efficiency is mainly due to the high absorption toward visible light and the decrease in electron–hole pairs recombination. A well maintained opened TiO{sub 2} tube-mouth configuration favors the high photoelectrical efficiency and stability of the CuInSe{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} NT photoelectrode. The co-sensitized CuInSe{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} NT photoelectrode displays excellent water splitting ability, 229.35 μM/cm{sup 2} hydrogen gas was achieved in 210 min. The formation of hydroxyl radicals (• OH) on the surface of the CuInSe{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} NT photoelectrode under visible-light illumination was detected.

  8. Nanocrystal quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, Victor I

    2010-01-01

    ""Soft"" Chemical Synthesis and Manipulation of Semiconductor Nanocrystals, J.A. Hollingsworth and V.I. Klimov Electronic Structure in Semiconductor Nanocrystals: Optical Experiment, D.J. NorrisFine Structure and Polarization Properties of Band-Edge Excitons in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, A.L. EfrosIntraband Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Dots, P. Guyot-Sionnest, M. Shim, and C. WangMultiexciton Phenomena in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, V.I. KlimovOptical Dynamics in Single Semiconductor Quantum Do

  9. Cadmium zinc telluride charged particle nuclear detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toney, J.E.; James, R.B.; Antolak, A.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the improvements in understanding of transport phenomena in cadmium zinc telluride radiation sensors achieved through studies of alpha particle response and spatially resolved photoconductivity mapping. Alpha particle response waveforms and photocurrent profiles both indicate non-uniformities in the electric field which may have detrimental effects on detector performance. Identifying and eliminating the sources of these nonuniformities will ultimately lead to improved detector performance

  10. Single-phase cadmium telluride thin films deposited by electroless electrodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrypunov, G.; Klochko, N.; Lyubov, V.; Li, T.; Volkova, N.

    2010-01-01

    Full text : Today cadmium telluride (CdTe) is a leading base material for the fabrication of thin film solar cells. Equally with the creation of traditional thin film photovoltaic devices on the base of CdTe in recent years several approaches have been investigated to develop solar cells with extremely thin (80-500 nm) CdTe absorber (so-called ηE(eta)-solar cells) that offer the potential to reduce recombination losses in the base layers and thus use low cost materials. Until today the CdTe depositions for the η-solar cells manufacture were performed by vapour phase epitaxy under dynamical vacuum at working temperature 750 degrees Celsium or by electrodeposition in the special electrochemical cell equipped with the potentiostat. Development research of simple and inexpensive method for obtaining of the single-phase stoichiometric cadmium telluride films has required an improvement of the electroless electrodeposition technique, which theretofore was characterized by some disadvantages, namely, the CdTe films were polluted by free tellurium additions and the composition of the films was Cd:Te=55:45. So, for the showing up the synthesis of doped or stoichiometric cadmium telluride films conditions and in order to decide the problem of the deposition of single-phase CdTe layers it was researched the electrochemical processes going during electroless electrolysis in sulfate solutions with different acidities and CdSO 4 concentrations. Some film samples during deposition were illuminated by 500 W halogen lamp. Deposition time was 10-15 min. The phase composition and structure of the deposited films were determined by XRD-method, the average sizes of the crystalline grains in the films were estimated using Debye-Scherer formula. The transmittance spectra of the samples were measured by double beam spectrophotometer in the spectral range of 0.6-1.1 μm. Surface morphology of the films was researched by scanning electron microscopy. By means of analysis of the

  11. Cellulose nanocrystals/ZnO as a bifunctional reinforcing nanocomposite for poly(vinyl alcohol)/chitosan blend films: fabrication, characterization and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Susan; Ahmad, Mansor B; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Namvar, Farideh

    2014-06-18

    In this study, cellulose nanocrystals/zinc oxide (CNCs/ZnO) nanocomposites were dispersed as bifunctional nano-sized fillers into poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and chitosan (Cs) blend by a solvent casting method to prepare PVA/Cs/CNCs/ZnO bio-nanocomposites films. The morphology, thermal, mechanical and UV-vis absorption properties, as well antimicrobial effects of the bio-nanocomposite films were investigated. It demonstrated that CNCs/ZnO were compatible with PVA/Cs and dispersed homogeneously in the polymer blend matrix. CNCs/ZnO improved tensile strength and modulus of PVA/Cs significantly. Tensile strength and modulus of bio-nanocomposite films increased from 55.0 to 153.2 MPa and from 395 to 932 MPa, respectively with increasing nano-sized filler amount from 0 to 5.0 wt %. The thermal stability of PVA/Cs was also enhanced at 1.0 wt % CNCs/ZnO loading. UV light can be efficiently absorbed by incorporating ZnO nanoparticles into a PVA/Cs matrix, signifying that these bio-nanocomposite films show good UV-shielding effects. Moreover, the biocomposites films showed antibacterial activity toward the bacterial species Salmonella choleraesuis and Staphylococcus aureus. The improved physical properties obtained by incorporating CNCs/ZnO can be useful in variety uses.

  12. Easy Fabrication of Highly Thermal-Stable Cellulose Nanocrystals Using Cr(NO33 Catalytic Hydrolysis System: A Feasibility Study from Macro- to Nano-Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Wei Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reported on the feasibility and practicability of Cr(NO33 hydrolysis to isolate cellulose nanocrystals (CNCCr(NO33 from native cellulosic feedstock. The physicochemical properties of CNCCr(NO33 were compared with nanocellulose isolated using sulfuric acid hydrolysis (CNCH2SO4. In optimum hydrolysis conditions, 80 °C, 1.5 h, 0.8 M Cr(NO33 metal salt and solid–liquid ratio of 1:30, the CNCCr(NO33 exhibited a network-like long fibrous structure with the aspect ratio of 15.7, while the CNCH2SO4 showed rice-shape structure with an aspect ratio of 3.5. Additionally, Cr(NO33-treated CNC rendered a higher crystallinity (86.5% ± 0.3% with high yield (83.6% ± 0.6% as compared to the H2SO4-treated CNC (81.4% ± 0.1% and 54.7% ± 0.3%, respectively. Furthermore, better thermal stability of CNCCr(NO33 (344 °C compared to CNCH2SO4 (273 °C rendered a high potential for nanocomposite application. This comparable effectiveness of Cr(NO33 metal salt provides milder hydrolysis conditions for highly selective depolymerization of cellulosic fiber into value-added cellulose nanomaterial, or useful chemicals and fuels in the future.

  13. Diorganyl dichalcogenides as useful synthons for colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutchey, Richard L

    2015-11-17

    The ability to synthesize colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals in a well-controlled manner (i.e., with fine control over size, shape, size dispersion, and composition) has been mastered over the past 15 years. Much of this success stems from careful studies of precursor conversion and nanocrystal growth with respect to phosphine chalcogenide precursors for the synthesis of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals. Despite the high level of success that has been achieved with phosphine chalcogenides, there has been a longstanding interest in exploring alternate chalcogenide precursors because of issues associated with phosphine chalcogenide cost, purity, toxicity, etc. This has resulted in a large body of literature on the use of sulfur and selenium dissolved in octadecene or amines, thio- and selenoureas, and silyl chalcogenides as alternate chalcogenide precursors for metal chalcogenide nanocrystal synthesis. In this Account, emerging work on the use of diorganyl dichalcogenides (R-E-E-R, where E = S, Se, or Te and R = alkyl, allyl, benzyl, or aryl) as alternate chalcogenide precursors for the synthesis of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals is summarized. Among the benefits of these dichalcogenide synthons are the following: (i) they represent the first and only common precursor type that can function as chalcogen transfer reagents for each of the group VI elements (i.e., to make metal oxide, metal sulfide, metal selenide, and metal telluride nanocrystals); (ii) they possess relatively weak E-E bonds that can be readily cleaved under mild thermolytic or photolytic conditions; and (iii) the organic substituents can be tuned to affect the reactivity. These combined attributes have allowed dichalcogenide precursors to be employed for a wide range of metal chalcogenide nanocrystal syntheses, including those for In2S3, SnxGe1-xSe, SnTe, Cu2-xSySe1-y, ZnSe, CdS, CdSe, MoSe2, WSe2, BiSe, and CuFeS2. Interestingly, a number of metastable phases of compositionally complex

  14. Tellurium self-diffusion and point defects in lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simirskij, Yu.N.; Firsova, L.P.

    1982-01-01

    Method of radioactive indicators was used to determine factors of tellurium self-diffusion in lead telluride with different deviation of the composition from stoichiometric in the range of enrichment by tellurium. It was found that at 973 K factors of tellurium self-diffusion in lead telluride depend slightly on the vapor pressure of tellurium equilibrium with solid phase

  15. Fabrication of novel g-C3N4 nanocrystals decorated Ag3PO4 hybrids: Enhanced charge separation and excellent visible-light driven photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng; Zeng, Qi; Zhao, Xia; Shao, Yu; Ji, Pengge; Wang, Changqian; Yan, Tao; Du, Bin

    2017-10-05

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C 3 N 4 ) nanocrystals (NCs) decorated Ag 3 PO 4 hybrids were synthesized by a facile method. The obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). The SEM and TEM images showed that the as-prepared Ag 3 PO 4 were composed of particles with diameters of 200-500nm, while the obtained nanocrystalline g-C 3 N 4 were composed of smaller particles with average diameter of 10nm. For nanocrystalline g-C 3 N 4 /Ag 3 PO 4 hybrids, the particle surfaces of Ag 3 PO 4 were decorated with numerous g-C 3 N 4 NCs, result in a larger contact area between g-C 3 N 4 and Ag 3 PO 4 . The photocatalytic performances were evaluated by decomposing MO, phenol, bisphenol A, and RhB under visible light. Compared with Ag 3 PO 4 and g-C 3 N 4 , the g-C 3 N 4 /Ag 3 PO 4 hybrid (mass ratio=1:4) exhibited the best activity, which was much higher than that of bulk-g-C 3 N 4 /Ag 3 PO 4 composite under the same conditions. The enhanced activities should be mainly ascribed to the enhanced separation efficiency of photo-generated carriers, which was proved by the photoluminescence (PL) spectra measurement. Controlled experiments proved that O 2 - and h + played the chief role in the degradation process. A possible Z-scheme degradation mechanism of organic contaminant over g-C 3 N 4 /Ag 3 PO 4 hybrid was proposed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Dual-functional aniline-assisted wet-chemical synthesis of bismuth telluride nanoplatelets and their thermoelectric performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changcun; Kong, Fangfang; Liu, Congcong; Liu, Huixuan; Hu, Yongjing; Wang, Tongzhou; Xu, Jingkun; Jiang, Fengxing

    2017-06-01

    The wet-chemical approach is of great significance for the synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) bismuth telluride nanoplatelets as a potential thermoelectric (TE) material. Herein, we proposed a simple and effective solution method with the assistance of aniline for the fabrication of bismuth telluride nanoplatelets at a low temperature of 100 °C. The choice of aniline with its dual function avoided the simultaneous use of a capping regent and a toxic reductant. The as-synthesized nanoplatelets have a large size of more than 900 × 500 nm2 and a small thickness of 15.4 nm. The growth of bismuth telluride nanoplatelets are related to the Bi/Te ratio of precursors indicating that a larger content of the Bi precursor is more conducive to the formation of 2D nanoplatelets. The bismuth telluride nanoplatelets pressed into a pellet show a smaller electrical resistivity (˜6.5 × 10-3 Ω · m) and a larger Seebeck coefficient (-135 μV K-1), as well as a lower thermal conductivity (0.27 W m-1 K-1) than those of nanoparticles. The next goal is to further reduce the electrical resistivity and optimize the TE performance by disposing of the residual reactant of aniline adsorbed on the surface of the nanoplatelets.

  17. Direct Observation of Room-Temperature Polar Ordering in Colloidal GeTe Nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polking, Mark J.; Zheng, Haimei; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Milliron, Delia J.; Chan, Emory; Caldwell, Marissa A.; Raoux, Simone; Kisielowski, Christian F.; Ager, Joel W. III; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Alivisatos, A.P.

    2009-01-01

    Ferroelectrics and other materials that exhibit spontaneous polar ordering have demonstrated immense promise for applications ranging from non-volatile memories to microelectromechanical systems. However, experimental evidence of polar ordering and effective synthetic strategies for accessing these materials are lacking for low-dimensional nanomaterials. Here, we demonstrate the synthesis of size-controlled nanocrystals of the polar material germanium telluride (GeTe) using colloidal chemistry and provide the first direct evidence of room-temperature polar ordering in nanocrystals less than 5 nm in size using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman studies demonstrate a sizeable polar distortion and a reversible size-dependent polar phase transition in these nanocrystals. The stability of polar ordering in solution-processible nanomaterials suggests an economical avenue to Tbit/in2-density non-volatile memory devices and other applications.

  18. Apparent resistivity of detector grade cadmium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siffert, P.; Rabin, B.; Tabatabai, H.Y.; Stuck, R.

    1977-01-01

    The resistivity of both chlorine compensated and undoped cadmium telluride, grown by the THM or programmed solution growth techniques, have been measured by several methods. Values up to 10 9 Ω.cm have been reached for these P-type samples, in agreement with the literature. However, when used in the detector manufacturing, the total depletion layer thickness at a certain voltage was much less as expected, indicating much lower real resistivities. The origin of this effect is probably due to fast polarization. A procedure is proposed to evaluate quickly the real extension of the depletion layer thickness

  19. Creating ligand-free silicon germanium alloy nanocrystal inks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erogbogbo, Folarin; Liu, Tianhang; Ramadurai, Nithin; Tuccarione, Phillip; Lai, Larry; Swihart, Mark T; Prasad, Paras N

    2011-10-25

    Particle size is widely used to tune the electronic, optical, and catalytic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals. This contrasts with bulk semiconductors, where properties are tuned based on composition, either through doping or through band gap engineering of alloys. Ideally, one would like to control both size and composition of semiconductor nanocrystals. Here, we demonstrate production of silicon-germanium alloy nanoparticles by laser pyrolysis of silane and germane. We have used FTIR, TEM, XRD, EDX, SEM, and TOF-SIMS to conclusively determine their structure and composition. Moreover, we show that upon extended sonication in selected solvents, these bare nanocrystals can be stably dispersed without ligands, thereby providing the possibility of using them as an ink to make patterned films, free of organic surfactants, for device fabrication. The engineering of these SiGe alloy inks is an important step toward the low-cost fabrication of group IV nanocrystal optoelectronic, thermoelectric, and photovoltaic devices.

  20. Nanocrystal quantum dot electronics and nanofabrication by electron beam ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbein, Michael D.

    Nanocrystal quantum dots are nanometer-scale structures with size-dependent electronic and optical properties that make them interesting for novel technological applications and for fundamental physics research. In this thesis, electronic properties of several types of semi-conductor nanocrystals are studied by integrating arrays of them into electrode-gap devices and measuring their conductivities with current-voltage characterization and charge-imaging. Additionally, novel nano-fabrication techniques were developed to assist in the studies of nanocrystals and nanostructures in general. Central to ail of this work has been the compatibility of electronic measurements and high-resolution imaging. This has allowed for greater insight into the nature of electron motion in nanocrystal arrays and also has been the enabling factor for realizing the nano-fabrication techniques.

  1. Deposition and characterization of p-type cadmium telluride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, S. S.; Firszt, F.; Naseem, H. A.; Stawski, R.

    1985-08-01

    Cadmium telluride is a direct-gap semiconductor with a room-temperature energy gap of 1.5 eV. It is a promising photovoltaic material, and single-crystalline homojunction and heterojunction solar cells have been prepared and characterized. Relatively short minority carrier diffusion length (1-2 microns) can be tolerated due to a short optical absorption length, and, for this reason, CdTe is particularly suited for thin-film devices. The fabrication of thin-film solar cells is based on the use of p-type CdTe films. The present investigation has the objective to prepare CdTe films with controlled properties in a reproducible manner, taking into account a utilization of the reaction of Cd and Te vapor on the surface of heated substrates in a hydrogen (or helium) atmosphere in a gas-flow system. Attention is given to details of film deposition, and CdTe films on graphite, W/graphite, mullite, and glass substrates.

  2. Development of a cadmium telluride pixel detector for astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, Walter R.; Mao, Peter H.; Rana, Vikram R.; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Ushio, Masayoshi; Aono, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Shin; Sato, Goro; Kokubun, Motohide; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2009-08-01

    We are developing imaging Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) pixel detectors optimized for astrophysical hard X-ray applications. Our hybrid detector consist of a CdTe crystal 1mm thick and 2cm × 2cm in area with segmented anode contacts directly bonded to a custom low-noise application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CdTe sensor, fabricated by ACRORAD (Okinawa, Japan), has Schottky blocking contacts on a 605 micron pitch in a 32 × 32 array, providing low leakage current and enabling readout of the anode side. The detector is bonded using epoxy-gold stud interconnects to a custom low noise, low power ASIC circuit developed by Caltech's Space Radiation Laboratory. We have achieved very good energy resolution over a wide energy range (0.62keV FWHM @ 60keV, 10.8keV FWHM @ 662keV). We observe polarization effects at room temperature, but they are suppressed if we operate the detector at or below 0°C degree. These detectors have potential application for future missions such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO).

  3. Mercury telluride as a zero-gap semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berchenko, N.N.; Pashkovskij, M.V.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents a review of main properties of mercury telluride which is a representative of a new class of substances - gapless semiconductors. The causes leading to the appearance of a gapless state in mercury chalcogenides are considered; it is demonstrated that the main role in the formation of the inverse band structure belongs to relativistic corrections. The specific properties of mercury telluride are associated with the zero forbidden band, p-like nature of electron states of the conduction band and its nonparabolicity, resonance states of impurities and anomalies of dielectric permittivity. Conditions of forbidden band appearing in mercury telluride under the effect external factors are analyzed

  4. Novel aspects of application of cadmium telluride quantum dots nanostructures in radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Zare, Hakimeh; Karimi, Shokufeh; Rahighi, Reza; Feizi, Shahzad

    2017-08-01

    In the last two decades, quantum dots nanomaterials have garnered a great deal of scientific interest because of their unique properties. Quantum dots (QDs) are inorganic fluorescent nanocrystals in the size range between 1 and 20 nm. Due to their structural properties, they possess distinctive properties and behave in different way from crystals in macro scale, in many branches of human life. Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) were labeled with 68Ga radio nuclide for fast in vivo targeting and coincidence imaging of tumors. Using instant paper chromatography, the physicochemical properties of the Cadmium telluride quantum dots labeled with 68Ga NPs (68Ga@ CdTe QDs) were found high enough stable in organic phases, e.g., a human serum, to be reliably used in bioapplications. In vivo biodistribution of the 68Ga@ CdTe QDs nanoconposite was investigated in rats bearing fibro sarcoma tumor after various post-injection periods of time. The 68Ga NPs exhibited a rapid as well as high tumor uptake in a very short period of time (less than 10 min), resulting in an efficient tumor targeting/imaging agent. Meantime, the low lipophilicity of the 68Ga NPs caused to their fast excretion throughout the body by kidneys (as also confirmed by the urinary tract). Because of the short half-life of 68Ga radionuclide, the 68Ga@ CdTe QDs with an excellent tumor targeting/imaging and fast washing out from the body can be suggested as one of the most effective and promising nanomaterials in nanotechnology-based cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  5. Novel aspects of application of cadmium telluride quantum dots nanostructures in radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Feizi, Shahzad [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Radiation Application Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zare, Hakimeh; Karimi, Shokufeh [Yazd University, Department of Physics, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahighi, Reza [Sharif University of Technology, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    In the last two decades, quantum dots nanomaterials have garnered a great deal of scientific interest because of their unique properties. Quantum dots (QDs) are inorganic fluorescent nanocrystals in the size range between 1 and 20 nm. Due to their structural properties, they possess distinctive properties and behave in different way from crystals in macro scale, in many branches of human life. Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) were labeled with {sup 68}Ga radio nuclide for fast in vivo targeting and coincidence imaging of tumors. Using instant paper chromatography, the physicochemical properties of the Cadmium telluride quantum dots labeled with {sup 68}Ga NPs ({sup 68}Ga rate at CdTe QDs) were found high enough stable in organic phases, e.g., a human serum, to be reliably used in bioapplications. In vivo biodistribution of the {sup 68}Ga rate at CdTe QDs nanoconposite was investigated in rats bearing fibro sarcoma tumor after various post-injection periods of time. The {sup 68}Ga NPs exhibited a rapid as well as high tumor uptake in a very short period of time (less than 10 min), resulting in an efficient tumor targeting/imaging agent. Meantime, the low lipophilicity of the {sup 68}Ga NPs caused to their fast excretion throughout the body by kidneys (as also confirmed by the urinary tract). Because of the short half-life of {sup 68}Ga radionuclide, the {sup 68}Ga rate at CdTe QDs with an excellent tumor targeting/imaging and fast washing out from the body can be suggested as one of the most effective and promising nanomaterials in nanotechnology-based cancer diagnosis and therapy. (orig.)

  6. Insights into the microstructural and physical properties of colloidal Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Ruishi, E-mail: rxie@foxmail.com [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Li, Yuanli [Department of Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Jiang, Linhai; Zhang, Xingquan [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • We present a facile and environmentally friendly protocol to fabricate Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals. • The microstructural and physical properties of Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals were systematically investigated. • The current synthesis is dramatically simple and highly reproducible, it will facilitate the commercial scale synthesis of highly luminescent water-soluble nanocrystals with surface functionality in the near future. - Abstract: Here, we present a facile and environmentally friendly synthetic protocol to fabricate highly luminescent and water-soluble Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals in aqueous solution at low temperature. The microstructure and various physical properties (e.g., crystal structure, interplanar spacing, lattice parameter, crystalline size, lattice microstrain, intrinsic stress, X-ray density, specific surface area, dislocation density, porosity, agglomeration number) of the Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals were systematically investigated using X-ray diffraction. The particle size and morphology of the Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals were determined by transmission electron microscopy. The optical properties (e.g., absorption and photoluminescence) of the fabricated nanocrystals were explored using ultraviolet–visible absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopies, respectively. The surface functionalization of the Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals by mercaptoacetic acid ligand was evidenced by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. To confirm the elementary composition of the obtained nanocrystals, Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was performed. To further shed light upon elemental distribution of the resulting nanocrystals, elemental mapping measurements were conducted. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms were also elucidated. As a consequence, the current investigation not only provides a deep insight into exploring the physical properties of doped nanocrystals, but also demonstrates a useful synthetic strategy for producing water-soluble and highly fluorescent doped

  7. Advanced Branching Control and Characterization of Inorganic Semiconducting Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Steven Michael [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The ability to finely tune the size and shape of inorganic semiconducting nanocrystals is an area of great interest, as the more control one has, the more applications will be possible for their use. The first two basic shapes develped in nanocrystals were the sphere and the anistropic nanorod. the II_VI materials being used such as Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), exhibit polytypism, which allows them to form in either the hexagonally packed wurtzite or cubically packed zinc blende crystalline phase. The nanorods are wurtzite with the length of the rod growing along the c-axis. As this grows, stacking faults may form, which are layers of zinc blende in the otherwise wurtzite crystal. Using this polytypism, though, the first generation of branched crystals were developed in the form of the CdTe tetrapod. This is a nanocrystal that nucleates in the zincblend form, creating a tetrahedral core, on which four wurtzite arms are grown. This structure opened up the possibility of even more complex shapes and applications. This disseration investigates the advancement of branching control and further understanding the materials polytypism in the form of the stacking faults in nanorods.

  8. Control of p-type and n-type thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride thin films by combinatorial sputter coating technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Masahiro, E-mail: goto.masahiro@nims.go.jp [Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Green Research on Energy and Environmental Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Thermal Management and Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Sasaki, Michiko [Thermal Management and Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Xu, Yibin [Thermal Management and Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Materials Database Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhan, Tianzhuo [Thermal Management and Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Isoda, Yukihiro [Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Green Research on Energy and Environmental Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Shinohara, Yoshikazu [Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Green Research on Energy and Environmental Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Thermal Management and Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • p- and n-type bismuth telluride thin films have been synthesized using a combinatorial sputter coating system (COSCOS) while changing only one of the experimental conditions, the RF power. • The dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) was optimized by the technique. • The fabrication of a Π-structured TE device was demonstrated. - Abstract: p- and n-type bismuth telluride thin films have been synthesized by using a combinatorial sputter coating system (COSCOS). The crystal structure and crystal preferred orientation of the thin films were changed by controlling the coating condition of the radio frequency (RF) power during the sputter coating. As a result, the p- and n-type films and their dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) were optimized by the technique. The properties of the thin films such as the crystal structure, crystal preferred orientation, material composition and surface morphology were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Also, the thermoelectric properties of the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity were measured. ZT for n- and p-type bismuth telluride thin films was found to be 0.27 and 0.40 at RF powers of 90 and 120 W, respectively. The proposed technology can be used to fabricate thermoelectric p–n modules of bismuth telluride without any doping process.

  9. Hybrid Light-Emitting Diode Enhanced With Emissive Nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopylov, Oleksii

    of the hybrid diode fabrication including process techniques for GaN LED and incorporation of the nanocrystals are presented with the emphasis on the differences with standard LED processing. Results and analysis of optical and electrical characterization including photoluminescence (PL), micro-PL, time......This thesis investigates a new type of white light emitting hybrid diode, composed of a light emitting GaN/InGaN LED and a layer of semiconductor nanocrystals for color conversion. Unlike standard white LEDs, the device is configured to achieve high color conversion efficiency via non......-radiative energy transfer from the primary LED to the nanocrystals. LED structures with sub-10 nm separation the between quantum well and the surface and patterned standard bright LEDs are considered for the hybrid devices, which require close proximity of the nanocrystals to the quantum well. The development...

  10. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SILICON AND CADMIUM TELLURIDE BASED SOLAR CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amjad Al QASSEM

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A compartive analzsis of silicon solar cells and of those containing a CdTe thin film which are widely used in solar energetics, particullarilly, in photovoltaic modules fabrication, is brought in this paper. The silicon is largely used in solar cells fabrication due to the low cost of solar cells production related to the low cost of the semiconductor fabrication and to the advanced material processing technology, when at the same time cadmium telluride has the wide use due to the fact that its fundamental parameters can provide theoretically a high value of efficiency of solar energy conversion into electrical one of 30%. The structure and photoelectrical parameters of silicon solar cells and of those cotaining a thin cadmium telluride layer are considered.ANALIZA COMPARATIVĂ A CELULELOR SOLARE DIN SILICIU ŞI TELURURA DE CADMIUÎn lucrarea de faţă este prezentată analiza comparativă a celulelor solare fabricate din siliciu şi a celor cu strat subţire de CdTe, care sunt pe larg utilizate în energetica solară, în particular la producerea modulelor fotovoltaice. Siliciul este intens folosit în fabricarea celulelor solare datorită costului redus al materialului semiconductor şi tehnologiei avansate de procesare, pe când telurura de cadmiu are o utilizare tot mai largă care, datorită parametrilor fundamentali, poate asigura teoretic o valoare înaltă a eficienţei conversiei energiei solare în cea electrică de (30%. Sunt considerate structura şi parametrii fotoelectrici ai celulelor solare din siliciu şi ai celor cu strat subţire de telurură de cadmiu.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Colloidal Metal and Photovoltaic Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu

    2014-11-05

    Metal and semiconducting nanocrystals have received a great deal of attention from fundamental scientists and application-oriented researchers due to their physical and chemical properties, which differ from those of bulk materials. Nanocrystals are essential building blocks in the development of nanostructured devices for energy conversion. Colloidal metals and metal chalcogenides have been developed for use as nanocrystal inks to produce efficient solar cells with lower costs. All high-performing photovoltaic nanocrystals contain toxic elements, such as Pb, or scarce elements, such as In; thus, the production of solution-processable nanocrystals from earth-abundant materials using environmentally benign synthesis and processing methods has become a major challenge for the inorganic semiconductor-based solar field. This dissertation, divided into two parts, addresses several aspects of these emerging challenges. The first portion of the thesis describes the synthesis and characterization of nanocrystals of antimony sulfide, which is composed of non-scarce and non-toxic elements, and examines their performance in photovoltaic devices. The effect of various synthetic parameters on the final morphology is explored. The structural, optical and morphological properties of the nanocrystals were investigated, and Sb2S3 nanocrystal-based solid-state semiconductor-sensitized solar cells were fabricated using different deposition processes. We achieved promising power conversion efficiencies of 1.48%. The second part of the thesis demonstrates a novel method for the in situ synthesis and patterning of nanocrystals via reactive inkjet printing. The use of low-cost manufacturing approaches for the synthesis of nanocrystals is critical for many applications, including photonics and electronics. In this work, a simple, low-cost method for the synthesis of nanocrystals with minimum size variation and waste using reactive inkjet printing is introduced. As a proof of concept, the

  12. Self-bonded composite films based on cellulose nanofibers and chitin nanocrystals as antifungal materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Eduardo; Salaberria, Asier M; Herrera, Rene; Fernandes, Susana C M; Labidi, Jalel

    2016-06-25

    Cellulose nanofibers and chitin nanocrystals, two main components of agricultural and aquacultural by-products, were obtained from blue agave and yellow squat lobster industrial residues. Cellulose nanofibers were obtained using high pressure homogenization, while chitin nanocrystals were obtained by hydrolysis in acid medium. Cellulose nanofibers and chitin nanocrystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy and Infrared spectroscopy. Self-bonded composite films with different composition were fabricated by hot pressing and their properties were evaluated. Antifungal activity of chitin nanocrystals was studied using a Cellometer(®) cell count device, mechanical properties at tension were measured with a universal testing machine, water vapor permeability was evaluated with a thermohygrometer and surface tension with sessile drop contact angle method. The addition of chitin nanocrystals reduced slightly the mechanical properties of the composite. Presence of chitin nanocrystals influenced the growth of Aspergillus sp fungus in the surface of the composites as expected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Semiconductor nanocrystals formed in SiO2 by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, J.G.; White, C.W.; Budai, J.D.; Withrow, S.P.; Chen, Y.

    1994-11-01

    Nanocrystals of group IV (Si, Ge and SiGe), III-V (GaAs), and II-VI (CdSe) semiconductor materials have been fabricated inside SiO 2 by ion implantation and subsequent thermal annealing. The microstructure of these nanocrystalline semiconductor materials has been studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The nanocrystals form in near-spherical shape with random crystal orientations in amorphous SiO 2 . Extensive studies on the nanocrystal size distributions have been carried out for the Ge nanocrystals by changing the implantation doses and the annealing temperatures. Remarkable roughening of the nanocrystals occurs when the annealing temperature is raised over the melting temperature of the implanted semiconductor material. Strong red photoluminescence peaked around 1.67 eV has been achieved in samples with Si nanocrystals in SiO 2

  14. Simultaneous control of nanocrystal size and nanocrystal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pattern, reflecting a corresponding peak in the pair distribution function at the characteristic typical nearest-neighbour interatomic distance. Therefore, it is rea- sonable to expect a compacted powder sample of nanocrystals to exhibit a peak in the XRD pattern at the appropriate angle corresponding to the typical nearest-.

  15. Silicon nanocrystal films for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechner, Robert W.

    2009-02-06

    Whether nanoparticles of silicon are really suited for such applications, whether layers fabricated from this exhibit semiconducting properties, whether they can be doped, and whether for instance via the doping the conductivity can be tuned, was studied in the present thesis. Starting material for this were on the one hand spherical silicon nanocrystals with a sharp size distribution and mean diameters in the range from 4-50 nm. Furthermore silicon particle were available, which are with 50-500 nm distinctly larger and exhibit a broad distribution of the mean size and a polycrystalline fine structure with strongly bifurcated external morphology. The small conductivities and tje low mobility values of the charge carriers in the layers of silicon nanocrystals suggest to apply suited thermal after-treatment procedures. So was found that the aluminium-induced layer exchange (ALILE) also can be transferred to the porous layers of nanocrystals. With the deuteron passivation a method was available to change the charge-carrier concentration in the polycrystalline layers. Additionally to ALILE laser crystallization as alternative after-treatment procedure of the nanocrystal layers was studied.

  16. Cadmium zinc telluride detector for low photon energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyung-Wook; Wang, Kai; Reznic, Alla; Karim, Karim S.

    2010-04-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) is a polycrystalline radiation detector that has been investigated over the years for a variety of applications including Constellation X-ray space mission [1] and direct-conversion medical imaging such as digital mammography [2]. Due to its high conversion gain and low electron-hole pair creation energy (~4.43 eV) [3], it has found use in high end, photon counting medical imaging applications including positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, its potential in low photon energy applications has not been fully explored. In this work, we explore the capacity of the CZT material to count low photon energies (6 keV - 20 keV). These energies are of direct relevance to applications in gamma ray breast brachytheraphy and mammography, X-ray protein crystallography, X-ray mammography and mammography tomosynthesis. We also present a design that integrates the CZT direct conversion detector with an inhouse fabricated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistor (TFT) passive pixel sensor (PPS) array. A CZT photoconductor (2 cm x 2 cm size, 5-mm-thick) prepared by the traveling heat method (THM) from RedlenTM is characterized. The current-voltage characteristics reveal a resistivity of 3.3 x 1011 Ω•cm and a steady state dark current in the range of nA. Photocurrent transients under different biases and illumination pulses are studied to investigate photogeneration and the charge trapping process. It is found that charge trapping plays a more significant role in transient behavior at low biases and low frequency.

  17. Polyimide Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Baochau N.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rowan, Stuart; Cudjoe, Elvis; Sandberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Polyimide (PI) aerogels are highly porous solids having low density, high porosity and low thermal conductivity with good mechanical properties. They are ideal for various applications including use in antenna and insulation such as inflatable decelerators used in entry, decent and landing operations. Recently, attention has been focused on stimuli responsive materials such as cellulose nano crystals (CNCs). CNCs are environmentally friendly, bio-renewable, commonly found in plants and the dermis of sea tunicates, and potentially low cost. This study is to examine the effects of CNC on the polyimide aerogels. The CNC used in this project are extracted from mantle of a sea creature called tunicates. A series of polyimide cellulose nanocrystal composite aerogels has been fabricated having 0-13 wt of CNC. Results will be discussed.

  18. Charge transport in metal oxide nanocrystal-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnerstrom, Evan Lars

    structure. Charge transport can obviously be taken to mean the conduction of electrons, but it also refers to the motion of ions, such as lithium ions and protons. In many cases, the transport of ions is married to the motion of electrons as well, either through an external electrical circuit, or within the same material in the case of mixed ionic electronic conductors. The collective motion of electrons over short length scales, that is, within single nanocrystals, is also a subject of study as it pertains to plasmonic nanocrystals. Finally, charge transport can also be coupled to or result from the formation of defects in metal oxides. All of these modes of charge transport in metal oxides gain further complexity when considered in nanocrystalline systems, where the introduction of numerous surfaces can change the character of charge transport relative to bulk systems, providing opportunities to exploit new physical phenomena. Part I of this dissertation explores the combination of electronic and ionic transport in electrochromic devices based on nanocrystals. Colloidal chemistry and solution processing are used to fabricate nanocomposites based on electrochromic tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanocrystals. The nanocomposites, which are completely synthesized using solution processing, consist of ITO nanocrystals and lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (LiTFSI) salt dispersed in a lithium ion-conducting polymer matrix of either poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). ITO nanocrystals are prepared by colloidal synthetic methods and the nanocrystal surface chemistry is modified to achieve favorable nanocrystal-polymer interactions. Homogeneous solutions containing polymer, ITO nanocrystals, and lithium salt are thus prepared and deposited by spin casting. Characterization by DC electronic measurements, microscopy, and x-ray scattering techniques show that the ITO nanocrystals form a complete, connected electrode within a polymer electrolyte

  19. Thin-film cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.

    1987-10-01

    Cadmium telluride, with a room-temperature band-gap energy of 1.5 eV, is a promising thin-film photovoltaic material. The major objective of this research has been to demonstrate thin-film CdTe heterojunction solar cells with a total area greater than 1 sq cm and photovoltaic efficiencies of 13 percent or more. Thin-film p-CdTe/CdS/SnO2:F/glass solar cells with an AM1.5 efficiency of 10.5 percent have been reported previously. This report contains results of work done on: (1) the deposition, resistivity control, and characterization of p-CdTe films by the close-spaced sublimation process; (2) the deposition of large-band-gap window materials; (3) the electrical properties of CdS/CdTe heterojunctions; (4) the formation of stable, reproducible, ohmic contacts (such as p-HgTe) to p-CdTe; and (5) the preparation and evaluation of heterojunction solar cells.

  20. Nanocrystals manufacturing by ultra-low-energy ion-beam-synthesis for non-volatile memory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normand, P. E-mail: p.normand@imel.demokritos.gr; Kapetanakis, E.; Dimitrakis, P.; Skarlatos, D.; Beltsios, K.; Tsoukalas, D.; Bonafos, C.; Ben Assayag, G.; Cherkashin, N.; Claverie, A.; Berg, J.A. van den; Soncini, V.; Agarwal, A.; Ameen, M.; Perego, M.; Fanciulli, M

    2004-02-01

    An overview of recent developments regarding the fabrication and structure of thin silicon dioxide films with embedded nanocrystals through ultra-low-energy ion-beam-synthesis (ULE-IBS) is presented. Advances in fabrication, increased understanding of structure formation processes and ways to control them allow for the fabrication of reproducible and attractive silicon-nanocrystal memory devices for a wide-range of memory applications as herein demonstrated in the case of low-voltage EEPROM-like applications.

  1. Nanocrystals manufacturing by ultra-low-energy ion-beam-synthesis for non-volatile memory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normand, P.; Kapetanakis, E.; Dimitrakis, P.; Skarlatos, D.; Beltsios, K.; Tsoukalas, D.; Bonafos, C.; Ben Assayag, G.; Cherkashin, N.; Claverie, A.; Berg, J.A. van den; Soncini, V.; Agarwal, A.; Ameen, M.; Perego, M.; Fanciulli, M.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of recent developments regarding the fabrication and structure of thin silicon dioxide films with embedded nanocrystals through ultra-low-energy ion-beam-synthesis (ULE-IBS) is presented. Advances in fabrication, increased understanding of structure formation processes and ways to control them allow for the fabrication of reproducible and attractive silicon-nanocrystal memory devices for a wide-range of memory applications as herein demonstrated in the case of low-voltage EEPROM-like applications

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of lead telluride/bismuth antimony telluride nanocomposites for thermoelectric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Shreyashi; Zhou, Chen; Morelli, Donald; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Uher, Ctirad; Brock, Stephanie L.

    2011-12-01

    Heterogeneous nanocomposites of p-type bismuth antimony telluride (Bi 2- xSb xTe 3) with lead telluride (PbTe) nanoinclusions have been prepared by an incipient wetness impregnation approach. The Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and Hall coefficient were measured from 80 to 380 K in order to investigate the influence of PbTe nanoparticles on the thermoelectric performance of nanocomposites. The Seebeck coefficients and electrical resistivities of nanocomposites decrease with increasing PbTe nanoparticle concentration due to an increased hole concentration. The lattice thermal conductivity decreases with the addition of PbTe nanoparticles but the total thermal conductivity increases due to the increased electronic thermal conductivity. We conclude that the presence of nanosized PbTe in the bulk Bi 2- xSb xTe 3 matrix results in a collateral doping effect, which dominates transport properties. This study underscores the need for immiscible systems to achieve the decreased thermal transport properties possible from nanostructuring without compromising the electronic properties.

  3. Properties of Nitrogen-Doped Zinc Telluride Films for Back Contact to Cadmium Telluride Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimpi, Tushar M.; Drayton, Jennifer; Swanson, Drew E.; Sampath, Walajabad S.

    2017-08-01

    Zinc telluride (ZnTe) films have been deposited onto uncoated glass superstrates by reactive radiofrequency (RF) sputtering with different amounts of nitrogen introduced into the process gas, and the structural and electronic transport properties of the resulting nitrogen-doped ZnTe (ZnTe:N) films characterized. Based on transmission and x-ray diffraction measurements, it was observed that the crystalline quality of the ZnTe:N films decreased with increasing nitrogen in the deposition process. The bulk carrier concentration of the ZnTe:N films determined from Hall-effect measurements showed a slight decrease at 4% nitrogen flow rate. The effect of ZnTe:N films as back contact to cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells was also investigated. ZnTe:N films were deposited before or after CdCl2 passivation on CdTe/CdS samples. Small-area devices were characterized for their electronic properties. Glancing-angle x-ray diffraction measurements and energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis confirmed substantial loss of zinc from the samples where CdCl2 passivation was carried out after ZnTe:N film deposition.

  4. Fluorescence Stability of Mercaptopropionic Acid Capped Cadmium Telluride Quantum Dots in Various Biochemical Buffers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borse, Vivek; Kashikar, Adisha; Srivastava, Rohit

    2018-04-01

    Quantum dots are the semiconductor nanocrystals having unique optical and electronic properties. Quantum dots are category of fluorescent labels utilized for biological tagging, biosensing, bioassays, bioimaging and in vivo imaging as they exhibit very small size, signal brightness, photostability, tuning of light emission range, longer photoluminescence decay time as compared to organic dyes. In this work, we have synthesized and characterized mercaptopropionic acid capped cadmium telluride quantum dots (MPA-CdTe QDs) using hydrothermal method. The study further reports fluorescence intensity stability of quantum dots suspended in different buffers of varying concentration (1-100 mM), stored at various photophysical conditions. Fluorescence intensity values were reduced with increase in buffer concentration. When the samples were stored at room temperature in ambient light condition the quantum dots suspended in different buffers lost the fluorescence intensity after day 15 (except TRIS II). Fluorescence intensity values were found stable for more than 30 days when the samples were stored in dark condition. Samples stored in refrigerator displayed modest fluorescence intensity even after 300 days of storage. Thus, storage of MPA-CdTe QDs in refrigerator may be the suitable choice to maintain its fluorescence stability for longer time for further application.

  5. Effect of reducing agent strength on the growth and thermoelectric performance of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour, Asmaa; Hassan, Nazly; Refaat, Heba M.; Soliman, Hesham M. A.; El-Dissouky, A.

    2018-03-01

    A novel combination of Trizma, as an environmentally friendly chelating agent, with either weak or strong reducing agent was used to produce n-type bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) nanocrystals via water-based chemical route. The synthesized powders were consolidated into pellets utilizing spark plasma sintering (SPS). The sintered n-type pellets exhibited potentially high electrical conductivities (5.29 × 105 and 5.23 × 105 S.m‑1) and low lattice thermal conductivities (0.12 and 0.25 Wm‑1K‑1) respectively. These thermoelectric (TE) properties suggested that the partially coherent boundaries permitted significant phonons scattering and electrons transfer. These led to an enhanced figure-of-merit (ZT) values (0.52 and 0.97), which are considered to be significant among the reported ZT values at room-temperature for the undoped synthesized n-type Bi2Te3 nanoparticles. Therefore, the current investigation displayed an efficient method to improve ZT of TE materials via nanostructure orchestrating, resulting in a worthy candidate n-type nanostructured Bi2Te3 for room-temperature TE applications.

  6. Ternary Silver Halide Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyweera, Sasitha C; Rasamani, Kowsalya D; Sun, Yugang

    2017-07-18

    Nanocrystalline silver halides (AgX) such as AgCl, AgBr, and AgI, a class of semiconductor materials with characteristics of both direct and indirect band gaps, represent the most crucial components in traditional photographic processing. The nanocrystal surfaces provide sensitivity specks that can turn into metallic silver, forming an invisible latent image, upon exposure to light. The photographic processing implies that the AgX nanoparticles possess unique properties. First, pristine AgX nanoparticles absorb light only at low efficiency to convert surface AgX into tiny clusters of silver atoms. Second, AgX nanoparticles represent an excellent class of materials to capture electrons efficiently. Third, small metallic silver clusters can catalyze the reduction of AgX nanoparticles to Ag nanoparticles in the presence of mild reducing reagents, known as self-catalytic reduction. These properties indicate that AgX nanoparticles can be partially converted to metallic silver with high precision, leading to the formation of hybrid AgX/Ag nanoparticles. The nanosized metallic Ag usually exhibit intense absorption bands in the visible spectral region due to their strong surface plasmon resonances, which make the AgX/Ag nanoparticles a class of promising visible-light-driven photocatalysts for environmental remediation and CO 2 reduction. Despite the less attention paid to their ability of capturing electrons, AgX nanoparticles might be a class of ideal electron shuttle materials to bridge light absorbers and catalysts on which electrons can drive chemical transformations. In this Account, we focus on ternary silver halide alloy (TSHA) nanoparticles, containing two types of halide ions, which increase the composition complexity of the silver halide nanoparticles. Interdiffusion of halide ions between two types of AgX at elevated temperatures has been developed for fabricating ternary silver halide alloy crystals, such as silver chlorobromide optical fibers for infrared

  7. Surface tension and contact angles of molten cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, R.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    The surface tension and contact angle of molten cadmium telluride (CdTe) were measured as a function of temperature by the sessile drop technique. A FORTRAN code was developed to calculate the surface tension of sessile drops, with the contact angle ranging from O to 180°. The wetting of cadmium telluride melt was studied on different surfaces. The surface tension of cadmium telluride was about 160 ±5 dynes · cm-1[1.6 m-1] at the melting point of 1093°C. The contact angle of CdTe melt was about 65° on a quartz optical flat, 75° on commercial fused quartz, and 125° on boron nitride coated quartz.

  8. Observation of Si Nanocrystal Distrubition by Photoluminescence Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serincan, U.

    2004-01-01

    The observation of Photoluminescence (PL) from the semiconductor nanocrystals embedded into the Si0 2 matrix has drawn much attention in recent years because of its promising solution for the fabrication of Si-based light emitting diodes (LEDs), Recently, we have observed that Si implanted and post annealed samples show a broad PL band near 850 nm. The broadness of the PL spectra is attributed to the nanocrystal size distribution in the annealed films. The size distribution of the nanocrystals shows a Gaussian distribution as determined by TRIM calculations. it is shown in this study that, nanocrystals with different sizes can selectively be excited with a conroBed etch of SiO 2 layer. Hence, by conducting an etch-measure experiment, the PL spectrum has been shown to correlate with Si nanocrystal distribution in the Si0 2 . The red and blue shifts observed during this measurement has evidenced that the observed light emission is a size dependent phenomenon resulted from the Si nanocrystals

  9. Design and characterization of cellulose nanocrystal-enhanced epoxy hardeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane X. Peng; Robert J. Moon; Jeffrey P. Youngblood

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are renewable, sustainable, and abundant nanomaterial widely used as reinforcing fillers in the field of polymer nanocomposites. In this study, two-part epoxy systems with CNC-enhanced hardeners were fabricated. Three types of hardeners, Jeffamine D400 (JD400), diethylenetriamine (DETA), and (±)-trans-1,2- diaminocyclohexane (DACH), were...

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Current status and issues in the surface passivation technology of mercury cadmium telluride infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, O. P.; Musca, C. A.; Faraone, L.

    1998-08-01

    Surface passivation has been recognized as a crucial step in the fabrication of mercury cadmium telluride photoconductive as well as photovoltaic detectors. The subject has attracted considerable attention in the past and several reviews existed by 1991. The subject matter, however, received added impetus with the development of techniques like MOCVD and MBE and recently there has been considerable work on MCT passivation using in situ grown II-VI semiconductors. In this report, we have tried to give the present status and identify the issues particularly with reference to the recent work on the subject.

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of lead telluride/bismuth antimony telluride nanocomposites for thermoelectric applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, Shreyashi; Zhou Chen; Morelli, Donald; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Uher, Ctirad; Brock, Stephanie L.

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous nanocomposites of p-type bismuth antimony telluride (Bi 2−x Sb x Te 3 ) with lead telluride (PbTe) nanoinclusions have been prepared by an incipient wetness impregnation approach. The Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and Hall coefficient were measured from 80 to 380 K in order to investigate the influence of PbTe nanoparticles on the thermoelectric performance of nanocomposites. The Seebeck coefficients and electrical resistivities of nanocomposites decrease with increasing PbTe nanoparticle concentration due to an increased hole concentration. The lattice thermal conductivity decreases with the addition of PbTe nanoparticles but the total thermal conductivity increases due to the increased electronic thermal conductivity. We conclude that the presence of nanosized PbTe in the bulk Bi 2−x Sb x Te 3 matrix results in a collateral doping effect, which dominates transport properties. This study underscores the need for immiscible systems to achieve the decreased thermal transport properties possible from nanostructuring without compromising the electronic properties. - Graphical abstract: PbTe nanoparticles introduced into p-type Bi 2 Te 3 by incipient wetness results in decreased lattice thermal conductivity, but also acts as an electronic dopant, resulting in an overall decrease in thermoelectric performance. Highlights: ► Composites of PbTe nanoparticles in Bi 2−x Sb x Te 3 were formed by incipient wetness. ► PbTe nanoparticles leads to decreased κ l , consistent with phonon scattering. ► PbTe nanoparticles lead to decreased S and ρ, due to increased carriers. ► Collateral doping from PbTe leads to decreased ZT with increasing concentration. ► Immiscible systems are preferred for improved ZT.

  12. Phase transition of bismuth telluride thin films grown by MBE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fülöp, Attila; Song, Yuxin; Charpentier, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    A previously unreported phase transition between Bi2Te3 and Bi4Te3 in bismuth telluride grown by molecular beam epitaxy is recorded via XRD, AFM, and SIMS observations. This transition is found to be related to the Te/Bi beam equivalent pressure (BEP) ratio. BEP ratios below 17 favor the formation...

  13. Synthesis of copper telluride nanowires using template-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Copper telluride (CuTe) nanowires were synthesized electrochemically from aqueous acidic solution of copper (II) sulphate (CuSO4.5H2O) and tellurium oxide (TeO2) on a copper substrate by template-assisted electrodeposition method. The electrodeposition was conducted at 30 °C and the length of nanowires was ...

  14. High-temperature thermoelectric behavior of lead telluride

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High-temperature thermoelectric behavior of lead telluride. M P SINGH1 and C M BHANDARI2. 1Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211 002, India. 2Indian Institute of Information Technology, Allahabad 211 002, India. E-mail: singhmps74@rediffmail.com; cmbhandari@yahoo.com. MS received 16 ...

  15. Spontaneous emission enhancement of colloidal perovskite nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhili; Waks, Edo

    Halide perovskite semiconductors have emerged as prominent photovoltaic materials since their high conversion efficiency and promising light emitting materials in optoelectronics. In particular, easy-to-fabricated colloidal perovskite nanocrystals based on CsPbX3 quantum dots has been intensively investigated recently. Their luminescent wavelength could be tuned precisely by their chemical composition and size of growth. This opens new applications including light-emitting diodes, optical amplifiers and lasing since their promising performance as emitters. However, this potentially high-efficient emitter and gain material has not been fully investigated and realized in integrated photonic structures. Here we demonstrate Purcell enhancement effect of CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals by coupling to an optimized photonic crystal nanobeam cavity as a first crucial step towards realization of integrated on-chip coherent light source with low energy consumption. We show clearly highly-enhanced photoluminescent spectrum and an averaged Purcell enhancement factor of 2.9 is achieved when they are coupled to nanobeam photonic crystal cavities compared to the ones on unpatterned surface in our lifetime measurement. Our success in enhancement of emission from CsPbX3 perovskite nanocrystals paves the way towards the realization of efficient light sources for integrated optoelectronic devices with low energy consumption.

  16. Oxide Nanocrystal Model Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weixin

    2016-03-15

    Model catalysts with uniform and well-defined surface structures have been extensively employed to explore structure-property relationships of powder catalysts. Traditional oxide model catalysts are based on oxide single crystals and single crystal thin films, and the surface chemistry and catalysis are studied under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. However, the acquired fundamental understandings often suffer from the "materials gap" and "pressure gap" when they are extended to the real world of powder catalysts working at atmospheric or higher pressures. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis have realized controlled synthesis of catalytic oxide nanocrystals with uniform and well-defined morphologies. These oxide nanocrystals consist of a novel type of oxide model catalyst whose surface chemistry and catalysis can be studied under the same conditions as working oxide catalysts. In this Account, the emerging concept of oxide nanocrystal model catalysts is demonstrated using our investigations of surface chemistry and catalysis of uniform and well-defined cuprous oxide nanocrystals and ceria nanocrystals. Cu2O cubes enclosed with the {100} crystal planes, Cu2O octahedra enclosed with the {111} crystal planes, and Cu2O rhombic dodecahedra enclosed with the {110} crystal planes exhibit distinct morphology-dependent surface reactivities and catalytic properties that can be well correlated with the surface compositions and structures of exposed crystal planes. Among these types of Cu2O nanocrystals, the octahedra are most reactive and catalytically active due to the presence of coordination-unsaturated (1-fold-coordinated) Cu on the exposed {111} crystal planes. The crystal-plane-controlled surface restructuring and catalytic activity of Cu2O nanocrystals were observed in CO oxidation with excess oxygen. In the propylene oxidation reaction with O2, 1-fold-coordinated Cu on Cu2O(111), 3-fold-coordinated O on Cu2O(110), and 2-fold-coordinated O on Cu2O(100) were identified

  17. Engineering Gold Nanorod-Based Plasmonic Nanocrystals for Optical Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonic nanocrystals have a unique ability to support localized surface plasmon resonances and exhibit rich and intriguing optical properties. Engineering plasmonic nanocrystals can maximize their potentials for specific applications. In this dissertation, we developed three unprecedented Au nanorod-based plasmonic nanocrystals through rational design of the crystal shape and/or composition, and successfully demonstrated their applications in light condensation, photothermal conversion, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The “Au nanorod-Au nanosphere dimer” nanocrystal was synthesized via the ligand-induced asymmetric growth of a Au nanosphere on a Au nanorod. This dimeric nanostructure features an extraordinary broadband optical absorption in the range of 400‒1400nm, and it proved to be an ideal black-body material for light condensation and an efficient solar-light harvester for photothermal conversion. The “Au nanorod (core) @ AuAg alloy (shell)” nanocrystal was built through the epitaxial growth of homogeneously alloyed AuAg shells on Au nanorods by precisely controlled synthesis. The resulting core-shell structured, bimetallic nanorods integrate the merits of the AuAg alloy with the advantages of anisotropic nanorods, exhibiting strong, stable and tunable surface plasmon resonances that are essential for SERS applications in a corrosive environment. The “high-index faceted Au nanorod (core) @ AuPd alloy (shell)” nanocrystal was produced via site-specific epitaxial growth of AuPd alloyed horns at the ends of Au nanorods. The AuPd alloyed horns are bound with high-index side facets, while the Au nanorod concentrates an intensive electric field at each end. This unique configuration unites highly active catalytic sites with strong SERS sites into a single entity and was demonstrated to be ideal for in situ monitoring of Pd-catalyzed reactions by SERS. The synthetic strategies developed here are promising towards the fabrication of

  18. Novel green synthetic strategy to prepare ZnO nanocrystals using rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) peel extract and its antibacterial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuvakkumar, R; Suresh, J; Nathanael, A Joseph; Sundrarajan, M; Hong, S I

    2014-08-01

    In the present investigation, we report a sustainable novel green synthetic strategy to synthesis zinc oxide nanocrystals. This is the first report on sustainable biosynthesis of zinc oxide nanocrystals employing Nephelium lappaceum L., peel extract as a natural ligation agent. Green synthesis of zinc oxide nanocrystals was carried out via zinc-ellagate complex formation using rambutan peel wastes. The successful formation of zinc oxide nanocrystals was confirmed employing standard characterisation studies. A possible mechanism for the formation of ZnO nanocrystals with rambutan peel extract was also proposed. The prepared ZnO nanocrystals were coated on the cotton fabric and their antibacterial activity were analyzed. ZnO nanocrystals coated cotton showed good antibacterial activity towards Escherichia coli (E. coli), gram negative bacteria and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), gram positive bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  20. Purification technologies for colloidal nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yi; Gee, Megan Y; Greytak, A B

    2017-01-10

    Almost all applications of colloidal nanocrystals require some type of purification or surface modification process following nanocrystal growth. Nanocrystal purification - the separation of nanocrystals from undesired solution components - can perturb the surface chemistry and thereby the physical properties of colloidal nanocrystals due to changes in solvent, solute concentrations, and exposure of the nanocrystal surface to oxidation or hydrolysis. For example, nanocrystal quantum dots frequently exhibit decreased photoluminescence brightness after precipitation from the growth solvent and subsequent redissolution. Consequently, purification is an integral part of the synthetic chemistry of colloidal nanocrystals, and the effect of purification methods must be considered in order to accurately compare and predict the behavior of otherwise similar nanocrystal samples. In this Feature Article we examine established and emerging approaches to the purification of colloidal nanoparticles from a nanocrystal surface chemistry viewpoint. Purification is generally achieved by exploiting differences in properties between the impurities and the nanoparticles. Three distinct properties are typically manipulated: polarity (relative solubility), electrophoretic mobility, and size. We discuss precipitation, extraction, electrophoretic methods, and size-based methods including ultracentrifugation, ultrafiltration, diafiltration, and size-exclusion chromatography. The susceptibility of quantum dots to changes in surface chemistry, with changes in photoluminescence decay associated with surface chemical changes, extends even into the case of core/shell structures. Accordingly, the goal of a more complete description of quantum dot surface chemistry has been a driver of innovation in colloidal nanocrystal purification methods. We specifically examine the effect of purification on surface chemistry and photoluminescence in quantum dots as an example of the challenges associated with

  1. Chemical design of nanocrystal solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2013-01-01

    This account highlights our recent and present activities dedicated to chemical synthesis and applications of inorganic nanostructures. In particular, we discuss the potential of metal amides as precursors in the synthesis of metallic and semiconductor nanocrystals. We show the importance of surface chemical functionalization for the emergence of collective electronic properties in nanocrystal solids. We also demonstrate a new kind of long-range ordered, crystalline matter comprising colloidal nanocrystals and atomically defined inorganic clusters. Finally, we point the reader's attention to the high potential benefits of size- and shape-tunability of nanocrystals for achieving higher performance of rechargeable Li-ion battery electrodes.

