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Sample records for telluride nanocrystals fabricated

  1. Nanocrystal thin film fabrication methods and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Cherie R.; Kim, David K.; Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Lai, Yuming

    2018-01-09

    Nanocrystal thin film devices and methods for fabricating nanocrystal thin film devices are disclosed. The nanocrystal thin films are diffused with a dopant such as Indium, Potassium, Tin, etc. to reduce surface states. The thin film devices may be exposed to air during a portion of the fabrication. This enables fabrication of nanocrystal-based devices using a wider range of techniques such as photolithography and photolithographic patterning in an air environment.

  2. Fabrication and electronic transport studies of single nanocrystal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, David Louis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01

    Semiconductor and metallic nanocrystals exhibit interesting electronic transport behavior as a result of electrostatic and quantum mechanical confinement effects. These effects can be studied to learn about the nature of electronic states in these systems. This thesis describes several techniques for the electronic study of nanocrystals. The primary focus is the development of novel methods to attach leads to prefabricated nanocrystals. This is because, while nanocrystals can be readily synthesized from a variety of materials with excellent size control, means to make electrical contact to these nanocrystals are limited. The first approach that will be described uses scanning probe microscopy to first image and then electrically probe surfaces. It is found that electronic investigations of nanocrystals by this technique are complicated by tip-sample interactions and environmental factors such as salvation and capillary forces. Next, an atomic force microscope technique for the catalytic patterning of the surface of a self assembled monolayer is described. In principle, this nano-fabrication technique can be used to create electronic devices which are based upon complex arrangements of nanocrystals. Finally, the fabrication and electrical characterization of a nanocrystal-based single electron transistor is presented. This device is fabricated using a hybrid scheme which combines electron beam lithography and wet chemistry to bind single nanocrystals in tunneling contact between closely spaced metallic leads. In these devices, both Au and CdSe nanocrystals show Coulomb blockade effects with characteristic energies of several tens of meV. Additional structure is seen the transport behavior of CdSe nanocrystals as a result of its electronic structure.

  3. Acetic acid-confined synthesis of uniform three-dimensional (3D) bismuth telluride nanocrystals consisting of few-quintuple-layer nanoplatelets

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Qiang; Radar, Kelly; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    High-selectivity, uniform three-dimensional (3D) flower-like bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) nanocrystals consisting of few-quintuple-layer nanoplatelets with a thickness down to 4.5 nm were synthesized for the first time by a facile, one-pot polyol method with acetic acid as the structure-director. Micrometre-sized 2D films and honeycomb-like spheres can be obtained using the uniform 3D Bi2Te3 nanocrystals as building blocks. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011.

  4. Microfluidic Fabrication of Hydrocortisone Nanocrystals Coated with Polymeric Stabilisers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Odetade

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocortisone (HC nanocrystals intended for parenteral administration of HC were produced by anti-solvent crystallisation within coaxial assemblies of pulled borosilicate glass capillaries using either co-current flow of aqueous and organic phases or counter-current flow focusing. The organic phase was composed of 7 mg/mL of HC in a 60:40 (v/v mixture of ethanol and water and the anti-solvent was milli-Q water. The microfluidic mixers were fabricated with an orifice diameter of the inner capillary ranging from 50 µm to 400 µm and operated at the aqueous to organic phase flow rate ratio ranging from 5 to 25. The size of the nanocrystals decreased with increasing aqueous to organic flow rate ratio. The counter-current flow microfluidic mixers provided smaller nanocrystals than the co-current flow devices under the same conditions and for the same geometry, due to smaller diameter of the organic phase stream in the mixing zone. The Z-average particle size of the drug nanocrystals increased from 210–280 nm to 320–400 nm after coating the nanocrystals with 0.2 wt % aqueous solution of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC in a stirred vial. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD analyses carried out on the dried nanocrystals stabilized with HPMC, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP, and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS were investigated and reported. The degree of crystallinity for the processed sample was lowest for the sample stabilised with HPMC and the highest for the raw HC powder.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of cellulose nanocrystal based transparent electroactive polyurethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyun-U.; Kim, Hyun Chan; Kim, Jung Woong; Zhai, Lindong; Jayaramudu, Tippabattini; Kim, Jaehwan

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) based transparent and electroactive polyurethane (CPPU), suitable for actively tunable optical lens. CNC is used for high dielectric filler to improve electromechanical behavior of CPPU. For high transparency and homogeneous distribution of CNC in polyurethane, CNC-poly[di(ethylene glycol) adipate] is used to play a role of polyol and isocyanate salt. The fabricated CPPU exhibits high transparency (>90%) and 10% of electromechanical strain under 3 V μm-1 electric field. Mechanical, dielectric properties as well as physical and chemical characteristics are investigated to prove the electromechanical behavior of CPPU.

  6. Inorganic photovoltaic devices fabricated using nanocrystal spray deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foos, Edward E; Yoon, Woojun; Lumb, Matthew P; Tischler, Joseph G; Townsend, Troy K

    2013-09-25

    Soluble inorganic nanocrystals offer a potential route to the fabrication of all-inorganic devices using solution deposition techniques. Spray processing offers several advantages over the more common spin- and dip-coating procedures, including reduced material loss during fabrication, higher sample throughput, and deposition over a larger area. The primary difference observed, however, is an overall increase in the film roughness. In an attempt to quantify the impact of this morphology change on the devices, we compare the overall performance of spray-deposited versus spin-coated CdTe-based Schottky junction solar cells and model their dark current-voltage characteristics. Spray deposition of the active layer results in a power conversion efficiency of 2.3 ± 0.3% with a fill factor of 45.7 ± 3.4%, Voc of 0.39 ± 0.06 V, and Jsc of 13.3 ± 3.0 mA/cm(2) under one sun illumination.

  7. Fabrication of multilayered Ge nanocrystals embedded in SiOxGeNy films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Fei; Green, Martin A.; Conibeer, Gavin; Cho, Eun-Chel; Huang Yidan; Perez-Wurfl, Ivan; Flynn, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Multilayered Ge nanocrystals embedded in SiO x GeN y films have been fabricated on Si substrate by a (Ge + SiO 2 )/SiO x GeN y superlattice approach, using a rf magnetron sputtering technique with a Ge + SiO 2 composite target and subsequent thermal annealing in N 2 ambient at 750 deg. C for 30 min. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement indicated the formation of Ge nanocrystals with an average size estimated to be 5.4 nm. Raman scattering spectra showed a peak of the Ge-Ge vibrational mode downward shifted to 299.4 cm -1 , which was caused by quantum confinement of phonons in the Ge nanocrystals. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that Ge nanocrystals were confined in (Ge + SiO 2 ) layers. This superlattice approach significantly improved both the size uniformity of Ge nanocrystals and their uniformity of spacing on the 'Z' growth direction

  8. Inorganic Nanocrystals Functionalized Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles: Fabrication and Enhanced Bio-applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiancong Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous SiO2 nanoparticles (MSNs are one of the most promising materials for bio-related applications due to advantages such as good biocompatibility, tunable mesopores, and large pore volume. However, unlike the inorganic nanocrystals with abundant physical properties, MSNs alone lack functional features. Thus, they are not sufficiently suitable for bio-applications that require special functions. Consequently, MSNs are often functionalized by incorporating inorganic nanocrystals, which provide a wide range of intriguing properties. This review focuses on inorganic nanocrystals functionalized MSNs, both their fabrication and bio-applications. Some of the most utilized methods for coating mesoporous silica (mSiO2 on nanoparticles were summarized. Magnetic, fluorescence and photothermal inorganic nanocrystals functionalized MSNs were taken as examples to demonstrate the bio-applications. Furthermore, asymmetry of MSNs and their effects on functions were also highlighted.

  9. Fabrication and evaluation of smart nanocrystals of artemisinin for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nanocrystals have the potential to substantially increase dissolution rate, solubility with subsequent enhanced bioavailability via the oral route of a range of poor water soluble drugs. Regardless of other issues, scale up of the batch size is the main issue associated with bottom up approach. Material and ...

  10. Fabrication of Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts by Deposition of Iron Nanocrystals on Carbon Nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casavola, Marianna; Hermannsdoerfer, Justus; de Jonge, Niels; Dugulan, A. Iulian; de Jong, Krijn P.

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of supported catalysts consisting of colloidal iron oxide nanocrystals with tunable size, geometry, and loadinghomogeneously dispersed on carbon nanotube (CNT) supportsis described herein. The catalyst synthesis is performed in a two-step approach. First, colloidal iron and iron

  11. Ready fabrication of thin-film electrodes from building nanocrystals for micro-supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zheng; Weng, Ding; Wang, Xiaolei; Cheng, Yanhua; Wang, Ge; Lu, Yunfeng

    2012-04-18

    Thin-film pseudocapacitor electrodes with ultrafast lithium storage kinetics, high capacitance and excellent cycling stability were fabricated from monodispersed TiO(2) building nanocrystals, providing a novel approach towards next-generation micro-supercapacitor applications. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  12. Colloidal Sb2S3 Nanocrystals: Synthesis, Characterization and Fabrication of Solid-State Semiconductor Sensitized Solar Cell

    KAUST Repository

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu

    2015-12-26

    Inorganic nanocrystals composed of earth-abundant and non-toxic elements are crucial to fabricated sustainable photovoltaic devices in large scale. In this study, various-shaped and different phases of antimony sulfide nanocrystals, which is composed of non-scarce and non-toxic elements, are synthesized using hot-injection colloidal method. The effect of various synthetic parameters on the final morphology is explored. Also, foreign ion (Chlorine) effects on the morphology of Sb2S3 nanocrystals have been observed. Structural, optical and morphological properties of the nanocrystals were investigated, and Sb2S3 nanocrystal-based solid-state semiconductor-sensitized solar cells were fabricated using as-prepared nanocrystals. We achieved promising power conversion efficiencies of 1.48%.

  13. Colloidal Sb2S3 Nanocrystals: Synthesis, Characterization and Fabrication of Solid-State Semiconductor Sensitized Solar Cell

    KAUST Repository

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu; Del Gobbo, Silvano; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Malik, Mohammad A; Bakr, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic nanocrystals composed of earth-abundant and non-toxic elements are crucial to fabricated sustainable photovoltaic devices in large scale. In this study, various-shaped and different phases of antimony sulfide nanocrystals, which is composed of non-scarce and non-toxic elements, are synthesized using hot-injection colloidal method. The effect of various synthetic parameters on the final morphology is explored. Also, foreign ion (Chlorine) effects on the morphology of Sb2S3 nanocrystals have been observed. Structural, optical and morphological properties of the nanocrystals were investigated, and Sb2S3 nanocrystal-based solid-state semiconductor-sensitized solar cells were fabricated using as-prepared nanocrystals. We achieved promising power conversion efficiencies of 1.48%.

  14. Fabrication of Ge nanocrystals doped silica-on-silicon waveguides and observation of their strong quantum confinement effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Germanium (Ge) nanocrystals embedded in silica matrix is an interesting material for new optoelectronic devices. In this paper, standard silica-on-silicon waveguides with a core doped by Ge nanocrystals were fabricated using plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition and reactive ion etching...

  15. Fabrication of Thermoelectric Sensor and Cooling Devices Based on Elaborated Bismuth-Telluride Alloy Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellah Boulouz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The principal motivation of this work is the development and realization of smart cooling and sensors devices based on the elaborated and characterized semiconducting thermoelectric thin film materials. For the first time, the details design of our sensor and the principal results are published. Fabrication and characterization of Bi/Sb/Te (BST semiconducting thin films have been successfully investigated. The best values of Seebeck coefficient (α(T at room temperature for Bi2Te3, and (Bi1−xSbx2Te3 with x = 0.77 are found to be −220 µV/K and +240 µV/K, respectively. Fabrication and evaluation of performance devices are reported. 2.60°C of cooling of only one Peltier module device for an optimal current of Iopt=2.50 mA is obtained. The values of temperature measured by infrared camera, by simulation, and those measured by the integrated and external thermocouple are reported. A sensitivity of the sensors of 5 mV Torr−1 mW−1 for the pressure sensor has been found with a response time of about 600 ms.

  16. Fabrication of highly oriented D03-Fe3Si nanocrystals by solid-state dewetting of Si ultrathin layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Muneyuki; Nakagawa, Tatsuhiko; Machida, Nobuya; Shigematsu, Toshihiko; Nakao, Motoi; Sudoh, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, highly oriented nanocrystals of Fe 3 Si with a D0 3 structure are fabricated on SiO 2 using ultrathin Si on insulator substrate. First, (001) oriented Si nanocrystals are formed on the SiO 2 layer by solid state dewetting of the top Si layer. Then, Fe addition to the Si nanocrystals is performed by reactive deposition epitaxy and post-deposition annealing at 500 °C. The structures of the Fe–Si nanocrystals are analyzed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and nanobeam electron diffraction. We observe that Fe 3 Si nanocrystals with D0 3 , B2, and A2 structures coexist on the 1-h post-annealed samples. Prolonged annealing at 500 °C is effective in obtaining Fe 3 Si nanocrystals with a D0 3 single phase, thereby promoting structural ordering in the nanocrystals. We discuss the formation process of the highly oriented D0 3 -Fe 3 Si nanocrystals on the basis of the atomistic structural information. - Highlights: • Highly oriented Fe–Si nanocrystals (NCs) are fabricated by reactive deposition. • Si NCs formed by solid state dewetting of Si thin layers are used as seed crystals. • The structures of Fe–Si NCs are analyzed by nanobeam electron diffraction. • Most of Fe–Si NCs possess the D0 3 structure after post-deposition annealing

  17. Plasmonic doped semiconductor nanocrystals: Properties, fabrication, applications and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Ilka; Scotognella, Francesco; Manna, Liberato

    2017-02-01

    Degenerately doped semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are of recent interest to the NC community due to their tunable localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in the near infrared (NIR). The high level of doping in such materials with carrier densities in the range of 1021cm-3 leads to degeneracy of the doping levels and intense plasmonic absorption in the NIR. The lower carrier density in degenerately doped semiconductor NCs compared to noble metals enables LSPR tuning over a wide spectral range, since even a minor change of the carrier density strongly affects the spectral position of the LSPR. Two classes of degenerate semiconductors are most relevant in this respect: impurity doped semiconductors, such as metal oxides, and vacancy doped semiconductors, such as copper chalcogenides. In the latter it is the density of copper vacancies that controls the carrier concentration, while in the former the introduction of impurity atoms adds carriers to the system. LSPR tuning in vacancy doped semiconductor NCs such as copper chalcogenides occurs by chemically controlling the copper vacancy density. This goes in hand with complex structural modifications of the copper chalcogenide crystal lattice. In contrast the LSPR of degenerately doped metal oxide NCs is modified by varying the doping concentration or by the choice of host and dopant atoms, but also through the addition of capacitive charge carriers to the conduction band of the metal oxide upon post-synthetic treatments, such as by electrochemical- or photodoping. The NIR LSPRs and the option of their spectral fine-tuning make accessible important new features, such as the controlled coupling of the LSPR to other physical signatures or the enhancement of optical signals in the NIR, sensing application by LSPR tracking, energy production from the NIR plasmon resonance or bio-medical applications in the biological window. In this review we highlight the recent advances in the synthesis of various different plasmonic

  18. Ti–Al–O nanocrystal charge trapping memory cells fabricated by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Zheng-Yi; Li, Ai-Dong; Li, Xin; Cao, Yan-Qiang; Wu, Di

    2014-01-01

    Charge trapping memory cells using Ti–Al–O (TAO) film as charge trapping layer and amorphous Al 2 O 3 as the tunneling and blocking layers were fabricated on Si substrates by atomic layer deposition method. As-deposited TAO films were annealed at 700 °C, 800 °C and 900 °C for 3 min in N 2 with a rapid thermal annealing process to form nanocrystals. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the microstructure and band diagram of the heterostructures. The electrical characteristics and charge storage properties of the Al 2 O 3 /TAO/Al 2 O 3 /Si stack structures were also evaluated. Compared to 700 °C and 900 °C samples, the memory cells annealed at 800 °C exhibit better memory performance with larger memory window of 4.8 V at ± 6 V sweeping, higher program/erase speed and excellent endurance. - Highlights: • The charge trapping memory cells were fabricated by atomic layer deposition method. • The anneal temperature plays a key role in forming nanocrystals. • The memory cells annealed at 800 °C exhibit better memory performance. • The band alignment is beneficial to enhance the retention characteristics

  19. Cost-effective fabrication of thermal- and chemical-stable ZIF-9 nanocrystals at ammonia atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Arash; Mansournia, Mohammadreza

    2017-12-01

    In this study, room temperature synthesis of zeolitic imidazolate framework-9 (ZIF-9) nanocrystals is reported for the first time at ammonia atmosphere in the absence of any organic additive. High thermal stability of the as-fabricated ZIF-9 up to 300 °C is illustrated by TG and XRD data. Also, the chemical resistance of product to harsh and severe solvothermal conditions introduces it to be an objective as potential material in many applications. Besides, the modest microporosity of the as-obtained ZIF-9 materials attracts more attentions for further investigation compared to those fabricated in organic solvents. By and large, the represented low-cost and room temperature synthetic method can be applicable in the large scale preparation of ZIF-9 for potentially practical utilization.

  20. Atomic retention and near infrared photoluminescence from PbSe nanocrystals fabricated by sequential ion implantation and electron beam annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carder, D.A.; Markwitz, A.; Reeves, R.J.; Kennedy, J.; Fang, F.

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystals of PbSe have been fabricated in a silicon dioxide matrix by sequential low energy ion implantation followed by an electron beam annealing step. Transmission electron microscopy reveals PbSe nanocrystals with typical sizes between 3 and 10 nm in the sub-surface region. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry has been used to study the total atomic retention, as a function of implanted atoms, following annealing. Photoluminescence was observed in various samples, at 4 K, as a broad peak between 1.4 and 2.0 μm, with observation of a dependence of the peak wavelength on annealing temperature. Room temperature photoluminescence was observed for samples with a high retention of implanted atoms, demonstrating the importance of nanocrystal density for achieving ambient temperature emission in these systems

  1. Fabrication of highly oriented D0{sub 3}-Fe{sub 3}Si nanocrystals by solid-state dewetting of Si ultrathin layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Muneyuki, E-mail: naito22@center.konan-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Konan University, Okamoto, Higashinada, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); Nakagawa, Tatsuhiko; Machida, Nobuya; Shigematsu, Toshihiko [Department of Chemistry, Konan University, Okamoto, Higashinada, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); Nakao, Motoi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Sensui, Tobata, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 804-8550 (Japan); Sudoh, Koichi [The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2013-07-31

    In this paper, highly oriented nanocrystals of Fe{sub 3}Si with a D0{sub 3} structure are fabricated on SiO{sub 2} using ultrathin Si on insulator substrate. First, (001) oriented Si nanocrystals are formed on the SiO{sub 2} layer by solid state dewetting of the top Si layer. Then, Fe addition to the Si nanocrystals is performed by reactive deposition epitaxy and post-deposition annealing at 500 °C. The structures of the Fe–Si nanocrystals are analyzed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and nanobeam electron diffraction. We observe that Fe{sub 3}Si nanocrystals with D0{sub 3}, B2, and A2 structures coexist on the 1-h post-annealed samples. Prolonged annealing at 500 °C is effective in obtaining Fe{sub 3}Si nanocrystals with a D0{sub 3} single phase, thereby promoting structural ordering in the nanocrystals. We discuss the formation process of the highly oriented D0{sub 3}-Fe{sub 3}Si nanocrystals on the basis of the atomistic structural information. - Highlights: • Highly oriented Fe–Si nanocrystals (NCs) are fabricated by reactive deposition. • Si NCs formed by solid state dewetting of Si thin layers are used as seed crystals. • The structures of Fe–Si NCs are analyzed by nanobeam electron diffraction. • Most of Fe–Si NCs possess the D0{sub 3} structure after post-deposition annealing.

  2. Comparison of discrete-storage nonvolatile memories: advantage of hybrid method for fabrication of Au nanocrystal nonvolatile memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qin; Jia Rui; Guan Weihua; Li Weilong; Liu Qi; Hu Yuan; Long Shibing; Chen Baoqin; Liu Ming; Ye Tianchun; Lu Wensheng; Jiang Long

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the memory characteristics of two kinds of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors embedded with Au nanocrytals are investigated: hybrid MOS with nanocrystals (NCs) fabricated by chemical syntheses and rapid thermal annealing (RTA) MOS with NCs fabricated by RTA. For both kinds of devices, the capacitance versus voltage (C-V) curves clearly indicate the charge storage in the NCs. The hybrid MOS, however, shows a larger memory window, as compared with RTA MOS. The retention characteristics of the two MOS devices are also investigated. The capacitance versus time (C-t) measurement shows that the hybrid MOS capacitor embedded with Au nanocrystals has a longer retention time. The mechanism of longer retention time for hybrid MOS capacitor is qualitatively discussed

  3. Fabrication and Measurement of Electroluminescence and Electrical Properties of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Containing Mott Insulator Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozoe, Soichiro; Kinoshita, Nobuaki; Matsuda, Masaki

    2016-04-01

    By using the short-time electrocrystallization technique, phthalocyanine (Pc)-based Mott insulator Co(Pc)(CN)2 . 2CHCl3 nanocrystals were fabricated and applied to organic light-emiting diodes (OLEDs). The fabricated device having the configuration ITO/Co(Pc)(CN)2 . 2CHCl3/Alq3/Al, in which ITO is indium-tin oxide and Alq3 is tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum, showed clear emission from Alq3, suggesting the Mott insulator Co(Pc)(CN)2 . 2CHCl3 can work as useful hole-injection and transport material in OLEDs.

  4. Origin of blue photoluminescence from colloidal silicon nanocrystals fabricated by femtosecond laser ablation in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, H L; Wu, W S; Zhang, Y; Wu, L K; Shen, W Z

    2016-08-12

    We present a detailed investigation into the origin of blue emission from colloidal silicon (Si) nanocrystals (NCs) fabricated by femtosecond laser ablation of Si powder in 1-hexene. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy observations confirm that Si NCs with average size 2.7 nm are produced and well dispersed in 1-hexene. Fourier transform infrared spectrum and x-ray photoelectron spectra have been employed to reveal the passivation of Si NCs surfaces with organic molecules. On the basis of the structural characterization, UV-visible absorption, temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL), time-resolved PL, and PL excitation spectra investigations, we deduce that room-temperature blue luminescence from colloidal Si NCs originates from the following two processes: (i) under illumination, excitons first form within colloidal Si NCs by direct transition at the X or Γ (Γ25 → Γ'2) point; (ii) and then some trapped excitons migrate to the surfaces of colloidal Si NCs and further recombine via the surface states associated with the Si-C or Si-C-H2 bonds.

  5. 3D Printing of Photocurable Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite for Fabrication of Complex Architectures via Stereolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaganas, Napolabel B; Mangadlao, Joey Dacula; de Leon, Al Christopher C; Palaganas, Jerome O; Pangilinan, Katrina D; Lee, Yan Jie; Advincula, Rigoberto C

    2017-10-04

    The advantages of 3D printing on cost, speed, accuracy, and flexibility have attracted several new applications in various industries especially in the field of medicine where customized solutions are highly demanded. Although this modern fabrication technique offers several benefits, it also poses critical challenges in materials development suitable for industry use. Proliferation of polymers in biomedical application has been severely limited by their inherently weak mechanical properties despite their other excellent attributes. Earlier works on 3D printing of polymers focus mainly on biocompatibility and cellular viability and lack a close attention to produce robust specimens. Prized for superior mechanical strength and inherent stiffness, cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) from abaca plant is incorporated to provide the necessary toughness for 3D printable biopolymer. Hence, this work demonstrates 3D printing of CNC-filled biomaterial with significant improvement in mechanical and surface properties. These findings may potentially pave the way for an alternative option in providing innovative and cost-effective patient-specific solutions to various fields in medical industry. To the best of our knowledge, this work presents the first successful demonstration of 3D printing of CNC nanocomposite hydrogel via stereolithography (SL) forming a complex architecture with enhanced material properties potentially suited for tissue engineering.

  6. Thermal degradation kinetics of polylactic acid/acid fabricated cellulose nanocrystal based bionanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monika; Dhar, Prodyut; Katiyar, Vimal

    2017-11-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) are fabricated from filter paper (as cellulosic source) by acid hydrolysis using different acids such as sulphuric (H 2 SO 4 ), phosphoric (H 3 PO 4 ), hydrochloric (HCl) and nitric (HNO 3 ) acid. The resulting acid derived CNC are melt mixed with Polylactic acid (PLA) using extruder at 180°C. Thermogravimetric (TGA) result shows that increase in 10% and 50% weight loss (T 10 , T 50 ) temperature for PLA-CNC film fabricated with HNO 3 , H 3 PO 4 and HCl derived CNC have improved thermal stability in comparison to H 2 SO 4 -CNC. Nonisothermal kinetic studies are carried out with modified-Coats-Redfern (C-R), Ozawa-Flynn-Wall (OFW) and Kissinger method to predict the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. Subsequently prediction of these parameter leads to the proposal of thermal induced degradation mechanism of nanocomposites using Criado method. The distribution of E a calculated from OFW model are (PLA-H 3 PO 4 -CNC: 125-139 kJmol -1 ), (PLA-HNO 3 -CNC: 126-145 kJmol -1 ), (PLA-H 2 SO 4 -CNC: 102-123 kJmol -1 ) and (PLA-HCl-CNC: 140-182 kJmol -1 ). This difference among E a for the decomposition of PLA-CNC bionanocomposite is probably due to various acids used in this study. The E a calculated by these two methods are found in consonance with that observed from Kissinger method. Further, hyphenated TG-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) result shows that gaseous products such as CO 2 , CO, lactide, aldehydes and other compounds are given off during the thermal degradation of PLA-CNC nanocomposite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Facile fabrication and electrochemical behaviors of Mn:ZnS nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Ruishi; Li, Yuanli; Liu, Haifeng; Guo, Baogang

    2016-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the rational design and synthesis of Mn:ZnS nanocrystals with adjustable doping concentrations utilizing a facile, cost effective, and environmentally benign chemical protocol. These nanostructures were investigated as electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Compared with pristine ZnS nanocrystals, the Mn:ZnS nanocrystals exhibit significantly improved electrochemical performances in terms of specific capacity and cycling performance. The Mn:ZnS nanocrystal sample with doping concentration of 1 at% displays second discharge capacity of 789.9 mA h g"−"1 at a current density of 24 mA g"−"1, about 2.39 times higher than that of the pure ZnS nanocrystal. Furthermore, the Mn:ZnS nanocrystal electrodes represent much better capacity retention than that of the undoped one. The greatly improved electrochemical performances of the Mn:ZnS nanocrystal samples could be attributed to the following factors. The large specific surface area can significantly enhance structural integrity by acting as mechanical buffer, effectively alleviating the volume changes generated during the lithiation/delithiation process. The incorporation of Mn into the lattice of ZnS improves charge transfer kinetics and results in a faster Li"+ diffusion rate during the charge–discharge process. It is of great significance to incorporate guest metal ions into nanostructured materials to display especial electrochemical characteristics triggering an effective approach to improve the electrochemical properties.

  8. Facile fabrication and electrochemical behaviors of Mn:ZnS nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Ruishi [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, 621010 (China); Li, Yuanli, E-mail: yuanlyl@foxmail.com [Department of Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, 621010 (China); Liu, Haifeng; Guo, Baogang [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, 621010 (China)

    2016-07-05

    Here, we demonstrate the rational design and synthesis of Mn:ZnS nanocrystals with adjustable doping concentrations utilizing a facile, cost effective, and environmentally benign chemical protocol. These nanostructures were investigated as electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Compared with pristine ZnS nanocrystals, the Mn:ZnS nanocrystals exhibit significantly improved electrochemical performances in terms of specific capacity and cycling performance. The Mn:ZnS nanocrystal sample with doping concentration of 1 at% displays second discharge capacity of 789.9 mA h g{sup −1} at a current density of 24 mA g{sup −1}, about 2.39 times higher than that of the pure ZnS nanocrystal. Furthermore, the Mn:ZnS nanocrystal electrodes represent much better capacity retention than that of the undoped one. The greatly improved electrochemical performances of the Mn:ZnS nanocrystal samples could be attributed to the following factors. The large specific surface area can significantly enhance structural integrity by acting as mechanical buffer, effectively alleviating the volume changes generated during the lithiation/delithiation process. The incorporation of Mn into the lattice of ZnS improves charge transfer kinetics and results in a faster Li{sup +} diffusion rate during the charge–discharge process. It is of great significance to incorporate guest metal ions into nanostructured materials to display especial electrochemical characteristics triggering an effective approach to improve the electrochemical properties.

  9. Yellow-emitting colloidal suspensions of silicon nanocrystals: Fabrication technology, luminescence performance and application prospects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kůsová, Kateřina; Cibulka, Ondřej; Dohnalová, Kateřina; Pelant, Ivan; Fučíková, A.; Valenta, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 6 (2009), s. 982-985 ISSN 1386-9477. [Spring Meeting of the European-Materials-Research-Society on Frontiers in Silicon -Based Photonics . Strasbourg, 26.05.2008-29.05.2008] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA101120804; GA MŠk LC510; GA ČR GA202/07/0818 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * photoluminescence * colloidal solution Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.177, year: 2009 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6VMT-4T72X3R-2&_user=625012&_coverDate=05%2F31%2F2009&_alid=940480650&_rdoc=3&_fmt=high&_ori

  10. Fabrication of CdSe nanocrystals using porous anodic alumina and their optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laatar, Fakher, E-mail: fakher8laatar@gmail.com [Laboratory of Semiconductors, Nanostructures and Advanced Technology (LSNTA), Center for Research and Technology Energy, Tourist Route Soliman, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Science faculty of Bizerte–Carthage University (Tunisia); Hassen, Mohamed [Laboratory of Semiconductors, Nanostructures and Advanced Technology (LSNTA), Center for Research and Technology Energy, Tourist Route Soliman, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Higher Institute of Applied Science and Technology of Sousse, City Taffala (Ibn Khaldun), 4003 Sousse (Tunisia); Amri, Chohdi [Laboratory of Semiconductors, Nanostructures and Advanced Technology (LSNTA), Center for Research and Technology Energy, Tourist Route Soliman, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Laatar, Fekri [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Minerals and Materials Applications, National Research Center for Materials Science, Technopole Borj Cedria (Tunisia); Smida, Alia; Ezzaouia, Hatem [Laboratory of Semiconductors, Nanostructures and Advanced Technology (LSNTA), Center for Research and Technology Energy, Tourist Route Soliman, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia)

    2016-10-15

    In this paper, Porous anodic alumina (PAA) template with highly ordered nanopores structure was synthesized on aluminum foils by two step anodization process. PAA template has hexagonal pores with average size between 30 and 180 nm. L-cysteine (L-Cys) functionalized cadmium selenide nanocrystals (CdSe NCs) were successfully embedded inside PAA layers by simple immersion in aqueous solution. The effect of pore diameter enlargement on the microstructure of CdSe NCs/PAA films was systematically studied by FE-SEM, XRD, EDX, Raman, UV–VIS absorbance and PL analysis. FE-SEM microscopy was used to investigate the surface morphology of PAA templates before and after CdSe NCs deposition. XRD investigation demonstrates that CdSe NCs into PAA templates were cubic in nature with zinc-blende structure. Raman measurements exhibit the characteristic modes of CdSe on the PAA layers as well as the films crystallinity as function of widening pores diameter. Optical properties of deposited CdSe NCs on PAA templates have been investigated using optical absorption and PL techniques. Photoluminescence spectroscopy has been used to determine the bandgap energy and the average size of CdSe NCs deposited on PAA layer. This method involves fitting the experimental spectra, using a model based on quantum confinement of electrons in CdSe nanocrystals having spherical and cylindrical forms (Quantum Dots (QDs) and Quantum Wires (QWs)). This model allows correlation between the PL spectra and the microstructure of the CdSe/PAA. Both photoluminescence and optical absorption show that the PL peak energy and the optical absorption edge of CdSe NCs/PAA exhibit similar behavior with changes in nanostructure size. The spectral behaviors of optical absorption and PL are consistent with a quantum confinement model throughout the sizes and shapes of the CdSe nanocrystals of the luminescent films. The effective bandgap energies determined from the PL peaks position are in good agreement with those

  11. Fabrication of CdSe nanocrystals using porous anodic alumina and their optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laatar, Fakher; Hassen, Mohamed; Amri, Chohdi; Laatar, Fekri; Smida, Alia; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, Porous anodic alumina (PAA) template with highly ordered nanopores structure was synthesized on aluminum foils by two step anodization process. PAA template has hexagonal pores with average size between 30 and 180 nm. L-cysteine (L-Cys) functionalized cadmium selenide nanocrystals (CdSe NCs) were successfully embedded inside PAA layers by simple immersion in aqueous solution. The effect of pore diameter enlargement on the microstructure of CdSe NCs/PAA films was systematically studied by FE-SEM, XRD, EDX, Raman, UV–VIS absorbance and PL analysis. FE-SEM microscopy was used to investigate the surface morphology of PAA templates before and after CdSe NCs deposition. XRD investigation demonstrates that CdSe NCs into PAA templates were cubic in nature with zinc-blende structure. Raman measurements exhibit the characteristic modes of CdSe on the PAA layers as well as the films crystallinity as function of widening pores diameter. Optical properties of deposited CdSe NCs on PAA templates have been investigated using optical absorption and PL techniques. Photoluminescence spectroscopy has been used to determine the bandgap energy and the average size of CdSe NCs deposited on PAA layer. This method involves fitting the experimental spectra, using a model based on quantum confinement of electrons in CdSe nanocrystals having spherical and cylindrical forms (Quantum Dots (QDs) and Quantum Wires (QWs)). This model allows correlation between the PL spectra and the microstructure of the CdSe/PAA. Both photoluminescence and optical absorption show that the PL peak energy and the optical absorption edge of CdSe NCs/PAA exhibit similar behavior with changes in nanostructure size. The spectral behaviors of optical absorption and PL are consistent with a quantum confinement model throughout the sizes and shapes of the CdSe nanocrystals of the luminescent films. The effective bandgap energies determined from the PL peaks position are in good agreement with those

  12. Designing Metallic and Insulating Nanocrystal Heterostructures to Fabricate Highly Sensitive and Solution Processed Strain Gauges for Wearable Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo Seok; Lee, Seung-Wook; Joh, Hyungmok; Seong, Mingi; Kim, Haneun; Kang, Min Su; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Sung, Yun-Mo; Oh, Soong Ju

    2017-12-01

    All-solution processed, high-performance wearable strain sensors are demonstrated using heterostructure nanocrystal (NC) solids. By incorporating insulating artificial atoms of CdSe quantum dot NCs into metallic artificial atoms of Au NC thin film matrix, metal-insulator heterostructures are designed. This hybrid structure results in a shift close to the percolation threshold, modifying the charge transport mechanism and enhancing sensitivity in accordance with the site percolation theory. The number of electrical pathways is also manipulated by creating nanocracks to further increase its sensitivity, inspired from the bond percolation theory. The combination of the two strategies achieves gauge factor up to 5045, the highest sensitivity recorded among NC-based strain gauges. These strain sensors show high reliability, durability, frequency stability, and negligible hysteresis. The fundamental charge transport behavior of these NC solids is investigated and the combined site and bond percolation theory is developed to illuminate the origin of their enhanced sensitivity. Finally, all NC-based and solution-processed strain gauge sensor arrays are fabricated, which effectively measure the motion of each finger joint, the pulse of heart rate, and the movement of vocal cords of human. This work provides a pathway for designing low-cost and high-performance electronic skin or wearable devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Fabrication of worm-like Ag2S nanocrystals under mediation of protein

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Pingdingshan University, Pingdingshan 467000, ... inorganic–organic nanocomposites and there is strong interaction between Ag2S and pepsin. ... applied in the fields of photovoltaics, electroluminescence .... method for fabricating Ag2S nanostructure by using proteins.

  14. Doping of germanium telluride with bismuth tellurides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrikosov, N.Kh.; Karpinskij, O.G.; Makalatiya, T.Sh.; Shelimova, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    Effect of germanium telluride doping with bismuth fellurides (Bi 2 Te 3 ; BiTe; Bi 2 Te) on phase transition temperature, lattice parameters and electrophysical properties of alloys is studied. It is shown that in alloys of GeTe-Bi 2 Te 3 (BiTe)(Bi 2 Te) cross sections solid solution of GeTe with Bi 2 Te 3 , characterized by deviation from stoichiometry, and germanium in the second phase the quantity of which increases during the transition from GeTe-Bi 2 Te 3 cross section to GeTe-Bi 2 Te are in equilibrium. Lower values of holes concentration and of electric conductivity and higher values of thermo e.m.f. coefficient in comparison with alloys of GeTe-Bi 2 Te 3 cross section with the same bismuth content are characterized for GeTe-Bi 2 Te cross section alloys. It is shown that in the range of GeTe-base solid solution the α→γ phase transformation which runs trough the two-phase region (α→γ) is observed with tellurium content increase. Extension of α-phase existence region widens with the bismuth content increase. Peculiarities of interatomic interaction in GeTe-base solid solutions with isovalent and heterovalent cation substitution are considered [ru

  15. Size and composition-controlled fabrication of VO2 nanocrystals by terminated cluster growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Slack, Jonathan

    2013-05-14

    A physical vapor deposition-based route for the fabrication of VO2 nanoparticles is demonstrated, consisting of reactive sputtering and vapor condensation at elevated pressures. The oxidation of vanadium atoms is an efficient heterogeneous nucleation method, leading to high nanoparticle throughtput. Fine control of the nanoparticle size and composition is obtained. Post growth annealing leads to crystalline VO2 nanoparticles with optimum thermocromic and plasmonic properties.

  16. Megapixel mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays for infrared imaging out to 12 microns, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the fabrication of large format, long wave infrared (LWIR) mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe or MCT) detector arrays where the cutoff wavelength is...