  2. About thermo-electric properties of bismuth telluride doped by gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akperov, M.M.; Ismailov, Sh.S.; Shukyurova, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Results of study of the Gd impurities effect on the bismuth telluride thermo-electric properties are presented. The experiment was carried out within the temperature range T=300-700 K. It is determined, that at temperature increase the energy level is appreciably closing up to bismuth telluride forbidden zone which makes up 0.16-0.24 eV. Such anomalous energy properties of gadolinium in telluride affect on material thermoelectric properties

  3. The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager on AstroSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalerao, V.; Bhattacharya, D.; Vibhute, A.; Pawar, P.; Rao, A. R.; Hingar, M. K.; Khanna, Rakesh; Kutty, A. P. K.; Malkar, J. P.; Patil, M. H.; Arora, Y. K.; Sinha, S.; Priya, P.; Samuel, Essy; Sreekumar, S.; Vinod, P.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Vadawale, S. V.; Vagshette, N.; Navalgund, K. H.; Sarma, K. S.; Pandiyan, R.; Seetha, S.; Subbarao, K.

    2017-06-01

    The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager (CZTI) is a high energy, wide-field imaging instrument on AstroSat. CZTI's namesake Cadmium Zinc Telluride detectors cover an energy range from 20 keV to >200 keV, with 11% energy resolution at 60 keV. The coded aperture mask attains an angular resolution of 17^' over a 4.6° × 4.6° (FWHM) field-of-view. CZTI functions as an open detector above 100 keV, continuously sensitive to GRBs and other transients in about 30% of the sky. The pixellated detectors are sensitive to polarization above ˜ 100 keV, with exciting possibilities for polarization studies of transients and bright persistent sources. In this paper, we provide details of the complete CZTI instrument, detectors, coded aperture mask, mechanical and electronic configuration, as well as data and products.

  4. Bismuth Telluride and Its Alloys as Materials for Thermoelectric Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Julian Goldsmid

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth telluride and its alloys are widely used as materials for thermoelectric refrigeration. They are also the best materials for use in thermoelectric generators when the temperature of the heat source is moderate. The dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, usually rises with temperature, as long as there is only one type of charge carrier. Eventually, though, minority carrier conduction becomes significant and ZT decreases above a certain temperature. There is also the possibility of chemical decomposition due to the vaporization of tellurium. Here we discuss the likely temperature dependence of the thermoelectric parameters and the means by which the composition may be optimized for applications above room temperature. The results of these theoretical predictions are compared with the observed properties of bismuth telluride-based thermoelements at elevated temperatures. Compositional changes are suggested for materials that are destined for generator modules.

  5. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1988--31 December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L. [University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75% or higher at 0. 44 {mu}m and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5% or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65% and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5% and 8%, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD{sub 1-x}Zn{sub 1-x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400{degrees}C using TEGa and AsH{sub 3} as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd{sub 1- x}Zn{sub x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. 67 refs.

  6. Fission-product tellurium and cesium telluride chemistry revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, J.; LeBlanc, J.C.

    1996-11-01

    The chemistry of fission-product tellurium is discussed with a focus on conditions in an operating CANDU reactor and in an accident scenario, i.e., a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). Cesium telluride, Cs 2 Te, is likely to be one of the most abundant tellurium species released to containment. Available thermodynamic data on gas phase Cs 2 Te is not complete; hence the volatility of cesium telluride was studied by Knudsen-cell mass spectrometry. Cesium telluride was found to vapourize incongruently, becoming more tellurium-rich in the condensed phase as vapourization progressed. Vapour-phase species that were observed were elemental cesium and tellurium, CsTe, Cs 2 Te, Cs 2 Te 2 and Cs 2 Te 3 . Second-law enthalpies and entropies were obtained for many of these species, and a third-law value, ΔH 298 o , of 186 ± 2 kJ·mol -1 was obtained for Cs 2 Te. (author)

  7. Zinc oxide tetrapod nanocrystal diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Marcus Christian

    Advances in fabrication and analysis tools have allowed the synthesis and manipulation of functional materials with features comparable to fundamental physical length scales. Many interesting properties inherently due to quantum size effects have been observed in nanometre scale structures. It is hoped that these nanoscale structures will play a key role in future materials and devices that exploit their unique properties. Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide band-gap transparent and piezoelectric semiconductor material. It also has a large exciton binding energy which allows for stable ultraviolet light emission at room temperature. There are therefore foreseeable applications in optoelectronic devices which include ultraviolet photosensitive devices and light emitting diodes. Nanoscale structures formed from ZnO are interesting as they possess many of the properties inherent form the bulk but are also subject to various quantum size effects that may occur at the nanoscale. To date, the study of ZnO nanostructures is a relatively recent endeavour with the vast majority of reports being made within the last five years. ZnO is unique in that it forms a family of nanoscale structures. These structures include nanoscale wires, rods, hexagons, tetrapods, ribbons, rings, flowers and helixes. This work is focussed on the study of zinc oxide tetrapod crystalline nanoscale structures and their devices. We have synthesised ZnO tetrapods using chemical vapour transport techniques. Photoluminescence characterisation revealed the presence of optically active surface defects that could be quenched with a simple surface treatment. We have also for the first time observed resonant cavity modes in a single ZnO tetrapod nanocrystal. An ultraviolet sensitive Schottky diode was fabricated from a single ZnO tetrapod using focussed ion-beam assisted deposition techniques. The device characteristics observed were modelled and successfully shown to result from an illumination induced reduction in

  8. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Shara Carol [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices

  9. Mechanical Properties of Nanocrystal Supercrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, Enrico; Podsiadlo, Paul; Shevchenko, Elena; Ogletree, D. Frank; Delplancke-Ogletree, Marie-Paule; Ashby, Paul D.

    2009-12-30

    Colloidal nanocrystals attract significant interest due to their potential applications in electronic, magnetic, and optical devices. Nanocrystal supercrystals (NCSCs) are particularly appealing for their well ordered structure and homogeneity. The interactions between organic ligands that passivate the inorganic nanocrystal cores critically influence their self-organization into supercrystals, By investigating the mechanical properties of supercrystals, we can directly characterize the particle-particle interactions in a well-defined geometry, and gain insight into both the self-assembly process and the potential applications of nanocrystal supercrystals. Here we report nanoindentation studies of well ordered lead-sulfide (Pbs) nanocrystal supercrystals. Their modulus and hardness were found to be similar to soft polymers at 1.7 GPa and 70 MPa respectively and the fractures toughness was 39 KPa/m1/2, revealing the extremely brittle nature of these materials.

  10. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Victor L.; Petruska, Melissa A.

    2010-05-25

    The present invention is directed to a process for preparing a solid composite having colloidal nanocrystals dispersed within a sol-gel matrix, the process including admixing colloidal nanocrystals with an amphiphilic polymer including hydrophilic groups selected from the group consisting of --COOH, --OH, --SO.sub.3H, --NH.sub.2, and --PO.sub.3H.sub.2 within a solvent to form an alcohol-soluble colloidal nanocrystal-polymer complex, admixing the alcohol-soluble colloidal nanocrystal-polymer complex and a sol-gel precursor material, and, forming the solid composite from the admixture. The present invention is also directed to the resultant solid composites and to the alcohol-soluble colloidal nanocrystal-polymer complexes.

  11. Hydrothermal preparation of high saturation magnetization and coercivity cobalt ferrite nanocrystals without subsequent calcination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, S.C.; Chia, C.H.; Zakaria, S.; Yusoff, M.; Haw, C.Y.; Ahmadi, Sh.; Huang, N.M.; Lim, H.N.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, CoFe 2 O 4 nanocrystals with high saturation magnetization (M s ) and high coercivity (H c ) have been fabricated via a simple hydrothermal method and without subsequent calcination. The resulting CoFe 2 O 4 nanocrystals are characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, differential scanning calorimetry and vibrating sample magnetometry. The results indicate that CoFe 2 O 4 nanocrystals are single crystal and the average crystallite size is increasing with the hydrothermal temperature. The electron micrographs show that the nanocrystals are well-dispersed and possess uniform size. The shape of CoFe 2 O 4 nanocrystals is transformed from spherical into rod by increasing the hydrothermal temperature. The nanocrystals show relatively high M s of 74.8 emu g -1 and H c of 2216 Oe, as compared to previous reported results. The obtained results reveal the applicability of this method for efficiently producing well crystallized and relatively high magnetic properties CoFe 2 O 4 nanocrystals as compared to other methods. More importantly, it does not require further calcination processes.

  12. Solution-Processed Efficient Nanocrystal Solar Cells Based on CdTe and CdS Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songwei Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Solution-processed CdTe nanocrystals solar cells have attracted much attention due to their low cost, low material consumption, and potential for roll-to-roll production. Among all kinds of semiconductor materials, CdS exhibits the lowest lattice mismatch with CdTe, which permits high junction quality and high device performance. In this study, high quality CdS nanocrystals were prepared by a non-injection technique with tetraethylthiuram disufide and 2,2′-dithiobisbenzothiazole as the stabilizers. Based on the CdTe and CdS nanocrystals, devices with the architecture of ITO/ZnO/CdS/CdTe/MoOx/Au were fabricated successfully by a solution process under ambient condition. The effects of annealing conditions, film thickness, and detailed device structure on the CdTe/CdS nanocrystal solar cells were investigated and discussed in detail. We demonstrate that high junction quality can be obtained by using CdS nanocrystal thin film compared to traditional CdS film via chemical bath deposition (CBD. The best device had short circuit current density (Jsc, open circuit voltage (Voc and fill factor (FF of 17.26 mA/cm2, 0.56 V, and 52.84%, respectively, resulting in a power conversion efficiency (PCE of 5.14%, which is significantly higher than that reported using CBD CdS as the window layer. This work provides important suggestions for the further improvement of efficiency in CdTe nanocrystal solar cells.

  13. Method of Creating Micro-scale Silver Telluride Grains Covered with Bismuth Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung (Inventor); Choi, Sang Hyouk (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Lee, Kunik (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided is a method of enhancing thermoelectric performance by surrounding crystalline semiconductors with nanoparticles by contacting a bismuth telluride material with a silver salt under a substantially inert atmosphere and a temperature approximately near the silver salt decomposition temperature; and recovering a metallic bismuth decorated material comprising silver telluride crystal grains.

  14. Growth and characterization of bismuth telluride nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picht, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Polycrystalline Bi 2 Te 3 nanowires are electrochemically grown in ion track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Potentiostatic growth is demonstrated in templates of various thicknesses ranging from 10 to 100 μm. The smallest observed nanowire diameters are 20 nm in thin membranes and approx. 140-180 nm in thicker membranes. The influence of the various deposition parameters on the nanowire growth rate is presented. Slower growth rates are attained by selective change of deposition potentials and lower temperatures. Nanowires synthesized at slower growth rates have shown to possess a higher degree of crystalline order and smoother surface contours. With respect to structural properties, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy verified the growth of Bi 2 Te 3 and evidenced the stability of specific properties, e.g. grain size or preferential orientation, with regard to variations in the deposition conditions. The interdependency of the fabrication parameters, i.e. temperature, deposition potential and nanochannel diameters, is demonstrated for wires grown in 30 μm thick membranes. It is visible from diffraction analysis that texture is tunable by the growth conditions but depends also on the size of the nanochannels in the template. Both (015) and (110) reflexes are observed for the nanowire arrays. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis further points out that variation of nanochannel size could lead to a change in elemental composition of the nanowires. (orig.)

  15. Growth and characterization of bismuth telluride nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picht, Oliver

    2010-05-26

    Polycrystalline Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires are electrochemically grown in ion track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Potentiostatic growth is demonstrated in templates of various thicknesses ranging from 10 to 100 {mu}m. The smallest observed nanowire diameters are 20 nm in thin membranes and approx. 140-180 nm in thicker membranes. The influence of the various deposition parameters on the nanowire growth rate is presented. Slower growth rates are attained by selective change of deposition potentials and lower temperatures. Nanowires synthesized at slower growth rates have shown to possess a higher degree of crystalline order and smoother surface contours. With respect to structural properties, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy verified the growth of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and evidenced the stability of specific properties, e.g. grain size or preferential orientation, with regard to variations in the deposition conditions. The interdependency of the fabrication parameters, i.e. temperature, deposition potential and nanochannel diameters, is demonstrated for wires grown in 30 {mu}m thick membranes. It is visible from diffraction analysis that texture is tunable by the growth conditions but depends also on the size of the nanochannels in the template. Both (015) and (110) reflexes are observed for the nanowire arrays. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis further points out that variation of nanochannel size could lead to a change in elemental composition of the nanowires. (orig.)

  16. Biomolecular Assembly of Gold Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micheel, Christine Marya [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-05-20

    Over the past ten years, methods have been developed to construct discrete nanostructures using nanocrystals and biomolecules. While these frequently consist of gold nanocrystals and DNA, semiconductor nanocrystals as well as antibodies and enzymes have also been used. One example of discrete nanostructures is dimers of gold nanocrystals linked together with complementary DNA. This type of nanostructure is also known as a nanocrystal molecule. Discrete nanostructures of this kind have a number of potential applications, from highly parallel self-assembly of electronics components and rapid read-out of DNA computations to biological imaging and a variety of bioassays. My research focused in three main areas. The first area, the refinement of electrophoresis as a purification and characterization method, included application of agarose gel electrophoresis to the purification of discrete gold nanocrystal/DNA conjugates and nanocrystal molecules, as well as development of a more detailed understanding of the hydrodynamic behavior of these materials in gels. The second area, the development of methods for quantitative analysis of transmission electron microscope data, used computer programs written to find pair correlations as well as higher order correlations. With these programs, it is possible to reliably locate and measure nanocrystal molecules in TEM images. The final area of research explored the use of DNA ligase in the formation of nanocrystal molecules. Synthesis of dimers of gold particles linked with a single strand of DNA possible through the use of DNA ligase opens the possibility for amplification of nanostructures in a manner similar to polymerase chain reaction. These three areas are discussed in the context of the work in the Alivisatos group, as well as the field as a whole.

  17. Tuning the formation and functionalities of ultrafine CoFe2O4 nanocrystals via interfacial coherent strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ying-Hui; Kuo, Ho-Hung; Liao, Sheng-Chieh; Liu, Heng-Jui; Chen, Ying-Jiun; Lin, Hong-Ji; Chen, Chien-Te; Lai, Chih-Huang; Zhan, Qian; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2013-06-01

    Complex oxide nanocrystals with a spinel structure show their remarkable optical, electronic, mechanical, thermal, and magnetic properties. In this study, we present a simple yet versatile strategy to grow self-assembled epitaxial CoFe2O4 nanocrystals with well-controlled size (less than 10 nm) and single orientation. CoFe2O4 nanocrystals were fabricated via phase separation in a BiFeO3-CoF2O4 ultrathin film by pulsed laser deposition. The coherent strain at the BiFeO3-CoF2O4 interface suppressed the growth of the nanocrystals regardless of substrate temperatures. This strain also resulted in the ferromagnetic anisotropy and interesting conducting behaviors of ultrafine CFO nanocrystals.

  18. Discrete Charge Storage Nonvolatile Memory Based on Si Nanocrystals with Nitridation Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xian-Gao, Zhang; Kun-Ji, Chen; Zhong-Hui, Fang; Xin-Ye, Qian; Guang-Yuan, Liu; Xiao-Fan, Jiang; Zhong-Yuan, Ma; Jun, Xu; Xin-Fan, Huang; Jian-Xin, Ji; Fei, He; Kuang-Bao, Song; Jun, Zhang; Hui, Wan; Rong-Hua, Wang

    2010-01-01

    A nonvolatile memory device with nitrided Si nanocrystals embedded in a Boating gate was fabricated. The uniform Si nanocrystals with high density (3 × 10 11 cm −2 ) were deposited on ultra-thin tunnel oxide layer (∼ 3 nm) and followed by a nitridation treatment in ammonia to form a thin silicon nitride layer on the surface of nanocrystals. A memory window of 2.4 V was obtained and it would be larger than 1.3 V after ten years from the extrapolated retention data. The results can be explained by the nitrogen passivation of the surface traps of Si nanocrystals, which slows the charge loss rate. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  19. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T., E-mail: thierry.melin@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, CNRS-UMR8520, Avenue Poincaré, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS-UMR7647, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  20. Preparation and characterization of cadmium telluride. Study of nuclear spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornet, Alain.

    1976-01-01

    Cadmium telluride single crystals have been grown by three different methods: zone refining, Bridgman and travelling heater method (THM). Characterization has been undertaken especially on the THM ingots by different methods, including time of flight, thermally stimulated current and thermoluminescence. A theoretical level scheme approach has been used to establish the mechanism of self-compensation with halogens. Finally nuclear radiation detection has been prepared and investigated. The following parameters have been considered: detector efficiency, energy resolution, stability in time and under irradiation. Structure suppressing polarization effects in chlorine compensated THM samples are presented [fr

  1. Synthesis and Doping of Silicon Nanocrystals for Versatile Nanocrystal Inks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Nicolaas Johannes

    The impact of nanotechnology on our society is getting larger every year. Electronics are becoming smaller and more powerful, the "Internet of Things" is all around us, and data generation is increasing exponentially. None of this would have been possible without the developments in nanotechnology. Crystalline semiconductor nanoparticles (nanocrystals) are one of the latest developments in the field of nanotechnology. This thesis addresses three important challenges for the transition of silicon nanocrystals from the lab bench to the marketplace: A better understanding of the nanocrystal synthesis was obtained, the electronic properties of the nanocrystals were characterized and tuned, and novel silicon nanocrystal inks were formed and applied using simple coating technologies. Plasma synthesis of nanocrystals has numerous advantages over traditional solution-based synthesis methods. While the formation of nanoparticles in low pressure nonthermal plasmas is well known, the heating mechanism leading to their crystallization is poorly understood. A combination of comprehensive plasma characterization with a nanoparticle heating model presented here reveals the underlying plasma physics leading to crystallization. The model predicts that the nanoparticles reach temperatures as high as 900 K in the plasma as a result of heating reactions on the nanoparticle surface. These temperatures are well above the gas temperature and sufficient for complete nanoparticle crystallization. Moving the field of plasma nanoparticle synthesis to atmospheric pressures is important for lowering its cost and making the process attractive for industrial applications. The heating and charging model for silicon nanoparticles was adapted in Chapter 3 to study plasmas maintained over a wide range of pressures (10 -- 105 Pa). The model considers three collisionality regimes and determines the dominant contribution of each regime under various plasma conditions. Strong nanoparticle cooling at

  2. Semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 8. Various Quantum Mechanical Concepts for Confinements in Semiconductor Nanocrystals. Jayakrishna Khatei Karuna Kar Nanda. Classroom Volume 18 Issue 8 August 2013 pp 771-776 ...

  3. A Radiation-Tolerant, Low-Power Non-Volatile Memory Based on Silicon Nanocrystal Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L. D.; Boer, E. A.; Ostraat, M. L.; Brongersma, M. L.; Flagan, R. C.; Atwater, H. A.; deBlauwe, J.; Green, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    Nanocrystal nonvolatile floating-gate memories are a good candidate for space applications - initial results suggest they are fast, more reliable and consume less power than conventional floating gate memories. In the nanocrystal based NVM device, charge is not stored on a continuous polysilicon layer (so-called floating gate), but instead on a layer of discrete nanocrystals. Charge injection and storage in dense arrays of silicon nanocrystals in SiO2 is a critical aspect of the performance of potential nanocrystal flash memory structures. The ultimate goal for this class of devices is few- or single-electron storage in a small number of nanocrystal elements. In addition, the nanocrystal layer fabrication technique should be simple, 8-inch wafer compatible and well controlled in program/erase threshold voltage swing was seen during 100,000 program and erase cycles. Additional near-term goals for this project include extensive testing for radiation hardness and the development of artificial layered tunnel barrier heterostructures which have the potential for large speed enhancements for read/write of nanocrystal memory elements, compared with conventional flash devices. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Kelvin probe studies of cesium telluride photocathode for AWA photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisniewski, Eric E., E-mail: ewisniew@anl.gov [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Velazquez, Daniel [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Yusof, Zikri, E-mail: zyusof@hawk.iit.edu [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Spentzouris, Linda; Terry, Jeff [Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Sarkar, Tapash J. [Rice University, 6100 Main, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Harkay, Katherine [Accelerator Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-05-21

    Cesium telluride is an important photocathode as an electron source for particle accelerators. It has a relatively high quantum efficiency (>1%), is sufficiently robust in a photoinjector, and has a long lifetime. This photocathode is grown in-house for a new Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) beamline to produce high charge per bunch (≈50nC) in a long bunch train. Here, we present a study of the work function of cesium telluride photocathode using the Kelvin probe technique. The study includes an investigation of the correlation between the quantum efficiency and the work function, the effect of photocathode aging, the effect of UV exposure on the work function, and the evolution of the work function during and after photocathode rejuvenation via heating. -- Highlights: ► The correlation between Quantum Efficiency (QE) and work function. ► How QE and work function evolve together. ► Rejuvenation of the photocathode via heating and the effect on work function. ► The effects on the work function due to exposure to UV light.

  5. Thin film cadmium telluride and zinc phosphide solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T.

    1984-10-01

    The deposition of cadmium telluride films by direct combination of the cadmium and tellurium vapor on foreign substrates is described. Nearly stoichiometric p-type cadmium telluride films and arsenic-doped p-type films were prepared reproducibly. Major efforts were directed to the deposition and characterization of heterojunction window materials, indium tin oxide, fluorine-doped tin oxide, cadmium oxide, and zinc oxide. A number of heterojunction solar cells were prepared, and the best thin-film ITO/CdTe solar cells had an AMI efficiency of about 7.2%. Zinc phosphide films were deposited on W/steel substrated by the reaction of zinc and phosphine in a hydrogen flow. Films without intentional doping had an electrical resistivity on the order of 10(6) ohm-cm, and this resistivity may be reduced to about 5 x 10(4) ohm-cm by adding hydrogen chloride or hydrogen bromide to the reaction mixture. Lower resistivity films are deposited by adding a controlled amount of silver nitrate solution on to the substrate surface. Major efforts are directed to the deposition of low-resistivity zinc selenide to prepare ZnSe/An3P2 heterojunction thin-film solar cells. The zinc selenide films deposited by vaccum evaporation and chemical vapor deposition techniques are all of high resistivity.

  6. Spectral analysis techniques for characterizing cadmium zinc telluride polarization modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, William R.; Taherion, Saeid; Kumar, F. Joseph; Giles, David; Hore, Dennis K.

    2018-04-01

    The low frequency electro-optic characteristics of cadmium zinc telluride are demonstrated in the mid-infrared, in the spectral range 2.5-11 μm. Conventional methods for characterizing the dynamic response by monitoring the amplitude of the time-varying light intensity do not account for spatial variation in material properties. In such cases, a more revealing method involves monitoring two distinct frequency components in order to characterize the dynamic and static contributions to the optical retardation. We demonstrate that, while this method works well for a ZnSe photo-elastic modulator, it does not fully capture the response of a cadmium zinc telluride electro-optic modulator. Ultimately, we show that acquiring the full waveform of the optical response enables a model to be created that accounts for inhomogeneity in the material that results in an asymmetric response with respect to the polarity of the driving voltage. This technique is applicable to broadband and fixed-wavelength applications in a variety of spectral ranges.

  7. Ore petrology and geochemistry of Tertiary gold telluride deposits of the Colorado mineral belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, J.A.; Romberger, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    Epithermal gold telluride deposits from the Colorado mineral belt share a number of similarities: relationship to alkalic stocks; high fluorine and CO/sub 2/ content; and similar paragenesis. Petrography of deposits in the Jamestown, Cripple Creek, and La Plata districts has resulted in a composite paragenesis: early Fe-Cu-Pb-Zn sulfides + hematite; tetrahedrite; high Te tellurides; low Te tellurides; late native gold. Fluid inclusion studies suggest telluride deposition occurred below 200/sup 0/C from low salinity. Gangue and alteration mineralogy indicates the ore fluids were near neutral pH during telluride deposition. The presence of hematite and locally barite suggest relatively oxidizing conditions. Evaluation of thermodynamic stabilities of tellurides and aqueous tellurium species indicates that progressive oxidation is consistent with the observed ore mineral paragenesis. Available data on gold bisulfide and chloride complexes suggest neither were important in the transport of gold in these systems. Thermodynamic data suggest the ditelluride ion (Te/sub 2//sup 2 -/) predominates in the range of inferred physiochemical conditions for the transport and deposition of gold in these systems. Inferred complexes such as AuTe/sub 2//sup -/ could account for the gold transport, and oxidation would be the most effective mechanism of precipitation of gold telluride or native gold. Published data suggest the associated alkalic stocks may be the ultimate source of the metals, since they are enriched in Au, Ag, Te, As, and Bi.

  8. The study and development of cadmium telluride detectors for gamma ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knispel, Gerard

    1970-01-01

    The purpose of this work is the study of possibility of cadmium telluride's utilisation in gamma ray spectroscopy. This material has some superiorities in comparison with germanium which is utilised in (Ge Li) structures. In a first chapter we study the interaction of rays with matter in the particular case of cadmium telluride. The range of α and β rays in the some way as the effect cross section of gamma ray versus energy are deducted from data tabulated for tin which has a density and an atomic weight very near. The problems related with creation and collection of charges in a cadmium telluride structure are discussed in the same way as the resolution in nuclear spectroscopy, acting the different parameters characterising the detector. In the second chapter, after some indications in the metallurgy of cadmium telluride, we describe the realisation of several structures types, evaporation of a cadmium telluride's layer, diffusion of gold or copper, metal semiconductor contact. Measures of current-voltage characteristics and capacity allow the determination of possibility of nuclear detection with this structures and state precisely some parameters. In the third chapter range's measures of α rays are compared with the first chapter's theoretical results. Results of α ray spectroscopy obtained with three detectors are described and show the possibility of cadmium telluride in this way. Detection of gamma ray at last justify the choice of this material, but the results obtained here show the progress to do in cadmium telluride metallurgy. (author) [fr

  9. Investigations of Cadmium Manganese Telluride Crystals for Room-Temperature Radiation Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Carcelen, V.; Gul, R.; James, R.

    2009-10-06

    Cadmium manganese telluride (CMT) has high potential as a material for room-temperature nuclear-radiation detectors. We investigated indium-doped CMT crystals taken from the stable growth region of the ingot, and compared its characteristics with that from the last-to-freeze region. We employed different techniques, including synchrotron white-beam X-ray topography (SWBXT), current-voltage (I-V) measurements, and low-temperature photoluminescence spectra, and we also assessed their responses as detectors to irradiation exposure. The crystal from the stable growth region proved superior to that from the last-to-freeze region; it is a single-grain crystal, free of twins, and displayed a resistivity higher by two orders-of-magnitude. The segregation of indium dopant in the ingot might be responsible for its better resistivity. Furthermore, we recorded a good response in the detector fabricated from the crystal taken from the stable growth region; its ({mu}{tau}){sub e} value was 2.6 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/V, which is acceptable for thin detectors, including for applications in medicine.

  10. One-Dimensional Fast Transient Simulator for Modeling Cadmium Sulfide/Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Da

    Solar energy, including solar heating, solar architecture, solar thermal electricity and solar photovoltaics, is one of the primary alternative energy sources to fossil fuel. Being one of the most important techniques, significant research has been conducted in solar cell efficiency improvement. Simulation of various structures and materials of solar cells provides a deeper understanding of device operation and ways to improve their efficiency. Over the last two decades, polycrystalline thin-film Cadmium-Sulfide and Cadmium-Telluride (CdS/CdTe) solar cells fabricated on glass substrates have been considered as one of the most promising candidate in the photovoltaic technologies, for their similar efficiency and low costs when compared to traditional silicon-based solar cells. In this work a fast one dimensional time-dependent/steady-state drift-diffusion simulator, accelerated by adaptive non-uniform mesh and automatic time-step control, for modeling solar cells has been developed and has been used to simulate a CdS/CdTe solar cell. These models are used to reproduce transients of carrier transport in response to step-function signals of different bias and varied light intensity. The time-step control models are also used to help convergence in steady-state simulations where constrained material constants, such as carrier lifetimes in the order of nanosecond and carrier mobility in the order of 100 cm2/Vs, must be applied.

  11. Enhanced thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride-organic hybrid films via graphene doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Airul Azha Abd; Umar, Akrajas Ali; Salleh, Muhamad Mat; Chen, Xiaomei; Oyama, Munetaka

    2016-01-01

    The thermoelectric properties of graphene-doped bismuth telluride-PEDOT:PSS-glycerol (hybrid) films were investigated. Prior to the study, p-type and n-type hybrid films were prepared by doping the PEDOT:PSS-glycerol with the p- and n-type bismuth telluride. Graphene-doped hybrid films were prepared by adding graphene particles of concentration ranging from 0.02 to 0.1 wt% into the hybrid films. Films of graphene-doped hybrid system were then prepared on a glass substrate using a spin-coating technique. It was found that the electrical conductivity of the hybrid films increases with the increasing of the graphene-dopant concentration and optimum at 0.08 wt% for both p- and n-type films, namely 400 and 195 S/cm, respectively. Further increasing in the concentration caused a decreasing in the electrical conductivity. Analysis of the thermoelectric properties of the films obtained that the p-type film exhibited significant improvement in its thermoelectric properties, where the thermoelectric properties increased with the increasing of the doping concentration. Meanwhile, for the case of n-type film, graphene doping showed a negative effect to the thermoelectrical properties, where the thermoelectric properties decreased with the increasing of doping concentration. Seebeck coefficient (and power factor) for optimum p-type and n-type hybrid thin films, i.e., doped with 0.08 wt% of graphene, is 20 μV/K (and 160 μW m -1 K -2 ) and 10 μV/K (and 19.5 μW m -1 K -2 ), respectively. The obtained electrical conductivity and thermoelectric properties of graphene-doped hybrid film are interestingly several orders higher than the pristine hybrid films. A thermocouple device fabricated utilizing the p- and n-type graphene-doped hybrid films can generate an electric voltage as high as 2.2 mV under a temperature difference between the hot-side and the cold-side terminal as only low as 55 K. This is equivalent to the output power as high as 24.2 nW (for output load as high as 50

  12. Enhanced thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride-organic hybrid films via graphene doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Airul Azha Abd [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia UKM, Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Technology Park Malaysia, Malaysia Institute of Microelectronics and System, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Umar, Akrajas Ali; Salleh, Muhamad Mat [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia UKM, Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Chen, Xiaomei [Jimei University, College of Food and Biological Engineering, Jimei, Xiamen (China); Oyama, Munetaka [Kyoto University, Graduate School of Engineering, Nishikyoku, Kyoto (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    The thermoelectric properties of graphene-doped bismuth telluride-PEDOT:PSS-glycerol (hybrid) films were investigated. Prior to the study, p-type and n-type hybrid films were prepared by doping the PEDOT:PSS-glycerol with the p- and n-type bismuth telluride. Graphene-doped hybrid films were prepared by adding graphene particles of concentration ranging from 0.02 to 0.1 wt% into the hybrid films. Films of graphene-doped hybrid system were then prepared on a glass substrate using a spin-coating technique. It was found that the electrical conductivity of the hybrid films increases with the increasing of the graphene-dopant concentration and optimum at 0.08 wt% for both p- and n-type films, namely 400 and 195 S/cm, respectively. Further increasing in the concentration caused a decreasing in the electrical conductivity. Analysis of the thermoelectric properties of the films obtained that the p-type film exhibited significant improvement in its thermoelectric properties, where the thermoelectric properties increased with the increasing of the doping concentration. Meanwhile, for the case of n-type film, graphene doping showed a negative effect to the thermoelectrical properties, where the thermoelectric properties decreased with the increasing of doping concentration. Seebeck coefficient (and power factor) for optimum p-type and n-type hybrid thin films, i.e., doped with 0.08 wt% of graphene, is 20 μV/K (and 160 μW m{sup -1} K{sup -2}) and 10 μV/K (and 19.5 μW m{sup -1} K{sup -2}), respectively. The obtained electrical conductivity and thermoelectric properties of graphene-doped hybrid film are interestingly several orders higher than the pristine hybrid films. A thermocouple device fabricated utilizing the p- and n-type graphene-doped hybrid films can generate an electric voltage as high as 2.2 mV under a temperature difference between the hot-side and the cold-side terminal as only low as 55 K. This is equivalent to the output power as high as 24.2 nW (for output

  13. Cadmium Telluride-Titanium Dioxide Nanocomposite for Photodegradation of Organic Substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontam, Areeporn; Khaorapapong, Nithima; Ogawa, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium telluride-titanium dioxide nanocomposite was prepared by hydrothermal reaction of sol-gel derived titanium dioxide and organically modified cadmium telluride. The crystallinity of titanium dioxide in the nanocomposite was higher than that of pure titanium dioxide obtained by the reaction under the same temperature and pressure conditions, showing that cadmium telluride induced the crystallization of titanium dioxide. Diffuse reflectance spectrum of the nanocomposite showed the higher absorption efficiency in the UV-visible region due to band-gap excitation of titanium dioxide. The nanocomposite significantly showed the improvement of photocatalytic activity for 4-chlorophenol with UV light.

  14. Preparation and study of the properties of lead telluride and cadmium telluride diodes for use in nuclear spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancon, R.

    1969-01-01

    This work studies the possibility of using high atomic number compound semiconductors, like lead telluride and cadmium telluride as to realize nuclear radiation detectors, specially in gamma ray spectrometry because of their high absorption coefficient. The problems related to the preparation of binary compounds are exposed. Experiments on PbTe show the influence of the conditions of preparation on the electrical properties of the semiconductor which are greatly dependent on the stoichiometry of the compound. PbTe surface-barrier diodes were realized and have been used to study the surface properties of this semiconductor. These diodes cannot detect nuclear radiations because of the too weak resistivity of our material. Different types of devices made of Cd Te have been studied. One of these diodes has been used as an alpha particle detector. We explain the relative poor performances of that detector by the presence of lattice defects in Cd Te where charge carriers may recombine themselves. By analysing the properties of gold diffused Cd Te diodes we identified this defect, the cadmium vacancy, the presence of which is due to the deviation from stoichiometry during the preparation of the material. (author) [fr

  15. Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) photovoltaic devices made using multistep selenization of nanocrystal films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Taylor B; Mori, Isao; Stolle, C Jackson; Bogart, Timothy D; Ostrowski, David P; Glaz, Micah S; Du, Jiang; Pernik, Douglas R; Akhavan, Vahid A; Kesrouani, Hady; Vanden Bout, David A; Korgel, Brian A

    2013-09-25

    The power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic devices made with ink-deposited Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2 (CIGS) nanocrystal layers can be enhanced by sintering the nanocrystals with a high temperature selenization process. This process, however, can be challenging to control. Here, we report that ink deposition followed by annealing under inert gas and then selenization can provide better control over CIGS nanocrystal sintering and yield generally improved device efficiency. Annealing under argon at 525 °C removes organic ligands and diffuses sodium from the underlying soda lime glass into the Mo back contact to improve the rate and quality of nanocrystal sintering during selenization at 500 °C. Shorter selenization time alleviates excessive MoSe2 formation at the Mo back contact that leads to film delamination, which in turn enables multiple cycles of nanocrystal deposition and selenization to create thicker, more uniform absorber films. Devices with power conversion efficiency greater than 7% are fabricated using the multiple step nanocrystal deposition and sintering process.

  16. Colloidal nanocrystals in epitactical semiconductor structures; Kolloidale Nanokristalle in epitaktischen Halbleiterstrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arens, C.

    2007-10-15

    in this thesis for the first time a new method for the fabrication of semiconductor quantum-dot structures was successfully applied. thereby colloidal CdSe nanocrystals have been imbedded by means of molecular-beam epitaxy into an epitactical ZnSe crystal matrix. The properties of the epitactically overgrown nanocrystals are elaborated in this thesis. The distribution of the nanocrystals on ZnSe surfaces dependes on the stressed state of the ZnSe layer. Nanocrystals on stressed ZnSe grow in agglomerates on its surface. Individual nanocrystals however can only be deposited on relaxed ZnSe. In-situ studies by means of reflection of high-energetically diffracted electrons show in both cases that under stoichiometrical conditions the ZnSe covering layer grows two-dimensionally. It is epitactic what is proved by means of highly resolving X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The nanocrystals are after the overgrowth with ZnSe optically activ.

  17. Acoustic study of nano-crystal embedded PbO–P2O5 glass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    properties of nano-crystal embedded glass matrix have attracted attention of technologists as well as scientists for fabrication of glass ceramic through controlled crysta- llization. ... To ensure the complete forma- tion of crystal phases one of the glass samples was heat- treated for a period of 2 h at 673 K which is above the.

  18. Comparative properties of cellulose nano-crystals from native and mercerized cotton fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable aqueous suspensions of cellulose nano-crystals (CNCs) were fabricated from both native and mercerized cotton fibers by sulfuric acid hydrolysis, followed by high-pressure homogenization. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry and Wide-angle X-Ray Diffraction data showed that the fibers had b...

  19. High efficiency cadmium telluride and zinc telluride based thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, A.; Sudharsanan, R.; Ringel, S.A.; Chou, H.C. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1992-10-01

    This report describes work to improve the basic understanding of CdTe and ZnTe alloys by growing and characterizing these films along with cell fabrication. The major objective was to develop wide-band-gap (1.6--1.8 eV) material for the top cell, along with compatible window material and transparent ohmic contacts, so that a cascade cell design can be optimized. Front-wall solar cells were fabricated with a glass/SnO{sub 2}/CdS window, where the CdS film is thin to maximize transmission and current. Wide-band-gap absorber films (E{sub g} = 1.75 eV) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) techniques, which provided excellent control for tailoring the film composition and properties. CdZnTe films were grown by both MBE and MOCVD. All the as-grown films were characterized by several techniques (surface photovoltage spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) for composition, bulk uniformity, thickness, and film and interface quality. Front-wall-type solar cells were fabricated in collaboration with Ametek Materials Research Laboratory using CdTe and CdZnTe polycrystalline absorber films. The effects of processing on ternary film were studied by AES and XPS coupled with capacitance voltage and current voltage measurements as a function of temperature. Bias-dependent spectral response and electrical measurements were used to test some models in order to identify and quantify dominant loss mechanisms.

  20. Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals in the Research Spotlight: Stability and Defect Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This Perspective outlines basic structural and optical properties of lead halide perovskite colloidal nanocrystals, highlighting differences and similarities between them and conventional II–VI and III–V semiconductor quantum dots. A detailed insight into two important issues inherent to lead halide perovskite nanocrystals then follows, namely, the advantages of defect tolerance and the necessity to improve their stability in environmental conditions. The defect tolerance of lead halide perovskites offers an impetus to search for similar attributes in other related heavy metal-free compounds. We discuss the origins of the significantly blue-shifted emission from CsPbBr3 nanocrystals and the synthetic strategies toward fabrication of stable perovskite nanocrystal materials with emission in the red and infrared parts of the optical spectrum, which are related to fabrication of mixed cation compounds guided by Goldschmidt tolerance factor considerations. We conclude with the view on perspectives of use of the colloidal perovskite nanocrystals for applications in backlighting of liquid-crystal TV displays. PMID:28920080

  1. Electrochemical Studies of Lead Telluride Behavior in Acidic Nitrate Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudnik E.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemistry of lead telluride stationary electrode was studied in nitric acid solutions of pH 1.5-3.0. E-pH diagram for Pb-Te-H2O system was calculated. Results of cyclic voltammetry of Pb, Te and PbTe were discussed in correlation with thermodynamic predictions. Anodic dissolution of PbTe electrode at potential approx. -100÷50 mV (SCE resulted in tellurium formation, while above 300 mV TeO2 was mainly produced. The latter could dissolve to HTeO+2 under acidic electrolyte, but it was inhibited by increased pH of the bath.

  2. Effect of thallium impurity on hole scattering in lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajdanov, V.I.; Nemov, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    Hole mobility in PbTe monocrystalline specimens in the temperature range from 4.2 to 300 K has been investigated. Detected is a sharp increase in scattering cross section of light and heavy holes in the specimens having the Hall hole concentration p approximately (5+-9)x10 19 cm -3 explained by resonant scattering into a band of quasilocal states of thallium located lower than the ceiling of heavy carrier zone by 0.01+-0.01 eV. Very large differences in resonant scattering of current carriers into the quasilocal states of In and Tl in PbTe result from the inertial polarizability of a crystal. The same mechanism is used to explain long-lived relaxation of zone electron concentration in lead telluride and Pbsub(1-x)Snsub(x)Te doped with indium [ru

  3. Effects of hydrazine on the solvothermal synthesis of Cu2ZnSnSe4 and Cu2CdSnSe4 nanocrystals for particle-based deposition of films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, Ming-Hung; Fu, Yaw-Shyan; Shih, Cheng-Hung; Kuo, Chun-Cheng; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Lin, Wen-Tai

    2013-01-01

    The effects of hydrazine on the synthesis of Cu 2 ZnSnSe 4 (CZTSe) and Cu 2 CdSnSe 4 (CCTSe) nanocrystals in an autoclave as a function of temperature and time were explored. On heating at 190 °C for 24-72 h, pure CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals could readily grow in the hydrazine-added solution, while in the hydrazine-free solution the intermediate phases such as ZnSe, Cu 2 Se, and Cu 2 SnSe 3 , and Cu 2 SnSe 3 and CdSe associated with the CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals grew, respectively. This result reveals that hydrazine can speed up the synthesis of pure CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals via a solvothermal process. The mechanisms for the hydrazine-enhanced growth of CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals were discussed. The pure CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals were subsequently fabricated to the smooth films by spin coating without further annealing in selenium atmosphere. This processing may be beneficial to the fabrication of the absorber layer for solar cells and thermoelectric devices. - Highlights: • Hydrazine enhances the growth of pure Cu 2 ZnSnSe 4 and Cu 2 CdSnSe 4 nanocrystals. • The nanocrystals can be fabricated to films by spin coating without annealing. • This solvothermal processing is promising for the fabrication of thin film devices

  4. Effects of hydrazine on the solvothermal synthesis of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}CdSnSe{sub 4} nanocrystals for particle-based deposition of films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Ming-Hung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China); Fu, Yaw-Shyan, E-mail: ysfu@mail.nutn.edu.tw [Department of Greenergy, National University of Tainan, Tainan, Taiwan 700 (China); Shih, Cheng-Hung; Kuo, Chun-Cheng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China); Guo, Tzung-Fang [Department of Photonics, Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China); Lin, Wen-Tai, E-mail: wtlin@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China)

    2013-10-01

    The effects of hydrazine on the synthesis of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} (CZTSe) and Cu{sub 2}CdSnSe{sub 4} (CCTSe) nanocrystals in an autoclave as a function of temperature and time were explored. On heating at 190 °C for 24-72 h, pure CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals could readily grow in the hydrazine-added solution, while in the hydrazine-free solution the intermediate phases such as ZnSe, Cu{sub 2}Se, and Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3}, and Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3} and CdSe associated with the CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals grew, respectively. This result reveals that hydrazine can speed up the synthesis of pure CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals via a solvothermal process. The mechanisms for the hydrazine-enhanced growth of CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals were discussed. The pure CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals were subsequently fabricated to the smooth films by spin coating without further annealing in selenium atmosphere. This processing may be beneficial to the fabrication of the absorber layer for solar cells and thermoelectric devices. - Highlights: • Hydrazine enhances the growth of pure Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}CdSnSe{sub 4} nanocrystals. • The nanocrystals can be fabricated to films by spin coating without annealing. • This solvothermal processing is promising for the fabrication of thin film devices.

  5. Nanocrystals for luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Liam R; Knowles, Kathryn E; McDowall, Stephen; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2015-02-11

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) harvest sunlight over large areas and concentrate this energy onto photovoltaics or for other uses by transporting photons through macroscopic waveguides. Although attractive for lowering solar energy costs, LSCs remain severely limited by luminophore reabsorption losses. Here, we report a quantitative comparison of four types of nanocrystal (NC) phosphors recently proposed to minimize reabsorption in large-scale LSCs: two nanocrystal heterostructures and two doped nanocrystals. Experimental and numerical analyses both show that even the small core absorption of the leading NC heterostructures causes major reabsorption losses at relatively short transport lengths. Doped NCs outperform the heterostructures substantially in this critical property. A new LSC phosphor is introduced, nanocrystalline Cd(1-x)Cu(x)Se, that outperforms all other leading NCs by a significant margin in both small- and large-scale LSCs under full-spectrum conditions.

  6. Nanocrystal assembly for tandem catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor; Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-14

    The present invention provides a nanocrystal tandem catalyst comprising at least two metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. One embodiment utilizes a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling sub-10 nm platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO.sub.2--Pt and Pt--SiO.sub.2, can be used to catalyze two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO.sub.2--Pt interface catalyzed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H.sub.2, which were then subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalyzed by the nearby Pt--SiO.sub.2 interface. Consequently, propanal was selectively produced on this nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst.

  7. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modification affect the biodistribution of nanocrystals. Ligand conjugation and stimuli-responsive polymers can also be used to target nanocrystals to specific pathogenic sites. In this review, the progress on injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery is discussed following a brief introduction to nanocrystal preparation methods, i.e., top-down and bottom-up technologies.

  8. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-06-28

    Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.

  9. Micro- and nanocrystals of organic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongjin; Hu, Wenping; Liu, Yunqi; Zhu, Daoben

    2010-04-20

    Organic semiconductors have attracted wide attention in recent decades, resulting in the rapid development of organic electronics. For example, the solution processibility of organic semiconductors allows researchers to use unconventional deposition methods (such as inkjet printing and stamping) to fabricate large area devices at low cost. The mechanical properties of organic semiconductors also allow for flexible electronics. However, the most distinguishing feature of organic semiconductors is their chemical versatility, which permits the incorporation of functionalities through molecular design. However, key scientific challenges remain before organic electronics technology can advance further, including both the materials' low charge carrier mobility and researchers' limited knowledge of structure-property relationships in organic semiconductors. We expect that high-quality organic single crystals could overcome these challenges: their purity and long-range ordered molecular packing ensure high device performance and facilitate the study of structure-property relationships. Micro- and nanoscale organic crystals could offer practical advantages compared with their larger counterparts. First, growing small crystals conserves materials and saves time. Second, devices based on the smaller crystals could maintain the functional advantages of larger organic single crystals but would avoid the growth of large crystals, leading to the more efficient characterization of organic semiconductors. Third, the effective use of small crystals could allow researchers to integrate these materials into micro- and nanoelectronic devices using a "bottom-up" approach. Finally, unique properties of crystals at micro- and nanometer scale lead to new applications, such as flexible electronics. In this Account, we focus on organic micro- and nanocrystals, including their design, the controllable growth of crystals, and structure-property studies. We have also fabricated devices and

  10. PbSe Nanocrystal Excitonic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Joshua J.

    2009-11-11

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of colloidal PbSe nanocrystal (NC)-based photovoltaic test structures that exhibit an excitonic solar cell mechanism. Charge extraction from the NC active layer is driven by a photoinduced chemical potential energy gradient at the nanostructured heterojunction. By minimizing perturbation to PbSe NC energy levels and thereby gaining insight into the "intrinsic" photovoltaic properties and charge transfer mechanism of PbSe NC, we show a direct correlation between interfacial energy level offsets and photovoltaic device performance. Size dependent PbSe NC energy levels were determined by cyclic voltammetry and optical spectroscopy and correlated to photovoltaic measurements. Photovoltaic test structures were fabricated from PbSe NC films sandwiched between layers of ZnO nanoparticles and PEDOT:PSS as electron and hole transporting elements, respectively. The device current-voltage characteristics suggest a charge separation mechanism that Is distinct from previously reported Schottky devices and consistent with signatures of excitonic solar cells. Remarkably, despite the limitation of planar junction structure, and without film thickness optimization, the best performing device shows a 1-sun power conversion efficiency of 3.4%, ranking among the highest performing NC-based solar cells reported to date. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  11. 2011 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai-Sheng Wang

    2011-07-29

    Small particles have been at the heart of nanoscience since the birth of the field and now stand ready to make significant contributions to the big challenges of energy, health and sustainability. Atomic clusters show exquisite size-dependent electronic and magnetic properties and offer a new level of control in catalyses, sensors and biochips; functionalised nanocrystals offer remarkable optical properties and diverse applications in electronic devices, solar energy, and therapy. Both areas are complemented by a raft of recent advances in fabrication, characterization, and performance of a diversity of nanomaterials from the single atom level to nanowires, nanodevices, and biologically-inspired nanosystems. The goal of the 2011 Gordon Conference is thus to continue and enhance the interdisciplinary tradition of this series and discuss the most recent advances, fundamental scientific questions, and emerging applications of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. A single conference covering all aspects of nanoscience from fundamental issues to applications has the potential to create new ideas and stimulate cross fertilization. The meeting will therefore provide a balance among the three sub-components of the conference, true to its title, with a selection of new topics added to reflect rapid advances in the field. The open atmosphere of a Gordon conference, emphasizing the presentation of unpublished results and extensive discussions, is an ideal home for this rapidly developing field and will allow all participants to enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Historically, this Gordon conference has been oversubscribed, so we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral presentations. Given the

  12. Synthesis and Manipulation of Semiconductor Nanocrystals inMicrofluidic Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Emory Ming-Yue [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Microfluidic reactors are investigated as a mechanism tocontrol the growth of semiconductor nanocrystals and characterize thestructural evolution of colloidal quantum dots. Due to their shortdiffusion lengths, low thermal masses, and predictable fluid dynamics,microfluidic devices can be used to quickly and reproducibly alterreaction conditions such as concentration, temperature, and reactiontime, while allowing for rapid reagent mixing and productcharacterization. These features are particularly useful for colloidalnanocrystal reactions, which scale poorly and are difficult to controland characterize in bulk fluids. To demonstrate the capabilities ofnanoparticle microreactors, a size series of spherical CdSe nanocrystalswas synthesized at high temperature in a continuous-flow, microfabricatedglass reactor. Nanocrystal diameters are reproducibly controlled bysystematically altering reaction parameters such as the temperature,concentration, and reaction time. Microreactors with finer control overtemperature and reagent mixing were designed to synthesize nanoparticlesof different shapes, such as rods, tetrapods, and hollow shells. The twomajor challenges observed with continuous flow reactors are thedeposition of particles on channel walls and the broad distribution ofresidence times that result from laminar flow. To alleviate theseproblems, I designed and fabricated liquid-liquid segmented flowmicroreactors in which the reaction precursors are encapsulated inflowing droplets suspended in an immiscible carrier fluid. The synthesisof CdSe nanocrystals in such microreactors exhibited reduced depositionand residence time distributions while enabling the rapid screening aseries of samples isolated in nL droplets. Microfluidic reactors werealso designed to modify the composition of existing nanocrystals andcharacterize the kinetics of such reactions. The millisecond kinetics ofthe CdSe-to-Ag2Se nanocrystal cation exchange reaction are measured insitu with micro

  13. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; E.Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Samorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-24

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO2-Pt and Pt-SiO2, can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO2-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H2, which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO2 interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts

  14. Carrier multiplication in germanium nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeed, S.; de Weerd, C.; Stallinga, P.; Spoor, F.C.M.; Houtepen, A.J.; Siebbeles, L.D.A.; Gregorkiewicz, T.

    2015-01-01

    Carrier multiplication is demonstrated in a solid-state dispersion of germanium nanocrystals in a silicon-dioxide matrix. This is performed by comparing ultrafast photo-induced absorption transients at different pump photon energies below and above the threshold energy for this process. The average

  15. Modeling of the electrostatic coupling between nanocrystals of a disordered nanocrystal floating gate memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armeanu, Dumitru; Leroy, Yann; Cordan, Anne-Sophie

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a realistic model that explicitly takes into account the electrostatic coupling between the nanocrystals of a disordered layer constituting the floating gate of a non-volatile memory. A statistical study of the neighborhood of a given nanocrystal is carried out, leading to the mean number of neighboring nanocrystals as a function of the radius of the central nanocrystal. We show that the empty neighborhood of every nanocrystal can be represented by an equivalent torus ring in the previous model of a single nanocrystal. Then the effects of charged nanocrystals are taken into account by an appropriate rigid shift of the energy levels of the central nanocrystal. The proposed model is validated by statistical comparisons with exact 3D computations, and the influence of the electrostatic coupling is analyzed and discussed. (paper)

  16. Nanocrystals distribution inside the writing lines in a glass matrix using Argon laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro-González, P; Martín, I R; Creus, Alberto Hernández

    2010-01-18

    Localized modification in strontium barium niobate glass doped with Ho(3+) under laser irradiation has been carried out. The preliminary samples of this study have been fabricated by the melt quenching method and doped with 2.5% mol of Ho(3+). A 3.5W cw multiline Ar-laser has been focused and shifted in a line during laser irradiation. The formation of Strontium Barium Niobate nanocrystals has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscope image and fluorescence. They have been localized in the irradiation line and change the optical properties of the sample. These nanocrystals have been obtained due to the excitation of the Ho(3+) ions which under nonradiative processes produced the heating of the sample. In this work, it has been demonstrated that the diffusion of the Nb(5+) ions to the border of the irradiated line controls the growth of the nanocrystals in the sample.