  17. Solution-Processed Inorganic Thin Film Transistors Fabricated from Butylamine-Capped Indium-Doped Zinc Oxide Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Hien Thu; Jeong, Hyundam [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Indium-doped zinc oxide nanocrystals (IZO NCs), capped with stearic acid (SA) of different sizes, were synthesized using a hot injection method in a noncoordinating solvent 1-octadecene (ODE). The ligand exchange process was employed to modify the surface of IZO NCs by replacing the longer-chain ligand of stearic acid with the shorter-chain ligand of butylamine (BA). It should be noted that the ligand-exchange percentage was observed to be 75%. The change of particle size, morphology, and crystal structures were obtained using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction pattern results. In our study, the 5 nm and 10 nm IZO NCs capped with stearic acid (SA-IZO) were ligand-exchanged with butylamine (BA), and were then spin-coated on a thermal oxide (SiO{sub 2}) gate insulator to fabricate a thin film transistor (TFT) device. The films were then annealed at various temperatures: 350 .deg. C, 400 .deg. C, 500 .deg. C, and 600 .deg. C. All samples showed semiconducting behavior and exhibited n-channel TFT{sup -} Curing temperature dependent on mobility was observed. Interestingly, mobility decreases with the increasing size of NCs from 5 to 10 nm. Miller-Abrahams hopping formalism was employed to explain the hopping mechanism insight our IZO NC films. By focusing on the effect of size, different curing temperatures, electron coupling, tunneling rate, and inter-NC separation, we found that the decrease in electron mobility for larger NCs was due to smaller electronic coupling.

  18. Properties of Nanostructure Bismuth Telluride Thin Films Using Thermal Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Arora

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth telluride has high thermoelectric performance at room temperature; in present work, various nanostructure thin films of bismuth telluride were fabricated on silicon substrates at room temperature using thermal evaporation method. Tellurium (Te and bismuth (Bi were deposited on silicon substrate in different ratio of thickness. These films were annealed at 50°C and 100°C. After heat treatment, the thin films attained the semiconductor nature. Samples were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM to show granular growth.

  19. High luminescent fibers with hybrid SiO2-coated CdTe nanocrystals fabricated by electrospinning technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Yongqiang; Liu, Ning; Yang, Ping; Shi, Ruixia; Ma, Qian; Zhang, Aiyu; Zhu, Yuanna; Wang, Junpeng; Wang, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    The polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) hybrid luminescent micro-/nanofibers doped with the novel hybrid SiO 2 -coated CdTe nanocrystals (HS-CdTe NCs) have been fabricated for the first time via the electrospinning technique. The morphologies and photoluminescence (PL) emissions of HS-CdTe/PVP micro-/nanofibers prepared by doping the HS-CdTe NCs with the different PL peak wavelength (571, 616, and 643 nm) in PVP fibers were investigated by optical and PL microscope. The results revealed that all the HS-CdTe/PVP hybrid fibers showed an ultralong length for several hundreds of micrometers and a relatively uniform diameter of 1000 ∼ 1200 nm. The hybrid fibers displayed a wavelength-tunable PL emission, determining by the PL of doped HS-CdTe NCs. Moreover, similar to the original PL properties of HS-CdTe NCs before the electrospinning, the HS-CdTe/PVP fibers also showed a series of superior PL properties, such as narrow and symmetry PL spectrum, high, and uniform brightness. For comparison purpose, we also prepared three CdTe/PVP hybrid fibers by doping the 553 nm, 600 nm, and 633 nm PL-emitting CdTe NCs respectively in PVP electrospinning fibers. The characterization results showed that, the obtained three CdTe/PVP hybrid fibers had a basically satisfactory micro-/nanofiber morphology with a long length and relatively uniform diameter, but all the fibers exhibited very weak PL emissions. The enormous contrast in PL properties between HS-CdTe/PVP and CdTe/PVP fibers should mainly be ascribed to the different connection modes of ligands with the NCs and the passivation effect of inert hybrid silica shell on HS-CdTe. It is hopeful that the high luminescent HS-CdTe/PVP micro-/nanofibers with the tunable PL peak wavelength would be a good candidate in the optical sensor, light-emitting devices (LEDs), nanometer-scale waveguides, and the other related photonic materials. - Highlights: • The HS-CdTe/PVP electrospun hybrid fibers were fabricated for the first time. • The

  20. Controlled fabrication of Si nanocrystal delta-layers in thin SiO{sub 2} layers by plasma immersion ion implantation for nonvolatile memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonafos, C.; Ben-Assayag, G.; Groenen, J.; Carrada, M. [CEMES-CNRS and Université de Toulouse, 29 rue J. Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Spiegel, Y.; Torregrosa, F. [IBS, Rue G Imbert Prolongée, ZI Peynier-Rousset, 13790 Peynier (France); Normand, P.; Dimitrakis, P.; Kapetanakis, E. [NCSRD, Terma Patriarchou Gregoriou, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Sahu, B. S.; Slaoui, A. [ICube, 23 Rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2013-12-16

    Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) is a promising alternative to beam line implantation to produce a single layer of nanocrystals (NCs) in the gate insulator of metal-oxide semiconductor devices. We report herein the fabrication of two-dimensional Si-NCs arrays in thin SiO{sub 2} films using PIII and rapid thermal annealing. The effect of plasma and implantation conditions on the structural properties of the NC layers is examined by transmission electron microscopy. A fine tuning of the NCs characteristics is possible by optimizing the oxide thickness, implantation energy, and dose. Electrical characterization revealed that the PIII-produced-Si NC structures are appealing for nonvolatile memories.

  1. Controlled fabrication of Si nanocrystal delta-layers in thin SiO2 layers by plasma immersion ion implantation for nonvolatile memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonafos, C.; Ben-Assayag, G.; Groenen, J.; Carrada, M.; Spiegel, Y.; Torregrosa, F.; Normand, P.; Dimitrakis, P.; Kapetanakis, E.; Sahu, B. S.; Slaoui, A.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) is a promising alternative to beam line implantation to produce a single layer of nanocrystals (NCs) in the gate insulator of metal-oxide semiconductor devices. We report herein the fabrication of two-dimensional Si-NCs arrays in thin SiO 2 films using PIII and rapid thermal annealing. The effect of plasma and implantation conditions on the structural properties of the NC layers is examined by transmission electron microscopy. A fine tuning of the NCs characteristics is possible by optimizing the oxide thickness, implantation energy, and dose. Electrical characterization revealed that the PIII-produced-Si NC structures are appealing for nonvolatile memories

  2. Fabrication of core-shell MIL-101(Cr)@UiO-66(Zr) nanocrystals for hydrogen storage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ren, Jianwei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available of the individual metal-organic framework (MOF) components and the coreeshell hybrid crystals were also characterized. The hydrogen storage capacity exhibited by the resulting core eshell nanocrystals was 26% and 60% higher than those of pure phase MIL-101 and Ui...

  3. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gur, Ilan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation presents the results of a research agenda aimed at improving integration and stability in nanocrystal-based solar cells through advances in active materials and device architectures. The introduction of 3-dimensional nanocrystals illustrates the potential for improving transport and percolation in hybrid solar cells and enables novel fabrication methods for optimizing integration in these systems. Fabricating cells by sequential deposition allows for solution-based assembly of hybrid composites with controlled and well-characterized dispersion and electrode contact. Hyperbranched nanocrystals emerge as a nearly ideal building block for hybrid cells, allowing the controlled morphologies targeted by templated approaches to be achieved in an easily fabricated solution-cast device. In addition to offering practical benefits to device processing, these approaches offer fundamental insight into the operation of hybrid solar cells, shedding light on key phenomena such as the roles of electrode-contact and percolation behavior in these cells. Finally, all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells are presented as a wholly new cell concept, illustrating that donor-acceptor charge transfer and directed carrier diffusion can be utilized in a system with no organic components, and that nanocrystals may act as building blocks for efficient, stable, and low-cost thin-film solar cells.

  4. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on photoluminescence spectra from structures with Si nanocrystals fabricated in SiO2 matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuravlev, K.S.; Tyschenko, I.E.; Vandyshev, E.N.; Bulytova, N.V.; Misiuk, A.; Rebohle, L.; Skorupa, W.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure applied at high temperature on photoluminescence of Si-implanted SiO 2 films was studied. A 'blue'-shift of PL spectrum from the SiO 2 films implanted with Si + ions to total dose of 1.2x10 17 cm -2 with increase in hydrostatic pressure was observed. For the films implanted with Si + ions to a total dose of 4.8x10 16 cm -2 high temperature annealing under high hydrostatic pressure (12 kbar) causes a 'red'-shift of photoluminescence spectrum. The 'red' photoluminescence bands are attributed to Si nanocrystals while the 'blue' ones are related to Si nanocrystals of reduced size or chains of silicon atoms or Si-Si defects. A decrease in size of Si nanocluster occurs in result of the pressure-induced decrease in the diffusion of silicon atoms. (author)

  5. The fabrication and analysis of a PbS nanocrystal:C{sub 60} bilayer hybrid photovoltaic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dissanayake, D M N M [Solid State Electronics Laboratory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2122 (United States); Hatton, R A [Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Lutz, T [Department of Chemistry, Imperial College, London SW7 2AY (United Kingdom); Curry, R J; Silva, S R P [Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ndissa@umich.edu

    2009-06-17

    A near-infrared sensitive hybrid photovoltaic system between PbS nanocrystals (PbS-NCs) and C{sub 60} is demonstrated. Up to 0.44% power conversion efficiency is obtained under AM1.5G with a short circuit current density (J{sub sc}) of 5 mA cm{sup -2} when the PbS-NC layer is treated in anhydrous methanol. The observed J{sub sc} is found be approximately one-third of the maximum expected from this hybrid configuration, indicating the potential for further optimization. Crucial for device operation, a smooth film of nanocrystals is seen to form on the hole transporting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) layer deposited on the transparent electrode, facilitated through an ionic interaction between nanocrystal capping ligands and the PEDOT:PSS. The formation of the open circuit voltage in this system is seen to be influenced by an interfacial dipole formed at the hole-extracting electrode, providing insights for further optimization.

  6. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering by colloidal CdSe nanocrystal submonolayers fabricated by the Langmuir–Blodgett technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander G. Milekhin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of an investigation of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS by optical phonons in colloidal CdSe nanocrystals (NCs homogeneously deposited on both arrays of Au nanoclusters and Au dimers using the Langmuir–Blodgett technique. The coverage of the deposited NCs was less than one monolayer, as determined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. SERS by optical phonons in CdSe nanocrystals showed a significant enhancement that depends resonantly on the Au nanocluster and dimer size, and thus on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR energy. The deposition of CdSe nanocrystals on the Au dimer nanocluster arrays enabled us to study the polarization dependence of SERS. The maximal SERS signal was observed for light polarization parallel to the dimer axis. The polarization ratio of the SERS signal parallel and perpendicular to the dimer axis was 20. The SERS signal intensity was also investigated as a function of the distance between nanoclusters in a dimer. Here the maximal SERS enhancement was observed for the minimal distance studied (about 10 nm, confirming the formation of SERS “hot spots”.

  7. Very low drift and high sensitivity of nanocrystal-TiO2 sensing membrane on pH-ISFET fabricated by CMOS compatible process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunjongpru, W.; Sungthong, A.; Porntheeraphat, S.; Rayanasukha, Y.; Pankiew, A.; Jeamsaksiri, W.; Srisuwan, A.; Chaisriratanakul, W.; Chaowicharat, E.; Klunngien, N.; Hruanun, C.; Poyai, A.; Nukeaw, J.

    2013-01-01

    High sensitivity and very low drift rate pH sensors are successfully prepared by using nanocrystal-TiO 2 as sensing membrane of ion sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET) device fabricated via CMOS process. This paper describes the physical properties and sensing characteristics of the TiO 2 membrane prepared by annealing Ti and TiN thin films that deposited on SiO 2 /p-Si substrates through reactive DC magnetron sputtering system. The X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy were used to investigate the structural and morphological features of deposited films after they had been subjected to annealing at various temperatures. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of the effects of amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition and subsequent oxidation of the annealed films. The electrolyte–insulator–semiconductor (EIS) device incorporating Ti-O-N membrane that had been obtained by annealing of TiN thin film at 850 °C exhibited a higher sensitivity (57 mV/pH), a higher linearity (1), a lower hysteresis voltage (1 mV in the pH cycle of 7 → 4 → 7 → 10 → 7), and a smaller drift rate (0.246 mV/h) than did those devices prepared at the other annealing temperatures. Furthermore, this pH-sensing device fabrication process is fully compatible with CMOS fabrication process technology.

  8. Fabrication of cellulose nanocrystal from Carex meyeriana Kunth and its application in the adsorption of methylene blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue; Liu, Hui; Han, Fuyi; Jiang, Shuai; Liu, Lifang; Xia, Zhaopeng

    2017-11-01

    Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) was extracted from Carex meyeriana Kunth (CMK) by a combination of TEMPO oxidation and mechanical homogenization method, and used to remove methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution. After alkali-oxygen treatment, the aqueous biphasic system (polyethylene glycol/inorganic salt) was applied to further remove lignin from CMK. The characteriazation of CNC, and the effects of H 2 O 2 dosage, CNC dosage, adsorption time, and initial MB concentration on the MB removal capacity of CNC were investigated. The results showed that the removal percentage of MB by CNC was raised with the increase of H 2 O 2 and CNC dosage. The adsorption kinetics of prepared CNC followed the pseudo-second-order model, and the adsorption isotherms fitted well to the Langmuir model with a calculated maximum adsoption capacity of 217.4mg/g, which was higher than those of CNC extracted by acid hydrolysis method, indicating CNC extracted from CMK had promising potentials in the field of MB adsorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cellulose nanocrystal: electronically conducting polymer nanocomposites for supercapacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Liew, Soon Yee

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of cellulose nanocrystals for the fabrication of porous nanocomposites with electronic conducting polymers for electrochemical supercapacitor applications. The exceptional strength and negatively charged surface functionalities on cellulose nanocrystals are utilised in these nanocomposites. The negatively charged surface functionalities on cellulose nanocrystals allow their simultaneous incorporation into electropolymerised, positively charged conducting polymer ...

  10. Spatial mapping of cadmium zinc telluride materials properties and electrical response to improve device yield and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Van Scyoc, J M; Yoon, H; Gilbert, T S; Hilton, N R; Lund, J C; James, R B

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride has experienced tremendous growth in its application to various radiation sensing problems over the last five years. However, there are still issues with yield, particularly of the large volume devices needed for imaging and sensitivity-critical applications. Inhomogeneities of various types and on various length scales currently prevent the fabrication of large devices of high spectral performance. This paper discusses the development of a set of characterization tools for quantifying these inhomogeneities, in order to develop improvement strategies to achieve the desired cadmium zinc telluride crystals for detector fabrication.

  11. Influence of TiO2 Nanocrystals Fabricating Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell on the Absorption Spectra of N719 Sensitizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puhong Wen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The absorption spectra of N719 sensitizer anchored on the films prepared by TiO2 nanocrystals with different morphology and size were investigated for improving the performance of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC. We find that the morphology and size of TiO2 nanocrystals can affect the UV-vis and FT-IR spectra of the sensitizer anchored on their surfaces. In particular, the low-energy metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions (MLCT band in the visible absorption spectra of N719 is strongly affected, and locations of these MLCT bands revealed larger differences. The results indicate that there is a red shift of MLCT band in the spectra obtained by using TiO2 nanocrystals with long morphology and large size compared to that in solution. And it produced a larger red-shift on the MLCT band after TiO2 nanocrystals with small size mixed with some long nanocrystals. Accordingly, the utilization rate to visible light is increased. This is a reason why the DSC prepared by using such film as a photoelectrode has better performance than before mixing.

  12. Low-cost fabrication of ternary CuInSe{sub 2} nanocrystals by colloidal route using a novel combination of volatile and non-volatile capping agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chawla, Parul; Narain Sharma, Shailesh, E-mail: shailesh@nplindia.org; Singh, Son

    2014-11-15

    Wet-route synthesis of CuInSe{sub 2} (CISe) nanocrystals has been envisaged with the utilization of the unique combination of coordinating ligand and non coordinating solvent. Our work demonstrates the formation of a single-phase, nearly stoichiometric and monodispersive, stable and well-passivated colloidal ternary CISe nanocrystals (band gap (E{sub g})∼1.16 eV) using a novel combination of ligands; viz. volatile arylamine aniline and non-volatile solvent 1-octadecene. The synthesis and growth conditions have been manoeuvred using the colligative properties of the mixture and thus higher growth temperature (∼250 °C) could be attained that promoted larger grain growth. The beneficial influence of the capping agents (aniline and 1-octadecene) on the properties of chalcopyrite nanocrystals has enabled us to pictorally model the structural, morphological and optoelectronic aspects of CISe nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: Without resorting to any post-selenization process and using the colligative properties of the mixture comprising of volatile aniline and non-volatile 1-octadecene to manoeuvre the growth conditions to promote Ostwald ripening, a single phase, monodispersive and nearly stoichiometric ternary CISe nanocrystals are formed by wet-synthesis route. - Highlights: • Wet-route synthesis of CISe nanocrystals reported without post-selenization process. • Single-phase, stable and well-passivated colloidal ternary CISe nanocrystals formed. • Novel combination of capping agents: volatile aniline and non-volatile 1-octadecene. • Higher growth temperature attained using the colligative properties of the mixture. • Metallic salts presence explains exp. and theoretical boiling point difference.

  13. Nature derived scaffolds for tissue engineering applications: Design and fabrication of a composite scaffold incorporating chitosan-g-d,l-lactic acid and cellulose nanocrystals from Lactuca sativa L. cv green leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Sung Won; Soriano, Juan Paolo E; Lee, Ji Yeon; Unnithan, Afeesh Rajan; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2018-04-15

    Through exhaustive extraction via successive alkali and bleaching treatments cellulose was isolated from lettuce. The isolated cellulose was hydrolyzed using 64wt% H 2 SO 4 at 55°C under constant stirring for 1h to obtain cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). Characterizations such as SEM, TEM, FTIR, TGA and XRD were done in order to determine differences in the physico-chemical characteristics of cellulose after each treatment step. The isolated CNCs have mean dimensions of 237±26, 33±12 and 32±7nm in length, thickness and height, respectively. These nanocrystals were incorporated to the formulations that were used to fabricate different chitosan-g-d,l-lactic acid (CgLA) scaffolds. Amide linkage formation between chitosan and lactic acid and further removal of water was facilitated by oven-drying under vacuum at 80°C. Results show that an increase in the concentration of CNCs added, increase in porosity, degradability, drug release property and cell viability were observed from the fabricated composite scaffolds. These results can provide information on how nanofillers such as CNCs can alter the properties of tissue scaffolds through the chemical properties and interactions they provide. Moreover, these characteristics can give new properties that are necessary for certain tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimizing colloidal nanocrystals for applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sytnyk, M.

    2015-01-01

    details of these developments were worked out by another PhD student. Thus the full story of the Ag-chalcogenide nanocrystals is presented in Appendix A. Chapter 5 of the thesis introduces another possibility to obtain non-toxic nanocrystals. It describes a procedure to transform powders of archetypical organic pigments into colloidal solutions of semiconductor nanocrystals. These nanocrystals are synthesized with controlled sizes and shapes. They are eventually covered with smart ligands, providing rapid charge separation, and exhibit emission in the visible and near-infrared spectral region. Based on them, photodetectors with responsivities up to 0.9 A/W, humidity sensors with a dynamic range of 7 orders of magnitude, and field effect transistors are demonstrated, fabricated by drop-casting or paint-brushing. These results show up an enormous potential of these colloidal pigment nanocrystals for the development of an environmentally-friendly, biocompatible, and low-cost electronics. (author)

  15. Organization of silicon nanocrystals by localized electrochemical etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayari-Kanoun, Asma; Drouin, Dominique; Beauvais, Jacques; Lysenko, Vladimir; Nychyporuk, Tetyana; Souifi, Abdelkader

    2009-01-01

    An approach to form a monolayer of organized silicon nanocrystals on a monocrystalline Si wafer is reported. Ordered arrays of nanoholes in a silicon nitride layer were obtained by combining electron beam lithography and plasma etching. Then, a short electrochemical etching current pulse led to formation of a single Si nanocrystal per each nanohole. As a result, high quality silicon nanocrystal arrays were formed with well controlled and reproducible morphologies. In future, this approach can be used to fabricate single electron devices.

  16. Rise time spectroscopy in cadmium telluride detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharager, Claude; Siffert, Paul; Carnet, Bernard; Le Meur, Roger.

    1980-11-01

    By a simultaneous analysis of rise time and pulse amplitude distributions of the signals issued from various cadmium telluride detectors, it is possible to obtain informations about surface and bulk trapping, field distribution within the detectors, as well as charge collection and transport properties. These investigations have been performed on both pure and chlorine doped and materials for various surfaces preparation conditions [fr

  17. Formation process and superparamagnetic properties of (Mn,Ga)As nanocrystals in GaAs fabricated by annealing of (Ga,Mn)As layers with low Mn content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadowski, Janusz; Domagala, Jaroslaw Z.; Mathieu, Roland

    2011-01-01

    °C) annealing of (Ga,Mn)As layers with Mn concentrations between 0.1% and 2%, grown by molecular beam epitaxy at 270°C. Decomposition of (Ga,Mn)As is already observed at the lowest annealing temperature of 400°C for layers with initial Mn content of 1% and 2%. Both cubic and hexagonal (Mn......,Ga)As nanocrystals, with similar diameters of 7-10 nm, are observed to coexist in layers with an initial Mn content of 0.5% and 2% after higher-temperature annealing. Measurements of magnetization relaxation in the time span 0.1-10 000 s provide evidence for superparamagnetic properties of the (Mn,Ga)As nanocrystals......X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and magnetization measurements are employed to study the structural and magnetic properties of Mn-rich (Mn,Ga)As nanocrystals embedded in GaAs. These nanocomposites are obtained by moderate-temperature (400°C) and high-temperature (560°C and 630...

  18. Memory characteristics of an MOS capacitor structure with double-layer semiconductor and metal heterogeneous nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Henan; Wu Liangcai; Song Zhitang; Hui Chun

    2009-01-01

    An MOS (metal oxide semiconductor) capacitor structure with double-layer heterogeneous nanocrystals consisting of semiconductor and metal embedded in a gate oxide for nonvolatile memory applications has been fabricated and characterized. By combining vacuum electron-beam co-evaporated Si nanocrystals and self-assembled Ni nanocrystals in a SiO 2 matrix, an MOS capacitor with double-layer heterogeneous nanocrystals can have larger charge storage capacity and improved retention characteristics compared to one with single-layer nanocrystals. The upper metal nanocrystals as an additional charge trap layer enable the direct tunneling mechanism to enhance the flat voltage shift and prolong the retention time. (semiconductor devices)

  19. Impact of nanocrystal spray deposition on inorganic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Troy K; Yoon, Woojun; Foos, Edward E; Tischler, Joseph G

    2014-05-28

    Solution-synthesized inorganic cadmium telluride nanocrystals (∼4 nm; 1.45 eV band gap) are attractive elements for the fabrication of thin-film-based low-cost photovoltaic (PV) devices. Their encapsulating organic ligand shell enables them to be easily dissolved in organic solvents, and the resulting solutions can be spray-cast onto indium-tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass under ambient conditions to produce photoactive thin films of CdTe. Following annealing at 380 °C in the presence of CdCl2(s) and evaporation of metal electrode contacts (glass/ITO/CdTe/Ca/Al), Schottky-junction PV devices were tested under simulated 1 sun conditions. An improved PV performance was found to be directly tied to control over the film morphology obtained by the adjustment of spray parameters such as the solution concentration, delivery pressure, substrate distance, and surface temperature. Higher spray pressures produced thinner layers (spray-cast Schottky devices rivaled those prepared by conventional spin-coating, showing Jsc = 14.6 ± 2.7 mA cm(-2), Voc = 428 ± 11 mV, FF = 42.8 ± 1.4%, and Eff. = 2.7 ± 0.5% under 1 sun illumination. This optimized condition of CdTe spray deposition was then applied to heterojunction devices (ITO/CdTe/ZnO/Al) to reach 3.0% efficiency after light soaking under forward bias. The film thickness, surface morphology, and light absorption were examined with scanning electron microscopy, optical profilometry, and UV/vis spectroscopy.

  20. Preparation of NiFe binary alloy nanocrystals for nonvolatile memory applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this work,an idea which applies binary alloy nanocrystal floating gate to nonvolatile memory application was introduced.The relationship between binary alloy’s work function and its composition was discussed theoretically.A nanocrystal floating gate structure with NiFe nanocrystals embedded in SiO2 dielectric layers was fabricated by magnetron sputtering.The micro-structure and composition deviation of the prepared NiFe nanocrystals were also investigated by TEM and EDS.

  1. A facile and green preparation of high-quality CdTe semiconductor nanocrystals at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yan [Jilin Province Research Center for Engineering and Technology of Spectral Analytical Instruments, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Shen Qihui; Shi Weiguang; Li Jixue; Liu Xiaoyang [State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Yu Dongdong [1st Hopstail affiliated to Jilin University, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Zhou Jianguang [Research Center for Analytical Instrumentation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)], E-mail: liuxy@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: jgzhou70@126.com

    2008-06-18

    One chemical reagent, hydrazine hydrate, was discovered to accelerate the growth of semiconductor nanocrystals (cadmium telluride) instead of additional energy, which was applied to the synthesis of high-quality CdTe nanocrystals at room temperature and ambient conditions within several hours. Under this mild condition the mercapto stabilizers were not destroyed, and they guaranteed CdTe nanocrystal particle sizes with narrow and uniform distribution over the largest possible range. The CdTe nanocrystals (photoluminescence emission range of 530-660 nm) synthesized in this way had very good spectral properties; for instance, they showed high photoluminescence quantum yield of up to 60%. Furthermore, we have succeeded in detecting the living Borrelia burgdorferi of Lyme disease by its photoluminescence image using CdTe nanocrystals.

  2. A facile and green preparation of high-quality CdTe semiconductor nanocrystals at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yan; Shen Qihui; Shi Weiguang; Li Jixue; Liu Xiaoyang; Yu Dongdong; Zhou Jianguang

    2008-01-01

    One chemical reagent, hydrazine hydrate, was discovered to accelerate the growth of semiconductor nanocrystals (cadmium telluride) instead of additional energy, which was applied to the synthesis of high-quality CdTe nanocrystals at room temperature and ambient conditions within several hours. Under this mild condition the mercapto stabilizers were not destroyed, and they guaranteed CdTe nanocrystal particle sizes with narrow and uniform distribution over the largest possible range. The CdTe nanocrystals (photoluminescence emission range of 530-660 nm) synthesized in this way had very good spectral properties; for instance, they showed high photoluminescence quantum yield of up to 60%. Furthermore, we have succeeded in detecting the living Borrelia burgdorferi of Lyme disease by its photoluminescence image using CdTe nanocrystals

  3. Occurency and aqueous processing of tellurides from Sonora (Mexico)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguayo, S.; Perez, E.; Ecinas, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Tellurium production is limited mainly to that obtained from the treatment of electrolyte muds from copper refineries. however, there are several other sources from which the precious metal tellurides are potentially attractive. This work presents a review of the main localitiesin Sonora (Mexico), where tellurides have been found. In addition, based upon the physical chemistry fundamentals for tellurium and precious metal tellurides, the aqueous extraction and recovery routes are discussed. (Author) 51 refs

  4. Size control of nanocrystals in InGaZnO4 thin films fabricated by using the sol-gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, S. J.; Cho, J. H.; Jang, Y. H.; Kim, C. H.

    2012-01-01

    We report the structural properties of InGaZnO 4 (IGZO) thin films prepared by using the sol-gel method. The structural properties of IGZO thin films were controlled by using the film thickness and thermal annealing temperature. In this study, the crystallization temperature of amorphous IGZO thin films was observed to be about 700 .deg. C. Also, we observed that the crystal size of IGZO thin films increased as the thickness and the annealing temperature were increased. In addition, we could observe that the atomic ratio of In, Ga and Zn of the IGZO thin film was slightly different from the molar ratio of a previous IGZO sol-gel solution (In:Ga:Zn = 1:1:1) post-annealed at 900 .deg. C because In and Zn are more volatile than Ga. The study of the crystallization of amorphous IGZO thin films provides an understanding of the growth mechanisms and thermal annealing effects for IGZO nanocrystals.

  5. Nanocrystal quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, Victor I

    2010-01-01

    ""Soft"" Chemical Synthesis and Manipulation of Semiconductor Nanocrystals, J.A. Hollingsworth and V.I. Klimov Electronic Structure in Semiconductor Nanocrystals: Optical Experiment, D.J. NorrisFine Structure and Polarization Properties of Band-Edge Excitons in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, A.L. EfrosIntraband Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Dots, P. Guyot-Sionnest, M. Shim, and C. WangMultiexciton Phenomena in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, V.I. KlimovOptical Dynamics in Single Semiconductor Quantum Do

  6. Tellurium self-diffusion and point defects in lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simirskij, Yu.N.; Firsova, L.P.

    1982-01-01

    Method of radioactive indicators was used to determine factors of tellurium self-diffusion in lead telluride with different deviation of the composition from stoichiometric in the range of enrichment by tellurium. It was found that at 973 K factors of tellurium self-diffusion in lead telluride depend slightly on the vapor pressure of tellurium equilibrium with solid phase

  7. Development of planar waveguides in zinc telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valette, Serge

    1977-02-01

    Zinc telluride (ZnTe) is one of the most attractive semi-conductors for monolithic integrated optics. In this study, the general characteristics of the planar optical waveguides achieved by implantation of light ions in ZnTe are investigated. Different aspects of prism-coupling and coherent light guiding have been taken up theoretically and experimentally. Some assumptions about the physical origin of these structures are discussed in order to explain all these results and the weak losses which have been measured. [fr

  8. Highly transparent conductive electrode with ultra-low HAZE by grain boundary modification of aqueous solution fabricated alumina-doped zinc oxide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nian, Qiong; Cheng, Gary J. [Birck Nanotechnology Center and School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States); Callahan, Michael; Bailey, John [Greentech Solutions, Inc., Hanson, Massachusetts 02341 (United States); Look, David [Semiconductor Research Center, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435 (United States); Efstathiadis, Harry [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE), University of Albany, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Commercial production of transparent conducting oxide (TCO) polycrystalline films requires high electrical conductivity with minimal degradation in optical transparency. Aqueous solution deposited TCO films would reduce production costs of TCO films but suffer from low electrical mobility, which severely degrades both electrical conductivity and optical transparency in the visible spectrum. Here, we demonstrated that grain boundary modification by ultra-violet laser crystallization (UVLC) of solution deposited aluminium-doped zinc oxide (AZO) nanocrystals results in high Hall mobility, with a corresponding dramatic improvement in AZO electrical conductance. The AZO films after laser irradiation exhibit electrical mobility up to 18.1 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} with corresponding electrical resistivity and sheet resistances as low as 1 × 10{sup −3} Ω cm and 75 Ω/sq, respectively. The high mobility also enabled a high transmittance (T) of 88%-96% at 550 nm for the UVLC films. In addition, HAZE measurement shows AZO film scattering transmittance as low as 1.8%, which is superior over most other solution deposited transparent electrode alternatives such as silver nanowires. Thus, AZO films produced by the UVLC technique have a combined figure of merit for electrical conductivity, optical transparency, and optical HAZE higher than other solution based deposition techniques and comparable to vacuumed based deposition methods.

  9. Easy Fabrication of Highly Thermal-Stable Cellulose Nanocrystals Using Cr(NO33 Catalytic Hydrolysis System: A Feasibility Study from Macro- to Nano-Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Wei Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reported on the feasibility and practicability of Cr(NO33 hydrolysis to isolate cellulose nanocrystals (CNCCr(NO33 from native cellulosic feedstock. The physicochemical properties of CNCCr(NO33 were compared with nanocellulose isolated using sulfuric acid hydrolysis (CNCH2SO4. In optimum hydrolysis conditions, 80 °C, 1.5 h, 0.8 M Cr(NO33 metal salt and solid–liquid ratio of 1:30, the CNCCr(NO33 exhibited a network-like long fibrous structure with the aspect ratio of 15.7, while the CNCH2SO4 showed rice-shape structure with an aspect ratio of 3.5. Additionally, Cr(NO33-treated CNC rendered a higher crystallinity (86.5% ± 0.3% with high yield (83.6% ± 0.6% as compared to the H2SO4-treated CNC (81.4% ± 0.1% and 54.7% ± 0.3%, respectively. Furthermore, better thermal stability of CNCCr(NO33 (344 °C compared to CNCH2SO4 (273 °C rendered a high potential for nanocomposite application. This comparable effectiveness of Cr(NO33 metal salt provides milder hydrolysis conditions for highly selective depolymerization of cellulosic fiber into value-added cellulose nanomaterial, or useful chemicals and fuels in the future.

  10. Fabrication and Thermophysical Properties of La(2-x)Zr(2-y)O7 Nanocrystal by a Sol-Gel Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Che, Ping; Zhao, Ziqiang; Liu, Shixiang; Li, Wenjun

    2016-03-01

    Non-Stoichiometric La2Zr2O7 (La(2-x)Zr(2-y)O7) Nanocrystal was synthesized by a simple sol-gel method. The crystalline structure, oxygen vacancy concentration, thermal expansion coefficient, as well as the fracture toughness of as-prepared materials were charactered by XRD, TG-DSC, PL spectra, dilatometer, and electronic universal testing machine respectively. The crystal structure of La2Zr2O7 is of the cubic type while lattice parameter increases with the deviatation of Zr4+ and La3+ from Stoichiometric La2Zr2O7 increasing. The average linear thermal expansion coefficient of non-stoichiometric La2Zr2O7 is obviously bigger than that of La2Zr2O7 in the temperature range between 150 degrees C and 950 degrees C. The fracture toughness of La(2-x)Zr(2-y)O7 increases with x and y increasing up to x = 0.3 and y = 0.25.

  11. Development of a cadmium telluride pixel detector for astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, Walter R.; Mao, Peter H.; Rana, Vikram R.; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Ushio, Masayoshi; Aono, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Shin; Sato, Goro; Kokubun, Motohide; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2009-08-01

    We are developing imaging Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) pixel detectors optimized for astrophysical hard X-ray applications. Our hybrid detector consist of a CdTe crystal 1mm thick and 2cm × 2cm in area with segmented anode contacts directly bonded to a custom low-noise application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CdTe sensor, fabricated by ACRORAD (Okinawa, Japan), has Schottky blocking contacts on a 605 micron pitch in a 32 × 32 array, providing low leakage current and enabling readout of the anode side. The detector is bonded using epoxy-gold stud interconnects to a custom low noise, low power ASIC circuit developed by Caltech's Space Radiation Laboratory. We have achieved very good energy resolution over a wide energy range (0.62keV FWHM @ 60keV, 10.8keV FWHM @ 662keV). We observe polarization effects at room temperature, but they are suppressed if we operate the detector at or below 0°C degree. These detectors have potential application for future missions such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO).

  12. Mercury telluride as a zero-gap semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berchenko, N.N.; Pashkovskij, M.V.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents a review of main properties of mercury telluride which is a representative of a new class of substances - gapless semiconductors. The causes leading to the appearance of a gapless state in mercury chalcogenides are considered; it is demonstrated that the main role in the formation of the inverse band structure belongs to relativistic corrections. The specific properties of mercury telluride are associated with the zero forbidden band, p-like nature of electron states of the conduction band and its nonparabolicity, resonance states of impurities and anomalies of dielectric permittivity. Conditions of forbidden band appearing in mercury telluride under the effect external factors are analyzed

  13. Novel aspects of application of cadmium telluride quantum dots nanostructures in radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Feizi, Shahzad [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Radiation Application Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zare, Hakimeh; Karimi, Shokufeh [Yazd University, Department of Physics, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahighi, Reza [Sharif University of Technology, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    In the last two decades, quantum dots nanomaterials have garnered a great deal of scientific interest because of their unique properties. Quantum dots (QDs) are inorganic fluorescent nanocrystals in the size range between 1 and 20 nm. Due to their structural properties, they possess distinctive properties and behave in different way from crystals in macro scale, in many branches of human life. Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) were labeled with {sup 68}Ga radio nuclide for fast in vivo targeting and coincidence imaging of tumors. Using instant paper chromatography, the physicochemical properties of the Cadmium telluride quantum dots labeled with {sup 68}Ga NPs ({sup 68}Ga rate at CdTe QDs) were found high enough stable in organic phases, e.g., a human serum, to be reliably used in bioapplications. In vivo biodistribution of the {sup 68}Ga rate at CdTe QDs nanoconposite was investigated in rats bearing fibro sarcoma tumor after various post-injection periods of time. The {sup 68}Ga NPs exhibited a rapid as well as high tumor uptake in a very short period of time (less than 10 min), resulting in an efficient tumor targeting/imaging agent. Meantime, the low lipophilicity of the {sup 68}Ga NPs caused to their fast excretion throughout the body by kidneys (as also confirmed by the urinary tract). Because of the short half-life of {sup 68}Ga radionuclide, the {sup 68}Ga rate at CdTe QDs with an excellent tumor targeting/imaging and fast washing out from the body can be suggested as one of the most effective and promising nanomaterials in nanotechnology-based cancer diagnosis and therapy. (orig.)

  14. Novel aspects of application of cadmium telluride quantum dots nanostructures in radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Zare, Hakimeh; Karimi, Shokufeh; Rahighi, Reza; Feizi, Shahzad

    2017-08-01

    In the last two decades, quantum dots nanomaterials have garnered a great deal of scientific interest because of their unique properties. Quantum dots (QDs) are inorganic fluorescent nanocrystals in the size range between 1 and 20 nm. Due to their structural properties, they possess distinctive properties and behave in different way from crystals in macro scale, in many branches of human life. Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) were labeled with 68Ga radio nuclide for fast in vivo targeting and coincidence imaging of tumors. Using instant paper chromatography, the physicochemical properties of the Cadmium telluride quantum dots labeled with 68Ga NPs (68Ga@ CdTe QDs) were found high enough stable in organic phases, e.g., a human serum, to be reliably used in bioapplications. In vivo biodistribution of the 68Ga@ CdTe QDs nanoconposite was investigated in rats bearing fibro sarcoma tumor after various post-injection periods of time. The 68Ga NPs exhibited a rapid as well as high tumor uptake in a very short period of time (less than 10 min), resulting in an efficient tumor targeting/imaging agent. Meantime, the low lipophilicity of the 68Ga NPs caused to their fast excretion throughout the body by kidneys (as also confirmed by the urinary tract). Because of the short half-life of 68Ga radionuclide, the 68Ga@ CdTe QDs with an excellent tumor targeting/imaging and fast washing out from the body can be suggested as one of the most effective and promising nanomaterials in nanotechnology-based cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  15. Advanced Branching Control and Characterization of Inorganic Semiconducting Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Steven Michael [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The ability to finely tune the size and shape of inorganic semiconducting nanocrystals is an area of great interest, as the more control one has, the more applications will be possible for their use. The first two basic shapes develped in nanocrystals were the sphere and the anistropic nanorod. the II_VI materials being used such as Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), exhibit polytypism, which allows them to form in either the hexagonally packed wurtzite or cubically packed zinc blende crystalline phase. The nanorods are wurtzite with the length of the rod growing along the c-axis. As this grows, stacking faults may form, which are layers of zinc blende in the otherwise wurtzite crystal. Using this polytypism, though, the first generation of branched crystals were developed in the form of the CdTe tetrapod. This is a nanocrystal that nucleates in the zincblend form, creating a tetrahedral core, on which four wurtzite arms are grown. This structure opened up the possibility of even more complex shapes and applications. This disseration investigates the advancement of branching control and further understanding the materials polytypism in the form of the stacking faults in nanorods.

  16. Control of p-type and n-type thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride thin films by combinatorial sputter coating technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Masahiro; Sasaki, Michiko; Xu, Yibin; Zhan, Tianzhuo; Isoda, Yukihiro; Shinohara, Yoshikazu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • p- and n-type bismuth telluride thin films have been synthesized using a combinatorial sputter coating system (COSCOS) while changing only one of the experimental conditions, the RF power. • The dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) was optimized by the technique. • The fabrication of a Π-structured TE device was demonstrated. - Abstract: p- and n-type bismuth telluride thin films have been synthesized by using a combinatorial sputter coating system (COSCOS). The crystal structure and crystal preferred orientation of the thin films were changed by controlling the coating condition of the radio frequency (RF) power during the sputter coating. As a result, the p- and n-type films and their dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) were optimized by the technique. The properties of the thin films such as the crystal structure, crystal preferred orientation, material composition and surface morphology were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Also, the thermoelectric properties of the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity were measured. ZT for n- and p-type bismuth telluride thin films was found to be 0.27 and 0.40 at RF powers of 90 and 120 W, respectively. The proposed technology can be used to fabricate thermoelectric p–n modules of bismuth telluride without any doping process.

  17. Control of p-type and n-type thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride thin films by combinatorial sputter coating technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Masahiro, E-mail: goto.masahiro@nims.go.jp [Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Green Research on Energy and Environmental Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Thermal Management and Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Sasaki, Michiko [Thermal Management and Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Xu, Yibin [Thermal Management and Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Materials Database Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhan, Tianzhuo [Thermal Management and Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Isoda, Yukihiro [Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Green Research on Energy and Environmental Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Shinohara, Yoshikazu [Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Green Research on Energy and Environmental Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Thermal Management and Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • p- and n-type bismuth telluride thin films have been synthesized using a combinatorial sputter coating system (COSCOS) while changing only one of the experimental conditions, the RF power. • The dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) was optimized by the technique. • The fabrication of a Π-structured TE device was demonstrated. - Abstract: p- and n-type bismuth telluride thin films have been synthesized by using a combinatorial sputter coating system (COSCOS). The crystal structure and crystal preferred orientation of the thin films were changed by controlling the coating condition of the radio frequency (RF) power during the sputter coating. As a result, the p- and n-type films and their dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) were optimized by the technique. The properties of the thin films such as the crystal structure, crystal preferred orientation, material composition and surface morphology were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Also, the thermoelectric properties of the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity were measured. ZT for n- and p-type bismuth telluride thin films was found to be 0.27 and 0.40 at RF powers of 90 and 120 W, respectively. The proposed technology can be used to fabricate thermoelectric p–n modules of bismuth telluride without any doping process.

  18. Studies of antimony telluride and copper telluride films electrodeposition from choline chloride containing ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catrangiu, Adriana-Simona; Sin, Ion [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Calea Grivitei 132, Bucharest (Romania); Prioteasa, Paula [INCDIE ICPE-Advanced Research, Splaiul Unirii 313, Bucharest (Romania); Cotarta, Adina [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Calea Grivitei 132, Bucharest (Romania); Cojocaru, Anca, E-mail: a_cojocaru@chim.upb.ro [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Calea Grivitei 132, Bucharest (Romania); Anicai, Liana [Center of Surface Science and Nanotechnology, University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest, Splaiul Independentei 313, Bucharest (Romania); Visan, Teodor [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Calea Grivitei 132, Bucharest (Romania)

    2016-07-29

    Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to investigate the deposition of antimony telluride or copper telluride from ionic liquid consisting in mixture of choline chloride with oxalic acid. In addition, the cathodic process during copper telluride formation was studied in the mixture of choline chloride with ethylene glycol. The results indicate that the Pt electrode is first covered with a Te layer, and then the more negative polarisation leads to the deposition of Sb{sub x}Te{sub y} or Cu{sub x}Te{sub y} semiconductor compounds. Thin films were deposited on copper and carbon steel at 60–70 °C and were characterised by scanning electron microscopy, energy X-ray dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Their stoichiometry depends on the bath composition and applied potential. EDS and XRD patterns indicate the possible synthesis of stoichiometric Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} phase and Cu{sub 2}Te, Cu{sub 5}Te{sub 3}, and Cu{sub 2.8}Te{sub 2} phases, respectively, by controlling the ratio of ion concentrations in ionic liquid electrolytes and deposition potential. - Highlights: • Sb{sub x}Te{sub y} and Cu{sub x}Te{sub y} films electrodeposited from choline-chloride-based ionic liquids. • The stoichiometry of film depends on the bath composition and deposition potential. • Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Cu{sub 2}Te, Cu{sub 5}Te{sub 3}, Cu{sub 2.8}Te{sub 2} phases were identified in X-ray diffraction patterns.

  19. Insights into the microstructural and physical properties of colloidal Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Ruishi, E-mail: rxie@foxmail.com [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Li, Yuanli [Department of Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Jiang, Linhai; Zhang, Xingquan [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • We present a facile and environmentally friendly protocol to fabricate Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals. • The microstructural and physical properties of Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals were systematically investigated. • The current synthesis is dramatically simple and highly reproducible, it will facilitate the commercial scale synthesis of highly luminescent water-soluble nanocrystals with surface functionality in the near future. - Abstract: Here, we present a facile and environmentally friendly synthetic protocol to fabricate highly luminescent and water-soluble Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals in aqueous solution at low temperature. The microstructure and various physical properties (e.g., crystal structure, interplanar spacing, lattice parameter, crystalline size, lattice microstrain, intrinsic stress, X-ray density, specific surface area, dislocation density, porosity, agglomeration number) of the Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals were systematically investigated using X-ray diffraction. The particle size and morphology of the Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals were determined by transmission electron microscopy. The optical properties (e.g., absorption and photoluminescence) of the fabricated nanocrystals were explored using ultraviolet–visible absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopies, respectively. The surface functionalization of the Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals by mercaptoacetic acid ligand was evidenced by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. To confirm the elementary composition of the obtained nanocrystals, Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was performed. To further shed light upon elemental distribution of the resulting nanocrystals, elemental mapping measurements were conducted. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms were also elucidated. As a consequence, the current investigation not only provides a deep insight into exploring the physical properties of doped nanocrystals, but also demonstrates a useful synthetic strategy for producing water-soluble and highly fluorescent doped

  20. Telluride School, Telluride, Colorado solar-energy-system performance evaluation, February 1982-April 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, K.M.

    1982-01-01

    The Telluride School solar site is an elementary/junior-senior high school in Colorado with a passive/active hybrid solar energy system designed to supply 40% of the heating load. It is equipped with a 1428 square foot, double glazed Trombe wall, a 1392 square foot greenhouse with collection tube, and an auxiliary oil-fired boiler. Monthly performance data are tabulated for the overall system and for the Trombe wall, greenhouse, and greenhouse storage. System operation is illustrated by graphs of typical Trombe wall insolation and temperatures and typical greenhouse insolation and temperatures. (LEW)

  1. Fabricating Fe3O4/Fe/Biocarbon Fibers using Cellulose Nanocrystals for High-Rate Li-ion Battery Anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shuzhen; He, Wen; Zhang, Xudong; Yang, Guihua; Ma, Jingyun; Yang, Xuena; Song, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Mesoporous biocarbon fibers adhered with Fe 3 O 4 /Fe nanoparticles (Fe 3 O 4 /Fe/MBCFs) are synthesized. • This method uses the natural cotton as a template and carbon source. • Fe 3 O 4 /Fe/MBCFs exhibit excellent cycling performance at higher current. - ABSTRACT: Searching the high rate Fe 3 O 4 -based materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) is still a great challenge. Here we tackle this problem by developing a facile and green method which uses the natural cotton as a biotemplate and a activity biocarbon source. By this new method, we synthesized the mesoporous biocarbon fibers adhered with Fe 3 O 4 /Fe nanoparticles (Fe 3 O 4 /Fe/MBCFs). Fe 3 O 4 /Fe/MBCFs are a highly stable anode material for high-rate LIBs due to its excellent cycling performance at higher current and fast charging feature. This anode shows a high reversible capacity of 472 mAh g −1 after 500 cycles and can be rapidly charge to 100% in 28.3 min. After 160 cycles at varied current densities from 1 A g −1 to 10 A g −1 , it still delivered a high discharge capacity of 524.6 mAh g −1 and an ultra-high coulombic efficiency close to 100%. This is attributed to the synergistic effects of several factors including the unique mesoporous hybrid construction, the graphitized biocarbon fibers and the chemical bonding between Fe 3 O 4 and Fe nanoparticles. This work is instructive for fabrication and design of nanostructured electrodes with extraordinary properties from biomass renewable resources

  2. Hybrid nanocrystal/polymer solar cells based on tetrapod-shaped CdSexTe1-x nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yi; Li Yunchao; Zhong Haizheng; Hou Jianhui; Ding Yuqin; Yang Chunhe; Li Yongfang

    2006-01-01

    A series of ternary tetrapodal nanocrystals of CdSe x Te 1-x with x = 0 (CdTe), 0.23, 0.53, 0.78, 1 (CdSe) were synthesized and used to fabricate hybrid nanocrystal/polymer solar cells. Herein, the nanocrystals acted as electron acceptors, and poly(2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene) (MEH-PPV) was used as an electron donor. It was found that the open circuit voltage (V oc ), short-circuit current (J sc ) and power conversion efficiency (η) of the devices all increased with increasing Se content in the CdSe x Te 1-x nanocrystals under identical experimental conditions. The solar cell based on the blend of tetrapodal CdSe nanocrystals and MEH-PPV (9:1 w/w) showed the highest power conversion efficiency of 1.13% under AM 1.5, 80 mW cm -2 , and the maximum incident photon to converted current efficiency (IPCE) of the device reached 47% at 510 nm. The influence of nanocrystal composition on the photovoltaic properties of the hybrid solar cells was explained by the difference of the band level positions between MEH-PPV and the nanocrystals

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of lead telluride/bismuth antimony telluride nanocomposites for thermoelectric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Shreyashi; Zhou, Chen; Morelli, Donald; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Uher, Ctirad; Brock, Stephanie L.

    2011-12-01

    Heterogeneous nanocomposites of p-type bismuth antimony telluride (Bi 2- xSb xTe 3) with lead telluride (PbTe) nanoinclusions have been prepared by an incipient wetness impregnation approach. The Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and Hall coefficient were measured from 80 to 380 K in order to investigate the influence of PbTe nanoparticles on the thermoelectric performance of nanocomposites. The Seebeck coefficients and electrical resistivities of nanocomposites decrease with increasing PbTe nanoparticle concentration due to an increased hole concentration. The lattice thermal conductivity decreases with the addition of PbTe nanoparticles but the total thermal conductivity increases due to the increased electronic thermal conductivity. We conclude that the presence of nanosized PbTe in the bulk Bi 2- xSb xTe 3 matrix results in a collateral doping effect, which dominates transport properties. This study underscores the need for immiscible systems to achieve the decreased thermal transport properties possible from nanostructuring without compromising the electronic properties.

  4. Properties of Nitrogen-Doped Zinc Telluride Films for Back Contact to Cadmium Telluride Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimpi, Tushar M.; Drayton, Jennifer; Swanson, Drew E.; Sampath, Walajabad S.

    2017-08-01

    Zinc telluride (ZnTe) films have been deposited onto uncoated glass superstrates by reactive radiofrequency (RF) sputtering with different amounts of nitrogen introduced into the process gas, and the structural and electronic transport properties of the resulting nitrogen-doped ZnTe (ZnTe:N) films characterized. Based on transmission and x-ray diffraction measurements, it was observed that the crystalline quality of the ZnTe:N films decreased with increasing nitrogen in the deposition process. The bulk carrier concentration of the ZnTe:N films determined from Hall-effect measurements showed a slight decrease at 4% nitrogen flow rate. The effect of ZnTe:N films as back contact to cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells was also investigated. ZnTe:N films were deposited before or after CdCl2 passivation on CdTe/CdS samples. Small-area devices were characterized for their electronic properties. Glancing-angle x-ray diffraction measurements and energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis confirmed substantial loss of zinc from the samples where CdCl2 passivation was carried out after ZnTe:N film deposition.

  5. Simultaneous control of nanocrystal size and nanocrystal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    applications such as a photo-sensor [11]. Thus, it is desirable to have, not only a control on the size of the nanocrystals, but also an independent tunability of the ... 1-thioglycerol) in 25 ml methanol under inert atmosphere. 10 ml of 0.2 M sodium sulfide solution is then added to the reaction mixture dropwise and the reaction.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Colloidal Metal and Photovoltaic Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu

    2014-11-05

    Metal and semiconducting nanocrystals have received a great deal of attention from fundamental scientists and application-oriented researchers due to their physical and chemical properties, which differ from those of bulk materials. Nanocrystals are essential building blocks in the development of nanostructured devices for energy conversion. Colloidal metals and metal chalcogenides have been developed for use as nanocrystal inks to produce efficient solar cells with lower costs. All high-performing photovoltaic nanocrystals contain toxic elements, such as Pb, or scarce elements, such as In; thus, the production of solution-processable nanocrystals from earth-abundant materials using environmentally benign synthesis and processing methods has become a major challenge for the inorganic semiconductor-based solar field. This dissertation, divided into two parts, addresses several aspects of these emerging challenges. The first portion of the thesis describes the synthesis and characterization of nanocrystals of antimony sulfide, which is composed of non-scarce and non-toxic elements, and examines their performance in photovoltaic devices. The effect of various synthetic parameters on the final morphology is explored. The structural, optical and morphological properties of the nanocrystals were investigated, and Sb2S3 nanocrystal-based solid-state semiconductor-sensitized solar cells were fabricated using different deposition processes. We achieved promising power conversion efficiencies of 1.48%. The second part of the thesis demonstrates a novel method for the in situ synthesis and patterning of nanocrystals via reactive inkjet printing. The use of low-cost manufacturing approaches for the synthesis of nanocrystals is critical for many applications, including photonics and electronics. In this work, a simple, low-cost method for the synthesis of nanocrystals with minimum size variation and waste using reactive inkjet printing is introduced. As a proof of concept, the

  7. Silicon nanocrystal films for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechner, Robert W.

    2009-02-06

    Whether nanoparticles of silicon are really suited for such applications, whether layers fabricated from this exhibit semiconducting properties, whether they can be doped, and whether for instance via the doping the conductivity can be tuned, was studied in the present thesis. Starting material for this were on the one hand spherical silicon nanocrystals with a sharp size distribution and mean diameters in the range from 4-50 nm. Furthermore silicon particle were available, which are with 50-500 nm distinctly larger and exhibit a broad distribution of the mean size and a polycrystalline fine structure with strongly bifurcated external morphology. The small conductivities and tje low mobility values of the charge carriers in the layers of silicon nanocrystals suggest to apply suited thermal after-treatment procedures. So was found that the aluminium-induced layer exchange (ALILE) also can be transferred to the porous layers of nanocrystals. With the deuteron passivation a method was available to change the charge-carrier concentration in the polycrystalline layers. Additionally to ALILE laser crystallization as alternative after-treatment procedure of the nanocrystal layers was studied.

  8. Semiconductor nanocrystals formed in SiO2 by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, J.G.; White, C.W.; Budai, J.D.; Withrow, S.P.; Chen, Y.

    1994-11-01

    Nanocrystals of group IV (Si, Ge and SiGe), III-V (GaAs), and II-VI (CdSe) semiconductor materials have been fabricated inside SiO 2 by ion implantation and subsequent thermal annealing. The microstructure of these nanocrystalline semiconductor materials has been studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The nanocrystals form in near-spherical shape with random crystal orientations in amorphous SiO 2 . Extensive studies on the nanocrystal size distributions have been carried out for the Ge nanocrystals by changing the implantation doses and the annealing temperatures. Remarkable roughening of the nanocrystals occurs when the annealing temperature is raised over the melting temperature of the implanted semiconductor material. Strong red photoluminescence peaked around 1.67 eV has been achieved in samples with Si nanocrystals in SiO 2

  9. Fluorescence Stability of Mercaptopropionic Acid Capped Cadmium Telluride Quantum Dots in Various Biochemical Buffers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borse, Vivek; Kashikar, Adisha; Srivastava, Rohit

    2018-04-01

    Quantum dots are the semiconductor nanocrystals having unique optical and electronic properties. Quantum dots are category of fluorescent labels utilized for biological tagging, biosensing, bioassays, bioimaging and in vivo imaging as they exhibit very small size, signal brightness, photostability, tuning of light emission range, longer photoluminescence decay time as compared to organic dyes. In this work, we have synthesized and characterized mercaptopropionic acid capped cadmium telluride quantum dots (MPA-CdTe QDs) using hydrothermal method. The study further reports fluorescence intensity stability of quantum dots suspended in different buffers of varying concentration (1-100 mM), stored at various photophysical conditions. Fluorescence intensity values were reduced with increase in buffer concentration. When the samples were stored at room temperature in ambient light condition the quantum dots suspended in different buffers lost the fluorescence intensity after day 15 (except TRIS II). Fluorescence intensity values were found stable for more than 30 days when the samples were stored in dark condition. Samples stored in refrigerator displayed modest fluorescence intensity even after 300 days of storage. Thus, storage of MPA-CdTe QDs in refrigerator may be the suitable choice to maintain its fluorescence stability for longer time for further application.

  10. Effect of reducing agent strength on the growth and thermoelectric performance of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour, Asmaa; Hassan, Nazly; Refaat, Heba M.; Soliman, Hesham M. A.; El-Dissouky, A.

    2018-03-01

    A novel combination of Trizma, as an environmentally friendly chelating agent, with either weak or strong reducing agent was used to produce n-type bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) nanocrystals via water-based chemical route. The synthesized powders were consolidated into pellets utilizing spark plasma sintering (SPS). The sintered n-type pellets exhibited potentially high electrical conductivities (5.29 × 105 and 5.23 × 105 S.m‑1) and low lattice thermal conductivities (0.12 and 0.25 Wm‑1K‑1) respectively. These thermoelectric (TE) properties suggested that the partially coherent boundaries permitted significant phonons scattering and electrons transfer. These led to an enhanced figure-of-merit (ZT) values (0.52 and 0.97), which are considered to be significant among the reported ZT values at room-temperature for the undoped synthesized n-type Bi2Te3 nanoparticles. Therefore, the current investigation displayed an efficient method to improve ZT of TE materials via nanostructure orchestrating, resulting in a worthy candidate n-type nanostructured Bi2Te3 for room-temperature TE applications.

  11. Electrochemical Deposition of Lanthanum Telluride Thin Films and Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Su (Ike); Farias, Stephen; Cammarata, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Tellurium alloys are characterized by their high performance thermoelectric properties and recent research has shown nanostructured tellurium alloys display even greater performance than bulk equivalents. Increased thermoelectric efficiency of nanostructured materials have led to significant interests in developing thin film and nanowire structures. Here, we report on the first successful electrodeposition of lanthanum telluride thin films and nanowires. The electrodeposition of lanthanum telluride thin films is performed in ionic liquids at room temperature. The synthesis of nanowires involves electrodepositing lanthanum telluride arrays into anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanoporous membranes. These novel procedures can serve as an alternative means of simple, inexpensive and laboratory-environment friendly methods to synthesize nanostructured thermoelectric materials. The thermoelectric properties of thin films and nanowires will be presented to compare to current state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials. The morphologies and chemical compositions of the deposited films and nanowires are characterized using SEM and EDAX analysis.

  12. Polyimide Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Baochau N.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rowan, Stuart; Cudjoe, Elvis; Sandberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Polyimide (PI) aerogels are highly porous solids having low density, high porosity and low thermal conductivity with good mechanical properties. They are ideal for various applications including use in antenna and insulation such as inflatable decelerators used in entry, decent and landing operations. Recently, attention has been focused on stimuli responsive materials such as cellulose nano crystals (CNCs). CNCs are environmentally friendly, bio-renewable, commonly found in plants and the dermis of sea tunicates, and potentially low cost. This study is to examine the effects of CNC on the polyimide aerogels. The CNC used in this project are extracted from mantle of a sea creature called tunicates. A series of polyimide cellulose nanocrystal composite aerogels has been fabricated having 0-13 wt of CNC. Results will be discussed.

  13. Lead telluride with increased mechanical stability for cylindrical thermoelectric generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to improve the mechanical stability of lead telluride (PbTe), trying to vary its mechanical properties independently from its thermoelectric properties. Thus the influence of material preparation as well as different dopants on the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of lead telluride is being analysed. When using appropriately set process parameters, milling and sintering of lead telluride increases the material's hardness. With sintering temperatures exceeding 300 C stable material of high relative density can be achieved. Milling lead telluride generates lattice defects leading to a reduction of the material's charge carrier density. These defects can be reduced by increased sintering temperatures. Contamination of the powder due to the milling process leads to bloating during thermal cycling and thus reduced density of the sintered material. In addition to that, evaporation of tellurium at elevated temperatures causes instability of the material's thermoelectric properties. Based on the experimental results obtained in this work, the best thermoelectric and mechanical properties can be obtained by sintering coarse powders at around 400 C. Within this work a concept was developed to vary the mechanical properties of lead telluride via synthesis of PbTe with electrically nondoping elements, which thus may keep the thermoelectric properties unchanged. Therefore, the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of Pb 1-x Ca x Te were investigated. Doping pure PbTe with calcium causes a significant increase of the material's hardness while only slightly decreasing the charge carrier density and thus keeping the thermoelectric properties apart from a slight reduction of the electrical conductivity nearly unchanged. The abovementioned concept is proven using sodium doped lead telluride, as it is used for thermoelectric generators: The additional doping with calcium again increases the material's hardness while its thermoelectric properties

  14. Charge transport in metal oxide nanocrystal-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnerstrom, Evan Lars

    structure. Charge transport can obviously be taken to mean the conduction of electrons, but it also refers to the motion of ions, such as lithium ions and protons. In many cases, the transport of ions is married to the motion of electrons as well, either through an external electrical circuit, or within the same material in the case of mixed ionic electronic conductors. The collective motion of electrons over short length scales, that is, within single nanocrystals, is also a subject of study as it pertains to plasmonic nanocrystals. Finally, charge transport can also be coupled to or result from the formation of defects in metal oxides. All of these modes of charge transport in metal oxides gain further complexity when considered in nanocrystalline systems, where the introduction of numerous surfaces can change the character of charge transport relative to bulk systems, providing opportunities to exploit new physical phenomena. Part I of this dissertation explores the combination of electronic and ionic transport in electrochromic devices based on nanocrystals. Colloidal chemistry and solution processing are used to fabricate nanocomposites based on electrochromic tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanocrystals. The nanocomposites, which are completely synthesized using solution processing, consist of ITO nanocrystals and lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide (LiTFSI) salt dispersed in a lithium ion-conducting polymer matrix of either poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). ITO nanocrystals are prepared by colloidal synthetic methods and the nanocrystal surface chemistry is modified to achieve favorable nanocrystal-polymer interactions. Homogeneous solutions containing polymer, ITO nanocrystals, and lithium salt are thus prepared and deposited by spin casting. Characterization by DC electronic measurements, microscopy, and x-ray scattering techniques show that the ITO nanocrystals form a complete, connected electrode within a polymer electrolyte

  15. Nanocrystals Technology for Pharmaceutical Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhongyao; Lian, Yumei; Kamal, Zul; Ma, Xin; Chen, Jianjun; Zhou, Xinbo; Su, Jing; Qiu, Mingfeng

    2018-05-17

    Nanocrystals technology is a promising method for improving the dissolution rate and enhancing the bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. In recent years, it has been developing rapidly and applied to drug research and engineering. Nanocrystal drugs can be formulated into various dosage forms. This review mainly focused on the nanocrystals technology and its application in pharmaceutical science. Firstly, different preparation methods of nanocrystal technology and the characterization of nanocrystal drugs are briefly described. Secondly, the application of nanocrystals technology in pharmaceutical science is mainly discussed followed by the introduction of sustained release formulations. Then, the scaling up process, marketed nanocrystal drug products and regulatory aspects about nanodrugs are summarized. Finally, the specific challenges and opportunities of nanocrystals technology for pharmaceutical science are summarized and discussed. This review will provide a comprehensive guide for scientists and engineers in the field of pharmaceutical science and biochemical engineering. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Eco-friendly approach towards green synthesis of zinc oxide nanocrystals and its potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmurugan, Palanivel; Park, Jung-Hee; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Yi, Young-Joo; Cho, Min; Jang, Jum-Suk; Myung, Hyun; Bang, Keuk-Soo; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we investigated a novel green route for synthesis of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals using Prunus × yedoensis Matsumura leaf extract as a reducing agent without using any surfactant or external energy. Standard characterization studies were carried out to confirm the obtained product using UV-Vis spectra, SEM-EDS, FTIR, TEM, and XRD. In addition, the synthesized ZnO nanocrystals were coated onto fabric and leather samples to study their bacteriostatic effect against odor-causing bacteria Brevibacterium linens and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Zinc oxide nanocrystal-coated fabric and leather showed good activity against both bacteria.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of lead telluride/bismuth antimony telluride nanocomposites for thermoelectric applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, Shreyashi; Zhou Chen; Morelli, Donald; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Uher, Ctirad; Brock, Stephanie L.

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous nanocomposites of p-type bismuth antimony telluride (Bi 2−x Sb x Te 3 ) with lead telluride (PbTe) nanoinclusions have been prepared by an incipient wetness impregnation approach. The Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and Hall coefficient were measured from 80 to 380 K in order to investigate the influence of PbTe nanoparticles on the thermoelectric performance of nanocomposites. The Seebeck coefficients and electrical resistivities of nanocomposites decrease with increasing PbTe nanoparticle concentration due to an increased hole concentration. The lattice thermal conductivity decreases with the addition of PbTe nanoparticles but the total thermal conductivity increases due to the increased electronic thermal conductivity. We conclude that the presence of nanosized PbTe in the bulk Bi 2−x Sb x Te 3 matrix results in a collateral doping effect, which dominates transport properties. This study underscores the need for immiscible systems to achieve the decreased thermal transport properties possible from nanostructuring without compromising the electronic properties. - Graphical abstract: PbTe nanoparticles introduced into p-type Bi 2 Te 3 by incipient wetness results in decreased lattice thermal conductivity, but also acts as an electronic dopant, resulting in an overall decrease in thermoelectric performance. Highlights: ► Composites of PbTe nanoparticles in Bi 2−x Sb x Te 3 were formed by incipient wetness. ► PbTe nanoparticles leads to decreased κ l , consistent with phonon scattering. ► PbTe nanoparticles lead to decreased S and ρ, due to increased carriers. ► Collateral doping from PbTe leads to decreased ZT with increasing concentration. ► Immiscible systems are preferred for improved ZT.

  18. Nanocrystals manufacturing by ultra-low-energy ion-beam-synthesis for non-volatile memory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normand, P. E-mail: p.normand@imel.demokritos.gr; Kapetanakis, E.; Dimitrakis, P.; Skarlatos, D.; Beltsios, K.; Tsoukalas, D.; Bonafos, C.; Ben Assayag, G.; Cherkashin, N.; Claverie, A.; Berg, J.A. van den; Soncini, V.; Agarwal, A.; Ameen, M.; Perego, M.; Fanciulli, M

    2004-02-01

    An overview of recent developments regarding the fabrication and structure of thin silicon dioxide films with embedded nanocrystals through ultra-low-energy ion-beam-synthesis (ULE-IBS) is presented. Advances in fabrication, increased understanding of structure formation processes and ways to control them allow for the fabrication of reproducible and attractive silicon-nanocrystal memory devices for a wide-range of memory applications as herein demonstrated in the case of low-voltage EEPROM-like applications.

  19. Nanocrystals manufacturing by ultra-low-energy ion-beam-synthesis for non-volatile memory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normand, P.; Kapetanakis, E.; Dimitrakis, P.; Skarlatos, D.; Beltsios, K.; Tsoukalas, D.; Bonafos, C.; Ben Assayag, G.; Cherkashin, N.; Claverie, A.; Berg, J.A. van den; Soncini, V.; Agarwal, A.; Ameen, M.; Perego, M.; Fanciulli, M.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of recent developments regarding the fabrication and structure of thin silicon dioxide films with embedded nanocrystals through ultra-low-energy ion-beam-synthesis (ULE-IBS) is presented. Advances in fabrication, increased understanding of structure formation processes and ways to control them allow for the fabrication of reproducible and attractive silicon-nanocrystal memory devices for a wide-range of memory applications as herein demonstrated in the case of low-voltage EEPROM-like applications

  20. An additive approach to low temperature zero pressure sintering of bismuth antimony telluride thermoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlin, Glenn C.; Tripathi, Rajesh; Nunes, Geoffrey; Lynch, Philip B.; Jones, Howard D.; Schmitt, Devin C.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents an additive-based approach to the formulation of thermoelectric materials suitable for screen printing. Such printing processes are a likely route to such thermoelectric applications as micro-generators for wireless sensor networks and medical devices, but require the development of materials that can be sintered at ambient pressure and low temperatures. Using a rapid screening process, we identify the eutectic combination of antimony and tellurium as an additive for bismuth-antimony-telluride that enables good thermoelectric performance without a high pressure step. An optimized composite of 15 weight percent Sb7.5Te92.5 in Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 is scaled up and formulated into a screen-printable paste. Samples fabricated from this paste achieve a thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of 0.74 using a maximum processing temperature of 748 K and a total thermal processing budget of 12 K-hours.

  1. High-temperature thermoelectric behavior of lead telluride

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The central problem in thermoelectric material research is the selection of ... temperature range (400–1000 K), and bismuth telluride-based materials .... parent from the results that band non-parabolicity has a significant effect on the .... M P Singh thankfully acknowledges financial assistance from the Council of Scien-.

  2. Phase transition of bismuth telluride thin films grown by MBE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fülöp, Attila; Song, Yuxin; Charpentier, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    A previously unreported phase transition between Bi2Te3 and Bi4Te3 in bismuth telluride grown by molecular beam epitaxy is recorded via XRD, AFM, and SIMS observations. This transition is found to be related to the Te/Bi beam equivalent pressure (BEP) ratio. BEP ratios below 17 favor the formation...

  3. Design and characterization of cellulose nanocrystal-enhanced epoxy hardeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane X. Peng; Robert J. Moon; Jeffrey P. Youngblood

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are renewable, sustainable, and abundant nanomaterial widely used as reinforcing fillers in the field of polymer nanocomposites. In this study, two-part epoxy systems with CNC-enhanced hardeners were fabricated. Three types of hardeners, Jeffamine D400 (JD400), diethylenetriamine (DETA), and (±)-trans-1,2- diaminocyclohexane (DACH), were...

  4. Processing and Characterization of Thin Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Anna

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) has the highest theoretical limit to conversion efficiency of single-junction photovoltaic (PV) technologies today. However, despite a maximum theoretical open-circuit voltage of 1.20 V, record devices have historically had voltages pinned around only 900 mV. Voltage losses due to high recombination rates remains to be the most complex hurdle to CdTe technology today, and the subject of on-going research in the physics PV group at Colorado State University. In this work, an ultrathin CdTe device architecture is proposed in an effort to reduce bulk recombination and boost voltages. By thinning the CdTe layer, a device's internal electric field extends fully towards the back contact. This quickly separates electrons-hole pairs throughout the bulk of the device and reduces overall recombination. Despite this advantage, very thin CdTe layers also present a unique set of optical and electrical challenges which result in performance losses not as prevalent in thicker devices. When fabricating CdTe solar cells, post-deposition treatments applied to the absorber layer are a critical step for achieving high efficiency devices. Exposure of the polycrystalline CdTe film to a chlorine species encourages the passivation of dangling bonds and larger grain formation, while copper-doping improves device uniformity and voltages. This work focuses on experiments conducted via close-space sublimation to optimize CdCl2 and CuCl treatments for thin CdTe solar cells. Sweeps of both exposure and anneal time were performed for both post-deposition treatments on CdTe devices with 1.0 mum absorber layers. The results demonstrate that thin CdTe devices require substantially less post-deposition processing than standard thicker devices as expected. Additionally, the effects of CdTe growth temperature on thin devices is briefly investigated. The results suggest that higher growth temperatures lead to both electrical and stoichiometric changes in CdTe closely associated

  5. Flexible and low-voltage integrated circuits constructed from high-performance nanocrystal transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, David K; Lai, Yuming; Diroll, Benjamin T; Murray, Christopher B; Kagan, Cherie R

    2012-01-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals are emerging as a new class of solution-processable materials for low-cost, flexible, thin-film electronics. Although these colloidal inks have been shown to form single, thin-film field-effect transistors with impressive characteristics, the use of multiple high-performance nanocrystal field-effect transistors in large-area integrated circuits has not been shown. This is needed to understand and demonstrate the applicability of these discrete nanocrystal field-effect transistors for advanced electronic technologies. Here we report solution-deposited nanocrystal integrated circuits, showing nanocrystal integrated circuit inverters, amplifiers and ring oscillators, constructed from high-performance, low-voltage, low-hysteresis CdSe nanocrystal field-effect transistors with electron mobilities of up to 22 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), current modulation >10(6) and subthreshold swing of 0.28 V dec(-1). We fabricated the nanocrystal field-effect transistors and nanocrystal integrated circuits from colloidal inks on flexible plastic substrates and scaled the devices to operate at low voltages. We demonstrate that colloidal nanocrystal field-effect transistors can be used as building blocks to construct complex integrated circuits, promising a viable material for low-cost, flexible, large-area electronics.

  6. Post-CMOS FinFET integration of bismuth telluride and antimony telluride thin-film-based thermoelectric devices on SoI substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Aktakka, Ethem Erkan; Ghafouri, Niloufar; Smith, Casey; Peterson, Rebecca Lorenz; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Najafi, Khalil

    2013-01-01

    This letter reports, for the first time, heterogeneous integration of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) and antimony telluride (Sb 2Te3) thin-film-based thermoelectric ffect transistors) via a characterized TE-film coevaporationand shadow-mask patterning

  7. Spontaneous emission enhancement of colloidal perovskite nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhili; Waks, Edo

    Halide perovskite semiconductors have emerged as prominent photovoltaic materials since their high conversion efficiency and promising light emitting materials in optoelectronics. In particular, easy-to-fabricated colloidal perovskite nanocrystals based on CsPbX3 quantum dots has been intensively investigated recently. Their luminescent wavelength could be tuned precisely by their chemical composition and size of growth. This opens new applications including light-emitting diodes, optical amplifiers and lasing since their promising performance as emitters. However, this potentially high-efficient emitter and gain material has not been fully investigated and realized in integrated photonic structures. Here we demonstrate Purcell enhancement effect of CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals by coupling to an optimized photonic crystal nanobeam cavity as a first crucial step towards realization of integrated on-chip coherent light source with low energy consumption. We show clearly highly-enhanced photoluminescent spectrum and an averaged Purcell enhancement factor of 2.9 is achieved when they are coupled to nanobeam photonic crystal cavities compared to the ones on unpatterned surface in our lifetime measurement. Our success in enhancement of emission from CsPbX3 perovskite nanocrystals paves the way towards the realization of efficient light sources for integrated optoelectronic devices with low energy consumption.

  8. About thermo-electric properties of bismuth telluride doped by gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akperov, M.M.; Ismailov, Sh.S.; Shukyurova, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Results of study of the Gd impurities effect on the bismuth telluride thermo-electric properties are presented. The experiment was carried out within the temperature range T=300-700 K. It is determined, that at temperature increase the energy level is appreciably closing up to bismuth telluride forbidden zone which makes up 0.16-0.24 eV. Such anomalous energy properties of gadolinium in telluride affect on material thermoelectric properties

  9. Light emission from silicon with tin-containing nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Roesgaard

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Tin-containing nanocrystals, embedded in silicon, have been fabricated by growing an epitaxial layer of Si1−x−ySnxCy, where x = 1.6 % and y = 0.04 % on a silicon substrate, followed by annealing at various temperatures ranging from 650 ∘C to 900 ∘C. The nanocrystal density and average diameters are determined by scanning transmission-electron microscopy to ≈1017 cm−3 and ≈5 nm, respectively. Photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrates that the light emission is very pronounced for samples annealed at 725 ∘C, and Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry shows that the nanocrystals are predominantly in the diamond-structured phase at this particular annealing temperature. The origin of the light emission is discussed.

  10. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  11. Gamma-ray peak shapes from cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namboodiri, M.N.; Lavietes, A.D.; McQuaid, J.H.

    1996-09-01

    We report the results of a study of the peak shapes in the gamma spectra measured using several 5 x 5 x 5 mm{sup 3} cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. A simple parameterization involving a Gaussian and an exponential low energy tail describes the peak shapes sell. We present the variation of the parameters with gamma energy. This type of information is very useful in the analysis of complex gamma spectra consisting of many peaks.