  17. Raman Spectroscopy of SiO{sub 2}–Na{sub 2}O–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass doped with Nd{sup 3+} and CdS nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serqueira, E.O.; Dantas, N.O. [Laboratório de Novos Materiais Isolantes e Semicondutores (LNMIS), Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG 38400-902 (Brazil); Anjos, V. [Grupo de Espectroscopia de Materiais, Departamento de Física, ICE – UFJF, Campus Universitário, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-330 (Brazil); Bell, M.J.V., E-mail: mjvbell@yahoo.com.br [Grupo de Espectroscopia de Materiais, Departamento de Física, ICE – UFJF, Campus Universitário, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-330 (Brazil)

    2014-01-05

    Highlights: • The formation of CdS nanocrystals in the glassy host is shown by Raman measurements. • Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} modifies the growth of CdS nanocrystals in the SNAB glass. • Nd{sup 3+} ions are not incorporated inside the semiconductor nanocrystals. -- Abstract: We report the Raman spectroscopic characterization of a SNAB glass system doped with neodymium and CdS nanocrystals and fabricated by the fusion process. Raman spectra revealed CdS nanocrystals in the glass host and bands associated with Si–O vibrational modes with five structural configurations, boroxol modes of B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al–O and Cd–S vibrational modes. Additionally, Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} modifies the growth of CdS nanocrystals in the SNAB glass and Nd{sup 3+} ions are not incorporated inside the semiconductor nanocrystals.

  18. Phase transitions and doping in semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Ayaskanta

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals are a promising technological material because their size-dependent optical and electronic properties can be exploited for a diverse range of applications such as light-emitting diodes, bio-labels, transistors, and solar cells. For many of these applications, electrical current needs to be transported through the devices. However, while their solution processability makes these colloidal nanocrystals attractive candidates for device applications, the bulky surfactants that render these nanocrystals dispersible in common solvents block electrical current. Thus, in order to realize the full potential of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals in the next-generation of solid-state devices, methods must be devised to make conductive films from these nanocrystals. One way to achieve this would be to add minute amounts of foreign impurity atoms (dopants) to increase their conductivity. Electronic doping in nanocrystals is still very much in its infancy with limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms that govern the doping process. This thesis introduces an innovative synthesis of doped nanocrystals and aims at expanding the fundamental understanding of charge transport in these doped nanocrystal films. The list of semiconductor nanocrystals that can be doped is large, and if one combines that with available dopants, an even larger set of materials with interesting properties and applications can be generated. In addition to doping, another promising route to increase conductivity in nanocrystal films is to use nanocrystals with high ionic conductivities. This thesis also examines this possibility by studying new phases of mixed ionic and electronic conductors at the nanoscale. Such a versatile approach may open new pathways for interesting fundamental research, and also lay the foundation for the creation of novel materials with important applications. In addition to their size-dependence, the intentional incorporation of

  19. Synthesis of octopus-tentacle-like Cu nanowire-Ag nanocrystals heterostructures and their enhanced electrocatalytic performance for oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Min; Liu, Suli; Zhang, Linyan; Zhang, Can; Tu, Wenwen; Dai, Zhihui; Bao, Jianchun

    2012-12-01

    In this article, the novel octopus-tentacle-like Cu nanowire-Ag nanocrystals heterostructures have been fabricated in solution phase via heterogeneous nucleation and growth of Ag nanocrystals on presynthesized Cu nanowires. The growth environment and dynamic factors of Ag nanocrystals play an important role for formation of such heterostructures. Combined the physical constants of Cu and Ag with a series of control experiments, the epitaxial growth means of Ag nanocrystals on Cu nanowire is found to abide by "layer-plus-island" (Stranski-Krastanow) mode. Because of the presence of multiple junctions and strong synergistic effect of their constituents, the obtained heterostructures exhibit greatly enhanced electrocatalytic performance toward oxygen reduction reaction compared with that of pure Ag nanocrystals, Cu nanowires, and mechanically mixed dual components as well as recently reported some non-Pt materials, which can be served as an alternative cathodic electrocatalyst to apply in alkaline fuel cells. Moreover, our method can be extended to fabricate octopus-tentacle-like Cu nanowire-Au nanocrystals and Cu nanowire-Pd nanocrystals heterostructures.

  20. Embedded silicon nanocrystal interface structure and strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Bhamy Maithry; Hegde, G. M.; Mahapatra, D. Roy

    2018-01-01

    The structure of nanocrystal-matrix interface and strain in embedded nanocrystals are studied using large-scale atomistic simulations, with the examples of Si nanocrystal embedded in amorphous matrix of SiO2. Photoluminescence from silicon nanocrystals embedded in a dielectric matrix like SiO2 and Si3N4 are promising for Si-based optical devices. The nanocrystal-matrix interface plays a crucial role in understanding its optical and electrical properties. Nanocrystals with diameters varying from 2.17 to 4.56 nm are studied. A detailed quantitative analysis of the variation of Si/SiO2 interface structure and strain distribution with nanocrystal diameter is reported. A linear variation of the interface width with nanocrystal diameter is observed with thinner interfaces for larger nanocrystals. Local deformation analysis reveals that the smaller nanocrystals are highly strained, whereas the strain in the larger ones shifts to the interface. This is in accordance with observed increase in total percentage of defect states in the interface from 39 to 70 % for diameter increasing from 2.17 to 4.56 nm. Moreover, based on the atomic arrangements at the interface, optically active defects like Pb centres, E centres and non-bridging oxygen centres are identified and a dominance of Pb centres is observed for all the nanocrystals. The detailed structural characterization-related investigations using the proposed simulation approach will find useful application in designing system-level response of embedded nanocrystals and also to correlate various experimental observations.

  1. Brief review of cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başol, Bülent M.; McCandless, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is the most commercially successful thin-film photovoltaic technology. Development of CdTe as a solar cell material dates back to the early 1980s when ˜10% efficient devices were demonstrated. Implementation of better quality glass, more transparent conductive oxides, introduction of a high-resistivity transparent film under the CdS junction-partner, higher deposition temperatures, and improved Cl-treatment, doping, and contacting approaches yielded >16% efficient cells in the early 2000s. Around the same time period, use of a photoresist plug monolithic integration process facilitated the demonstration of the first 11% efficient module. The most dramatic advancements in CdTe device efficiencies were made during the 2013 to 2014 time frame when small-area cell conversion efficiency was raised to 20% range and a champion module efficiency of 17% was reported. CdTe technology is attractive in terms of its limited life-cycle greenhouse gas and heavy metal emissions, small carbon footprint, and short energy payback times. Limited Te availability is a challenge for the growth of this technology unless Te utilization rates are greatly enhanced along with device efficiencies.

  2. Enhancement of the thermoelectric performance of oxygen substituted bismuth telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Quang, Tran; Kim, Miyoung

    2017-12-01

    We carried out first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and the semi-classical Boltzmann transport theory to study the effect of oxygen substitution on the electronic structure and thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride. The newly formed compound, Bi2O2Te, is found to be a narrow bandgap semiconductor with the bandgap of Eg = 0.13 eV. The presence of a flat band close to the valence band maximum gives rise to a steep slope of density of states near Fermi energy, leading to a significant enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient. As a result, the thermoelectric power factor of Bi2O2Te is significantly improved by controlling the carrier concentration, and the maximum power factor increased with temperature. Assuming the experiment-thermal conductivity, Bi2O2Te exhibits a high figure of merit of ZT ˜1.27 around 600 K for the p-type doping, which matches or exceeds ZT of the state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials in this temperature range. This suggests that Bi2O2Te with p-type doping is a new promising material for use in the moderate-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion.

  3. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid.

  4. Theoretical study of bismuth-doped cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez-Proupin, E.; Rios-Gonzalez, J. A.; Pena, J. L.

    Cadmium telluride heavily doped with bismuth has been proposed as an absorber with an intermediate band for solar cells. Increase in the photocurrent has been shown recently, although the overall cell efficiency has not improved. In this work, we study the electronic structure and the formation energies of the defects associated to bismuth impurities. We have performed electronic structure calculations within generalized density functional theory, using the exchange-correlation functional HSE(w) , where the range-separation parameter w has been tuned to reproduce the CdTe bandgap. Improving upon previous reports, we have included the spin-orbit interaction, which modifies the structure of the valence band and the energy levels of bismuth. We have found that interstitial Bi (Bii) tends to occupy Cd vacancies, cadmium substitution (BiCd) creates single donor level, while tellurium substitution (BiTe) is a shallow single acceptor. We investigate the interaction between these point defects and how can they be combined to create a partially filled intermediate band. Supported by FONDECYT Grant 1130437, CONACYT-SENER SUSTENTABILIDAD ENERGETICA/project CeMIE-Sol PY-207450/25 and PY-207450/26. JARG acknowledges CONACYT fellowship for research visit. Powered@NLHPC (ECM-02).

  5. Mechanical properties of thermoelectric lanthanum telluride from quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guodong; Aydemir, Umut; Wood, Max; Goddard, William A., III; Zhai, Pengcheng; Zhang, Qingjie; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2017-07-01

    Lanthanum telluride (La3Te4) is an n-type high-performance thermoelectric material in the high temperature range, but its mechanical properties remain unknown. Since we want robust mechanical properties for their integration into industrial applications, we report here quantum mechanics (QM) simulations to determine the ideal strength and deformation mechanisms of La3Te4 under pure shear deformations. Among all plausible shear deformation paths, we find that shearing along the (0 0 1)/ slip system has the lowest ideal shear strength of 0.99 GPa, making it the most likely slip system to be activated under pressure. We find that the long range La-Te ionic interactions play the predominant role in resisting shear deformation. To enhance the mechanical strength, we suggest improving the long ionic La-Te bond stiffness to strengthen the ionic La-Te framework in La3Te4 by a defect-engineering strategy, such as partial substitution of La by Ce or Pr having isotypic crystal structures. This work provides the fundamental information to understand the intrinsic mechanics of La3Te4.

  6. A cadmium-zinc-telluride crystal array spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, H. R.; Quam, W.; DeVore, T.; Vogle, R.; Weslowski, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a gamma detector employing an array of eight cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) crystals configured as a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer. This detector is part of a more complex instrument that identifies the isotope,displays this information, and records the gamma spectrum. Various alarms and other operator features are incorporated in this battery operated rugged instrument. The CZT detector is the key component of this instrument and will be described in detail in this paper. We have made extensive spectral measurements of the usual laboratory gamma sources, common medical isotopes, and various Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) with this detector. Some of these data will be presented as spectra. We will also present energy resolution and detection efficiency for the basic 8-crystal array. Additional data will also be presented for a 32-crystal array. The basic 8-crystal array development was completed two years ago, and the system electronic design has been imp roved recently. This has resulted in significantly improved noise performance. We expect to have a much smaller detector package, using 8 crystals, in a few months. This package will use flip-chip packaging to reduce the electronics physical size by a factor of 5

  7. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid. PMID:27966540

  8. Process dependent thermoelectric properties of EDTA assisted bismuth telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulsi, Chiranjit; Banerjee, Dipali, E-mail: dipalibanerjeebesu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah-711103, West Bengal (India); Kargupta, Kajari [Chemical Engineering Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata-700032, West Bengal (India)

    2016-04-13

    Comparison between the structure and thermoelectric properties of EDTA (Ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid) assisted bismuth telluride prepared by electrochemical deposition and hydrothermal route is reported in the present work. The prepared samples have been structurally characterized by high resolution X-ray diffraction spectra (HRXRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopic images (HRTEM). Crystallite size and strain have been determined from Williamson-Hall plot of XRD which is in conformity with TEM images. Measurement of transport properties show sample in the pellet form (S{sub 1}) prepared via hydrothermal route has higher value of thermoelectric power (S) than the electrodeposited film (S{sub 2}). But due to a substantial increase in the electrical conductivity (σ) of the film (S{sub 2}) over the pellet (S{sub 1}), the power factor and the figure of merit is higher for sample S{sub 2} than the sample S{sub 1} at room temperature.

  9. Precision timing detectors with cadmium-telluride sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornheim, A.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Precision timing detectors for high energy physics experiments with temporal resolutions of a few 10 ps are of pivotal importance to master the challenges posed by the highest energy particle accelerators such as the LHC. Calorimetric timing measurements have been a focus of recent research, enabled by exploiting the temporal coherence of electromagnetic showers. Scintillating crystals with high light yield as well as silicon sensors are viable sensitive materials for sampling calorimeters. Silicon sensors have very high efficiency for charged particles. However, their sensitivity to photons, which comprise a large fraction of the electromagnetic shower, is limited. To enhance the efficiency of detecting photons, materials with higher atomic numbers than silicon are preferable. In this paper we present test beam measurements with a Cadmium-Telluride (CdTe) sensor as the active element of a secondary emission calorimeter with focus on the timing performance of the detector. A Schottky type CdTe sensor with an active area of 1cm2 and a thickness of 1 mm is used in an arrangement with tungsten and lead absorbers. Measurements are performed with electron beams in the energy range from 2 GeV to 200 GeV. A timing resolution of 20 ps is achieved under the best conditions.

  10. Facile one-step synthesis and transformation of Cu(I)-doped zinc sulfide nanocrystals to Cu(1.94)S-ZnS heterostructured nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Haihang; Tang, Aiwei; Huang, Liming; Wang, Yu; Yang, Chunhe; Hou, Yanbing; Peng, Hongshang; Zhang, Fujun; Teng, Feng

    2013-07-09

    A facile one-pot heating process without any injection has been developed to synthesize different Cu-Zn-S-based nanocrystals. The composition of the products evolves from Cu(I)-doped ZnS (ZnS:Cu(I)) nanocrystals into heterostructured nanocrystals consisting of monoclinic Cu1.94S and wurtzite ZnS just by controlling the molar ratios of zinc acetylacetonate (Zn(acac)2) to copper acetylacetonate (Cu(acac)2) in the mixture of n-dodecanethiol (DDT) and 1-octadecene (ODE). Accompanying the composition transformation, the crystal phase of ZnS is changed from cubic zinc blende to hexagonal wurtzite. Depending on the synthetic parameters including the reaction time, temperature, and the feeding ratios of Zn/Cu precursors, the morphology of the as-obtained heterostructured nanocrystals can be controlled in the forms of taper-like, matchstick-like, tadpole-like, or rod-like. Interestingly, when the molar ratio of Cu(acac)2 to Zn(acac)2 is increased to 9:1, the crystal phase of the products is transformed from monoclinic Cu1.94S to the mixed phase composed of cubic Cu1.8S and tetragonal Cu1.81S as the reaction time is further prolonged. The crystal-phase transformation results in the morphological change from quasi-spherical to rice shape due to the incorporation of Zn ions into the Cu1.94S matrix. This method provides a simple but highly reproducible approach for synthesis of Cu(I)-doped nanocrystals and heterostructured nanocrystals, which are potentially useful in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices.

  11. Electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended inliquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hongjian; Guo, Jinghua; Yin, Yadong; Augustsson, Andreas; Dong, Chungli; Nordgren, Joseph; Chang, Chinglin; Alivisatos, Paul; Thornton, Geoff; Ogletree, D. Frank; Requejo, Felix G.; de Groot, Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2007-07-16

    The electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended in liquid as a function of size has been investigated using in-situ x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. A sharp absorption peak associated with the ligand molecules is found that increases in intensity upon reducing the nanocrystal size. X-ray Raman features due to d-d and to charge-transfer excitations of ligand molecules are identified. The study reveals the local symmetry of the surface of {var_epsilon}-Co phase nanocrystals, which originates from a dynamic interaction between Co nanocrystals and surfactant + solvent molecules.

  12. 76 FR 46288 - Adequacy Determination for Colorado Springs, Cañon City, Greeley, Pagosa Springs, and Telluride...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ... Springs, Ca[ntilde]on City, Greeley, Pagosa Springs, and Telluride; Carbon Monoxide and PM 10 Maintenance... transportation conformity purposes: ``Revised Carbon Monoxide Attainment/Maintenance Plan Colorado Springs... Springs Attainment/Maintenance Area,'' and ``Revised PM10 Attainment/Maintenance Plan Telluride [[Page...

  13. Solution processing of next-generation nanocrystal solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Embden, J.; Chesman, A. S. R.; Duffy, N. W.; Della Gaspera, E.; Jasieniak, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Next-generation solar cells will be fabricated from low-cost and earth abundant elements, using processes that are amenable to printing on a variety of light-weight substrates. The utilization of compositionally and structurally controlled colloidal nanocrystals as building blocks for such devices fulfills these criteria. Our recent efforts in developing kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals, one of the most promising materials to emerge in this area, enable the deposition of CZTS thin-films directly from a variety of solution-processed methods. Nanocrystalline thin films possess poor electronic properties, which precludes their use in solar cell devices. In order to overcome this, thermal treatment steps under an atmosphere of vaporous selenium are applied to induce large scale crystallite growth and the production of selenized CZTSSe films. This process results in a highly photoactive p-type layer. The n-type cadmium sulfide layer is also deposited from solution using chemical bath deposition. We will discuss each of these accomplishments in detail, highlighting the significant challenges that need to be overcome in order to fabricate working CZTSSe thin film solar cells.

  14. Optical gain in silicon nanocrystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pelant, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 208, č. 3 (2011), s. 625-630 ISSN 1862-6300 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA101120804; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : experimental approach * luminescence * nanocrystals * optical gain * silicon Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.463, year: 2011

  15. Special features of self-compensation of halogen donor action in lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajdanov, V.I.; Nemov, S.A.; Ravich, Yu.I.; Dereza, A.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    Specific features of self-compensation of halogen donor action in lead telluride are investigasted. Lead telluride samples with chlorine additions (with tellurium excess) and, besides, with bromine- and iodine additions were studied in order to reveal general regularities in alloyind with all halogen donor impurities. Experimental dependences of the difference between the electron and hole concentrations (n-p) in PbTe as a function of an amount of introduced halogen impurities (Ni) are presented for samples with a maximum compensation at 295 K. General features of the n-p=f(Ni) dependence are presented for all halogens. The hypothesis on the kinetic mechanism of increasing the efficiency of self-compensation of halogen donor action in lead telluride is suggested

  16. Thermal conductivity of silicon nanocrystals and polystyrene nanocomposite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juangsa, Firman Bagja; Muroya, Yoshiki; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Ryu, Meguya; Morikawa, Junko

    2016-01-01

    Silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) are well known for their size-dependent optical and electronic properties; they also have the potential for low yet controllable thermal properties. As a silicon-based low-thermal conductivity material is required in microdevice applications, SiNCs can be utilized for thermal insulation. In this paper, SiNCs and polymer nanocomposites were produced, and their thermal conductivity, including the density and specific heat, was measured. Measurement results were compared with thermal conductivity models for composite materials, and the comparison shows a decreasing value of the thermal conductivity, indicating the effect of the size and presence of the nanostructure on the thermal conductivity. Moreover, employing silicon inks at room temperature during the fabrication process enables a low cost of fabrication and preserves the unique properties of SiNCs. (paper)

  17. A GREENER SYNTHESIS OF CORE (FE, CU)-SHELL (AU, PT, PD AND AG) NANOCRYSTALS USING AQUEOUS VITAMIN C

    Science.gov (United States)

    A greener method to fabricate the novel core (Fe and Cu)-shell (noble metals) metal nanocrystals using aqueous ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is described. Transition metal salts such as Cu and Fe were reduced using ascorbic acid, a benign naturally available antioxidant, and then add...

  18. A method and device for generating semi-insulating cadmium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marfaing, Yves; Triboulet, Robert; Marfaing, Gerard; Cornet, Alain; Siffert, Paul.

    1973-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and a device for preparing cadmium telluride in precise stoichiometric proportions. The invention consists in carrying out a series of three syntheses and re-crystallizations of cadmium telluride starting from a mixture in stoichiometric proportions, the last two crystallization steps being characterized in that one of them is carried out at high temperature whereas the other is carried out at a lower temperature, in the presence of a tellurium bath so as to minimize crystal defects. This applies to the manufacture of diodes for ionization chambers, nuclear of infrared detectors and electro-optical modulators [fr

  19. Synthesis of diluted magnetic semiconductor Bi{sub 2−x}Mn{sub x}Te{sub 3} nanocrystals in a host glass matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, R.S. [Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Naturais e Educação (ICENE), Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, 38025-180 Uberaba, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Mikhail, H.D., E-mail: ricardosilva@fisica.uftm.edu.br [Instituto de Ciências Tecnológicas e Exatas (ICTE), Departamento de Engenharia Mecânica, Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, 38064-200 Uberaba, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Pavani, R. [Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Naturais e Educação (ICENE), Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, 38025-180 Uberaba, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Cano, N.F. [Departamento de Ciências do Mar, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, 11030-400 Santos, São Paulo (Brazil); Silva, A.C.A.; Dantas, N.O. [Instituto de Física, Laboratório de Novos Materiais Isolantes e Semicondutores (LNMIS), Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, 38400-902 Uberlândia, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-11-05

    Diluted magnetic semiconductors of manganese doped in bismuth-telluride nanocrystals (Bi{sub 2−x}Mn{sub x}Te{sub 3} NCs) were grown in a glass matrix and investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy/Magnetic Force Microscopy, and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. TEM images showed that the nanocrystals formed within the glass matrix were nearly spherical, with average sizes between 4 and 5 nm, and d{sub 015}-spacing of approximately 0.322 nm, which corresponds to the (015) interplanar distance in Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} bulk. The diffraction patterns showed that the diffraction peak associated with the (015) plane of the Bi{sub 2−x}Mn{sub x}Te{sub 3} nanocrystals shifts to larger diffraction angles as manganese (Mn) concentration increases, suggesting that the Mn{sup 2+} ions are substitutional defects occupying Bi sites (Mn{sub Bi}). AFM and MFM measurements showed magnetic phase contrast patterns, providing further evidence of Mn{sup 2+} ion incorporation in the nanocrystal structure. EPR signal of manganese ion incorporation and valence states in the crystalline structure of the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanocrystals confirmed the presence of the Mn{sup 2+} state. - Highlights: • Bi{sub 2−x}Mn{sub x}Te{sub 3} NCs were synthesized in a glass matrix by fusion method. • Transmission Electronic Microscopy shows the formation of Bi{sub 2−x}Mn{sub x}Te{sub 3} NCs. • The sp-d exchange interaction in DMS NCs can be evidenced by X Ray-Diffraction and Magnetic Force Microscopy. • Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectra confirmed that Mn{sup 2+} ions are located in two distinct Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} NCs sites.

  20. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shimon [Pinole, CA; Schlamp, Michael C [Plainsboro, NJ; Alivisatos, A Paul [Oakland, CA

    2011-09-27

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  1. Biomaterials supported CdS nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balu, Alina M.; Campelo, Juan M.; Luque, Rafael; Rajabi, Fatemeh; Romero, Antonio A.

    2010-01-01

    CdS quantum dot materials were prepared through a simple room temperature deposition of CdS nanocrystals on biomaterials including starch and chitosan. Materials obtained were found to contain differently distributed CdS nanocrystals on the surface of the biopolymers, making them potentially interesting for biomedical applications as contrast agents and/or in photocatalysis.

  2. Hollow nanocrystals and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivisatos, A Paul [Oakland, CA; Yin, Yadong [Moreno Valley, CA; Erdonmez, Can Kerem [Berkeley, CA

    2011-07-05

    Described herein are hollow nanocrystals having various shapes that can be produced by a simple chemical process. The hollow nanocrystals described herein may have a shell as thin as 0.5 nm and outside diameters that can be controlled by the process of making.

  3. Synthesis, spectroscopy and simulation of doped nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suyver, Jan Frederik

    2003-01-01

    This thesis deals with the properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (ZnS or ZnSe) in the size range (diameter) of 2 nm to 10 nm. The nanocrystals under investigation are doped with the transition metal ions manganese or copper. The goal is to study photoluminescence and electroluminescence from

  4. Formation of In x Ga1-x As nanocrystals in thin Si layers by ion implantation and flash lamp annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wutzler, Rene; Rebohle, Lars; Prucnal, Slawomir; Grenzer, Jörg; Hübner, René; Böttger, Roman; Skorupa, Wolfgang; Helm, Manfred

    2017-06-01

    The integration of high-mobility III-V compound semiconductors emerges as a promising route for Si device technologies to overcome the limits of further down-scaling. In this paper, a non-conventional approach of the combination of ion beam implantation with short-time flash lamp annealing is employed to fabricate In x Ga1-x As nanocrystals and to study their crystallization process in thin Si layers. The implantation fluence ratio of Ga and In ions has been varied to tailor the final nanocrystal composition. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction analyses verify the formation of ternary III-V nanocrystals within the Si layer. Transmission electron microscopy reveals single-crystalline precipitates with a low number of defects. A liquid epitaxy mechanism is used to describe the formation process of III-V nanocrystals after melting of the implanted thin Si layer by flash lamp annealing. The fabricated In x Ga1-x As nanocrystals are mainly Ga-rich with respect to the implanted Ga/In ratio.

  5. Stress-induced indirect to direct band gap transition in β-FeSi2 nanocrystals embedded in Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevlyagin, A. V.; Goroshko, D. L.; Chusovitin, E. A.; Balagan, S. A.; Dotsenko, S. A.; Galkin, K. N.; Galkin, N. G.; Shamirzaev, T. S.; Gutakovskii, A. K.; Iinuma, M.; Terai, Y.

    2017-09-01

    Embedded in silicon β-FeSi2 nanocrystals (NCs) were grown on Si(111) by solid phase epitaxy of a thin iron film followed by Si molecular beam epitaxy. After solid phase epitaxy, a mixture of β-FeSi2 and ɛ-FeSi nanocrystals is formed on the surface, sometimes β and ɛ phases coexist inside one nanocrystal. During initial stage of Si molecular beam epitaxy all ɛ-FeSi transforms into β-FeSi2. β-FeSi2 nanocrystals tend to move following Si growth front. By adjusting growth condition, we manage to prevent the nanocrystals from moving and to fabricate 7-layer n-Si(111)/β-FeSi2_NCs/p+-Si silicon heterostructure with embedded β-FeSi2 NCs. An epitaxial relationship and a stress induced in the nanocrystals by silicon matrix were found to be suitable for indirect to direct band gap transition in β-FeSi2. Of the heterostructure, a n-i-p avalanche photodetector and a light-emitting diode were formed. They have shown relatively good performance: ultrabroadband photoresponse from the visible (400 nm) to short-wavelength infrared (1800 nm) ranges owing to quantum-confined Stark effect in the nanocrystals and optical emission power of up to 25 µW at 9 A/cm2 with an external quantum efficiency of 0.009% at room temperature owing to a direct fundamental transition in stressed β-FeSi2 nanocrystals.

  6. Symmetry breaking during seeded growth of nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaohu; Xia, Younan

    2012-11-14

    Currently, most of the reported noble-metal nanocrystals are limited to a high level of symmetry, as constrained by the inherent, face-centered cubic (fcc) lattice of these metals. In this paper, we report, for the first time, a facile and versatile approach (backed up by a clear mechanistic understanding) for breaking the symmetry of an fcc lattice and thus obtaining nanocrystals with highly unsymmetrical shapes. The key strategy is to induce and direct the growth of nanocrystal seeds into unsymmetrical modes by manipulating the reduction kinetics. With silver as an example, we demonstrated that the diversity of possible shapes taken by noble-metal nanocrystals could be greatly expanded by incorporating a series of new shapes drastically deviated from the fcc lattice. This work provides a new method to investigate shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanocrystal.

  7. Measuring the Valence of Nanocrystal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Jonathan Scharle [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2016-11-30

    The goal of this project is to understand and control the interplay between nanocrystal stoichiometry, surface ligand binding and exchange, and the optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals in solution and in thin solid films. We pursued three research directions with this goal in mind: 1) We characterized nanocrystal stoichiometry and its influence on the binding of L-type and X-type ligands, including the thermodynamics of binding and the kinetics of ligand exchange. 2) We developed a quantitative understanding of the relationship between surface ligand passivation and photoluminescence quantum yield. 3) We developed methods to replace the organic ligands on the nanocrystal with halide ligands and controllably deposit these nanocrystals into thin films, where electrical measurements were used to investigate the electrical transport and internanocrystal electronic coupling.

  8. Post-CMOS FinFET integration of bismuth telluride and antimony telluride thin-film-based thermoelectric devices on SoI substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Aktakka, Ethem Erkan

    2013-10-01

    This letter reports, for the first time, heterogeneous integration of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) and antimony telluride (Sb 2Te3) thin-film-based thermoelectric ffect transistors) via a characterized TE-film coevaporationand shadow-mask patterning process using predeposition surface treatment methods for reduced TE-metal contact resistance. As a demonstration vehicle, a 2 × 2 mm2-sized integrated planar thermoelectric generator (TEG) is shown to harvest 0.7 μ W from 21-K temperature gradient. Transistor performance showed no significant change upon post-CMOS TEG integration, indicating, for the first time, the CMOS compatibility of the Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 thin films, which could be leveraged for realization of high-performance integrated micro-TE harvesters and coolers. © 2013 IEEE.

  9. Investigation of the Internal Electric Field in Cadmium Zinc Telluride Detectors Using the Pockels Effect and the Analysis of Charge Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groza, Michael; Krawczynski, Henic; Garson, Alfred, III; Martin, Jerrad W.; Lee, Kuen; Li, Qiang; Beilicke, Matthias; Cui, Yunlong; Buliga, Vladimir; Guo, Mingsheng; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Pockels electro-optic effect can be used to investigate the internal electric field in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) single crystals that are used to fabricate room temperature x and gamma radiation detectors. An agreement is found between the electric field mapping obtained from Pockels effect images and the measurements of charge transients generated by alpha particles. The Pockels effect images of a CZT detector along two mutually perpendicular directions are used to optimize the detector response in a dual anode configuration, a device in which the symmetry of the internal electric field with respect to the anode strips is of critical importance. The Pockels effect is also used to map the electric field in a CZT detector with dual anodes and an attempt is made to find a correlation with the simulated electric potential in such detectors. Finally, the stress-induced birefringence effects seen in the Pockels images are presented and discussed.

  10. Direct Ink Write (DIW) 3D Printed Cellulose Nanocrystal Aerogel Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Vincent Chi-Fung; Dunn, Conner K.; Zhang, Zhe; Deng, Yulin; Qi, H. Jerry

    2017-01-01

    Pure cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) aerogels with controlled 3D structures and inner pore architecture are printed using the direct ink write (DIW) technique. While traditional cellulosic aerogel processing approaches lack the ability to easily fabricate complete aerogel structures, DIW 3D printing followed by freeze drying can overcome this shortcoming and can produce CNC aerogels with minimal structural shrinkage or damage. The resultant products have great potential in applications such as ti...

  11. Fabrication and characterization of solid PbI2 nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasi, Gopi K; Dollahon, Norman R; Ahmadi, Temer S

    2007-01-01

    Lead iodide nanoparticles are synthesized in reverse micelle solution of AOT/H 2 O/n-heptane. Optical absorption spectra and TEM analysis indicated the formation of crystalline particles with an average radius of 1.5 nm, which is less than the Bohr radius of the exciton (1.9 nm) in bulk PbI 2 . Using theoretical models and optical spectra of quantum confined PbI 2 nanoparticles, a radius of 1.5 nm and a thickness of 1.7 nm was calculated, which are in full agreement with the TEM results. Particles were isolated from the dispersed medium and were analysed by powder XRD and Raman spectroscopy, indicating the formation of a predominantly 2H-PbI 2 polytype. This work presents the first case of fully isolated, fully characterized solid nanoparticles of PbI 2 . It also presents XRD and Raman spectrum for the first time for PbI 2 nanoparticles of intermediate quantum confinement

  12. Optical and structural characterization of oleic acid-stabilized CdTe nanocrystals for solution thin film processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Davet Gutiérrez-Lazos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents results of the optical and structural characterization of oleic acid-stabilized cadmium telluride nanocrystals (CdTe-NC synthesized by an organometallic route. After being cleaned, the CdTe-NC were dispersed in toluene to obtain an ink-like dispersion, which was drop-cast on glass substrate to deposit a thin film. The CdTe-NC colloidal dispersion as well as the CdTe drop-cast thin films were characterized with regard to the optical and structural properties. TEM analysis indicates that the CdTe-NC have a nearly spherical shape (3.5 nm as mean size. Electron diffraction and XRD diffraction analyses indicated the bulk-CdTe face-centered cubic structure for CdTe-NC. An additional diffraction line corresponding to the octahedral Cd3P2 was also detected as a secondary phase, which probably originates by reacting free cadmium ions with trioctylphosphine (the tellurium reducing agent. The Raman spectrum exhibits two broad bands centered at 141.6 and 162.3 cm−1, which could be associated to the TO and LO modes of cubic CdTe nanocrystals, respectively. Additional peaks located in the 222 to 324 cm−1 range, agree fairly well with the wavenumbers reported for TO modes of octahedral Cd3P2.

  13. Thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaics: ES and H issues, solutions, and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweibel, K.; Moskowitz, P.; Fthenakis, V.

    1998-02-01

    Photovoltaics (PV) is a growing business worldwide, with new technologies evolving towards potentially large-volume production. PV use produces no emissions, thus offsetting many potential environmental problems. However, the new PV technologies also bring unfamiliar environment, safety, and health (ES and H) challenges that require innovative solutions. This is a summary of the issues, solutions, and perspectives associated with the use of cadmium in one of the new and important PV technologies: thin-film, cadmium telluride (CdTe) PV, which is being developed and commercialized by several companies including Solar Cells Inc. (Toledo, Ohio), BP Solar (Fairfield, California), and Matsushita (Japan). The principal ES and H issue for thin-film cadmium telluride PV is the potential introduction of cadmium--a toxic heavy metal--into the air or water. The amount of cadmium in thin-film PV, however, is quite small--one nickel cadmium flashlight battery has about as much cadmium (7 g) as a square meter of PV module using current technology--and a typical cordless power tool will have 5--10 batteries. CdTe modules are also very well sealed, limiting the chance of release. Nonetheless, minimizing the amount of cadmium in cadmium telluride modules and preventing the introduction of that cadmium into the environment is a top priority for National Renewable Energy Laboratory researchers and cadmium telluride PV manufacturers

  14. Effects of spark plasma sintering conditions on the anisotropic thermoelectric properties of bismuth antimony telluride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Li; Hegelund Spangsdorf, Steeven; Van Nong, Ngo

    2016-01-01

    Bismuth antimony telluride (BixSb2-xTe3, 0.4 room-temperature thermoelectric power generation. In this work, p-type Bi0.4Sb1.6Te3 samples were prepared under various conditions (temperature, holding time, and ramp...

  15. Atomic layer deposition of metal tellurides and selenides using alkylsilyl compounds of tellurium and selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pore, Viljami; Hatanpää, Timo; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku

    2009-03-18

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of metal selenide and telluride thin films has been limited because of a lack of precursors that would at the same time be safe and exhibit high reactivity as required in ALD. Yet there are many important metal selenide and telluride thin film materials whose deposition by ALD might be beneficial, for example, CuInSe2 for solar cells and Ge2Sb2Te5 for phase-change random-access memories. Especially in the latter case highly conformal deposition offered by ALD is essential for high storage density. By now, ALD of germanium antimony telluride (GST) has been attempted only using plasma-assisted processes owing to the lack of appropriate tellurium precursors. In this paper we make a breakthrough in the development of new ALD precursors for tellurium and selenium. Compounds with a general formula (R3Si)2Te and (R3Si)2Se react with various metal halides forming the corresponding metal tellurides and selenides. As an example, we show that Sb2Te3, GeTe, and GST films can be deposited by ALD using (Et3Si)2Te, SbCl3, and GeCl2 x C4H8O2 compounds as precursors. All three precursors exhibit a typical saturative ALD growth behavior and GST films prepared at 90 degrees C show excellent conformality on a high aspect-ratio trench structure.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of cadmium manganese telluride: a semimagnetic ternary alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, T.; Basu, S.

    1993-01-01

    Polycrystalline cadmium manganese telluride (Cd ( 1-x)Mn x Te) was synthesized by the vertical Bridgman method. Compositional analysis was done by X-ray studies and optical absorption to indicate x=0.23. XPS, ac and dc susceptibility studies are also presented. (author). 12 refs., 2 figs

  17. Electrodeposition of bismuth telluride thermoelectric films from a nonaqueous electrolyte using ethylene glycol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, H.P.; Wu, M.; Su, J.; Vullers, R.J.M.; Vereecken, P.M.; Fransaer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Ethylene glycol was studied as an electrolyte for the electrodeposition of thermoelectric bismuth telluride films by cyclic voltammetry, rotating ring disk electrode and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM). The reduction of both Bi3+ and Te4+ ions proceeds in one step without the

  18. Structural Engineering of Vacancy Defected Bismuth Tellurides for Thermo-electric Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chumakov Y.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Dynamics and ab-initio simulations are used to find the most stable stoichiometries of Bismuth Tellurides with vacancy defects. The interest is to decrease the thermal conductivity of these compounds a key point to achieve high figure of merits. A reduction of 70% of the thermal conductivity is observed with Te vacancies of only 5%.

  19. Bandgap-Engineered Mercury Cadmium Telluride Infrared Detector Structures for Reduced Cooling Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itsuno, Anne M.

    State-of-the-art mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) high performance infrared (IR) p-n heterojunction technology remains limited by intrinsic, thermal Auger generation-recombination (C-11.) mechanisms which necessitate strict cooling requirements, and challenges related to processing technology, particularly those associated with achieving stable, controllable in situ p-type doping in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown HgCdTe. These limitations motivate the need to firstly, increase device operating temperatures, and secondly, address material processing issues. This work investigates three alternative HgCdTe IR device architectures as proposed solutions 1) the high operating temperature (HOT) detector, 2) the nBn detector, and 3) the NBnuN detector. The HOT detector is designed to suppress Auger processes, in turn, reducing the detector noise and cryogenic cooling requirements. A simulation study comparing the device behavior and performance metrics of the Auger-suppressed HOT structure to those obtained for the conventional double layer planar heterostructure (DLPH) device predicts the HOT detector can provide a significant advantage over conventional detectors with an increased operating temperature of ˜40-50 K for devices with cutoff wavelengths in the range of 5-12 mum. In a related study, a series of experiments is conducted to examine arsenic (As) deep diffusion in HgCdTe with the goal of achieving controllable low p-type doping in the HOT absorber layer to reduce Auger G-R processes by increasing minority carrier lifetimes. Furthermore, a unipolar, barrier-integrated nBn detector structure is proposed to address the challenges associated with p-type doping in MBE grown HgCdTe. Numerically simulated performance characteristics of the HgCdTe nBn device predict values similar to comparable DLPH structures for a range of temperatures, motivating the experimental demonstration of mid- and long-wave IR HgCdTe nBn detectors. Fabricated nBn detectors successfully

  20. Controlling upconversion nanocrystals for emerging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Shi, Bingyang; Jin, Dayong; Liu, Xiaogang

    2015-11-01

    Lanthanide-doped upconversion nanocrystals enable anti-Stokes emission with pump intensities several orders of magnitude lower than required by conventional nonlinear optical techniques. Their exceptional properties, namely large anti-Stokes shifts, sharp emission spectra and long excited-state lifetimes, have led to a diversity of applications. Here, we review upconversion nanocrystals from the perspective of fundamental concepts and examine the technical challenges in relation to emission colour tuning and luminescence enhancement. In particular, we highlight the advances in functionalization strategies that enable the broad utility of upconversion nanocrystals for multimodal imaging, cancer therapy, volumetric displays and photonics.

  1. Multiexciton fluorescence from semiconductor nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, Brent; Caruge, Jean-Michel; Chan, Y.-T.; Halpert, Jonathan; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2005-01-01

    We use transient photoluminescence to spectrally resolve the emission from 1, 2, and 3 electron-hole pairs states in CdSe colloidal nanocrystals with radii ranging between 2.3 and 5.2 nm. Temporally and spectrally resolved multiexciton emission from single NCs is also observed. The observation of multiexciton emission enables new experiments and potential applications at both the single NC level and using ensembles of NCs. First we discuss the use of single CdSe(CdZnS) core(shell) colloidal NCs (spheres and rods) to generate triggered photon pair emission at room temperature, with specific ordering of the pair's constituent photons. Second, we incorporate CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystals into a TiO 2 host matrix and observe simultaneous two-state amplified spontaneous emission and lasing from both multiexcitonic transitions (1S 3/2 -1S e and 1P 3/2 -1P e ) in a surface-emitting distributed feedback CdSe NC laser. From our data we deduce radiative lifetimes, quantum yields, stimulated emission gain, and power dependencies for the multiexciton transitions

  2. Lanthanide-doped nanocrystals: synthesis, optical-magnetic properties, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guofeng; Peng, Qing; Li, Yadong

    2011-05-17

    Because of the potential applications of lanthanide-doped nanocrystals in display devices, optical communication, solid-state lasers, catalysis, and biological labeling, the controlled synthesis of these new nanomaterials has sparked considerable interest. Nanosized phosphorescent or optoelectronic devices usually exhibit novel properties, depending on their structures, shapes, and sizes, such as tunable wavelengths, rapid responses, and high efficiencies. Thus, the development of facile synthetic methods towards high-quality lanthanide-doped nanocrystals with uniform size and shape appears to be of key importance both for the exploration of their materials properties and for potential applications. This Account focuses on the recent development in our laboratory of the synthesis and applications of lanthanide-doped nanocrystals. Since 2005, when we proposed a general strategy for nanocrystal synthesis via a liquid-solid-solution process, a range of monodisperse and colloidal lanthanide-doped fluoride, oxide, hydroxide, orthovanadate, thiooxide, borate, and phosphate nanocrystals have been successfully prepared. By rationally tuning the reaction conditions, we have readily synthesized nanostructures, such as hollow microspheres, nanorods, nanowires, hexagonal nanoplates, and nanobelts. By adjusting the different colloidal nanocrystal mixtures, we fabricated unique binary nanostructures with novel dual-mode luminescence properties through a facile ultrasonic method. By tridoping with lanthanide ions that had different electronic structures, we successfully achieved β-NaYF(4) nanorods that were paramagnetic with tuned upconversion luminescence. We have also used NaYF(4):Yb(3+)/Er(3+) conbined with magnetite nanoparticles as a sensitive detection system for DNA: NaYF(4):Yb(3+)/Er(3+) and Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were modified with two different DNA sequences. Then, the modified NaYF(4):Yb(3+)/Er(3+) nanoparticles were conjugated to the modified Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles

  3. Electrical Characteristics of WSi2 Nanocrystal Capacitors with Barrier-Engineered High-k Tunnel Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo Jun; Lee, Dong Uk; Kim, Eun Kyu; You, Hee-Wook; Cho, Won-Ju

    2011-06-01

    Nanocrystal-floating gate capacitors with WSi2 nanocrystals and high-k tunnel layers were fabricated to improve the electrical properties such as retention, programming/erasing speed, and endurance. The WSi2 nanocrystals were distributed uniformly between the tunnel and control gate oxide layers. The electrical performance of the tunnel barrier with the SiO2/HfO2/Al2O3 (2/1/3 nm) (OHA) tunnel layer appeared to be better than that with the Al2O3/HfO2/Al2O3 (2/1/3 nm) (AHA) tunnel layer. When ΔVFB is about 1 V after applying voltage at ±8 V, the programming/erasing speeds of AHA and OHA tunnel layers are 300 ms and 500 µs, respectively. In particular, the device with WSi2 nanocrystals and the OHA tunnel barrier showed a large memory window of about 7.76 V when the voltage swept from 10 to -10 V, and it was maintained at about 2.77 V after 104 cycles.

  4. Quantum confinement of lead titanate nanocrystals by wet chemical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaviyarasu, K., E-mail: kaviyarasuloyolacollege@gmail.com [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology Laboratories, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, P O Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Manikandan, E., E-mail: maniphysics@gmail.com [Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Central Research Laboratory, Sree Balaji Medical College & Hospital, Bharath University, Chrompet, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology Laboratories, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, P O Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Maaza, M., E-mail: likmaaz@gmail.com [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology Laboratories, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, P O Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    Lead Titanate (PbTiO{sub 3)} is a category of the practical semiconductor metal oxides, which is widely applied in various scientific and industrial fields because of its catalytic, optical, and electrical properties. PbTiO{sub 3} nanocrystalline materials have attracted a wide attention due to their unique properties. PbTiO{sub 3} nanocrystals were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) to identify the PbTiO{sub 3} nanocrystals were composed a tetragonal structure. The diameter of a single sphere was around 20 nm and the diameter reached up to 3 μm. The chemical composition of the samples and the valence states of elements were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in detail. - Highlights: • Single crystalline NSs of PbTiO{sub 3} fabricated by wet chemical method. • PbTiO{sub 3} NSs were uniform and continuous along the long axis. • Tetragonal perovskite structure with the diameter 20 nm and length 3 μm. • XPS spectrum was fitted with Lorentzian function respectively. • The size of the images is also 10 μm × 10 μm.

  5. Electron retention in InAs-nanocrystals embedded in SiO2/Si for non-volatile memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocevar, M.; Regreny, P.; Gendry, M.; Poncet, A.; Souifi, A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present the electrical characterization of an InAs nanocrystal based metal-oxide-semiconductor structure. The fabricated device behaves as a memory since the charges injected in the InAs through the SiO 2 tunnel layer (holes or electrons) have a long retention time in or by the nanocrystals. A discharging model based on direct tunnelling through a dielectric barrier has been used in order to calculate electron discharging kinetics. The results show that InAs-nanocrystals are of real interest for electron storage in non-volatile memories with an improvement of data retention for electron. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Benzimidazole-functionalized Zr-UiO-66 nanocrystals for luminescent sensing of Fe{sup 3+} in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Yingying; Zhang, Hanzhuo; Lei, Fan; Liang, Mei; Qian, Xuefeng; Shen, Peilian [The Key laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, National Engineering Lab for Textile Fiber Materials and Processing Technology (Zhejiang), College of Materials and Textiles, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Xu, Hui, E-mail: huixu@cjlu.edu.cn [Institute of Coordination Bond Metrology and Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Chen, Zhihui, E-mail: huixu.chen@gmail.com [The Key laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, National Engineering Lab for Textile Fiber Materials and Processing Technology (Zhejiang), College of Materials and Textiles, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Key Lab of Advanced Transducers and Intelligent Control System, Ministry of Education and Shanxi Province, College of Physics and Optoelectronics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Gao, Junkuo, E-mail: jkgao@zstu.edu.cn [The Key laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, National Engineering Lab for Textile Fiber Materials and Processing Technology (Zhejiang), College of Materials and Textiles, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Yao, Juming [The Key laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, National Engineering Lab for Textile Fiber Materials and Processing Technology (Zhejiang), College of Materials and Textiles, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Zr-based MOF structure UiO-66 exhibits unprecedented high thermal and chemical stability, making it to be one of the most used MOFs in various applications. Yet, the poor photoluminescent (PL) properties of UiO-66 limit its applications in luminescent sensing. Herein, a new benzimidazole-functionalized UiO-66 nanocrystal (UiO-66-BI) was successfully fabricated via microwave synthesis. UiO-66-BI displayed octahedral nanocrystal morphology with a diameter smaller than 200 nm and could disperse well in water and common organic solvents. UiO-66-BI demonstrated extended optical absorption in the visible-light region and efficiently improved PL emission compared with UiO-66 pristine. The sensing properties of UiO-66-BI nanocrystals towards different ions were studied, and the results demonstrated that UiO-66-BI showed excellent selective luminescent sensing of Fe{sup 3+} ions in water.

  7. Synthesis of copper telluride nanowires using template-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007; Pan et al 2008; Zhang and Johnson 2009). Several me- thods are reported to have been used for the fabrication of nanosensors (Suzuoki et al 1987; Caillaud et al 1993; Jin and Ying 1994; Inukai et al 1995; Mahmood et al 1995;. Peulon and Lincot 1996; Hussain et al 2010). However, capacitive (chemical) sensors ...

  8. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawendi, Moungi G.; Sundar, Vikram C.

    2010-04-06

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties.

  9. Zirconia nanocrystals as submicron level biological label

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smits, K; Gruduls, A; Jankovica, D; Liepins, J; Gavare, M; Patmalnieks, A

    2012-01-01

    Inorganic nanocrystals are of increasing interest for their usage in biology and pharmacology research. Our interest was to justify ZrO 2 nanocrystal usage as submicron level biological label in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisia culture. For the first time (to our knowledge) images with sub micro up-conversion luminescent particles in biologic media were made. A set of undoped as well as Er and Yb doped ZrO 2 samples at different concentrations were prepared by sol-gel method. The up-conversion luminescence for free standing and for nanocrystals with baker's yeast cells was studied and the differences in up-conversion luminescence spectra were analyzed. In vivo toxic effects of ZrO 2 nanocrystals were tested by co-cultivation with baker's yeast.

  10. High Temperature AL-Nanocrystal Alloy Synthesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Perepezko, J

    2001-01-01

    Aluminum-rich metallic glasses containing transition metals and rare earth elements have been found to yield finely mixed microstructures of Al nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix and exhibit...

  11. Zirconia nanocrystals as submicron level biological label

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, K.; Liepins, J.; Gavare, M.; Patmalnieks, A.; Gruduls, A.; Jankovica, D.

    2012-08-01

    Inorganic nanocrystals are of increasing interest for their usage in biology and pharmacology research. Our interest was to justify ZrO2 nanocrystal usage as submicron level biological label in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisia culture. For the first time (to our knowledge) images with sub micro up-conversion luminescent particles in biologic media were made. A set of undoped as well as Er and Yb doped ZrO2 samples at different concentrations were prepared by sol-gel method. The up-conversion luminescence for free standing and for nanocrystals with baker's yeast cells was studied and the differences in up-conversion luminescence spectra were analyzed. In vivo toxic effects of ZrO2 nanocrystals were tested by co-cultivation with baker's yeast.

  12. Nanocrystals embedded in hafnium dioxide-based dielectrics as charge storage nodes of nano-floating gate memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pui Fai

    2007-12-01

    Nanocrystals (NC) embedded in dielectrics have attracted a great deal of attention recently because they can potentially be applied in nonvolatile, high-speed, high-density and low-power memory devices. This device benefits from a relatively low operating voltage, high endurance, fast write-erase speeds and better immunity to soft errors. The nanocrystal materials suitable for such an application can be either metals or semiconductors. Recent studies have shown that high-k dielectrics, instead of SiO2 , for the tunneling layer in nanocrystal floating gate memory can improve the trade-off between data retention and program efficiency due to the unique band alignment of high-k dielectrics in the programming and retention modes. In this project, HfAlO has been selected as the high- k dielectric for the nanocrystal floating gate memory structure. The trilayer structure (HfAlO/Ge-NC/HfAlO) on Si was fabricated by PLD. Results revealed that relatively low substrate temperature and growth rate are favourable for the formation of smaller-size Ge nanocrystals. Effects of size/density of the Ge nanocrystal, the tunneling and control oxide layer thicknesses and the oxygen partial pressure during their growth on the charge storage and charge retention characteristics have also been studied. The island structure of the Ge nanocrystal suggests that the growth is based on the Volmer-Webber mode. The self-organized Ge nanocrystals so formed were uniform in size (5--20 nm diameter) and distribution with a density approaching 1012--1013cm-2. Flat-band voltage shift (DeltaVFB) of about 3.6 V and good retention property have been achieved. By varying aggregation distance, sputtering gas pressure and ionization power of the nanocluster source, nanoclusters of Ge with different sizes can be formed. The memory effect of the trilayer structure so formed with 10 nm Ge nanoclusters are manifested by the counter-clockwise hysteresis loop in the C-V curves and a maximum flat-band voltage

  13. Photophysical Properties of II-VI Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ke

    As it is well known, semiconductor nanocrystals (also called quantum dots, QDs) are being actively pursued for use in many different types of luminescent optical materials. These materials include the active media for luminescence downconversion in artificial lighting, lasers, luminescent solar concentrators and many other applications. Chapter 1 gives general introduction of QDs, which describe the basic physical properties and optical properties. Based on the experimental spectroscopic study, a semiquantitative method-effective mass model is employed to give theoretical prediction and guide. The following chapters will talks about several topics respectively. A predictive understanding of the radiative lifetimes is therefore a starting point for the understanding of the use of QDs for these applications. Absorption intensities and radiative lifetimes are fundamental properties of any luminescent material. Meantime, achievement of high efficiency with high working temperature and heterostructure fabrication with manipulation of lattice strain are not easy and need systematic investigation. To make accurate connections between extinction coefficients and radiative recombination rates, chapter 2 will consider three closely related aspects of the size dependent spectroscopy of II-VI QDs. First, it will consider the existing literature on cadmium selenide (CdSe) QD absorption spectra and extinction coefficients. From these results and fine structure considerations Boltzmann weighted radiative lifetimes are calculated. These lifetimes are compared to values measured on very high quality CdSe and CdSe coated with zinc selenide (ZnSe) shells. Second, analogous literature data are analyzed for cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanocrystals and compared to lifetimes measured for very high quality QDs. Furthermore, studies of the absorption and excitation spectra and measured radiative lifetimes for CdTe/CdSe Type-II core/shell QDs are reported. These results are also analyzed in

  14. Fluorescence intermittency in single cadmium selenide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmal, M.; Dabbousi, B. O.; Bawendi, M. G.; Macklin, J. J.; Trautman, J. K.; Harris, T. D.; Brus, L. E.

    1996-10-01

    SEMICONDUCTOR nanocrystals offer the opportunity to study the evolution of bulk materials properties as the size of a system increases from the molecular scale1,2. In addition, their strongly size-dependent optical properties render them attractive candidates as tunable light absorbers and emitters in optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes3,4 and quantum-dot lasers5,6, and as optical probes of biological systems7. Here we show that light emission from single fluorescing nanocrystals of cadmium selenide under continuous excitation turns on and off intermittently with a characteristic timescale of about 0.5 seconds. This intermittency is not apparent from ensemble measurements on many nanocrystals. The dependence on excitation intensity and the change in on/off times when a passivating, high-bandgap shell of zinc sulphide encapsulates the nanocrystal8,9 suggests that the abrupt turning off of luminescence is caused by photo-ionization of the nanocrystal. Thus spectroscopic measurements on single nanocrystals can reveal hitherto unknown aspects of their photophysics.

  15. Inorganic Chemistry Solutions to Semiconductor Nanocrystal Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, Samuel R. [Ames Laboratory; Guo, Yijun [Ames Laboratory; Ruberu, T. Purnima A. [Ames Laboratory; Tavasoli, Elham [Ames Laboratory; Vela, Javier [Ames Laboratory

    2014-03-15

    The optoelectronic and chemical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals heavily depend on their composition, size, shape and internal structure, surface functionality, etc. Available strategies to alter these properties through traditional colloidal syntheses and ligand exchange methods place a premium on specific reaction conditions and surfactant combinations. In this invited review, we apply a molecular-level understanding of chemical precursor reactivity to reliably control the morphology, composition and intimate architecture (core/shell vs. alloyed) of semiconductor nanocrystals. We also describe our work aimed at achieving highly selective, low-temperature photochemical methods for the synthesis of semiconductor–metal and semiconductor–metal oxide photocatalytic nanocomposites. In addition, we describe our work on surface modification of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots using new approaches and methods that bypass ligand exchange, retaining the nanocrystal's native ligands and original optical properties, as well as on spectroscopic methods of characterization useful in determining surface ligand organization and chemistry. Using recent examples from our group and collaborators, we demonstrate how these efforts have lead to faster, wider and more systematic application of semiconductor nanocrystal-based materials to biological imaging and tracking, and to photocatalysis of unconventional substrates. We believe techniques and methods borrowed from inorganic chemistry (including coordination, organometallic and solid state chemistry) have much to offer in reaching a better understanding of the synthesis, functionalization and real-life application of such exciting materials as semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, rods, tetrapods, etc.).

  16. Bright trions in direct-bandgap silicon nanocrystals revealed bylow-temperature single-nanocrystal spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kůsová, Kateřina; Pelant, Ivan; Valenta, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 4, Oct (2015), e336 ISSN 2047-7538 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA ČR GPP204/12/P235 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * single-nanocrystal spectroscopy * luminescing trions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 13.600, year: 2015

  17. Shaping Gold Nanocrystals in Dimethyl Sulfoxide: Toward Trapezohedral and Bipyramidal Nanocrystals Enclosed by {311} Facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wenxin; Duan, Yukun; Qing, Zikun; Huang, Hejin; Lu, Xianmao

    2017-04-26

    The remarkable synthetically tunable structural, electronic, and optical properties of gold nanocrystals have attracted increasing interest and enabled multidisciplinary applications. Over the past decades, nearly all the possible fundamental shapes of faceted Au nanocrystals have been synthesized, except for only one missing-the trapezohedron enclosed by {hkk} facets. In this report, the unprecedented synthesis of trapezohedral Au nanocrystals with {311} crystal facets was realized. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was discovered as a solvent for shaping Au nanocrystals with {311} crystal facets for the first time. Mechanistic studies, together with previous DFT and STM studies, attribute the unique role of DMSO to its ambidentate nature, where both sulfur and oxygen of DMSO can coordinate to gold surface, endowing its unique role in stabilizing high-index {311} facets through a "two center bonding" mode. The DMSO-based synthesis provides a new synthetic tool toward the synthesis of a series of unreported Au nanocrystals with new structures. In particular, a new type of gold bipyramids, the octagonal bipyramids, was first synthesized with additional plasmonic tunability while simultaneously retaining their {311} facets. The application of these new Au nanocrystals in surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy was investigated, and their shape-dependent performances were demonstrated. These results highlight the tremendous potential of using ambidentate molecules as shape- and surface-directing agents for metal nanocrystals and offer the promise of enabling new synthetic tools toward atomically precise control of surface structures of metal nanocrystals.

  18. Grafted SiC nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saini, Isha; Sharma, Annu; Dhiman, Rajnish

    2017-01-01

    ), raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. UV–Visible absorption spectroscopy was used to study optical properties such as optical energy gap (Eg), Urbach's energy (Eu), refractive index (n), real (ε1) and imaginary (ε2) parts of dielectric constant of PVA as well as PVA-g-SiC/PVA......) were determined. Microhardness measurements performed at an applied load of 9.8 mN showed an increase in the Knoop microhardness number (KHN) of PVA containing 0.015 wt% PVA-g-SiC nanocrystals. Detailed analysis of current-voltage data indicates that the conduction mechanism responsible for increase...... in conductivity of PVA-g-SiC/PVA nanocomposite film is voltage dependent and Schottky mechanism is the dominant conduction mechanism at medium and high voltage regions....

  19. Solution synthesis of germanium nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerung, Henry [Albuquerque, NM; Boyle, Timothy J [Kensington, MD; Bunge, Scott D [Cuyahoga Falls, OH

    2009-09-22

    A method for providing a route for the synthesis of a Ge(0) nanometer-sized material from. A Ge(II) precursor is dissolved in a ligand heated to a temperature, generally between approximately 100.degree. C. and 400.degree. C., sufficient to thermally reduce the Ge(II) to Ge(0), where the ligand is a compound that can bond to the surface of the germanium nanomaterials to subsequently prevent agglomeration of the nanomaterials. The ligand encapsulates the surface of the Ge(0) material to prevent agglomeration. The resulting solution is cooled for handling, with the cooling characteristics useful in controlling the size and size distribution of the Ge(0) materials. The characteristics of the Ge(II) precursor determine whether the Ge(0) materials that result will be nanocrystals or nanowires.

  20. Light Scattering Spectroscopies of Semiconductor Nanocrystals (Quantum Dots)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Peter Y; Gardner, Grat; Nozaki, Shinji; Berbezier, Isabelle

    2006-01-01

    We review the study of nanocrystals or quantum dots using inelastic light scattering spectroscopies. In particular recent calculations of the phonon density of states and low frequency Raman spectra in Ge nanocrystals are presented for comparison with experimental results

  1. Near-infrared light emitting device using semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supran, Geoffrey J.S.; Song, Katherine W.; Hwang, Gyuweon; Correa, Raoul Emile; Shirasaki, Yasuhiro; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Bulovic, Vladimir; Scherer, Jennifer

    2018-04-03

    A near-infrared light emitting device can include semiconductor nanocrystals that emit at wavelengths beyond 1 .mu.m. The semiconductor nanocrystals can include a core and an overcoating on a surface of the core.

  2. Assembling a Lasing Hybrid Material With Supramolecular Polymers and Nanocrystals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Leiming

    2003-01-01

    .... In the system containing ZnO nanocrystals as the inorganic component, both phases are oriented in the hybrid material forming an ultraviolet lasing medium with a lower threshold relative to pure ZnO nanocrystals.

  3. Surface treatment of nanocrystal quantum dots after film deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykora, Milan; Koposov, Alexey; Fuke, Nobuhiro

    2015-02-03

    Provided are methods of surface treatment of nanocrystal quantum dots after film deposition so as to exchange the native ligands of the quantum dots for exchange ligands that result in improvement in charge extraction from the nanocrystals.

  4. Characterization of large cadmium zinc telluride crystals grown by traveling heater method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H.; Awadalla, S.A.; Iniewski, K.

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to evaluate thick, 20 X 20 X 10 and 10 X 10 X 10 mm(3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), Cd0.9Zn0.1Te, crystals grown using the traveling heater method (THIM). The phenomenal spectral performance and small size and low concentration of Te inclusions/precipitates of these c......The focus of this paper is to evaluate thick, 20 X 20 X 10 and 10 X 10 X 10 mm(3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), Cd0.9Zn0.1Te, crystals grown using the traveling heater method (THIM). The phenomenal spectral performance and small size and low concentration of Te inclusions...

  5. GEOLOGY OF THE FLORENCIA GOLD – TELLURIDE DEPOSIT (CAMAGÜEY, CUBA AND SOME METALLURGICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López K Jesús M.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results from a study of the Florencia gold-telluride deposit in Central Cuba, including mineralogical, petrographical, microprobe and chemical analysis. Valuable information is provided for the exploration, mining and processing of gold ores from other nearby deposits with similar characteristics. Results highlight changes in the mineralogical composition of the ores between the north and south sectors of the deposit, as reflected in metallurgical concentrates after beneficiation and flotation of samples from these sectors.
    It is shown that gold deposits of the Cretaceous Volcanic Arc of Cuba largely consist of native gold, telluride and pyrite, where arsenopyrite is almost absent. Traces of lead, zinc and cadmium are present in the periphery of the main ore zones.

  6. Mechanism of manganese (mono and di) telluride thin-film formation and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Raj Kishore; Singh, Gurmeet; Shul, Yong Gun; Kim, Hansung

    2007-03-01

    Mechanistic studies on the electrocrystallization of manganese telluride (MnTe) thin film are reported using aqueous acidic solution containing MnSO 4 and TeO 2. Tartaric acid was used for the inhibition of hydrated manganese oxide anodic growth at counter electrode. A detailed study on the mechanistic aspect of electrochemical growth of MnTe using cyclic voltametry is carried out. Conditions for electrochemical growth of manganese mono and di telluride thin films have been reported using cyclic voltammetric scans for Mn 2+, Te 4+ and combined Mn 2+ and Te 4+. X-ray diffraction showed the formation of polycrystalline MnTe films with cubic, hexagonal and orthorhombic mixed phases. MnTe film morphology was studied using scanning electron microscope. Susceptibility and electrical characterization supports the anti-ferromagnetic behavior of the as-deposited MnTe thin film.

  7. Donor impurity self-compensation by neutral complexes in bismuth doped lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravich, Yu.I.; Nemov, S.A.; Proshin, V.I.

    1994-01-01

    Self-compensation is calculated of impurity doping action in semiconductors of the A 4 B 6 type by neutral complexes, consisting of a vacancy and two impurity atoms. Complexes entropy is estimated and the thermodynamic potential is minimized in the concentration of single two-charge vacancies and complexes. Calculation results are compared with experimental data, obtained when lead telluride doping by bismuth. Account for complex formation improves agreement theory with experiment. 4 refs., 1 fig

  8. Diagnostic Genesis Features of Au-Ag Selenide-Telluride Mineralization of Western Java Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euis Tintin Yuningsih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.3.1.67-76The ore mineralogy of the westernmost part of West Java such as Pongkor, Cibaliung, Cikidang, Cikotok, and Cirotan are characterized by the dominance of silver-arsenic-antimony sulfosalt with silver selenides and rarely tellurides over the argentite, whereas the eastern part of West Java including Arinem and Cineam deposits are dominated by silver-gold tellurides. Mineralogy of Se-type deposits at Pongkor, Cikidang, Cibaliung, Cisungsang, and Cirotan and Te-type deposits at Arinem and Cineam shows their different geochemical characteristics. Mineralogical and geochemical differences can be explained by variation of physico-chemical conditions that existed during gold-silver deposition by applying the phase relation among sulfide, telluride, and selenide mineral association in the deposits. The relative values of ƒSe2(g, ƒTe(g, and ƒS2(g control the actual presence of selenide or telluride minerals within the West Java deposits, which also depend on their concentrations in the hydrothermal fluid. Even though the concentration of selenium in the hydrothermal fluid of Te-type deposits might have been similar or even higher than that in the Se-type, early substitution of selenium in the sulfide minerals prevents its concentration in the hydrothermal fluid to the levels for precipitating selenide minerals. Therefore, early sulfide mineral deposition from reduction fluids will not increase the ƒSe2(g/ƒS2(g ratio to form selenide minerals in Te-type deposits of Arinem and Cineam, other than selenium-bearing sulfide mineral such as Se-bearing galena or Se-bearing pyrargyrite-proustite.

  9. Microwave-Assisted Size Control of Colloidal Nickel Nanocrystals for Colloidal Nanocrystals-Based Non-volatile Memory Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Manoj; Velampati, Ravi Shankar R.; Mandal, D.; Sharma, Rohit

    2018-03-01

    Colloidal synthesis and size control of nickel (Ni) nanocrystals (NCs) below 10 nm are reported using a microwave synthesis method. The synthesised colloidal NCs have been characterized using x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). XRD analysis highlights the face centred cubic crystal structure of synthesised NCs. The size of NCs observed using TEM and DLS have a distribution between 2.6 nm and 10 nm. Furthermore, atomic force microscopy analysis of spin-coated NCs over a silicon dioxide surface has been carried out to identify an optimum spin condition that can be used for the fabrication of a metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) non-volatile memory (NVM) capacitor. Subsequently, the fabrication of a MOS NVM capacitor is reported to demonstrate the potential application of colloidal synthesized Ni NCs in NVM devices. We also report the capacitance-voltage (C-V) and capacitance-time (C-t) response of the fabricated MOS NVM capacitor. The C-V and C-t characteristics depict a large flat band voltage shift (V FB) and high retention time, respectively, which indicate that colloidal Ni NCs are excellent candidates for applications in next-generation NVM devices.

  10. A probabilistic model of the electron transport in films of nanocrystals arranged in a cubic lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriegel, Ilka [Department of Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), via Morego, 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Scotognella, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.scotognella@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Center for Nano Science and Technology@PoliMi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Giovanni Pascoli, 70/3, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2016-08-01

    The fabrication of nanocrystal (NC) films, starting from colloidal dispersion, is a very attractive topic in condensed matter physics community. NC films can be employed for transistors, light emitting diodes, lasers, and solar cells. For this reason the understanding of the film conductivity is of major importance. In this paper we describe a probabilistic model that allows the prediction of the conductivity of NC films, in this case of a cubic lattice of Lead Selenide or Cadmium Selenide NCs. The model is based on the hopping probability between NCs. The results are compared to experimental data reported in literature. - Highlights: • Colloidal nanocrystal (NC) film conductivity is a topic of major importance. • We present a probabilistic model to predict the electron conductivity in NC films. • The model is based on the hopping probability between NCs. • We found a good agreement between the model and data reported in literature.

  11. Preparation and magnetic properties of CoWO{sub 4} nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jiwei; Zhang, Endi; Ma, Jianmin; Wang, Taihong [Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Optoelectronic Devices of Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha (China); Chang, Liao [National Oceanography Centre, University of Southampton, European Way, Southampton (United Kingdom); Wang, Ping [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2012-09-15

    Cobalt tungstate (CoWO{sub 4}) nanocrystals with an average size of 20-50 nm were synthesized via a template- or surfactant-free hydrothermal route. The crystal structure and morphology of the as-synthesized CoWO{sub 4} sample were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Magnetic measurements on the as-synthesized CoWO{sub 4} nanocrystals indicate a Neel temperature (T{sub N}) of {proportional_to}40 K. This lower T{sub N} may be a result of the nanostructured particles that reduce the exchange coupling. The new synthetic route presented in this paper has potential applications to fabricate other metal tungstates (MWO{sub 4}) materials. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Enhanced formation of Ge nanocrystals in Ge : SiO2 layers by swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonova, I V; Volodin, V A; Marin, D M; Skuratov, V A; Smagulova, S A; Janse van Vuuren, A; Neethling, J; Jedrzejewski, J; Balberg, I

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report the ability of swift heavy Xe ions with an energy of 480 MeV and a fluence of 10 12 cm -2 to enhance the formation of Ge nanocrystals within SiO 2 layers with variable Ge contents. These Ge-SiO 2 films were fabricated by the co-sputtering of Ge and quartz sources which followed various annealing procedures. In particular, we found that the irradiation of the Ge : SiO 2 films with subsequent annealing at 500 °C leads to the formation of a high concentration of nanocrystals (NCs) with a size of 2-5 nm, whereas without irradiation only amorphous inclusions were observed. This effect, as evidenced by Raman spectra, is enhanced by pre-irradiation at 550 °C and post-irradiation annealing at 600 °C, which also leads to the observation of room temperature visible photoluminescence. (paper)

  13. Promoted Iron Nanocrystals Obtained via Ligand Exchange as Active and Selective Catalysts for Synthesis Gas Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casavola, Marianna; Xie, Jingxiu; Meeldijk, Johannes D; Krans, Nynke A; Goryachev, Andrey; Hofmann, Jan P; Dugulan, A Iulian; de Jong, Krijn P

    2017-08-04

    Colloidal synthesis routes have been recently used to fabricate heterogeneous catalysts with more controllable and homogeneous properties. Herein a method was developed to modify the surface composition of colloidal nanocrystal catalysts and to purposely introduce specific atoms via ligands and change the catalyst reactivity. Organic ligands adsorbed on the surface of iron oxide catalysts were exchanged with inorganic species such as Na 2 S, not only to provide an active surface but also to introduce controlled amounts of Na and S acting as promoters for the catalytic process. The catalyst composition was optimized for the Fischer-Tropsch direct conversion of synthesis gas into lower olefins. At industrially relevant conditions, these nanocrystal-based catalysts with controlled composition were more active, selective, and stable than catalysts with similar composition but synthesized using conventional methods, possibly due to their homogeneity of properties and synergic interaction of iron and promoters.

  14. Nanocrystal Bioassembly: Asymmetry, Proximity, and Enzymatic Manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claridge, Shelley A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Research at the interface between biomolecules and inorganic nanocrystals has resulted in a great number of new discoveries. In part this arises from the synergistic duality of the system: biomolecules may act as self-assembly agents for organizing inorganic nanocrystals into functional materials; alternatively, nanocrystals may act as microscopic or spectroscopic labels for elucidating the behavior of complex biomolecular systems. However, success in either of these functions relies heavily uponthe ability to control the conjugation and assembly processes.In the work presented here, we first design a branched DNA scaffold which allows hybridization of DNA-nanocrystal monoconjugates to form discrete assemblies. Importantly, the asymmetry of the branched scaffold allows the formation of asymmetric2assemblies of nanocrystals. In the context of a self-assembled device, this can be considered a step toward the ability to engineer functionally distinct inputs and outputs.Next we develop an anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography purification method which allows large gold nanocrystals attached to single strands of very short DNA to be purified. When two such complementary conjugates are hybridized, the large nanocrystals are brought into close proximity, allowing their plasmon resonances to couple. Such plasmon-coupled constructs are of interest both as optical interconnects for nanoscale devices and as `plasmon ruler? biomolecular probes.We then present an enzymatic ligation strategy for creating multi-nanoparticle building blocks for self-assembly. In constructing a nanoscale device, such a strategy would allow pre-assembly and purification of components; these constructs can also act as multi-label probes of single-stranded DNA conformational dynamics. Finally we demonstrate a simple proof-of-concept of a nanoparticle analog of the polymerase chain reaction.

  15. Use of a Soluble Anode in Electrodeposition of Thick Bismuth Telluride Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, M.; Diliberto, S.; de Vaulx, C.; Azzouz, K.; Boulanger, C.

    2014-10-01

    Integration of thermoelectric devices within an automotive heat exchanger could enable conversion of lost heat into electrical energy, contributing to improved total output from the engine. For this purpose, synthesis of thick bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) films is required. Bismuth telluride has been produced by an electrochemical method in nitric acid with a sacrificial bismuth telluride anode as the source of cations. The binary layer grows on the working electrode while the counter-electrode, a Bi2Te3 disk obtained by high frequency melting, is oxidized to BiIII and TeIV. This process leads to auto-regeneration of the solution without modification of its composition. The thickness of films deposited by use of the Bi2Te3 anode was approximately 10 times that without. To demonstrate the utility of a soluble anode in electrochemical deposition, we report characterization of the composition and morphology of the films obtained under different experimental conditions. Perfectly dense and regular Bi2Te3 films (˜400 μm) with low internal stress and uniform composition across the cross-section were prepared. Their thermoelectric properties were assessed.

  16. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  17. Architectural design of heterogeneous metallic nanocrystals--principles and processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Zhang, Qingbo; Yao, Qiaofeng; Xie, Jianping; Lee, Jim Yang

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Heterogeneous metal nanocrystals (HMNCs) are a natural extension of simple metal nanocrystals (NCs), but as a research topic, they have been much less explored until recently. HMNCs are formed by integrating metal NCs of different compositions into a common entity, similar to the way atoms are bonded to form molecules. HMNCs can be built to exhibit an unprecedented architectural diversity and complexity by programming the arrangement of the NC building blocks ("unit NCs"). The architectural engineering of HMNCs involves the design and fabrication of the architecture-determining elements (ADEs), i.e., unit NCs with precise control of shape and size, and their relative positions in the design. Similar to molecular engineering, where structural diversity is used to create more property variations for application explorations, the architectural engineering of HMNCs can similarly increase the utility of metal NCs by offering a suite of properties to support multifunctionality in applications. The architectural engineering of HMNCs calls for processes and operations that can execute the design. Some enabling technologies already exist in the form of classical micro- and macroscale fabrication techniques, such as masking and etching. These processes, when used singly or in combination, are fully capable of fabricating nanoscopic objects. What is needed is a detailed understanding of the engineering control of ADEs and the translation of these principles into actual processes. For simplicity of execution, these processes should be integrated into a common reaction system and yet retain independence of control. The key to architectural diversity is therefore the independent controllability of each ADE in the design blueprint. The right chemical tools must be applied under the right circumstances in order to achieve the desired outcome. In this Account, after a short illustration of the infinite possibility of combining different ADEs to create HMNC design

  18. Controlled fabrication of luminescent and magnetic nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingxin; Zhong, Yucheng; Fan, Jing; Huang, Weiren

    2018-03-01

    Luminescent and magnetic multifunctional nanocomposite is in high demand and widely used in many scales, such as drug delivery, bioseparation, chemical/biosensors, and so on. Although lots of strategies have been successfully developed for the demand of multifunctional nanocomposites, it is not easy to prepare multifunctional nanocomposites by using a simple method, and satisfy all kinds of demands simultaneously. In this work, via a facile and versatile method, luminescent nanocrystals and magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized through self-assembly under vigorous stirring and ultrasonic treatment. These multifunctional nanocomposites are not only water stable but also find wide application such as magnetic separation and concentration with a series of moderate speed, multicolor fluorescence at different emission wavelength, high efficiency of the excitation and emission, and so on. By changing different kinds of luminescent nanocrystals and controlling the amount of luminescent and magnetic nanoparticles, a train of multifunctional nanocomposites was successfully fabricated via a versatile and robust method.

  19. Effect of Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the electrical properties of Ba{sub 0.9}Ca{sub 0.1}Zr{sub 0.1}Ti{sub 0.9}O{sub 3} ceramics fabricated using nanocrystals seed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parjansri, P. [Rajamangala University of Technology Krungthep, Physics Division, Faculty of Science and Technology, Bangkok (Thailand); Intatha, U. [Mae Fah Luang University, School of Science, Chiang Rai (Thailand); Guo, R.; Bhalla, A.S. [University of Texas at San Antonio, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, San Antonio, TX (United States); Eitssayeam, S. [Chiang Mai University, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Chiang Mai University, Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai (Thailand)

    2016-09-15

    This work was to investigate the effects of antimony oxide (Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}) on the electrical properties of Ba{sub 0.9}Ca{sub 0.1}Zr{sub 0.1}Ti{sub 0.9}O{sub 3} (BCZT) ceramics and was prepared by adding 1 mol% of BCZT nanocrystals. The seed is nanocrystals of BCZT which was synthesized by the molten salt method. The ceramics powders were prepared by the mixed oxide method using BaCO{sub 3}, CaCO{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2} as starting materials, and the BCZT seed was added as nanocrystal for induce phase transition. They were doped with x mol% Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} (x = 0.0-0.5). Results indicated that all samples show pure perovskite phase. The Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} enhanced the electrical properties of the ceramic systems. Excellent values of a dielectric constant (ε {sub r}) at room temperature (T{sub r}) were 4086 with sample of x = 0.5, and at Curie temperature (T{sub c}) was 15,485 for samples with x = 0.1. The highest remnant polarization (P{sub r}), piezoelectric charge coefficient (d{sub 33}), piezoelectric voltage coefficient (g{sub 33}), electromechanical coefficient for planar mode (k{sub p}) and thickness mode (k{sub t}) values were 6.3 μC/cm{sup 2}, 346 pC/N, 15.6 x 10{sup -3} Vm/N, 42 and 41 %, respectively, which were obtained for the sample of x = 0.2 mol% Sb. (orig.)

  20. Influence of a front buffer layer on the performance of flexible Cadmium sulfide/Cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabaduge, Hasitha Padmika

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells have been developing as a promising candidate for large-scale application of photovoltaic energy conversion and have become the most commercially successful polycrystalline thin-film solar module material. In scaling up from small cells to large-area modules, inevitably non-uniformities across the large area will limit the performance of the large cell or module. The effects of these non-uniformities can be reduced by introducing a thin, high-resistivity transparent buffer layer between the conductive electrodes and the semiconductor diode. ZnO is explored in this dissertation as a high-resistivity transparent buffer layer for sputtered CdTe solar cells and efficiencies over 15% have been achieved on commercially available Pilkington TEC15M glass substrates. The highest open-circuit voltage of 0.858V achieved using the optimized ZnO buffer layer is among the best reported in the literature. The properties of ZnO:Al as a buffer are also investigated. We have shown that ZnO:Al can serve both as a transparent conducting oxide layer as well as a high-resistivity transparent layer for CdTe solar cells. ZnO:Al reactively sputtered with oxygen can give the necessary resistivities that allow it to be used as a high-resistivity transparent layer. Glass is the most common choice as the substrate for solar cells fabricated in the superstrate configuration due to its transparency and mechanical rigidity. However flexible substrates offer the advantages of light weight, high flexibility, ease of integrability and higher throughput through roll-to-roll processing over glass. This dissertation presents significant improvements made to flexible CdTe solar cells reporting an efficiency of 14% on clear KaptonRTM flexible polyimide substrates. Our efficiency of 14% is, to our knowledge, the best for any flexible CdTe cell reported in literature.

  1. Multiexciton absorption in CdSe nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschetti, Alberto; Zhang, Yong

    2009-03-01

    Efficient multiple-exciton generation (MEG) has been recently reported in semiconductor nanocrystals. In this process, a single absorbed photon generates two or more electron-hole pairs. The MEG efficiency has so far been evaluated assuming that the change (bleaching) of the absorption spectrum due to MEG is linearly proportional to the number of excitons (NX) that are present in the nanocrystal. We have examined this assumption using atomistic pseudopotential calculations for colloidal CdSe nanocrystals ranging in size from 3 to 4.6 nm. We found that the bleaching of the first absorption peak, δα1S, depends non-linearly on NX, due to carrier-carrier interactions. When a single exciton is present in the nanocrystal, the 1S exciton peak is already 65-75% bleached. This non-linearity mandates an upper bound of 1.5 to the value of the normalized bleaching that can be attributed to MEG, significantly smaller than the limit of 2.0 predicted by the linear scaling assumption. Thus, measured values of the normalized bleaching in excess of 1.5 in CdSe nanocrystals cannot be due entirely to MEG, but must originate in part from other mechanisms.

  2. Iron Oxide Nanocrystals for Magnetic Hyperthermia Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale L. Huber

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanocrystals have been investigated extensively in the past several years for several potential applications, such as information technology, MRI contrast agents, and for drug conjugation and delivery. A specific property of interest in biomedicine is magnetic hyperthermia—an increase in temperature resulting from the thermal energy released by magnetic nanocrystals in an external alternating magnetic field. Iron oxide nanocrystals of various sizes and morphologies were synthesized and tested for specific losses (heating power using frequencies of 111.1 kHz and 629.2 kHz, and corresponding magnetic field strengths of 9 and 25 mT. Polymorphous nanocrystals as well as spherical nanocrystals and nanowires in paramagnetic to ferromagnetic size range exhibited good heating power. A remarkable 30 °C temperature increase was observed in a nanowire sample at 111 kHz and magnetic field of 25 mT (19.6 kA/m, which is very close to the typical values of 100 kHz and 20 mT used in medical treatments.

  3. Enhanced photoelectrochemical water splitting and photocatalytic water oxidation of Cu2O nanocube-loaded BiVO4 nanocrystal heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenzhong; Zhang, Weiwei; Meng, Shan; Jia, Lujie; Tan, Miao; Hao, Chenchun; Liang, Yujie; Wang, Jun; Zou, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Reducing the fast recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs of semiconductor photocatalyst is very important to improve its photocatalysis. In this paper we fabricate Cu2O nanocube-decorated BiVO4 nanocrystal (denoted as BiVO4@Cu2O nanocrystal@nanocube) heterostructure photocatalyst by coupling n-type BiVO4 with p-type Cu2O. The BiVO4@Cu2O nanocrystal@nanocube photocatalysts show superior photocatalytic activities in photoelectrochemical (PEC) activity and photocatalytic water oxidation to BiVO4 photocatalysts under visible light illumination. The BiVO4@Cu2O nanocrystal@nanocube heterostructure electrode achieves the highest photocurrent density of 10 μA cm-2 at 0 V versus Ag/AgCl, 5 times higher than that of BiVO4 nanocrystal electrode ( 2 μA cm-2). The light induced evolution rate of O2 generation for BiVO4@Cu2O nanocrystal@nanocube heterostructures is as high as 150 μmol h-1100 mg cat-1, more than 3 times higher than that (48 μmol h-1100 mg cat-1) of BiVO4 nanocrystals. The enhanced photocatalysis activities of the BiVO4@Cu2O nanocrystal@nanocube photocatalysts are attributed to the efficient separation of the photoexcited electron-hole pairs caused by inner electronic field (IEF) of p-n junction. This study opens up new opportunities in designing photoactive materials with highly enhanced performance for solar energy conversion.

  4. Enriching Silver Nanocrystals with a Second Noble Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiren; Sun, Xiaojun; Yang, Yin; Li, Jumei; Zhang, Yun; Qin, Dong

    2017-07-18

    Noble-metal nanocrystals have received considerable interests owing to their fascinating properties and promising applications in areas including plasmonics, catalysis, sensing, imaging, and medicine. As demonstrated by ample examples, the performance of nanocrystals in these and related applications can be augmented by switching from monometallic to bimetallic systems. The inclusion of a second metal can enhance the properties and greatly expand the application landscape by bringing in new capabilities. Seeded growth offers a powerful route to bimetallic nanocrystals. This approach is built upon the concept that preformed nanocrystals with uniform, well-controlled size, shape, and structure can serve as seeds to template and direct the deposition of metal atoms. Seeded growth is, however, limited by galvanic replacement when the deposited metal is less reactive than the seed. The involvement of galvanic replacement not only makes it difficult to control the outcome of seeded growth but also causes degradation to some properties. We have successfully addressed this issue by reducing the salt precursor(s) into atoms with essentially no galvanic replacement. In the absence of self-nucleation, the atoms are preferentially deposited onto the seeds to generate bimetallic nanocrystals with controlled structures. In this Account, we use Ag nanocubes as an example to demonstrate the fabrication of Ag@M and Ag@Ag-M (M = Au, Pd, or Pt) nanocubes with a core-frame or core-shell structure by controlling the deposition of M atoms. A typical synthesis involves the titration of M n+ (a precursor to M) ions into an aqueous suspension containing Ag nanocubes, ascorbic acid, and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) under ambient conditions. In one approach, aqueous sodium hydroxide is introduced to increase the initial pH of the reaction system. At pH = 11.9, ascorbic acid is dominated by ascorbate monoanion, a much stronger reductant, to suppress the galvanic replacement between M n+ and Ag. In

  5. Hydrothermal synthesis of tungsten doped tin dioxide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cailong; Li, Yufeng; Chen, Yiwen; Lin, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Tungsten doped tin dioxide (WTO) nanocrystals were synthesized through a one-step hydrothermal method. The structure, composition and morphology of WTO nanocrystals were characterized by x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra, zeta potential analysis and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Results show that the as-prepared WTO nanocrystals were rutile-type structure with the size near 13 nm. Compared with the undoped tin dioxide nanocrystals, the WTO nanocrystals possessed better dispersity in ethanol phase and formed transparent sol.

  6. The structure and morphology of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadavanich, Andreas V. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-11-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals were studied using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Organically capped nanocrystals were found to have faceted shapes consistent with Wulff polyhedra after the effects of capping ligands on surface energies were taken into account. The basic shape thus derived for wurtzite (WZ) structure CdSe nanocrystals capped by tri-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) was a truncated hexagonal prism, elongated alone the <001> axis with (100) and (002) facets. This structure has C{sub 3v} point group symmetry. The main defect in this structure is a stacking fault (a single layer of zinc blende type stacking), which does not significantly affect the shape (does not alter the point group).

  7. Shaping metal nanocrystals through epitaxial seeded growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habas, Susan E.; Lee, Hyunjoo; Radmilovic, Velimir; Somorjai,Gabor A.; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-17

    Morphological control of nanocrystals has becomeincreasingly important, as many of their physical and chemical propertiesare highly shape-dependent. Nanocrystal shape control for both single andmultiple material systems, however, remains fairly empirical andchallenging. New methods need to be explored for the rational syntheticdesign of heterostructures with controlled morphology. Overgrowth of adifferent material on well-faceted seeds, for example, allows for the useof the defined seed morphology to control nucleation and growth of thesecondary structure. Here, we have used highly faceted cubic Pt seeds todirect the epitaxial overgrowth of a secondary metal. We demonstrate thisconcept with lattice matched Pd to produce conformal shape-controlledcore-shell particles, and then extend it to lattice mismatched Au to giveanisotropic growth. Seeding with faceted nanocrystals may havesignificant potential towards the development of shape-controlledheterostructures with defined interfaces.

  8. Crystallization and Growth of Colloidal Nanocrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Leite, Edson Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Since the size, shape, and microstructure of nanocrystalline materials strongly impact physical and chemical properties, the development of new synthetic routes to  nanocrystals with controlled composition and morphology is a key objective of the nanomaterials community. This objective is dependent on control of the nucleation and growth mechanisms that occur during the synthetic process, which in turn requires a fundamental understanding of both classical nucleation and growth and non-classical growth processes in nanostructured materials.  Recently, a novel growth process called Oriented Attachment (OA) was identified which appears to be a fundamental mechanism during the development of nanoscale  materials. OA is a special case of aggregation that provides an important route by which nanocrystals grow, defects are formed, and unique—often symmetry-defying—crystal morphologies can be produced. This growth mechanism involves reversible self-assembly of primary nanocrystals followed by reorientati...

  9. Gold nanocrystals with DNA-directed morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xingyi; Huh, June; Park, Wounjhang; Lee, Luke P; Kwon, Young Jik; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-09-16

    Precise control over the structure of metal nanomaterials is important for developing advanced nanobiotechnology. Assembly methods of nanoparticles into structured blocks have been widely demonstrated recently. However, synthesis of nanocrystals with controlled, three-dimensional structures remains challenging. Here we show a directed crystallization of gold by a single DNA molecular regulator in a sequence-independent manner and its applications in three-dimensional topological controls of crystalline nanostructures. We anchor DNA onto gold nanoseed with various alignments to form gold nanocrystals with defined topologies. Some topologies are asymmetric including pushpin-, star- and biconcave disk-like structures, as well as more complex jellyfish- and flower-like structures. The approach of employing DNA enables the solution-based synthesis of nanocrystals with controlled, three-dimensional structures in a desired direction, and expands the current tools available for designing and synthesizing feature-rich nanomaterials for future translational biotechnology.

  10. Developing New Nanoprobes from Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Aihua [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots havegarnered the spotlight as an important new class of biological labelingtool. Withoptical properties superior to conventional organicfluorophores from many aspects, such as high photostability andmultiplexing capability, quantum dots have been applied in a variety ofadvanced imaging applications. This dissertation research goes along withlarge amount of research efforts in this field, while focusing on thedesign and development of new nanoprobes from semiconductor nanocrystalsthat are aimed for useful imaging or sensing applications not possiblewith quantum dots alone. Specifically speaking, two strategies have beenapplied. In one, we have taken advantage of the increasing capability ofmanipulating the shape of semiconductor nanocrystals by developingsemiconductor quantum rods as fluorescent biological labels. In theother, we have assembled quantum dots and gold nanocrystals into discretenanostructures using DNA. The background information and synthesis,surface manipulation, property characterization and applications of thesenew nanoprobes in a few biological experiments are detailed in thedissertation.

  11. Plasmonic Properties of Silicon Nanocrystals Doped with Boron and Phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Nicolaas J; Schramke, Katelyn S; Kortshagen, Uwe R

    2015-08-12

    Degenerately doped silicon nanocrystals are appealing plasmonic materials due to silicon's low cost and low toxicity. While surface plasmonic resonances of boron-doped and phosphorus-doped silicon nanocrystals were recently observed, there currently is poor understanding of the effect of surface conditions on their plasmonic behavior. Here, we demonstrate that phosphorus-doped silicon nanocrystals exhibit a plasmon resonance immediately after their synthesis but may lose their plasmonic response with oxidation. In contrast, boron-doped nanocrystals initially do not exhibit plasmonic response but become plasmonically active through postsynthesis oxidation or annealing. We interpret these results in terms of substitutional doping being the dominant doping mechanism for phosphorus-doped silicon nanocrystals, with oxidation-induced defects trapping free electrons. The behavior of boron-doped silicon nanocrystals is more consistent with a strong contribution of surface doping. Importantly, boron-doped silicon nanocrystals exhibit air-stable plasmonic behavior over periods of more than a year.

  12. Process for fabricating polycrystalline semiconductor thin-film solar cells, and cells produced thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuanzhi; Sheldon, Peter

    2000-01-01

    A novel, simplified method for fabricating a thin-film semiconductor heterojunction photovoltaic device includes initial steps of depositing a layer of cadmium stannate and a layer of zinc stannate on a transparent substrate, both by radio frequency sputtering at ambient temperature, followed by the depositing of dissimilar layers of semiconductors such as cadmium sulfide and cadmium telluride, and heat treatment to convert the cadmium stannate to a substantially single-phase material of a spinel crystal structure. Preferably, the cadmium sulfide layer is also deposited by radio frequency sputtering at ambient temperature, and the cadmium telluride layer is deposited by close space sublimation at an elevated temperature effective to convert the amorphous cadmium stannate to the polycrystalline cadmium stannate with single-phase spinel structure.

  13. Spectroscopy of carrier multiplication in nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, Benjamin; Limpens, Rens; Chung, Nguyen Xuan; Schall, Peter; Gregorkiewicz, Tom

    2016-02-08

    Carrier multiplication in nanostructures promises great improvements in a number of widely used technologies, among others photodetectors and solar cells. The decade since its discovery was ridden with fierce discussions about its true existence, magnitude, and mechanism. Here, we introduce a novel, purely spectroscopic approach for investigation of carrier multiplication in nanocrystals. Applying this method to silicon nanocrystals in an oxide matrix, we obtain an unambiguous spectral signature of the carrier multiplication process and reveal details of its size-dependent characteristics-energy threshold and efficiency. The proposed method is generally applicable and suitable for both solid state and colloidal samples, as well as for a great variety of different materials.

  14. Recent Progress on Solution-Processed CdTe Nanocrystals Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Xue

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Solution-processed CdTe nanocrystals (NCs photovoltaic devices have many advantages, both in commercial manufacture and daily operation, due to the low-cost fabrication process, which becomes a competitive candidate for next-generation solar cells. All solution-processed CdTe NCs solar cells were first reported in 2005. In recent years, they have increased over four-fold in power conversion efficiency. The latest devices achieve AM 1.5 G power conversion efficiency up to 12.0%, values comparable to those of commercial thin film CdTe/CdS solar cells fabricated by the close-space sublimation (CSS method. Here we review the progress and prospects in this field, focusing on new insights into CdTe NCs synthesized, device fabrication, NC solar cell operation, and how these findings give guidance on optimizing solar cell performance.

  15. Robust, functional nanocrystal solids by infilling with atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Gibbs, Markelle; Perkins, Craig L; Tolentino, Jason; Zarghami, Mohammad H; Bustamante, Jorge; Law, Matt

    2011-12-14

    Thin films of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are inherently metatstable materials prone to oxidative and photothermal degradation driven by their large surface-to-volume ratios and high surface energies. (1) The fabrication of practical electronic devices based on NC solids hinges on preventing oxidation, surface diffusion, ripening, sintering, and other unwanted physicochemical changes that can plague these materials. Here we use low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) to infill conductive PbSe NC solids with metal oxides to produce inorganic nanocomposites in which the NCs are locked in place and protected against oxidative and photothermal damage. Infilling NC field-effect transistors and solar cells with amorphous alumina yields devices that operate with enhanced and stable performance for at least months in air. Furthermore, ALD infilling with ZnO lowers the height of the inter-NC tunnel barrier for electron transport, yielding PbSe NC films with electron mobilities of 1 cm2 V(-1) s(-1). Our ALD technique is a versatile means to fabricate robust NC solids for optoelectronic devices.

  16. Carrier Transport, Recombination, and the Effects of Grain Boundaries in Polycrystalline Cadmium Telluride Thin Films for Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuteja, Mohit

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), a chalcogenide semiconductor, is currently used as the absorber layer in one of the highest efficiency thin film solar cell technologies. Current efficiency records are over 22%. In 2011, CdTe solar cells accounted for 8% of all solar cells installed. This is because, in part, CdTe has a low degradation rate, high optical absorption coefficient, and high tolerance to intrinsic defects. Solar cells based on polycrystalline CdTe exhibit a higher short-circuit current, fill factor, and power conversion efficiency than their single crystal counterparts. This is despite the fact that polycrystalline CdTe devices exhibit lower open-circuit voltages. This is contrary to the observation for silicon and III-V semiconductors, where material defects cause a dramatic drop in device performance. For example, grain boundaries in covalently-bonded semiconductors (a) act as carrier recombination centers, and (b) lead to localized energy states, causing carrier trapping. Despite significant research to date, the mechanism responsible for the superior current collection properties of polycrystalline CdTe solar cells has not been conclusively answered. This dissertation focuses on the macro-scale electronic band structure, and micro scale electronic properties of grains and grain boundaries in device-grade CdTe thin films to answer this open question. My research utilized a variety of experimental techniques. Samples were obtained from leading groups fabricating the material and devices. A CdCl 2 anneal is commonly performed as part of this fabrication and its effects were also investigated. Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy was employed to study the band structure and defect states in CdTe polycrystals. Cadmium vacancy- and chlorine-related states lead to carrier recombination, as in CdTe films grown by other methods. Comparing polycrystalline and single crystal CdTe, showed that the key to explaining the improved performance of polycrystalline CdTe does

  17. Mercury cadmium telluride implanted junction profile measurement and depth control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Songmin; Lin, Chun; Li, Haibin; Wei, Yanfeng; Ye, Zhenhua; Ding, Ruijun; He, Li

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a novel junction profile measurement method is proposed. A serial of junctions were fabricated by B+ implantation. Then a beveled bar which was about 10mm long and several micrometers deep was formed by carefully controlled wet-etching. The remaining depth of n region changes from the full depth that is about 5.3mm after ion implantation to zero depending on its lateral position and the slope of the etching bar. Voltage-current and Laser Beam Induced Current (LBIC) measurements were applied to determine the HgCdTe junction edge. The LBIC signal orrectification characteristic indicates the existence of a PN junction. The junction depth is extracted from the position where the PN junction disappears and the slope of the etching bar. The junction depth of intrinsic doped HgCdTe was measured, which is about 2.4μm. A significant 0.4mm thick N-region was observed. Moreover, junction depths of samples annealed for different time were also investigated. By this method, it's possible to measure the three dimensional profile of a planar PN junction.

  18. Ultrafast Silicon Photonics with Visible to Mid-Infrared Pumping of Silicon Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diroll, Benjamin T. [Center; Schramke, Katelyn S. [Department; Guo, Peijun [Center; Kortshagen, Uwe R. [Department; Schaller, Richard D. [Center; Department

    2017-09-15

    Dynamic optical control of infrared (IR) transparency and refractive index is achieved using boron-doped silicon nanocrystals excited with mid-IR optical pulses. Unlike previous silicon-based optical switches, large changes in transmittance are achieved without a fabricated structure by exploiting strong light coupling of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) produced from free holes of p-type silicon nanocrystals. The choice of optical excitation wavelength allows selectivity between hole heating and carrier generation through intraband or interband photoexcitation, respectively. Mid-IR optical pumping heats the free holes of p-Si nanocrystals to effective temperatures greater than 3500 K. Increases of the hole effective mass at high effective hole temperatures lead to a sub-picosecond change of the dielectric function resulting in a redshift of the LSPR, modulating mid-IR transmission by as much as 27% and increasing the index of refraction by more than 0.1 in the mid-IR. Low hole heat capacity dictates sub-picosecond hole cooling, substantially faster than carrier recombination, and negligible heating of the Si lattice, permitting mid-IR optical switching at terahertz repetition frequencies. Further, the energetic distribution of holes at high effective temperatures partially reverses the Burstein-Moss effect, permitting modulation of transmittance at telecommunications wavelengths. The results presented here show that doped silicon, particularly in micro- or nanostructures, is a promising dynamic metamaterial for ultrafast IR photonics.

  19. Heterojunction PbS Nanocrystal Solar Cells with Oxide Charge-Transport Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Hyun, Byung-Ryool

    2013-12-23

    Oxides are commonly employed as electron-transport layers in optoelectronic devices based on semiconductor nanocrystals, but are relatively rare as hole-transport layers. We report studies of NiO hole-transport layers in PbS nanocrystal photovoltaic structures. Transient fluorescence experiments are used to verify the relevant energy levels for hole transfer. On the basis of these results, planar heterojunction devices with ZnO as the photoanode and NiO as the photocathode were fabricated and characterized. Solution-processed devices were used to systematically study the dependence on nanocrystal size and achieve conversion efficiency as high as 2.5%. Optical modeling indicates that optimum performance should be obtained with thinner oxide layers than can be produced reliably by solution casting. Roomerature sputtering allows deposition of oxide layers as thin as 10 nm, which enables optimization of device performance with respect to the thickness of the charge-transport layers. The best devices achieve an open-circuit voltage of 0.72 V and efficiency of 5.3% while eliminating most organic material from the structure and being compatible with tandem structures. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  20. 3D printed scaffolds with gradient porosity based on a cellulose nanocrystal hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Sahar; Mathew, Aji P

    2018-03-01

    3-Dimensional (3D) printing provides a unique methodology for the customization of biomedical scaffolds with respect to size, shape, pore structure and pore orientation useful for tissue repair and regeneration. 3D printing was used to fabricate fully bio-based porous scaffolds of a double crosslinked interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) from a hydrogel ink of sodium alginate and gelatin (SA/G) reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). CNCs provided favorable rheological properties required for 3D printing. The 3D printed scaffolds were crosslinked sequentially via covalent and ionic reactions resulting in dimensionally stable hydrogel scaffolds with pore sizes of 80-2125 μm and nanoscaled pore wall roughness (visible from scanning electron microscopy) favorable for cell interaction. The 2D wide angle X-ray scattering studies showed that the nanocrystals orient preferably in the printing direction; the degree of orientation varied between 61-76%. The 3D printing pathways were optimised successfully to achieve 3-dimensional scaffolds (Z axis up to 20 mm) with uniform as well as gradient pore structures. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D printing in developing bio-based scaffolds with controlled pore sizes, gradient pore structures and alignment of nanocrystals for optimal tissue regeneration.

  1. Water-Assisted Size and Shape Control of CsPbBr3 Perovskite Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Bai, Xue; Wu, Hua; Zhang, Xiangtong; Sun, Chun; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Weitao; Yu, William W; Rogach, Andrey L

    2018-03-19

    Lead-halide perovskites are well known to decompose rapidly when exposed to polar solvents, such as water. Contrary to this common-place observation, we have found that through introducing a suitable minor amount of water into the reaction mixture, we can synthesize stable CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals. The size and the crystallinity, and as a result the band gap tunability of the strongly emitting CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals correlate with the water content. Suitable amounts of water change the crystallization environment, inducing the formation of differently shaped perovskites, namely spherical NCs, rectangular nanoplatelets, or nanowires. Bright CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals with the photoluminescence quantum yield reaching 90 % were employed for fabrication of inverted hybrid inorganic/organic light-emitting devices, with the peak luminance of 4428 cd m -2 and external quantum yield of 1.7 %. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Tellurides from Sunrise Dam gold deposit, Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia: a new occurrence of nagyágite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Y.-H.; Ciobanu, C. L.; Pring, A.; Brügger, J.; Skinner, W.; Cook, N. J.; Nugus, M.

    2007-11-01

    The complex Pb-Sb-Au tellurosulfide nagyágite is found together with eight tellurides (hessite, petzite, calaverite, altaite, tellurantimony (and Bi-bearing tellurantimony), melonite, tetradymite and an unnamed Au(Ag)-As-telluride) in sulfide-sulfosalt assemblages from late, high-grade veins (D4) and post-D4 veinlets in the world-class orogenic gold deposit at Sunrise Dam, Eastern Goldfields Province of the Archaean Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia. The composition of nagyágite at Sunrise Dam conforms to ideal stoichiometry, with negligible As content and Au/(Au+Te) ratio of 0.325 [i.e., (Pb4.84Sb1.10 As0.05)5.99S5.99(Au0.98 Te2.03)3.01]. The diverse mineralogy of the post-D4 veinlets, relative to the host veins, is attributed to small-scale reaction fronts established along zones of replacement at the polished section scale. The association of telluride assemblages and native gold is interpreted in terms of remobilization of ore components (including Ag, Sb, Te and Au) from the pre-existing assemblages, and their redeposition during subsequent tectonic events. The presence of nagyágite and Au-Ag tellurides in veins, in quantities that may be significant in economic terms, as well as the character of their breakdown products, have implications for ore processing and gold recovery, as well as for the genetic interpretation of the deposit. The strong structural control upon formation of the telluride-bearing assemblages at Sunrise Dam and the ability of these minerals to reflect changes in the local environment, contradicts the current view that these tellurides have a magmatic affiliation.

  3. Feasibility of preparing patterned molybdenum coatings on bismuth telluride thermoelectric modules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Miller, Stephen Samuel; Knight, Marlene E.; LePage, William S.; Sobczak, Catherine Elizabeth.; Wesolowski, Daniel Edward

    2013-09-01

    Molybdenum electrical interconnects for thermoelectric modules were produced by air plasma spraying a 30%CE%BCm size molybdenum powder through a laser-cut Kapton tape mask. Initial feasibility demonstrations showed that the molybdenum coating exhibited excellent feature and spacing retention (~170%CE%BCm), adhered to bismuth-telluride, and exhibited electrical conductivity appropriate for use as a thermoelectric module interconnect. A design of experiments approach was used to optimize air plasma spray process conditions to produce a molybdenum coating with low electrical resistivity. Finally, a molybdenum coating was successfully produced on a fullscale thermoelectric module. After the addition of a final titanium/gold layer deposited on top of the molybdenum coating, the full scale module exhibited an electrical resistivity of 128%CE%A9, approaching the theoretical resistivity value for the 6mm module leg of 112%CE%A9. Importantly, air plasma sprayed molybdenum did not show significant chemical reaction with bismuth-telluride substrate at the coating/substrate interface. The molybdenum coating microstructure consisted of lamellar splats containing columnar grains. Air plasma sprayed molybdenum embedded deeply (several microns) into the bismuth-telluride substrate, leading to good adhesion between the coating and the substrate. Clusters of round pores (and cracks radiating from the pores) were found immediately beneath the molybdenum coating. These pores are believed to result from tellurium vaporization during the spray process where the molten molybdenum droplets (2623%C2%B0C) transferred their heat of solidification to the substrate at the moment of impact. Substrate cooling during the molybdenum deposition process was recommended to mitigate tellurium vaporization in future studies.

  4. Processing and Characterization of Cellulose Nanocrystals/Polylactic Acid Nanocomposite Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M. Sullivan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this study is to examine the effect of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC on the properties of polylactic acid (PLA films. The films are fabricated via melt compounding and melt fiber spinning followed by compression molding. Film fracture morphology, thermal properties, crystallization behavior, thermo-mechanical behavior, and mechanical behavior were determined as a function of CNC content using scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, dynamic mechanical analysis, and tensile testing. Film crystallinity increases with increasing CNC content indicating CNC act as nucleating agents, promoting crystallization. Furthermore, the addition of CNC increased the film storage modulus and slightly broadened the glass transition region.

  5. Bond length contraction in Au nanocrystals formed by ion implantation into thin SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluth, P.; Johannessen, B.; Giraud, V.; Cheung, A.; Glover, C.J.; Azevedo, G. de M; Foran, G.J.; Ridgway, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    Au nanocrystals (NCs) fabricated by ion implantation into thin SiO 2 and annealing were investigated by means of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A bond length contraction was observed and can be explained by surface tension effects in a simple liquid-drop model. Such results are consistent with previous reports on nonembedded NCs implying a negligible influence of the SiO 2 matrix. Cumulant analysis of the EXAFS data suggests surface reconstruction or relaxation involving a further shortened bond length. A deviation from the octahedral closed shell structure is apparent for NCs of size 25 A

  6. Recent Progress on Solution-Processed CdTe Nanocrystals Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Xue; Rongfang Wu; Ya Xie; Qiongxuan Tan; Donghuan Qin; Hongbin Wu; Wenbo Huang

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed CdTe nanocrystals (NCs) photovoltaic devices have many advantages, both in commercial manufacture and daily operation, due to the low-cost fabrication process, which becomes a competitive candidate for next-generation solar cells. All solution-processed CdTe NCs solar cells were first reported in 2005. In recent years, they have increased over four-fold in power conversion efficiency. The latest devices achieve AM 1.5 G power conversion efficiency up to 12.0%, values compar...

  7. Active optical fibers doped with ceramic nanocrystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrázek, Jan; Kašík, Ivan; Procházková, L.; Čuba, V.; Aubrecht, Jan; Cajzl, Jakub; Podrazký, Ondřej; Peterka, Pavel; Nikl, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 6 (2014), s. 567-574 ISSN 1336-1376 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M100761202 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : Erbium * Nanocrystals * Special optical fiber Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D)

  8. Biodegradation behaviors of cellulose nanocrystals -PVA nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Rohani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this research, biodegradation behaviors of cellulose nanocrystals-poly vinyl alcohol nanocomposites were investigated. Nanocomposite films with different filler loading levels (3, 6, 9 and 12% by wt were developed by solvent casting method. The effect of cellulose nanocrystals on the biodegradation behaviors of nanocomposite films was studied. Water absorption and water solubility tests were performed by immersing specimens into distilled water. The characteristic parameter of diffusion coefficient and maximum moisture content were determined from the obtained water absorption curves. The water absorption behavior of the nanocomposites was found to follow a Fickian behavior. The maximum water absorption and diffusion coefficients were decreased by increasing the cellulose nanocrystals contents, however the water solubility decrease. The biodegradability of the films was investigated by immersing specimens into cellulase enzymatic solution as well as by burial in soil. The results showed that adding cellulose nanocrystals increase the weight loss of specimens in enzymatic solution but decrease it in soil media. The limited biodegradability of specimens in soil media attributed to development of strong interactions with solid substrates that inhibit the accessibility of functional groups. Specimens with the low degree of hydrolysis underwent extensive biodegradation in both enzymatic and soil media, whilst specimens with the high degree of hydrolysis showed recalcitrance to biodegradation under those conditions.

  9. Mechanistic Study of Monodisperse Iron Oxide Nanocrystals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To gain better insight into the formation of iron oxide nanocrystals from the solution phase thermal decomposition of iron (III) oleate complex, different reaction conditions including time, heating ramp, as well as concentrations of iron oleate precursor and oleic acid ligand were systematically varied and the resulting ...

  10. Synthesis, simulation & spectroscopy: physical chemistry of nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suyver, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments on nanocrystalline semiconductors form a wide and rapidly expanding field of research. This chapter concentrates on two very different topics within this field. In the first part, pair formation of dopant ions in nanocrystals is discussed. After a general introduction on the influence

  11. Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A [Los Alamos, NM; Chen, Yongfen [Eugene, OR; Klimov, Victor I [Los Alamos, NM; Htoon, Han [Los Alamos, NM; Vela, Javier [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-05-03

    Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said outer shell comprises multiple monolayers, wherein at least 30% of the quantum dots have an on-time fraction of 0.80 or greater under continuous excitation conditions for a period of time of at least 10 minutes.

  12. Solvothermal synthesis and characterization of CZTS nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumasiya, Ajay; Shah, N. M.

    2017-05-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is a promising thin film absorber material for low cost solar cell applications. CZTS nanoparticle ink synthesized using solvothermal route is an attractive option to deposit absorber layer using screen printing or spin coating method in CZTS thin film solar cell. In this study we have synthesized CZTS nanocrystals using solvothermal method from aqueous solution of Copper nitrate [Cu(NO3)2], Zinc nitrate [Zn(NO3)2], tin chloride [SnCl4] and thiourea with varying concentration of Cu(NO3)2 (viz 0.82 mmol,1.4 mmol, 1.7 mmol) keeping concentrations of rest of solutions constant. As synthesized CZTS nanocrystals are characterized using Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-rays (EDAX) to verify stoichiometry of elements. Analysis of EDAX data suggests that CZTS nanocrystals having Copper nitrate [Cu (NO3)2] concentration of 1.4 m mole is near stoichiometric. X-ray diffraction analysis study of CZTS nanocrystals having Copper nitrate [Cu (NO3)2] concentration of 1.4 m mole reveals the preferred orientation of the grains in (112), (220) and (312) direction confirming Kesterite structure of CZTS.