  12. Engineering Gold Nanorod-Based Plasmonic Nanocrystals for Optical Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonic nanocrystals have a unique ability to support localized surface plasmon resonances and exhibit rich and intriguing optical properties. Engineering plasmonic nanocrystals can maximize their potentials for specific applications. In this dissertation, we developed three unprecedented Au nanorod-based plasmonic nanocrystals through rational design of the crystal shape and/or composition, and successfully demonstrated their applications in light condensation, photothermal conversion, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The “Au nanorod-Au nanosphere dimer” nanocrystal was synthesized via the ligand-induced asymmetric growth of a Au nanosphere on a Au nanorod. This dimeric nanostructure features an extraordinary broadband optical absorption in the range of 400‒1400nm, and it proved to be an ideal black-body material for light condensation and an efficient solar-light harvester for photothermal conversion. The “Au nanorod (core) @ AuAg alloy (shell)” nanocrystal was built through the epitaxial growth of homogeneously alloyed AuAg shells on Au nanorods by precisely controlled synthesis. The resulting core-shell structured, bimetallic nanorods integrate the merits of the AuAg alloy with the advantages of anisotropic nanorods, exhibiting strong, stable and tunable surface plasmon resonances that are essential for SERS applications in a corrosive environment. The “high-index faceted Au nanorod (core) @ AuPd alloy (shell)” nanocrystal was produced via site-specific epitaxial growth of AuPd alloyed horns at the ends of Au nanorods. The AuPd alloyed horns are bound with high-index side facets, while the Au nanorod concentrates an intensive electric field at each end. This unique configuration unites highly active catalytic sites with strong SERS sites into a single entity and was demonstrated to be ideal for in situ monitoring of Pd-catalyzed reactions by SERS. The synthetic strategies developed here are promising towards the fabrication of

  13. Light-emitting diodes based on nontoxic zinc-alloyed silver-indium-sulfide (AIZS) nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Saikat; Guchhait, Asim; Pal, Amlan J.

    2014-04-01

    We report solution-processed growth of zinc-alloyed silver-indium-sulfide (AIZS) nanocrystals followed by fabrication and characterization of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on such nanostructures. While growing the low dimensional crystals, we vary the ratio between the silver and zinc contents that in turn tunes the bandgap and correspondingly their photoluminescence (PL) emission. We also dope the AIZS nanocrystals with manganese, so that their PL emission, which appears due to a radiative transition between the d-states of the dopants, becomes invariant in energy when the diameter of the quantum dots or the dopant concentration in the nanostructures varies. The LEDs fabricated with such undoped and manganese-doped AIZS nanocrystals emit electroluminescence (EL) that matches the PL spectrum of the respective nanomaterial. The results demonstrate examples of quantum dot LEDs (QDLEDs) based on nontoxic AIZS nanocrystals.

  14. Novel green synthetic strategy to prepare ZnO nanocrystals using rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) peel extract and its antibacterial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuvakkumar, R; Suresh, J; Nathanael, A Joseph; Sundrarajan, M; Hong, S I

    2014-08-01

    In the present investigation, we report a sustainable novel green synthetic strategy to synthesis zinc oxide nanocrystals. This is the first report on sustainable biosynthesis of zinc oxide nanocrystals employing Nephelium lappaceum L., peel extract as a natural ligation agent. Green synthesis of zinc oxide nanocrystals was carried out via zinc-ellagate complex formation using rambutan peel wastes. The successful formation of zinc oxide nanocrystals was confirmed employing standard characterisation studies. A possible mechanism for the formation of ZnO nanocrystals with rambutan peel extract was also proposed. The prepared ZnO nanocrystals were coated on the cotton fabric and their antibacterial activity were analyzed. ZnO nanocrystals coated cotton showed good antibacterial activity towards Escherichia coli (E. coli), gram negative bacteria and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), gram positive bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hybrid Light-Emitting Diode Enhanced With Emissive Nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopylov, Oleksii

    This thesis investigates a new type of white light emitting hybrid diode, composed of a light emitting GaN/InGaN LED and a layer of semiconductor nanocrystals for color conversion. Unlike standard white LEDs, the device is configured to achieve high color conversion efficiency via non-radiative e......This thesis investigates a new type of white light emitting hybrid diode, composed of a light emitting GaN/InGaN LED and a layer of semiconductor nanocrystals for color conversion. Unlike standard white LEDs, the device is configured to achieve high color conversion efficiency via non...... of the hybrid diode fabrication including process techniques for GaN LED and incorporation of the nanocrystals are presented with the emphasis on the differences with standard LED processing. Results and analysis of optical and electrical characterization including photoluminescence (PL), micro-PL, time......-resolved PL and electroluminescence (EL) together with current-voltage characteristics are presented to evaluate the device performance. A clear evidence of non-radiative energy transfer was seen in the carrier dynamics of both the LED and the nanocrystals when the quantum well – nanocrystals separation...

  16. Solid-state cadmium telluride radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Yoji; Kitamoto, Hisashi; Hosomatsu, Haruo

    1984-09-01

    The growth of CdTe single crystal and its application to CdTe detector array was studied for X-ray computed tomography (XCT) equipment. A p-type CdTe single crystal with 10/sup 4/ ohm.cm specific resistivity was grown in a quartz ampoule under vapor pressure control of Cd in a vertical Bridgman furnace. An 18-element detector array was fabricated with this single crystal. The detector was operated with no bias and the sensitivity was confirmed to be between 2.8 x 10/sup -12/ and 14 x 10/sup -12/ A.h/(R.mm/sup 2/). Commercial CdTe single crystal was used to manufacture as 560-element detector array for XCT. Results show that CdTe detector is sensitive, linear and has high resolution.

  17. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Shara Carol [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices

  18. Photoemission studies of semiconductor nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamad, K.S.; Roth, R.; Alivisatos, A.P.

    1997-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals have been the focus of much attention in the last ten years due predominantly to their size dependent optical properties. Namely, the band gap of nanocrystals exhibits a shift to higher energy with decreasing size due to quantum confinement effects. Research in this field has employed primarily optical techniques to study nanocrystals, and in this respect this system has been investigated extensively. In addition, one is able to synthesize monodisperse, crystalline particles of CdS, CdSe, Si, InP, InAs, as well as CdS/HgS/CdS and CdSe/CdS composites. However, optical spectroscopies have proven ambiguous in determining the degree to which electronic excitations are interior or surface admixtures or giving a complete picture of the density of states. Photoemission is a useful technique for understanding the electronic structure of nanocrystals and the effects of quantum confinement, chemical environments of the nanocrystals, and surface coverages. Of particular interest to the authors is the surface composition and structure of these particles, for they have found that much of the behavior of nanocrystals is governed by their surface. Previously, the authors had performed x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) on CdSe nanocrystals. XPS has proven to be a powerful tool in that it allows one to determine the composition of the nanocrystal surface

  19. Method of synthesizing pyrite nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadia, Cyrus; Wu, Yue

    2013-04-23

    A method of synthesizing pyrite nanocrystals is disclosed which in one embodiment includes forming a solution of iron (III) diethyl dithiophosphate and tetra-alkyl-ammonium halide in water. The solution is heated under pressure. Pyrite nanocrystal particles are then recovered from the solution.

  20. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruska, Melissa A [Los Alamos, NM; Klimov, Victor L [Los Alamos, NM

    2007-06-05

    The present invention is directed to solid composites including colloidal nanocrystals within a sol-gel host or matrix and to processes of forming such solid composites. The present invention is further directed to alcohol soluble colloidal nanocrystals useful in formation of sol-gel based solid composites.

  1. Growth and characterization of bismuth telluride nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picht, Oliver

    2010-05-26

    Polycrystalline Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires are electrochemically grown in ion track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Potentiostatic growth is demonstrated in templates of various thicknesses ranging from 10 to 100 {mu}m. The smallest observed nanowire diameters are 20 nm in thin membranes and approx. 140-180 nm in thicker membranes. The influence of the various deposition parameters on the nanowire growth rate is presented. Slower growth rates are attained by selective change of deposition potentials and lower temperatures. Nanowires synthesized at slower growth rates have shown to possess a higher degree of crystalline order and smoother surface contours. With respect to structural properties, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy verified the growth of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and evidenced the stability of specific properties, e.g. grain size or preferential orientation, with regard to variations in the deposition conditions. The interdependency of the fabrication parameters, i.e. temperature, deposition potential and nanochannel diameters, is demonstrated for wires grown in 30 {mu}m thick membranes. It is visible from diffraction analysis that texture is tunable by the growth conditions but depends also on the size of the nanochannels in the template. Both (015) and (110) reflexes are observed for the nanowire arrays. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis further points out that variation of nanochannel size could lead to a change in elemental composition of the nanowires. (orig.)

  2. Growth and characterization of bismuth telluride nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picht, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Polycrystalline Bi 2 Te 3 nanowires are electrochemically grown in ion track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Potentiostatic growth is demonstrated in templates of various thicknesses ranging from 10 to 100 μm. The smallest observed nanowire diameters are 20 nm in thin membranes and approx. 140-180 nm in thicker membranes. The influence of the various deposition parameters on the nanowire growth rate is presented. Slower growth rates are attained by selective change of deposition potentials and lower temperatures. Nanowires synthesized at slower growth rates have shown to possess a higher degree of crystalline order and smoother surface contours. With respect to structural properties, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy verified the growth of Bi 2 Te 3 and evidenced the stability of specific properties, e.g. grain size or preferential orientation, with regard to variations in the deposition conditions. The interdependency of the fabrication parameters, i.e. temperature, deposition potential and nanochannel diameters, is demonstrated for wires grown in 30 μm thick membranes. It is visible from diffraction analysis that texture is tunable by the growth conditions but depends also on the size of the nanochannels in the template. Both (015) and (110) reflexes are observed for the nanowire arrays. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis further points out that variation of nanochannel size could lead to a change in elemental composition of the nanowires. (orig.)

  3. Method of Creating Micro-scale Silver Telluride Grains Covered with Bismuth Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung (Inventor); Choi, Sang Hyouk (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Lee, Kunik (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided is a method of enhancing thermoelectric performance by surrounding crystalline semiconductors with nanoparticles by contacting a bismuth telluride material with a silver salt under a substantially inert atmosphere and a temperature approximately near the silver salt decomposition temperature; and recovering a metallic bismuth decorated material comprising silver telluride crystal grains.

  4. Electrical properties of cadmium telluride films doped with antimony

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atdaev, B.S.; Garyagdyev, G.; Grin', V.F.; Noskov, A.I.

    1989-01-01

    Effect of cadmium telluride doping with antimony on electric and photoelectric properties is investigated. Temperature dependence of dark (σ d ) and photoconductivity (σ p ) during excitation from the range of proper absorption in the temperature range 77-300 K and spectral distribution of photoconductivity at 300 K are investigated. It is shown that in the process of doping antimony diffusses intensively over CdTe grain boundaries, decreasing potential barriers between them and due to diffusion into CdTe grains it changes their electrical properties. The acceptor character of antimony impurity can be caused by antimony diffusion into tellurium sublattice owing to proximity of their ionic and covalent radii

  5. XAFS studies of nickel-doped lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radisavljevic, Ivana; Novakovic, Nikola; Ivanovic, Nenad; Romcevic, Nebojsa; Manasijevic, Miodrag; Mahnke, Heinz-Eberhard

    2009-01-01

    The problem of impurities and defect states in lead telluride-based semiconductors is of crucial importance for their practical applications. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) techniques are capable to address some of the key issues regarding impurities position, their valent state, as well as the local structural changes of the host lattice in the immediate surrounding of the impurity atoms. In this paper we present the results of the Ni K-absorption edge XAFS studies of Ni-doped PbTe at different temperatures. Analysis of near edge and extended XAFS regions of the measured spectra provided information about exact local environment and lattice ordering around Ni atoms.

  6. In Situ Preparation of Metal Halide Perovskite Nanocrystal Thin Films for Improved Light-Emitting Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lianfeng; Yeh, Yao-Wen; Tran, Nhu L; Wu, Fan; Xiao, Zhengguo; Kerner, Ross A; Lin, YunHui L; Scholes, Gregory D; Yao, Nan; Rand, Barry P

    2017-04-25

    Hybrid organic-inorganic halide perovskite semiconductors are attractive candidates for optoelectronic applications, such as photovoltaics, light-emitting diodes, and lasers. Perovskite nanocrystals are of particular interest, where electrons and holes can be confined spatially, promoting radiative recombination. However, nanocrystalline films based on traditional colloidal nanocrystal synthesis strategies suffer from the use of long insulating ligands, low colloidal nanocrystal concentration, and significant aggregation during film formation. Here, we demonstrate a facile method for preparing perovskite nanocrystal films in situ and that the electroluminescence of light-emitting devices can be enhanced up to 40-fold through this nanocrystal film formation strategy. Briefly, the method involves the use of bulky organoammonium halides as additives to confine crystal growth of perovskites during film formation, achieving CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 and CH 3 NH 3 PbBr 3 perovskite nanocrystals with an average crystal size of 5.4 ± 0.8 nm and 6.4 ± 1.3 nm, respectively, as confirmed through transmission electron microscopy measurements. Additive-confined perovskite nanocrystals show significantly improved photoluminescence quantum yield and decay lifetime. Finally, we demonstrate highly efficient CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 red/near-infrared LEDs and CH 3 NH 3 PbBr 3 green LEDs based on this strategy, achieving an external quantum efficiency of 7.9% and 7.0%, respectively, which represent a 40-fold and 23-fold improvement over control devices fabricated without the additives.

  7. Biomolecular Assembly of Gold Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micheel, Christine Marya [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-05-20

    Over the past ten years, methods have been developed to construct discrete nanostructures using nanocrystals and biomolecules. While these frequently consist of gold nanocrystals and DNA, semiconductor nanocrystals as well as antibodies and enzymes have also been used. One example of discrete nanostructures is dimers of gold nanocrystals linked together with complementary DNA. This type of nanostructure is also known as a nanocrystal molecule. Discrete nanostructures of this kind have a number of potential applications, from highly parallel self-assembly of electronics components and rapid read-out of DNA computations to biological imaging and a variety of bioassays. My research focused in three main areas. The first area, the refinement of electrophoresis as a purification and characterization method, included application of agarose gel electrophoresis to the purification of discrete gold nanocrystal/DNA conjugates and nanocrystal molecules, as well as development of a more detailed understanding of the hydrodynamic behavior of these materials in gels. The second area, the development of methods for quantitative analysis of transmission electron microscope data, used computer programs written to find pair correlations as well as higher order correlations. With these programs, it is possible to reliably locate and measure nanocrystal molecules in TEM images. The final area of research explored the use of DNA ligase in the formation of nanocrystal molecules. Synthesis of dimers of gold particles linked with a single strand of DNA possible through the use of DNA ligase opens the possibility for amplification of nanostructures in a manner similar to polymerase chain reaction. These three areas are discussed in the context of the work in the Alivisatos group, as well as the field as a whole.

  8. Application of cadmium telluride detectors to high energy computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.; Thomas, G.; Cuzin, M.; Verger, L.

    1991-01-01

    15 years ago, Cadmium Telluride detectors have been investigated in our laboratory as possible detectors for medical scanners [1]. Today most of these machines are using high pressure Xenon gas as multicells detectors, BGO or CdWO 4 scintillators for industrial computerized tomography. Xenon gas detectors are well suited for detection of 100 KeV X-rays and enables to build 1000 cells homogeneous detector with a dynamic range of 3 decades. BGO and CdWO 4 scintillators, associated with photomultipliers or photodiodes are used for higher energy (400 KeV). They present a low afterglow and a dynamic range of 4 to 5 decades. Non destructive testing of very absorbing objects (eg 2 m diameter solid rocket motor) by X-ray tomography requires much higher energy X-rays (16 MeV) and doses up to 12000 rads/min at 1 meter. For this application Cadmium Telluride detectors operating as photoconductors are well suited. A prototype of tomograph machine, able to scan 0.5 m diameter high density objects has been realized with 25 CdTe detectors (25x15x0.8 mm 3 ). It produces good quality 1024x1024 tomographic images

  9. Kelvin probe studies of cesium telluride photocathode for AWA photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisniewski, Eric E., E-mail: ewisniew@anl.gov [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Velazquez, Daniel [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Yusof, Zikri, E-mail: zyusof@hawk.iit.edu [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Spentzouris, Linda; Terry, Jeff [Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Sarkar, Tapash J. [Rice University, 6100 Main, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Harkay, Katherine [Accelerator Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-05-21

    Cesium telluride is an important photocathode as an electron source for particle accelerators. It has a relatively high quantum efficiency (>1%), is sufficiently robust in a photoinjector, and has a long lifetime. This photocathode is grown in-house for a new Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) beamline to produce high charge per bunch (≈50nC) in a long bunch train. Here, we present a study of the work function of cesium telluride photocathode using the Kelvin probe technique. The study includes an investigation of the correlation between the quantum efficiency and the work function, the effect of photocathode aging, the effect of UV exposure on the work function, and the evolution of the work function during and after photocathode rejuvenation via heating. -- Highlights: ► The correlation between Quantum Efficiency (QE) and work function. ► How QE and work function evolve together. ► Rejuvenation of the photocathode via heating and the effect on work function. ► The effects on the work function due to exposure to UV light.

  10. Magneto-photoconductivity of three dimensional topological insulator bismuth telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bingchen; Eginligil, Mustafa; Yu, Ting

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic field dependence of the photocurrent in a 3D topological insulator is studied. Among the 3D topological insulators bismuth telluride has unique hexagonal warping and spin texture which has been studied by photoemission, scanning tunnelling microscopy and transport. Here, we report on low temperature magneto-photoconductivity, up to 7 T, of two metallic bismuth telluride topological insulator samples with 68 and 110 nm thicknesses excited by 2.33 eV photon energy along the magnetic field perpendicular to the sample plane. At 4 K, both samples exhibit negative magneto-photoconductance below 4 T, which is as a result of weak-antilocalization of Dirac fermions similar to the previous observations in electrical transport. However the thinner sample shows positive magneto-photoconductance above 4 T. This can be attributed to the coupling of surface states. On the other hand, the thicker sample shows no positive magneto-photoconductance up to 7 T since there is only one surface state at play. By fitting the magneto-photoconductivity data of the thicker sample to the localization formula, we obtain weak antilocalization behaviour at 4, 10, and 20 K, as expected; however, weak localization behaviour at 30 K, which is a sign of surface states masked by bulk states. Also, from the temperature dependence of phase coherence length bulk carrier-carrier interaction is identified separately from the surface states. Therefore, it is possible to distinguish surface states by magneto-photoconductivity at low temperature, even in metallic samples.

  11. Density-controllable nonvolatile memory devices having metal nanocrystals through chemical synthesis and assembled by spin-coating technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guangli; Chen Yubin; Shi Yi; Pu Lin; Pan Lijia; Zhang Rong; Zheng Youdou

    2010-01-01

    A novel two-step method is employed, for the first time, to fabricate nonvolatile memory devices that have metal nanocrystals. First, size-averaged Au nanocrystals are synthesized chemically; second, they are assembled into memory devices by a spin-coating technique at room temperature. This attractive approach makes it possible to tailor the diameter and control the density of nanocrystals individually. In addition, processes at room temperature prevent Au diffusion, which is a main concern for the application of metal nanocrystal-based memory. The experimental results, both the morphology characterization and the electrical measurements, reveal that there is an optimum density of nanocrystal monolayer to balance between long data retention and a large hysteresis memory window. At the same time, density-controllable devices could also feed the preferential emphasis on either memory window or retention time. All these facts confirm the advantages and novelty of our two-step method. (semiconductor devices)

  12. Discrete Charge Storage Nonvolatile Memory Based on Si Nanocrystals with Nitridation Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xian-Gao, Zhang; Kun-Ji, Chen; Zhong-Hui, Fang; Xin-Ye, Qian; Guang-Yuan, Liu; Xiao-Fan, Jiang; Zhong-Yuan, Ma; Jun, Xu; Xin-Fan, Huang; Jian-Xin, Ji; Fei, He; Kuang-Bao, Song; Jun, Zhang; Hui, Wan; Rong-Hua, Wang

    2010-01-01

    A nonvolatile memory device with nitrided Si nanocrystals embedded in a Boating gate was fabricated. The uniform Si nanocrystals with high density (3 × 10 11 cm −2 ) were deposited on ultra-thin tunnel oxide layer (∼ 3 nm) and followed by a nitridation treatment in ammonia to form a thin silicon nitride layer on the surface of nanocrystals. A memory window of 2.4 V was obtained and it would be larger than 1.3 V after ten years from the extrapolated retention data. The results can be explained by the nitrogen passivation of the surface traps of Si nanocrystals, which slows the charge loss rate. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  13. Synthesis and Doping of Silicon Nanocrystals for Versatile Nanocrystal Inks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Nicolaas Johannes

    The impact of nanotechnology on our society is getting larger every year. Electronics are becoming smaller and more powerful, the "Internet of Things" is all around us, and data generation is increasing exponentially. None of this would have been possible without the developments in nanotechnology. Crystalline semiconductor nanoparticles (nanocrystals) are one of the latest developments in the field of nanotechnology. This thesis addresses three important challenges for the transition of silicon nanocrystals from the lab bench to the marketplace: A better understanding of the nanocrystal synthesis was obtained, the electronic properties of the nanocrystals were characterized and tuned, and novel silicon nanocrystal inks were formed and applied using simple coating technologies. Plasma synthesis of nanocrystals has numerous advantages over traditional solution-based synthesis methods. While the formation of nanoparticles in low pressure nonthermal plasmas is well known, the heating mechanism leading to their crystallization is poorly understood. A combination of comprehensive plasma characterization with a nanoparticle heating model presented here reveals the underlying plasma physics leading to crystallization. The model predicts that the nanoparticles reach temperatures as high as 900 K in the plasma as a result of heating reactions on the nanoparticle surface. These temperatures are well above the gas temperature and sufficient for complete nanoparticle crystallization. Moving the field of plasma nanoparticle synthesis to atmospheric pressures is important for lowering its cost and making the process attractive for industrial applications. The heating and charging model for silicon nanoparticles was adapted in Chapter 3 to study plasmas maintained over a wide range of pressures (10 -- 105 Pa). The model considers three collisionality regimes and determines the dominant contribution of each regime under various plasma conditions. Strong nanoparticle cooling at

  14. Flexible, High-Speed CdSe Nanocrystal Integrated Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinner, F Scott; Lai, Yuming; Straus, Daniel B; Diroll, Benjamin T; Kim, David K; Murray, Christopher B; Kagan, Cherie R

    2015-10-14

    We report large-area, flexible, high-speed analog and digital colloidal CdSe nanocrystal integrated circuits operating at low voltages. Using photolithography and a newly developed process to fabricate vertical interconnect access holes, we scale down device dimensions, reducing parasitic capacitances and increasing the frequency of circuit operation, and scale up device fabrication over 4 in. flexible substrates. We demonstrate amplifiers with ∼7 kHz bandwidth, ring oscillators with <10 μs stage delays, and NAND and NOR logic gates.

  15. Cadmium Telluride-Titanium Dioxide Nanocomposite for Photodegradation of Organic Substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontam, Areeporn; Khaorapapong, Nithima; Ogawa, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium telluride-titanium dioxide nanocomposite was prepared by hydrothermal reaction of sol-gel derived titanium dioxide and organically modified cadmium telluride. The crystallinity of titanium dioxide in the nanocomposite was higher than that of pure titanium dioxide obtained by the reaction under the same temperature and pressure conditions, showing that cadmium telluride induced the crystallization of titanium dioxide. Diffuse reflectance spectrum of the nanocomposite showed the higher absorption efficiency in the UV-visible region due to band-gap excitation of titanium dioxide. The nanocomposite significantly showed the improvement of photocatalytic activity for 4-chlorophenol with UV light.

  16. Physical and optical properties of size-selective CdTe nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fok, Alice [Department of Chemistry, The City College of New York, CUNY New York, NY 10031 (United States); Morales, Jorge [Department of Biology, City College of New York, CUNY New York, NY 10031 (United States); Sohel, Mohammad [Natural Sciences Department, Hostos College, CUNY Bronx, NY 10451 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Physical and optical properties of colloidal cadmium telluride nanocrystals (CdTe NCs) were investigated. The CdTe NCs were synthesized by reacting elemental tellurium dissolved in tributylphosphine with a mixture of cadmium oxide, octadecene, and oleic acid. These NCs, which were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are spherical and ranged from 5 to 7 nm in diameter. The identity of the compound post-synthesis was confirmed by X-Ray diffraction (XRD) patterns. UV-Vis and photoluminescence (PL) properties as grown and pure CdTe samples were investigated. Bright excitonic photoluminescence emission was observed (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Enhanced thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride-organic hybrid films via graphene doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Airul Azha Abd; Umar, Akrajas Ali; Salleh, Muhamad Mat; Chen, Xiaomei; Oyama, Munetaka

    2016-01-01

    The thermoelectric properties of graphene-doped bismuth telluride-PEDOT:PSS-glycerol (hybrid) films were investigated. Prior to the study, p-type and n-type hybrid films were prepared by doping the PEDOT:PSS-glycerol with the p- and n-type bismuth telluride. Graphene-doped hybrid films were prepared by adding graphene particles of concentration ranging from 0.02 to 0.1 wt% into the hybrid films. Films of graphene-doped hybrid system were then prepared on a glass substrate using a spin-coating technique. It was found that the electrical conductivity of the hybrid films increases with the increasing of the graphene-dopant concentration and optimum at 0.08 wt% for both p- and n-type films, namely 400 and 195 S/cm, respectively. Further increasing in the concentration caused a decreasing in the electrical conductivity. Analysis of the thermoelectric properties of the films obtained that the p-type film exhibited significant improvement in its thermoelectric properties, where the thermoelectric properties increased with the increasing of the doping concentration. Meanwhile, for the case of n-type film, graphene doping showed a negative effect to the thermoelectrical properties, where the thermoelectric properties decreased with the increasing of doping concentration. Seebeck coefficient (and power factor) for optimum p-type and n-type hybrid thin films, i.e., doped with 0.08 wt% of graphene, is 20 μV/K (and 160 μW m -1 K -2 ) and 10 μV/K (and 19.5 μW m -1 K -2 ), respectively. The obtained electrical conductivity and thermoelectric properties of graphene-doped hybrid film are interestingly several orders higher than the pristine hybrid films. A thermocouple device fabricated utilizing the p- and n-type graphene-doped hybrid films can generate an electric voltage as high as 2.2 mV under a temperature difference between the hot-side and the cold-side terminal as only low as 55 K. This is equivalent to the output power as high as 24.2 nW (for output load as high as 50

  18. High-performance supercapacitors based on nanocomposites of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanocrystals and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaolei; Chen, Zheng; Lu, Yunfeng [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Li, Ge [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai (China); Augustyn, Veronica; Dunn, Bruce [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ma, Xueming [Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai (China); Wang, Ge [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China)

    2011-11-15

    Nanocomposites of CNTs and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanocrystals were fabricated exhibiting excellent conductivity, high specific capacitance, and large voltage window, which led to successful fabrication of asymmetric supercapacitors with high energy densities, power densities, and cycling stability. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Cellulose nanocrystal submonolayers by spin coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kontturi, E.J.; Johansson, L.S.; Kontturi, K.S.; Ahonen, P.; Thune, P.C.; Laine, J.

    2007-01-01

    Dilute concentrations of cellulose nanocrystal solutions were spin coated onto different substrates to investigate the effect of the substrate on the nanocrystal submonolayers. Three substrates were probed: silica, titania, and amorphous cellulose. According to atomic force microscopy (AFM) images,

  20. Electrochemical Studies of Lead Telluride Behavior in Acidic Nitrate Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudnik E.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemistry of lead telluride stationary electrode was studied in nitric acid solutions of pH 1.5-3.0. E-pH diagram for Pb-Te-H2O system was calculated. Results of cyclic voltammetry of Pb, Te and PbTe were discussed in correlation with thermodynamic predictions. Anodic dissolution of PbTe electrode at potential approx. -100÷50 mV (SCE resulted in tellurium formation, while above 300 mV TeO2 was mainly produced. The latter could dissolve to HTeO+2 under acidic electrolyte, but it was inhibited by increased pH of the bath.

  1. Effect of thallium impurity on hole scattering in lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajdanov, V.I.; Nemov, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    Hole mobility in PbTe monocrystalline specimens in the temperature range from 4.2 to 300 K has been investigated. Detected is a sharp increase in scattering cross section of light and heavy holes in the specimens having the Hall hole concentration p approximately (5+-9)x10 19 cm -3 explained by resonant scattering into a band of quasilocal states of thallium located lower than the ceiling of heavy carrier zone by 0.01+-0.01 eV. Very large differences in resonant scattering of current carriers into the quasilocal states of In and Tl in PbTe result from the inertial polarizability of a crystal. The same mechanism is used to explain long-lived relaxation of zone electron concentration in lead telluride and Pbsub(1-x)Snsub(x)Te doped with indium [ru

  2. Study on thermal annealing of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Fochuk, P.M.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Horace, J.; McCall, B.; Gul, R.; Xu, L.; Kopach, O.V.; James, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) has attracted increasing interest with its promising potential as a room-temperature nuclear-radiation-detector material. However, different defects in CZT crystals, especially Te inclusions and dislocations, can degrade the performance of CZT detectors. Post-growth annealing is a good approach potentially to eliminate the deleterious influence of these defects. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we built up different facilities for investigating post-growth annealing of CZT. Here, we report our latest experimental results. Cd-vapor annealing reduces the density of Te inclusions, while large temperature gradient promotes the migration of small-size Te inclusions. Simultaneously, the annealing lowers the density of dislocations. However, only-Cd-vapor annealing decreases the resistivity, possibly reflecting the introduction of extra Cd in the lattice. Subsequent Te-vapor annealing is needed to ensure the recovery of the resistivity after removing the Te inclusions.

  3. Modelling of illuminated current–voltage characteristics to evaluate leakage currents in long wavelength infrared mercury cadmium telluride photovoltaic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopal, Vishnu; Qiu, WeiCheng; Hu, Weida

    2014-01-01

    The current–voltage characteristics of long wavelength mercury cadmium telluride infrared detectors have been studied using a recently suggested method for modelling of illuminated photovoltaic detectors. Diodes fabricated on in-house grown arsenic and vacancy doped epitaxial layers were evaluated for their leakage currents. The thermal diffusion, generation–recombination (g-r), and ohmic currents were found as principal components of diode current besides a component of photocurrent due to illumination. In addition, both types of diodes exhibited an excess current component whose growth with the applied bias voltage did not match the expected growth of trap-assisted-tunnelling current. Instead, it was found to be the best described by an exponential function of the type, I excess  = I r0  + K 1 exp (K 2 V), where I r0 , K 1 , and K 2 are fitting parameters and V is the applied bias voltage. A study of the temperature dependence of the diode current components and the excess current provided the useful clues about the source of origin of excess current. It was found that the excess current in diodes fabricated on arsenic doped epitaxial layers has its origin in the source of ohmic shunt currents. Whereas, the source of excess current in diodes fabricated on vacancy doped epitaxial layers appeared to be the avalanche multiplication of photocurrent. The difference in the behaviour of two types of diodes has been attributed to the difference in the quality of epitaxial layers

  4. Colloidal nanocrystals in epitactical semiconductor structures; Kolloidale Nanokristalle in epitaktischen Halbleiterstrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arens, C.

    2007-10-15

    in this thesis for the first time a new method for the fabrication of semiconductor quantum-dot structures was successfully applied. thereby colloidal CdSe nanocrystals have been imbedded by means of molecular-beam epitaxy into an epitactical ZnSe crystal matrix. The properties of the epitactically overgrown nanocrystals are elaborated in this thesis. The distribution of the nanocrystals on ZnSe surfaces dependes on the stressed state of the ZnSe layer. Nanocrystals on stressed ZnSe grow in agglomerates on its surface. Individual nanocrystals however can only be deposited on relaxed ZnSe. In-situ studies by means of reflection of high-energetically diffracted electrons show in both cases that under stoichiometrical conditions the ZnSe covering layer grows two-dimensionally. It is epitactic what is proved by means of highly resolving X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The nanocrystals are after the overgrowth with ZnSe optically activ.

  5. Acoustic study of nano-crystal embedded PbO–P2O5 glass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Keywords. Glasses; acoustical properties; nanostructured materials; glass ceramic. 1. Introduction. During the last two decades, studies of different physical properties of nano-crystal embedded glass matrix have attracted attention of technologists as well as scientists for fabrication of glass ceramic through controlled crysta-.

  6. Characterization of CdSe-nanocrystals used in semiconductors for aerospace applications: Production and optical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maroof A. Hegazy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanocrystals (NC’s are the materials with dimensions less than 10 nm. When the dimensions of nanocrystals are reduced the bulk bohr diameter, the photo generated electron-hole pair becomes confined and nanocrystal exhibits size dependent upon optical properties. This work is focused on the studying of CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals. These nanocrystals are considered as one of the most widely studies semiconductors because of their size – tunable optical properties from the visible spectrum. CdSe-nanocrystals are produced and obtained throughout the experimental setup initiated at Nano-NRIAG Unit (NNU, which has been constructed and assembled at NRIAG institute. This unit has a specific characterization for preparing chemical compositions, which may be used for solar cell fabrications and space science technology. The materials prepared included cadmium oxide and selinid have sizes ranging between 2.27 nm and 3.75 nm. CdSe-nanocrystals are synthesized in “TOP/TOPO (tri–octyl phosphine/tri–octyl phosphine oxide. Diagnostic tools, include UV analysis, TEM microscope, and X-ray diffraction, which are considered for the analytical studies of the obtained materials. The results show that, in this size regime, the generated particles have unique optical properties, which is achieved from the UV analysis. Also, the TEM image analysis shows the size and shape of the produced particles. These studies are carried out to optimize the photoluminescent efficiency of these nanoparticles. Moreover, the data revealed that, the grain size of nanocrystals is dependent upon the growth time in turn, it leads to a change in the energy gap. Some applications of this class of materials are outlined.

  7. Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals in the Research Spotlight: Stability and Defect Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This Perspective outlines basic structural and optical properties of lead halide perovskite colloidal nanocrystals, highlighting differences and similarities between them and conventional II–VI and III–V semiconductor quantum dots. A detailed insight into two important issues inherent to lead halide perovskite nanocrystals then follows, namely, the advantages of defect tolerance and the necessity to improve their stability in environmental conditions. The defect tolerance of lead halide perovskites offers an impetus to search for similar attributes in other related heavy metal-free compounds. We discuss the origins of the significantly blue-shifted emission from CsPbBr3 nanocrystals and the synthetic strategies toward fabrication of stable perovskite nanocrystal materials with emission in the red and infrared parts of the optical spectrum, which are related to fabrication of mixed cation compounds guided by Goldschmidt tolerance factor considerations. We conclude with the view on perspectives of use of the colloidal perovskite nanocrystals for applications in backlighting of liquid-crystal TV displays. PMID:28920080

  8. Effects of hydrazine on the solvothermal synthesis of Cu2ZnSnSe4 and Cu2CdSnSe4 nanocrystals for particle-based deposition of films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, Ming-Hung; Fu, Yaw-Shyan; Shih, Cheng-Hung; Kuo, Chun-Cheng; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Lin, Wen-Tai

    2013-01-01

    The effects of hydrazine on the synthesis of Cu 2 ZnSnSe 4 (CZTSe) and Cu 2 CdSnSe 4 (CCTSe) nanocrystals in an autoclave as a function of temperature and time were explored. On heating at 190 °C for 24-72 h, pure CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals could readily grow in the hydrazine-added solution, while in the hydrazine-free solution the intermediate phases such as ZnSe, Cu 2 Se, and Cu 2 SnSe 3 , and Cu 2 SnSe 3 and CdSe associated with the CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals grew, respectively. This result reveals that hydrazine can speed up the synthesis of pure CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals via a solvothermal process. The mechanisms for the hydrazine-enhanced growth of CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals were discussed. The pure CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals were subsequently fabricated to the smooth films by spin coating without further annealing in selenium atmosphere. This processing may be beneficial to the fabrication of the absorber layer for solar cells and thermoelectric devices. - Highlights: • Hydrazine enhances the growth of pure Cu 2 ZnSnSe 4 and Cu 2 CdSnSe 4 nanocrystals. • The nanocrystals can be fabricated to films by spin coating without annealing. • This solvothermal processing is promising for the fabrication of thin film devices

  9. Effects of hydrazine on the solvothermal synthesis of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}CdSnSe{sub 4} nanocrystals for particle-based deposition of films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Ming-Hung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China); Fu, Yaw-Shyan, E-mail: ysfu@mail.nutn.edu.tw [Department of Greenergy, National University of Tainan, Tainan, Taiwan 700 (China); Shih, Cheng-Hung; Kuo, Chun-Cheng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China); Guo, Tzung-Fang [Department of Photonics, Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China); Lin, Wen-Tai, E-mail: wtlin@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China)

    2013-10-01

    The effects of hydrazine on the synthesis of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} (CZTSe) and Cu{sub 2}CdSnSe{sub 4} (CCTSe) nanocrystals in an autoclave as a function of temperature and time were explored. On heating at 190 °C for 24-72 h, pure CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals could readily grow in the hydrazine-added solution, while in the hydrazine-free solution the intermediate phases such as ZnSe, Cu{sub 2}Se, and Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3}, and Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3} and CdSe associated with the CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals grew, respectively. This result reveals that hydrazine can speed up the synthesis of pure CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals via a solvothermal process. The mechanisms for the hydrazine-enhanced growth of CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals were discussed. The pure CZTSe and CCTSe nanocrystals were subsequently fabricated to the smooth films by spin coating without further annealing in selenium atmosphere. This processing may be beneficial to the fabrication of the absorber layer for solar cells and thermoelectric devices. - Highlights: • Hydrazine enhances the growth of pure Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}CdSnSe{sub 4} nanocrystals. • The nanocrystals can be fabricated to films by spin coating without annealing. • This solvothermal processing is promising for the fabrication of thin film devices.

  10. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-06-28

    Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.

  11. Flexible and fragmentable tandem photosensitive nanocrystal skins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, S.; Uran, C.; Bozok, B.; Gungor, K.; Kelestemur, Y.; Lesnyak, V.; Gaponik, N.; Eychmüller, A.; Demir, H. V.