  13. Heterostructures Prepared by Surface Modification of Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic nanocrystals (NCs) have drawn the attention from many researchers due to their promising potentials for next generation technologies, from photovoltaics to biological applications. Various types of NCs have become available by synthetic protocols developed in the last two decades. In addition, multicomponent hybrid NCs which can be…

  14. Prospects of Colloidal Copper Chalcogenide Nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stam, W.; Berends, A.C.; de Mello-Donega, Celso

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, colloidal copper chalcogenide nanocrystals (NCs) have emerged as promising alternatives to conventional Cd and Pb chalcogenide NCs. Owing to their wide size, shape, and composition tunability, Cu chalcogenide NCs hold great promise for several applications, such as

  15. Atomic force microscopy characterization of cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roya R. Lahiji; Xin Xu; Ronald Reifenberger; Arvind Raman; Alan Rudie; Robert J. Moon

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are gaining interest as a “green” nanomaterial with superior mechanical and chemical properties for high-performance nanocomposite materials; however, there is a lack of accurate material property characterization of individual CNCs. Here, a detailed study of the topography, elastic and adhesive properties of individual wood-derived CNCs...

  16. Chelating ligands for nanocrystals' surface functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querner, Claudia; Reiss, Peter; Bleuse, Joël; Pron, Adam

    2004-09-22

    A new family of ligands for the surface functionalization of CdSe nanocrystals is proposed, namely alkyl or aryl derivatives of carbodithioic acids (R-C(S)SH). The main advantages of these new ligands are as follows: they nearly quantitatively exchange the initial surface ligands (TOPO) in very mild conditions; they significantly improve the resistance of nanocrystals against photooxidation because of their ability of strong chelate-type binding to metal atoms; their relatively simple preparation via Grignard intermediates facilitates the development of new bifunctional ligands containing, in addition to the anchoring carbodithioate group, a second function, which enables the grafting of molecules or macromolecules of interest on the nanocrystal surface. To give an example of this approach, we report, for the first time, the grafting of an electroactive oligomer from the polyaniline family-aniline tetramer-on CdSe nanocrystals after their functionalization with 4-formyldithiobenzoic acid. The grafting proceeds via a condensation reaction between the aldehyde group of the ligand and the terminal primary amine group of the tetramer. The resulting organic/inorganic hybrid exhibits complete extinction of the fluorescence of its constituents, indicating efficient charge or energy transfer between the organic and the inorganic semiconductors.

  17. Chelating ligands for nanocrystals' surface functionalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Querner, Claudia; Reiss, Peter; Bleuse, Joël; Pron, Adam

    2004-01-01

    A new family of ligands for the surface functionalization of CdSe nanocrystals is proposed, namely alkyl or aryl derivatives of carbodithioic acids (R-C(S)SH). The main advantages of these new ligands are as follows: they nearly quantitatively exchange the initial surface ligands (TOPO) in very mild

  18. Biocompatibility of bio based calcium carbonate nanocrystals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Currently, there has been extensive research interest for inorganic nanocrystals such as calcium phosphate, iron oxide, silicone, carbon nanotube and layered double hydroxide as a drug delivery system especially in cancer therapy. However, toxicological screening of such particles is paramount importance ...

  19. Infrared colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals: synthesis, properties, and photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Huiying; Tsang, Sai-Wing

    2012-04-07

    Simple solution phase, catalyst-free synthetic approaches that offer monodispersed, well passivated, and non-aggregated colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals have presented many research opportunities not only for fundamental science but also for technological applications. The ability to tune the electrical and optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals by manipulating the size and shape of the crystals during the colloidal synthesis provides potential benefits to a variety of applications including photovoltaic devices, light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors, biological imaging/labeling, and more. Recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals and the achievements in colloidal PbS or PbSe nanocrystals solar cells have demonstrated the promising application of infrared-emitting colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals in photovoltaic devices. Here, we review recent progress in the synthesis and optical properties of colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals. We focus in particular upon the size- and shape-controlled synthesis of PbS, PbSe, and PbTe nanocrystals by using different precursors and various stabilizing surfactants for the growth of the colloidal nanocrystals. We also summarize recent advancements in the field of colloidal nanocrystals solar cells based on colloidal PbS and PbSe nanocrystals. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  20. Infrared colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals: Synthesis, properties, and photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Huiying; Tsang, Sai-Wing

    2012-03-01

    Simple solution phase, catalyst-free synthetic approaches that offer monodispersed, well passivated, and non-aggregated colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals have presented many research opportunities not only for fundamental science but also for technological applications. The ability to tune the electrical and optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals by manipulating the size and shape of the crystals during the colloidal synthesis provides potential benefits to a variety of applications including photovoltaic devices, light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors, biological imaging/labeling, and more. Recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals and the achievements in colloidal PbS or PbSe nanocrystals solar cells have demonstrated the promising application of infrared-emitting colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals in photovoltaic devices. Here, we review recent progress in the synthesis and optical properties of colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals. We focus in particular upon the size- and shape-controlled synthesis of PbS, PbSe, and PbTe nanocrystals by using different precursors and various stabilizing surfactants for the growth of the colloidal nanocrystals. We also summarize recent advancements in the field of colloidal nanocrystals solar cells based on colloidal PbS and PbSe nanocrystals.

  1. Lead telluride with increased mechanical stability for cylindrical thermoelectric generators; Bleitellurid mit erhoehter mechanischer Stabilitaet fuer zylindrische thermoelektrische Generatoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Andreas

    2013-04-30

    The aim of this work is to improve the mechanical stability of lead telluride (PbTe), trying to vary its mechanical properties independently from its thermoelectric properties. Thus the influence of material preparation as well as different dopants on the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of lead telluride is being analysed. When using appropriately set process parameters, milling and sintering of lead telluride increases the material's hardness. With sintering temperatures exceeding 300 C stable material of high relative density can be achieved. Milling lead telluride generates lattice defects leading to a reduction of the material's charge carrier density. These defects can be reduced by increased sintering temperatures. Contamination of the powder due to the milling process leads to bloating during thermal cycling and thus reduced density of the sintered material. In addition to that, evaporation of tellurium at elevated temperatures causes instability of the material's thermoelectric properties. Based on the experimental results obtained in this work, the best thermoelectric and mechanical properties can be obtained by sintering coarse powders at around 400 C. Within this work a concept was developed to vary the mechanical properties of lead telluride via synthesis of PbTe with electrically nondoping elements, which thus may keep the thermoelectric properties unchanged. Therefore, the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of Pb{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}Te were investigated. Doping pure PbTe with calcium causes a significant increase of the material's hardness while only slightly decreasing the charge carrier density and thus keeping the thermoelectric properties apart from a slight reduction of the electrical conductivity nearly unchanged. The abovementioned concept is proven using sodium doped lead telluride, as it is used for thermoelectric generators: The additional doping with calcium again increases the material's hardness while

  2. Portable cadmium telluride detectors and their applicability for external measurement of 51Cr-EDTA clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojsen, J.; Groth, S.; Rossing, N.

    1981-01-01

    The combination of portable cadmium telluride detectors and a solid state memory have been examined with reference to point and volume source sensitivities and the equivalent, effective detector thickness. Based on the i.v. injection of 51 Cr-EDTA, the glomerular filtration rate in 23 patients has been measured by external detection of the disappearance rate of the tracer and only one blood sample. Correlation to conventional blood sampling technique is r = 0.992. The glomerular filtration rate determined from the externally measured disappearance rate constant only, is discussed. (author)

  3. Formation of solid solutions on the boundary of zinc oxidezinc telluride heterojunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurkan, A.E.; Buzhor, L.V.

    1987-01-01

    Distribution of ZnO x Te 1-x alloy composition on the interface of zinc oxide-zinc telluride heterojunction depending on the production conditions is investigated. A regularity in the formation of an extended area with constant alloy composition is detected. The regularity is explained by the fact that electric Peltier field conditioned by contact of two heterogeneous semiconductors participates in the solid solution formation process. Peltier field levels off the composition at the end length section. So, a possibility of creating a section with the assigned minor thickness alloy constant composition controlled in the interface of heterojunction occurs

  4. Characterization of microstructural stability for nanotwinned mercury cadmium telluride under cyclic nanoindentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Nianmin; Ma, Guojun; Kang, Renke

    2013-01-01

    Nanotwinned (nt) mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe or MCT) was prepared using nanoindentations. The hardness of nt-MCT is 100 times higher than that of monocrystalline counterparts. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the twin lamellae of nt-MCT prior to cyclic nanoindentations are distributed along two directions, intersecting at an angle of 76°. The nanotwinned microstructure of nt-MCT is stable after 100 cyclic nanoindentations. The loading–unloading curves of nt-MCT are basically invariable after 50 cycles, and have elastic characteristics

  5. Advanced methods for preparation and characterization of infrared detector materials. [mercury cadmium telluride alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1981-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis data were obtained on mercury cadmium telluride alloys in order to establish the liquidus temperatures for the various alloy compositions. Preliminary theoretical analyses was performed to establish the ternary phase equilibrium parameters for the metal rich region of the phase diagram. Liquid-solid equilibrium parameters were determined for the pseudobinary alloy system. Phase equilibrium was calculated and Hg(l-x) Cd(x) Te alloys were directionally solidified from pseudobinary melts. Electrical resistivity and Hall coefficient measurements were obtained.

  6. Tiny optical fiber temperature sensor based on temperature-dependent refractive index of zinc telluride film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Qiang; Song, Zhangqi; Song, Dongyu; Zhang, Xueliang; Li, Bingsheng; Yu, Yang; Chen, Yuzhong

    2018-03-01

    The temperature-dependent refractive index of zinc telluride film can be used to develop a tiny, low cost and film-coated optical fiber temperature sensor. Pulse reference-based compensation technique is used to largely reduce the background noise which makes it possible to detect the minor reflectivity change of the film in different temperatures. The temperature sensitivity is 0.0034dB/° and the background noise is measured to be 0.0005dB, so the resolution can achieve 0.2°.

  7. Nonvolatile Flash Memory Devices Using CeO2 Nanocrystal Trapping Layer for Two-Bit per Cell Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shao-Ming; Chien, Chao-Hsin; Huang, Jiun-Jia; Lei, Tan-Fu

    2007-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the characteristics of nonvolatile silicon oxide nitride oxide silicon (SONOS)-type memories using cerium oxide (CeO2) nanocrystals as a charge storage agent. We observed that the shape of the formed CeO2 nanocrystals is nearly spherical and that their size is almost similar identical to their high density of 5× 1011 cm-2. Such CeO2 nanocrystals were formed by depositing a thin CeO2 film of ca. 2-3 nm thickness using an evaporater gun system and then rapid thermal annealing (RTA) in O2 ambient at 900 °C for 1 min. The fabricated memory devices show good electrical properties in terms of a sufficiently large memory window (>2 V), program/erase (P/E) speed (0.1/1 ms), retention time up to 104 s with only 5% charge loss, and endurance after 105 cycles with small memory window narrowing and two-bit operation. These properties suggest that the nonvolatile SONOS-type memories with the CeO2 nanocrystal trapping agent can be applied in future flash memories.

  8. Synthesis of nanocrystals and nanocrystal self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuoying

    Chapter 1. A general introduction is presented on nanomaterials and nanoscience. Nanoparticles are discussed with respect to their structure and properties. Ferroelectric materials and nanoparticles in particular are highlighted, especially in the case of the barium titanate, and their potential applications are discussed. Different nanocrystal synthetic techniques are discussed. Nanoparticle superlattices, the novel "meta-materials" built from self-assembly at the nanoscale, are introduced. The formation of nanoparticle superlattices and the importance and interest of synthesizing these nanostructures is discussed. Chapter 2. Advanced applications for high k dielectric and ferroelectric materials in the electronics industry continues to demand an understanding of the underlying physics in decreasing dimensions into the nanoscale. The first part of this chapter presents the synthesis, processing, and electrical characterization of nanostructured thin films (thickness ˜100 nm) of barium titanate BaTiO3 built from uniform nanoparticles (alcohols were used to study the effect of size and morphological control over the nanocrystals. Techniques including X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and high-resolution electron microscopy are used to examine crystallinity and morphology. Chapter 3. By investigating the self-assembly of cadmium selenide-gold (CdSe-Au) nanoparticle mixtures by transmission electron microscopy after solvent evaporation, the effect of solvents in the formation process of CdSe-Au binary nanoparticle superlattices (BNSLs) was studied. 1-dodecanethiol was found to be critical in generating conditions necessary for superlattice formation, prior to the other factors that likely determine structure, highlighting the dual role of this organic polar molecule as both ligand and high boiling point/crystallization solvent. The influence of thiol was investigated under various concentrations (and also

  9. Self-assembled ultra small ZnO nanocrystals for dye-sensitized solar cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patra, Astam K.; Dutta, Arghya; Bhaumik, Asim, E-mail: msab@iacs.res.in

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a facile chemical approach to produce self-assembled ultra-small mesoporous zinc oxide nanocrystals using sodium salicylate (SS) as a template under hydrothermal conditions. These ZnO nanomaterials have been successfully fabricated as a photoanode for the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) in the presence of N719 dye and iodine–triiodide electrolyte. The structural features, crystallinity, purity, mesophase and morphology of the nanostructure ZnO are investigated by several characterization tools. N{sub 2} sorption analysis revealed high surface areas (203 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and narrow pore size distributions (5.1–5.4 nm) for different samples. The mesoporous structure and strong photoluminescence facilitates the high dye loading at the mesoscopic void spaces and light harvesting in DSSC. By utilizing this ultra-small ZnO photoelectrode with film thickness of about 7 μm in the DSSC with an open-circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) of 0.74 V, short-circuit current density (J{sub SC}) of 3.83 mA cm{sup −2} and an overall power conversion efficiency of 1.12% has been achieved. - Graphical abstract: Ultra-small ZnO nanocrystals have been synthesized with sodium salicylate as a template and using it as a photoanode in a dye-sensitized solar cell 1.12% power conversion efficiency has been observed. - Highlights: • Synthesis of self-assembled ultra-small mesoporous ZnO nanocrystals by using sodium salicylate as a template. • Mesoporous ZnO materials have high BET surface areas and void space. • ZnO nanoparticles serve as a photoanode for the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). • Using ZnO nanocrystals as photoelectrode power conversion efficiency of 1.12% has been achieved.

  10. Great Disparity in Photoluminesence Quantum Yields of Colloidal CsPbBr3 Nanocrystals with Varied Shape: The Effect of Crystal Lattice Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiangtao; Liu, Mei; Fang, Li; Jiang, Shenlong; Zhou, Jingtian; Ding, Huaiyi; Huang, Hongwen; Wen, Wen; Luo, Zhenlin; Zhang, Qun; Wang, Xiaoping; Gao, Chen

    2017-07-06

    Understanding the big discrepancy in the photoluminesence quantum yields (PLQYs) of nanoscale colloidal materials with varied morphologies is of great significance to its property optimization and functional application. Using different shaped CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals with the same fabrication processes as model, quantitative synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the increasing trend in lattice strain values of the nanocrystals: nanocube, nanoplate, nanowire. Furthermore, transient spectroscopic measurements reveal the same trend in the defect quantities of these nanocrystals. These experimental results unambiguously point out that large lattice strain existing in CsPbBr 3 nanoparticles induces more crystal defects and thus decreases the PLQY, implying that lattice strain is a key factor other than the surface defect to dominate the PLQY of colloidal photoluminesence materials.

  11. Induced superconductivity in the topological insulator mercury telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The combination of a topological insulator (TI) and a superconductor (S), which together form a TI/S interface, is expected to influence the possible surface states in the TI. It is of special interest, if the theoretical prediction of zero energy Majorana states in this system is verifiable. This thesis presents the experimental realization of such an interface between the TI strained bulk HgTe and the S Nb and studies if the afore mentioned expectations are met. As these types of interfaces were produced for the first time the initial step was to develop a new lithographic process. Optimization of the S deposition technique as well as the application of cleaning processes allowed for reproducible fabrication of structures. In parallel the measurement setup was upgraded to be able to execute the sensitive measurements at low energy. Furthermore several filters have been implemented into the system to reduce high frequency noise and the magnetic field control unit was additionally replaced to achieve the needed resolution in the μT range. Two kinds of basic geometries have been studied: Josephson junctions (JJs) and superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). A JJ consists of two Nb contacts with a small separation on a HgTe layer. These S/TI/S junctions are one of the most basic structures possible and are studied via transport measurements. The transport through this geometry is strongly influenced by the behavior at the two S/TI interfaces. In voltage dependent differential resistance measurements it was possible to detect multiple Andreev reflections in the JJ, indicating that electrons and holes are able to traverse the HgTe gap between both interfaces multiple times while keeping phase coherence. Additionally using BTK theory it was possible to extract the interface transparency of several junctions. This allowed iterative optimization for the highest transparency via lithographic improvements at these interfaces. The increased transparency and

  12. Glass-ceramic optical fiber containing Ba2TiSi2O8 nanocrystals for frequency conversion of lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zaijin; Xiao, Xusheng; Wang, Xin; Ma, Zhijun; Lewis, Elfed; Farrell, Gerald; Wang, Pengfei; Ren, Jing; Guo, Haitao; Qiu, Jianrong

    2017-03-30

    A glass-ceramic optical fiber containing Ba 2 TiSi 2 O 8 nanocrystals fabricated using a novel combination of the melt-in-tube method and successive heat treatment is reported for the first time. For the melt-in-tube method, fibers act as a precursor at the drawing temperature for which the cladding glass is softened while the core glass is melted. It is demonstrated experimentally that following heat treatment, Ba 2 TiSi 2 O 8 nanocrystals with diameters below 10 nm are evenly distributed throughout the fiber core. Comparing to the conventional rod-in-tube method, the melt-in-tube method is superior in terms of controllability of crystallization to allow for the fabrication of low loss glass-ceramic fibers. When irradiated using a 1030 nm femtosecond laser, an enhanced green emission at a wavelength of 515 nm is observed in the glass-ceramic fiber, which demonstrates second harmonic generation of a laser action in the fabricated glass-ceramic fibers. Therefore, this new glass-ceramic fiber not only provides a highly promising development for frequency conversion of lasers in all optical fiber based networks, but the melt-in-tube fabrication method also offers excellent opportunities for fabricating a wide range of novel glass-ceramic optical fibers for multiple future applications including fiber telecommunications and lasers.

  13. Using Nanowires To Extract Excitons from a Nanocrystal Solid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorn, August; Strasfeld, David B.; Harris, Daniel K.; Han, Hee-Sun; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2011-11-22

    Synthetic methods yielding highly uniform colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals with controlled shapes and sizes are now available for many materials. These methods have enabled geometrical control of optical properties, which are difficult or impossible to achieve in conventional bulk solids. However, incorporating nanocrystals efficiently into photodetectors remains challenging because of the low charge carrier mobilities typical of nanocrystal solids. Here we present an approach based on exciton energy transfer from CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals to embedded CdSe nanowires. By combining the wide electronic tunability of nanocrystals with the excellent one-dimensional charge transport characteristics obtainable in nanowires, we are able to increase photocurrent extraction from a nanocrystal solid by 2–3 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, we correlate local device morphology with optoelectronic functionality by measuring the local photocurrent response in a scanning confocal microscope. We also discuss how nancocrystal/nanowire hybrid devices could be used in particle detector systems.

  14. Validation with the thallium 201 of a cadmium-zinc-telluride semiconductor camera (C.Z.T.); Validation avec le thallium 201 d'une camera a semi-conducteur cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Songy, B.; Guernou, M.; Geronazzo, R.; Lussato, D. [Centre cardiologique du Nord, 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2010-07-01

    With thallium-201 ({sup 201}Tl), the cadmium-zinc-telluride (C.Z.T.) NM530c discovery camera allows acquisition of 5 min with enhanced imaging quality and reliable diagnosis, in the prone or supine position. (N.C.)

  15. Possible bicollinear nematic state with monoclinic lattice distortions in iron telluride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Christopher B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Herbrych, Jacek W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dagotto, Elbio R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moreo, Adriana [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Here, iron telluride (FeTe) is known to display bicollinear magnetic order at low temperatures together with a monoclinic lattice distortion. Because the bicollinear order can involve two different wave vectors (π/2,π/2) and (π/2,–π/2), symmetry considerations allow for the possible stabilization of a nematic state with short-range bicollinear order coupled to monoclinic lattice distortions at a TS higher than the temperature TN where long-range bicollinear order fully develops. As a concrete example, the three-orbital spin-fermion model for iron telluride is studied with an additional coupling ˜λ12 between the monoclinic lattice strain and an orbital-nematic order parameter with B2g symmetry. Monte Carlo simulations show that with increasing ˜λ12 the first-order transition characteristic of FeTe splits and bicollinear nematicity is stabilized in a (narrow) temperature range. In this new regime, the lattice is monoclinically distorted and short-range spin and orbital order breaks rotational invariance. A discussion of possible realizations of this exotic state is provided.

  16. Measurements of copper and cesium telluride cathodes in a radio-frequency photoinjector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Prat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Radio-frequency (rf photoinjectors are commonly used to generate intense bright electron beams for a wide range of applications, most notably as drivers for X-ray Free-Electron Lasers. The photocathode, mounted inside an rf gun and illuminated by a suitable laser, thereby plays a crucial role as the source of the electrons. The intrinsic emittance and the quantum efficiency of the electron source are determined by the properties of the photocathode’s surface material. We present measurements of the intrinsic emittance and the quantum efficiency performed with copper and cesium telluride cathodes in the same rf photoinjector, thus comparing, for the first time, the performance of metal and semiconductor cathodes under the same conditions. Our results are consistent with theoretical expectations and show that the difference in intrinsic emittance for the two types of material is not significant in view of accelerator applications. We conclude that cesium telluride photocathodes provide a much higher quantum efficiency at essentially negligible degradation in beam emittance.

  17. Synthesis of ultra-long cadmium telluride nanotubes via combinational chemical transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kee-Ryung; Cho, Hong-Baek; Choa, Yong-Ho, E-mail: choa15@hanyang.ac.kr

    2017-03-01

    Synthesis of high-throughput cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanotubes with an ultra-long aspect ratio is presented via a combination process concept combined with electrospinning, electrodeposition, and cationic exchange reaction. Ultra-long sacrificial silver (Ag) nanofibers were synthesized by electrospinning involving two-step calcination, and were then electrodeposited to create silver telluride nanotubes. These nanotubes underwent cationic exchange reaction in cadmium nitrate tetrahydrate solution with the aid of a ligand, tributylphosphine (TBP). Analysis showed that ultra-long pure zinc blende CdTe nanotubes were obtained with controlled dimension and uniform morphology. The thermodynamic driving force induced by the coordination of methanol solvent and TBP attributed to overcome the kinetic barrier between Ag{sub 2}Te and CdTe nanotubes, facilitating the synthesis of CdTe nanotubes. This synthetic process involving a topotactic reaction route paves a way for high-throughput extended synthesis of new chalcogenide hollow nanotubes for application in photodetectors and solar cells. - Highlights: • High throughput synthetic route of hollow CdTe nanotubes with ultra-long aspect ratio. • Chemical combination of electrospinning, electrodeposition & cation exchange reaction. • Pure zinc blende CdTe by controlled dimension & structural variation of Ag nanofibers. • Potential for the high throughput synthesis of new exotic chalcogenide nanotubes.

  18. Synthesis of Multicolor Core/Shell NaLuF4:Yb3+/Ln3+@CaF2 Upconversion Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to synthesize high-quality hierarchical core/shell nanocrystals from an efficient host lattice is important to realize efficacious photon upconversion for applications ranging from bioimaging to solar cells. Here, we describe a strategy to fabricate multicolor core @ shell α-NaLuF4:Yb3+/Ln3+@CaF2 (Ln = Er, Ho, Tm upconversion nanocrystals (UCNCs based on the newly established host lattice of sodium lutetium fluoride (NaLuF4. We exploited the liquid-solid-solution method to synthesize the NaLuF4 core of pure cubic phase and the thermal decomposition approach to expitaxially grow the calcium fluoride (CaF2 shell onto the core UCNCs, yielding cubic core/shell nanocrystals with a size of 15.6 ± 1.2 nm (the core ~9 ± 0.9 nm, the shell ~3.3 ± 0.3 nm. We showed that those core/shell UCNCs could emit activator-defined multicolor emissions up to about 772 times more efficient than the core nanocrystals due to effective suppression of surface-related quenching effects. Our results provide a new paradigm on heterogeneous core/shell structure for enhanced multicolor upconversion photoluminescence from colloidal nanocrystals.

  19. Silicon nanocrystals: from bio-imager to erbium sensitizer

    OpenAIRE

    Prtljaga, Nikola

    2012-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been centred on the light emitting properties of silicon nanocrystals and the possible applications of this particular material platform to various topics ranging from bio-imaging to erbium ion sensitization. Silicon nanocrystals as bio-imaging agent have been investigated by employing colloidal dispersion of individual silicon nanocrystals where surface properties could be controlled to a great extent. By using a suitable functionalization scheme, high quality hyd...

  20. Q-switched erbium doped fiber laser using antimony telluride-polyvinyl alcohol (Sb2Te3-PVA) as saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quisar Lokman, Muhammad; Ahmad, Fauzan; Wadi Harun, Sulaiman

    2017-11-01

    Q-switched erbium doped fiber laser was demonstrated using antimony telluride (Sb2Te3) as saturable absorber (SA). The SA was fabricated by adding Sb3Te2 powder into PVA suspension and left dry in room temperature for two days. Then, the SA was sandwiched in between two FC/PC fiber ferrules, which can provide easy integration and flexibility into the laser cavity. Stable and self-started Q-switched laser operates at 1531 nm center wavelength. The laser repetition rate increased from 54.5 kHz to 88.4 kHz and pulse duration decreased from 6.84 μs to 4.58 μs as the pump power increased. A signal to noise ratio value of 55 dB was achieved at pump power 130 mW. At the maximum pump power, the average output power and pulse energy are 0.26 mW and 2.78 nJ.

  1. Cadmium Telluride and Grain Boundaries: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Michael Evan

    roughness for direct wafer bonding. High resolution x-ray diffraction is used to study the strain of the CdTe epilayer at the epilayer-substrate interface by generating reciprocal space maps of the (004), (115), and (335) crystallographic planes. It is found that CdTe grown on an (001) InSb substrate at a low growth temperature exhibits nearly 0% relaxation. As a result, the in-plane lattice parameter of the CdTe layer is maximally strained to match the smaller lattice parameter of the InSb substrate. Consequently, the CdTe lattice is tetragonally strained normal to the substrate surface, which causes the out-of-plane lattice parameter of CdTe to be larger than its intrinsic value. Lastly, a CdCl2-treated CdTe-CdS (p-type CdTe on n-type CdS) solar cell structure is simulated using a semiconductor-heterojunction simulation program. In literature, it has been reported that chlorine atoms from the treatment segregate along grain boundaries in polycrystalline CdTe and cause the formation of local p-n junctions by inverting the grain boundaries to n-type. The simulated structure includes one grain and 2 grain boundaries. The grain/bulk CdTe material is p-type while the grain boundaries are made to be n-type with varying doping concentrations. Both the conduction band and valence band energy exhibit downward sloping from the CdTe surface to the CdTe-CdS interface. This structure assumes that the grain boundaries are parallel to the CdTe-CdS interface. While these simulations do not prove the existence of the local type-inversion hypothesis, they do entertain a novel possibility for future devices fabrication methods.

  2. Digital fabrication

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The Winter 2012 (vol. 14 no. 3) issue of the Nexus Network Journal features seven original papers dedicated to the theme “Digital Fabrication”. Digital fabrication is changing architecture in fundamental ways in every phase, from concept to artifact. Projects growing out of research in digital fabrication are dependent on software that is entirely surface-oriented in its underlying mathematics. Decisions made during design, prototyping, fabrication and assembly rely on codes, scripts, parameters, operating systems and software, creating the need for teams with multidisciplinary expertise and different skills, from IT to architecture, design, material engineering, and mathematics, among others The papers grew out of a Lisbon symposium hosted by the ISCTE-Instituto Universitario de Lisboa entitled “Digital Fabrication – A State of the Art”. The issue is completed with four other research papers which address different mathematical instruments applied to architecture, including geometric tracing system...

  3. Ferrimagnetic nanocrystal assemblies as versatile magnetic particle hyperthermia mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellari, D; Brintakis, K; Kostopoulou, A; Myrovali, E; Simeonidis, K; Lappas, A; Angelakeris, M

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal nanocrystal assemblies (nanoclusters), consisting of 13 nm iron oxide nanocrystals, were synthesized in various sizes (45-98 nm), and were investigated as heating mediators for magnetic particle hyperthermia. The colloidal nanocrystal clusters show enhanced heating efficiency in comparison with their constituent primary iron oxide nanocrystals due to collective magnetic features. The fine tuning of intra-cluster magnetic interactions results to the domination of the hysteresis losses mechanism over the relaxation loss heating contributions and eventually to a versatile magnetic particle hyperthermia mediator. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Facile preparation of carbon wrapped copper telluride nanowires as high performance anodes for sodium and lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Yang, Jun; Geng, Hongbo; Chao Li, Cheng

    2017-04-01

    Uniform carbon wrapped copper telluride nanowires were successfully prepared by using an in situ conversion reaction. The length of these nanowires is up to several micrometers and the width is around 30-40 nm. The unique one dimensional structure and the presence of conformal carbon coating of copper telluride greatly accommodate the large volumetric changes during cycling, significantly increase the electrical conductivity and reduce charge transfer resistance. The copper telluride nanowires show promising performance in a lithium ion battery with a discharge capacity of 130.2 mA h g-1 at a high current density of 6.0 A g-1 (26.74 C) and a stable cycling performance of 673.3 mA h g-1 during the 60th cycle at 100 mA g-1. When evaluated as anode material for a sodium ion battery, the copper telluride nanowires deliver a reversible capacity of 68.1 mA h g-1 at 1.0 A g-1 (˜4.46 C) and have a high capacity retention of 177.5 mA h g-1 during the 500th cycle at 100 mA g-1.

  5. Effect of Annealing on the Properties of Antimony Telluride Thin Films and Their Applications in CdTe Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouling Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimony telluride alloy thin films were deposited at room temperature by using the vacuum coevaporation method. The films were annealed at different temperatures in N2 ambient, and then the compositional, structural, and electrical properties of antimony telluride thin films were characterized by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, and Hall measurements. The results indicate that single phase antimony telluride existed when the annealing temperature was higher than 488 K. All thin films exhibited p-type conductivity with high carrier concentrations. Cell performance was greatly improved when the antimony telluride thin films were used as the back contact layer for CdTe thin film solar cells. The dark current voltage and capacitance voltage measurements were performed to investigate the formation of the back contacts for the cells with or without Sb2Te3 buffer layers. CdTe solar cells with the buffer layers can reduce the series resistance and eliminate the reverse junction between CdTe and metal electrodes.

  6. Active Optical Fibers Doped with Ceramic Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Mrazek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Erbium-doped active optical fiber was successfully prepared by incorporation of ceramic nanocrystals inside a core of optical fiber. Modified chemical vapor deposition was combined with solution-doping approach to preparing preform. Instead of inorganic salts erbium-doped yttrium-aluminium garnet nanocrystals were used in the solution-doping process. Prepared preform was drawn into single-mode optical fiber with a numerical aperture 0.167. Optical and luminescence properties of the fiber were analyzed. Lasing ability of prepared fiber was proofed in a fiber-ring set-up. Optimal laser properties were achieved for a fiber length of 20~m. The slope efficiency of the fiber-laser was about 15%. Presented method can be simply extended to the deposition of other ceramic nanomaterials.

  7. Tunable plasmonic lattices of silver nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Andrea; Sinsermsuksakul, Prasert; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-18

    Silver nanocrystals are ideal building blocks for plasmonicmaterials that exhibit a wide range of unique and potentially usefuloptical phenomena. Individual nanocrystals display distinct opticalscattering spectra and can be assembled into hierarchical structures thatcouple strongly to external electromagnetic fields. This coupling, whichis mediated by surface plasmons, depends on their shape and arrangement.Here we demonstrate the bottom-up assembly of polyhedral silvernanocrystals into macroscopic two-dimensional superlattices using theLangmuir-Blodgett technique. Our ability to control interparticlespacing, density, and packing symmetry allows for tunability of theoptical response over the entire visible range. This assembly strategyoffers a new, practical approach to making novel plasmonic materials forapplication in spectroscopic sensors, sub-wavelength optics, andintegrated devices that utilize field enhancement effects.

  8. Quasicrystalline nanocrystal superlattice with partial matching rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xingchen; Chen, Jun; Eric Irrgang, M.; Engel, Michael; Dong, Angang; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Murray, Christopher B.

    2017-02-01

    Expanding the library of self-assembled superstructures provides insight into the behaviour of atomic crystals and supports the development of materials with mesoscale order. Here we build on recent findings of soft matter quasicrystals and report a quasicrystalline binary nanocrystal superlattice that exhibits correlations in the form of partial matching rules reducing tiling disorder. We determine a three-dimensional structure model through electron tomography and direct imaging of surface topography. The 12-fold rotational symmetry of the quasicrystal is broken in sublayers, forming a random tiling of rectangles, large triangles and small triangles with 6-fold symmetry. We analyse the geometry of the experimental tiling and discuss factors relevant for the stabilization of the quasicrystal. Our joint experimental-computational study demonstrates the power of nanocrystal superlattice engineering and further narrows the gap between the richness of crystal structures found with atoms and in soft matter assemblies.

  9. Cellulose nanocrystal properties and their applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mahdi jonoobi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this work is to provide an overview of recent research in the area of cellulose nonmaterials production from different sources. Due to their abundance, their renewability, high strength and stiffness, being eco-friendly, and low weight; numerous studies have been reported on the isolation of cellulose nanomaterials from different cellulosic sources and their use in high performance applications. This work covers an introduction into the nano cellulose definition as well as used methods for isolation of nanomaterials (nanocrystals from various sources. The rod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNC can be isolated from sources like wood, plant fibers, agriculture and industrial bio residues, tunicates, and bacterial cellulose using acid hydrolysis process. Following this, the paper focused on characterization methods, materials properties and structure. The current review is a comprehensive literature regarding the nano cellulose isolation and demonstrates the potential of cellulose nanomaterials to be used in a wide range of high-tech applications.

  10. Room-temperature treatments for all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cell devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loiudice, Anna, E-mail: anna.loiudice@iit.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica " E. De Giorgi" , Università del Salento, via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); CBN — Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies, Italian Institute of Technology, Energy Platform, Via Barsanti sn, 73010 Arnesano (Lecce) (Italy); Rizzo, Aurora [CBN — Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies, Italian Institute of Technology, Energy Platform, Via Barsanti sn, 73010 Arnesano (Lecce) (Italy); NNL CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, via per Arnesano km. 5, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Corricelli, Michela [Istituto per i Processi Chimico Fisici (IPCF-CNR) Bari, c/o Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, Via Orabona 4, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, Via Orabona 4, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Curri, M. Lucia [Istituto per i Processi Chimico Fisici (IPCF-CNR) Bari, c/o Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, Via Orabona 4, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Belviso, Maria R. [NNL CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, via per Arnesano km. 5, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Cozzoli, P. Davide [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica " E. De Giorgi" , Università del Salento, via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); NNL CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, via per Arnesano km. 5, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Grancini, Giulia; Petrozza, Annamaria [Center for Nano Science and Technology at PoliMi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Pascoli 70/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gigli, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica " E. De Giorgi" , Università del Salento, via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); CBN — Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies, Italian Institute of Technology, Energy Platform, Via Barsanti sn, 73010 Arnesano (Lecce) (Italy); NNL CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, via per Arnesano km. 5, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2014-06-02

    We have developed a room-temperature solution processing approach to integrate colloidal anatase titanium dioxide nanorods (TiO{sub 2} NRs) and lead sulfide quantum dots (PbS QDs) into a heterostructured p-n junction device. To this aim we have exploited a post-deposition treatment to remove surface-adsorbed ligands by means of UV-light-irradiation of TiO{sub 2} NRs and a dilute acid treatment of PbS QDs. Here we report a systematic study on the optimization of the post-deposition treatments and device fabrication. Our approach is fully compatible with plastic device technology and is potentially useful for the integration of crystalline TiO{sub 2} as active component into disparate solar cell architectures and organic optoelectronic devices. - Highlights: • Colloidal nanocrystals offer path to low-cost manufacturing atop flexible substrates. • We fabricate an all-inorganic solar cell under room temperature treatments. • Our approach is fully compatible with plastic device technology. • It is useful for the integration of nanocrystals into disparate device architectures.

  11. Strongly emissive perovskite nanocrystal inks for high-voltage solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkerman, Quinten A.; Gandini, Marina; di Stasio, Francesco; Rastogi, Prachi; Palazon, Francisco; Bertoni, Giovanni; Ball, James M.; Prato, Mirko; Petrozza, Annamaria; Manna, Liberato

    2016-12-01

    Lead halide perovskite semiconductors have recently gained wide interest following their successful embodiment in solid-state photovoltaic devices with impressive power-conversion efficiencies, while offering a relatively simple and low-cost processability. Although the primary optoelectronic properties of these materials have already met the requirement for high-efficiency optoelectronic technologies, industrial scale-up requires more robust processing methods, as well as solvents that are less toxic than the ones that have been commonly used so successfully on the lab-scale. Here we report a fast, room-temperature synthesis of inks based on CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals using short, low-boiling-point ligands and environmentally friendly solvents. Requiring no lengthy post-synthesis treatments, the inks are directly used to fabricate films of high optoelectronic quality, exhibiting photoluminescence quantum yields higher than 30% and an amplified spontaneous emission threshold as low as 1.5 μJ cm-2. Finally, we demonstrate the fabrication of perovskite nanocrystal-based solar cells, with open-circuit voltages as high as 1.5 V.

  12. Size dependence of non-linear optical properties of SiO2 thin films containing InP nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, M. J.; Zhang, L. D.; Zhang, J. G.

    SiO2 composite thin films containing InP nanocrystals were fabricated by radio-frequency magnetron co-sputtering technique. The microstructure of the composite thin films was characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrum. The optical absorption band edges exhibit marked blueshift with respect to bulk InP due to strong quantum confinement effect. Non-linear optical absorption and non-linear optical refraction were studied by a Z-scan technique using a single Gaussian beam of a He-Ne laser (632.8 nm). We observed the saturation absorption and two-photon absorption in the composite films. An enhanced third-order non-linear optical absorption coefficient and non-linear optical refractive index were achieved in the composite films. The nonlinear optical properties of the films display the dependence on InP nanocrystals size.

  13. Extracting hot carriers from photoexcited semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2014-12-10

    This research program addresses a fundamental question related to the use of nanomaterials in solar energy -- namely, whether semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) can help surpass the efficiency limits, the so-called “Shockley-Queisser” limit, in conventional solar cells. In these cells, absorption of photons with energies above the semiconductor bandgap generates “hot” charge carriers that quickly “cool” to the band edges before they can be utilized to do work; this sets the solar cell efficiency at a limit of ~31%. If instead, all of the energy of the hot carriers could be captured, solar-to-electric power conversion efficiencies could be increased, theoretically, to as high as 66%. A potential route to capture this energy is to utilize semiconductor nanocrystals. In these materials, the quasi-continuous conduction and valence bands of the bulk semiconductor become discretized due to confinement of the charge carriers. Consequently, the energy spacing between the electronic levels can be much larger than the highest phonon frequency of the lattice, creating a “phonon bottleneck” wherein hot-carrier relaxation is possible via slower multiphonon emission. For example, hot-electron lifetimes as long as ~1 ns have been observed in NCs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. In colloidal NCs, long lifetimes have been demonstrated through careful design of the nanocrystal interfaces. Due to their ability to slow electronic relaxation, semiconductor NCs can in principle enable extraction of hot carriers before they cool to the band edges, leading to more efficient solar cells.

  14. Systematic synthesis of lanthanide phosphate nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Ziyang; Chen, Chen; Chu, Deren; Li, Haohang; Li, Yadong

    2007-01-01

    Uniform LnPO(4).x H(2)O (Ln=Y, La-Nd, Sm-Lu) nanocrystals that have controllable 0D (spherelike), 1D (rodlike), and 2D (polygonlike) structures have been systematically synthesized by means of a hydrothermal method by using a mixed solvent of water and ethanol. Transmission electron microscopy images and SEAD (selected area electron diffraction) patterns revealed that the products are highly crystalline and have structurally uniform shapes. IR, Raman, and electron energy loss spectroscopies gave spectra that indicated that an amount of oleic acid molecules were presented at the surface of individual nanocrystals. These nanocrystals have hydrophobic surfaces and could be easily dispersed in nonpolar solvents. Moreover, a creditable synthetic mechanism for nucleation, growth, and shape evolution has been proposed. Eu(3+) doped products were also prepared by using the same synthetic process. The Eu(3+) doped products exhibited an orange-red luminescence that is ascribed to an electron transition within the 4f shell. Analysis of the photoluminescent spectra revealed that the optical properties are strongly dependent on their morphologies.

  15. Facile Synthesis of Monodisperse Gold Nanocrystals Using Virola oleifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milaneze, Bárbara A.; Oliveira, Jairo P.; Augusto, Ingrid; Keijok, Wanderson J.; Côrrea, Andressa S.; Ferreira, Débora M.; Nunes, Otalíbio C.; Gonçalves, Rita de Cássia R.; Kitagawa, Rodrigo R.; Celante, Vinícius G.; da Silva, André Romero; Pereira, Ana Claudia H.; Endringer, Denise C.; Schuenck, Ricardo P.; Guimarães, Marco C. C.

    2016-10-01

    The development of new routes and strategies for nanotechnology applications that only employ green synthesis has inspired investigators to devise natural systems. Among these systems, the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using plant extracts has been actively developed as an alternative, efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally safe method for producing nanoparticles, and this approach is also suitable for large-scale synthesis. This study reports reproducible and completely natural gold nanocrystals that were synthesized using Virola oleifera extract. V. oleifera resin is rich in epicatechin, ferulic acid, gallic acid, and flavonoids (i.e., quercetin and eriodictyol). These gold nanoparticles play three roles. First, these nanoparticles exhibit remarkable stability based on their zeta potential. Second, these nanoparticles are functionalized with flavonoids, and third, an efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly mechanism can be employed to produce green nanoparticles with organic compounds on the surface. Our model is capable of reducing the resin of V. oleifera, which creates stability and opens a new avenue for biological applications. This method does not require painstaking conditions or hazardous agents and is a rapid, efficient, and green approach for the fabrication of monodisperse gold nanoparticles.

  16. Engineering of Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Light Emitting Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Todescato

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanocrystals are rapidly spreading into the display and lighting markets. Compared with liquid crystal and organic LED displays, nanocrystalline quantum dots (QDs provide highly saturated colors, wide color gamut, resolution, rapid response time, optical efficiency, durability and low cost. This remarkable progress has been made possible by the rapid advances in the synthesis of colloidal QDs and by the progress in understanding the intriguing new physics exhibited by these nanoparticles. In this review, we provide support to the idea that suitably engineered core/graded-shell QDs exhibit exceptionally favorable optical properties, photoluminescence and optical gain, while keeping the synthesis facile and producing QDs well suited for light emitting applications. Solid-state laser emitters can greatly profit from QDs as efficient gain materials. Progress towards fabricating low threshold, solution processed DFB lasers that are optically pumped using one- and two-photon absorption is reviewed. In the field of display technologies, the exploitation of the exceptional photoluminescence properties of QDs for LCD backlighting has already advanced to commercial levels. The next big challenge is to develop the electroluminescence properties of QD to a similar state. We present an overview of QLED devices and of the great perspectives for next generation display and lighting technologies.

  17. Perovskite Nanocrystals as a Color Converter for Visible Light Communication

    KAUST Repository

    Dursun, Ibrahim

    2016-05-31

    Visible light communication (VLC) is an emerging technology that uses light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or laser diodes for simultaneous illumination and data communication. This technology is envisioned to be a major part of the solution to the current bottlenecks in data and wireless communication. However, the conventional lighting phosphors that are typically integrated with LEDs have limited modulation bandwidth and thus cannot provide the bandwidth required to realize the potential of VLC. In this work, we present a promising light converter for VLC by designing solution-processed CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) with a conventional red phosphor. The fabricated CsPbBr3 NCs phosphor-based white light converter exhibits an unprecedented modulation bandwidth of 491 MHz, which is ~ 40 times greater than that of conventional phosphors, and the capability to transmit a high data rate of up to 2 Gbit/s. Moreover, this perovskite enhanced white light source combines ultrafast response characteristics with a high color rendering index of 89 and a low correlated color temperature of 3236 K, thereby enabling dual VLC and solid-state lighting functionalities.

  18. SAXS and EXAFS studies of ion beam synthesized Au nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluth, P.; Johannessen, B.; Cookson, D.J.; Foran, G.J.; Ridgway, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    We have used small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to investigate Au nanocrystals (NCs) fabricated by high dose ion implantation into thin SiO 2 and subsequent annealing at different temperatures. Size distributions were determined from SAXS and structural parameters were extracted from EXAFS measurements, the latter analyzed as a function of NC size. Increasing implantation dose leads to an increasing average NC size and broadening of the size distribution. A significant size-dependent bond length contraction with respect to bulk material was observed. For samples annealed at 1100 deg. C our analysis suggests that an increased structural disorder is predominantly located at the NC surface. Post-implantation annealing at temperatures of 500 deg. C and 800 deg. C for 1 h in forming gas had no detectable influence on the NC size distribution, however, a significant influence on the structural parameters, in particular increased disorder was observed. This is potentially the result of stress induced disorder due to the different thermal expansion of the NC and matrix materials

  19. Spider Silk-CBD-Cellulose Nanocrystal Composites: Mechanism of Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirovitch, Sigal; Shtein, Zvi; Ben-Shalom, Tal; Lapidot, Shaul; Tamburu, Carmen; Hu, Xiao; Kluge, Jonathan A; Raviv, Uri; Kaplan, David L; Shoseyov, Oded

    2016-09-18

    The fabrication of cellulose-spider silk bio-nanocomposites comprised of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and recombinant spider silk protein fused to a cellulose binding domain (CBD) is described. Silk-CBD successfully binds cellulose, and unlike recombinant silk alone, silk-CBD self-assembles into microfibrils even in the absence of CNCs. Silk-CBD-CNC composite sponges and films show changes in internal structure and CNC alignment related to the addition of silk-CBD. The silk-CBD sponges exhibit improved thermal and structural characteristics in comparison to control recombinant spider silk sponges. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of the silk-CBD sponge was higher than the control silk sponge and similar to native dragline spider silk fibers. Gel filtration analysis, dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that silk-CBD, but not the recombinant silk control, formed a nematic liquid crystalline phase similar to that observed in native spider silk during the silk spinning process. Silk-CBD microfibrils spontaneously formed in solution upon ultrasonication. We suggest a model for silk-CBD assembly that implicates CBD in the central role of driving the dimerization of spider silk monomers, a process essential to the molecular assembly of spider-silk nanofibers and silk-CNC composites.

  20. Stress evolution of Ge nanocrystals in dielectric matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahariqushchi, Rahim; Raciti, Rosario; Emre Kasapoğlu, Ahmet; Gür, Emre; Sezen, Meltem; Kalay, Eren; Mirabella, Salvatore; Aydinli, A.

    2018-05-01

    Germanium nanocrystals (Ge NCs) embedded in single and multilayer silicon oxide and silicon nitride matrices have been synthesized using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition followed by conventional furnace annealing or rapid thermal processing in N2 ambient. Compositions of the films were determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The formation of NCs under suitable process conditions was observed with high resolution transmission electron microscope micrographs and Raman spectroscopy. Stress measurements were done using Raman shifts of the Ge optical phonon line at 300.7 cm-1. The effect of the embedding matrix and annealing methods on Ge NC formation were investigated. In addition to Ge NCs in single layer samples, the stress on Ge NCs in multilayer samples was also analyzed. Multilayers of Ge NCs in a silicon nitride matrix separated by dielectric buffer layers to control the size and density of NCs were fabricated. Multilayers consisted of SiN y :Ge ultrathin films sandwiched between either SiO2 or Si3N4 by the proper choice of buffer material. We demonstrated that it is possible to tune the stress state of Ge NCs from compressive to tensile, a desirable property for optoelectronic applications. We also observed that there is a correlation between the stress and the crystallization threshold in which the compressive stress enhances the crystallization, while the tensile stress suppresses the process.

  1. Thermal conductivity and tensile properties of tin oxide filled UPR/EPS composites with and without organic nanocrystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, R.; Syed Mustafa, S. A.; Norizan, Mohd N.; Suraya Amerudin, L.

    2017-07-01

    Panel composite for building application made from waste expanded polystyrene (EPS) and unsaturated polyester (UPR) were fabricated and tested in this research for their tensile and thermal characteristics in determining its insulation properties. Research had been carried out to incorporate EPS into UPR with addition of two additives types which are tin oxide (SnO) stand alone, and tin oxide in combination with organic nanocrystals. The weight percentage of SnO had been varied from 0.1 to 2%, and the nanocrystals between 0.1 to 0.5%; both fabricated via casting and compression of the UPR/EPS composite. The testing performed are tensile properties by an Instron Universal Tensile Machine; and thermal conductivity test by using KD2 Pro hand-held thermal probe. It was found that, by using UPE/EPS, the additives affected the composites' thermal conductivity and tensile capabilities. For tensile strength, the control sample showed the highest tensile strength at 22.2 MPa. For thermal conductivity (k value), the lowest value was recorded by the 1% SnO stand alone at an approximate ~ 0.172 W/m.K. Via organic nanocrystal use fixed at 0.1%, the k value increases up to a certain point with increasing SnO. Addition of more SnO and nanocrystal incorporation had mostly increases its thermal conductivity and heat capacity. Heat capacity was also found to be at the lowest in the 1% SnO stand alone sample at 2.008 MJ/m3.K.

  2. Group IV nanocrystals with ion-exchangeable surface ligands and methods of making the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Lance M.; Nichols, Asa W.; Chernomordik, Boris D.; Anderson, Nicholas C.; Beard, Matthew C.; Neale, Nathan R.

    2018-01-09

    Methods are described that include reacting a starting nanocrystal that includes a starting nanocrystal core and a covalently bound surface species to create an ion-exchangeable (IE) nanocrystal that includes a surface charge and a first ion-exchangeable (IE) surface ligand ionically bound to the surface charge, where the starting nanocrystal core includes a group IV element.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of colloidal nanocrystals of ternary chalcogenide compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazing, D. S.; Shul'ga, A. I.; Matyushkin, L. B.; Aleksandrova, O. A.; Moshnikov, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Colloidal nanocrystals of CuInS2 and CuInSe2 were synthesized in an apolar noncoordinating medium using 1-dodecanethiol as a ligand. A semiconductor shell of ZnS was formed for CuInS2 nanocrystals obtained by the injection method. The obtained samples were characterized by absorption spectroscopy and photoluminescence.

  4. A simple synthesis and characterization of CuS nanocrystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    UV-vis absorption spectra of the nanocrystals in water were recorded using a Perkin-Elmer UV-visible spectrometer. 3. Results and discussion. In figure 1a, we show a typical TEM image of 11 nm CuS nanocrystals obtained by reacting 1⋅25 mmolar solution,. Cu(ac)2, with 1⋅25 mmolar solution of thioacetamide. The.

  5. Morphology-controlled Pd nanocrystals as catalysts in tandem ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MIRIAM NAVLANI-GARCÍA

    2017-09-22

    Sep 22, 2017 ... A facile synthetic protocol was used to prepare morphology controlled Pd nanocrystals with spherical and cubic ... nanocrystals and their catalytic ability in a tandem dehydrogenation/hydrogenation reaction composed by the dehydrogenation of ...... reaction J. Power Sources 302 343. 34. Jin M, Liu H, ...

  6. Synthesis and preservation of graphene-supported uranium dioxide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Hanyu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Wang, Haitao [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, Texas Tech University, 911 Boston Ave., Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Burns, Peter C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, 251 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); McNamara, Bruce K.; Buck, Edgar C. [Nuclear Chemistry & Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Na, Chongzheng, E-mail: chongzheng.na@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, Texas Tech University, 911 Boston Ave., Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Graphene-supported uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) nanocrystals are potentially important fuel materials. Here, we investigate the possibility of synthesizing graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals in polar ethylene glycol compounds by the polyol reduction of uranyl acetylacetone under boiling reflux, thereby enabling the use of an inexpensive graphene precursor graphene oxide into a one-pot process. We show that triethylene glycol is the most suitable solvent with an appropriate reduction potential for producing nanometer-sized UO{sub 2} crystals compared to monoethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, and polyethylene glycol. Graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized with triethylene glycol show evidence of heteroepitaxy, which can be beneficial for facilitating heat transfer in nuclear fuel particles. Furthermore, we show that graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized by polyol reduction can be readily stored in alcohols, impeding oxidation from the prevalent oxygen in air. Together, these methods provide a facile approach for preparing and storing graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals for further investigation and development under ambient conditions. - Highlights: • UO{sub 2} nanocrystals are synthesized using polyol reduction method. • Triethylene glycol is the best reducing agent for nano-sized UO{sub 2} crystals. • UO{sub 2} nanocrystals grow on graphene through heteroepitaxy. • Graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals can be stored in alcohols to prevent oxidation.

  7. Extraordinary Interfacial Stitching between Single All-Inorganic Perovskite Nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez, Leyre; Lin, Junhao; De Weerd, Chris; Poirier, Lucas; Boehme, Simon C.; Von Hauff, Elizabeth; Fujiwara, Yasufumi; Suenaga, Kazutomo; Gregorkiewicz, Tom

    2018-01-01

    All-inorganic cesium lead halide perovskite nanocrystals are extensively studied because of their outstanding optoelectronic properties. Being of a cubic shape and typically featuring a narrow size distribution, CsPbX3 (X = Cl, Br, and I) nanocrystals are the ideal starting material for the

  8. Cadmium telluride quantum dots as pH-sensitive probes for tiopronin determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yunqing; Ye Chao; Zhu Zhenghui [Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210009 (China); Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Hu Yuzhu [Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210009 (China) and Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)], E-mail: njhuyuzu@126.com

    2008-03-03

    The pH-sensitive cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs) were used as proton probes for tiopronin determination. Based on the fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs caused by tiopronin, a simple, rapid and specific quantitative method was proposed. Under the optimal conditions, the calibration plot of ln(F{sub 0}/F) with concentration of tiopronin was linear in the range of 0.15-20 {mu}g mL{sup -1}(0.92-122.5 {mu}mol L{sup -1}) with correlation coefficient of 0.998. The limit of detection (LOD) (3{sigma}/k) was 0.15 {mu}g mL{sup -1}(0.92 {mu}mol mL{sup -1}). The content of tiopronin in pharmaceutical tablet was determined by the proposed method and the result agreed with that obtained from the oxidation-reduction titration method and the claimed value.

  9. A miniature cadmium telluride detector module for continuous monitoring of left-ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, P B; Berger, H J; Steidley, J; Brendel, A F; Gottschalk, A; Zaret, B L

    1981-02-01

    The authors describe a miniature cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector module for continuous monitoring of ventricular function using an equilibrium radionuclide blood-pool label. The detector and collimator are small, light, and suitable for direct attachment to the chest wall. Clinical studies in 18 patients using a prototype system demonstrated reasonably good correlation with left-ventricular ejection fractions (LVEF) determined by first-pass studies performed with a multicrystal scintillation camera (r = 0.74) and gated equilibrium studies performed with a computerized sodium iodide (Nal) probe (r = 0.76). The CdTe device may prove to be useful in patients in intensive and coronary care units as well as in ambulatory patients.