    2016-02-01

    We proposed and demonstrated the first account of large-area, semi-transparent, tandem photosensitive nanocrystal skins (PNSs) constructed on flexible substrates operating on the principle of photogenerated potential buildup, which avoid the need for applying an external bias and circumvent the current-matching limitation between junctions. We successfully fabricated and operated the tandem PNSs composed of single monolayers of colloidal water-soluble CdTe and CdHgTe nanocrystals (NCs) in adjacent junctions on a Kapton polymer tape. Owing to the usage of a single NC layer in each junction, noise generation was significantly reduced while keeping the resulting PNS films considerably transparent. In each junction, photogenerated excitons are dissociated at the interface of the semi-transparent Al electrode and the NC layer, with holes migrating to the contact electrode and electrons trapped in the NCs. As a result, the tandem PNSs lead to an open-circuit photovoltage buildup equal to the sum of those of the two single junctions, exhibiting a total voltage buildup of 128.4 mV at an excitation intensity of 75.8 μW cm-2 at 350 nm. Furthermore, we showed that these flexible PNSs could be bent over 3.5 mm radius of curvature and cut out in arbitrary shapes without damaging the operation of individual parts and without introducing any significant loss in the total sensitivity. These findings indicate that the NC skins are promising as building blocks to make low-cost, flexible, large-area UV/visible sensing platforms with highly efficient full-spectrum conversion.We proposed and demonstrated the first account of large-area, semi-transparent, tandem photosensitive nanocrystal skins (PNSs) constructed on flexible substrates operating on the principle of photogenerated potential buildup, which avoid the need for applying an external bias and circumvent the current-matching limitation between junctions. We successfully fabricated and operated the tandem PNSs composed of

  12. PbSe Nanocrystal Excitonic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Joshua J.

    2009-11-11

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of colloidal PbSe nanocrystal (NC)-based photovoltaic test structures that exhibit an excitonic solar cell mechanism. Charge extraction from the NC active layer is driven by a photoinduced chemical potential energy gradient at the nanostructured heterojunction. By minimizing perturbation to PbSe NC energy levels and thereby gaining insight into the "intrinsic" photovoltaic properties and charge transfer mechanism of PbSe NC, we show a direct correlation between interfacial energy level offsets and photovoltaic device performance. Size dependent PbSe NC energy levels were determined by cyclic voltammetry and optical spectroscopy and correlated to photovoltaic measurements. Photovoltaic test structures were fabricated from PbSe NC films sandwiched between layers of ZnO nanoparticles and PEDOT:PSS as electron and hole transporting elements, respectively. The device current-voltage characteristics suggest a charge separation mechanism that Is distinct from previously reported Schottky devices and consistent with signatures of excitonic solar cells. Remarkably, despite the limitation of planar junction structure, and without film thickness optimization, the best performing device shows a 1-sun power conversion efficiency of 3.4%, ranking among the highest performing NC-based solar cells reported to date. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  13. Formation of nanocrystals embedded in a silicon nitride film at a low temperature ({<=}200 deg. C)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Tae-Hwan [Department of Nano Science and Technology, University of Seoul, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Wan-Shick [Department of Nano Science and Technology, University of Seoul, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: wshong@uos.ac.kr

    2008-12-15

    Silicon-rich silicon nitride films with embedded silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) were fabricated successfully on plastic substrates at a low temperature by catalytic chemical vapor deposition. A mixture of SiH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2} was used as a source gas. Formation of the silicon nanocrystals was analyzed by photoluminescence spectra and was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The formation of Si NCs required an H{sub 2}/SiH{sub 4} mixture ratio that was higher than four.

  14. Enhanced light emission in photonic crystal nanocavities with Erbium-doped silicon nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarova, Maria; Sih, Vanessa; Vuckovic, Jelena; Warga, Joe; Li Rui; Dal Negro, Luca

    2008-01-01

    Photonic crystal nanocavities are fabricated in silicon membranes covered by thermally annealed silicon-rich nitride films with Erbium-doped silicon nanocrystals. Silicon nitride films were deposited by sputtering on top of silicon on insulator wafers. The nanocavities were carefully designed in order to enhance emission from the nanocrystal sensitized Erbium at the 1540 nm wavelength. Experimentally measured quality factors of ∼6000 were found to be consistent theoretical predictions. The Purcell factor of 1.4 was estimated from the observed 20-fold enhancement of Erbium luminescence

  15. A cadmium-zinc-telluride crystal array spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, H. R.; Quam, W.; DeVore, T.; Vogle, R.; Weslowski, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a gamma detector employing an array of eight cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) crystals configured as a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer. This detector is part of a more complex instrument that identifies the isotope,displays this information, and records the gamma spectrum. Various alarms and other operator features are incorporated in this battery operated rugged instrument. The CZT detector is the key component of this instrument and will be described in detail in this paper. We have made extensive spectral measurements of the usual laboratory gamma sources, common medical isotopes, and various Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) with this detector. Some of these data will be presented as spectra. We will also present energy resolution and detection efficiency for the basic 8-crystal array. Additional data will also be presented for a 32-crystal array. The basic 8-crystal array development was completed two years ago, and the system electronic design has been imp roved recently. This has resulted in significantly improved noise performance. We expect to have a much smaller detector package, using 8 crystals, in a few months. This package will use flip-chip packaging to reduce the electronics physical size by a factor of 5

  16. Preliminary uranium enrichment analysis results using cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavietes, A.D.; McQuaid, J.H.; Paulus, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and EG ampersand G ORTEC have jointly developed a portable ambient-temperature detection system that can be used in a number of application scenarios. The detection system uses a planar cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector with custom-designed detector support electronics developed at LLNL and is based on the recently released MicroNOMAD multichannel analyzer (MCA) produced by ORTEC. Spectral analysis is performed using software developed at LLNL that was originally designed for use with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector systems. In one application, the CZT detection system determines uranium enrichments ranging from less than 3% to over 75% to within accuracies of 20%. The analysis was performed using sample sizes of 200 g or larger and acquisition times of 30 min. The authors have demonstrated the capabilities of this system by analyzing the spectra gathered by the CZT detection system from uranium sources of several enrichments. These experiments demonstrate that current CZT detectors can, in some cases, approach performance criteria that were previously the exclusive domain of larger HPGe detector systems

  17. Cadmium zinc telluride as a mid-infrared variable retarder

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, William; Taherion, Saeid; Kumar, F. Joseph; Giles, David; Hore, Dennis

    2018-04-01

    The electro-optic behavior of cadmium zinc telluride is examined in the mid-infrared region between 3 and 11 μm, for applied DC field strengths of up to 106 V/m. The measurements performed here include full characterization of the polarization state of the transmitted light by means of the Stokes vector. We demonstrate the suitability of this material for DC variable retarder applications such as those achieved by quarter- or half-wave retardation. A comparison of two different metallic coatings for electrodes, gold and indium, reveals important differences in performance that are attributed to the homogeneity of the field through the bulk of the crystal. We illustrate that, in the case of both metals, the same electro-optic coefficients are measured, but regions of higher and lower retardation result in significant depolarization in the case of gold. Such depolarization may adversely affect the contrast ratio in a light valve, or increase the voltage necessary for the operation of an arbitrary polarization state generator.

  18. Theoretical study of bismuth-doped cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez-Proupin, E.; Rios-Gonzalez, J. A.; Pena, J. L.

    Cadmium telluride heavily doped with bismuth has been proposed as an absorber with an intermediate band for solar cells. Increase in the photocurrent has been shown recently, although the overall cell efficiency has not improved. In this work, we study the electronic structure and the formation energies of the defects associated to bismuth impurities. We have performed electronic structure calculations within generalized density functional theory, using the exchange-correlation functional HSE(w) , where the range-separation parameter w has been tuned to reproduce the CdTe bandgap. Improving upon previous reports, we have included the spin-orbit interaction, which modifies the structure of the valence band and the energy levels of bismuth. We have found that interstitial Bi (Bii) tends to occupy Cd vacancies, cadmium substitution (BiCd) creates single donor level, while tellurium substitution (BiTe) is a shallow single acceptor. We investigate the interaction between these point defects and how can they be combined to create a partially filled intermediate band. Supported by FONDECYT Grant 1130437, CONACYT-SENER SUSTENTABILIDAD ENERGETICA/project CeMIE-Sol PY-207450/25 and PY-207450/26. JARG acknowledges CONACYT fellowship for research visit. Powered@NLHPC (ECM-02).

  19. Niobium and zirconium telluride thin films prepared by sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassem, M.; Pailharey, D.; Mathey, Y.

    2000-01-01

    A versatile procedure of sputter deposition, well adapted for getting a large of Te/M ratios (with M = Zr or Nb), has led to the synthesis of several highly anisotropic zirconium and niobium poly tellurides in thin film form. Upon tuning the two key parameters of the process, i.e., the Te percentage in the target and the substrate temperature during the deposition, preparation of systems ranging from ZrTe 0 .72 to ZrTe 6 .7, on the one hand, and from NbTe 1 .28 to NbTe 7 .84, on the other, has been achieved. Besides their amorphous or crystalline (with or without preferential orientations) behavior and their relationship to known structural types, the most striking feature of these films is their large departure from the stoichiometry of the bulk Mte x reference compounds. This peculiarity, together with the possible changes of composition under annealing, are described and interpreted in terms of variable of Te and M atoms trapped or intercalated within the parent structures. (author)

  20. Precision timing detectors with cadmium-telluride sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornheim, A.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Precision timing detectors for high energy physics experiments with temporal resolutions of a few 10 ps are of pivotal importance to master the challenges posed by the highest energy particle accelerators such as the LHC. Calorimetric timing measurements have been a focus of recent research, enabled by exploiting the temporal coherence of electromagnetic showers. Scintillating crystals with high light yield as well as silicon sensors are viable sensitive materials for sampling calorimeters. Silicon sensors have very high efficiency for charged particles. However, their sensitivity to photons, which comprise a large fraction of the electromagnetic shower, is limited. To enhance the efficiency of detecting photons, materials with higher atomic numbers than silicon are preferable. In this paper we present test beam measurements with a Cadmium-Telluride (CdTe) sensor as the active element of a secondary emission calorimeter with focus on the timing performance of the detector. A Schottky type CdTe sensor with an active area of 1cm2 and a thickness of 1 mm is used in an arrangement with tungsten and lead absorbers. Measurements are performed with electron beams in the energy range from 2 GeV to 200 GeV. A timing resolution of 20 ps is achieved under the best conditions.

  1. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid. PMID:27966540

  2. Doping effect in Si nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongke; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Pei; Jiang, Yicheng; Chen, Kunji

    2018-06-01

    Intentional doping in semiconductors is a fundamental issue since it can control the conduction type and ability as well as modify the optical and electronic properties. To realize effective doping is the basis for developing semiconductor devices. However, by reducing the size of a semiconductor, like Si, to the nanometer scale, the doping effects become complicated due to the coupling between the quantum confinement effect and the surfaces and/or interfaces effect. In particular, by introducing phosphorus or boron impurities as dopants into material containing Si nanocrystals with a dot size of less than 10 nm, it exhibits different behaviors and influences on the physical properties from its bulk counterpart. Understanding the doping effects in Si nanocrystals is currently a challenge in order to further improve the performance of the next generation of nano-electronic and photonic devices. In this review, we present an overview of the latest theoretical studies and experimental results on dopant distributions and their effects on the electronic and optical properties of Si nanocrystals. In particular, the advanced characterization techniques on dopant distribution, the carrier transport process as well as the linear and nonlinear optical properties of doped Si nanocrystals, are systematically summarized.

  3. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; E.Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Samorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-24

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO2-Pt and Pt-SiO2, can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO2-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H2, which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO2 interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts

  4. Synthesis and Manipulation of Semiconductor Nanocrystals inMicrofluidic Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Emory Ming-Yue [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Microfluidic reactors are investigated as a mechanism tocontrol the growth of semiconductor nanocrystals and characterize thestructural evolution of colloidal quantum dots. Due to their shortdiffusion lengths, low thermal masses, and predictable fluid dynamics,microfluidic devices can be used to quickly and reproducibly alterreaction conditions such as concentration, temperature, and reactiontime, while allowing for rapid reagent mixing and productcharacterization. These features are particularly useful for colloidalnanocrystal reactions, which scale poorly and are difficult to controland characterize in bulk fluids. To demonstrate the capabilities ofnanoparticle microreactors, a size series of spherical CdSe nanocrystalswas synthesized at high temperature in a continuous-flow, microfabricatedglass reactor. Nanocrystal diameters are reproducibly controlled bysystematically altering reaction parameters such as the temperature,concentration, and reaction time. Microreactors with finer control overtemperature and reagent mixing were designed to synthesize nanoparticlesof different shapes, such as rods, tetrapods, and hollow shells. The twomajor challenges observed with continuous flow reactors are thedeposition of particles on channel walls and the broad distribution ofresidence times that result from laminar flow. To alleviate theseproblems, I designed and fabricated liquid-liquid segmented flowmicroreactors in which the reaction precursors are encapsulated inflowing droplets suspended in an immiscible carrier fluid. The synthesisof CdSe nanocrystals in such microreactors exhibited reduced depositionand residence time distributions while enabling the rapid screening aseries of samples isolated in nL droplets. Microfluidic reactors werealso designed to modify the composition of existing nanocrystals andcharacterize the kinetics of such reactions. The millisecond kinetics ofthe CdSe-to-Ag2Se nanocrystal cation exchange reaction are measured insitu with micro

  5. Confined Growth of ZIF-8 Nanocrystals with Tunable Structural Colors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Bingdong; Yang, Yuanqing; Jansen, Henri

    2018-01-01

    Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIF-8) have promising applications as sensors or catalysts due to their highly porous crystalline structures. While most of the previous studies are based on ZIF-8 crystals either in isolated particles in aqueous environments or in a compact colloidal form, here...... down to ≈100 nm. A wide range of structural colors generated by the ZIF-8 nanocrystals is also observed, which can be attributed to the size-dependent resonant scattering as verified by finite-difference time-domain simulations and classical Mie theory. The scalable fabrication of wafer-based ZIF-8...

  6. Synthesis and charge storage properties of double-layered NiSi nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jong-Hwan

    2010-01-01

    Based on bidirectional diffusion of Ni atoms, double-layered nickel silicide (NiSi) nanocrystals (NCs) for multilevel charge storage were fabricated, and their charge storage properties were examined. The double layer was produced by long-term thermal annealing (for 4 h at 900 o C) of a sandwich structure comprised of a thin Ni film of 0.3 nm sandwiched between two silicon-rich oxide (SiO 1.36 ) layers. Transmission electron microscopic image clearly exhibits a distinct NiSi nanocrystal double layer with a gap of about 7 nm between the mean positions of particle distribution in each NC layer. Capacitance-voltage measurements on the metal/oxide/semiconductor (MOS) capacitors with the double-layered NiSi nanocrystals are shown to have the apparent two plateaus of charge storage, the large memory window of about 9 V and the improved charge retention stability.

  7. Water-assisted size and shape control of CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Bai, Xue; Wu, Hua; Zhang, Xiangtong; Sun, Chun; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Weitao; Yu, William W.; Rogach, Andrey L.

    2018-01-01

    Lead-halide perovskites are well known to decompose rapidly when exposed to polar solvents, such as water. Contrary to this common-place observation, we have found that through introducing a suitable minor amount of water into the reaction mixture, we can synthesize stable CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals. The size and the crystallinity, and as a result the band gap tunability of the strongly emitting CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals correlate with the water content. Suitable amounts of water change the crystallization environment, inducing the formation of differently shaped perovskites, namely spherical NCs, rectangular nanoplatelets, or nanowires. Bright CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals with the photoluminescence quantum yield reaching 90 % were employed for fabrication of inverted hybrid inorganic/organic light-emitting devices, with the peak luminance of 4428 cd m -2 and external quantum yield of 1.7 %. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Phase transitions and doping in semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Ayaskanta

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals are a promising technological material because their size-dependent optical and electronic properties can be exploited for a diverse range of applications such as light-emitting diodes, bio-labels, transistors, and solar cells. For many of these applications, electrical current needs to be transported through the devices. However, while their solution processability makes these colloidal nanocrystals attractive candidates for device applications, the bulky surfactants that render these nanocrystals dispersible in common solvents block electrical current. Thus, in order to realize the full potential of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals in the next-generation of solid-state devices, methods must be devised to make conductive films from these nanocrystals. One way to achieve this would be to add minute amounts of foreign impurity atoms (dopants) to increase their conductivity. Electronic doping in nanocrystals is still very much in its infancy with limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms that govern the doping process. This thesis introduces an innovative synthesis of doped nanocrystals and aims at expanding the fundamental understanding of charge transport in these doped nanocrystal films. The list of semiconductor nanocrystals that can be doped is large, and if one combines that with available dopants, an even larger set of materials with interesting properties and applications can be generated. In addition to doping, another promising route to increase conductivity in nanocrystal films is to use nanocrystals with high ionic conductivities. This thesis also examines this possibility by studying new phases of mixed ionic and electronic conductors at the nanoscale. Such a versatile approach may open new pathways for interesting fundamental research, and also lay the foundation for the creation of novel materials with important applications. In addition to their size-dependence, the intentional incorporation of

  9. Special features of self-compensation of halogen donor action in lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajdanov, V.I.; Nemov, S.A.; Ravich, Yu.I.; Dereza, A.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    Specific features of self-compensation of halogen donor action in lead telluride are investigasted. Lead telluride samples with chlorine additions (with tellurium excess) and, besides, with bromine- and iodine additions were studied in order to reveal general regularities in alloyind with all halogen donor impurities. Experimental dependences of the difference between the electron and hole concentrations (n-p) in PbTe as a function of an amount of introduced halogen impurities (Ni) are presented for samples with a maximum compensation at 295 K. General features of the n-p=f(Ni) dependence are presented for all halogens. The hypothesis on the kinetic mechanism of increasing the efficiency of self-compensation of halogen donor action in lead telluride is suggested

  10. Process for obtaining oxygen doped zinc telluride monocrystals and scintillator crystals obtained by this process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Maurice; Moreau, Roland; D'Haenen, J.-P.; Merenda, Pierre.

    1976-01-01

    A process is described for obtaining oxygen doped zinc telluride monocrystals, for use as scintillator crystals for ionising radiation detectors. The following operations are carried out in succession: one or several zinc telluride crystals are introduced into a silica ampoule together with a ternary mixture of zinc tellurium and oxygen, as an oxide or hydroxide of these elements; the ampoule is pumped down to a high vacuum and sealed; the sealed ampoule containing the mixture and monocrystals is placed in a kiln and brought to a uniform temperature sufficient to make the mixture three-phased, depending on its composition; the zinc telluride crystalline compound remains solid; the ampoule is then tempered to bring it quickly back to ambient temperature [fr

  11. Raman Spectroscopy of SiO{sub 2}–Na{sub 2}O–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass doped with Nd{sup 3+} and CdS nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serqueira, E.O.; Dantas, N.O. [Laboratório de Novos Materiais Isolantes e Semicondutores (LNMIS), Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG 38400-902 (Brazil); Anjos, V. [Grupo de Espectroscopia de Materiais, Departamento de Física, ICE – UFJF, Campus Universitário, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-330 (Brazil); Bell, M.J.V., E-mail: mjvbell@yahoo.com.br [Grupo de Espectroscopia de Materiais, Departamento de Física, ICE – UFJF, Campus Universitário, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-330 (Brazil)

    2014-01-05

    Highlights: • The formation of CdS nanocrystals in the glassy host is shown by Raman measurements. • Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} modifies the growth of CdS nanocrystals in the SNAB glass. • Nd{sup 3+} ions are not incorporated inside the semiconductor nanocrystals. -- Abstract: We report the Raman spectroscopic characterization of a SNAB glass system doped with neodymium and CdS nanocrystals and fabricated by the fusion process. Raman spectra revealed CdS nanocrystals in the glass host and bands associated with Si–O vibrational modes with five structural configurations, boroxol modes of B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al–O and Cd–S vibrational modes. Additionally, Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} modifies the growth of CdS nanocrystals in the SNAB glass and Nd{sup 3+} ions are not incorporated inside the semiconductor nanocrystals.

  12. Current transport mechanisms in mercury cadmium telluride diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopal, Vishnu, E-mail: vishnu-46@yahoo.com, E-mail: wdhu@mail.sitp.ac.cn [Institute of Defence Scientists and Technologists, CFEES Complex, Brig. S. K. Majumdar Marg, Delhi 110054 (India); Li, Qing; He, Jiale; Hu, Weida, E-mail: vishnu-46@yahoo.com, E-mail: wdhu@mail.sitp.ac.cn [National Lab for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); He, Kai; Lin, Chun [Key Laboratory of Infrared Imaging Materials and Detectors, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China)

    2016-08-28

    This paper reports the results of modelling of the current-voltage characteristics (I-V) of a planar mid-wave Mercury Cadmium Telluride photodiode in a gate controlled diode experiment. It is reported that the diode exhibits nearly ideal I-V characteristics under the optimum surface potential leading to the minimal surface leakage current. Deviations from the optimum surface potential lead to non ideal I–V characteristics, indicating a strong relationship between the ideality factor of the diode with its surface leakage current. Diode's I–V characteristics have been modelled over a range of gate voltages from −9 V to −2 V. This range of gate voltages includes accumulation, flat band, and depletion and inversion conditions below the gate structure of the diode. It is shown that the I–V characteristics of the diode can be very well described by (i) thermal diffusion current, (ii) ohmic shunt current, (iii) photo-current due to background illumination, and (iv) excess current that grows by the process of avalanche multiplication in the gate voltage range from −3 V to −5 V that corresponds to the optimum surface potential. Outside the optimum gate voltage range, the origin of the excess current of the diode is associated with its high surface leakage currents. It is reported that the ohmic shunt current model applies to small surface leakage currents. The higher surface leakage currents exhibit a nonlinear shunt behaviour. It is also shown that the observed zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode over the entire gate voltage range is the sum of ohmic shunt resistance and estimated zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode from its thermal saturation current.

  13. Strong blue emission from ZnO nanocrystals synthesized in acetone-based solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efafi, B.; Majles Ara, M.H.; Mousavi, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    In this research, ZnO nanocrystals were synthesized by an improved sol–gel method. UV–vis, FTIR and photoluminescence spectra of the ZnO solution synthesized by this route indicated different properties compared to the other preparation methods. It was observed from FTIR that the sol (prepared using acetone) with the low concentration contains a noticeable amount of the Zn–O bond. The PL spectrum with a strong blue emission confirmed that these nanocrystals are good candidate for use in applications where a monochromatic emission is required. To the best of our knowledge, monochromatic emission ZnO devices have been fabricated through high technology instruments but this paper introduces a simple method for preparation of ZnO with the high intensity blue peak. The size and morphology of ZnO nanocrystals have been studied using FESEM. The nanocrystal size was estimated about 70 nm which was in good agreement with XRD data. - Highlights: • Preparation of ZnO nanocrystals through a novel method by the use of acetone as the solvent. • Observation of the strong blue emission peak from the ZnO prepared solution. • Reduction of green emission in the synthesized sample compared to the other methods of preparation.

  14. Strong blue emission from ZnO nanocrystals synthesized in acetone-based solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efafi, B. [NanoPhotonics Lab., Physics Department, Kharazmi University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Departments of Physics, Iran University of Science & Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Majles Ara, M.H., E-mail: majlesara@gmail.com [NanoPhotonics Lab., Physics Department, Kharazmi University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mousavi, S.S. [NanoPhotonics Lab., Physics Department, Kharazmi University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this research, ZnO nanocrystals were synthesized by an improved sol–gel method. UV–vis, FTIR and photoluminescence spectra of the ZnO solution synthesized by this route indicated different properties compared to the other preparation methods. It was observed from FTIR that the sol (prepared using acetone) with the low concentration contains a noticeable amount of the Zn–O bond. The PL spectrum with a strong blue emission confirmed that these nanocrystals are good candidate for use in applications where a monochromatic emission is required. To the best of our knowledge, monochromatic emission ZnO devices have been fabricated through high technology instruments but this paper introduces a simple method for preparation of ZnO with the high intensity blue peak. The size and morphology of ZnO nanocrystals have been studied using FESEM. The nanocrystal size was estimated about 70 nm which was in good agreement with XRD data. - Highlights: • Preparation of ZnO nanocrystals through a novel method by the use of acetone as the solvent. • Observation of the strong blue emission peak from the ZnO prepared solution. • Reduction of green emission in the synthesized sample compared to the other methods of preparation.

  15. Dissolution kinetics of lead telluride in alkali solutions of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilova, M.G.; Sveshnikova, L.L.; Stavitskaya, T.A.; Repinskij, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    Dissolution kinetics of lead telluride in alkali solutions of hydrogen peroxide was investigated. Dependences of change of PbTe dissolution rate on concentration of hydrogen peroxide and alkali in the solution were obtained. It is shown that dissolution rate of lead telluride is affected by dissolution rate of lead oxide, representing the product of ReTe dissolution. The obtained regularities can be explained by change of solution structure with increase of KOH concentration and by the state of hydrogen peroxide in the solution

  16. Simulation of core-level binding energy shifts in germanium-doped lead telluride crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyubin, A.S.; Dedyulin, S.N.; Yashina, L.V.; Shtanov, V.I.

    2007-01-01

    To simulate the changes in core-level binding energies in germanium-doped lead telluride, cluster calculations of the changes in the electrostatic potential at the corresponding centers have been performed. Different locations of the Ge atom in the crystal bulk have been considered: near vacancies, near another dopant site, and near the surface. For calculating the potential in the clusters that model the bulk and the surface of the lead telluride crystal (c-PbTe), the electron density obtained in the framework of the Hartree-Fock and hybrid density functional theory (DFT) methods has been used [ru

  17. Post-CMOS FinFET integration of bismuth telluride and antimony telluride thin-film-based thermoelectric devices on SoI substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Aktakka, Ethem Erkan

    2013-10-01

    This letter reports, for the first time, heterogeneous integration of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) and antimony telluride (Sb 2Te3) thin-film-based thermoelectric ffect transistors) via a characterized TE-film coevaporationand shadow-mask patterning process using predeposition surface treatment methods for reduced TE-metal contact resistance. As a demonstration vehicle, a 2 × 2 mm2-sized integrated planar thermoelectric generator (TEG) is shown to harvest 0.7 μ W from 21-K temperature gradient. Transistor performance showed no significant change upon post-CMOS TEG integration, indicating, for the first time, the CMOS compatibility of the Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 thin films, which could be leveraged for realization of high-performance integrated micro-TE harvesters and coolers. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. Nanocrystal synthesis and thin film formation for earth abundant photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Nathaniel J.

    Providing access to on-demand energy at the global scale is a grand challenge of our time. The fabrication of solar cells from nanocrystal inks comprising earth abundant elements represents a scalable and sustainable photovoltaic technology with the potential to meet the global demand for electricity. Solar cells with Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) absorber layers are of particular interest due to the high absorption coefficient of CZTSSe, its band gap in the ideal range for efficient photovoltaic power conversion, and the relative abundance of its constituent elements in the earth's crust. Despite the promise of this material system, CZTSSe solar cell efficiencies reported throughout literature have failed to exceed 12.6%, principally due to the low open-circuit voltage (VOC) achieved in these devices compared to the absorber band gap. The work presented herein primarily aims to address the low VOC problem. First, the fundamental cause for such low VOC's is investigated. Interparticle compositional inhomogeneities identified in the synthesized CZTS nanocrystals and their effect on the absorber layer formation and device performance are characterized. Real-time energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) elucidates the role of these inhomogeneities in the mechanism by which a film of CZTS nanocrystals converts into a dense absorber layer comprising micron-sized CZTSSe grains upon annealing in a selenium atmosphere (selenization). Additionally, a direct correlation between the nanocrystal inhomogeneities and the VOC in completed devices is observed. Detailed characterization of CZTSSe solar cells identifies electrical potential fluctuations in the CZTSSe absorber - due to spatial composition variations not unlike those observed in the nanocrystals - as a primary V OC inhibitor. Additional causes for low VOC's in CZTSSe solar cells proposed in the literature involve recombination at the interface between the CZTSSe absorber and: (1) the n-type, CdS buffer layer, or (2) the

  19. Transparent ‘solution’ of ultrathin magnesium hydroxide nanocrystals for flexible and transparent nanocomposite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jie-Xin; Sun, Qian; Chen, Bo; Zeng, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Cong; Chen, Jian-Feng; Wu, Xi; Zou, Hai-Kui

    2015-01-01

    Transparent solutions of nanocrystals exhibit many unique properties, and are thus attractive materials for numerous applications. However, the synthesis of transparent nanocrystal solutions of magnesium hydroxide (MH) with wide applications is yet to be realized. Here, we report a facile two-step process, which includes a direct reactive precipitation in alcohol phase instead of aqueous phase combined with a successive surface modification, to prepare transparent alcohol solutions containing lamellar MH nanocrystals with an average size of 52 nm and an ultrathin thickness of 1–2 nm, which is the thinnest MH nanoplatelet reported in the literatures. Further, highly flexible and transparent nanocomposite films are fabricated with a solution mixing method by adding the transparent MH nanocrystal solutions into PVB solution. Considering the simplicity of the fabrication process, high transparency and good flexibility, this MH/polymer nanocomposite film is promising for flame-resistant applications in plastic electronics and optical devices with high transparency, such as flexible displays, optical filters, and flexible solar cells. (paper)

  20. Thermal conductivity of silicon nanocrystals and polystyrene nanocomposite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juangsa, Firman Bagja; Muroya, Yoshiki; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Ryu, Meguya; Morikawa, Junko

    2016-01-01

    Silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) are well known for their size-dependent optical and electronic properties; they also have the potential for low yet controllable thermal properties. As a silicon-based low-thermal conductivity material is required in microdevice applications, SiNCs can be utilized for thermal insulation. In this paper, SiNCs and polymer nanocomposites were produced, and their thermal conductivity, including the density and specific heat, was measured. Measurement results were compared with thermal conductivity models for composite materials, and the comparison shows a decreasing value of the thermal conductivity, indicating the effect of the size and presence of the nanostructure on the thermal conductivity. Moreover, employing silicon inks at room temperature during the fabrication process enables a low cost of fabrication and preserves the unique properties of SiNCs. (paper)

  1. Bioinspired Bouligand cellulose nanocrystal composites: a review of mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Bharath; Gilman, Jeffrey W.

    2017-12-01

    The twisted plywood, or Bouligand, structure is the most commonly observed microstructural motif in natural materials that possess high mechanical strength and toughness, such as that found in bone and the mantis shrimp dactyl club. These materials are isotropically toughened by a low volume fraction of soft, energy-dissipating polymer and by the Bouligand structure itself, through shear wave filtering and crack twisting, deflection and arrest. Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are excellent candidates for the bottom-up fabrication of these structures, as they naturally self-assemble into `chiral nematic' films when cast from solutions and possess outstanding mechanical properties. In this article, we present a review of the fabrication techniques and the corresponding mechanical properties of Bouligand biomimetic CNC nanocomposites, while drawing comparison to the performance standards set by tough natural composite materials. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue `New horizons for cellulose nanotechnology'.

  2. Recyclable organic solar cells on cellulose nanocrystal substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yinhua; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Khan, Talha M; Liu, Jen-Chieh; Hsu, James; Shim, Jae Won; Dindar, Amir; Youngblood, Jeffrey P; Moon, Robert J; Kippelen, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy is potentially the largest source of renewable energy at our disposal, but significant advances are required to make photovoltaic technologies economically viable and, from a life-cycle perspective, environmentally friendly, and consequently scalable. Cellulose nanomaterials are emerging high-value nanoparticles extracted from plants that are abundant, renewable, and sustainable. Here, we report on the first demonstration of efficient polymer solar cells fabricated on optically transparent cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) substrates. The solar cells fabricated on the CNC substrates display good rectification in the dark and reach a power conversion efficiency of 2.7%. In addition, we demonstrate that these solar cells can be easily separated and recycled into their major components using low-energy processes at room temperature, opening the door for a truly recyclable solar cell technology. Efficient and easily recyclable organic solar cells on CNC substrates are expected to be an attractive technology for sustainable, scalable, and environmentally-friendly energy production.

  3. Synthesis of diluted magnetic semiconductor Bi{sub 2−x}Mn{sub x}Te{sub 3} nanocrystals in a host glass matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, R.S. [Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Naturais e Educação (ICENE), Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, 38025-180 Uberaba, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Mikhail, H.D., E-mail: ricardosilva@fisica.uftm.edu.br [Instituto de Ciências Tecnológicas e Exatas (ICTE), Departamento de Engenharia Mecânica, Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, 38064-200 Uberaba, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Pavani, R. [Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Naturais e Educação (ICENE), Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, 38025-180 Uberaba, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Cano, N.F. [Departamento de Ciências do Mar, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, 11030-400 Santos, São Paulo (Brazil); Silva, A.C.A.; Dantas, N.O. [Instituto de Física, Laboratório de Novos Materiais Isolantes e Semicondutores (LNMIS), Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, 38400-902 Uberlândia, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-11-05

    Diluted magnetic semiconductors of manganese doped in bismuth-telluride nanocrystals (Bi{sub 2−x}Mn{sub x}Te{sub 3} NCs) were grown in a glass matrix and investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy/Magnetic Force Microscopy, and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. TEM images showed that the nanocrystals formed within the glass matrix were nearly spherical, with average sizes between 4 and 5 nm, and d{sub 015}-spacing of approximately 0.322 nm, which corresponds to the (015) interplanar distance in Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} bulk. The diffraction patterns showed that the diffraction peak associated with the (015) plane of the Bi{sub 2−x}Mn{sub x}Te{sub 3} nanocrystals shifts to larger diffraction angles as manganese (Mn) concentration increases, suggesting that the Mn{sup 2+} ions are substitutional defects occupying Bi sites (Mn{sub Bi}). AFM and MFM measurements showed magnetic phase contrast patterns, providing further evidence of Mn{sup 2+} ion incorporation in the nanocrystal structure. EPR signal of manganese ion incorporation and valence states in the crystalline structure of the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanocrystals confirmed the presence of the Mn{sup 2+} state. - Highlights: • Bi{sub 2−x}Mn{sub x}Te{sub 3} NCs were synthesized in a glass matrix by fusion method. • Transmission Electronic Microscopy shows the formation of Bi{sub 2−x}Mn{sub x}Te{sub 3} NCs. • The sp-d exchange interaction in DMS NCs can be evidenced by X Ray-Diffraction and Magnetic Force Microscopy. • Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectra confirmed that Mn{sup 2+} ions are located in two distinct Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} NCs sites.

  4. Structure Map for Embedded Binary Alloy Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, C.W.; Shin, S.J.; Liao, C.Y.; Guzman, J.; Stone, P.R.; Watanabe, M.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.; Chrzan, D.C.

    2008-09-20

    The equilibrium structure of embedded nanocrystals formed from strongly segregating binary-alloys is considered within a simple thermodynamic model. The model identifies two dimensionlessinterface energies that dictate the structure, and allows prediction of the stable structure for anychoice of these parameters. The resulting structure map includes three distinct nanocrystal mor-phologies: core/shell, lobe/lobe, and completely separated spheres.

  5. Hollow nanocrystals and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivisatos, A Paul [Oakland, CA; Yin, Yadong [Moreno Valley, CA; Erdonmez, Can Kerem [Berkeley, CA

    2011-07-05

    Described herein are hollow nanocrystals having various shapes that can be produced by a simple chemical process. The hollow nanocrystals described herein may have a shell as thin as 0.5 nm and outside diameters that can be controlled by the process of making.

  6. Synthesis, spectroscopy and simulation of doped nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suyver, Jan Frederik

    2003-01-01

    This thesis deals with the properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (ZnS or ZnSe) in the size range (diameter) of 2 nm to 10 nm. The nanocrystals under investigation are doped with the transition metal ions manganese or copper. The goal is to study photoluminescence and electroluminescence from

  7. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shimon [Pinole, CA; Schlamp, Michael C [Plainsboro, NJ; Alivisatos, A Paul [Oakland, CA

    2011-09-27

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  8. Thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaics: ES and H issues, solutions, and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweibel, K.; Moskowitz, P.; Fthenakis, V.

    1998-02-01

    Photovoltaics (PV) is a growing business worldwide, with new technologies evolving towards potentially large-volume production. PV use produces no emissions, thus offsetting many potential environmental problems. However, the new PV technologies also bring unfamiliar environment, safety, and health (ES and H) challenges that require innovative solutions. This is a summary of the issues, solutions, and perspectives associated with the use of cadmium in one of the new and important PV technologies: thin-film, cadmium telluride (CdTe) PV, which is being developed and commercialized by several companies including Solar Cells Inc. (Toledo, Ohio), BP Solar (Fairfield, California), and Matsushita (Japan). The principal ES and H issue for thin-film cadmium telluride PV is the potential introduction of cadmium--a toxic heavy metal--into the air or water. The amount of cadmium in thin-film PV, however, is quite small--one nickel cadmium flashlight battery has about as much cadmium (7 g) as a square meter of PV module using current technology--and a typical cordless power tool will have 5--10 batteries. CdTe modules are also very well sealed, limiting the chance of release. Nonetheless, minimizing the amount of cadmium in cadmium telluride modules and preventing the introduction of that cadmium into the environment is a top priority for National Renewable Energy Laboratory researchers and cadmium telluride PV manufacturers

  9. A GREENER SYNTHESIS OF CORE (FE, CU)-SHELL (AU, PT, PD AND AG) NANOCRYSTALS USING AQUEOUS VITAMIN C

    Science.gov (United States)

    A greener method to fabricate the novel core (Fe and Cu)-shell (noble metals) metal nanocrystals using aqueous ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is described. Transition metal salts such as Cu and Fe were reduced using ascorbic acid, a benign naturally available antioxidant, and then add...