  10. Electronic properties of chlorine doped cadmium telluride used as high energy photoconductive detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verger, L.; Cuzin, M.; Gaude, G.; Glasser, F.; Mathy, F.; Rustique, J.; Schaub, B.

    1991-01-01

    A new high energy X-ray chlorine doped Cadmium Telluride (CdTe:Cl) photoconductor is described. We discuss different deposition techniques (Sputtering, Evaporation, Electroless) to realize ohmic contacts which have low leakage current and which allow high applied electric field. The temperature dependence of the dark current give an activation energy of 0.6 eV for standard CdTe:Cl. The transient response of photoconductors under high X-ray energy beams has been characterized using three different pulse duration 150 ps, 30 ns and 4 μs. Sensitivity and speed of response are studied as a function of neutron pre-irradiated doses (0, 10 14 , 10 15 , 10 16 n/cm 2 ): neutron irradiations reduce the carrier lifetime at the expense of a lower sensitivity

  11. Atomic resolution on the (111 )B surface of mercury cadmium telluride by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Fang-Xing; Hong, Feng; Pan, Bi-Cai; Wang, Yin; Shao, Jun; Shen, Xue-Chu

    2018-01-01

    The real-space atomic surface structure of mercury cadmium telluride was successfully achieved on the (111 )B surface of H g0.78C d0.22Te by ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The work casts light on the reconstructions of the (111 )B surface unraveling a (2 ×2 ) surface reconstruction induced by adatom adsorption of Cd. The other (2 ×2 ) surface reconstruction is clarified to be induced by the single Te vacancy, which is more stable than the reconstruction of multivacancies in contrast to the prevailing view. The simulated STM images are in good agreement with the experiments. We also observed an in situ morphology transition from the (1 ×1 ) structure to those (2 ×2 ) reconstructions, implying the stability of the reconstructions.

  12. Electron beam evaporation deposition of cadmium sulphide and cadmium telluride thin films: Solar cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Li; Chen Jing; Xu Ling; Xu Jun; Ma Zhong-Yuan; Su Wei-Ning; Yu Yao

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium sulphide (CdS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films are deposited by electron beam evaporation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals that the root mean square (RMS) roughness values of the CdS films increase as substrate temperature increases. The optical band gap values of CdS films increase slightly with the increase in the substrate temperature, in a range of 2.42–2.48 eV. The result of Hall effect measurement suggests that the carrier concentration decreases as the substrate temperature increases, making the resistivity of the CdS films increase. CdTe films annealed at 300°C show that their lowest transmittances are due to their largest packing densities. The electrical characteristics of CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells are investigated in dark conditions and under illumination. Typical rectifying and photovoltaic properties are obtained. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  13. Chemical pressure and hidden one-dimensional behavior in rare earth tri-telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacchetti, A.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH; Giamarchi, T.; /Geneva U.; Ru, N.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14

    We report on the first optical measurements of the rare-earth tri-telluride charge-density-wave systems. Our data, collected over an extremely broad spectral range, allow us to observe both the Drude component and the single-particle peak, ascribed to the contributions due to the free charge carriers and to the charge-density-wave gap excitation, respectively. The data analysis displays a diminishing impact of the charge-density-wave condensate on the electronic properties with decreasing lattice constant across the rare-earth series. We propose a possible mechanism describing this behavior and we suggest the presence of a one-dimensional character in these two-dimensional compounds. We also envisage that interactions and umklapp processes might play a relevant role in the formation of the charge-density-wave state in these compounds.

  14. Role of Van der Waals interactions in determining the structure of liquid tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaut, Matthieu; Flores-Ruiz, Hugo; Coulet, Vanessa; Piarristeguy, Andrea; Johnson, Mark; Cuello, Gabriel; Pradel, Annie

    The simulation of tellurides using standard density functional (DFT) theory based molecular dynamics usually leads to an overestimation of the bond distances and a noticeable mismatch between theory and experiments when e.g. structure functions are being directly compared. Here, the structural properties of several compositions of Ge-Te and Ge-Sb-Te liquids are studied from a combination of neutron diffraction and DFT-based molecular dynamics. Importantly, we find an excellent agreement in the reproduction of the structure in real and reciprocal spaces, resulting from the incorporation of dispersion forces in the simulation. We then investigate structural properties including structure factors, pair distribution functions, angular distributions, coordination numbers, neighbor distributions, and compare our results with experimental findings. References:Physical Review B 92, 134205 (2015)Physical Review B 89, 174205 (2014)Physical Review B 90, 094207 (2014) Support from Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) (Grant No. ANR-11-BS08-0012) is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Evaluation of DAST and zinc telluride nonlinear crystals for efficient terahertz generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatesh, M.; Chaudhary, A. K., E-mail: akcsp@uohyd.ernet.in [Advanced Centre of Research in High Energy Materials, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, India-500046 (India); Rao, K. S.

    2015-07-31

    Terahertz (THz) signal is generated from 4-N, N-dimethylamino-4’-N’-methyl-stilbazolium tosylate (i.e. DAST Crystal) and Zinc telluride (ZnTe) nonlinear crystals by employing 140 fs laser pulses at 800 nm with 80 MHz repetition rate. The semi insulating gallium arsenide photoconductive stripline antennas (gap =5 µm, length = 20 µm) is used as a Terahertz detector. The detected temporal profile of Terahertz radiation generated from DAST crystal is high as compared to ZnTe crystal in terms of amplitude. THz effective bandwidths of these crystals are extended up to 1.1 THz range. The potential of THz generation of DAST and ZnTe crystals are evaluated with respect to incident laser power.

  16. Angular dependence of magnetization reversal in epitaxial chromium telluride thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pramanik, Tanmoy, E-mail: pramanik.tanmoy@utexas.edu; Roy, Anupam, E-mail: anupam@austin.utexas.edu; Dey, Rik, E-mail: rikdey@utexas.edu; Rai, Amritesh; Guchhait, Samaresh; Movva, Hema C.P.; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2017-09-01

    Highlights: • Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in epitaxial Cr{sub 2}Te{sub 3} has been investigated. • Presence of a relatively strong second order anisotropy contribution is observed. • Magnetization reversal is explained quantitatively using a 1D defect model. • Relative roles of nucleation and pinning in magnetization reversal are discussed. • Domain structures and switching process are visualized by micromagnetic simulation. - Abstract: We investigate magnetic anisotropy and magnetization reversal mechanism in chromium telluride thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We report existence of strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in these thin films, along with a relatively strong second order anisotropy contribution. The angular variation of the switching field observed from the magnetoresistance measurement is explained quantitatively using a one-dimensional defect model. The model reveals the relative roles of nucleation and pinning in the magnetization reversal, depending on the applied field orientation. Micromagnetic simulations are performed to visualize the domain structure and switching process.

  17. Structural, Mechanical and Thermodynamic Properties under Pressure Effect of Rubidium Telluride: First Principle Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidai K.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available First-principles density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate the structural, elastic and thermodynamic properties of rubidium telluride in cubic anti-fluorite (anti-CaF2-type structure. The calculated ground-state properties of Rb2Te compound such as equilibrium lattice parameter and bulk moduli are investigated by generalized gradient approximation (GGA-PBE that are based on the optimization of total energy. The elastic constants, Young’s and shear modulus, Poisson ratio, have also been calculated. Our results are in reasonable agreement with the available theoretical and experimental data. The pressure dependence of elastic constant and thermodynamic quantities under high pressure are also calculated and discussed.

  18. First operation of cesium telluride photocathodes in the TTF injector RF gun

    CERN Document Server

    Sertore, D; Flöttmann, K; Stephan, F; Zapfe, K; Michelato, P

    2000-01-01

    During the run 1998/1999 a new injector based on a laser-driven RF gun was brought in operation at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac at DESY, in order to produce the beam structure and quality required either by TeV collider and SASE FEL experiments. High quantum efficiency cesium telluride photocathodes, prepared at Milano and transferred to DESY, have been successfully operated in the RF gun. A bunch charge of 50 nC, only limited by space charge effects, was achieved. The photocathodes have shown an operative lifetime of several months. A new cathode surface finishing has showed a promising decrease of the photocathode dark current. Measurements of dark current, quantum efficiency and lifetime are reported.

  19. Photoluminescence from Si nanocrystals in silica: The effect of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheylan, S.; Elliman, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of H passivation on the PL emission of Si nanocrystals produced in silica by ion-implantion and annealing is shown to depend on the implant fluence. At low fluences, where the nanocrystals are small, passivation causes an enhancement of the emission intensity that is uniform over the full spectral range and therefore appears to be independent of nanocrystal size. For higher fluences, where the average size and size distribution of the nanocrystals are larger, the enhancement occurs preferentially at longer wavelengths, giving rise to a red-shift in the emission spectra. Both the enhancement and the red-shift increase monotonically with increasing fluence. These data are shown to be consistent with a model in which the probability to contain a non-radiative defect increases with nanocrystal size

  20. Facile synthesis of water-soluble curcumin nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Zoran M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, facile synthesis of water soluble curcumin nanocrystals is reported. Solvent exchange method was applied to synthesize curcumin nanocrystals. Different techniques were used to characterize the structural and photophysical properties of curcumin nanocrystals. We found that nanocurcumin prepared by this method had good chemical and physical stability, could be stored in the powder form at room temperature, and was freely dispersible in water. It was established that the size of curcumin nanocrystals was varied in the range of 20-500 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-Vis analyses showed the presence of tetrahydrofuran inside the curcumin nanocrystals. Also, it was found that nanocurcumin emitted photoluminescencewith yellow-green colour. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172003

  1. Isolating and moving single atoms using silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2010-09-07

    A method is disclosed for isolating single atoms of an atomic species of interest by locating the atoms within silicon nanocrystals. This can be done by implanting, on the average, a single atom of the atomic species of interest into each nanocrystal, and then measuring an electrical charge distribution on the nanocrystals with scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) or electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) to identify and select those nanocrystals having exactly one atom of the atomic species of interest therein. The nanocrystals with the single atom of the atomic species of interest therein can be sorted and moved using an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The method is useful for forming nanoscale electronic and optical devices including quantum computers and single-photon light sources.

  2. Epithermal Gold-Silver Deposits in Western Java, Indonesia: Gold-Silver Selenide-Telluride Mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euis Tintin Yuningsih

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i2.180The gold-silver ores of western Java reflect a major metallogenic event during the Miocene-Pliocene and Pliocene ages. Mineralogically, the deposits can be divided into two types i.e. Se- and Te-type deposits with some different characteristic features. The objective of the present research is to summarize the mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of Se- and Te-type epithermal mineralization in western Java. Ore and alteration mineral assemblage, fluid inclusions, and radiogenic isotope studies were undertaken in some deposits in western Java combined with literature studies from previous authors. Ore mineralogy of some deposits from western Java such as Pongkor, Cibaliung, Cikidang, Cisungsang, Cirotan, Arinem, and Cineam shows slightly different characteristics as those are divided into Se- and Te-types deposits. The ore mineralogy of the westernmost of west Java region such as Pongkor, Cibaliung, Cikidang, Cisungsang, and Cirotan is characterized by the dominance of silver-arsenic-antimony sulfosalt with silver selenides and rarely tellurides over the argentite, while to the eastern part of West Java such as Arinem and Cineam deposits are dominated by silver-gold tellurides. The average formation temperatures measured from fluid inclusions of quartz associated with ore are in the range of 170 – 220°C with average salinity of less than 1 wt% NaClequiv for Se-type and 190 – 270°C with average salinity of ~2 wt% NaClequiv for Te-type.

  3. The determination of the free energy of formation of binary tellurides using lithium coulometric titration techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, J.G.; Stevenson, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report low-temperature electrochemical coulometric titration technique using Li developed and used to determine the Gibbs free energies of formation of binary telluride compounds. The approach is based on the metal/lithium/tellurium phase diagram and relies upon the rapid diffusion of Li in these systems. The Gibbs free energy of formation of Li 2 Te was determined by electrochemically titrating Li into pure Te until a two-phase Li 2 Te/Te mixture was formed. A value of -82.1 plus or minus 0.3 kcal/mol was calculated. With this information, the Gibbs free energies of formation of HgTe, CdTe, and ZnTe were determined from the measured Li electrochemical potential found in appropriate metal/telluride/Li 2 Te Gibbs tie triangle regions. ZnTe and CdTe and were investigated by depositing a large amount of Li on the sample in question and observing a constant potential region after lon annealing times. HgTe and Hg 0.8 · 0.2 Te were investigated by depositing a small amount of Li on the sample and observing the short time transient, with no plateau observed, but a characteristic kink potential. Suitable analysis of the potential-time response characteristics for these cases lead to values for the free energies of formation of CdTe and ZnTe and HgTe of - 23.2 ± 0.6 and - 26.4 ± 0.9 kcal/mol and - 6.8 ± 111 kcal/mol, respectively, in good agreement with the information in the literature

  4. Fluorescent cadmium telluride quantum dots embedded chitosan nanoparticles: a stable, biocompatible preparation for bio-imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghormade, Vandana; Gholap, Haribhau; Kale, Sonia; Kulkarni, Vaishnavi; Bhat, Suresh; Paknikar, Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) are an optically attractive option for bioimaging, but are known to display high cytotoxicity. Nanoparticles synthesized from chitosan, a natural biopolymer of β 1-4 linked glucosamine, display good biocompatibility and cellular uptake. A facile, green synthetic strategy has been developed to embed green fluorescent cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) in biocompatible CNPs to obtain a safer preparation than 'as is' QDs. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed the crystal lattice corresponding to CdTe QDs embedded in CNPs while thermogravimetry confirmed their polymeric composition. Electrostatic interactions between thiol-capped QDs (4 nm, -57 mV) and CNPs (~300 nm, +38 mV) generated CdTe QDs-embedded CNPs that were stable up to three months. Further, viability of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells in vitro increased in presence of QDs-embedded CNPs as compared to bare QDs. At the highest concentration (10 μg/ml), the former shows 34 and 39% increase in viability at 24 and 48 h, respectively, as compared to the latter. This shows that chitosan nanoparticles do not release the QDs up to 48 h and do not cause extended toxicity. Furthermore, hydrolytic enzymes such as lysozyme and chitinase did not degrade chitosan nanoparticles. Moreover, QDs-embedded CNPs show enhanced internalization in NIH3T3 cells as compared to bare QDs. This method offers ease of synthesis and handling of stable, luminescent, biocompatible CdTe QDs-embedded CNPs with a favorable toxicity profile and better cellular uptake with potential for bioimaging and targeted detection of cellular components.

  5. Solution synthesis of telluride-based nano-barbell structures coated with PEDOT:PSS for spray-printed thermoelectric generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Eun Jin; Kang, Young Hun; Jang, Kwang-Suk; Lee, Changjin; Cho, Song Yun

    2016-05-01

    Solution-processable telluride-based heterostructures coated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (Te-Bi2Te3/PEDOT:PSS) were synthesized through a solution-phase reaction at low temperatures. The water-based synthesis yielded PEDOT:PSS-coated Te-Bi2Te3 nano-barbell structures with a high Seebeck coefficient that can be stably dispersed in water. These hybrid solutions were deposited onto a substrate by the spray-printing method to prepare thermoelectric generators. The thermoelectric properties of the Te-Bi2Te3/PEDOT:PSS hybrid films were significantly enhanced by a simple acid treatment due to the increased electrical conductivity, and the power factor of those materials can be effectively tuned over a wide range depending on the acid concentration of the treatment. The power factors of the synthesized Te-Bi2Te3/PEDOT:PSS hybrids were optimized to 60.05 μW m-1 K-2 with a Seebeck coefficient of 93.63 μV K-1 and an electrical conductivity of 69.99 S cm-1. The flexible thermoelectric generator fabricated by spray-printing Te-Bi2Te3/PEDOT:PSS hybrid solutions showed an open-circuit voltage of 1.54 mV with six legs at ΔT = 10 °C. This approach presents the potential for realizing printing-processable hybrid thermoelectric materials for application in flexible thermoelectric generators.Solution-processable telluride-based heterostructures coated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (Te-Bi2Te3/PEDOT:PSS) were synthesized through a solution-phase reaction at low temperatures. The water-based synthesis yielded PEDOT:PSS-coated Te-Bi2Te3 nano-barbell structures with a high Seebeck coefficient that can be stably dispersed in water. These hybrid solutions were deposited onto a substrate by the spray-printing method to prepare thermoelectric generators. The thermoelectric properties of the Te-Bi2Te3/PEDOT:PSS hybrid films were significantly enhanced by a simple acid treatment due to the increased electrical conductivity, and

  6. Z-Contrast STEM Imaging and EELS of CdSe Nanocrystals: Towards the Analysis of Individual Nanocrystal Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erwin, M.; Kadavanich, A.V.; Kippeny, T.; Pennycook, S.J.; Rosenthal, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    We have applied Atomic Number Contract Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (Z-Contrast STEM) and STEM/EELS (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy) towards the study of colloidal CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals embedded in MEH-PPV polymer films. Unlike the case of conventional phase-contrast High Resolution TEM, Z-Contrast images are direct projections of the atomic structure. Hence they can be interpreted without the need for sophisticated image simulation and the image intensity is a direct measure of the thickness of a nanocrystal. Our thickness measurements are in agreement with the predicted faceted shape of these nanocrystals. Our unique 1.3A resolution STEM has successfully resolve3d the sublattice structure of these CdSe nanocrystals. In [010] projection (the polar axis in the image plane) we can distinguish Se atom columns from Cd columns. Consequently we can study the effects of lattice polarity on the nanocrystal morphology. Furthermore, since the STEM technique does not rely on diffraction, it is superbly suited to the study of non-periodic detail, such as the surface structure of the nanocrystals. EELS measurements on individual nanocrystals indicate a significant amount (equivalet to 0.5-1 surface monolayers) of oxygen on the nanocrystals, despite processing in an inert atmosphere. Spatially resolved measurements at 7A resolution suggest a surface oxide layer. However, the uncertainty in the measurement precludes definitive assignment at this time. The source of the oxygen is under investigation as well

  7. Photonic devices on paper, plastic and textile fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willander, Magnus; Khan, Azam; Nur, Omer

    2013-03-01

    We will present some of our results from low temperature (textile fabrics. Both nanowires and nanotubes are grown at low temperature. The nanowires were processed to fabricate white light emitting diodes (LEDs) with color rendering index (CRI) of up to 95. Then both the nanowires and nanotubes were tested regarding the piezoelectric effect and for generating electric power from mechanical movements. This opens the possibility to drive the LEDs from harvesting ambient mechanical movements. We also developed a printing process suitable for mass production to fabricate these LEDs on paper substrates. Also on the paper contacts and interconnection lines were made by a simple pencil drawing on the paper on which the nanowires then were printed. This ZnO nanocrystals graphitic circuitry worked excellent as metal electrodes. In this way a UV-detector was fabricated. Finally, we will also compare the paper substrates results with our other results on other different types of flexible substrates like cotton and plastic substrates.

  8. Gas-phase synthesis of semiconductor nanocrystals and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Rajib

    Luminescent nanomaterials is a newly emerging field that provides challenges not only to fundamental research but also to innovative technology in several areas such as electronics, photonics, nanotechnology, display, lighting, biomedical engineering and environmental control. These nanomaterials come in various forms, shapes and comprises of semiconductors, metals, oxides, and inorganic and organic polymers. Most importantly, these luminescent nanomaterials can have different properties owing to their size as compared to their bulk counterparts. Here we describe the use of plasmas in synthesis, modification, and deposition of semiconductor nanomaterials for luminescence applications. Nanocrystalline silicon is widely known as an efficient and tunable optical emitter and is attracting great interest for applications in several areas. To date, however, luminescent silicon nanocrystals (NCs) have been used exclusively in traditional rigid devices. For the field to advance towards new and versatile applications for nanocrystal-based devices, there is a need to investigate whether these NCs can be used in flexible and stretchable devices. We show how the optical and structural/morphological properties of plasma-synthesized silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) change when they are deposited on stretchable substrates made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Synthesis of these NCs was performed in a nonthermal, low-pressure gas phase plasma reactor. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of direct deposition of NCs onto stretchable substrates. Additionally, in order to prevent oxidation and enhance the luminescence properties, a silicon nitride shell was grown around Si NCs. We have demonstrated surface nitridation of Si NCs in a single step process using non?thermal plasma in several schemes including a novel dual-plasma synthesis/shell growth process. These coated NCs exhibit SiNx shells with composition depending on process parameters. While measurements including

  9. A Facile Fabrication of Silver-Coated Copper Nanowires by Galvanic Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated a general strategy to fabricate silver-coated copper nanowires by a galvanic replacement, which is guided by the chemical principle that metal ions (silver ions with a relatively high reduction potential can galvanically etch nanostructure made from a less metal (copper. Well-dispersed and high-yielded copper nanowires were initially synthesized and then introduced into silver-ammonia solution for the growth of silver nanocrystals on the nanowire surfaces under vigorous oscillation. The results of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope revealed that the silver nanocrystals were uniformly distributed on the copper nanowire surfaces to form Cu-Ag heterostructures. The concentration of silver-ammonia solution and the time of replacement reaction determine the size and density of the silver nanocrystals. Our investigation might pave the way to the synthesis of other bimetallic nanostructures via a facile, fast, and economical route.

  10. Silicon Nanocrystal Synthesis in Microplasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ken

    Nanocrystalline silicon particles with grains smaller than 5 nm are widely recognized as a key material in optoelectronic devices, lithium battery electrodes, and bio-medical labels. Another important characteristic is that silicon is an environmentally safe material that is used in numerous silicon technologies. To date, several synthesis methods such as sputtering, laser ablation, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) based on low-pressure silane chemistry (SiH4) have been developed for precise control of size and density distributions of silicon nanocrystals. In this study, we explore the possibility of microplasma technologies for efficient production of mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon particles on a micrometer-scale, continuous-flow plasma reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Mixtures of argon, hydrogen, and silicon tetrachloride were activated using a very-high-frequency (144 MHz) power source in a capillary glass tube with volume of less than 1 μl. Fundamental plasma parameters of the microplasma were characterized using optical emission spectroscopy, which respectively indicated electron density of 1015 cm-3, argon excitation temperature of 5000 K, and rotational temperature of 1500 K. Such high-density non-thermal reactive plasma can decompose silicon tetrachloride into atomic silicon to produce supersaturated silicon vapor, followed by gas-phase nucleation via three-body collision: particle synthesis in high-density plasma media is beneficial for promoting nucleation processes. In addition, further growth of silicon nuclei can be terminated in a short-residence-time reactor. Micro-Raman scattering spectra showed that as-deposited particles are mostly amorphous silicon with a small fraction of silicon nanocrystals. Transmission electron micrography confirmed individual 3-15 nm silicon nanocrystals. Although particles were not mono-dispersed, they were well separated and not coagulated.

  11. Synthesis of Silicon Nanocrystals in Microplasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ken

    Nanocrystalline silicon particles with a grain size of at least less than 10 nm are widely recognized as one of the key materials in optoelectronic devices, electrodes of lithium battery, bio-medical labels. There is also important character that silicon is safe material to the environment and easily gets involved in existing silicon technologies. To date, several synthesis methods such as sputtering, laser ablation, and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) based on low-pressure silane chemistry (SiH4) have been developed for precise control of size and density distributions of silicon nanocrystals. We explore the possibility of microplasma technologies for the efficient production of mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon particles in a micrometer-scale, continuous-flow plasma reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Mixtures of argon, hydrogen, and silicon tetrachloride were activated using very high frequency (VHF = 144 MHz) power source in a capillary glass tube with a volume of less than 1 μ-liter. Fundamental plasma parameters of VHF capacitively coupled microplasma were characterized by optical emission spectroscopy, showing electron density of approximately 1015 cm-3 and rotational temperature of 1500 K, respectively. Such high-density non-thermal reactive plasma has a capability of decomposing silicon tetrachloride into atomic silicon to produce supersaturated atomic silicon vapor, followed by gas phase nucleation via three-body collision. The particle synthesis in high-density plasma media is beneficial for promoting nucleation process. In addition, further growth of silicon nuclei was able to be favorably terminated in a short-residence time reactor. Micro Raman scattering spectrum showed that as-deposited particles were mostly amorphous silicon with small fraction of silicon nanocrystals. Transmission electron micrograph confirmed individual silicon nanocrystals of 3-15 nm size. Although those particles were not mono-dispersed, they were

  12. Preparation of a stable sol suspension of Pd-loaded SnO₂ nanocrystals by a photochemical deposition method for highly sensitive semiconductor gas sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Masayoshi; Kida, Tetsuya; Shimanoe, Kengo

    2012-08-01

    A stable sol suspension of Pd-loaded SnO(2) nanocrystals, which is valid for both fundamental studies of semiconductor gas sensor and fabrications of a micro gas sensor, was fabricated by the photochemical deposition of PdCl(4)(2-) onto SnO(2) in an aqueous solution. UV light was irradiated on a mixture of a SnO(2) sol obtained through a hydrothermal treatment of stannic acid gel in the presence of PdCl(4)(2-) and ethanol/water at pH 2. A stable sol suspension of Pd-loaded SnO(2) was successfully obtained by controlling the pH of the above suspension to 10.5 after UV irradiation. Thin-film type sensor devices (film thickness ∼200 nm) using Pd-loaded SnO(2) nanocrystal were successfully fabricated by a spin-coating method. Gas sensing measurements showed that the deposition of Pd on the SnO(2) nanocrystals resulted in large electrical sensitization effect. The maximum gas sensitization effect was obtained at 0.125 mol % Pd loading. Moreover, the Pd loading lowered the temperature, in which the maximum sensor response to H(2) was obtained, due to the efficient catalytic combustion of H(2) on Pd.

  13. Structure and Magnetic Properties of Lanthanide Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickerson, James Henry [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We have had considerable success on this project, particularly in the understanding of the relationship between nanostructure and magnetic properties in lanthanide nanocrystals. We also have successfully facilitated the doctoral degrees of Dr. Suseela Somarajan, in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Dr. Melissa Harrison, in the Materials Science Program. The following passages summarize the various accomplishments that were featured in 9 publications that were generated based on support from this grant. We thank the Department of Energy for their generous support of our research efforts in this area of materials science, magnetism, and electron microscopy.

  14. Flame synthesis of zinc oxide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchan-Merchan, Wilson, E-mail: wmerchan-merchan@ou.edu [School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Farahani, Moien Farmahini [School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report a single-step flame method for the synthesis of Zn oxide nanocrystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diverse flame positions lead to a variation of Zn oxide nanocrystal growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The synthesized crystals have polyhedral, pipet- and needle-like shape. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High length-to-diameter aspect-ratio crystals appear in a higher temperature flame. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal growth mechanism corresponds to vapor-to-solid conversion. - Abstract: Distinctive zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals were synthesized on the surface of Zn probes using a counter-flow flame medium formed by methane/acetylene and oxygen-enriched air streams. The source material, a zinc wire with a purity of {approx}99.99% and diameter of 1 mm, was introduced through a sleeve into the oxygen rich region of the flame. The position of the probe/sleeve was varied within the flame medium resulting in growth variation of ZnO nanocrystals on the surface of the probe. The shape and structural parameters of the grown crystals strongly depend on the flame position. Structural variations of the synthesized crystals include single-crystalline ZnO nanorods and microprisms (ZMPs) (the ZMPs have less than a few micrometers in length and several hundred nanometers in cross section) with a large number of facets and complex axial symmetry with a nanorod protruding from their tips. The protruding rods are less than 100 nm in diameter and lengths are less than 1 {mu}m. The protruding nanorods can be elongated several times by increasing the residence time of the probe/sleeve inside the oxygen-rich flame or by varying the flame position. At different flame heights, nanorods having higher length-to-diameter aspect-ratio can be synthesized. A lattice spacing of {approx}0.26 nm was measured for the synthesized nanorods, which can be closely correlated with the (0 0 2) interplanar spacing of hexagonal ZnO (Wurtzite) cells

  15. Well-coupled graphene and Pd-based bimetallic nanocrystals nanocomposites for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huanhuan; Liu, Suli; Zhang, Chunli; Bao, Jianchun; Zheng, Yulin; Han, Min; Dai, Zhihui

    2014-02-12

    In this paper, a series of well-coupled graphene (G) and MPd3 (M = Fe, Cu, Ag, Au, Cr, Mo, W) nanocrystals nanocomposites (G-MPd3 NCPs) have been synthesized via a versatile electrostatic assembly and hydrogen reduction strategy, i.e., sequential assembly of coordination anions and cations on excess cationic polymer modified graphene oxide to form composite precursors and then thermal treating under H2/Ar gases atmosphere. In those NCPs, the MPd3 components are uniform and smaller than 10 nm, which are well anchored on G with "naked" or "clean" surfaces. By adjusting reaction temperature, the interplay of MPd3 nanocrystals and G can be well-controlled. Below 700 °C, no sintering phenomena are observed, indicating the unprecedented dispersion and stability effect of G for MPd3 nanocrystals. All the obtained NCPs can be directly used to catalyze oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media. Compared with single component, monometallic, and some reported non-Pt catalysts, greatly enhanced electrocatalytic performances are observed in those NCPs due to strong synergistic or coupling of their constituents. Among them, G-FePd3 NCPs exhibit the highest catalytic activity, but their current density needs to be improved compared with G-CrPd3, G-MoPd3, and G-WPd3 ones. This work not only provides a general strategy for fabricating well-coupled G-MPd3 NCPs but also paves the way for future designing multicomponent NCPs with multiple interfaces to apply in alkaline fuel cells.

  16. Preparation and physicochemical characterization of cellulose nanocrystals from industrial waste cotton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thambiraj, S.; Ravi Shankaran, D., E-mail: dravishankaran@hotmail.com

    2017-08-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of the preparation of cellulose nanocrystals from industrial waste cotton. - Highlights: • Cellulose microcrystals (CMCs) were synthesized from industrial waste cotton by controlled acid and basic hydrolysis. • Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) were synthesized from CMCs by controlled acid hydrolysis. • The synthesis process is simple and the CNCs possess liquid crystalline character, biocompatibility and sustainability. • The morphology of the CNCs were studied by AFM and TEM analysis. The average width is 10 ± 1 nm and length is 180 ± 60 nm. - Abstract: We aimed to develop a simple and low-cost method for the production of high-performance cellulose nanomaterials from renewable and sustainable resources. Here, cellulose microcrystals (CMCs) were prepared by controlled acidic and basic hydrolysis of cotton from textile industry wastes. The resulted CMCs were further converted into cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) with high crystallinity by acidic hydrolysis. The physicochemical characteristics and morphological feature of CMCs and CNCs were studied by various analytical techniques such as UV–vis spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fluorescence spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy (AFM), High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The isolated CNCs possess a needle-like morphological structure with the longitudinal and lateral dimensions of 180 ± 60 nm, 10 ± 1 nm, respectively. The AFM result reveals that the CNCs have a high aspect ratio of 40 ± 14 nm and the average thickness of 6.5 nm. The XRD and TEM analysis indicate that the synthesized CNCs possess face-centered cubic crystal structure. Preliminary experiments were carried out to fabricate CNCs incorporated poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) film. The results suggest that the concept of waste to wealth could be well

  17. Surface and Core Electronic Structure of Oxidized Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor A. Nama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio restricted Hartree-Fock method within the framework of large unit cell formalism is used to simulate silicon nanocrystals between 216 and 1000 atoms (1.6–2.65 nm in diameter that include Bravais and primitive cell multiples. The investigated properties include core and oxidized surface properties. Results revealed that electronic properties converge to some limit as the size of the nanocrystal increases. Increasing the size of the core of a nanocrystal resulted in an increase of the energy gap, valence band width, and cohesive energy. The lattice constant of the core and oxidized surface parts shows a decreasing trend as the nanocrystal increases in a size that converges to 5.28 Ǻ in a good agreement with the experiment. Surface and core convergence to the same lattice constant reflects good adherence of oxide layer at the surface. The core density of states shows highly degenerate states that split at the oxygenated (001-(1×1 surface due to symmetry breaking. The nanocrystal surface shows smaller gap and higher valence and conduction bands when compared to the core part, due to oxygen surface atoms and reduced structural symmetry. The smaller surface energy gap shows that energy gap of the nanocrystal is controlled by the surface part. Unlike the core part, the surface part shows a descending energy gap that proves its obedience to quantum confinement effects. Nanocrystal geometry proved to have some influence on all electronic properties including the energy gap.

  18. STM/STS and BEES study of nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jianfei

    This work investigates the electronic properties of very small gold and semiconductor particles using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES). Complementary theoretical works were also performed. The first theoretical work was to calculate the quantized states in the CdS/HgS/CdS quantum-well-quantum-dot nanocrystals using eight-band envelope method. Measured spectroscopy data on gold nanocrystals have rich features. In order to understand and relate these features to the electronic properties of the nanocrystals, we developed a tunneling model. This model includes the effect of excited states which have electron-hole pairs. The relaxation between discrete energy levels can also be included in this model. We also considered how the nanocrystals affect the BEES current. In this work an ultra-high vacuum and low-temperature STM was re-designed and re-built. The BEEM/BEES capabilities were incorporated into the STM. We used this STM to image gold nanocrystals and semiconductor nanocrystals. STS and BEES spectra of gold nanocrystals were collected and compared with calculations.

  19. Structural and morphological evaluation of Ru–Pd bimetallic nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xianfeng [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Lin, Rui; Ofoli, Robert Y. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Mei, Zhi, E-mail: zmei@chem.wayne.edu [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Jackson, James E., E-mail: jackson@chemistry.msu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Ru–Pd bimetallic nanocrystals are successfully synthesized via a facile polyol co-reduction method. The resulting nanocrystals show spheres, triangular nanoplates, decahedra, nanorods, and irregular shapes. A combination of Pd{sup II} and Ru{sup III} precursors tends to yield Ru–Pd bimetallic nanocrystals of higher shape monodispersity than those from Pd{sup II} and Ru{sup II} precursors. The mole ratio between Ru and Pd components in the precursor solution also plays a key role in determining the size/shape distribution of the nanocrystals, with higher Pd/Ru ratios generating products of more uniform size. Elemental analyses and electron microscopy studies suggest that the obtained nanocrystals have alloyed structures over the full composition space and that they form through either monomer addition or coalescence mechanisms. - Highlights: • 1. Polyol reduction method generates well-controlled Ru–Pd alloy nanocrystals. • Ru precursor types play a significant role in tuning particle morphology and structures. • Pd to Ru precursor molar ratio controls final particle size and composition. • Ru–Pd bimetallic nanocrystals display alloyed structures over full composition space.

  20. Luminescent Colloidal Semiconductor Nanocrystals Containing Copper: Synthesis, Photophysics, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Kathryn E; Hartstein, Kimberly H; Kilburn, Troy B; Marchioro, Arianna; Nelson, Heidi D; Whitham, Patrick J; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2016-09-28

    Copper-doped semiconductors are classic phosphor materials that have been used in a variety of applications for many decades. Colloidal copper-doped semiconductor nanocrystals have recently attracted a great deal of interest because they combine the solution processability and spectral tunability of colloidal nanocrystals with the unique photoluminescence properties of copper-doped semiconductor phosphors. Although ternary and quaternary semiconductors containing copper, such as CuInS2 and Cu2ZnSnS4, have been studied primarily in the context of their photovoltaic applications, when synthesized as colloidal nanocrystals, these materials have photoluminescence properties that are remarkably similar to those of copper-doped semiconductor nanocrystals. This review focuses on the luminescent properties of colloidal copper-doped, copper-based, and related copper-containing semiconductor nanocrystals. Fundamental investigations into the luminescence of copper-containing colloidal nanocrystals are reviewed in the context of the well-established luminescence mechanisms of bulk copper-doped semiconductors and copper(I) molecular coordination complexes. The use of colloidal copper-containing nanocrystals in applications that take advantage of their luminescent properties, such as bioimaging, solid-state lighting, and luminescent solar concentrators, is also discussed.

  1. Diffusion of iron in β-iron telluride (Fe1.12Te) by Moessbauer spectroscopy and tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magara, Masaaki; Tsuji, Toshihide; Naito, Keiji

    1993-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of iron in a β-iron telluride (Fe 1.12 Te) polycrystalline sample was measured by Moessbauer diffusional line broadening method which relates to the collapse of coherence in gamma-ray photon by the atomic jump at local sites. The diffusion coefficient of iron along the c-axis in nearly single crystal of β-iron telluride was also measured by tracer technique which shows the results of an atom transport in long distance. The activation energies for the diffusion of iron in Fe 1.12 Te obtained by the Moessbauer spectroscopy and the tracer method were 91.5±5.4 and 106±23 kJ/mol, respectively. The diffusion coefficients of iron in β-iron telluride obtained by Moessbauer line broadening are in fair agreement with the values averaged from that along c-axis obtained by tracer method and that along a- and b-axes obtained from reaction rate constant between iron and tellurium by the previous study of the present authors. (orig.)

  2. Effects of chemical intermixing on electrical and thermal contact conductances at metallized bismuth and antimony telluride interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devender,; Mehta, Rutvik J.; Ramanath, Ganpati, E-mail: Ramanath@rpi.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Lofgreen, Kelly; Mahajan, Ravi [Intel Corporation, Assembly Test and Technology Development, Chandler, Arizona 85226 (United States); Yamaguchi, Masashi [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian [Department of Mechanical Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Tailoring electrical and thermal contact conductivities (Σ{sub c} and Γ{sub c}) across metallized pnictogen chalcogenide interfaces is key for realizing efficient thermoelectric devices. The authors report that Cu, Ni, Ti, and Ta diffusion and interfacial telluride formation with n-Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and p-Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} influence both Σ{sub c} and Γ{sub c}. Cu metallization yields the highest Γ{sub c} and the lowest Σ{sub c}, correlating with maximal metal diffusion and copper telluride formation. Ni diffuses less and yields the highest Σ{sub c} with Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} due to p-type nickel telluride formation, which diminishes Σ{sub c} improvement with n-Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} interfaces. Ta and Ti contacts yield the lowest properties similar to that in Ni-metallized structures. These correlations between interfacial diffusion and phase formation on electronic and thermal transport properties will be important for devising suitable metallization for thermoelectric devices.

  3. Enhanced thermoelectric properties of phase-separating bismuth selenium telluride thin films via a two-step method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takashiri, Masayuki, E-mail: takashiri@tokai-u.jp; Kurita, Kensuke [Department of Materials Science, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Hagino, Harutoshi; Miyazaki, Koji [Department of Mechanical and Control Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, 1-1 Sensui, Tobata-ku, Kitakyushu 804-8550 (Japan); Tanaka, Saburo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, Nihon University, 1 Nakagawara, Tokusada, Tamuramachi, Koriyama, Fukushima 963-8642 (Japan)

    2015-08-14

    A two-step method that combines homogeneous electron beam (EB) irradiation and thermal annealing has been developed to enhance the thermoelectric properties of nanocrystalline bismuth selenium telluride thin films. The thin films, prepared using a flash evaporation method, were treated with EB irradiation in a N{sub 2} atmosphere at room temperature and an acceleration voltage of 0.17 MeV. Thermal annealing was performed under Ar/H{sub 2} (5%) at 300 °C for 60 min. X-ray diffraction was used to determine that compositional phase separation between bismuth telluride and bismuth selenium telluride developed in the thin films exposed to higher EB doses and thermal annealing. We propose that the phase separation was induced by fluctuations in the distribution of selenium atoms after EB irradiation, followed by the migration of selenium atoms to more stable sites during thermal annealing. As a result, thin film crystallinity improved and mobility was significantly enhanced. This indicates that the phase separation resulting from the two-step method enhanced, rather than disturbed, the electron transport. Both the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient were improved following the two-step method. Consequently, the power factor of thin films that underwent the two-step method was enhanced to 20 times (from 0.96 to 21.0 μW/(cm K{sup 2}) that of the thin films treated with EB irradiation alone.

  4. Improved electronic coupling in hybrid organic-inorganic nanocomposites employing thiol-functionalized P3HT and bismuth sulfide nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, L; Higuchi, S; MacLachlan, A J; Stavrinadis, A; Miller, N C; Diedenhofen, S L; Bernechea, M; Sweetnam, S; Nelson, J; Haque, S A; Tajima, K; Konstantatos, G

    2014-09-07

    In this study, we employ a thiol-functionalized polymer (P3HT-SH) as a leverage to tailor the nanomorphology and electronic coupling in polymer-nanocrystal composites for hybrid solar cells. The presence of the thiol functional group allows for a highly crystalline semiconducting polymer film at low thiol content and allows for improved nanomorphologies in hybrid organic-inorganic systems when employing non-toxic bismuth sulfide nanocrystals. The exciton dissociation efficiency and carrier dynamics at this hybrid heterojunction are investigated through photoluminescence quenching and transient absorption spectroscopy measurements, revealing a larger degree of polaron formation when P3HT-SH is employed, suggesting an increased electronic interaction between the metal chalcogenide nanocrystals and the thiol-functionalized P3HT. The fabricated photovoltaic devices show 15% higher power conversion efficiencies as a result of the improved nanomorphology and better charge transfer mechanism together with the higher open circuit voltages arising from the deeper energy levels of P3HT-SH.

  5. Upconversion luminescence properties of Er(3+)-Bi3+ codoped CaSnO3 nanocrystals with perovskite structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xinling; Zhang, Ying; Ding, Linghong; Su, Zhaohui; Zhang, W F

    2010-03-01

    New phosphor nanocrystals of ASnO3:Er3+ (A = Ca, Sr, and Ba) and CaSnO3:Er(3+)-Bi3+ were prepared by a hydrothermal method. Their structures were examined by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Upconversion luminescence properties of the Er3+ ions in these host materials were investigated upon excitation at 980 nm. Green emission bands of Er3+ around 528 and 545 nm were more favorable in CaSnO3 than in SrSnO3 and BaSnO3. This was interpreted in terms of a crystal structural distortion and configuration coordinate model. The investigation of the upconversion luminescence of Er(3+)-Bi3+codoped CaSnO3 nanocrystals indicates that Bi3+ ions could largely sensitize the emission of Er3+ ions which was attributed to the efficient energy transfer from Bi3+ to Er3+ ions and the modification of the local symmetry of Er3+ ions. The results show that the CaSnO3:Er(3+)-Bi3+ nanocrystals have potential application for fabricating visible upconversion devices.

  6. Towards ion beam synthesis of single CdSe nanocrystal quantum dots in a SiO{sub 2} matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangold, Hans Moritz; Kinzel, Joerg B.; Krenner, Hubert J. [Emmy Noether Group at Lehrstuhl Experimentalphysik 1, Universitaet Augsburg (Germany); Karl, Helmut [Lehrstuhl Experimentalphysik IV, Universitaet Augsburg (Germany); Wixforth, Achim [Lehrstuhl Experimentalphysik I, Universitaet Augsburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    II-VI compound semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are a promising class of materials for applications in optical devices in the visible spectral domain. Here we show that in addition to traditional fabrication techniques such as molecular beam epitaxy or chemical synthesis, high fluence ion-beam implantation followed by a rapid thermal annealing step, can be readily applied to synthesize CdSe nanocrystals with superior optical properties within the thermal oxide on a Si wafer. In order to confine the implantation volume we employ chromium masks with arrays of nanoscale aperture openings with diameters smaller than 250 nm. We analyzed the such implanted and annealed samples by scanning electron microscopy and micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy. We observe a pronounced broadening and blue shift of the nanocrystal emission when decreasing the aperture diameter to <1000 nm. We attribute this behavior to a reduction of the mean nanocrystal size but increase of its size distribution. For the smallest aperture sizes used we observe a pronounced shell-filling behavior characteristic for single quantum dot nanoemitters.

  7. Formation of hollow nanocrystals through the nanoscale kirkendall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Yadong; Rioux, Robert M.; Erdonmez, Can K.; Hughes, Steven; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2004-03-11

    We demonstrate that hollow nanocrystals can be synthesized through a mechanism analogous to the Kirkendall Effect, in which pores form due to the difference in diffusion rates between two components in a diffusion couple. Cobalt nanocrystals are chosen as a primary example to show that their reaction in solution with oxygen, sulfur or selenium leads to the formation of hollow nanocrystals of the resulting oxide and chalcogenides. This process provides a general route to the synthesis of hollow nanostructures of large numbers of compounds. A simple extension of this process yields platinum-cobalt oxide yolk-shell nanostructures which may serve as nanoscale reactors in catalytic applications.

  8. Controlled Chemical Doping of Semiconductor Nanocrystals Using Redox Buffers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, Jesse H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Surendranath, Yogesh [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Alivisatos, Paul [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-07-20

    Semiconductor nanocrystal solids are attractive materials for active layers in next-generation optoelectronic devices; however, their efficient implementation has been impeded by the lack of precise control over dopant concentrations. Herein we demonstrate a chemical strategy for the controlled doping of nanocrystal solids under equilibrium conditions. Exposing lead selenide nanocrystal thin films to solutions containing varying proportions of decamethylferrocene and decamethylferrocenium incrementally and reversibly increased the carrier concentration in the solid by 2 orders of magnitude from their native values. This application of redox buffers for controlled doping provides a new method for the precise control of the majority carrier concentration in porous semiconductor thin films.

  9. Steroid nanocrystals prepared using the nano spray dryer B-90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Koichi; Nishida, Kohji

    2013-01-25

    The Nano Spray Dryer B-90 offers a new, simple, and alternative approach for the production of drug nanocrystals. In this study, the preparation of steroid nanocrystals using the Nano Spray Dryer B-90 was demonstrated. The particle size was controlled by selecting the mesh aperture size. Submicrometer steroid particles in powder form were successfully obtained. These nanoparticles were confirmed to have a crystal structure using powder X-ray diffraction pattern analysis. Since drug nanocrystals have recently been considered as a novel type of drug formulation for drug delivery systems, this study will be useful for nano-medical applications.

  10. Orientation dependence of the work function for metal nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lingyuan; Souto-Casares, Jaime; Chelikowsky, James R.; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2017-12-01

    Work function values measured at different surfaces of a metal are usually different. This raises an interesting question: What is the work function of a nano-size crystal, where differently oriented facets can be adjacent? Work functions of metallic nanocrystals are also of significant practical interest, especially in catalytic applications. Using real space pseudopotentials constructed within density functional theory, we compute the local work function of large aluminum and gold nanocrystals. We investigate how the local work function follows the change of the surface plane orientation around multifaceted nanocrystals, and we establish the importance of the orbital character near the Fermi level in determining work function differences between facets.

  11. Fluxible nanoclusters of Fe3O4 nanocrystal-embedded polyaniline by macromolecule-induced self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Li, Qi; Li, Denian; Wang, Yue; Dong, Lijie; Xie, Haian; Wang, Jun; Xiong, Chuanxi

    2013-08-13

    We have prepared Fe3O4 nanocrystal-embedded polyaniline hybrids with well-defined cluster-like morphology through macromolecule-induced self-assembly. These magnetic and electrically conductive composite nanoclusters show flowability at room temperature in the absence of any solvent, which offers great potential in applications such as microwave absorbents and electromagnetic shielding coatings. This macromolecule-induced self-assembly strategy can be readily applied on the fabrication of other ion oxide/conjugated polymer composites to achieve robust multifunctional materials.

  12. Nanocrystal clusters in combination with spectral imaging to improve sensitivity in antibody labeling applications of fluorescent nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, John S.; Panza, Janice L.; Bootman, Matt

    2007-02-01

    Composition-tunable nanocrystals are fluorescent nanoparticles with a uniform particle size and with adjustable optical characteristics. When used for optical labeling of biomolecular targets these and other nanotechnology solutions have enabled new approaches which are possible because of the high optical output, narrow spectral signal, consistent quantum efficiency across a broad emission range and long lived fluorescent behavior of the nanocrystals. When coupled with spectral imaging the full potential of multiplexing multiple probes in a complex matrix can be realized. Spectral imaging can be used to improve sensitivity of narrowband fluorophores through application of chemometric image processing techniques used to reduce the influence of autofluorescence background. Composition-tunable nanocrystals can be complexed together to form nanoclusters which have the advantage of significantly stronger signal and therefore a higher sensitivity. These nanoclusters can be targeted in biomolecular systems using standard live-cell labeling and immunohistochemistry based techniques. Composition-tunable nanocrystals and nanoclusters have comparable mass and brightness across a wide emission range. This enables the production of nanocrystal-based probes that have comparable reactivity and sensitivity over a large color range. We present spectral imaging results of antibody targeted nanocrystal cluster labeling of target proteins in cultured cells and a Western blot experiment. The combination of spectral imaging with the use of clusters of nanocrystals further improves the sensitivity over either of the approaches independently.

  13. Reusable hydroxyapatite nanocrystal sensors for protein adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Chakarov, Dinko; Kasemo, Bengt; Tanaka, Junzo

    2010-08-01

    The repeatability of the adsorption and removal of fibrinogen and fetal bovine serum on hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystal sensors was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring technique. The HAp nanocrystals were coated on a gold-coated quartz sensor by electrophoretic deposition. Proteins adsorbed on the HAp sensors were removed by (i) ammonia/hydrogen peroxide mixture (APM), (ii) ultraviolet light (UV), (iii) UV/APM, (iv) APM/UV and (v) sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) treatments. FTIR spectra of the reused surfaces revealed that the APM and SDS treatments left peptide fragments or the proteins adsorbed on the surfaces, whereas the other methods successfully removed the proteins. The QCM-D measurements indicated that in the removal treatments, fibrinogen was slowly adsorbed in the first cycle because of the change in surface wettability revealed by contact angle measurements. The SDS treatment was not effective in removing proteins. The APM or UV treatment decreased the frequency shifts for the reused HAp sensors. The UV/APM treatment did not induce the frequency shifts but decreased the dissipation shifts. Therefore, we conclude that the APM/UV treatment is the most useful method for reproducing protein adsorption behavior on HAp sensors.

  14. Reusable hydroxyapatite nanocrystal sensors for protein adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Hanagata, Nobutaka [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Chakarov, Dinko; Kasemo, Bengt [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteberg S-41296 (Sweden); Tanaka, Junzo, E-mail: tikoma@ceram.titech.ac.j [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    The repeatability of the adsorption and removal of fibrinogen and fetal bovine serum on hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystal sensors was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring technique. The HAp nanocrystals were coated on a gold-coated quartz sensor by electrophoretic deposition. Proteins adsorbed on the HAp sensors were removed by (i) ammonia/hydrogen peroxide mixture (APM), (ii) ultraviolet light (UV), (iii) UV/APM, (iv) APM/UV and (v) sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) treatments. FTIR spectra of the reused surfaces revealed that the APM and SDS treatments left peptide fragments or the proteins adsorbed on the surfaces, whereas the other methods successfully removed the proteins. The QCM-D measurements indicated that in the removal treatments, fibrinogen was slowly adsorbed in the first cycle because of the change in surface wettability revealed by contact angle measurements. The SDS treatment was not effective in removing proteins. The APM or UV treatment decreased the frequency shifts for the reused HAp sensors. The UV/APM treatment did not induce the frequency shifts but decreased the dissipation shifts. Therefore, we conclude that the APM/UV treatment is the most useful method for reproducing protein adsorption behavior on HAp sensors.

  15. Reusable hydroxyapatite nanocrystal sensors for protein adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motohiro Tagaya, Toshiyuki Ikoma, Nobutaka Hanagata, Dinko Chakarov, Bengt Kasemo and Junzo Tanaka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The repeatability of the adsorption and removal of fibrinogen and fetal bovine serum on hydroxyapatite (HAp nanocrystal sensors was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D monitoring technique. The HAp nanocrystals were coated on a gold-coated quartz sensor by electrophoretic deposition. Proteins adsorbed on the HAp sensors were removed by (i ammonia/hydrogen peroxide mixture (APM, (ii ultraviolet light (UV, (iii UV/APM, (iv APM/UV and (v sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS treatments. FTIR spectra of the reused surfaces revealed that the APM and SDS treatments left peptide fragments or the proteins adsorbed on the surfaces, whereas the other methods successfully removed the proteins. The QCM-D measurements indicated that in the removal treatments, fibrinogen was slowly adsorbed in the first cycle because of the change in surface wettability revealed by contact angle measurements. The SDS treatment was not effective in removing proteins. The APM or UV treatment decreased the frequency shifts for the reused HAp sensors. The UV/APM treatment did not induce the frequency shifts but decreased the dissipation shifts. Therefore, we conclude that the APM/UV treatment is the most useful method for reproducing protein adsorption behavior on HAp sensors.

  16. Reusable hydroxyapatite nanocrystal sensors for protein adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Chakarov, Dinko; Kasemo, Bengt; Tanaka, Junzo

    2010-01-01

    The repeatability of the adsorption and removal of fibrinogen and fetal bovine serum on hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystal sensors was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring technique. The HAp nanocrystals were coated on a gold-coated quartz sensor by electrophoretic deposition. Proteins adsorbed on the HAp sensors were removed by (i) ammonia/hydrogen peroxide mixture (APM), (ii) ultraviolet light (UV), (iii) UV/APM, (iv) APM/UV and (v) sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) treatments. FTIR spectra of the reused surfaces revealed that the APM and SDS treatments left peptide fragments or the proteins adsorbed on the surfaces, whereas the other methods successfully removed the proteins. The QCM-D measurements indicated that in the removal treatments, fibrinogen was slowly adsorbed in the first cycle because of the change in surface wettability revealed by contact angle measurements. The SDS treatment was not effective in removing proteins. The APM or UV treatment decreased the frequency shifts for the reused HAp sensors. The UV/APM treatment did not induce the frequency shifts but decreased the dissipation shifts. Therefore, we conclude that the APM/UV treatment is the most useful method for reproducing protein adsorption behavior on HAp sensors.