  10. Bismuth telluride topological insulator nanosheet saturable absorbers for q-switched mode-locked Tm:ZBLAN waveguide lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xiantao; Gross, Simon; Withford, Michael J.; Fuerbach, Alexander [Centre for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) and MQ Photonics Research Centre, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie Univ., NSW (Australia); Zhang, Han; Guo, Zhinan [SZU-NUS Collaborative Innovation Centre for Optoelectronic Science and Technology, Key Lab. of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen Univ. (China)

    2016-08-15

    Nanosheets of bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}), a topological insulator material that exhibits broadband saturable absorption due to its non-trivial Dirac-cone like energy structure, are utilized to generate short pulses from Tm:ZBLAN waveguide lasers. By depositing multiple layers of a carefully prepared Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} solution onto a glass substrate, the modulation depth and the saturation intensity of the fabricated devices can be controlled and optimized. This approach enables the realization of saturable absorbers that feature a modulation depth of 13% and a saturation intensity of 997 kW/cm{sup 2}. For the first time to our knowledge, Q-switched mode-locked operation of a linearly polarized mid-IR ZBLAN waveguide chip laser was realized in an extended cavity configuration using the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The maximum average output power of the laser is 16.3 mW and the Q-switched and mode-locked repetition rates are 44 kHz and 436 MHz, respectively. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Symmetry breaking during seeded growth of nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaohu; Xia, Younan

    2012-11-14

    Currently, most of the reported noble-metal nanocrystals are limited to a high level of symmetry, as constrained by the inherent, face-centered cubic (fcc) lattice of these metals. In this paper, we report, for the first time, a facile and versatile approach (backed up by a clear mechanistic understanding) for breaking the symmetry of an fcc lattice and thus obtaining nanocrystals with highly unsymmetrical shapes. The key strategy is to induce and direct the growth of nanocrystal seeds into unsymmetrical modes by manipulating the reduction kinetics. With silver as an example, we demonstrated that the diversity of possible shapes taken by noble-metal nanocrystals could be greatly expanded by incorporating a series of new shapes drastically deviated from the fcc lattice. This work provides a new method to investigate shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanocrystal.

  12. Measuring the Valence of Nanocrystal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Jonathan Scharle [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2016-11-30

    The goal of this project is to understand and control the interplay between nanocrystal stoichiometry, surface ligand binding and exchange, and the optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals in solution and in thin solid films. We pursued three research directions with this goal in mind: 1) We characterized nanocrystal stoichiometry and its influence on the binding of L-type and X-type ligands, including the thermodynamics of binding and the kinetics of ligand exchange. 2) We developed a quantitative understanding of the relationship between surface ligand passivation and photoluminescence quantum yield. 3) We developed methods to replace the organic ligands on the nanocrystal with halide ligands and controllably deposit these nanocrystals into thin films, where electrical measurements were used to investigate the electrical transport and internanocrystal electronic coupling.

  13. Optical and structural characterization of oleic acid-stabilized CdTe nanocrystals for solution thin film processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Davet Gutiérrez-Lazos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents results of the optical and structural characterization of oleic acid-stabilized cadmium telluride nanocrystals (CdTe-NC synthesized by an organometallic route. After being cleaned, the CdTe-NC were dispersed in toluene to obtain an ink-like dispersion, which was drop-cast on glass substrate to deposit a thin film. The CdTe-NC colloidal dispersion as well as the CdTe drop-cast thin films were characterized with regard to the optical and structural properties. TEM analysis indicates that the CdTe-NC have a nearly spherical shape (3.5 nm as mean size. Electron diffraction and XRD diffraction analyses indicated the bulk-CdTe face-centered cubic structure for CdTe-NC. An additional diffraction line corresponding to the octahedral Cd3P2 was also detected as a secondary phase, which probably originates by reacting free cadmium ions with trioctylphosphine (the tellurium reducing agent. The Raman spectrum exhibits two broad bands centered at 141.6 and 162.3 cm−1, which could be associated to the TO and LO modes of cubic CdTe nanocrystals, respectively. Additional peaks located in the 222 to 324 cm−1 range, agree fairly well with the wavenumbers reported for TO modes of octahedral Cd3P2.

  14. Grafted SiC nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saini, Isha; Sharma, Annu; Dhiman, Rajnish

    2017-01-01

    ), raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. UV–Visible absorption spectroscopy was used to study optical properties such as optical energy gap (Eg), Urbach's energy (Eu), refractive index (n), real (ε1) and imaginary (ε2) parts of dielectric constant of PVA as well as PVA......Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) grafted SiC (PVA-g-SiC)/PVA nanocomposite was synthesized by incorporating PVA grafted silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystals inside PVA matrix. In-depth structural characterization of resulting nanocomposite was carried out using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR...

  15. Indium telluride nanotubes: Solvothermal synthesis, growth mechanism, and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Liyan [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Yan, Shancheng, E-mail: yansc@njupt.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); School of Geography and Biological Information, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210046 (China); Lu, Tao; Shi, Yi; Wang, Jianyu [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Yang, Fan [School of Geography and Biological Information, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210046 (China)

    2014-03-15

    hydrogen storage, compared with the nanowires. The nanotube device also has a broad light detection range from 300 nm to 1100 nm, covering the UV–visible–NIR region. This good performance of In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes may enable significant advancements of new photodetection and photosensing applications. Highlights: • The In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotube device also has a broad light detection range from 300 nm to 1100 nm. • The nanotube is 137.85 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}, which makes it suitable for gas sensing and hydrogen storage. • A possible growth mechanism of the indium telluride nanotubes was proposed. • In addition, no In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes have been reported until now.

  16. Fabrication and characterization of solid PbI2 nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasi, Gopi K; Dollahon, Norman R; Ahmadi, Temer S

    2007-01-01

    Lead iodide nanoparticles are synthesized in reverse micelle solution of AOT/H 2 O/n-heptane. Optical absorption spectra and TEM analysis indicated the formation of crystalline particles with an average radius of 1.5 nm, which is less than the Bohr radius of the exciton (1.9 nm) in bulk PbI 2 . Using theoretical models and optical spectra of quantum confined PbI 2 nanoparticles, a radius of 1.5 nm and a thickness of 1.7 nm was calculated, which are in full agreement with the TEM results. Particles were isolated from the dispersed medium and were analysed by powder XRD and Raman spectroscopy, indicating the formation of a predominantly 2H-PbI 2 polytype. This work presents the first case of fully isolated, fully characterized solid nanoparticles of PbI 2 . It also presents XRD and Raman spectrum for the first time for PbI 2 nanoparticles of intermediate quantum confinement

  17. Development Considerations for Nanocrystal Drug Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Ling; John, Mathew; Lee, Sau L; Tyner, Katherine M

    2017-05-01

    Nanocrystal technology has emerged as a valuable tool for facilitating the delivery of poorly water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and enhancing API bioavailability. To date, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has received over 80 applications for drug products containing nanocrystals. These products can be delivered by different routes of administration and are used in a variety of therapeutic areas. To aid in identifying key developmental considerations for these products, a retrospective analysis was performed on the submissions received by the FDA to date. Over 60% of the submissions were for the oral route of administration. Based on the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS), most nanocrystal drugs submitted to the FDA are class II compounds that possess low aqueous solubility and high intestinal permeability. Impact of food on drug bioavailability was reduced for most nanocrystal formulations as compared with their micronized counterparts. For all routes of administration, dose proportionality was observed for some, but not all, nanocrystal products. Particular emphasis in the development of nanocrystal products was placed on the in-process tests and controls at critical manufacturing steps (such as milling process), mitigation and control of process-related impurities, and the stability of APIs or polymorphic form (s) during manufacturing and upon storage. This emphasis resulted in identifying challenges to the development of these products including accurate determination of particle size (distribution) of drug substance and/or nanocrystal colloidal dispersion, identification of polymorphic form (s), and establishment of drug substance/product specifications.

  18. Binding SnO2 nanocrystals in nitrogen-doped graphene sheets as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaosi; Wan, Li-Jun; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2013-04-18

    Hybrid anode materials for Li-ion batteries are fabricated by binding SnO2 nanocrystals (NCs) in nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-RGO) sheets by means of an in situ hydrazine monohydrate vapor reduction method. The SnO2NCs in the obtained SnO2NC@N-RGO hybrid material exhibit exceptionally high specific capacity and high rate capability. Bonds formed between graphene and SnO2 nanocrystals limit the aggregation of in situ formed Sn nanoparticles, leading to a stable hybrid anode material with long cycle life. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Optical Amplification at 1525 nm in BaYF5: 20% Yb3+, 2% Er3+ Nanocrystals Doped SU-8 Polymer Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengcheng Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated optical amplification in BaYF5: 20% Yb3+, 2% Er3+ (BYF nanocrystals doped polymer waveguide. BYF nanocrystals with an average size of ∼13 nm were synthesized by a high-boiling solvent process. Intense 1.53 μm fluorescence was obtained in the nanocrystals under excitation at 980 nm. An optical polymer waveguide was fabricated by using BYF nanocrystals doped SU-8 polymer as the core material. A relative optical gain of ∼10.4 dB at 1525 nm was achieved in a 1.1 cm long waveguide for an input signal power of ∼0.09 mW and a pump power of ∼212 mW.

  20. Evolution of biofunctional semiconductor nanocrystals: a calorimetric investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debasmita; Mondal, Somrita; Roy, Chandra Nath; Saha, Abhijit

    2013-12-14

    Semiconductor nanomaterials have found numerous applications in optoelectronic device fabrication and in platforms for drug delivery and hyperthermia cancer treatment, and in various other biomedical fields because of their high photochemical stability and size-tunable photoluminescence (PL). However, little attention has been paid to exploring the energetics of formation of these semiconductor nanoparticles. We demonstrate that formation of nanocrystals with biofunctionalization supported by widely used groups, BSA and cysteine, is an exothermic spontaneous process driven by enthalpy. The whole energetics of the reaction shows that formation of smaller particles is favored with lower synthesis temperature. Further, it is shown that the thermodynamics of nanoparticle formation is strongly influenced by the conformation of the protein matrix. We also demonstrate that protein supported formation of nanocrystals is thermodynamically more favorable compared to that involving smaller organic thiol groups. The favorable enthalpy of formation compensates unfavorable entropy, resulting in favorable Gibbs free energy. Thus, this study can open up new avenues for establishing a thermodynamic basis for the design of nanosystems with new and tunable properties.

  1. Quantum confinement of lead titanate nanocrystals by wet chemical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaviyarasu, K., E-mail: kaviyarasuloyolacollege@gmail.com [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology Laboratories, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, P O Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Manikandan, E., E-mail: maniphysics@gmail.com [Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Central Research Laboratory, Sree Balaji Medical College & Hospital, Bharath University, Chrompet, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology Laboratories, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, P O Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Maaza, M., E-mail: likmaaz@gmail.com [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology Laboratories, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, P O Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    Lead Titanate (PbTiO{sub 3)} is a category of the practical semiconductor metal oxides, which is widely applied in various scientific and industrial fields because of its catalytic, optical, and electrical properties. PbTiO{sub 3} nanocrystalline materials have attracted a wide attention due to their unique properties. PbTiO{sub 3} nanocrystals were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) to identify the PbTiO{sub 3} nanocrystals were composed a tetragonal structure. The diameter of a single sphere was around 20 nm and the diameter reached up to 3 μm. The chemical composition of the samples and the valence states of elements were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in detail. - Highlights: • Single crystalline NSs of PbTiO{sub 3} fabricated by wet chemical method. • PbTiO{sub 3} NSs were uniform and continuous along the long axis. • Tetragonal perovskite structure with the diameter 20 nm and length 3 μm. • XPS spectrum was fitted with Lorentzian function respectively. • The size of the images is also 10 μm × 10 μm.

  2. Physical properties and microstructure performance of ultrafine nanocrystals reinforced laser 3D print microlaminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jianing; Xia, Chunzhi; Liu, Peng; Pan, Guanghui; Wang, Congwei

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ultrafine nanocrystals, nanorods and amorphous phases were produced in such LRP microlaminates. • The amorphous/nanocrystalline interface owned a high bonding energy. • Amorphous/nanocrystalline interface may retard growth of nanocrystals in a certain extent. • Due to production of amorphous, lots of microscale ASNPs were produced. • Ultrafine nanocrystals had the high interface energy, which became the driving force of the atomic motions. - Abstract: Rapid prototyping based on laser alloying was used to produce ultrafine nanocrystals (UN) reinforced three-dimensional microlaminates. Such microlaminates were fabricated on a TA1 alloy by laser rapid prototyping (LRP) of Stellite 20–TiN–B 4 C mixed powders to produce a bottom layer; then Stellite 20–TiN–B 4 C–Sb powders were deposited on such bottom-layer in order to form an upper-layer. There is an excellent metallurgical combination between such two layer; the upper-layer shows a better wear resistance than that of the bottom layer. The Sb addition promoted lots of UN to be produced, and lots of the nanorods were also produced in such microlaminates, their growth was retarded by agglomeration of UN in a certain extent. Such UN had the high interface energy, which became the driving force of atomic motions, favoring formation of a compact fine structure

  3. Physical properties and microstructure performance of ultrafine nanocrystals reinforced laser 3D print microlaminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianing, E-mail: jn2369@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong Jianzhu University, Jinan 250101 (China); Beijing Aeronautical Manufacturing Technology Research Institute, Beijing 100024 (China); Xia, Chunzhi [Provincial Laboratory of Advanced Welding Technology, Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang 212003 (China); Liu, Peng; Pan, Guanghui; Wang, Congwei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong Jianzhu University, Jinan 250101 (China)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Ultrafine nanocrystals, nanorods and amorphous phases were produced in such LRP microlaminates. • The amorphous/nanocrystalline interface owned a high bonding energy. • Amorphous/nanocrystalline interface may retard growth of nanocrystals in a certain extent. • Due to production of amorphous, lots of microscale ASNPs were produced. • Ultrafine nanocrystals had the high interface energy, which became the driving force of the atomic motions. - Abstract: Rapid prototyping based on laser alloying was used to produce ultrafine nanocrystals (UN) reinforced three-dimensional microlaminates. Such microlaminates were fabricated on a TA1 alloy by laser rapid prototyping (LRP) of Stellite 20–TiN–B{sub 4}C mixed powders to produce a bottom layer; then Stellite 20–TiN–B{sub 4}C–Sb powders were deposited on such bottom-layer in order to form an upper-layer. There is an excellent metallurgical combination between such two layer; the upper-layer shows a better wear resistance than that of the bottom layer. The Sb addition promoted lots of UN to be produced, and lots of the nanorods were also produced in such microlaminates, their growth was retarded by agglomeration of UN in a certain extent. Such UN had the high interface energy, which became the driving force of atomic motions, favoring formation of a compact fine structure.

  4. Charge transport in a CoPt3 nanocrystal microwire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beecher, P.; De Marzi, G.; Quinn, A.J.; Redmond, G.; Shevchenko, E.V.; Weller, H.

    2004-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of single CoPt 3 nanocrystal microwires formed by magnetic field-directed growth from colloidal solutions are presented. The wires comprise disordered assemblies of discrete nanocrystals, separated from each other by protective organic ligand shells. Electrical data indicate that the activated charge transport properties of the wires are determined by the nanocrystal charging energy, governed by the size and capacitance of the individual nanocrystals. Focused ion beam-assisted deposition of Pt metal at the wire-electrode junctions is employed to optimize the wire-electrode contacts, whilst maintaining the nanocrystal-dominated transport characteristics of these one-dimensional nanocrystal structures

  5. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawendi, Moungi G.; Sundar, Vikram C.

    2010-04-06

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties.

  6. High Temperature AL-Nanocrystal Alloy Synthesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Perepezko, J

    2001-01-01

    Aluminum-rich metallic glasses containing transition metals and rare earth elements have been found to yield finely mixed microstructures of Al nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix and exhibit...

  7. Semiconductor-nanocrystal/conjugated polymer thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Dittmer, Janke J.; Huynh, Wendy U.; Milliron, Delia

    2014-06-17

    The invention described herein provides for thin films and methods of making comprising inorganic semiconductor-nanocrystals dispersed in semiconducting-polymers in high loading amounts. The invention also describes photovoltaic devices incorporating the thin films.

  8. Mechanism of manganese (mono and di) telluride thin-film formation and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Raj Kishore; Singh, Gurmeet; Shul, Yong Gun; Kim, Hansung

    2007-03-01

    Mechanistic studies on the electrocrystallization of manganese telluride (MnTe) thin film are reported using aqueous acidic solution containing MnSO 4 and TeO 2. Tartaric acid was used for the inhibition of hydrated manganese oxide anodic growth at counter electrode. A detailed study on the mechanistic aspect of electrochemical growth of MnTe using cyclic voltametry is carried out. Conditions for electrochemical growth of manganese mono and di telluride thin films have been reported using cyclic voltammetric scans for Mn 2+, Te 4+ and combined Mn 2+ and Te 4+. X-ray diffraction showed the formation of polycrystalline MnTe films with cubic, hexagonal and orthorhombic mixed phases. MnTe film morphology was studied using scanning electron microscope. Susceptibility and electrical characterization supports the anti-ferromagnetic behavior of the as-deposited MnTe thin film.

  9. GEOLOGY OF THE FLORENCIA GOLD – TELLURIDE DEPOSIT (CAMAGÜEY, CUBA AND SOME METALLURGICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López K Jesús M.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results from a study of the Florencia gold-telluride deposit in Central Cuba, including mineralogical, petrographical, microprobe and chemical analysis. Valuable information is provided for the exploration, mining and processing of gold ores from other nearby deposits with similar characteristics. Results highlight changes in the mineralogical composition of the ores between the north and south sectors of the deposit, as reflected in metallurgical concentrates after beneficiation and flotation of samples from these sectors.
    It is shown that gold deposits of the Cretaceous Volcanic Arc of Cuba largely consist of native gold, telluride and pyrite, where arsenopyrite is almost absent. Traces of lead, zinc and cadmium are present in the periphery of the main ore zones.

  10. Characterization of large cadmium zinc telluride crystals grown by traveling heater method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H.; Awadalla, S.A.; Iniewski, K.

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to evaluate thick, 20 X 20 X 10 and 10 X 10 X 10 mm(3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), Cd0.9Zn0.1Te, crystals grown using the traveling heater method (THIM). The phenomenal spectral performance and small size and low concentration of Te inclusions/precipitates of these c......The focus of this paper is to evaluate thick, 20 X 20 X 10 and 10 X 10 X 10 mm(3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), Cd0.9Zn0.1Te, crystals grown using the traveling heater method (THIM). The phenomenal spectral performance and small size and low concentration of Te inclusions...

  11. Benzimidazole-functionalized Zr-UiO-66 nanocrystals for luminescent sensing of Fe3+ in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Yingying; Zhang, Hanzhuo; Lei, Fan; Liang, Mei; Qian, Xuefeng; Shen, Peilian; Xu, Hui; Chen, Zhihui; Gao, Junkuo; Yao, Juming

    2017-01-01

    Zr-based MOF structure UiO-66 exhibits unprecedented high thermal and chemical stability, making it to be one of the most used MOFs in various applications. Yet, the poor photoluminescent (PL) properties of UiO-66 limit its applications in luminescent sensing. Herein, a new benzimidazole-functionalized UiO-66 nanocrystal (UiO-66-BI) was successfully fabricated via microwave synthesis. UiO-66-BI displayed octahedral nanocrystal morphology with a diameter smaller than 200 nm and could disperse well in water and common organic solvents. UiO-66-BI demonstrated extended optical absorption in the visible-light region and efficiently improved PL emission compared with UiO-66 pristine. The sensing properties of UiO-66-BI nanocrystals towards different ions were studied, and the results demonstrated that UiO-66-BI showed excellent selective luminescent sensing of Fe 3+ ions in water.

  12. Benzimidazole-functionalized Zr-UiO-66 nanocrystals for luminescent sensing of Fe{sup 3+} in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Yingying; Zhang, Hanzhuo; Lei, Fan; Liang, Mei; Qian, Xuefeng; Shen, Peilian [The Key laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, National Engineering Lab for Textile Fiber Materials and Processing Technology (Zhejiang), College of Materials and Textiles, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Xu, Hui, E-mail: huixu@cjlu.edu.cn [Institute of Coordination Bond Metrology and Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Chen, Zhihui, E-mail: huixu.chen@gmail.com [The Key laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, National Engineering Lab for Textile Fiber Materials and Processing Technology (Zhejiang), College of Materials and Textiles, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Key Lab of Advanced Transducers and Intelligent Control System, Ministry of Education and Shanxi Province, College of Physics and Optoelectronics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Gao, Junkuo, E-mail: jkgao@zstu.edu.cn [The Key laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, National Engineering Lab for Textile Fiber Materials and Processing Technology (Zhejiang), College of Materials and Textiles, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Yao, Juming [The Key laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, National Engineering Lab for Textile Fiber Materials and Processing Technology (Zhejiang), College of Materials and Textiles, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Zr-based MOF structure UiO-66 exhibits unprecedented high thermal and chemical stability, making it to be one of the most used MOFs in various applications. Yet, the poor photoluminescent (PL) properties of UiO-66 limit its applications in luminescent sensing. Herein, a new benzimidazole-functionalized UiO-66 nanocrystal (UiO-66-BI) was successfully fabricated via microwave synthesis. UiO-66-BI displayed octahedral nanocrystal morphology with a diameter smaller than 200 nm and could disperse well in water and common organic solvents. UiO-66-BI demonstrated extended optical absorption in the visible-light region and efficiently improved PL emission compared with UiO-66 pristine. The sensing properties of UiO-66-BI nanocrystals towards different ions were studied, and the results demonstrated that UiO-66-BI showed excellent selective luminescent sensing of Fe{sup 3+} ions in water.

  13. Photophysical Properties of II-VI Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ke

    As it is well known, semiconductor nanocrystals (also called quantum dots, QDs) are being actively pursued for use in many different types of luminescent optical materials. These materials include the active media for luminescence downconversion in artificial lighting, lasers, luminescent solar concentrators and many other applications. Chapter 1 gives general introduction of QDs, which describe the basic physical properties and optical properties. Based on the experimental spectroscopic study, a semiquantitative method-effective mass model is employed to give theoretical prediction and guide. The following chapters will talks about several topics respectively. A predictive understanding of the radiative lifetimes is therefore a starting point for the understanding of the use of QDs for these applications. Absorption intensities and radiative lifetimes are fundamental properties of any luminescent material. Meantime, achievement of high efficiency with high working temperature and heterostructure fabrication with manipulation of lattice strain are not easy and need systematic investigation. To make accurate connections between extinction coefficients and radiative recombination rates, chapter 2 will consider three closely related aspects of the size dependent spectroscopy of II-VI QDs. First, it will consider the existing literature on cadmium selenide (CdSe) QD absorption spectra and extinction coefficients. From these results and fine structure considerations Boltzmann weighted radiative lifetimes are calculated. These lifetimes are compared to values measured on very high quality CdSe and CdSe coated with zinc selenide (ZnSe) shells. Second, analogous literature data are analyzed for cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanocrystals and compared to lifetimes measured for very high quality QDs. Furthermore, studies of the absorption and excitation spectra and measured radiative lifetimes for CdTe/CdSe Type-II core/shell QDs are reported. These results are also analyzed in

  14. Photoluminescence of nanocrystals embedded in oxide matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada, C.; Gonzalez, J.A.; Kunold, A.; Reyes-Esqueda, J.A.; Pereyra, P.

    2006-12-01

    We used the theory of finite periodic systems to explain the photoluminescence spectra dependence on the average diameter of nanocrystals embedded in oxide matrices. Because of the broad matrix band gap, the photoluminescence response is basically determined by isolated nanocrystals and sequences of a few of them. With this model we were able to reproduce the shape and displacement of the experimentally observed photoluminescence spectra. (author)

  15. Diagnostic Genesis Features of Au-Ag Selenide-Telluride Mineralization of Western Java Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euis Tintin Yuningsih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.3.1.67-76The ore mineralogy of the westernmost part of West Java such as Pongkor, Cibaliung, Cikidang, Cikotok, and Cirotan are characterized by the dominance of silver-arsenic-antimony sulfosalt with silver selenides and rarely tellurides over the argentite, whereas the eastern part of West Java including Arinem and Cineam deposits are dominated by silver-gold tellurides. Mineralogy of Se-type deposits at Pongkor, Cikidang, Cibaliung, Cisungsang, and Cirotan and Te-type deposits at Arinem and Cineam shows their different geochemical characteristics. Mineralogical and geochemical differences can be explained by variation of physico-chemical conditions that existed during gold-silver deposition by applying the phase relation among sulfide, telluride, and selenide mineral association in the deposits. The relative values of ƒSe2(g, ƒTe(g, and ƒS2(g control the actual presence of selenide or telluride minerals within the West Java deposits, which also depend on their concentrations in the hydrothermal fluid. Even though the concentration of selenium in the hydrothermal fluid of Te-type deposits might have been similar or even higher than that in the Se-type, early substitution of selenium in the sulfide minerals prevents its concentration in the hydrothermal fluid to the levels for precipitating selenide minerals. Therefore, early sulfide mineral deposition from reduction fluids will not increase the ƒSe2(g/ƒS2(g ratio to form selenide minerals in Te-type deposits of Arinem and Cineam, other than selenium-bearing sulfide mineral such as Se-bearing galena or Se-bearing pyrargyrite-proustite.

  16. Donor impurity self-compensation by neutral complexes in bismuth doped lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravich, Yu.I.; Nemov, S.A.; Proshin, V.I.

    1994-01-01

    Self-compensation is calculated of impurity doping action in semiconductors of the A 4 B 6 type by neutral complexes, consisting of a vacancy and two impurity atoms. Complexes entropy is estimated and the thermodynamic potential is minimized in the concentration of single two-charge vacancies and complexes. Calculation results are compared with experimental data, obtained when lead telluride doping by bismuth. Account for complex formation improves agreement theory with experiment. 4 refs., 1 fig

  17. Applying analytical ultracentrifugation to nanocrystal suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, Jennifer A; Krueger, Karl M; Mayo, J T; Yavuz, Cafer T; Redden, Jacina J; Colvin, Vicki L, E-mail: colvin@rice.ed [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-60, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2009-09-02

    While applied frequently in physical biochemistry to the study of protein complexes, the quantitative use of analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) for nanocrystal analysis is relatively rare. Its application in nanoscience is potentially very powerful as it provides a measure of nanocrystal density, size and structure directly in the solution phase. Towards that end, this paper examines the best practices for applying data collection and analysis methods for AUC, geared towards the study of biomolecules, to the unique problems of nanoparticle analysis. Using uniform nanocrystals of cadmium selenide, we compared several schemes for analyzing raw sedimentation data. Comparable values of the mean sedimentation coefficients (s-value) were found using several popular analytical approaches; however, the distribution in sample s-values is best captured using the van Holde-Weischt algorithm. Measured s-values could be reproducibly collected if sample temperature and concentration were controlled; under these circumstances, the variability for average sedimentation values was typically 5%. The full shape of the distribution in s-values, however, is not easily subjected to quantitative interpretation. Moreover, the selection of the appropriate sedimentation speed is crucial for AUC of nanocrystals as the density of inorganic nanocrystals is much larger than that of solvents. Quantitative analysis of sedimentation properties will allow for better agreement between experimental and theoretical models of nanocrystal solution behavior, as well as providing deeper insight into the hydrodynamic size and solution properties of nanomaterials.

  18. Use of a Soluble Anode in Electrodeposition of Thick Bismuth Telluride Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, M.; Diliberto, S.; de Vaulx, C.; Azzouz, K.; Boulanger, C.

    2014-10-01

    Integration of thermoelectric devices within an automotive heat exchanger could enable conversion of lost heat into electrical energy, contributing to improved total output from the engine. For this purpose, synthesis of thick bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) films is required. Bismuth telluride has been produced by an electrochemical method in nitric acid with a sacrificial bismuth telluride anode as the source of cations. The binary layer grows on the working electrode while the counter-electrode, a Bi2Te3 disk obtained by high frequency melting, is oxidized to BiIII and TeIV. This process leads to auto-regeneration of the solution without modification of its composition. The thickness of films deposited by use of the Bi2Te3 anode was approximately 10 times that without. To demonstrate the utility of a soluble anode in electrochemical deposition, we report characterization of the composition and morphology of the films obtained under different experimental conditions. Perfectly dense and regular Bi2Te3 films (˜400 μm) with low internal stress and uniform composition across the cross-section were prepared. Their thermoelectric properties were assessed.

  19. Sheet resistance effects in mercury cadmium telluride implanted photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorito, G.; Gasparrini, G.; Svelto, F.

    1977-01-01

    The frequency response of Hg + implanted Hgsub(1-x)Cdsub(x)Te photodiodes is discussed. This analysis, evaluating both the response to fast laser pulses and the 3 dB rolloff of the diode shot-noise spectrum, showed the necessity of adopting a distributed equivalent circuit model taking into account the implanted layer sheet resistance. Frequency behaviour, in fact, proved not to match a simple p-n junction model based on a lumped standard equivalent circuit. On this basis apparent anomalies previously reported can be explained, and useful suggestions can be obtained for design and fabrication of fast detectors. (author)

  20. Bright trions in direct-bandgap silicon nanocrystals revealed bylow-temperature single-nanocrystal spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kůsová, Kateřina; Pelant, Ivan; Valenta, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 4, Oct (2015), e336 ISSN 2047-7538 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA ČR GPP204/12/P235 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * single-nanocrystal spectroscopy * luminescing trions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 13.600, year: 2015

  1. Solution synthesis of germanium nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerung, Henry [Albuquerque, NM; Boyle, Timothy J [Kensington, MD; Bunge, Scott D [Cuyahoga Falls, OH

    2009-09-22

    A method for providing a route for the synthesis of a Ge(0) nanometer-sized material from. A Ge(II) precursor is dissolved in a ligand heated to a temperature, generally between approximately 100.degree. C. and 400.degree. C., sufficient to thermally reduce the Ge(II) to Ge(0), where the ligand is a compound that can bond to the surface of the germanium nanomaterials to subsequently prevent agglomeration of the nanomaterials. The ligand encapsulates the surface of the Ge(0) material to prevent agglomeration. The resulting solution is cooled for handling, with the cooling characteristics useful in controlling the size and size distribution of the Ge(0) materials. The characteristics of the Ge(II) precursor determine whether the Ge(0) materials that result will be nanocrystals or nanowires.

  2. Sub-2 nm SnO2 nanocrystals: A reduction/oxidation chemical reaction synthesis and optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hui; Du Ning; Chen Bindi; Cui Tianfeng; Yang Deren

    2008-01-01

    A simple reduction/oxidation chemical solution approach at room temperature has been developed to synthesize ultrafine SnO 2 nanocrystals, in which NaBH 4 is used as a reducing agent instead of mineralizers such as sodium hydroxide, ammonia, and alcohol. The morphology, structure, and optical property of the ultrafine SnO 2 nanocrystals have been characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis (DSC-TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. It is indicated that the uniform tetragonal ultrafine SnO 2 nanocrystals with the size below 2 nm have been fabricated at room temperature. The band gap of the ultrafine SnO 2 nanocrystals is about 4.1 eV, exhibiting 0.5 eV blue shift from that of the bulk SnO 2 (3.6 eV). Furthermore, the mechanism for the reduction/oxidation chemical reaction synthesis of the ultrafine SnO 2 nanocrystals has been preliminary presented

  3. 2009 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures GRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lai-Sheng [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2009-07-19

    For over thirty years, this Gordon Conference has been the premiere meeting for the field of cluster science, which studies the phenomena that arise when matter becomes small. During its history, participants have witnessed the discovery and development of many novel materials, including C60, carbon nanotubes, semiconductor and metal nanocrystals, and nanowires. In addition to addressing fundamental scientific questions related to these materials, the meeting has always included a discussion of their potential applications. Consequently, this conference has played a critical role in the birth and growth of nanoscience and engineering. The goal of the 2009 Gordon Conference is to continue the forward-looking tradition of this meeting and discuss the most recent advances in the field of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. As in past meetings, this will include new topics that broaden the field. In particular, a special emphasis will be placed on nanomaterials related to the efficient use, generation, or conversion of energy. For example, we anticipate presentations related to batteries, catalysts, photovoltaics, and thermoelectrics. In addition, we expect to address the controversy surrounding carrier multiplication with a session in which recent results addressing this phenomenon will be discussed and debated. The atmosphere of the conference, which emphasizes the presentation of unpublished results and lengthy discussion periods, ensures that attendees will enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Because only a limited number of participants are allowed to attend this conference, and oversubscription is anticipated, we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. An invitation is not required. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral

  4. Assembling a Lasing Hybrid Material With Supramolecular Polymers and Nanocrystals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Leiming

    2003-01-01

    .... In the system containing ZnO nanocrystals as the inorganic component, both phases are oriented in the hybrid material forming an ultraviolet lasing medium with a lower threshold relative to pure ZnO nanocrystals.

  5. Surface treatment of nanocrystal quantum dots after film deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykora, Milan; Koposov, Alexey; Fuke, Nobuhiro

    2015-02-03

    Provided are methods of surface treatment of nanocrystal quantum dots after film deposition so as to exchange the native ligands of the quantum dots for exchange ligands that result in improvement in charge extraction from the nanocrystals.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Colloidal Metal and Photovoltaic Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu

    2014-01-01

    -performing photovoltaic nanocrystals contain toxic elements, such as Pb, or scarce elements, such as In; thus, the production of solution-processable nanocrystals from earth-abundant materials using environmentally benign synthesis and processing methods has become a

  7. Near-infrared light emitting device using semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supran, Geoffrey J.S.; Song, Katherine W.; Hwang, Gyuweon; Correa, Raoul Emile; Shirasaki, Yasuhiro; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Bulovic, Vladimir; Scherer, Jennifer

    2018-04-03

    A near-infrared light emitting device can include semiconductor nanocrystals that emit at wavelengths beyond 1 .mu.m. The semiconductor nanocrystals can include a core and an overcoating on a surface of the core.

  8. Light Scattering Spectroscopies of Semiconductor Nanocrystals (Quantum Dots)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Peter Y; Gardner, Grat; Nozaki, Shinji; Berbezier, Isabelle

    2006-01-01

    We review the study of nanocrystals or quantum dots using inelastic light scattering spectroscopies. In particular recent calculations of the phonon density of states and low frequency Raman spectra in Ge nanocrystals are presented for comparison with experimental results

  9. Material properties of large-volume cadmium zinc telluride crystals and their relationship to nuclear detector performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, R.B.; Lund, J. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Yoon, H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    The material showing the greatest promise today for production of large-volume gamma-ray spectrometers operable at room temperature is cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). Unfortunately, because of deficiencies in the quality of the present material, high-resolution CZT spectrometers have thus far been limited to relatively small dimensions, which makes them inefficient at detecting high photon energies and ineffective for weak radiation signals except in near proximity. To exploit CZT fully, it will be necessary to make substantial improvements in the material quality. Improving the material involves advances in the purity, crystallinity, and control of the electrical compensation mechanism. Sandia National Laboratories, California, in close collaboration with US industry and academia, has initiated efforts to develop a detailed understanding of the underlying material problems limiting the performance of large volume gamma-ray spectrometers and to overcome them through appropriate corrections therein. A variety of analytical and numerical techniques are employed to quantify impurities, compositional and stoichiometric variations, crystallinity, strain, bulk and surface defect states, carrier mobilities and lifetimes, electric field distributions, and contact chemistry. Data from these measurements are correlated with spatial maps of the gamma-ray and alpha particle spectroscopic response to determine improvements in the material purification, crystal growth, detector fabrication, and surface passivation procedures. The results of several analytical techniques will be discussed. The intended accomplishment of this work is to develop a low-cost, high-efficiency CZT spectrometer with an active volume of 5 cm{sup 3} and energy resolution of 1--2% (at 662 keV), which would give the US a new field capability for screening radioactive substances.

  10. Material properties of large-volume cadmium zinc telluride crystals and their relationship to nuclear detector performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.B.; Lund, J.; Yoon, H.

    1997-01-01

    The material showing the greatest promise today for production of large-volume gamma-ray spectrometers operable at room temperature is cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). Unfortunately, because of deficiencies in the quality of the present material, high-resolution CZT spectrometers have thus far been limited to relatively small dimensions, which makes them inefficient at detecting high photon energies and ineffective for weak radiation signals except in near proximity. To exploit CZT fully, it will be necessary to make substantial improvements in the material quality. Improving the material involves advances in the purity, crystallinity, and control of the electrical compensation mechanism. Sandia National Laboratories, California, in close collaboration with US industry and academia, has initiated efforts to develop a detailed understanding of the underlying material problems limiting the performance of large volume gamma-ray spectrometers and to overcome them through appropriate corrections therein. A variety of analytical and numerical techniques are employed to quantify impurities, compositional and stoichiometric variations, crystallinity, strain, bulk and surface defect states, carrier mobilities and lifetimes, electric field distributions, and contact chemistry. Data from these measurements are correlated with spatial maps of the gamma-ray and alpha particle spectroscopic response to determine improvements in the material purification, crystal growth, detector fabrication, and surface passivation procedures. The results of several analytical techniques will be discussed. The intended accomplishment of this work is to develop a low-cost, high-efficiency CZT spectrometer with an active volume of 5 cm 3 and energy resolution of 1--2% (at 662 keV), which would give the US a new field capability for screening radioactive substances

  11. Nanocrystal Bioassembly: Asymmetry, Proximity, and Enzymatic Manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claridge, Shelley A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Research at the interface between biomolecules and inorganic nanocrystals has resulted in a great number of new discoveries. In part this arises from the synergistic duality of the system: biomolecules may act as self-assembly agents for organizing inorganic nanocrystals into functional materials; alternatively, nanocrystals may act as microscopic or spectroscopic labels for elucidating the behavior of complex biomolecular systems. However, success in either of these functions relies heavily uponthe ability to control the conjugation and assembly processes.In the work presented here, we first design a branched DNA scaffold which allows hybridization of DNA-nanocrystal monoconjugates to form discrete assemblies. Importantly, the asymmetry of the branched scaffold allows the formation of asymmetric2assemblies of nanocrystals. In the context of a self-assembled device, this can be considered a step toward the ability to engineer functionally distinct inputs and outputs.Next we develop an anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography purification method which allows large gold nanocrystals attached to single strands of very short DNA to be purified. When two such complementary conjugates are hybridized, the large nanocrystals are brought into close proximity, allowing their plasmon resonances to couple. Such plasmon-coupled constructs are of interest both as optical interconnects for nanoscale devices and as `plasmon ruler? biomolecular probes.We then present an enzymatic ligation strategy for creating multi-nanoparticle building blocks for self-assembly. In constructing a nanoscale device, such a strategy would allow pre-assembly and purification of components; these constructs can also act as multi-label probes of single-stranded DNA conformational dynamics. Finally we demonstrate a simple proof-of-concept of a nanoparticle analog of the polymerase chain reaction.

  12. Enhanced formation of Ge nanocrystals in Ge : SiO2 layers by swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonova, I V; Volodin, V A; Marin, D M; Skuratov, V A; Smagulova, S A; Janse van Vuuren, A; Neethling, J; Jedrzejewski, J; Balberg, I

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report the ability of swift heavy Xe ions with an energy of 480 MeV and a fluence of 10 12 cm -2 to enhance the formation of Ge nanocrystals within SiO 2 layers with variable Ge contents. These Ge-SiO 2 films were fabricated by the co-sputtering of Ge and quartz sources which followed various annealing procedures. In particular, we found that the irradiation of the Ge : SiO 2 films with subsequent annealing at 500 °C leads to the formation of a high concentration of nanocrystals (NCs) with a size of 2-5 nm, whereas without irradiation only amorphous inclusions were observed. This effect, as evidenced by Raman spectra, is enhanced by pre-irradiation at 550 °C and post-irradiation annealing at 600 °C, which also leads to the observation of room temperature visible photoluminescence. (paper)

  13. A probabilistic model of the electron transport in films of nanocrystals arranged in a cubic lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriegel, Ilka [Department of Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), via Morego, 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Scotognella, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.scotognella@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Center for Nano Science and Technology@PoliMi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Giovanni Pascoli, 70/3, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2016-08-01

    The fabrication of nanocrystal (NC) films, starting from colloidal dispersion, is a very attractive topic in condensed matter physics community. NC films can be employed for transistors, light emitting diodes, lasers, and solar cells. For this reason the understanding of the film conductivity is of major importance. In this paper we describe a probabilistic model that allows the prediction of the conductivity of NC films, in this case of a cubic lattice of Lead Selenide or Cadmium Selenide NCs. The model is based on the hopping probability between NCs. The results are compared to experimental data reported in literature. - Highlights: • Colloidal nanocrystal (NC) film conductivity is a topic of major importance. • We present a probabilistic model to predict the electron conductivity in NC films. • The model is based on the hopping probability between NCs. • We found a good agreement between the model and data reported in literature.

  14. Depositing of CuS nanocrystals upon the graphene scaffold and their photocatalytic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongbin; Zhang, Lixin; Jiu, Hongfang; Li, Na; Sun, Yixin

    2014-06-01

    A series of copper sulfide nanocrystals/graphene nanocomposites (CuS/GR) with different weight ratios of GR were fabricated via a one-step hydrothermal approach by using dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as the source of sulfur and solvent. The as-prepared samples were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS), transmission scanning electron microscopy (TEM) and photoluminescence spectra (PL) are employed to determine the properties of the samples. The results show that the CuS nanocrystals with an average size of 16 nm almost overspread on the GR graphene scaffold. The samples exhibit excellent photocatalytic activities in degrading the methylene blue (MB) compared with pure CuS. This work shows that CuS/GR nanocomposites would be promising in dye wastewater treatment as Fenton-like reagents.

  15. Depositing of CuS nanocrystals upon the graphene scaffold and their photocatalytic activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yongbin; Zhang, Lixin; Jiu, Hongfang; Li, Na; Sun, Yixin

    2014-01-01

    A series of copper sulfide nanocrystals/graphene nanocomposites (CuS/GR) with different weight ratios of GR were fabricated via a one-step hydrothermal approach by using dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as the source of sulfur and solvent. The as-prepared samples were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS), transmission scanning electron microscopy (TEM) and photoluminescence spectra (PL) are employed to determine the properties of the samples. The results show that the CuS nanocrystals with an average size of 16 nm almost overspread on the GR graphene scaffold. The samples exhibit excellent photocatalytic activities in degrading the methylene blue (MB) compared with pure CuS. This work shows that CuS/GR nanocomposites would be promising in dye wastewater treatment as Fenton-like reagents.

  16. Depositing of CuS nanocrystals upon the graphene scaffold and their photocatalytic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yongbin [Chemical Engineering and Environment Institute, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Zhang, Lixin, E-mail: edwardzlx@163.com [Chemical Engineering and Environment Institute, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Jiu, Hongfang [College of Science, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Li, Na; Sun, Yixin [Chemical Engineering and Environment Institute, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China)

    2014-06-01

    A series of copper sulfide nanocrystals/graphene nanocomposites (CuS/GR) with different weight ratios of GR were fabricated via a one-step hydrothermal approach by using dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as the source of sulfur and solvent. The as-prepared samples were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS), transmission scanning electron microscopy (TEM) and photoluminescence spectra (PL) are employed to determine the properties of the samples. The results show that the CuS nanocrystals with an average size of 16 nm almost overspread on the GR graphene scaffold. The samples exhibit excellent photocatalytic activities in degrading the methylene blue (MB) compared with pure CuS. This work shows that CuS/GR nanocomposites would be promising in dye wastewater treatment as Fenton-like reagents.

  17. Architectural design of heterogeneous metallic nanocrystals--principles and processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Zhang, Qingbo; Yao, Qiaofeng; Xie, Jianping; Lee, Jim Yang

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Heterogeneous metal nanocrystals (HMNCs) are a natural extension of simple metal nanocrystals (NCs), but as a research topic, they have been much less explored until recently. HMNCs are formed by integrating metal NCs of different compositions into a common entity, similar to the way atoms are bonded to form molecules. HMNCs can be built to exhibit an unprecedented architectural diversity and complexity by programming the arrangement of the NC building blocks ("unit NCs"). The architectural engineering of HMNCs involves the design and fabrication of the architecture-determining elements (ADEs), i.e., unit NCs with precise control of shape and size, and their relative positions in the design. Similar to molecular engineering, where structural diversity is used to create more property variations for application explorations, the architectural engineering of HMNCs can similarly increase the utility of metal NCs by offering a suite of properties to support multifunctionality in applications. The architectural engineering of HMNCs calls for processes and operations that can execute the design. Some enabling technologies already exist in the form of classical micro- and macroscale fabrication techniques, such as masking and etching. These processes, when used singly or in combination, are fully capable of fabricating nanoscopic objects. What is needed is a detailed understanding of the engineering control of ADEs and the translation of these principles into actual processes. For simplicity of execution, these processes should be integrated into a common reaction system and yet retain independence of control. The key to architectural diversity is therefore the independent controllability of each ADE in the design blueprint. The right chemical tools must be applied under the right circumstances in order to achieve the desired outcome. In this Account, after a short illustration of the infinite possibility of combining different ADEs to create HMNC design

  18. Microwave-assisted synthesis and optical properties of cuprous oxide micro/nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Dandan [Key Laboratory of Processing and Testing Technology of Glass and Functional Ceramics of Shandong Province, Qilu University of Technology, Jinan 250353 (China); Du, Yi, E-mail: duyi234@126.com [Key Laboratory of Processing and Testing Technology of Glass and Functional Ceramics of Shandong Province, Qilu University of Technology, Jinan 250353 (China); Tian, Xiuying, E-mail: xiuyingt@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hunan Institute of Humanities Science and Technology, Loudi 417000 (China); Li, Zhongfu; Chen, Zhongtao; Zhu, Chaofeng [Key Laboratory of Processing and Testing Technology of Glass and Functional Ceramics of Shandong Province, Qilu University of Technology, Jinan 250353 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Cuprous oxide micro/nanocrystals were fabricated by a facile and green microwave-assisted method using soluble starch as reductant and dispersant. Spheres with the diameter of about 100 and 600 nm, octahedron and truncated octahedron with the edge length of about 0.8–3 μm cuprous oxide micro/nanocrystals were successfully obtained. Microwave heating was proved to be a efficient method and was advantageous to the homogeneous nucleation. Growth mechanism of the prepared Cu{sub 2}O microcrystals were investigated carefully. Furthermore, the optical properties of the prepared cuprous oxide microcrystals were investigated by UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, demonstrating that their band gaps of obtained samples were 1.96–2.07 eV, assigned to their different sizes and morphologies. - Abstract: Cuprous oxide micro/nanocrystals were fabricated by a facile and green microwave-assisted method using soluble starch as reductant and dispersant. It was observed that the addition amounts of NaOH had a prominent effect on the morphologies and size of cuprous oxide products, and microwave heating was proved to be a efficient method and was advantageous to the homogeneous nucleation. The as-obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The results indicated that the samples were pure cuprous oxide. Spheres with the diameter of about 100 and 600 nm, octahedron and truncated octahedron with the edge length of about 0.8–3 μm cuprous oxide micro/nanocrystals were successfully obtained. Furthermore, the UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy was used to investigate the optical properties of the prepared cuprous oxide microcrystals, demonstrating that their band gaps of obtained samples were 1.96–2.07 eV, assigned to their different sizes and morphologies.

  19. Effect of Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the electrical properties of Ba{sub 0.9}Ca{sub 0.1}Zr{sub 0.1}Ti{sub 0.9}O{sub 3} ceramics fabricated using nanocrystals seed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parjansri, P. [Rajamangala University of Technology Krungthep, Physics Division, Faculty of Science and Technology, Bangkok (Thailand); Intatha, U. [Mae Fah Luang University, School of Science, Chiang Rai (Thailand); Guo, R.; Bhalla, A.S. [University of Texas at San Antonio, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, San Antonio, TX (United States); Eitssayeam, S. [Chiang Mai University, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Chiang Mai University, Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai (Thailand)

    2016-09-15

    This work was to investigate the effects of antimony oxide (Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}) on the electrical properties of Ba{sub 0.9}Ca{sub 0.1}Zr{sub 0.1}Ti{sub 0.9}O{sub 3} (BCZT) ceramics and was prepared by adding 1 mol% of BCZT nanocrystals. The seed is nanocrystals of BCZT which was synthesized by the molten salt method. The ceramics powders were prepared by the mixed oxide method using BaCO{sub 3}, CaCO{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2} as starting materials, and the BCZT seed was added as nanocrystal for induce phase transition. They were doped with x mol% Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} (x = 0.0-0.5). Results indicated that all samples show pure perovskite phase. The Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} enhanced the electrical properties of the ceramic systems. Excellent values of a dielectric constant (ε {sub r}) at room temperature (T{sub r}) were 4086 with sample of x = 0.5, and at Curie temperature (T{sub c}) was 15,485 for samples with x = 0.1. The highest remnant polarization (P{sub r}), piezoelectric charge coefficient (d{sub 33}), piezoelectric voltage coefficient (g{sub 33}), electromechanical coefficient for planar mode (k{sub p}) and thickness mode (k{sub t}) values were 6.3 μC/cm{sup 2}, 346 pC/N, 15.6 x 10{sup -3} Vm/N, 42 and 41 %, respectively, which were obtained for the sample of x = 0.2 mol% Sb. (orig.)

  20. Controlled fabrication of luminescent and magnetic nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingxin; Zhong, Yucheng; Fan, Jing; Huang, Weiren

    2018-03-01

    Luminescent and magnetic multifunctional nanocomposite is in high demand and widely used in many scales, such as drug delivery, bioseparation, chemical/biosensors, and so on. Although lots of strategies have been successfully developed for the demand of multifunctional nanocomposites, it is not easy to prepare multifunctional nanocomposites by using a simple method, and satisfy all kinds of demands simultaneously. In this work, via a facile and versatile method, luminescent nanocrystals and magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized through self-assembly under vigorous stirring and ultrasonic treatment. These multifunctional nanocomposites are not only water stable but also find wide application such as magnetic separation and concentration with a series of moderate speed, multicolor fluorescence at different emission wavelength, high efficiency of the excitation and emission, and so on. By changing different kinds of luminescent nanocrystals and controlling the amount of luminescent and magnetic nanoparticles, a train of multifunctional nanocomposites was successfully fabricated via a versatile and robust method.

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis of tungsten doped tin dioxide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cailong; Li, Yufeng; Chen, Yiwen; Lin, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Tungsten doped tin dioxide (WTO) nanocrystals were synthesized through a one-step hydrothermal method. The structure, composition and morphology of WTO nanocrystals were characterized by x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra, zeta potential analysis and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Results show that the as-prepared WTO nanocrystals were rutile-type structure with the size near 13 nm. Compared with the undoped tin dioxide nanocrystals, the WTO nanocrystals possessed better dispersity in ethanol phase and formed transparent sol.

  2. Structure and performance of dielectric films based on self-assembled nanocrystals with a high dielectric constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Limin; Liu, Shuangyi; Van Tassell, Barry J; Liu, Xiaohua; Byro, Andrew; Zhang, Henan; Leland, Eli S; Akins, Daniel L; Steingart, Daniel A; Li, Jackie; O'Brien, Stephen

    2013-10-18

    Self-assembled films built from nanoparticles with a high dielectric constant are attractive as a foundation for new dielectric media with increased efficiency and range of operation, due to the ability to exploit nanofabrication techniques and emergent electrical properties originating from the nanoscale. However, because the building block is a discrete one-dimensional unit, it becomes a challenge to capture potential enhancements in dielectric performance in two or three dimensions, frequently due to surface effects or the presence of discontinuities. This is a recurring theme in nanoparticle film technology when applied to the realm of thin film semiconductor and device electronics. We present the use of chemically synthesized (Ba,Sr)TiO3 nanocrystals, and a novel deposition-polymerization technique, as a means to fabricate the dielectric layer. The effective dielectric constant of the film is tunable according to nanoparticle size, and effective film dielectric constants of up to 34 are enabled. Wide area and multilayer dielectrics of up to 8 cm(2) and 190 nF are reported, for which the building block is an 8 nm nanocrystal. We describe models for assessing dielectric performance, and distinct methods for improving the dielectric constant of a nanocrystal thin film. The approach relies on evaporatively driven assembly of perovskite nanocrystals with uniform size distributions in a tunable 7-30 nm size range, coupled with the use of low molecular weight monomer/polymer precursor chemistry that can infiltrate the porous nanocrystal thin film network post assembly. The intercrystal void space (low k dielectric volume fraction) is minimized, while simultaneously promoting intercrystal connectivity and maximizing volume fraction of the high k dielectric component. Furfuryl alcohol, which has good affinity to the surface of (Ba,Sr)TiO3 nanocrystals and miscibility with a range of solvents, is demonstrated to be ideal for the production of nanocomposites. The

  3. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  4. Enriching Silver Nanocrystals with a Second Noble Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiren; Sun, Xiaojun; Yang, Yin; Li, Jumei; Zhang, Yun; Qin, Dong

    2017-07-18

    Noble-metal nanocrystals have received considerable interests owing to their fascinating properties and promising applications in areas including plasmonics, catalysis, sensing, imaging, and medicine. As demonstrated by ample examples, the performance of nanocrystals in these and related applications can be augmented by switching from monometallic to bimetallic systems. The inclusion of a second metal can enhance the properties and greatly expand the application landscape by bringing in new capabilities. Seeded growth offers a powerful route to bimetallic nanocrystals. This approach is built upon the concept that preformed nanocrystals with uniform, well-controlled size, shape, and structure can serve as seeds to template and direct the deposition of metal atoms. Seeded growth is, however, limited by galvanic replacement when the deposited metal is less reactive than the seed. The involvement of galvanic replacement not only makes it difficult to control the outcome of seeded growth but also causes degradation to some properties. We have successfully addressed this issue by reducing the salt precursor(s) into atoms with essentially no galvanic replacement. In the absence of self-nucleation, the atoms are preferentially deposited onto the seeds to generate bimetallic nanocrystals with controlled structures. In this Account, we use Ag nanocubes as an example to demonstrate the fabrication of Ag@M and Ag@Ag-M (M = Au, Pd, or Pt) nanocubes with a core-frame or core-shell structure by controlling the deposition of M atoms. A typical synthesis involves the titration of M n+ (a precursor to M) ions into an aqueous suspension containing Ag nanocubes, ascorbic acid, and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) under ambient conditions. In one approach, aqueous sodium hydroxide is introduced to increase the initial pH of the reaction system. At pH = 11.9, ascorbic acid is dominated by ascorbate monoanion, a much stronger reductant, to suppress the galvanic replacement between M n+ and Ag. In

  5. Crystallization and Growth of Colloidal Nanocrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Leite, Edson Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Since the size, shape, and microstructure of nanocrystalline materials strongly impact physical and chemical properties, the development of new synthetic routes to  nanocrystals with controlled composition and morphology is a key objective of the nanomaterials community. This objective is dependent on control of the nucleation and growth mechanisms that occur during the synthetic process, which in turn requires a fundamental understanding of both classical nucleation and growth and non-classical growth processes in nanostructured materials.  Recently, a novel growth process called Oriented Attachment (OA) was identified which appears to be a fundamental mechanism during the development of nanoscale  materials. OA is a special case of aggregation that provides an important route by which nanocrystals grow, defects are formed, and unique—often symmetry-defying—crystal morphologies can be produced. This growth mechanism involves reversible self-assembly of primary nanocrystals followed by reorientati...

  6. Shaping metal nanocrystals through epitaxial seeded growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habas, Susan E.; Lee, Hyunjoo; Radmilovic, Velimir; Somorjai,Gabor A.; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-17

    Morphological control of nanocrystals has becomeincreasingly important, as many of their physical and chemical propertiesare highly shape-dependent. Nanocrystal shape control for both single andmultiple material systems, however, remains fairly empirical andchallenging. New methods need to be explored for the rational syntheticdesign of heterostructures with controlled morphology. Overgrowth of adifferent material on well-faceted seeds, for example, allows for the useof the defined seed morphology to control nucleation and growth of thesecondary structure. Here, we have used highly faceted cubic Pt seeds todirect the epitaxial overgrowth of a secondary metal. We demonstrate thisconcept with lattice matched Pd to produce conformal shape-controlledcore-shell particles, and then extend it to lattice mismatched Au to giveanisotropic growth. Seeding with faceted nanocrystals may havesignificant potential towards the development of shape-controlledheterostructures with defined interfaces.

  7. The structure and morphology of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadavanich, Andreas V. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-11-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals were studied using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Organically capped nanocrystals were found to have faceted shapes consistent with Wulff polyhedra after the effects of capping ligands on surface energies were taken into account. The basic shape thus derived for wurtzite (WZ) structure CdSe nanocrystals capped by tri-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) was a truncated hexagonal prism, elongated alone the <001> axis with (100) and (002) facets. This structure has C{sub 3v} point group symmetry. The main defect in this structure is a stacking fault (a single layer of zinc blende type stacking), which does not significantly affect the shape (does not alter the point group).

  8. Strained interface defects in silicon nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Benjamin G.; Stradins, Paul [National Center for Photovoltaics, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Hiller, Daniel; Zacharias, Margit [IMTEK - Faculty of Engineering, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg (Germany); Luo, Jun-Wei; Beard, Matthew C. [Chemical and Materials Science, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Semonin, Octavi E. [Chemical and Materials Science, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-08-07

    The surface of silicon nanocrystals embedded in an oxide matrix can contain numerous interface defects. These defects strongly affect the nanocrystals' photoluminescence efficiency and optical absorption. Dangling-bond defects are nearly eliminated by H{sub 2} passivation, thus decreasing absorption below the quantum-confined bandgap and enhancing PL efficiency by an order of magnitude. However, there remain numerous other defects seen in absorption by photothermal deflection spectroscopy; these defects cause non-radiative recombination that limits the PL efficiency to <15%. Using atomistic pseudopotential simulations, we attribute these defects to two specific types of distorted bonds: Si-Si and bridging Si-O-Si bonds between two Si atoms at the nanocrystal surface. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Developing New Nanoprobes from Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Aihua [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots havegarnered the spotlight as an important new class of biological labelingtool. Withoptical properties superior to conventional organicfluorophores from many aspects, such as high photostability andmultiplexing capability, quantum dots have been applied in a variety ofadvanced imaging applications. This dissertation research goes along withlarge amount of research efforts in this field, while focusing on thedesign and development of new nanoprobes from semiconductor nanocrystalsthat are aimed for useful imaging or sensing applications not possiblewith quantum dots alone. Specifically speaking, two strategies have beenapplied. In one, we have taken advantage of the increasing capability ofmanipulating the shape of semiconductor nanocrystals by developingsemiconductor quantum rods as fluorescent biological labels. In theother, we have assembled quantum dots and gold nanocrystals into discretenanostructures using DNA. The background information and synthesis,surface manipulation, property characterization and applications of thesenew nanoprobes in a few biological experiments are detailed in thedissertation.

  10. Carrier Transport, Recombination, and the Effects of Grain Boundaries in Polycrystalline Cadmium Telluride Thin Films for Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuteja, Mohit

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), a chalcogenide semiconductor, is currently used as the absorber layer in one of the highest efficiency thin film solar cell technologies. Current efficiency records are over 22%. In 2011, CdTe solar cells accounted for 8% of all solar cells installed. This is because, in part, CdTe has a low degradation rate, high optical absorption coefficient, and high tolerance to intrinsic defects. Solar cells based on polycrystalline CdTe exhibit a higher short-circuit current, fill factor, and power conversion efficiency than their single crystal counterparts. This is despite the fact that polycrystalline CdTe devices exhibit lower open-circuit voltages. This is contrary to the observation for silicon and III-V semiconductors, where material defects cause a dramatic drop in device performance. For example, grain boundaries in covalently-bonded semiconductors (a) act as carrier recombination centers, and (b) lead to localized energy states, causing carrier trapping. Despite significant research to date, the mechanism responsible for the superior current collection properties of polycrystalline CdTe solar cells has not been conclusively answered. This dissertation focuses on the macro-scale electronic band structure, and micro scale electronic properties of grains and grain boundaries in device-grade CdTe thin films to answer this open question. My research utilized a variety of experimental techniques. Samples were obtained from leading groups fabricating the material and devices. A CdCl 2 anneal is commonly performed as part of this fabrication and its effects were also investigated. Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy was employed to study the band structure and defect states in CdTe polycrystals. Cadmium vacancy- and chlorine-related states lead to carrier recombination, as in CdTe films grown by other methods. Comparing polycrystalline and single crystal CdTe, showed that the key to explaining the improved performance of polycrystalline CdTe does

  11. Fabrication of Metallic Quantum Dot Arrays For Nanoscale Nonlinear Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, M. D.; Hmelo, A. B.; Lopez Magruder, R., III; Weller Haglund, R. A., Jr.; Feldman, L. C.

    2003-03-01

    Ordered arrays of metal nanocrystals embedded in or sequestered on dielectric hosts have potential applications as elements of nonlinear or near-field optical circuits, as sensitizers for fluorescence emitters and photo detectors, and as anchor points for arrays of biological molecules. Metal nanocrystals are strongly confined electronic systems with size-, shape and spatial orientation-dependent optical responses. At the smallest scales (below about 15 nm diameter), their band structure is drastically altered by the small size of the system, and the reduced population of conduction-band electrons. Here we report on the fabrication of two-dimensional ordered metallic nanocrystal arrays, and one-dimensional nanocrystal-loaded waveguides for optical investigations. We have employed strategies for synthesizing metal nanocrystal composites that capitalize on the best features of focused ion beam (FIB) machining and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The FIB generates arrays of specialized sites; PLD vapor deposition results in the directed self-assembly of Ag nanoparticles nucleated at the FIB generated sites on silicon substrates. We present results based on the SEM, AFM and optical characterization of prototype composites. This research has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-FG02-01ER45916.

  12. Feasibility of preparing patterned molybdenum coatings on bismuth telluride thermoelectric modules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Miller, Stephen Samuel; Knight, Marlene E.; LePage, William S.; Sobczak, Catherine Elizabeth.; Wesolowski, Daniel Edward

    2013-09-01

    Molybdenum electrical interconnects for thermoelectric modules were produced by air plasma spraying a 30%CE%BCm size molybdenum powder through a laser-cut Kapton tape mask. Initial feasibility demonstrations showed that the molybdenum coating exhibited excellent feature and spacing retention (~170%CE%BCm), adhered to bismuth-telluride, and exhibited electrical conductivity appropriate for use as a thermoelectric module interconnect. A design of experiments approach was used to optimize air plasma spray process conditions to produce a molybdenum coating with low electrical resistivity. Finally, a molybdenum coating was successfully produced on a fullscale thermoelectric module. After the addition of a final titanium/gold layer deposited on top of the molybdenum coating, the full scale module exhibited an electrical resistivity of 128%CE%A9, approaching the theoretical resistivity value for the 6mm module leg of 112%CE%A9. Importantly, air plasma sprayed molybdenum did not show significant chemical reaction with bismuth-telluride substrate at the coating/substrate interface. The molybdenum coating microstructure consisted of lamellar splats containing columnar grains. Air plasma sprayed molybdenum embedded deeply (several microns) into the bismuth-telluride substrate, leading to good adhesion between the coating and the substrate. Clusters of round pores (and cracks radiating from the pores) were found immediately beneath the molybdenum coating. These pores are believed to result from tellurium vaporization during the spray process where the molten molybdenum droplets (2623%C2%B0C) transferred their heat of solidification to the substrate at the moment of impact. Substrate cooling during the molybdenum deposition process was recommended to mitigate tellurium vaporization in future studies.

  13. Plasmonic Properties of Silicon Nanocrystals Doped with Boron and Phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Nicolaas J; Schramke, Katelyn S; Kortshagen, Uwe R

    2015-08-12

    Degenerately doped silicon nanocrystals are appealing plasmonic materials due to silicon's low cost and low toxicity. While surface plasmonic resonances of boron-doped and phosphorus-doped silicon nanocrystals were recently observed, there currently is poor understanding of the effect of surface conditions on their plasmonic behavior. Here, we demonstrate that phosphorus-doped silicon nanocrystals exhibit a plasmon resonance immediately after their synthesis but may lose their plasmonic response with oxidation. In contrast, boron-doped nanocrystals initially do not exhibit plasmonic response but become plasmonically active through postsynthesis oxidation or annealing. We interpret these results in terms of substitutional doping being the dominant doping mechanism for phosphorus-doped silicon nanocrystals, with oxidation-induced defects trapping free electrons. The behavior of boron-doped silicon nanocrystals is more consistent with a strong contribution of surface doping. Importantly, boron-doped silicon nanocrystals exhibit air-stable plasmonic behavior over periods of more than a year.

  14. Luminescence in colloidal Mn2+-doped semiconductor nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulac, Remi; Archer, Paul I.; Gamelin, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in nanocrystal doping chemistries have substantially broadened the variety of photophysical properties that can be observed in colloidal Mn 2+ -doped semiconductor nanocrystals. A brief overview is provided, focusing on Mn 2+ -doped II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals prepared by direct chemical synthesis and capped with coordinating surface ligands. These Mn 2+ -doped semiconductor nanocrystals are organized into three major groups according to the location of various Mn 2+ -related excited states relative to the energy gap of the host semiconductor nanocrystals. The positioning of these excited states gives rise to three distinct relaxation scenarios following photoexcitation. A brief outlook on future research directions is provided. - Graphical abstract: Mn 2+ -doped semiconductor nanocrystals are organized into three major groups according to the location of various Mn 2+ -related excited states relative to the energy gap of the host semiconductor nanocrystals. The positioning of these excited states gives rise to three distinct relaxation scenarios following photoexcitation

  15. Cloning nanocrystal morphology with soft templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Dev Kumar; Pandey, Anshu

    2016-08-01

    In most template directed preparative methods, while the template decides the nanostructure morphology, the structure of the template itself is a non-general outcome of its peculiar chemistry. Here we demonstrate a template mediated synthesis that overcomes this deficiency. This synthesis involves overgrowth of silica template onto a sacrificial nanocrystal. Such templates are used to copy the morphologies of gold nanorods. After template overgrowth, gold is removed and silver is regrown in the template cavity to produce a single crystal silver nanorod. This technique allows for duplicating existing nanocrystals, while also providing a quantifiable breakdown of the structure - shape interdependence.

  16. Tiny optical fiber temperature sensor based on temperature-dependent refractive index of zinc telluride film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Qiang; Song, Zhangqi; Song, Dongyu; Zhang, Xueliang; Li, Bingsheng; Yu, Yang; Chen, Yuzhong

    2018-03-01

    The temperature-dependent refractive index of zinc telluride film can be used to develop a tiny, low cost and film-coated optical fiber temperature sensor. Pulse reference-based compensation technique is used to largely reduce the background noise which makes it possible to detect the minor reflectivity change of the film in different temperatures. The temperature sensitivity is 0.0034dB/° and the background noise is measured to be 0.0005dB, so the resolution can achieve 0.2°.

  17. Cadmium telluride gamma-radiation detectors with a high energy resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseeva, L.A.; Dorogov, P.G.; Ivanov, V.I.; Khusainov, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    This paper considers the possibility of improving the energy resolution of cadmium telluride gamma-radiation detectors through the choice of the geometry and size of the sensitive region of the detector. The optimum ratio of the product of the mobility and lifetime for electrons to the same product for holes from the point of view of energy resolution is greater than or equal to 10 2 for a detector of spherical geometry and should be less than or equal to 10 for a cylindrical geometry and approximately 1 for a planar geometry. The optimum values of the major and minor radii of a spherical detector are calculated

  18. Formation of solid solutions on the boundary of zinc oxidezinc telluride heterojunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurkan, A.E.; Buzhor, L.V.

    1987-01-01

    Distribution of ZnO x Te 1-x alloy composition on the interface of zinc oxide-zinc telluride heterojunction depending on the production conditions is investigated. A regularity in the formation of an extended area with constant alloy composition is detected. The regularity is explained by the fact that electric Peltier field conditioned by contact of two heterogeneous semiconductors participates in the solid solution formation process. Peltier field levels off the composition at the end length section. So, a possibility of creating a section with the assigned minor thickness alloy constant composition controlled in the interface of heterojunction occurs

  19. Specific features of the photoconductivity of semi-insulating cadmium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubyatnikov, V. A.; Grigor’ev, F. I.; Lysenko, A. P., E-mail: aplysenko@hse.ru; Strogankova, N. I.; Shadov, M. B. [National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow Institute of Electronics and Mathematics (Russian Federation); Belov, A. G. [OAO GIREDMET State Research and Design Institute of the Rare-Metal Industry (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    The effect of local illumination providing a high level of free-carrier injection on the conductivity of a sample of semi-insulating cadmium telluride and on the properties of ohmic contacts to the sample is studied. It is found that, irrespective of the illumination region, the contact resistance of ohmic contacts decreases and the concentration of majority carriers in the sample grows in proportion to the illumination intensity. It is shown that inherent heterogeneities in crystals of semi-insulating semiconductors can be studied by scanning with a light probe.

  20. Iron telluride nanorods-based system for the detection of total mercury in blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Prathik; Lin, Zong-Hong [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Liang, Chi-Te [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chang, Huan-Tsung, E-mail: changht@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Elucidation of the detection of mercury using iron telluride nanorods (FeTe NRs), and dose-response curve for varying concentrations of Hg{sup 2+}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron telluride nanorods (FeTe NRs) are prepared from tellurium nanowires (Te NWs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercury telluride nanorods (HgTe NRs) form by cation exchange reaction of FeTe NRs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sup 2+} ions released catalyze the oxidation of ABTS by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercury is effectively determined in blood with an LOD of 1.31 nM at S/N ratio 3. - Abstract: We have developed a simple, colorimetric iron telluride (FeTe) nanorods (NRs) based system for the detection of mercury, mainly based on the cation exchange reaction between FeTe NRs and Hg{sup 2+}. FeTe NRs (length, 105 {+-} 21 nm) react with Hg{sup 2+} to form HgTe NRs (length, 112 {+-} 26 nm) and consequently release Fe{sup 2+} ions that catalyzes the oxidation between a peroxidase substrate 2,2 Prime -azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The concentration of Fe{sup 2+} and thereby Hg{sup 2+} can be determined by measuring the absorbance of the ABTS oxidized product at 418 nm. This approach allows the detection of Hg{sup 2+}, with a limit of detection of 1.31 nM at a signal-to-noise ratio 3 and a linear range 5-100 nM (R{sup 2} = 0.99). The low-cost, simple, sensitive, and reproducible assay has been validated for the detection of Hg{sup 2+} in a blood sample (SRM 955c), with the result being in good agreement with that provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  1. Crystalline perfection and mechanical investigations on vertical Bridgman grown Bismuth telluride (Bi_2Te_3) single crystals for thermoelectric applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, Anuj; Vijayan, N.; Singh, Budhendra; Thukral, Kanika; Maurya, K.K.

    2016-01-01

    High efficiency thermoelectric materials plays a vital role in power generation and refrigeration applications. Bismuth telluride (Bi_2Te_3) is one among them. In the present work single crystal of bismuth telluride was grown using vertical Bridgman technique. The phase of grown crystals was analysed using a powder X-ray diffractometer. Quality of the grown crystal was assessed by using high resolution X-ray diffractometer and observed that it is fairly good. Further mechanical investigations on grown crystal was carried out using nano-indentation technique and various mechanical properties like hardness, stiffness and Young’s modulus were evaluated. Observed results clearly indicate its suitability for thermoelectric applications.

  2. Lead telluride with increased mechanical stability for cylindrical thermoelectric generators; Bleitellurid mit erhoehter mechanischer Stabilitaet fuer zylindrische thermoelektrische Generatoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Andreas

    2013-04-30

    The aim of this work is to improve the mechanical stability of lead telluride (PbTe), trying to vary its mechanical properties independently from its thermoelectric properties. Thus the influence of material preparation as well as different dopants on the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of lead telluride is being analysed. When using appropriately set process parameters, milling and sintering of lead telluride increases the material's hardness. With sintering temperatures exceeding 300 C stable material of high relative density can be achieved. Milling lead telluride generates lattice defects leading to a reduction of the material's charge carrier density. These defects can be reduced by increased sintering temperatures. Contamination of the powder due to the milling process leads to bloating during thermal cycling and thus reduced density of the sintered material. In addition to that, evaporation of tellurium at elevated temperatures causes instability of the material's thermoelectric properties. Based on the experimental results obtained in this work, the best thermoelectric and mechanical properties can be obtained by sintering coarse powders at around 400 C. Within this work a concept was developed to vary the mechanical properties of lead telluride via synthesis of PbTe with electrically nondoping elements, which thus may keep the thermoelectric properties unchanged. Therefore, the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of Pb{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}Te were investigated. Doping pure PbTe with calcium causes a significant increase of the material's hardness while only slightly decreasing the charge carrier density and thus keeping the thermoelectric properties apart from a slight reduction of the electrical conductivity nearly unchanged. The abovementioned concept is proven using sodium doped lead telluride, as it is used for thermoelectric generators: The additional doping with calcium again increases the material's hardness while its thermoelectric

  3. Lead telluride with increased mechanical stability for cylindrical thermoelectric generators; Bleitellurid mit erhoehter mechanischer Stabilitaet fuer zylindrische thermoelektrische Generatoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Andreas

    2013-04-30

    The aim of this work is to improve the mechanical stability of lead telluride (PbTe), trying to vary its mechanical properties independently from its thermoelectric properties. Thus the influence of material preparation as well as different dopants on the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of lead telluride is being analysed. When using appropriately set process parameters, milling and sintering of lead telluride increases the material's hardness. With sintering temperatures exceeding 300 C stable material of high relative density can be achieved. Milling lead telluride generates lattice defects leading to a reduction of the material's charge carrier density. These defects can be reduced by increased sintering temperatures. Contamination of the powder due to the milling process leads to bloating during thermal cycling and thus reduced density of the sintered material. In addition to that, evaporation of tellurium at elevated temperatures causes instability of the material's thermoelectric properties. Based on the experimental results obtained in this work, the best thermoelectric and mechanical properties can be obtained by sintering coarse powders at around 400 C. Within this work a concept was developed to vary the mechanical properties of lead telluride via synthesis of PbTe with electrically nondoping elements, which thus may keep the thermoelectric properties unchanged. Therefore, the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of Pb{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}Te were investigated. Doping pure PbTe with calcium causes a significant increase of the material's hardness while only slightly decreasing the charge carrier density and thus keeping the thermoelectric properties apart from a slight reduction of the electrical conductivity nearly unchanged. The abovementioned concept is proven using sodium doped lead telluride, as it is used for thermoelectric generators: The additional doping with calcium again increases the material's hardness while

  4. Induced superconductivity in the topological insulator mercury telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The combination of a topological insulator (TI) and a superconductor (S), which together form a TI/S interface, is expected to influence the possible surface states in the TI. It is of special interest, if the theoretical prediction of zero energy Majorana states in this system is verifiable. This thesis presents the experimental realization of such an interface between the TI strained bulk HgTe and the S Nb and studies if the afore mentioned expectations are met. As these types of interfaces were produced for the first time the initial step was to develop a new lithographic process. Optimization of the S deposition technique as well as the application of cleaning processes allowed for reproducible fabrication of structures. In parallel the measurement setup was upgraded to be able to execute the sensitive measurements at low energy. Furthermore several filters have been implemented into the system to reduce high frequency noise and the magnetic field control unit was additionally replaced to achieve the needed resolution in the μT range. Two kinds of basic geometries have been studied: Josephson junctions (JJs) and superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). A JJ consists of two Nb contacts with a small separation on a HgTe layer. These S/TI/S junctions are one of the most basic structures possible and are studied via transport measurements. The transport through this geometry is strongly influenced by the behavior at the two S/TI interfaces. In voltage dependent differential resistance measurements it was possible to detect multiple Andreev reflections in the JJ, indicating that electrons and holes are able to traverse the HgTe gap between both interfaces multiple times while keeping phase coherence. Additionally using BTK theory it was possible to extract the interface transparency of several junctions. This allowed iterative optimization for the highest transparency via lithographic improvements at these interfaces. The increased transparency and

  5. Robust, functional nanocrystal solids by infilling with atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yao; Gibbs, Markelle; Perkins, Craig L.; Tolentino, Jason; Zarghami, Mohammad H.; Bustamante, Jr., J.; Law, Matt

    2011-12-14

    Thin films of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are inherently metatstable materials prone to oxidative and photothermal degradation driven by their large surface-to-volume ratios and high surface energies. The fabrication of practical electronic devices based on NC solids hinges on preventing oxidation, surface diffusion, ripening, sintering, and other unwanted physicochemical changes that can plague these materials. Here we use low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) to infill conductive PbSe NC solids with metal oxides to produce inorganic nanocomposites in which the NCs are locked in place and protected against oxidative and photothermal damage. Infilling NC field-effect transistors and solar cells with amorphous alumina yields devices that operate with enhanced and stable performance for at least months in air. Furthermore, ALD infilling with ZnO lowers the height of the inter-NC tunnel barrier for electron transport, yielding PbSe NC films with electron mobilities of 1 cm² V-1 s-1. Our ALD technique is a versatile means to fabricate robust NC solids for optoelectronic devices.