  17. Radiative and Nonradiative Recombination in CuInS2 Nanocrystals and CuInS2-Based Core/Shell Nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, A.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411263986; Rabouw, F.T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413318036; Spoor, Frank; Bladt, Eva; Grozema, Ferdinand; Houtepen, Arjan; Siebbeles, Laurens; de Mello-Donega, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/125593899

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent copper indium sulfide (CIS) nanocrystals are a potential solution to the toxicity issues associated with Cd- and Pb-based nanocrystals. However, the development of high-quality CIS nanocrystals has been complicated by insufficient knowledge of the electronic structure and of the factors

  18. The upconversion luminescence and magnetism in Yb{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} co-doped LaF{sub 3} nanocrystals for potential bimodal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syamchand, Sasidharanpillai S., E-mail: syamchand.ss@gmail.com; George, Sony, E-mail: emailtosony@gmail.com [University of Kerala, Department of Chemistry (India)

    2016-12-15

    Biocompatible upconversion nanoparticles with multifunctional properties can serve as potential nanoprobes for multimodal imaging. Herein, we report an upconversion nanocrystal based on lanthanum fluoride which is developed to address the imaging modalities, upconversion luminescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Lanthanide ions (Yb{sup 3+} and Ho{sup 3+}) doped LaF{sub 3} nanocrystals (LaF{sub 3} Yb{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+}) are fabricated through a rapid microwave-assisted synthesis. The hexagonal phase LaF{sub 3} nanocrystals exhibit nearly spherical morphology with average diameter of 9.8 nm. The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis estimated the doping concentration of Yb{sup 3+} and Ho{sup 3+} as 3.99 and 0.41%, respectively. The nanocrystals show upconversion luminescence when irradiated with near-infrared (NIR) photons of wavelength 980 nm. The emission spectrum consists of bands centred at 542, 645 and 658 nm. The stronger green emission at 542 nm and the weak red emissions at 645 and 658 nm are assigned to {sup 5}S{sub 2} → {sup 5}I{sub 8} and {sup 5}F{sub 5} → {sup 5}I{sub 8} transitions of Ho{sup 3+}, respectively. The pump power dependence of luminescence intensity confirmed the two-photon upconversion process. The nanocrystals exhibit paramagnetism due to the presence of lanthanide ion dopant Ho{sup 3+} and the magnetization is 19.81 emu/g at room temperature. The nanocrystals exhibit a longitudinal relaxivity (r{sub 1}) of 0.12 s{sup −1} mM{sup −1} and transverse relaxivity (r{sub 2}) of 28.18 s{sup −1} mM{sup −1}, which makes the system suitable for developing T2 MRI contrast agents based on holmium. The LaF{sub 3} Yb{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} nanocrystals are surface modified by PEGylation to improve biocompatibility and enhance further functionalisation. The PEGylated nanocrystals are found to be non-toxic up to 50 μg/mL for 48 h of incubation, which is confirmed by the MTT assay as well as

  19. Synthesis, Deposition, and Microstructure Development of Thin Films Formed by Sulfidation and Selenization of Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernomordik, Boris David

    Significant reduction in greenhouse gas emission and pollution associated with the global power demand can be accomplished by supplying tens-of-terawatts of power with solar cell technologies. No one solar cell material currently on the market is poised to meet this challenge due to issues such as manufacturing cost, material shortage, or material toxicity. For this reason, there is increasing interest in efficient light-absorbing materials that are comprised of abundant and non-toxic elements for thin film solar cell. Among these materials are copper zinc tin sulfide (Cu2ZnSnS4, or CZTS), copper zinc tin selenide (Cu2ZnSnSe4, or CZTSe), and copper zinc tin sulfoselenide alloys [Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1-x )4, or CZTSSe]. Laboratory power conversion efficiencies of CZTSSe-based solar cells have risen to almost 13% in less than three decades of research. Meeting the terawatt challenge will also require low cost fabrication. CZTSSe thin films from annealed colloidal nanocrystal coatings is an example of solution-based methods that can reduce manufacturing costs through advantages such as high throughput, high material utilization, and low capital expenses. The film microstructure and grain size affects the solar cell performance. To realize low cost commercial production and high efficiencies of CZTSSe-based solar cells, it is necessary to understand the fundamental factors that affect crystal growth and microstructure evolution during CZTSSe annealing. Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals were synthesized via thermolysis of single-source cation and sulfur precursors copper, zinc and tin diethyldithiocarbamates. The average nanocrystal size could be tuned between 2 nm and 40 nm, by varying the synthesis temperature between 150 °C and 340 °C. The synthesis is rapid and is completed in less than 10 minutes. Characterization by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirm that the nanocrystals are nominally

  20. Growth and Characterization of (211)B Cadmium Telluride Buffer Layer Grown by Metal-organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy on Nanopatterned Silicon for Mercury Cadmium Telluride Based Infrared Detector Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintri, Shashidhar S.

    Mercury cadmium telluride (MCT or Hg1-xCdxTe) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is presently the material of choice for fabricating infrared (IR) detectors used in night vision based military applications. The focus of MCT epitaxy has gradually shifted since the last decade to using Si as the starting substrate since it offers several advantages. But the ˜19 % lattice mismatch between MCT and Si generates lots of crystal defects some of which degrade the performance of MCT devices. Hence thick CdTe films are used as buffer layers on Si to accommodate the defects. However, growth of high quality single crystal CdTe on Si is challenging and to date, the best MBE CdTe/Si reportedly has defects in the mid-105 cm -2 range. There is a critical need to reduce the defect levels by at least another order of magnitude, which is the main motivation behind the present work. The use of alternate growth technique called metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) offers some advantages over MBE and in this work MOVPE has been employed to grow the various epitaxial films. In the first part of this work, conditions for obtaining high quality (211)B CdTe epitaxy on (211)Si were achieved, which also involved studying the effect of having additional intermediate buffer layers such as Ge and ZnTe and incorporation of in-situ thermal cyclic annealing (TCA) to reduce the dislocation density. A critical problem of Si cross-contamination due to 'memory effect' of different reactant species was minimized by introducing tertiarybutylArsine (TBAs) which resulted in As-passivation of (211)Si. The best 8-10 µm thick CdTe films on blanket (non-patterned) Si had dislocations around 3×105 cm-2, which are the best reported by MOVPE till date and comparable to the highest quality films available by MBE. In the second part of the work, nanopatterned (211)Si was used to study the effect of patterning on the crystal quality of epitaxial CdTe. In one such study, patterning of ˜20 nm holes in SiO2

  1. Fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals via supramolecular assembly of terpyridine-modified cellulose nanocrystals and terpyridine-modified perylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Mohammad L.; Moorefield, Charles M.; Elbatal, Hany S.; Newkome, George R.; Modarelli, David A.; Romano, Natalie C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Surfaces of cellulose nanocrystals were modified with terpyridine ligands. ► Fluorescent nanocrystals could be obtained via self-assembly of terpyridine-modified perylene dye onto the terpyridine-modified cellulose nanocrystals. ► Further self-assembly of azide-functionalized terpyridine onto the fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals was possible to obtain nanocellulosic material with expected use in bioimaging. - Abstract: Due to their natural origin, biocompatibility, and non-toxicity, cellulose nanocrystals are promising candidates for applications in nanomedicine. Highly fluorescent nanocellulosic material was prepared via surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals with 2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine side chains followed by supramolecular assembly of terpyridine-modified perylene dye onto the terpyridine-modified cellulose nanocrystals (CTP) via Ru III /Ru II reduction. The prepared terpyridine-modified cellulose-Ru II -terpyridine-modified perylene (CTP-Ru II -PeryTP) fluorescent nanocrystals were characterized using cross-polarized/magic angle spin 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS 13 C NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV–visible, and fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, further self-assembly of terpyridine units with azide functional groups onto CTP-Ru II -PeryTP was possible via repeating the Ru III /Ru II reduction protocol to prepare supramolecular fluorescent nanocrystals with azide functionality (CTP-Ru II -PeryTP-Ru II -AZTP). The prepared derivative may have potential application in bio-imaging since the terminal azide groups can be easily reacted with antigens via “Click” chemistry reaction.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of bismuth telluride based nanostructured thermoelectric composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz Khorasgani, Mohsen

    Thermoelectric (TE) materials and devices are attractive in solid-state energy conversion applications such as waste heat recovery, air-conditioning, and refrigeration. Since the 1950's lots of unremitting efforts have been made to enhance the efficiency of energy conversion in TE materials (i. e. improving the figure of merit (ZT)), however, most of commercial bulk TE materials still suffer from low efficiency with ZTs around unity. To enhance the performance of bismuth telluride based TE alloys, we have developed composite TE materials, based on the idea that introducing more engineered interfaces in the bulk TE materials may lead to thermal conductivity reduction due to increased phonon scattering by these interfaces. In this approach it is expected that the electronic transport properties of the material are not effectively affected. Consequently, ZT enhancement can be achieved. In this dissertation we will discuss synthesis and characterization of two types of bismuth telluride based bulk composite TE materials. The first type is engineered to contain the presence of coherent interfaces between phases in the material resulting from different mixtures of totally miscible compounds with similar composition. The second type includes the nanocomposites with embedded foreign nano-particles in which the matrix and the particles are delimited by incoherent interfaces. The synthesis procedure, micro- and nano-structures as well as thermoelectric properties of these composites will be presented. In our study on the composites with coherent interfaces, we produced a series of different composites of p-type bismuth antimony telluride alloys and studied their microstructure and thermoelectric properties. Each composite consists of two phases that were obtained in powder form by mechanical alloying. Mixed powders in various proportions of the two different phases were consolidated by hot extrusion to obtain each bulk composite. The minimum grain size of bulk composites as

  3. Analysis of the optical properties of Er{sup 3+}-doped strontium barium niobate nanocrystals using time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalska, D.; Haro-Gonzalez, P. [Universidad de La Laguna, Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Experimental, Electronica y Sistemas, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Martin, I.R. [Universidad de La Laguna, Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Experimental, Electronica y Sistemas, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Malta Consolider Team, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Caceres, J.M. [Universidad de La Laguna, Departamento de Edafologia y Geologia, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2010-06-15

    This paper reports the results obtained in strontium barium niobate (SBN) nanocrystals in glasses doped with 1, 2.5 and 5 mol% of Er{sup 3+} ions. The melt-quenching method was applied to fabricate the glasses with composition SrO-BaO-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and further thermal treatment was used to obtain glass ceramic samples from the glass precursor. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the formation of SBN nanocrystals with an average size of about 50 nm in diameter. Time-resolved fluorescence spectra for the emission of Er{sup 3+} ions at 1550 nm have been analyzed in order to confirm the incorporation of the Er{sup 3+} ions into the nanocrystals. Green frequency upconversion emission under excitation at 975 nm coming from the ions in the nanocrystals has been obtained. This intense upconversion is about a factor of 500 higher than that obtained from the ions which reside in the glassy phase. Moreover, temporal evolution studies have been carried out with the purpose of determining the involved upconversion mechanism and the importance of these processes as a source of losses for the optical amplification at 1550 nm. (orig.)

  4. Simple approach to reinforce hydrogels with cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Han, Chun-Rui; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2014-05-01

    The physical crosslinking of colloidal nanoparticles via dynamic and directional non-covalent interactions has led to significant advances in composite hydrogels. In this paper, we report a simple approach to fabricate tough, stretchable and hysteretic isotropic nanocomposite hydrogels, where rod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are encapsulated by flexible polymer chains of poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (PDMA). The CNC-PDMA colloidal clusters build a homogeneously cross-linked network and lead to significant reinforcing effect of the composites. Hierarchically structured CNC-PDMA clusters, from isolated particles to an interpenetrated network, are observed by transmission electron microscopy measurements. Dynamic shear oscillation measurements are applied to demystify the differences in network rheological behaviors, which were compared with network behaviors of chemically cross-linked PDMA counterparts. Tensile tests indicate that the hybrid hydrogels possess higher mechanical properties and a more efficient energy dissipation mechanism. In particular, with only 0.8 wt% of CNC loading, a 4.8-fold increase in Young's modulus, 9.2-fold increase in tensile strength, and 5.8-fold increase in fracture strain are achieved, which is ascribed to a combination of CNC reinforcement in the soft matrix and CNC-PDMA colloidal cluster conformational rearrangement under stretching. Physical interactions within networks serve as reversible sacrificial bonds that dissociate upon deformation, exhibiting large hysteresis as an energy dissipation mechanism via cluster mobility. This result contrasts with the case of chemically cross-linked PDMA counterparts where the stress relaxation is slow due to the permanent cross-links and low resistance against crack propagation within the covalent network.The physical crosslinking of colloidal nanoparticles via dynamic and directional non-covalent interactions has led to significant advances in composite hydrogels. In this paper, we report

  5. One-step synthesis of hybrid nanocrystals with rational tuning of the morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Wei; Zheng, Tingting; Wang, Youcheng; Li, Xu; Zhao, Xu; Zeng, Jie; Hou, J G

    2014-11-12

    Metal-sulfide hybrid nanocrystals (HNCs) have been of great interest for their distinguished interfacial effect, which gives rise to unique catalytic properties. However, most of the reported metal-sulfide HNCs were synthesized via two-step approaches and few were fabricated based on the one-step strategies. Herein, we report a facile one-pot synthesis of CuPt-Cu2S, Pt-Cu2S HNCs, and CuPt nanocubes by simply changing the Pt precursor types. 1-Hexadecanethiol (HDT) was employed in this system to mediate the reduction of metal precursors and also as capping agent and sulfur source. Moreover, CuPd-Cu2S and Au-Cu2S HNCs were successfully prepared by using this one-step method. The catalytic properties of the obtained three nanocrystals were investigated in hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde. Results show that CuPt-Cu2S HNCs exhibited the highest conversion rate and the highest selectivity toward hydrocinnamaldehyde while 3-phenyl-1-propanol was the only product over Pt-Cu2S HNCs.

  6. Thermally Stable Cellulose Nanocrystals toward High-Performance 2D and 3D Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chao; Bian, Huiyang; Gao, Tingting; Jiang, Feng; Kierzewski, Iain Michael; Wang, Yilin; Yao, Yonggang; Chen, Liheng; Shao, Ziqiang; Zhu, J Y; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-08-30

    Cellulose nanomaterials have attracted much attention in a broad range of fields such as flexible electronics, tissue engineering, and 3D printing for their excellent mechanical strength and intriguing optical properties. Economic, sustainable, and eco-friendly production of cellulose nanomaterials with high thermal stability, however, remains a tremendous challenge. Here versatile cellulose nanocrystals (DM-OA-CNCs) are prepared through fully recyclable oxalic acid (OA) hydrolysis along with disk-milling (DM) pretreatment of bleached kraft eucalyptus pulp. Compared with the commonly used cellulose nanocrystals from sulfuric acid hydrolysis, DM-OA-CNCs show several advantages including large aspect ratio, carboxylated surface, and excellent thermal stability along with high yield. We also successfully demonstrate the fabrication of high-performance films and 3D-printed patterns using DM-OA-CNCs. The high-performance films with high transparency, ultralow haze, and excellent thermal stability have the great potential for applications in flexible electronic devices. The 3D-printed patterns with porous structures can be potentially applied in the field of tissue engineering as scaffolds.

  7. Chitosan nanoparticles/cellulose nanocrystals nanocomposites as a carrier system for the controlled release of repaglinide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Elseoud, Wafaa S; Hassan, Mohammad L; Sabaa, Magdy W; Basha, Mona; Hassan, Enas A; Fadel, Shaimaa M

    2018-05-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the use of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and chitosan nanoparticles (CHNP) for developing controlled-release drug delivery system of the anti-hyperglycemic drug Repaglinide (RPG). CNC was isolated from palm fruit stalks by sulfuric acid hydrolysis; the dimensions of the isolated nanocrystals were 86-237 nm in length and 5-7 nm in width. Simple and economic method was used for the fabrication of controlled release drug delivery system from CNC and CHNP loaded with RPG drug via ionic gelation of chitosan in the presence of CNC and RPG. The prepared systems showed high drug encapsulation efficiency of about ~98%. Chemical modification of CNC by oxidation to introduce carboxylic groups on their surface (OXCNC) was also carried out for further controlling of RPG release. Particles size analysis showed that the average size of CHNP was about 197 nm while CHNP/CNC/RPG or CHNP/OXCNC/RPG nanoparticles showed average size of 215-310 nm. Compatibility studies by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed no chemical reaction between RPG and the system's components used. By studying the drug release kinetic, all the prepared RPG formulations followed Higuchi model, indicating that the drug released by diffusion through the nanoparticles polymeric matrix. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Microbial Uptake, Toxicity, and Fate of Biofabricated ZnS:Mn Nanocrystals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J F Swift

    Full Text Available Despite their importance in nano-environmental health and safety, interactions between engineered nanomaterials and microbial life remain poorly characterized. Here, we used the model organism E. coli to study the penetration requirements, subcellular localization, induction of stress responses, and long-term fate of luminescent Mn-doped ZnS nanocrystals fabricated under "green" processing conditions with a minimized ZnS-binding protein. We find that such protein-coated quantum dots (QDs are unable to penetrate the envelope of unmodified E. coli but readily translocate to the cytoplasm of cells that have been made competent by chemical treatment. The process is dose-dependent and reminiscent of bacterial transformation. Cells that have internalized up to 0.5 μg/mL of nanocrystals do not experience a significant activation of the unfolded protein or SOS responses but undergo oxidative stress when exposed to high QD doses (2.5 μg/mL. Finally, although they are stable in quiescent cells over temperatures ranging from 4 to 42°C, internalized QDs are rapidly diluted by cell division in a process that does not involve TolC-dependent efflux. Taken together, our results suggest that biomimetic QDs based on low toxicity inorganic cores capped by a protein shell are unlikely to cause significant damage to the microbial ecosystem.

  9. Ground-based experiments and theory in preparation for floating zone melting and directional solidification of cadmium telluride in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, W. R.; Carlson, F. M.; Aidun, D. K.; White, V.; Rosch, W.; Chang, W. M.; Shetty, R.; Fritz, A.; Balasubramanian, R.; Rosen, G.; Kweeder, J.; Wen, C.

    The objective of this program is to apply theoretical and experimental methods to optimize the equipment and procedures for floating zone melting and Bridgman-Stockbarger growth of cadmium telluride crystals in space. Computer codes were developed for the computation of heat transfer in the furnace and thermal stress in the resulting crystal. The predictions for the temperature field are being compared with experimental measurements. It was found that if the crystal sticks to the ampoule wall, differential thermal expansion between crystal and ampoule contributes much more to the stress than does the temperature field in the crystal. Thus, one goal of solidification of cadmium telluride in space is to reduce or eliminate contact of the crystal with the ampoule wall. Another goal is to find coatings and linings which reduce sticking of the grown crystal onto the ampoule. We developed techniques for measuring the surface tension and contact angle of molten cadmium telluride vs temperature and stoichiometry. The surface tension decreased with increasing temperature and with decreasing cadmium concentration. Wetting increased in the following order: pyrolytic boron nitride, carbon-coated quartz, sandblasted quartz, HF-etched quartz, and plain quartz. Additional coatings and potential ampoule lining materials are being developed and will be tested both for wetting by the melt and for sticking by the solid. Techniques are being developed for measuring sticking. We are also developing techniques for measuring the mechanical properties of cadmium telluride and for the direct observation of defect formation and evolution vs temperature. X-ray topography will be done in real time using the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, in collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Techniques are being developed for floating zone melting of cadmium telluride in space. We have successfully float zoned 5 mm rods on Earth

  10. Plasmon-Enhanced Energy Transfer in Photosensitive Nanocrystal Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Shahab; Akgul, Mehmet Zafer; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2017-06-27

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) interacted with localized surface plasmon (LSP) gives us the ability to overcome inadequate transfer of energy between donor and acceptor nanocrystals (NCs). In this paper, we show LSP-enhanced FRET in colloidal photosensors of NCs in operation, resulting in substantially enhanced photosensitivity. The proposed photosensitive device is a layered self-assembled colloidal platform consisting of separated monolayers of the donor and the acceptor colloidal NCs with an intermediate metal nanoparticle (MNP) layer made of gold interspaced by polyelectrolyte layers. Using LBL assembly, we fabricated and comparatively studied seven types of such NC-monolayer devices (containing only donor, only acceptor, Au MNP-donor, Au MNP-acceptor, donor-acceptor bilayer, donor-Au MNP-acceptor trilayer, and acceptor-Au MNP-donor reverse trilayer). In these structures, we revealed the effect of LSP-enhanced FRET and exciton interactions from the donor NCs layer to the acceptor NCs layer. Compared to a single acceptor NC device, we observed a significant extension in operating wavelength range and a substantial photosensitivity enhancement (2.91-fold) around the LSP resonance peak of Au MNPs in the LSP-enhanced FRET trilayer structure. Moreover, we present a theoretical model for the intercoupled donor-Au MNP-acceptor structure subject to the plasmon-mediated nonradiative energy transfer. The obtained numerical results are in excellent agreement with the systematic experimental studies done in our work. The potential to modify the energy transfer through mastering the exciton-plasmon interactions and its implication in devices make them attractive for applications in nanophotonic devices and sensors.

  11. Hydrazine-mediated construction of nanocrystal self-assembly materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ding; Liu, Min; Lin, Min; Bu, Xinyuan; Luo, Xintao; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Bai

    2014-10-28

    Self-assembly is the basic feature of supramolecular chemistry, which permits to integrate and enhance the functionalities of nano-objects. However, the conversion of self-assembled structures to practical materials is still laborious. In this work, on the basis of studying one-pot synthesis, spontaneous assembly, and in situ polymerization of aqueous semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs), NC self-assembly materials are produced and applied to design high performance white light-emitting diode (WLED). In producing self-assembly materials, the additive hydrazine (N2H4) is curial, which acts as the promoter to achieve room-temperature synthesis of aqueous NCs by favoring a reaction-controlled growth, as the polyelectrolyte to weaken inter-NC electrostatic repulsion and therewith facilitate the one-dimensional self-assembly, and in particular as the bifunctional monomers to polymerize with mercapto carboxylic acid-modified NCs via in situ amidation reaction. This strategy is versatile for mercapto carboxylic acid-modified aqueous NCs, for example CdS, CdSe, CdTe, CdSe(x)Te(1-x), and Cd(y)Hg(1-y)Te. Because of the multisite modification with carboxyl, the NCs act as macromonomers, thus producing cross-linked self-assembly materials with excellent thermal, solvent, and photostability. The assembled NCs preserve strong luminescence and avoid unpredictable fluorescent resonance energy transfer, the main problem in design WLED from multiple NC components. These advantages allow the fabrication of NC-based WLED with high color rendering index (86), high luminous efficacy (41 lm/W), and controllable color temperature.

  12. Gram-scale synthesis of catalytic Co9S8 nanocrystal ink as a cathode material for spray-deposited, large-area dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Hao; Lu, Ming-De; Tung, Yung-Liang; Tuan, Hsing-Yu

    2013-10-22

    We report the development of Co9S8 nanocrystals as a cost-effective cathode material that can be readily combined with spraying techniques to fabricate large-area dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) devices and can be further connected with series or parallel cell architectures to obtain a relatively high output voltage or current. A gram-scale synthesis of Co9S8 nanocrystal is carried out via a noninjection reaction by mixing anhydrous CoCl2 with trioctylphosphine (TOP), dodecanethiol and oleylamine (OLA) at 250 °C. The Co9S8 nanocrystals possess excellent catalytic ability with respect to I(-)/I3(-) redox reactions. The Co9S8 nanocrystals are prepared as nanoinks to fabricate uniform, crack-free Co9S8 thin films on different substrates by using a spray deposition technique. These Co9S8 films are used as counter electrodes assembled with dye-adsorbed TiO2 photoanodes to fabricate DSSC devices having a working area of 2 cm(2) and an average power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.02 ± 0.18% under AM 1.5 solar illumination, which is comparable with the PCE of 7.2 ± 0.12% obtained using a Pt cathode. Furthermore, six 2 cm(2)-sized DSSC devices connected in series output an open-circuit voltage of 4.2 V that can power a wide range of electronic devices such as LED arrays and can charge commercial lithium ion batteries.

  13. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals: Simple preparation, characterization and formation mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohandes, Fatemeh [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fathi, Mohammadhossein [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dental Materials Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fereshteh, Zeinab [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-01

    Crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles and nanorods have been successfully synthesized via a simple precipitation method. To control the shape and particle size of HAP nanocrystals, coordination ligands derived from 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde were first prepared, characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H-NMR) spectroscopies, and finally applied in the synthesis process of HAP. On the other hand, the HAP nanocrystals were also characterized by several techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). According to the FE-SEM and TEM micrographs, it was found that the morphology and crystallinity of the HAP powders depended on the coordination mode of the ligands. - Highlights: • HAP nanobundles and nanoparticles have been prepared by a precipitation method. • Morphologies of HAP nanocrystals were controlled by different coordination ligands. • The formation mechanism of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals was also considered.

  14. Rapid thermal synthesis of GaN nanocrystals and nanodisks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sofer, Z.; Sedmidubský, D.; Huber, Š.; Šimek, P.; Šaněk, F.; Jankovský, O.; Gregorová, E.; Fiala, R.; Matějková, Stanislava; Mikulics, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2013), 1411/1-1411/7 ISSN 1388-0764 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : gallium nitride * thermal ammonolysis * nanodisks * nanocrystals Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.278, year: 2013

  15. Embedded tin nanocrystals in silicon—an electrical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, L.; Haastrup, M. J.; Roesgaard, S.; Hansen, J. L.; Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Julsgaard, B.

    2018-02-01

    Tin nanocrystals embedded in a SiSn layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy on n-type Si are investigated by means of deep level transient spectroscopy. Two Sn related deep traps are observed, depending on the annealing temperature of the samples. A deep level at {E}{{C}}-0.62 {eV} (Sn1) is observed for annealing temperatures up to 650{}\\circ C, whereas a level at {E}{{C}}-0.53 {eV} (Sn2) appears for annealing temperatures above 600{}\\circ C. Scanning transmission electron microscopy shows the formation of Sn nanocrystals at 600{}\\circ C, which coincides with the appearance of Sn2. Sn1 is tentatively assigned to a Sn related precursor defect, which transforms upon annealing into either Sn nanocrystals or an interface defect located at the nanocrystal surface.

  16. Nonvolatile memory effect of tungsten nanocrystals under oxygen plasma treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shih-Cheng; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Wei-Ren; Lo, Yuan-Chun; Wu, Kai-Ting; Sze, S.M.; Chen, Jason; Liao, I.H.; Yeh, Fon-Shan

    2010-01-01

    In this work, an oxygen plasma treatment was used to improve the memory effect of nonvolatile W nanocrystal memory, including memory window, retention and endurance. To investigate the role of the oxygen plasma treatment in charge storage characteristics, the X-ray photon-emission spectra (XPS) were performed to analyze the variation of chemical composition for W nanocrystal embedded oxide both with and without the oxygen plasma treatment. In addition, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses were also used to identify the microstructure in the thin film and the size and density of W nanocrystals. The device with the oxygen plasma treatment shows a significant improvement of charge storage effect, because the oxygen plasma treatment enhanced the quality of silicon oxide surrounding the W nanocrystals. Therefore, the data retention and endurance characteristics were also improved by the passivation.

  17. Nonvolatile memory effect of tungsten nanocrystals under oxygen plasma treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shih-Cheng, E-mail: scchen0213@gmail.co [Department of Electrical Engineering and Institute of Electronic Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ting-Chang [Department of Physics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, and Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wei-Ren [Institute of Electronics, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan, Hsinchu, Taiwan 300 (China); Lo, Yuan-Chun; Wu, Kai-Ting [Institute of Photonics Technologies, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Sze, S.M. [Institute of Electronics, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan, Hsinchu, Taiwan 300 (China); Chen, Jason; Liao, I.H. [ProMOS Technologies, No. 19 Li Hsin Rd., Science-Based Industrial Park, Hsinchu, Taiwan 300 (China); Yeh, Fon-Shan [Department of Electrical Engineering and Institute of Electronic Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China)

    2010-10-01

    In this work, an oxygen plasma treatment was used to improve the memory effect of nonvolatile W nanocrystal memory, including memory window, retention and endurance. To investigate the role of the oxygen plasma treatment in charge storage characteristics, the X-ray photon-emission spectra (XPS) were performed to analyze the variation of chemical composition for W nanocrystal embedded oxide both with and without the oxygen plasma treatment. In addition, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses were also used to identify the microstructure in the thin film and the size and density of W nanocrystals. The device with the oxygen plasma treatment shows a significant improvement of charge storage effect, because the oxygen plasma treatment enhanced the quality of silicon oxide surrounding the W nanocrystals. Therefore, the data retention and endurance characteristics were also improved by the passivation.

  18. Influence of dimensionality on phase transition in VO2 nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagojević V.A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermally synthesized one-dimensional and two-dimensional nanocrystals of VO2 undergo phase transition around 65°C, where temperature and mechanism of phase transition are dependent on dimensionality of nanocrystals. Both nanocrystalline samples exhibit depression of phase transition temperature compared to the bulk material, the magnitude of which depends on the dimensionality of the nanocrystal. One-dimensional nanoribbons exhibit lower phase transition temperature and higher values of apparent activation energy than two-dimensional nanosheets. The phase transition exhibits as a complex process with somewhat lower value of enthalpy than the phase transition in the bulk, probably due to higher proportion of surface atoms in the nanocrystals. High values of apparent activation energy indicate that individual steps of the phase transition involve simultaneous movement of large groups of atoms, as expected for single-domain nanocrystalline materials. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 142015

  19. Solubilisation of dye-loaded zeolite L nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devaux, A.; Popović, Z.; Bossart, O.; De Cola, L.; Kunzmann, A.; Calzaferri, G.

    2006-01-01

    Solubilisation of zeolite L nanocrystals in different solvents is reported. Grafting alkoxysilane derivatives with a hydrophobic part leads to transparent suspensions in non-polar solvents while modification with a positively charged complex leads to solubilisation in water.

  20. Processing of ZnO nanocrystals by solochemical technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusatti, M.; Speckhahn, R.; Silva, L.A.; Rosario, J.A.; Lima, R.B.; Kuhnen, N.C.; Riella, H.G.; Campos, C.E.M.

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, we report the synthesis of high quality ZnO nanocrystals by solochemical technique. This synthetic strategy has been shown to have advantages over other methods of producing nanostructures in terms of low cost, efficiency, simplicity and uniformity of crystal structure. Zinc chloride solution at room temperature was mixed with sodium hydroxide solution at 50°C to produce ZnO nanocrystals. Transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the ZnO nanocrystals obtained. The structure of ZnO was refined by the Rietveld Method from X-ray diffraction data. These methods showed that the product consisted of pure ZnO nanocrystals and has, predominantly, a rod-like morphology. (author)

  1. Writing on Nanocrystals: Patterning Colloidal Inorganic Nanocrystal Films through Irradiation-Induced Chemical Transformations of Surface Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazon, Francisco; Prato, Mirko; Manna, Liberato

    2017-09-27

    In the past couple of decades, colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs) and, more specifically, semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have emerged as crucial materials for the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, with applications in very diverse areas such as optoelectronics and biotechnology. Films made of inorganic NCs deposited on a substrate can be patterned by e-beam lithography, altering the structure of their capping ligands and thus allowing exposed areas to remain on the substrate while non-exposed areas are redispersed in a solvent, as in a standard lift-off process. This methodology can be described as a "direct" lithography process, since the exposure is performed directly on the material of interest, in contrast with conventional lithography which uses a polymeric resist as a mask for subsequent material deposition (or etching). A few reports from the late 1990s and early 2000s used such direct lithography to fabricate electrical wires from metallic NCs. However, the poor conductivity obtained through this process hindered the widespread use of the technique. In the early 2010s, the same method was used to define fluorescent patterns on QD films, allowing for further applications in biosensing. For the past 2-3 years, direct lithography on NC films with e-beams and X-rays has gone through an important development as it has been demonstrated that it can tune further transformations on the NCs, leading to more complex patternings and opening a whole new set of possible applications. This Perspective summarizes the findings of the past 20 years on direct lithography on NC films with a focus on the latest developments on QDs from 2014 and provides different potential future outcomes of this promising technique.

  2. Room-temperature synthetic pathways to barium titanate nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Christopher W; Cuevas, Marie A; Brutchey, Richard L

    2008-12-01

    Novel room-temperature pathways to BaTiO(3) nanocrystals have been recently developed, which stand in contrast to traditional high-temperature methods. Peptide-assisted, bio-facilitated routes have been developed for low-temperature nanocrystal growth, in addition to two low-temperature routes completely independent of biomolecules. These innovative methods lay the groundwork for the facile production of nanoscale BaTiO(3) in economical and energy-efficient ways.

  3. Formation of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals. The aspect of nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudera, S.

    2007-08-17

    The present work describes different techniques to control some major parameters of colloidal nanocrystals. The individual techniques rely on the manipulation of the nucleation event. The sensitive control of the nanocrystals' size and shape is discussed. Furthermore the formation of hybrid nanocrystals composed of different materials is presented. The synthesis technique for the production of the different samples involves organic solvents and surfactants and reactions at elevated temperatures. The presence of magic size clusters offers a possibility to control the size of the nanocrystals even at very small dimensions. The clusters produced comprise ca. 100 atoms. In the case of CdSe, nanocrystals of this size emit a blue fluorescence and therefore extend the routinely accessible spectrum for this material over the whole visible range. Samples fluorescing in the spectral range from green to red are produced with standard recipes. In this work a reaction scheme for magic size clusters is presented and a theoretical model to explain the particular behaviour of their growth dynamics is discussed. The samples are investigated by optical spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis. A method to form branched nanocrystals is discussed. The branching point is analysed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and proves for the occurrence of a multiple twinned structure are strengthened by simulation of the observed patterns. Two different techniques to generate nanocrystals of this type are presented. The first relies on a seeded growth approach in which the nucleation of the second material is allowed only on de ned sites of the seeds. The second technique uses the tips of pre-formed nano-dumbbells as sacrificial domains. The material on the tips is replaced by gold. Hybrid materials are formed by a seeded-growth mechanism. Pre-formed nanocrystals provide the nucleation sites for the second material. (orig.)

  4. Cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon as adsorbent for removal of sunset yellow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, M.; Hekmati Jah, A.; Khodadoust, S.; Sahraei, R.; Daneshfar, A.; Mihandoost, A.; Purkait, M. K.

    2012-05-01

    Adsorption is a promising technique for decolorization of effluents of textile dyeing industries but its application is limited due to requirement of high amounts of adsorbent required. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded onto activated carbon (CdTN-AC) for the removal of sunset yellow (SY) dye from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch mode varying solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration, CdTN-AC dose, and temperature. In order to investigate the efficiency of SY adsorption on CdTN-AC, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models were studied. It was observed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits better than other kinetic models with good correlation coefficient. Equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy, entropy, activation energy, and sticking probability were also calculated. It was found that the sorption of SY onto CdTN-AC was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The proposed adsorbent is applicable for SY removal from waste of real effluents including pea-shooter, orange drink and jelly banana with efficiency more than 97%.

  5. Effect of the interface on the mechanical properties and thermal conductivity of bismuth telluride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tang-Yu; Wang, Kuan-Yu; Fang, Te-Hua; Huang, Chao-Chun

    2018-02-01

    Bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) is a type of thermoelectric material used for energy generation that does not cause pollution. Increasing the thermoelectric conversion efficiency (ZT) is one of the most important steps in the development of thermoelectric components. In this study, we use molecular dynamics to investigate the mechanical properties and thermal conductivity of quintuple layers of Bi2Te3 nanofilms with different atomic arrangements at the interface and study the effects of varying layers, angles, and grain boundaries. The results indicate that the Bi2Te3 nanofilm perfect substrate has the ideal Young’s modulus and thermal conductivity, and the maximum yield stress is observed for a thickness of ∼90 Å. As the interface changed, the structural disorder of atomic arrangement affected the mechanical properties; moreover, the phonons encounter lattice disordered atomic region will produce scattering reduce heat conduction. The results of this investigation are helpful for the application of Bi2Te3 nanofilms as thermoelectric materials.

  6. N-hydroxysuccinimide-mediated photoelectrooxidation of aliphatic alcohols based on cadmium telluride nanoparticles decorated graphene nanosheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navaee, Aso; Salimi, Abdollah

    2013-01-01

    A simple nonenzymatic electrochemical protocol is proposed for the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols using formed N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) radical cation on the graphene nanosheets/L-cysteine/cadmium telluride quantum dot (QD) nanocomposite (GNs/Cys/CdTe) modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode. At first, graphene oxide (GO) is chemically synthesized from graphite after which Cys is covalently functionalized to GO through formation of amide bonds between carboxylic acid groups of GO and amine groups of Cys. The resulting GNs/Cys is used as a capping agent to synthesize CdTe QD nanoparticles. After the characterization of the as-made nanocomposite which confirmed the successful attachment of CdTe nanoparticles to the GNs, the ability of the GNs/Cys/CdTe modified GC electrode toward the nonenzymatic ethanol electrooxidation is examined in the presence of NHS as an effective mediating system. Our results revealed that the proposed system possess a good activity to NHS electrooxidation and subsequently, ethanol oxidation. Moreover, the GNs/Cys/CdTe modified electrode displayed a significant photoelectrocatalytic activity toward the ethanol oxidation upon illumination by visible light. The photoactive GNs/Cys/CdTe nanohybrid presented here showing favorable photoelectrochemical features for nonenzymatic aliphatic alcohols oxidation may hold great promise to the development of electrochemical sensors and biofuel cells

  7. Resonant Enhancement of Charge Density Wave Diffraction in the Rare-Earth Tri-Tellurides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.S.; Sorini, A.P.; Yi, M.; Chuang, Y.D.; Moritz, B.; Yang, W.L.; Chu, J.-H.; Kuo, H.H.; Gonzalez, A.G.Cruz; Fisher, I.R.; Hussain, Z.; Devereau, T.P.; Shen, Z.X.

    2012-05-15

    We performed resonant soft X-ray diffraction on known charge density wave (CDW) compounds, rare earth tri-tellurides. Near the M{sub 5} (3d - 4f) absorption edge of rare earth ions, an intense diffraction peak is detected at a wavevector identical to that of CDW state hosted on Te{sub 2} planes, indicating a CDW-induced modulation on the rare earth ions. Surprisingly, the temperature dependence of the diffraction peak intensity demonstrates an exponential increase at low temperatures, vastly different than that of the CDW order parameter. Assuming 4f multiplet splitting due to the CDW states, we present a model to calculate X-ray absorption spectrum and resonant profile of the diffraction peak, agreeing well with experimental observations. Our results demonstrate a situation where the temperature dependence of resonant X-ray diffraction peak intensity is not directly related to the intrinsic behavior of the order parameter associated with the electronic order, but is dominated by the thermal occupancy of the valence states.

  8. Heart imaging by cadmium telluride gamma camera European Program 'BIOMED' consortium

    CERN Document Server

    Scheiber, C; Chambron, J; Prat, V; Kazandjan, A; Jahnke, A; Matz, R; Thomas, S; Warren, S; Hage-Hali, M; Regal, R; Siffert, P; Karman, M

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium telluride semiconductor detectors (CdTe) operating at room temperature are attractive for medical imaging because of their good energy resolution providing excellent spatial and contrast resolution. The compactness of the detection system allows the building of small light camera heads which can be used for bedside imaging. A mobile pixellated gamma camera based on 2304 CdTe (pixel size: 3x3 mm, field of view: 15 cmx15 cm) has been designed for cardiac imaging. A dedicated 16-channel integrated circuit has also been designed. The acquisition hardware is fully programmable (DSP card, personal computer-based system). Analytical calculations have shown that a commercial parallel hole collimator will fit the efficiency/resolution requirements for cardiac applications. Monte-Carlo simulations predict that the Moire effect can be reduced by a 15 deg. tilt of the collimator with respect to the detector grid. A 16x16 CdTe module has been built for the preliminary physical tests. The energy resolution was 6.16...

  9. Thermal transport in bismuth telluride quintuple layer: mode-resolved phonon properties and substrate effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Cheng; Bao, Hua

    2016-06-06

    The successful exfoliation of atomically-thin bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) quintuple layer (QL) attracts tremendous research interest in this strongly anharmonic quasi-two-dimensional material. The thermal transport properties of this material are not well understood, especially the mode-wise properties and when it is coupled with a substrate. In this work, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations and normal mode analysis to study the mode-resolved thermal transport in freestanding and supported Bi2Te3 QL. The detailed mode-wise phonon properties are calculated and the accumulated thermal conductivities with respect to phonon mean free path (MFP) are constructed. It is shown that 60% of the thermal transport is contributed by phonons with MFP longer than 20 nm. Coupling with a-SiO2 substrate leads to about 60% reduction of thermal conductivity. Through varying the interfacial coupling strength and the atomic mass of substrate, we also find that phonon in Bi2Te3 QL is more strongly scattered by interfacial potential and its transport process is less affected by the dynamics of substrate. Our study provides an in-depth understanding of heat transport in Bi2Te3 QL and is helpful in further tailoring its thermal property through nanostructuring.

  10. Low-cost cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors based on electron-transport-only designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunett, B.A.; Lund, J.C.; Van Scyoc, J.M.; Hilton, N.R.; Lee, E.Y.; James, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this project was to utilize a novel device design to build a compact, high resolution, room temperature operated semiconductor gamma ray sensor. This sensor was constructed from a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystal. It was able to both detect total radiation intensity and perform spectroscopy on the detected radiation. CZT detectors produced today have excellent electron charge carrier collection, but suffer from poor hole collection. For conventional gamma-ray spectrometers, both the electrons and holes must be collected with high efficiency to preserve energy resolution. The requirement to collect the hole carriers, which have relatively low lifetimes, limits the efficiency and performance of existing experimental devices. By implementing novel device designs such that the devices rely only on the electron signal for energy information, the sensitivity of the sensors for detecting radiation can be increased substantially. In this report the authors describe a project to develop a new type of electron-only CZT detector. They report on their successful efforts to design, implement and test these new radiation detectors. In addition to the design and construction of the sensors the authors also report, in considerable detail, on the electrical characteristics of the CZT crystals used to make their detectors

  11. Topology of Electron Density of Cadmium Telluride Determined from Relief and Contour Plots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, A.P.; Gopir, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    The topology of the electron density yields a faithful and a reliable mapping of the concepts of atoms, molecular structure, bonds and structure, besides providing the basis for a theory of structural stability. In quantum mechanics, and in particular quantum chemistry, the electron density is a measure of the probability of an electron occupying an infinitesimal element of space surrounding any given point. Contour plots of electron density distribution of cadmium telluride (CdTe) were obtained using the density functional theory (DFT) method and were used as the basis to qualitatively study the bond, structure and stability of the molecule when it is in bulk. We looked at the way the electron density, ρ of CdTe defines the gradient field and hence the bonding type. We identified the bond paths that coincide with the contours of electron sharing. These bond paths indicated that the molecule was slightly covalent. Our topological analysis led us to conclude that CdTe was an n-type semiconductor with covalent bond and slight ionic character. (author)

  12. Phase diagram of germanium telluride encapsulated in carbon nanotubes from first-principles searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Jamie M.; Medeiros, Paulo V. C.; Vasylenko, Andrij; Sloan, Jeremy; Quigley, David; Morris, Andrew J.

    2017-12-01

    Germanium telluride has attracted great research interest, primarily because of its phase-change properties. We have developed a general scheme, based on the ab initio random structure searching (AIRSS) method, for predicting the structures of encapsulated nanowires, and using this we predict a number of thermodynamically stable structures of GeTe nanowires encapsulated inside carbon nanotubes of radii under 9 Å . We construct the phase diagram of encapsulated GeTe, which provides quantitative predictions about the energetic favorability of different filling structures as a function of the nanotube radius, such as the formation of a quasi-one-dimensional rock-salt-like phase inside nanotubes of radii between 5.4 and 7.9 Å . Simulated TEM images of our structures show excellent agreement between our results and experimental TEM imagery. We show that, for some nanotubes, the nanowires undergo temperature-induced phase transitions from one crystalline structure to another due to vibrational contributions to the free energy, which is a first step toward nano-phase-change memory devices.

  13. Measurement and Modeling of Blocking Contacts for Cadmium Telluride Gamma Ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Patrick R. [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States)

    2010-01-07

    Gamma ray detectors are important in national security applications, medicine, and astronomy. Semiconductor materials with high density and atomic number, such as Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), offer a small device footprint, but their performance is limited by noise at room temperature; however, improved device design can decrease detector noise by reducing leakage current. This thesis characterizes and models two unique Schottky devices: one with an argon ion sputter etch before Schottky contact deposition and one without. Analysis of current versus voltage characteristics shows that thermionic emission alone does not describe these devices. This analysis points to reverse bias generation current or leakage through an inhomogeneous barrier. Modeling the devices in reverse bias with thermionic field emission and a leaky Schottky barrier yields good agreement with measurements. Also numerical modeling with a finite-element physics-based simulator suggests that reverse bias current is a combination of thermionic emission and generation. This thesis proposes further experiments to determine the correct model for reverse bias conduction. Understanding conduction mechanisms in these devices will help develop more reproducible contacts, reduce leakage current, and ultimately improve detector performance.

  14. Investigation of the electrochemical deposition of thick layers of cadmium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, J.

    2007-04-01

    This research thesis deals with the problem of electrochemical deposition of thick layers of cadmium telluride (CdTe) meeting the requirements of high energy radiation detection. The author first recalls the physicochemical properties of CdTe and the basic principles of radiology. He details the different criteria which define a material for X ray detection. He describes the experimental conditions, the nature and preparation of substrates, and the different electrochemical systems used in this research. He studies the impact of the applied potential on the material properties, and compares previously obtained results available in the literature with those obtained in the chosen pool conditions. He discusses the synthesis of CdTe thick layers for which different methods are tested: static in potential, static in intensity, pulsed. The coatings obtained with a given potential and then with a given current are investigated. Finally, the influence of a thermal treatment in presence or absence of a sintering agent on the morphology, the chemical composition, and the crystalline and electric properties of the deposited material is discussed, and the results of the behaviour under X rays of a electrodeposited layer are presented

  15. Variation of resistivity of copper doped cadmium telluride prepared by electrodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Windheim, J.A.; Cocivera, M.

    1990-01-01

    Thin film cadmium telluride is an attractive material because its band gap makes it suitable for a number of applications. The authors have prepared this material by electrodeposition both in the dark and under illumination. The resultant films, which are p-type as deposited and after heat treatment, have been used with electrodeposited cadmium sulfide to form pn junction photovoltaic cells. Light-to-electric power conversion efficiencies for a number of samples average around 3.5%. To increase this efficiency, the authors have initiated a program to reduce film resistivity by the incorporation of dopants using electrochemical and vapour techniques. The electrical characterization of electrodeposited thin film materials by Hall effect or resistance measurements is difficult because the sample must be removed from the conducting substrate before studies can be done. In this paper, results are presented for copper incorporated by two methods, electrochemical codeposition and electromigration and the effect is discussed in terms of a model in which the conductivity is controlled by the relative magnitudes of the dopant density and the density of interface states at the grain boundary

  16. Advanced methods for preparation and characterization of infrared detector materials. [mercury cadmium tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Martin, B. G.

    1980-01-01

    Mercury cadmium telluride crystals were prepared by the Bridgman method with a wide range of crystal growth rates and temperature gradients adequate to prevent constitutional supercooling under diffusion-limited, steady state, growth conditions. The longitudinal compositional gradients for different growth conditions and alloy compositions were calculated and compared with experimental data to develop a quantitative model of the crystal growth kinetics for the Hg(i-x)CdxTe alloys, and measurements were performed to ascertain the effect of growth conditions on radial compositional gradients. The pseudobinary HgTe-CdTe constitutional phase diagram was determined by precision differential thermal analysis measurements and used to calculate the segregation coefficient of Cd as a function of x and interface temperature. Computer algorithms specific to Hg(1-x)CdxTe were developed for calculations of the charge carrier concentrations, charge carrier mobilities, Hall coefficient, optical absorptance, and Fermi energy as functions of x, temperature, ionized donor and acceptor concentrations, and neutral defect concentrations.

  17. Efficient solution route to transparent ZnO semiconductor films using colloidal nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suehiro

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ZnO nanocrystals (NCs were synthesized by heating Zn (II acetylacetonate in oleic acid/oleylamine in the presence of 1,2-hexadecanediol at 220 °C. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and dynamic light scattering (DLS measurements revealed the formation of monodispersed ZnO NCs of ca. 7 nm. ZnO NC assembled films were fabricated on a glass substrate by deposition with the colloidal ZnO NCs dispersed in toluene. The film composed of the NCs showed good optical transparency in the visible to near-infrared region. A device coupling the ZnO NC film with a p-type Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS NC film exhibited an obvious diode-like current–voltage behavior. The results suggest that the transparent ZnO film has a potentiality to be used for an n-type window layer in some optoelectronic applications.

  18. Direct Ink Write (DIW) 3D Printed Cellulose Nanocrystal Aerogel Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Vincent Chi-Fung; Dunn, Conner K; Zhang, Zhe; Deng, Yulin; Qi, H Jerry

    2017-08-14

    Pure cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) aerogels with controlled 3D structures and inner pore architecture are printed using the direct ink write (DIW) technique. While traditional cellulosic aerogel processing approaches lack the ability to easily fabricate complete aerogel structures, DIW 3D printing followed by freeze drying can overcome this shortcoming and can produce CNC aerogels with minimal structural shrinkage or damage. The resultant products have great potential in applications such as tissue scaffold templates, drug delivery, packaging, etc., due to their inherent sustainability, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Various 3D structures are successfully printed without support material, and the print quality can be improved with increasing CNC concentration and printing resolution. Dual pore CNC aerogel scaffolds are also successfully printed, where the customizable 3D structure and inner pore architecture can potentially enable advance CNC scaffold designs suited for specific cell integration requirements.

  19. Optical properties of Er3+-doped strontium barium niobate nanocrystals obtained by thermal treatment in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haro-Gonzalez, P.; Lahoz, F.; Gonzalez-Platas, J.; Caceres, J.M.; Gonzalez-Perez, S.; Marrero-Lopez, D.; Capuj, N.; Martin, I.R.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of the optical properties of Er 3+ ions in strontium barium niobate glass and glass ceramics have been carried out. The glasses have been fabricated using a melt-quenching method, and the glass ceramic samples have been obtained from the glass precursor by a thermal treatment. The ceramic samples formed by a glassy phase, and a crystalline phase contains nanocrystals of Sr 1-x Ba x Nb 2 O 6 (SBN) doped with Er 3+ ions with a mean size of ∼50 nm, as confirmed with XRD. Green up-conversion emission has been obtained under excitation at 800 nm, and the temporal evolution of this emission has been reported with the purpose of determining the involved up-conversion mechanism. These optical measures have confirmed that the Er 3+ ions have been incorporated into the SBN matrix, after a thermal treatment, which produced an increment of the up-conversion efficiency

  20. Role of the inversion layer on the charge injection in silicon nanocrystal multilayered light emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tondini, S. [Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38123 Trento (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Informatica e Matematica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); Pucker, G. [Advanced Photonics and Photovoltaics Group, Bruno Kessler Foundation, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Trento (Italy); Pavesi, L. [Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38123 Trento (Italy)

    2016-09-07

    The role of the inversion layer on injection and recombination phenomena in light emitting diodes (LEDs) is here studied on a multilayer (ML) structure of silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) embedded in SiO{sub 2}. Two Si-NC LEDs, which are similar for the active material but different in the fabrication process, elucidate the role of the non-radiative recombination rates at the ML/substrate interface. By studying current- and capacitance-voltage characteristics as well as electroluminescence spectra and time-resolved electroluminescence under pulsed and alternating bias pumping scheme in both the devices, we are able to ascribe the different experimental results to an efficient or inefficient minority carrier (electron) supply by the p-type substrate in the metal oxide semiconductor LEDs.

  1. Magnetoresistance of drop-cast film of cobalt-substituted magnetite nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohiki, Shigemi; Nara, Koichiro; Mitome, Masanori; Tsuya, Daiju

    2014-10-22

    An oleic acid-coated Fe2.7Co0.3O4 nanocrystal (NC) self-assembled film was fabricated via drop casting of colloidal particles onto a three-terminal electrode/MgO substrate. The film exhibited a large coercivity (1620 Oe) and bifurcation of the zero-field-cooled and field-cooled magnetizations at 300 K. At 10 K, the film exhibited both a Coulomb blockade due to single electron charging as well as a magnetoresistance of ∼-80% due to spin-dependent electron tunneling. At 300 K, the film also showed a magnetoresistance of ∼-80% due to hopping of spin-polarized electrons. Enhanced magnetic coupling between adjacent NCs and the large coercivity resulted in a large spin-polarized current flow even at 300 K.

  2. Homogeneous Synthesis and Electroluminescence Device of Highly Luminescent CsPbBr3 Perovskite Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Song; Yang, Yanchun; Kang, Xiaojiao; Wang, Lan; Huang, Lijian; Pan, Daocheng

    2017-03-06

    Highly luminescent CsPbBr 3 perovskite nanocrystals (PNCs) are homogeneously synthesized by mixing toluene solutions of PbBr 2 and cesium oleate at room temperature in open air. We found that PbBr 2 can be easily dissolved in nonpolar toluene in the presence of tetraoctylammonium bromide, which allows us to homogeneously prepare CsPbBr 3 perovskite quantum dots and prevents the use of harmful polar organic solvents, such as N,N-dimethylformamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone. Additionally, this method can be extended to synthesize highly luminescent CH 3 NH 3 PbBr 3 perovskite quantum dots. An electroluminescence device with a maximal luminance of 110 cd/m 2 has been fabricated by using high-quality CsPbBr 3 PNCs as the emitting layer.

  3. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Haitao

    2007-01-01

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis and application of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based on high temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has become one of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. This method is first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkers in 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and later extended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well as anisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod. This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystal synthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied by characterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and products and following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on these results, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction between the precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth of nanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theory calculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursor decomposition and monomer formation pathway. Based on the proposed reaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses water as a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSe and CdS nanorods

  4. Inhibition of palm oil oxidation by zeolite nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kok-Hou; Awala, Hussein; Mukti, Rino R; Wong, Ka-Lun; Rigaud, Baptiste; Ling, Tau Chuan; Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Koleva, Iskra Z; Vayssilov, Georgi N; Mintova, Svetlana; Ng, Eng-Poh

    2015-05-13

    The efficiency of zeolite X nanocrystals (FAU-type framework structure) containing different extra-framework cations (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+)) in slowing the thermal oxidation of palm oil is reported. The oxidation study of palm oil is conducted in the presence of zeolite nanocrystals (0.5 wt %) at 150 °C. Several characterization techniques such as visual analysis, colorimetry, rheometry, total acid number (TAN), FT-IR spectroscopy, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and Karl Fischer analyses are applied to follow the oxidative evolution of the oil. It was found that zeolite nanocrystals decelerate the oxidation of palm oil through stabilization of hydroperoxides, which are the primary oxidation product, and concurrently via adsorption of the secondary oxidation products (alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and esters). In addition to the experimental results, periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to elucidate further the oxidation process of the palm oil in the presence of zeolite nanocrystals. The DFT calculations show that the metal complexes formed with peroxides are more stable than the complexes with alkenes with the same ions. The peroxides captured in the zeolite X nanocrystals consequently decelerate further oxidation toward formation of acids. Unlike the monovalent alkali metal cations in the zeolite X nanocrystals (K(+), Na(+), and Li(+)), Ca(2+) reduced the acidity of the oil by neutralizing the acidic carboxylate compounds to COO(-)(Ca(2+))1/2 species.

  5. First Principles Study of Core-Shell Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, Igor

    2011-03-01

    Core-shell nanocrystals composed of two different semiconductors have recently attracted considerable attention. These structures provide enhanced functionality and possess more degrees of freedom than single-component semiconductor nanocrystals and quantum dots. I present the results of ab initio density functional calculations for the structures, electronic densities of states, and optical absorption gaps of core-shell nanocrystals composed of group II-VI semiconductors, such as CdSe, CdTe, ZnSe, and ZnTe. The outer surfaces of the nanocrystals are passivated using partially charged hydrogen atoms. The calculations are performed for ``traditional'' core-shell nanocrystals, in which a core a narrow gap semiconductor is covered with a shell of a wide gap material, and ``inverted'' core-shell nanocrystals, in which a wide-gap core is enclosed in a narrow-gap shell. Supported by the Donors of the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund under Grant No. PRF-48556-AC10 and by the U. S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG36-08GO88008.

  6. Cellulose nanocrystals from acacia bark-Influence of solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taflick, Ticiane; Schwendler, Luana A; Rosa, Simone M L; Bica, Clara I D; Nachtigall, Sônia M B

    2017-08-01

    The isolation of cellulose nanocrystals from different lignocellulosic materials has shown increased interest in academic and technological research. These materials have excellent mechanical properties and can be used as nanofillers for polymer composites as well as transparent films for various applications. In this work, cellulose isolation was performed following an environmental friendly procedure without chlorine. Cellulose nanocrystals were isolated from the exhausted acacia bark (after the industrial process of extracting tannin) with the objective of evaluating the effect of the solvent extraction steps on the characteristics of cellulose and cellulose nanocrystals. It was also assessed the effect of acid hydrolysis time on the thermal stability, morphology and size of the nanocrystals, through TGA, TEM and light scattering analyses. It was concluded that the extraction step with solvents was important in the isolation of cellulose, but irrelevant in the isolation of cellulose nanocrystals. Light scattering experiments indicated that 30min of hydrolysis was long enough for the isolation of cellulose nanocrystals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Making sense of nanocrystal lattice fringes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraundorf, P.; Qin Wentao; Moeck, Peter; Mandell, Eric

    2005-01-01

    The orientation dependence of thin-crystal lattice fringes can be gracefully quantified using fringe-visibility maps, a direct-space analog of Kikuchi maps [Nishikawa and Kikuchi, Nature (London) 121, 1019 (1928)]. As in navigation of reciprocal space with the aid of Kikuchi lines, fringe-visibility maps facilitate acquisition of crystallographic information from lattice images. In particular, these maps can help researchers to determine the three-dimensional lattice of individual nanocrystals, to 'fringe-fingerprint' collections of randomly oriented particles, and to measure local specimen thickness with only a modest tilt. Since the number of fringes in an image increases with maximum spatial-frequency squared, these strategies (with help from more precise goniometers) will be more useful as aberration correction moves resolutions into the subangstrom range

  8. SnS thin films realized from colloidal nanocrystal inks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kergommeaux, Antoine de, E-mail: antoine@dekergommeaux.com [CEA Grenoble, INAC-SPrAM (UMR 5819 CEA/CNRS/UJF-Grenoble 1), Laboratoire d' Electronique Moléculaire, Organique et Hybride, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); INES, CEA-DRT/LITEN/DTS/LMPV, Institut National de l' Energie Solaire, Le Bourget du Lac (France); Faure-Vincent, Jérôme [CEA Grenoble, INAC-SPrAM (UMR 5819 CEA/CNRS/UJF-Grenoble 1), Laboratoire d' Electronique Moléculaire, Organique et Hybride, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Pron, Adam [CEA Grenoble, INAC-SPrAM (UMR 5819 CEA/CNRS/UJF-Grenoble 1), Laboratoire d' Electronique Moléculaire, Organique et Hybride, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 3, Warsaw (Poland); Bettignies, Rémi de [INES, CEA-DRT/LITEN/DTS/LMPV, Institut National de l' Energie Solaire, Le Bourget du Lac (France); Reiss, Peter, E-mail: peter.reiss@cea.fr [CEA Grenoble, INAC-SPrAM (UMR 5819 CEA/CNRS/UJF-Grenoble 1), Laboratoire d' Electronique Moléculaire, Organique et Hybride, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2013-05-01

    Tin sulfide (SnS), having a direct band gap of 1.3 eV, is a promising absorber material for solar energy conversion. We synthesized colloidal SnS nanocrystals with a size tuneable from 5 to 20 nm and low size dispersion. These nanocrystals can be processed as thin films using low-cost solution phase methods. They also offer the possibility of controlling the crystalline phase before deposition. With the goal to obtain dense and crack-free films of high conductivity, we used a layer-by-layer deposition technique. In the first step, the substrate was dipped in the nanocrystal colloidal solution (“ink”). Next, exchange of the nanocrystal surface ligands (oleylamine, trioctylphosphine, oleic acid) was carried out by dipping the substrate into a solution of small cross-linking molecules (1,4-benzenedithiol). This exchange enhances the electronic coupling and charge carrier mobilities by reducing the interparticle distance. At the same time it assures the immobilization of the nanocrystals to avoid their removal during subsequent depositions. The thickness of the nanocrystal thin films was controlled in a range of 100–250 nm by varying the number of the alternating nanocrystal deposition and ligand exchange steps. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy investigations show that the obtained films are dense and homogeneous with a surface roughness as low as 3 to 4 nm root mean square. Using an inverted structure, the heterojunction of a SnS nanocrystals film with n-type ZnO nanocrystals shows a strongly increased current density under white light irradiation with respect to the dark. - Highlights: ► We synthesized 5–20 nm diameter SnS colloidal nanocrystals. ► Thin films of 100–250 nm can be obtained with layer-by-layer deposition method. ► Ligand exchange procedure is performed to enhance the conductivity. ► Electrical measurements under light exhibit an increase of the current density.

  9. Toxicity and Bio-Safety Evaluation of Magnetic Nanocrystals Designed for Nano-Medical Sensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheon, Jinwoo

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic nanocrystals exhibit unique superparamagnetic behaviors. When they get into bio-medical systems, these magnetic nanocrystals have the potential to be utilized as probes and vectors for next-generation diagnosis and therapy...

  10. State of the art of nanocrystals technology for delivery of poorly soluble drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yuqi; Du, Juan; Wang, Lulu; Wang, Yancai, E-mail: wangyancai1999@163.com [Qilu University of Technology, School of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Engineering (China)

    2016-09-15

    Formulation of nanocrystals is a distinctive approach which can effectively improve the delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs, thus enticing the development of the nanocrystals technology. The characteristics of nanocrystals resulted in an exceptional drug delivery conductance, including saturation solubility, dissolution velocity, adhesiveness, and affinity. Nanocrystals were treated as versatile pharmaceuticals that could be delivered through almost all routes of administration. In the current review, oral, pulmonary, and intravenous routes of administration were presented. Also, the targeting of drug nanocrystals, as well as issues of efficacy and safety, were also discussed. Several methods were applied for nanocrystals production including top-down production strategy (media milling, high-pressure homogenization), bottom-up production strategy (antisolvent precipitation, supercritical fluid process, and precipitation by removal of solvent), and the combination approaches. Moreover, this review also described the evaluation and characterization of the drug nanocrystals and summarized the current commercial pharmaceutical products utilizing nanocrystals technology.

  11. State of the art of nanocrystals technology for delivery of poorly soluble drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yuqi; Du, Juan; Wang, Lulu; Wang, Yancai

    2016-01-01

    Formulation of nanocrystals is a distinctive approach which can effectively improve the delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs, thus enticing the development of the nanocrystals technology. The characteristics of nanocrystals resulted in an exceptional drug delivery conductance, including saturation solubility, dissolution velocity, adhesiveness, and affinity. Nanocrystals were treated as versatile pharmaceuticals that could be delivered through almost all routes of administration. In the current review, oral, pulmonary, and intravenous routes of administration were presented. Also, the targeting of drug nanocrystals, as well as issues of efficacy and safety, were also discussed. Several methods were applied for nanocrystals production including top-down production strategy (media milling, high-pressure homogenization), bottom-up production strategy (antisolvent precipitation, supercritical fluid process, and precipitation by removal of solvent), and the combination approaches. Moreover, this review also described the evaluation and characterization of the drug nanocrystals and summarized the current commercial pharmaceutical products utilizing nanocrystals technology.

  12. Shape control and associated magnetic properties of spinel cobalt ferrite nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qing; Zhang, Z John

    2004-05-19

    By combining nonhydrolytic reaction with seed-mediated growth, high-quality and monodisperse spinel cobalt ferrite, CoFe(2)O(4), nanocrystals can be synthesized with a highly controllable shape of nearly spherical or almost perfectly cubic. The shape of the nanocrystals can also be reversibly interchanged between spherical and cubic morphology through controlling nanocrystal growth rate. Furthermore, the magnetic studies show that the blocking temperature, saturation, and remanent magnetization of nanocrystals are solely determined by the size regardless the spherical or cubic shape. However, the shape of the nanocrystals is a dominating factor for the coercivity of nanocrystals due to the effect of surface anisotropy. Such magnetic nanocrystals with distinct shapes possess tremendous potentials in fundamental understanding of magnetism and in technological applications of magnetic nanocrystals for high-density information storage.

  13. Mechanical, barrier and morphological properties of starch nanocrystals-reinforced pea starch films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojing; Qiu, Chao; Ji, Na; Sun, Cuixia; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2015-05-05

    To characterize the pea starch films reinforced with waxy maize starch nanocrystals, the mechanical, water vapor barrier and morphological properties of the composite films were investigated. The addition of starch nanocrystals increased the tensile strength of the composite films, and the value of tensile strength of the composite films was highest when starch nanocrystals content was 5% (w/w). The moisture content (%), water vapor permeability, and water-vapor transmission rate of the composite films significantly decreased as starch nanocrystals content increased. When their starch nanocrystals content was 1-5%, the starch nanocrystals dispersed homogeneously in the composite films, resulting in a relatively smooth and compact film surface and better thermal stability. However, when starch nanocrystals content was more than 7%, the starch nanocrystals began to aggregate, which resulted in the surface of the composite films developing a longitudinal fibrous structure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Facile Fabrication of Ultrafine Copper Nanoparticles in Organic Solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegert Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A facile chemical reduction method has been developed to fabricate ultrafine copper nanoparticles whose sizes can be controlled down to ca. 1 nm by using poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP as the stabilizer and sodium borohyrdride as the reducing agent in an alkaline ethylene glycol (EG solvent. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM results and UV–vis absorption spectra demonstrated that the as-prepared particles were well monodispersed, mostly composed of pure metallic Cu nanocrystals and extremely stable over extended period of simply sealed storage.

  15. An Ethology of Urban Fabric(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsch, Jonas; Thomsen, Bodil Marie Stavning

    2014-01-01

    The article explores a non-metaphorical understanding of urban fabric(s), shifting the attention from a bird’s eye perspective to the actual, textural manifestations of a variety of urban fabric(s) to be studied in their real, processual, ecological and ethological complexity within urban life. We...... effectuate this move by bringing into resonance a range of intersecting fields that all deal with urban fabric(s) in complementary ways (interaction design and urban design activism, fashion, cultural theory, philosophy, urban computing)....

  16. Out- versus in-plane magnetic anisotropy of free Fe and Co nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Dongzhe; Barreteau, Cyrille; Castell, Martin R.

    2014-01-01

    We report tight-binding and density functional theory calculations of magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) of free Fe (body-centered-cubic) and Co (face-centered-cubic) slabs and nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are truncated square pyramids which can be grown experimentally by deposition of ...... reversal mechanism of the nanocrystals. Indeed, the very high uniaxial anisotropy of Fe nanocrystals makes them a much better potential candidate for magnetic storage devices....

  17. Green synthesis of core-shell gold-palladium@palladium nanocrystals dispersed on graphene with enhanced catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation in alkaline media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie-Ning; Li, Shan-Shan; Ma, Xiaohong; Chen, Fang-Yi; Wang, Ai-Jun; Chen, Jian-Rong; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2014-09-01

    Well-defined core-shell gold-palladium@palladium nanocrystals (AuPd@Pd) are facilely prepared by a simple and green wet-chemical method at 25 °C. A Good's buffer, 2-[4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazinyl] ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), is used as a reducing agent and a shape-directing agent, while there is no template, seed, organic solvent, or surfactant involved. The AuPd@Pd nanocrystals are uniformly dispersed on graphene nanosheets by ultrasonication, resulting in the formation of graphene supported AuPd@Pd (G-AuPd@Pd). The as-prepared nanocomposites exhibit the improved catalytic activity, good tolerance, and better stability for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) in alkaline media, compared with the G-Pd and commercial Pd black catalysts. The as-developed method may provide a promising pathway for large-scale fabrication of AuPd-based catalysts.

  18. Fabrication and Gas-Sensing Properties of Ni-Silicide/Si Nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Hsun-Feng; Chen, Chun-An; Liu, Shang-Wu; Tang, Chun-Kai

    2017-01-01

    Ni-silicide/Si nanowires were fabricated by atomic force microscope nano-oxidation on silicon-on-insulator substrates, selective wet etching, and reactive deposition epitaxy. Ni-silicide nanocrystal-modified Si nanowire and Ni-silicide/Si heterostructure multi-stacked nanowire were formed by low- and high-coverage depositions of Ni, respectively. The Ni-silicide/Si Schottky junction and Ni-silicide region were attributed high- and low-resistance parts of nanowire, respectively, causing the re...

  19. Processing and characterization of new oxy-sulfo-telluride glasses in the Ge-Sb-Te-S-O system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.; Jackson, J.; Petit, L.; Rivero-Baleine, C.; Richardson, K.

    2010-01-01

    New oxy-sulfo-telluride glasses have been prepared in the Ge-Sb-Te-S-O system employing a two-step melting process which involves the processing of a chalcogenide glass (ChG) and subsequent melting with TeO 2 or Sb 2 O 3 . The progressive incorporation of O at the expense of S was found to increase the density and the glass transition temperature and to decrease the molar volume of the investigated oxy-sulfo-telluride glasses. We also observed a shift of the vis-NIR cut-off wavelength to longer wavelength probably due to changes in Sb coordination within the glass matrix and overall matrix polarizability. Using Raman spectroscopy, correlations have been shown between the formation of Ge- and Sb-based oxysulfide structural units and the S/O ratio. Lastly, two glasses with similar composition (Ge 20 Sb 6 S 64 Te 3 O 7 ) processed by melting the Ge 23 Sb 7 S 70 glass with TeO 2 or the Ge 23 Sb 2 S 72 Te 4 glass with Sb 2 O 3 were found to have slightly different physical, thermal, optical and structural properties. These changes are thought to result mainly from the higher moisture content and sensitivity of the TeO 2 starting materials as compared to that of the Sb 2 O 3 . - Graphical abstract: In this paper, we discuss our most recent findings on the processing and characterization of new ChG glasses prepared with small levels of Te, melted either with TeO 2 or Sb 2 O 3 powders. We explain how these new oxy-sulfo-telluride glasses are prepared and we correlate the physical, thermal and optical properties of the investigated glasses to the structure changes induced by the addition of oxygen in the Ge-Sb-S-Te glass network.

  20. Preparation of bismuth telluride based thermoelectric nanomaterials via low-energy ball milling and their property characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Christopher A.

    Thermoelectric materials are able to convert energy between heat and electricity with no moving parts, making them very appealing for power generation purposes. This is particularly appealing since many forms of energy generation lose energy to waste heat. The Livermore National Laboratory estimates that up to 55% of the energy created in traditional power plants is lost through heat generation [1]. As greenhouse gas emissions become a more important issue, large sources of waste like this will need to be harnessed. Adoption of these materials has been limited due to the cost and efficiency of current technology. Bismuth telluride based alloys have a dimensionless figure of merit, a measure of efficiency, near one at room temperature, which makes it the best current material. In order to compete with other forms of energy generation, this needs to be increased to three or higher [2]. Recently, improvements in performance have come in the form of random nanostructured materials [3]. Bulk bismuth telluride is subjected to particle size reduction via high-energy ball milling in order to scatter phonons between grains. This reduces the lattice thermal conductivity which in turn increases the performance of the material. In this work, we investigate the use of low-energy ball milling as a method of creating nanoparticles of n-type and p-type Bi2Te3 alloys for thermoelectric applications. Optimization of parameters such as milling containers, milling media, contamination and milling time has resulted in creating 15nm particles of bismuth telluride alloys. After creating solid pellets of the resulting powders via hot pressing, the material's thermal and electrical conductivities as well as Seebeck coefficients were measured. The ZT of n-type Bi2Te2.7Se3 created using this method is 0.32, while the p-type Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 exhibits a higher ZT of 1.24, both at room temperature.

  1. Prospects of novel front and back contacts for high efficiency cadmium telluride thin film solar cells from numerical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matin, M.A. [Department of Electrical, Electronic and System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Chittagong University of Engineering and Technology (CUET), Chittagong (Bangladesh); Mannir Aliyu, M.; Quadery, Abrar H. [Department of Electrical, Electronic and System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Amin, Nowshad [Department of Electrical, Electronic and System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Center of Excellence for Research in Engineering Materials (CEREM), College of Engineering, King Saud University, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-09-15

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin film solar cell has long been recognized as a leading photovoltaic candidate for its high efficiency and low cost. A numerical simulation has been performed using AMPS-1D simulator to explore the possibility of higher efficiency and stable CdS/CdTe cell among several cell structures with indium tin oxide (ITO) and cadmium stannate (Cd{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}) as front contact material, tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}), zinc oxide (ZnO) and zinc stannate (Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}) as buffer layer, and silver (Ag) or antimony telluride (Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) with molybdenum (Mo) or zinc telluride (ZnTe) with aluminium (Al) as back contact material. The cell structure ITO/i-ZnO/CdS/CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x}/CdTe/Ag has shown the best conversion efficiency of 16.9% (Voc=0.9 V, Jsc=26.35 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF=0.783). This analysis has shown that ITO as front contact material, ZnO as buffer layer and ZnTe or Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} back surface reflector (BSR) are suitable material system for high efficiency (>15%) and stable CdS/CdTe cells. The cell normalized efficiency linearly decreased at a temperature gradient of -0.25%/ C for ZnTe based cells, and at -0.40%/ C for other cells. (author)

  2. Depleted Nanocrystal-Oxide Heterojunctions for High-Sensitivity Infrared Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-28

    of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506, United States Abstract. CdSe-based nanocrystal quantum wells (QWs...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: 4.3 Electronic Sensing - Depleted Nanocrystal - Oxide Heterojunctions for High...reviewed journals: Final Report: 4.3 Electronic Sensing - Depleted Nanocrystal -Oxide Heterojunctions for High-Sensitivity Infrared Detection Report Title

  3. Infrared Emitting and Photoconducting Colloidal Silver Chalcogenide Nanocrystal Quantum Dots from a Silylamide-Promoted Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yarema, Maksym; Pichler, Stefan; Sytnyk, Mykhailo; Seyrkammer, Robert; Lechner, Rainer T.; Fritz-Popovski, Gerhard; Jarzab, Dorota; Szendrei, Krisztina; Resel, Roland; Korovyanko, Oleksandra; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Paris, Oskar; Hesser, Guenter; Heiss, Wolfgang; Hesser, Günter

    Here, we present a hot injection synthesis of colloidal Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals (Ag(2)Se, Ag(2)Te, and Ag(2)S) that resulted in exceptionally small nanocrystal sizes in the range between 2 and 4 nm. Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals exhibit band gap energies within the near-infrared spectral region,

  4. Investigations of portable cadmium telluride (CdTe(Cl)) detectors for clinical studies with radioactive indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojsen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The combination of small, portable γ-radiation-sensitive Cadmium Telluride (CdTE(Cl)) crystal detectors and portable solid state data storage memories makes it feasible to extend the measuring period in a number of clinical investigations based on the use of various radioisotopes and external detection. Blood sampling can be avoided in some cases. Continuous ambulatory monitoring of relevant physiological parameters is practicable, e.g. kidney function (GFR), left ventricular ejection fraction, subcutaneous blood flow, muscle blood flow and insulin absorption in diabetic patients. In the present methodological study the applicability of the 133-Xe washout technique to subcutaneous (s.c.) adipose tissue blood flow (SBF) has been investigated and adapted to the use of CdTe(Cl) detectors attached to the skin surface for the measurement of local 133-Xe-disappearance rate constants (k). Physical characterization of CdTe(Cl) detectors as γ-sensitive devices has been performed, and adequate counting sensitivities were found without detector energy-resolution properties. The CdTe(Cl) detectors are therefore suitable for single indicator studies. The measuring geometry of CdTe(Cl) detectors was studied and compared with that of stationary Sodium Iodide (NaI(Tl)) detectors in both phantom and in vivo investigations. The spatial properties of CdTe(Cl) detectors could to some extent be adjusted by pulse height discrimination and lead collimation. When long-term measurements were complicated by for instance physical activity of the patients, the small CdTe(Cl) detectors in general showed equal or better performance than the heavy and voluminous NaI(Tl) detectors. The free movement of the ambulatory patient and the avoidance of cable connections to stationary data-collecting systems gave improved possibilities for measurements of the relevant parameters. From this point of view, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors must be considered an important advance for radioactivity studies in

  5. A Fumonisins Immunosensor Based on Polyanilino-Carbon Nanotubes Doped with Palladium Telluride Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milua Masikini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An impedimetric immunosensor for fumonisins was developed based on poly(2,5-dimethoxyaniline-multi-wall carbon nanotubes doped with palladium telluride quantum dots onto a glassy carbon surface. The composite was assembled by a layer-by-layer method to form a multilayer film of quantum dots (QDs and poly(2,5-dimethoxyaniline-multi-wall carbon nanotubes (PDMA-MWCNT. Preparation of the electrochemical immunosensor for fumonisins involved drop-coating of fumonisins antibody onto the composite modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy response of the FB1 immunosensor (GCE/PT-PDMA-MWCNT/anti-Fms-BSA gave a linear range of 7 to 49 ng L−1 and the corresponding sensitivity and detection limits were 0.0162 kΩ L ng−1 and 0.46 pg L−1, respectively, hence the limit of detection of the GCE/PT-PDMA-MWCNT immunosensor for fumonisins in corn certified material was calculated to be 0.014 and 0.011 ppm for FB1, and FB2 and FB3, respectively. These results are lower than those obtained by ELISA, a provisional maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI for fumonisins (the sum of FB1, FB2, and FB3 established by the Joint FAO/WHO expert committee on food additives and contaminants of 2 μg kg−1 and the maximum level recommended by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA for protection of human consumption (2–4 mg L−1.

  6. Spectroscopic, microscopic, and internal stress analysis in cadmium telluride grown by close-space sublimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manciu, Felicia S.; Salazar, Jessica G.; Diaz, Aryzbe; Quinones, Stella A.

    2015-01-01

    High quality materials with excellent ordered structure are needed for developing photovoltaic and infrared devices. With this end in mind, the results of our research prove the importance of a detailed, comprehensive spectroscopic and microscopic analysis in assessing cadmium telluride (CdTe) characteristics. The goal of this work is to examine not only material crystallinity and morphology, but also induced stress in the deposit material. A uniform, selective growth of polycrystalline CdTe by close-space sublimation on patterned Si(111) and Si(211) substrates is demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy images. Besides good crystallinity of the samples, as revealed by both Raman scattering and Fourier transform infrared absorption investigations, the far-infrared transmission data also show the presence of surface optical phonon modes, which is direct evidence of confinement in such a material. The qualitative identification of the induced stress was achieved by performing confocal Raman mapping microscopy on sample surfaces and by monitoring the existence of the rock-salt and zinc-blende structural phases of CdTe, which were associated with strained and unstrained morphologies, respectively. Although the induced stress in the material is still largely due to the high lattice mismatch between CdTe and the Si substrate, the current results provide a direct visualization of its partial release through the relaxation effect at crystallite boundaries and of preferential growth directions of less strain. Our study, thus offers significant value for improvement of material properties, by targeting the needed adjustments in the growth processes. - Highlights: • Assessing the characteristics of CdTe deposited on patterned Si substrates • Proving the utility of confocal Raman microscopy in monitoring the induced stress • Confirming the partial stress release through the grain boundary relaxation effect • Demonstrating the phonon confinement effect in low

  7. Spark plasma sintered bismuth telluride-based thermoelectric materials incorporating dispersed boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, H.R., E-mail: hugo.williams@leicester.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ambrosi, R.M. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Chen, K. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Friedman, U. [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ning, H.; Reece, M.J. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Robbins, M.C.; Simpson, K. [European Thermodynamics Ltd., 8 Priory Business Park, Wistow Road, Kibworth LE8 0R (United Kingdom); Stephenson, K. [European Space Agency, ESTEC TEC-EP, Keplerlaan 1, 2201AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2015-03-25

    Highlights: • Nano-B{sub 4}C reinforced Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} p-type thermoelectric produced by SPS. • Addition of B{sub 4}C up to 0.2 vol% to SPS’d material has little effect on zT. • Vickers hardness improved by 27% by adding 0.2 vol% B{sub 4}C. • Fracture toughness of SPS material: K{sub IC} = 0.80 MPa m{sup 1/2} by SEVNB. • Mechanical properties much better than commercial directionally solidified material. - Abstract: The mechanical properties of bismuth telluride based thermoelectric materials have received much less attention in the literature than their thermoelectric properties. Polycrystalline p-type Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} materials were produced from powder using spark plasma sintering (SPS). The effects of nano-B{sub 4}C addition on the thermoelectric performance, Vickers hardness and fracture toughness were measured. Addition of 0.2 vol% B{sub 4}C was found to have little effect on zT but increased hardness by approximately 27% when compared to polycrystalline material without B{sub 4}C. The K{sub IC} fracture toughness of these compositions was measured as 0.80 MPa m{sup 1/2} by Single-Edge V-Notched Beam (SEVNB). The machinability of polycrystalline materials produced by SPS was significantly better than commercially available directionally solidified materials because the latter is limited by cleavage along the crystallographic plane parallel to the direction of solidification.

  8. The crystal structures and powder diffraction patterns of the uranium tellurides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, R.L. (State Univ. of New York, Alfred, NY (USA). Inst. of Ceramic Superconductivity); Nichols, M.C.; Boehme, D.R. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA))

    1990-10-03

    A critical review of all of the reported structures and powder diffraction patterns in the uranium telluride system has been undertaken. Structures that are correct: Cubic -- UTe: no experimental pattern exists. Retain calculated 15--865. Cubic --U{sub 3}Te{sub 4}: retain the poor quality 12--610 but adopt the pattern calculated here. Cubic U{sub 2}Te{sub 3}: no experimental pattern exists. Adopt pattern calculated here. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 2}: Adopt the new pattern of Boehme et al. Monoclinic {alpha}UTe{sub 3} Adopt the new pattern of Boehme et al. Monoclinic {alpha}UTe{sub 3} Adopt the new pattern of Boehme et al. Orthorhombic {beta}UTe{sub 3}: Adopt pattern calculated here. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 5}: Adopt the new pattern of Boehme et al. Structures in need of refinement: Orthorhombic U{sub 2}Te{sub 3}:Adopt pattern calculated here over 34--807. Hexagonal U{sub 7}Te{sub 12}: Adopt pattern calculated here but retain 24--1368. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 1.78}: Adopt pattern calculated here and retain our modified 21--1404 reported for U{sub 4}Te{sub 7}. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 2.5}: Adopt pattern calculated here. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 3.4}: Accept recent pattern of Boehme et al. Phases for which no structures or reliable patterns exist: Orthorhombic U{sub 3}Te{sub 4}: no published pattern. Tetragonal U{sub 3}Te{sub 5}: three patterns 21--1407, 34--766 and 34--896 exit but all are of very poor quality. Phases which probably do not exist: Tetragonal UTe{sub 1.78}, Tetragonal UTe{sub 2}, Cubic UTe{sub 2} U{sub 3}Te{sub 7}(21--1402), U{sub 3}Te{sub 8}(21--1406).

  9. Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride Focal Plane Array Performance Under Non-Standard Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Bruce, Carl F.; Green, Robert O.; Coles, J. B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper highlights a new technique that allows the Teledyne Scientific & Imaging LLC TCM6604A Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) Focal Plane Array (FPA) to operate at room temperature. The Teledyne MCT FPA has been a standard in Imaging Spectroscopy since its creation in the 1980's. This FPA has been used in applications ranging from space instruments such as CRISM, M3 and ARTEMIS to airborne instruments such as MaRS and the Next Generation AVIRIS Instruments1. Precise focal plane alignment is always a challenge for such instruments. The current FPA alignment process results in multiple cold cycles requiring week-long durations, thereby increasing the risk and cost of a project. These alignment cycles are necessary because optimal alignment is approached incrementally and can only be measured with the FPA and Optics at standard operating conditions, requiring a cold instrument. Instruments using this FPA are normally cooled to temperatures below 150K for the MCT FPA to properly function. When the FPA is run at higher temperatures the dark current increases saturating the output. This paper covers the prospect of warm MCT FPA operation from a theoretical and experimental perspective. We discuss the empirical models and physical laws that govern MCT material properties and predict the optimal settings that will result in the best MCT PA performance at 300K. Theoretical results are then calculated for the proposed settings. We finally present the images and data obtained using the actual system with the warm MCT FPA settings. The paper concludes by emphasizing the strong positive correlation between the measured values and the theoretical results.

  10. Fabrication and Prototyping Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The Fabrication and Prototyping Lab for composite structures provides a wide variety of fabrication capabilities critical to enabling hands-on research and...

  11. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachleben, Joseph Robert [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and 13C enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution 1H and 13C liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 Å. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time > 10-8 s-1. The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O2 and ultraviolet. A method for measuring 14N-1H J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T1 and T2 experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in 13C enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  12. Controlled synthesis of thorium and uranium oxide nano-crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudry, Damien; Apostolidis, Christos; Walter, Olaf; Gouder, Thomas; Courtois, Eglantine; Kubel, Christian; Meyer, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about the size and shape effects on the properties of actinide compounds. As a consequence, the controlled synthesis of well-defined actinide-based nano-crystals constitutes a fundamental step before studying their corresponding properties. In this paper, we report on the non-aqueous surfactant-assisted synthesis of thorium and uranium oxide nano-crystals. The final characteristics of thorium and uranium oxide nano-crystals can be easily tuned by controlling a few experimental parameters such as the nature of the actinide precursor and the composition of the organic system (e.g., the chemical nature of the surfactants and their relative concentrations). Additionally, the influence of these parameters on the outcome of the synthesis is highly dependent on the nature of the actinide element (thorium versus uranium). By using optimised experimental conditions, monodisperse isotropic uranium oxide nano-crystals with different sizes (4.5 and 10.7 nm) as well as branched nano-crystals (overall size ca. 5 nm), nano-dots (ca. 4 nm) and nano-rods (with ultra-small diameters of 1 nm) of thorium oxide were synthesised. (authors)

  13. Strain-induced optical absorption properties of semiconductor nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai; Luo, Sheng; Ouyang, Gang; Yang, Guowei

    2013-06-28

    As comparable to the spherical nanocrystals, the nanocrystals with non-spherical shape have fascinating properties induced by a large fraction of under-coordinated atoms located at end parts, including edges, vertexes, and side facets. Herein, taking into account the shell-core configuration of semiconductor nanospheres, nanocubes, and nanorods, we investigate the self-equilibrium strain on optical absorption properties from the perspective of atomistic origin. It has been found that the band gap of nanocrystals exhibits a pronounced blueshift compared with that of the bulk counterpart, and further shown that the band gap of nanospheres is different from that of naoncubes and nanorods. Moreover, we demonstrate that the shape effects have weak influences on the absorption coefficient when the crystal size approaches to a threshold value that is much smaller than the exciton Bohr radius at short wavelengths. Remarkably, the nanocubes have the largest deformation potential compared to the nanorods and nanospheres at fixed strain. The physical origin can be ascribed to the self-equilibrium strain induced by end effects that changes the bonding identifies, which leads to the variations of cohesive energy and entire Hamiltonian of nanocrystals. Our theoretical predictions not only are consistent with the experimental measurements and simulations, but also indicate the possible method on tunable optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals.

  14. Stabilizing Agents for Drug Nanocrystals: Effect on Bioavailability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Tuomela

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug nanocrystals are a versatile option for drug delivery purposes, and while the number of poorly soluble drug materials is all the time increasing, more research in this area is performed. Drug nanocrystals have a simple structure—a solid drug core is surrounded by a layer of stabilizing agent. However, despite the considerably simple structure, the selection of an appropriate stabilizer for a certain drug can be challenging. Mostly, the stabilizer selection is based purely on the requirement of physical stability, e.g., maintaining the nanosized particle size as long as possible after the formation of drug nanocrystals. However, it is also worth taking into account that stabilizer can affect the bioavailability in the final formulation via interactions with cells and cell layers. In addition, formation of nanocrystals is only one process step, and for the final formulation, more excipients are often added to the composition. The role of the stabilizers in the final formulation can be more than only stabilizing the nanocrystal particle size. A good example is the stabilizer’s role as cryoprotectant during freeze drying. In this review, the stabilizing effect, role of stabilizers in final nanocrystalline formulations, challenges in reaching in vitro–in vivo correlation with nanocrystalline products, and stabilizers’ effect on higher bioavailability are discussed.

  15. Performance Parameters and Characterizations of Nanocrystals: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manasi M. Chogale

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Poor bioavailability of drugs associated with their poor solubility limits the clinical effectiveness of almost 40% of the newly discovered drug moieties. Low solubility, coupled with a high log p value, high melting point and high dose necessitates exploration of alternative formulation strategies for such drugs. One such novel approach is formulation of the drugs as “Nanocrystals”. Nanocrystals are primarily comprised of drug and surfactants/stabilizers and are manufactured by “top-down” or “bottom-up” methods. Nanocrystals aid the clinical efficacy of drugs by various means such as enhancement of bioavailability, lowering of dose requirement, and facilitating sustained release of the drug. This effect is dependent on the various characteristics of nanocrystals (particle size, saturation solubility, dissolution velocity, which have an impact on the improved performance of the nanocrystals. Various sophisticated techniques have been developed to evaluate these characteristics. This article describes in detail the various characterization techniques along with a brief review of the significance of the various parameters on the performance of nanocrystals.

  16. Ligand exchange in quaternary alloyed nanocrystals--a spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabka, Grzegorz; Bujak, Piotr; Giedyk, Kamila; Kotwica, Kamil; Ostrowski, Andrzej; Malinowska, Karolina; Lisowski, Wojciech; Sobczak, Janusz W; Pron, Adam

    2014-11-14

    Exchange of initial, predominantly stearate ligands for pyridine in the first step and butylamine (BA) or 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) in the second one was studied for alloyed quaternary Cu-In-Zn-S nanocrystals. The NMR results enabled us to demonstrate, for the first time, direct binding of the pyridine labile ligand to the nanocrystal surface as evidenced by paramagnetic shifts of the three signals attributed to its protons to 7.58, 7.95 and 8.75 ppm. XPS investigations indicated, in turn, a significant change in the composition of the nanocrystal surface upon the exchange of initial ligands for pyridine, which being enriched in indium in the 'as prepared' form became enriched in zinc after pyridine binding. This finding indicated that the first step of ligand exchange had to involve the removal of the surface layer enriched in indium with simultaneous exposure of a new, zinc-enriched layer. In the second ligand exchange step (replacement of pyridine with BA or MUA) the changes in the nanocrystal surface compositions were much less significant. The presence of zinc in the nanocrystal surface layer turned out necessary for effective binding of pyridine as shown by a comparative study of ligand exchange in Cu-In-Zn-S, Ag-In-Zn-S and CuInS2, carried out by complementary XPS and NMR investigations.

  17. Fabrication of recyclable superhydrophobic cotton fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Wook; Park, Eun Ji; Jeong, Myung-Geun; Kim, Il Hee; Seo, Hyun Ook; Kim, Ju Hwan; Kim, Kwang-Dae; Kim, Young Dok

    2017-04-01

    Commercial cotton fabric was coated with SiO2 nanoparticles wrapped with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer, and the resulting material surface showed a water contact angle greater than 160°. The superhydrophobic fabric showed resistance to water-soluble contaminants and maintained its original superhydrophobic properties with almost no alteration even after many times of absorption-washing cycles of oil. Moreover, superhydrophobic fabric can be used as a filter to separate oil from water. We demonstrated a simple method of fabrication of superhydrophobic fabric with potential interest for use in a variety of applications.

  18. Energy relaxation in CdSe nanocrystals: the effects of morphology and film preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, Bryan T; Chen, Liangliang; Ruan, Xiulin; Xu, Xianfan

    2013-01-14

    Ultrafast time-resolved absorption spectroscopy is used to investigate exciton dynamics in CdSe nanocrystal films. The effects of morphology, quantum-dot versus quantum-rod, and preparation of nanocrystals in a thin film form are investigated. The measurements revealed longer intraband exciton relaxation in quantum-rods than in quantum-dots. The slowed relaxation in quantum-rods is due to mitigation of the Auger-relaxation mechanism from elongating the nanocrystal. In addition, the nanocrystal thin film showed long-lived confined acoustic phonons corresponding to the ellipsoidal breathing mode, contrary to others work on colloidal systems of CdSe nanocrystals.

  19. Computational analysis of interfacial attachment kinetics and transport phenomena during liquid phase epitaxy of mercury cadmium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasin, Igal; Brandon, Simon [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Ben Dov, Anne; Grimberg, Ilana; Klin, Olga; Weiss, Eliezer [SCD-Semi-Conductor Devices, P.O. Box 2250/99, Haifa 31021 (Israel)

    2010-07-01

    Deposition of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) thin films, on lattice matched cadmium zinc telluride substrates, is often achieved via Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE). The yield and quality of these films, required for the production of infrared detector devices, is to a large extent limited by lack of knowledge regarding details of physical phenomena underlying the deposition process. Improving the understanding of these phenomena and their impact on the quality of the resultant films is therefore an important goal which can be achieved through relevant computational and/or experimental studies. We present a combined computational and experimental effort aimed at elucidating physical phenomena underlying the LPE of MCT via a slider growth process. The focus of the presentation will be results generated by a time-dependent three-dimensional model of mass transport, fluid flow, and interfacial attachment kinetics, which we have developed and applied in the analysis of this LPE process. These results, combined with experimental analyses, lead to an improved understanding of the role of different transport and kinetic phenomena underlying this growth process.

  20. Silicon nanocrystals embedded in oxide films grown by magnetron sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Bonafos

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparison of the results that we obtained and reported over the last few years on the structural, optical and light emitting properties of Si-SiO2 and Si-Al2O3 films that were fabricated using a specific configuration of RF magnetron sputtering. In these films the Si volume fraction, x, varies along the film (which is typically 14 cm long from a value of ~0.1 at one end to ~0.9 at the other end. For the films with x > 0.3, the formation of amorphous Si clusters was observed in as-deposited Si-SiO2 and Si-Al2O3 films. Si nanocrystals (Si-ncs were generated by high-temperature annealing of the films in nitrogen atmosphere. We found that two processes can contribute to the Si-ncs formation: (i the crystallization of the existing amorphous Si inclusions in the as-deposited films, and (ii the thermally stimulated phase separation. Process (i can be responsible for the independence of Si-ncs mean sizes on x in annealed films with x > 0.5. At the same time, difference in the structural and the light emitting properties of the two types of films was observed. For the samples of the same x, the Si-ncs embedded in the Al2O3 host were found to be larger than the Si-ncs in the SiO2 host. This phenomenon can be explained by the lower temperature required for phase separation in Si-Al2O3 or by the lower temperature of the crystallization of Si-ncs in alumina. The latter suggestion is supported by Raman scattering and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra. In contrast with the Si-SiO2, the Si-ncs embedded in Si-Al2O3 films were found to be under tensile stress. This effect was explained by the strains at the interfaces between the film and silica substrate as well as between the Si inclusions and the Al2O3 host. It was also shown that exciton recombination in Si-ncs is the dominant radiative channel in Si-SiO2 films, while the emission from the oxide defects dominates in Si-Al2O3 films. This can be due to the high number of non

  1. Chalcogenide nanocrystal assembly: Controlling heterogeneity and modulating heterointerfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jessica

    This dissertation work is focused on developing methods to facilitate charge transport in heterostructured materials that comprise a nanoscale component. Multicomponent semiconductor materials were prepared by (1) spin coating of discrete nanomaterials onto porous silicon (pSi) or (2) self-assembly. Spin-coating of colloidal quantum dot (QD) PbS solutions was employed to create prototype PbS QD based radiation detection devices using porous silicon (pSi) as an n-type support and charge transport material. These devices were initially tested as a photodetector to ascertain the possibility of their use in high energy radiation detection. Short chain thiolate ligands (4-fluorothiophenolate) and anion passivation at the particle interface were evaluated to augment interparticle transport. However, the samples showed minimum interaction with the light source possibly due to poor infiltration into the pSi. The second project was also driven by the potential synergistic properties that can be achieved in multicomponent metal chalcogenide nanostructures, potentially useful in optoelectronic devices. Working with well-established methods for single component metal chalcogenide (MQ) particle gels this dissertation research sought to develop practical methods for co-gelation of different component particles with complimentary functionalities. By monitoring the kinetics of aggregation using time resolved dynamic light scattering and NMR spectroscopy the kinetics of aggregation of the two most common crystal structures for CdQ nanocrystals was studied and it was determined that the hexagonal (wurtzite) crystal structure aggregated faster than the cubic (zinc blende) crystal structure. For gel coupling of nanoparticles with differing Q (Q=S, Se and Te), once we accounted for the crystal structure effects, it was determined that the relative redox characteristics of Q govern the reaction rate. The oxidative sol-gel assembly routes were also employed to fabricate metal

  2. Properties of Nanocrystals-formulated Aluminosilicate Bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Conciauro

    2015-10-01

    insulating and/or mechanical properties. The nanocrystals- modified refractories showed variations in properties, with respect to the untreated aluminosilicate reference in heat- insulating performances (thermal diffusivities were measured by the “hot disk” technique. In general, they also showed improvements in mechanical compression resist‐ ance for all of the samples at 2 wt. %. The best heat insula‐ tion was obtained with the addition of nano-aluminium hydroxide at 2 wt. %, while the highest mechanical compres‐ sion breaking resistance was found with nano-CaCO3 at 2 wt. %. These outcomes were investigated with complemen‐ tary techniques, like mercury porosimetry for porosity, and Archimedes methods to measure physical properties like the bulk and apparent densities, apparent porosities and water absorption. The results show that the nano-alumini‐ um hydroxide modified bricks were the most porous, which could explain the best heat-insulating performances. There is a less straightforward explanation for the mechanical resistance results, as they may have relations with the characteristics of the pores. Furthermore, the nanoparti‐ cles may have possible reactions with the matrix during the heat treatments.

  3. Recent Developments in Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Silver Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaohu; Zeng, Jie; Zhang, Qiang; Moran, Christine H; Xia, Younan

    2012-01-01

    This feature article introduces our recent work on understanding the roles played by citrate and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) as capping agents in seed-mediated syntheses of Ag nanocrystals with controlled shapes. We have demonstrated that citrate and PVP selectively bind to Ag(111) and Ag(100) surfaces, respectively, and thus favor the formation of Ag nanocrystals enclosed preferentially by {111} or {100} facets. In addition, we have quantified the coverage density of PVP adsorbed on the surface of Ag nanocubes. Based on the mechanistic understanding, a series of Ag nanocrystals with controlled shapes and sizes have been successfully synthesized by using different combinations of seeds and capping agents: single-crystal spherical/cubic seeds with citrate for cuboctahedrons and octahedrons or with PVP for cubes and bars; and plate-like seeds with citrate for enlarged thin plates or with PVP for thickened plates.

  4. Adsorption of vitamin E on mesoporous titania nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, C.J., E-mail: cjshih@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Lin, C.T.; Wu, S.M. [School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-15

    Tri-block nonionic surfactant and titanium chloride were used as starting materials for the synthesis of mesoporous titania nanocrystallite powders. The main objective of the present study was to examine the synthesis of mesoporous titania nanocrystals and the adsorption of vitamin E on those nanocrystals using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms. When the calcination temperature was increased to 300 {sup o}C, the reflection peaks in the XRD pattern indicated the presence of an anatase phase. The crystallinity of the nanocrystallites increased from 80% to 98.6% with increasing calcination temperature from 465 {sup o}C to 500 {sup o}C. The N{sub 2} adsorption data and XRD data taken after vitamin E adsorption revealed that the vitamin E molecules were adsorbed in the mesopores of the titania nanocrystals.

  5. Adsorption of vitamin E on mesoporous titania nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, C.J.; Lin, C.T.; Wu, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Tri-block nonionic surfactant and titanium chloride were used as starting materials for the synthesis of mesoporous titania nanocrystallite powders. The main objective of the present study was to examine the synthesis of mesoporous titania nanocrystals and the adsorption of vitamin E on those nanocrystals using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms. When the calcination temperature was increased to 300 o C, the reflection peaks in the XRD pattern indicated the presence of an anatase phase. The crystallinity of the nanocrystallites increased from 80% to 98.6% with increasing calcination temperature from 465 o C to 500 o C. The N 2 adsorption data and XRD data taken after vitamin E adsorption revealed that the vitamin E molecules were adsorbed in the mesopores of the titania nanocrystals.

  6. Cellulose nanocrystals, nanofibers, and their composites as renewable smart materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Zhai, Lindong; Mun, Seongcheol; Ko, Hyun-U.; Yun, Young-Min

    2015-04-01

    Cellulose is one of abundant renewable biomaterials in the world. Over 1.5 trillion tons of cellulose is produced per year in nature by biosynthesis, forming microfibrils which in turn aggregate to form cellulose fibers. Using new effective methods these microfibrils can be disintegrated from the fibers to nanosized materials, so called cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) and cellulose nanofiber (CNF). The CNC and CNF have extremely good strength properties, dimensional stability, thermal stability and good optical properties on top of their renewable behavior, which can be a building block of new materials. This paper represents recent advancement of cellulose nanocrystals and cellulose nanofibers, followed by their possibility for smart materials. Natural behaviors, extraction, modification of cellulose nanocrystals and fibers are explained and their synthesis with nanomaterials is introduced, which is necessary to meet the technological requirements for smart materials. Also, its challenges are addressed.

  7. Seeded Growth Route to Noble Calcium Carbonate Nanocrystal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminul Islam

    Full Text Available A solution-phase route has been considered as the most promising route to synthesize noble nanostructures. A majority of their synthesis approaches of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 are based on either using fungi or the CO2 bubbling methods. Here, we approached the preparation of nano-precipitated calcium carbonate single crystal from salmacis sphaeroides in the presence of zwitterionic or cationic biosurfactants without external source of CO2. The calcium carbonate crystals were rhombohedron structure and regularly shaped with side dimension ranging from 33-41 nm. The high degree of morphological control of CaCO3 nanocrystals suggested that surfactants are capable of strongly interacting with the CaCO3 surface and control the nucleation and growth direction of calcium carbonate nanocrystals. Finally, the mechanism of formation of nanocrystals in light of proposed routes was also discussed.

  8. Predicting Nanocrystal Shape through Consideration of Surface-Ligand Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Bealing, Clive R.

    2012-03-27

    Density functional calculations for the binding energy of oleic acid-based ligands on Pb-rich {100} and {111} facets of PbSe nanocrystals determine the surface energies as a function of ligand coverage. Oleic acid is expected to bind to the nanocrystal surface in the form of lead oleate. The Wulff construction predicts the thermodynamic equilibrium shape of the PbSe nanocrystals. The equilibrium shape is a function of the ligand surface coverage, which can be controlled by changing the concentration of oleic acid during synthesis. The different binding energy of the ligand on the {100} and {111} facets results in different equilibrium ligand coverages on the facets, and a transition in the equilibrium shape from octahedral to cubic is predicted when increasing the ligand concentration during synthesis. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  9. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamad, Kimberly Sue [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  10. MEGACELL: A nanocrystal model construction software for HRTEM multislice simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroppa, Daniel G.; Righetto, Ricardo D.; Montoro, Luciano A.; Ramirez, Antonio J.

    2011-01-01

    Image simulation has an invaluable importance for the accurate analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM) results, especially due to its non-linear image formation mechanism. Because the as-obtained images cannot be interpreted in a straightforward fashion, the retrieval of both qualitative and quantitative information from HRTEM micrographs requires an iterative process including the simulation of a nanocrystal model and its comparison with experimental images. However most of the available image simulation software requires atom-by-atom coordinates as input for the calculations, which can be prohibitive for large finite crystals and/or low-symmetry systems and zone axis orientations. This paper presents an open source citation-ware tool named MEGACELL, which was developed to assist on the construction of nanocrystals models. It allows the user to build nanocrystals with virtually any convex polyhedral geometry and to retrieve its atomic positions either as a plain text file or as an output compatible with EMS (Electron Microscopy Software) input protocol. In addition to the description of this tool features, some construction examples and its application for scientific studies are presented. These studies show MEGACELL as a handy tool, which allows an easier construction of complex nanocrystal models and improves the quantitative information extraction from HRTEM images. -- Highlights: → A software to support the HRTEM image simulation of nanocrystals in actual size. → MEGACELL allows the construction of complex nanocrystals models for multislice image simulation. → Some examples of improved nanocrystalline system characterization are presented, including the analysis of 3D morphology and growth behavior.

  11. Reaction chemistry and ligand exchange at cadmium selenide nanocrystal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Jonathan; Park, Jungwon; Trudeau, Paul-Emile; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-02

    Chemical modification of nanocrystal surfaces is fundamentally important to their assembly, their implementation in biology and medicine, and greatly impacts their electrical and optical properties. However, it remains a major challenge owing to a lack of analytical tools to directly determine nanoparticle surface structure. Early nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (1) and tri-n-octylphosphine (2), suggested these coordinating solvents are datively bound to the particle surface. However, assigning the broad NMR resonances of surface-bound ligands is complicated by significant concentrations of phosphorus-containing impurities in commercial sources of 1, and XPS provides only limited information about the nature of the phosphorus containing molecules in the sample. More recent reports have shown the surface ligands of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in technical grade 1, and in the presence of alkylphosphonic acids, include phosphonic and phosphinic acids. These studies do not, however, distinguish whether these ligands are bound datively, as neutral, L-type ligands, or by X-type interaction of an anionic phosphonate/phosphinate moiety with a surface Cd{sup 2+} ion. Answering this question would help clarify why ligand exchange with such particles does not proceed generally as expected based on a L-type ligand model. By using reagents with reactive silicon-chalcogen and silicon-chlorine bonds to cleave the ligands from the nanocrystal surface, we show that our CdSe and CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystal surfaces are likely terminated by X-type binding of alkylphosphonate ligands to a layer of Cd{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} ions, rather than by dative interactions. Further, we provide spectroscopic evidence that 1 and 2 are not coordinated to our purified nanocrystals.

  12. Processing of Polymer Nanocomposites Reinforced with Polysaccharide Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Dufresne

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous suspensions of polysaccharide (cellulose, chitin or starch nanocrystals can be prepared by acid hydrolysis of biomass. The main problem with their practical use is related to the homogeneous dispersion of these nanoparticles within a polymeric matrix. Water is the preferred processing medium. A new and interesting way for the processing of polysaccharide nanocrystals-based nanocomposites is their transformation into a co-continuous material through long chain surface chemical modification. It involves the surface chemical modification of the nanoparticles based on the use of grafting agents bearing a reactive end group and a long compatibilizing tail.

  13. Improved reliability of Mo nanocrystal memory with ammonia plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.-C.; Tu, C.-H.; Chen, W.-R.; Hu, C.-W.; Sze, Simon M.; Tseng, T.-Y.; Chang, T.-C.; Chen, S.-C.; Lin, J.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated ammonia plasma treatment influence on the nonvolatile memory characteristics of the charge storage layer composed of Mo nanocrystals embedded in nonstoichiometry oxide (SiO x ). X-ray photoelectron spectra analyses revealed that nitrogen was incorporated into the charge storage layer. Electric analyses indicated that the memory window was reduced and the retention and the endurance improved after the treatment. The reduction in the memory window and the improvement in retention were interpreted in terms of the nitrogen passivation of traps in the oxide around Mo nanocrystals. The robust endurance characteristic was attributed the improvement of the quality of the surrounding oxide by nitrogen passivation

  14. The detection and subsequent volume optimization of biological nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R. Luft

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Identifying and then optimizing initial crystallization conditions is a prerequisite for macromolecular structure determination by crystallography. Improved technologies enable data collection on crystals that are difficult if not impossible to detect using visible imaging. The application of second-order nonlinear imaging of chiral crystals and ultraviolet two-photon excited fluorescence detection is shown to be applicable in a high-throughput manner to rapidly verify the presence of nanocrystals in crystallization screening conditions. It is noted that the nanocrystals are rarely seen without also producing microcrystals from other chemical conditions. A crystal volume optimization method is described and associated with a phase diagram for crystallization.

  15. Confined Growth of ZIF-8 Nanocrystals with Tunable Structural Colors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Bingdong; Yang, Yuanqing; Jansen, Henri

    2018-01-01

    -8 synthesis, and the dispersion of gold nanoparticles as inhibitors for the following crystallization transformation of ZIF-8 crystals. By choosing the concentration of gold nanoparticles, the density of ZIF-8 nanocrystals can be controlled and the sizes of individual ZIF-8 crystals can be scaled......Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIF-8) have promising applications as sensors or catalysts due to their highly porous crystalline structures. While most of the previous studies are based on ZIF-8 crystals either in isolated particles in aqueous environments or in a compact colloidal form, here...... nanocrystals empowered with tunable optical properties paves a new way to explore the promising applications in nanophotonics and bionanotechnology....

  16. Photoluminescence of hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prtljaga, Nikola; D'Amato, Elvira; Pitanti, Alessandro; Guider, Romain; Froner, Elena; Larcheri, Silvia; Scarpa, Marina; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Stable aqueous solutions of undecylenic-acid-grafted silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) were prepared. The time evolution of the photoluminescence properties of these hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals has been followed on different timescales (hours and days). On a short timescale (hours), Si-nc tend to agglomerate while the PL lineshape and intensity are stable. Agglomeration can be reduced by using suitable surfactants. On a long timescale (days), oxidation of Si-nc occurs even in the presence of surfactants. These two observations render Si-nc very useful as a labeling agent for biosensing.

  17. Photoluminescence of hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prtljaga, Nikola; D'Amato, Elvira; Pitanti, Alessandro; Guider, Romain; Froner, Elena; Larcheri, Silvia; Scarpa, Marina; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2011-05-01

    Stable aqueous solutions of undecylenic-acid-grafted silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) were prepared. The time evolution of the photoluminescence properties of these hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals has been followed on different timescales (hours and days). On a short timescale (hours), Si-nc tend to agglomerate while the PL lineshape and intensity are stable. Agglomeration can be reduced by using suitable surfactants. On a long timescale (days), oxidation of Si-nc occurs even in the presence of surfactants. These two observations render Si-nc very useful as a labeling agent for biosensing.

  18. Photoluminescence of hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prtljaga, Nikola; D' Amato, Elvira; Pitanti, Alessandro; Guider, Romain; Froner, Elena; Larcheri, Silvia; Scarpa, Marina; Pavesi, Lorenzo, E-mail: nikolap@science.unitn.it [Department of Physics, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy)

    2011-05-27

    Stable aqueous solutions of undecylenic-acid-grafted silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) were prepared. The time evolution of the photoluminescence properties of these hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals has been followed on different timescales (hours and days). On a short timescale (hours), Si-nc tend to agglomerate while the PL lineshape and intensity are stable. Agglomeration can be reduced by using suitable surfactants. On a long timescale (days), oxidation of Si-nc occurs even in the presence of surfactants. These two observations render Si-nc very useful as a labeling agent for biosensing.

  19. Preparation of ZnO nanocrystals via ultrasonic irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, D.; Jiang, Jianzhong; Hansen, P. L.

    2003-01-01

    A simple and rapid process has been developed for the preparation of nanometer-sized ZnO crystals via ultrasonic irradiation, by which pure ZnO nanocrystals with an average size of 6 nm and narrow size distribution can be synthesized in a short time and without using any solvents for the precipit......A simple and rapid process has been developed for the preparation of nanometer-sized ZnO crystals via ultrasonic irradiation, by which pure ZnO nanocrystals with an average size of 6 nm and narrow size distribution can be synthesized in a short time and without using any solvents...

  20. Photogenerated Exciton Dissociation in Highly Coupled Lead Salt Nanocrystal Assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Joshua J.

    2010-05-12

    Internanocrystal coupling induced excitons dissociation in lead salt nanocrystal assemblies is investigated. By combining transient photoluminescence spectroscopy, grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering, and time-resolved electric force microscopy, we show that excitons can dissociate, without the aid of an external bias or chemical potential gradient, via tunneling through a potential barrier when the coupling energy is comparable to the exciton binding energy. Our results have important implications for the design of nanocrystal-based optoelectronic devices. © 2010 American Chemical Society.