  6. Formation of Monocrystalline 1D and 2D Architectures via Epitaxial Attachment: Bottom-Up Routes through Surfactant-Mediated Arrays of Oriented Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yoshitaka; Kageyama, Hiroyuki; Oaki, Yuya; Imai, Hiroaki

    2015-06-09

    Monocrystalline architectures with well-defined shapes were achieved by bottom-up routes through epitaxial attachment of Mn3O4 nanocrystals. The crystallographically continuous 1D chains elongated in the a axis and 2D panels having large a or c faces were obtained by removal of the organic mediator from surfactant-mediated 1D and 2D arrays of Mn3O4 nanocrystals, respectively. Our basal approach indicates that the epitaxial attachment through the surfactant-mediated arrays is utilized for fabrication of a wide variety of micrometric architectures from nanometric crystalline units.

  7. Solution-processing of ultra-thin CdTe/ZnO nanocrystal solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, Brandon I.; Gengenbach, Thomas R.; Watkins, Scott E.; Mulvaney, Paul; Jasieniak, Jacek J.

    2014-01-01

    We have carried out a detailed study into how modifications of the physical, chemical and optical properties of solution-processed, nanocrystalline CdTe layers influence the photovoltaic performance of sintered CdTe/ZnO nanocrystal solar cells. Such solar cells are fabricated through layer-by-layer assembly, which is enabled through an inter layer chemical and thermal treatment cycle. In this manner we are able to fabricate working solar cells with sintered CdTe layers as low as 90 nm, provided that grain size is precisely controlled. We show that the extent of grain growth achieved during the CdTe sintering process is strongly dependent on nanocrystal surface chemistry and chemical environment, with the removal of the organic capping ligands and the introduction of CdCl 2 prior to annealing leading to greatly enhanced growth. Due to the air processing involved and the nanocrystalline nature of the CdTe, the overall performance of these solar cells is shown to be strongly dependent on both annealing temperature and time, with optimal results requiring a balance between crystal growth and degradation due to oxidation. Using this simple bi-layer device structure, optimized treatment conditions result in power conversion efficiencies of up to 7.7% and peak internal quantum efficiencies in excess of 95%. - Highlights: • We study the growth of nanocrystalline CdTe thin films from colloidal nanocrystals. • We examine the CdTe growth profiles as a function of surface chemistry. • We show that nanocrystalline CdTe is susceptible to oxidation under air annealing. • We show how this oxidation influences performance in CdTe/ZnO solar cells. • We demonstrate CdTe/ZnO solar cells with an efficiency of 7.7% fabricated in air

  8. Cadmium Telluride and Grain Boundaries: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Michael Evan

    roughness for direct wafer bonding. High resolution x-ray diffraction is used to study the strain of the CdTe epilayer at the epilayer-substrate interface by generating reciprocal space maps of the (004), (115), and (335) crystallographic planes. It is found that CdTe grown on an (001) InSb substrate at a low growth temperature exhibits nearly 0% relaxation. As a result, the in-plane lattice parameter of the CdTe layer is maximally strained to match the smaller lattice parameter of the InSb substrate. Consequently, the CdTe lattice is tetragonally strained normal to the substrate surface, which causes the out-of-plane lattice parameter of CdTe to be larger than its intrinsic value. Lastly, a CdCl2-treated CdTe-CdS (p-type CdTe on n-type CdS) solar cell structure is simulated using a semiconductor-heterojunction simulation program. In literature, it has been reported that chlorine atoms from the treatment segregate along grain boundaries in polycrystalline CdTe and cause the formation of local p-n junctions by inverting the grain boundaries to n-type. The simulated structure includes one grain and 2 grain boundaries. The grain/bulk CdTe material is p-type while the grain boundaries are made to be n-type with varying doping concentrations. Both the conduction band and valence band energy exhibit downward sloping from the CdTe surface to the CdTe-CdS interface. This structure assumes that the grain boundaries are parallel to the CdTe-CdS interface. While these simulations do not prove the existence of the local type-inversion hypothesis, they do entertain a novel possibility for future devices fabrication methods.

  9. Prospects of Colloidal Copper Chalcogenide Nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stam, W.; Berends, A.C.; de Mello-Donega, Celso

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, colloidal copper chalcogenide nanocrystals (NCs) have emerged as promising alternatives to conventional Cd and Pb chalcogenide NCs. Owing to their wide size, shape, and composition tunability, Cu chalcogenide NCs hold great promise for several applications, such as

  10. Hafnium carbide nanocrystal chains for field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Song; Li, Hejun; Zhang, Yulei; Ren, Jincui; Qiang, Xinfa; Zhang, Shouyang

    2014-01-01

    A hafnium carbide (HfC) nanostructure, i.e., HfC nanocrystal chain, was synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. X-ray diffractometer, field-emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer were employed to characterize the product. The synthesized one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures with many faceted octahedral nanocrystals possess diameters of tens of nanometers to 500 nm and lengths of a few microns. The chain-like structures possess a single crystalline structure and preferential growth direction along the [1 0 0] crystal orientation. The growth of the chains occurred through the vapor–liquid–solid process along with a negative-feedback mechanism. The field emission (FE) properties of the HfC nanocrystal chains as the cold cathode emitters were examined. The HfC nanocrystal chains display good FE properties with a low turn-on field of about 3.9 V μm −1 and a high field enhancement factor of 2157, implying potential applications in vacuum microelectronics.

  11. Atomic force microscopy characterization of cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roya R. Lahiji; Xin Xu; Ronald Reifenberger; Arvind Raman; Alan Rudie; Robert J. Moon

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are gaining interest as a “green” nanomaterial with superior mechanical and chemical properties for high-performance nanocomposite materials; however, there is a lack of accurate material property characterization of individual CNCs. Here, a detailed study of the topography, elastic and adhesive properties of individual wood-derived CNCs...

  12. Biocompatibility of bio based calcium carbonate nanocrystals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Currently, there has been extensive research interest for inorganic nanocrystals such as calcium phosphate, iron oxide, silicone, carbon nanotube and layered double hydroxide as a drug delivery system especially in cancer therapy. However, toxicological screening of such particles is paramount importance ...

  13. Solvothermal synthesis and characterization of CZTS nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumasiya, Ajay; Shah, N. M.

    2017-05-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is a promising thin film absorber material for low cost solar cell applications. CZTS nanoparticle ink synthesized using solvothermal route is an attractive option to deposit absorber layer using screen printing or spin coating method in CZTS thin film solar cell. In this study we have synthesized CZTS nanocrystals using solvothermal method from aqueous solution of Copper nitrate [Cu(NO3)2], Zinc nitrate [Zn(NO3)2], tin chloride [SnCl4] and thiourea with varying concentration of Cu(NO3)2 (viz 0.82 mmol,1.4 mmol, 1.7 mmol) keeping concentrations of rest of solutions constant. As synthesized CZTS nanocrystals are characterized using Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-rays (EDAX) to verify stoichiometry of elements. Analysis of EDAX data suggests that CZTS nanocrystals having Copper nitrate [Cu (NO3)2] concentration of 1.4 m mole is near stoichiometric. X-ray diffraction analysis study of CZTS nanocrystals having Copper nitrate [Cu (NO3)2] concentration of 1.4 m mole reveals the preferred orientation of the grains in (112), (220) and (312) direction confirming Kesterite structure of CZTS.

  14. Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A [Los Alamos, NM; Chen, Yongfen [Eugene, OR; Klimov, Victor I [Los Alamos, NM; Htoon, Han [Los Alamos, NM; Vela, Javier [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-05-03

    Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said outer shell comprises multiple monolayers, wherein at least 30% of the quantum dots have an on-time fraction of 0.80 or greater under continuous excitation conditions for a period of time of at least 10 minutes.

  15. Biodegradation behaviors of cellulose nanocrystals -PVA nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Rohani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this research, biodegradation behaviors of cellulose nanocrystals-poly vinyl alcohol nanocomposites were investigated. Nanocomposite films with different filler loading levels (3, 6, 9 and 12% by wt were developed by solvent casting method. The effect of cellulose nanocrystals on the biodegradation behaviors of nanocomposite films was studied. Water absorption and water solubility tests were performed by immersing specimens into distilled water. The characteristic parameter of diffusion coefficient and maximum moisture content were determined from the obtained water absorption curves. The water absorption behavior of the nanocomposites was found to follow a Fickian behavior. The maximum water absorption and diffusion coefficients were decreased by increasing the cellulose nanocrystals contents, however the water solubility decrease. The biodegradability of the films was investigated by immersing specimens into cellulase enzymatic solution as well as by burial in soil. The results showed that adding cellulose nanocrystals increase the weight loss of specimens in enzymatic solution but decrease it in soil media. The limited biodegradability of specimens in soil media attributed to development of strong interactions with solid substrates that inhibit the accessibility of functional groups. Specimens with the low degree of hydrolysis underwent extensive biodegradation in both enzymatic and soil media, whilst specimens with the high degree of hydrolysis showed recalcitrance to biodegradation under those conditions.

  16. Mechanistic Study of Monodisperse Iron Oxide Nanocrystals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To gain better insight into the formation of iron oxide nanocrystals from the solution phase thermal decomposition of iron (III) oleate complex, different reaction conditions including time, heating ramp, as well as concentrations of iron oleate precursor and oleic acid ligand were systematically varied and the resulting ...

  17. Strain effect on the heat transport properties of bismuth telluride nanofilms with a hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Te-Hua; Chang, Win-Jin; Wang, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Chao-Chun

    2018-06-01

    We investigated the mechanical behavior of bismuth telluride nanofilms with holes by using an equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) approach. The holes had diameters of 20, 30, 40, and 50 Å. The thermal conductivity values of the nanofilms were calculated under different strains at different temperatures using a nonequilibrium MD simulation. The simulation revealed that the thermal conductivity of a bismuth telluride nanofilm with a hole decreases with an increase in hole diameter at different strains. For a film with a perfect structure at 300 K, a 48% reduction (from 0.33 to 0.17 W/m K) in the thermal conductivity was observed at a 7% tensile strain. In addition, the thermal conductivity increased by approximately 39% (from 0.33 to 0.46 W/m K) at a 7% compressive strain. A very low value (0.11 W/m K) of thermal conductivity is obtained for the nanofilm with a hole diameter of 50 Å at a 7% tensile strain at 300 K.

  18. Effect of electronic contribution on temperature-dependent thermal transport of antimony telluride thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won-Yong; Park, No-Won [Department of Physics, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ji-Eun [Department of Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Soon-Gil, E-mail: sgyoon@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Jung-Hyuk [School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Kwon, E-mail: sangkwonlee@cau.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • We investigated thermal transport of the antimony telluride thin films. • The contribution of the electronic thermal conductivity increased up to ∼77% at 300 K. • We theoretically analyze and explain the high contribution of electronic component. - Abstract: We study the theoretical and experimental characteristics of thermal transport of 100 nm and 500 nm-thick antimony telluride (Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) thin films prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was measured at temperatures ranging from 20 to 300 K, using four-point-probe 3-ω method. Out-of-plane thermal conductivity of the Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film was much lesser in comparison to the bulk material in the entire temperature range, confirming that the phonon- and electron-boundary scattering are enhanced in thin films. Moreover, we found that the contribution of the electronic thermal conductivity (κ{sub e}) in total thermal conductivity (κ) linearly increased up to ∼77% at 300 K with increasing temperature. We theoretically analyze and explain the high contribution of electronic component of thermal conductivity towards the total thermal conductivity of the film by a modified Callaway model. Further, we find the theoretical model predictions to correspond well with the experimental results.

  19. Synthesis of ultra-long cadmium telluride nanotubes via combinational chemical transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kee-Ryung; Cho, Hong-Baek; Choa, Yong-Ho, E-mail: choa15@hanyang.ac.kr

    2017-03-01

    Synthesis of high-throughput cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanotubes with an ultra-long aspect ratio is presented via a combination process concept combined with electrospinning, electrodeposition, and cationic exchange reaction. Ultra-long sacrificial silver (Ag) nanofibers were synthesized by electrospinning involving two-step calcination, and were then electrodeposited to create silver telluride nanotubes. These nanotubes underwent cationic exchange reaction in cadmium nitrate tetrahydrate solution with the aid of a ligand, tributylphosphine (TBP). Analysis showed that ultra-long pure zinc blende CdTe nanotubes were obtained with controlled dimension and uniform morphology. The thermodynamic driving force induced by the coordination of methanol solvent and TBP attributed to overcome the kinetic barrier between Ag{sub 2}Te and CdTe nanotubes, facilitating the synthesis of CdTe nanotubes. This synthetic process involving a topotactic reaction route paves a way for high-throughput extended synthesis of new chalcogenide hollow nanotubes for application in photodetectors and solar cells. - Highlights: • High throughput synthetic route of hollow CdTe nanotubes with ultra-long aspect ratio. • Chemical combination of electrospinning, electrodeposition & cation exchange reaction. • Pure zinc blende CdTe by controlled dimension & structural variation of Ag nanofibers. • Potential for the high throughput synthesis of new exotic chalcogenide nanotubes.

  20. Possible bicollinear nematic state with monoclinic lattice distortions in iron telluride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Christopher B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Herbrych, Jacek W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dagotto, Elbio R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moreo, Adriana [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Here, iron telluride (FeTe) is known to display bicollinear magnetic order at low temperatures together with a monoclinic lattice distortion. Because the bicollinear order can involve two different wave vectors (π/2,π/2) and (π/2,–π/2), symmetry considerations allow for the possible stabilization of a nematic state with short-range bicollinear order coupled to monoclinic lattice distortions at a TS higher than the temperature TN where long-range bicollinear order fully develops. As a concrete example, the three-orbital spin-fermion model for iron telluride is studied with an additional coupling ˜λ12 between the monoclinic lattice strain and an orbital-nematic order parameter with B2g symmetry. Monte Carlo simulations show that with increasing ˜λ12 the first-order transition characteristic of FeTe splits and bicollinear nematicity is stabilized in a (narrow) temperature range. In this new regime, the lattice is monoclinically distorted and short-range spin and orbital order breaks rotational invariance. A discussion of possible realizations of this exotic state is provided.

  1. The use of cadmium telluride γ spectrometers in monitoring activity deposited in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.T.

    1977-01-01

    The ability to inspect and test key components and when necessary repair or replace them is a significant factor in the safety case submitted before consent is given for construction of a nuclear reactor. A knowledge of the probable rate of deposition and isotopic composition of radioactive contamination in these areas is necessary and since it is not always practicable to take samples away to the laboratory for analysis, direct gamma ray spectroscopy in the contaminated environment is sometimes used. The experience of direct monitoring with a cadmium telluride spectrometer in two such reactor situations is reported. In the first situation, a remotely cooled intrinsic Germanium spectrometer was used in equivalent positions and spectra from both systems are presented. The relative merits of the two systems are discussed. In the second situation, measurements were made in an environment at 70 deg C in radiation levels of 10Rh -1 . An improvised cooling system was used to maintain the Cadmium Telluride at about 20 deg C and Pile-up Rejection was used to enable count rates of about 10 5 s -1 to be handled. It is noted that the usually quoted detector parameters, resolution and crystal volume, are not necessarily the most important in practical spectrometry of mixed isotopes. As with germanium detectors, the most useful parameter is probably the Peak-to-Compton ratio

  2. Heterojunction PbS nanocrystal solar cells with oxide charge-transport layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Byung-Ryool; Choi, Joshua J; Seyler, Kyle L; Hanrath, Tobias; Wise, Frank W

    2013-12-23

    Oxides are commonly employed as electron-transport layers in optoelectronic devices based on semiconductor nanocrystals, but are relatively rare as hole-transport layers. We report studies of NiO hole-transport layers in PbS nanocrystal photovoltaic structures. Transient fluorescence experiments are used to verify the relevant energy levels for hole transfer. On the basis of these results, planar heterojunction devices with ZnO as the photoanode and NiO as the photocathode were fabricated and characterized. Solution-processed devices were used to systematically study the dependence on nanocrystal size and achieve conversion efficiency as high as 2.5%. Optical modeling indicates that optimum performance should be obtained with thinner oxide layers than can be produced reliably by solution casting. Room-temperature sputtering allows deposition of oxide layers as thin as 10 nm, which enables optimization of device performance with respect to the thickness of the charge-transport layers. The best devices achieve an open-circuit voltage of 0.72 V and efficiency of 5.3% while eliminating most organic material from the structure and being compatible with tandem structures.

  3. Evolution of microstructural defects with strain effects in germanium nanocrystals synthesized at different annealing temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Minghuan; Cai, Rongsheng; Zhang, Yujuan; Wang, Chao [The Cultivation Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, No. 308, Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qingdao University, No. 308, Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Wang, Yiqian, E-mail: yqwang@qdu.edu.cn [The Cultivation Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, No. 308, Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); College of Physics Science, Qingdao University, No. 308, Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Ross, Guy G.; Barba, David [INRS-EMT, 1650 Boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Ge nanocrystals (Ge-ncs) were produced by implantation of {sup 74}Ge{sup +} into a SiO{sub 2} film on (100) Si, followed by high-temperature annealing from 700 °C to 1100 °C. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies show that the average size of Ge-ncs increases with the annealing temperature. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) investigations reveal the presence of planar and linear defects in the formed Ge-ncs, whose relative concentrations are determined at each annealing temperature. The relative concentration of planar defects is almost independent of the annealing temperature up to 1000 °C. However, from 1000 °C to 1100 °C, its concentration decreases dramatically. For the linear defects, their concentration varies considerably with the annealing temperatures. In addition, by measuring the interplanar spacing of Ge-ncs from the HRTEM images, a strong correlation is found between the dislocation percentage and the stress field intensity. Our results provide fundamental insights regarding both the presence of microstructural defects and the origin of the residual stress field within Ge-ncs, which can shed light on the fabrication of Ge-ncs with quantified crystallinity and appropriate size for the advanced Ge-nc devices. - Highlights: • Growth of Ge nanocrystals at different annealing temperatures was investigated. • Strain field has great effects on the formation of dislocations. • Different mechanisms are proposed to explain growth regimes of Ge nanocrystals.

  4. Heterojunction PbS Nanocrystal Solar Cells with Oxide Charge-Transport Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Hyun, Byung-Ryool

    2013-12-23

    Oxides are commonly employed as electron-transport layers in optoelectronic devices based on semiconductor nanocrystals, but are relatively rare as hole-transport layers. We report studies of NiO hole-transport layers in PbS nanocrystal photovoltaic structures. Transient fluorescence experiments are used to verify the relevant energy levels for hole transfer. On the basis of these results, planar heterojunction devices with ZnO as the photoanode and NiO as the photocathode were fabricated and characterized. Solution-processed devices were used to systematically study the dependence on nanocrystal size and achieve conversion efficiency as high as 2.5%. Optical modeling indicates that optimum performance should be obtained with thinner oxide layers than can be produced reliably by solution casting. Roomerature sputtering allows deposition of oxide layers as thin as 10 nm, which enables optimization of device performance with respect to the thickness of the charge-transport layers. The best devices achieve an open-circuit voltage of 0.72 V and efficiency of 5.3% while eliminating most organic material from the structure and being compatible with tandem structures. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  5. Water-Assisted Size and Shape Control of CsPbBr3 Perovskite Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Bai, Xue; Wu, Hua; Zhang, Xiangtong; Sun, Chun; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Weitao; Yu, William W; Rogach, Andrey L

    2018-03-19

    Lead-halide perovskites are well known to decompose rapidly when exposed to polar solvents, such as water. Contrary to this common-place observation, we have found that through introducing a suitable minor amount of water into the reaction mixture, we can synthesize stable CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals. The size and the crystallinity, and as a result the band gap tunability of the strongly emitting CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals correlate with the water content. Suitable amounts of water change the crystallization environment, inducing the formation of differently shaped perovskites, namely spherical NCs, rectangular nanoplatelets, or nanowires. Bright CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals with the photoluminescence quantum yield reaching 90 % were employed for fabrication of inverted hybrid inorganic/organic light-emitting devices, with the peak luminance of 4428 cd m -2 and external quantum yield of 1.7 %. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Water-assisted size and shape control of CsPbBr{sub 3} perovskite nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics and College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Department of Materials Science, Key Laboratory of Mobile Materials MOE, State Key Laboratory of Automotive Simulation and Control, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Bai, Xue; Wu, Hua; Zhang, Xiangtong; Sun, Chun; Zhang, Yu [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics and College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Weitao [Department of Materials Science, Key Laboratory of Mobile Materials MOE, State Key Laboratory of Automotive Simulation and Control, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Yu, William W. [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics and College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Department of Chemistry and Physics, Louisiana State University, Shreveport, LA (United States); Rogach, Andrey L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Centre for Functional Photonics (CFP), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (China)

    2018-03-19

    Lead-halide perovskites are well known to decompose rapidly when exposed to polar solvents, such as water. Contrary to this common-place observation, we have found that through introducing a suitable minor amount of water into the reaction mixture, we can synthesize stable CsPbBr{sub 3} nanocrystals. The size and the crystallinity, and as a result the band gap tunability of the strongly emitting CsPbBr{sub 3} nanocrystals correlate with the water content. Suitable amounts of water change the crystallization environment, inducing the formation of differently shaped perovskites, namely spherical NCs, rectangular nanoplatelets, or nanowires. Bright CsPbBr{sub 3} nanocrystals with the photoluminescence quantum yield reaching 90 % were employed for fabrication of inverted hybrid inorganic/organic light-emitting devices, with the peak luminance of 4428 cd m{sup -2} and external quantum yield of 1.7 %. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Ultrafast Silicon Photonics with Visible to Mid-Infrared Pumping of Silicon Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diroll, Benjamin T; Schramke, Katelyn S; Guo, Peijun; Kortshagen, Uwe R; Schaller, Richard D

    2017-10-11

    Dynamic optical control of infrared (IR) transparency and refractive index is achieved using boron-doped silicon nanocrystals excited with mid-IR optical pulses. Unlike previous silicon-based optical switches, large changes in transmittance are achieved without a fabricated structure by exploiting strong light coupling of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) produced from free holes of p-type silicon nanocrystals. The choice of optical excitation wavelength allows for selectivity between hole heating and carrier generation through intraband or interband photoexcitation, respectively. Mid-IR optical pumping heats the free holes of p-Si nanocrystals to effective temperatures greater than 3500 K. Increases of the hole effective mass at high effective hole temperatures lead to a subpicosecond change of the dielectric function, resulting in a redshift of the LSPR, modulating mid-IR transmission by as much as 27%, and increasing the index of refraction by more than 0.1 in the mid-IR. Low hole heat capacity dictates subpicosecond hole cooling, substantially faster than carrier recombination, and negligible heating of the Si lattice, permitting mid-IR optical switching at terahertz repetition frequencies. Further, the energetic distribution of holes at high effective temperatures partially reverses the Burstein-Moss effect, permitting the modulation of transmittance at telecommunications wavelengths. The results presented here show that doped silicon, particularly in micro- or nanostructures, is a promising dynamic metamaterial for ultrafast IR photonics.

  8. Modeling and simulation of floating gate nanocrystal FET devices and circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasaneen, El-Sayed A. M.

    The nonvolatile memory market has been growing very fast during the last decade, especially for mobile communication systems. The Semiconductor Industry Association International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors states that the difficult challenge for nonvolatile semiconductor memories is to achieve reliable, low power, low voltage performance and high-speed write/erase. This can be achieved by aggressive scaling of the nonvolatile memory cells. Unfortunately, scaling down of conventional nonvolatile memory will further degrade the retention time due to the charge loss between the floating gate and drain/source contacts and substrate which makes conventional nonvolatile memory unattractive. Using nanocrystals as charge storage sites reduces dramatically the charge leakage through oxide defects and drain/source contacts. Floating gate nanocrystal nonvolatile memory, FG-NCNVM, is a candidate for future memory because it is advantageous in terms of high-speed write/erase, small size, good scalability, low-voltage, low-power applications, and the capability to store multiple bits per cell. Many studies regarding FG-NCNVMs have been published. Most of them have dealt with fabrication improvements of the devices and device characterizations. Due to the promising FG-NCNVM applications in integrated circuits, there is a need for circuit a simulation model to simulate the electrical characteristics of the floating gate devices. In this thesis, a FG-NCNVM circuit simulation model has been proposed. It is based on the SPICE BSIM simulation model. This model simulates the cell behavior during normal operation. Model validation results have been presented. The SPICE model shows good agreement with experimental results. Current-voltage characteristics, transconductance and unity gain frequency (fT) have been studied showing the effect of the threshold voltage shift (DeltaVth) due to nanocrystal charge on the device characteristics. The threshold voltage shift due to

  9. Biomimetic synthesis of noble metal nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chin-Yi

    At the nanometer scale, the physical and chemical properties of materials heavily depend on their sizes and shapes. This fact has triggered considerable efforts in developing controllable nanomaterial synthesis. The controlled growth of colloidal nanocrystal is a kinetic process, in which high-energy facets grow faster and then vanish, leading to a nanocrystal enclosed by low-energy facets. Identifying a surfactant that can selectively bind to a particular crystal facet and thus lower its surface energy, is critical and challenging in shape controlled synthesis of nanocrystals. Biomolecules exhibiting exquisite molecular recognition properties can be exploited to precisely engineer nanostructured materials. In the first part of my thesis, we employed the phage display technique to select a specific multifunctional peptide sequence which can bind on Pd surface and mediate Pd crystal nucleation and growth, achieving size controlled synthesis of Pd nanocrystals in aqueous solution. We further demonstrated a rational biomimetic approach to the predictable synthesis of nanocrystals enclosed by a particular facet in the case of Pt. Specifically, Pt {100} and Pt {111} facet-specific peptides were identified and used to synthesize Pt nanocubes and Pt nano-tetrahedrons, respectively. The mechanistic studies of Pt {111} facet-specific peptide had led us to study the facet-selective adsorption of aromatic molecules on noble metal surfaces. The discoveries had achieved the development of design strategies to select facet-selective molecules which can synthesize nanocrystals with expected shapes in both Pt and Pd system. At last, we exploited Pt facet-specific peptides and controlled the molecular interaction to produce one- and three- dimensional nanostructures composed of anisotropic nanoparticles in synthetic conditions without supramolecular pre-organization, demonstrating the full potential of biomolecules in mediating material formation process. My research on biomimetic

  10. Magnetoresistance and Microstructure of Magnetite Nanocrystals Dispersed in Indium−Tin Oxide Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    Okada, Koichi; Kohiki, Shigemi; Mitome, Masanori; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Arai, Masao; Mito, Masaki; Deguchi, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Epitaxial indium−tin oxide (ITO) thin films were fabricated on a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate by pulsed-laser deposition using magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticle dispersed ITO powders as a target. Magnetoresistance of the film at a field of 1 T was 39% at 45 K, and it stayed at 3% above 225 K. The film demonstrated cooling hysteresis in the temperature dependence of direct-current magnetization. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that phase-separated Fe3O4 nanocrystals with w...

  11. Processing and Characterization of Cellulose Nanocrystals/Polylactic Acid Nanocomposite Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M. Sullivan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this study is to examine the effect of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC on the properties of polylactic acid (PLA films. The films are fabricated via melt compounding and melt fiber spinning followed by compression molding. Film fracture morphology, thermal properties, crystallization behavior, thermo-mechanical behavior, and mechanical behavior were determined as a function of CNC content using scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, dynamic mechanical analysis, and tensile testing. Film crystallinity increases with increasing CNC content indicating CNC act as nucleating agents, promoting crystallization. Furthermore, the addition of CNC increased the film storage modulus and slightly broadened the glass transition region.

  12. Bond length contraction in Au nanocrystals formed by ion implantation into thin SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluth, P.; Johannessen, B.; Giraud, V.; Cheung, A.; Glover, C.J.; Azevedo, G. de M; Foran, G.J.; Ridgway, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    Au nanocrystals (NCs) fabricated by ion implantation into thin SiO 2 and annealing were investigated by means of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A bond length contraction was observed and can be explained by surface tension effects in a simple liquid-drop model. Such results are consistent with previous reports on nonembedded NCs implying a negligible influence of the SiO 2 matrix. Cumulant analysis of the EXAFS data suggests surface reconstruction or relaxation involving a further shortened bond length. A deviation from the octahedral closed shell structure is apparent for NCs of size 25 A

  13. Synthesis of nanocrystals and nanocrystal self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuoying

    Chapter 1. A general introduction is presented on nanomaterials and nanoscience. Nanoparticles are discussed with respect to their structure and properties. Ferroelectric materials and nanoparticles in particular are highlighted, especially in the case of the barium titanate, and their potential applications are discussed. Different nanocrystal synthetic techniques are discussed. Nanoparticle superlattices, the novel "meta-materials" built from self-assembly at the nanoscale, are introduced. The formation of nanoparticle superlattices and the importance and interest of synthesizing these nanostructures is discussed. Chapter 2. Advanced applications for high k dielectric and ferroelectric materials in the electronics industry continues to demand an understanding of the underlying physics in decreasing dimensions into the nanoscale. The first part of this chapter presents the synthesis, processing, and electrical characterization of nanostructured thin films (thickness ˜100 nm) of barium titanate BaTiO3 built from uniform nanoparticles (alcohols were used to study the effect of size and morphological control over the nanocrystals. Techniques including X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and high-resolution electron microscopy are used to examine crystallinity and morphology. Chapter 3. By investigating the self-assembly of cadmium selenide-gold (CdSe-Au) nanoparticle mixtures by transmission electron microscopy after solvent evaporation, the effect of solvents in the formation process of CdSe-Au binary nanoparticle superlattices (BNSLs) was studied. 1-dodecanethiol was found to be critical in generating conditions necessary for superlattice formation, prior to the other factors that likely determine structure, highlighting the dual role of this organic polar molecule as both ligand and high boiling point/crystallization solvent. The influence of thiol was investigated under various concentrations (and also

  14. Ultra-low-energy ion-beam synthesis of nanometer-separated Si nanoparticles and Ag nanocrystals 2D layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrada, M.; Haj Salem, A.; Pecassou, B.; Paillard, V.; Ben Assayag, G.

    2018-03-01

    2D networks of Si and Ag nanocrystals have been fabricated in the same SiO2 matrix by Ultra-Low-Energy Ion-Beam-Synthesis. Our synthesis scheme differs from a simple sequential ion implantation and its key point is the control of the matrix integrity through an appropriate intermediate thermal annealing. Si nanocrystal layer is synthesised first due to high thermal budget required for nucleation, while the second Ag nanocrystal plane is formed during a subsequent implantation due to the high diffusivity of Ag in silica. The aim of this work is to show how it is possible to overcome the limitation related to ion mixing and implantation damage to obtain double layers of Si-NCs and Ag-NCs with controlled characteristics. For this, we take advantage of annealing under slight oxidizing ambient to control the oxidation of Si-NCs and the Si excess in the matrix. The nanocrystal characteristics and in particular their position and size can be adjusted thanks to a compromise between the implantation energy, the implanted dose for both Si and Ag ions and the intermediate annealing conditions (atmosphere, temperature and duration).

  15. Effect of Annealing on the Properties of Antimony Telluride Thin Films and Their Applications in CdTe Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouling Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimony telluride alloy thin films were deposited at room temperature by using the vacuum coevaporation method. The films were annealed at different temperatures in N2 ambient, and then the compositional, structural, and electrical properties of antimony telluride thin films were characterized by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, and Hall measurements. The results indicate that single phase antimony telluride existed when the annealing temperature was higher than 488 K. All thin films exhibited p-type conductivity with high carrier concentrations. Cell performance was greatly improved when the antimony telluride thin films were used as the back contact layer for CdTe thin film solar cells. The dark current voltage and capacitance voltage measurements were performed to investigate the formation of the back contacts for the cells with or without Sb2Te3 buffer layers. CdTe solar cells with the buffer layers can reduce the series resistance and eliminate the reverse junction between CdTe and metal electrodes.

  16. Design of a novel dual Z-scheme photocatalytic system composited of Ag{sub 2}O modified Ti{sup 3+} self doped TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals with individual exposed (001) and (101) facets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mengyan; Liu, Hui, E-mail: liuhui@sust.edu.cn; Liu, Tingting; Qin, Yangxiao

    2017-02-15

    A novel dual Z-scheme photocatalytic system composited of Ag{sub 2}O nanocrystals modified Ti{sup 3+} self doped TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals with individual exposed (001) and (101) facets were successfully fabricated. In which, the Ti{sup 3+} self doped TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals with individual exposed (001) and (101) facets have been firstly prepared by a simple hydrothermal method, subsequently the as-prepared products were modified with Ag{sub 2}O nanocrystals through a sonochemical depositing process in order to build a novel dual Z-scheme photocatalytic system. The samples were carefully characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–visible diffuse reflectance spectra (UV–vis DRS), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET). The photocatalytic activity toward degradation of Rhodamine B (Rh B) aqueous solution under stimulated solar light was investigated. The experimental results showed this new dual Z-scheme photocatalytic system possess an enhanced photocatalytic degradation activity compared to that similar surface heterojunction photocatalysts composed of Ti{sup 3+} self doped TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals with individual exposed (001) and (101) facets. This novel photocatalytic system presents a high charge-separation efficiency and strong redox ability. This study will help us to better understand the photocatalytic mechanism of semiconductor photocatalysts with exposed different facets, and provide a new insight into the design and fabrication of advanced photocatalytic materials. - Highlights: •A novel dual Z-scheme system was built by Ag{sub 2}O and facet exposed TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals. •The individual TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals exposed (001) and (101) facets respectively. •Ag{sub 2}O coupled with Ti{sup 3+} self doped TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals through a sonochemical process. •The as-prepared sample possesses a super photocatalytic activity.

  17. Self-assembled ultra small ZnO nanocrystals for dye-sensitized solar cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patra, Astam K.; Dutta, Arghya; Bhaumik, Asim, E-mail: msab@iacs.res.in

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a facile chemical approach to produce self-assembled ultra-small mesoporous zinc oxide nanocrystals using sodium salicylate (SS) as a template under hydrothermal conditions. These ZnO nanomaterials have been successfully fabricated as a photoanode for the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) in the presence of N719 dye and iodine–triiodide electrolyte. The structural features, crystallinity, purity, mesophase and morphology of the nanostructure ZnO are investigated by several characterization tools. N{sub 2} sorption analysis revealed high surface areas (203 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and narrow pore size distributions (5.1–5.4 nm) for different samples. The mesoporous structure and strong photoluminescence facilitates the high dye loading at the mesoscopic void spaces and light harvesting in DSSC. By utilizing this ultra-small ZnO photoelectrode with film thickness of about 7 μm in the DSSC with an open-circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) of 0.74 V, short-circuit current density (J{sub SC}) of 3.83 mA cm{sup −2} and an overall power conversion efficiency of 1.12% has been achieved. - Graphical abstract: Ultra-small ZnO nanocrystals have been synthesized with sodium salicylate as a template and using it as a photoanode in a dye-sensitized solar cell 1.12% power conversion efficiency has been observed. - Highlights: • Synthesis of self-assembled ultra-small mesoporous ZnO nanocrystals by using sodium salicylate as a template. • Mesoporous ZnO materials have high BET surface areas and void space. • ZnO nanoparticles serve as a photoanode for the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). • Using ZnO nanocrystals as photoelectrode power conversion efficiency of 1.12% has been achieved.

  18. Great Disparity in Photoluminesence Quantum Yields of Colloidal CsPbBr3 Nanocrystals with Varied Shape: The Effect of Crystal Lattice Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiangtao; Liu, Mei; Fang, Li; Jiang, Shenlong; Zhou, Jingtian; Ding, Huaiyi; Huang, Hongwen; Wen, Wen; Luo, Zhenlin; Zhang, Qun; Wang, Xiaoping; Gao, Chen

    2017-07-06

    Understanding the big discrepancy in the photoluminesence quantum yields (PLQYs) of nanoscale colloidal materials with varied morphologies is of great significance to its property optimization and functional application. Using different shaped CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals with the same fabrication processes as model, quantitative synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the increasing trend in lattice strain values of the nanocrystals: nanocube, nanoplate, nanowire. Furthermore, transient spectroscopic measurements reveal the same trend in the defect quantities of these nanocrystals. These experimental results unambiguously point out that large lattice strain existing in CsPbBr 3 nanoparticles induces more crystal defects and thus decreases the PLQY, implying that lattice strain is a key factor other than the surface defect to dominate the PLQY of colloidal photoluminesence materials.

  19. Cadmium Manganese Telluride (Cd1-xMnxTe): A potential material for room-temperature radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, A.; Cui, Y.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.; Yang, G.; Kim, K-H.; Gul, R.; Xu, L.; Li, L.; Mycielski, A.; and James, R.B.

    2010-07-11

    Cadmium Manganese Telluride (CdMnTe) recently emerged as a promising material for room-temperature X- and gamma-ray detectors. It offers several potential advantages over CdZnTe. Among them is its optimal tunable band gap ranging from 1.7-2.2 eV, and its relatively low (< 50%) content of Mn compared to that of Zn in CdZnTe that assures this favorable band-gap range. Another important asset is the segregation coefficient of Mn in CdTe that is approximately unity compared to 1.35 for Zn in CdZnTe, so ensuring the homogenous distribution of Mn throughout the ingot; hence, a large-volume stoichiometric yield is attained. However, some materials issues primarily related to the growth process impede the production of large, defect-free single crystals. The high bond-ionicity of CdMnTe entails a higher propensity to crystallize into a hexagonal structure rather than to adopt the expected zinc-blend structure, which is likely to generate twins in the crystals. In addition, bulk defects generate in the as-grown crystals due to the dearth of high-purity Mn, which yields a low-resistivity material. In this presentation, we report on our observations of such material defects in current CdMnTe materials, and our evaluation of its potential as an alternative detector material to the well-known CdZnTe detectors. We characterized the bulk defects of several indium- and vanadium-doped Cd1-xMnxTe crystals by using several advanced techniques, viz., micro-scale mapping, white-beam x-ray diffraction/reflection topography, and chemical etching. Thereafter, we fabricated some detectors from selected CdMnTe crystals, characterized their electrical properties, and tested their performance as room-temperature X- and gamma-ray detectors. Our experimental results indicate that CdMnTe materials could well prove to become a viable alternative in the near future.

  20. Structure and transformation of tactoids in cellulose nanocrystal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Xi; Hamad, Wadood Y.; MacLachlan, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals obtained from natural sources are of great interest for many applications. In water, cellulose nanocrystals form a liquid crystalline phase whose hierarchical structure is retained in solid films after drying. Although tactoids, one of the most primitive components of liquid crystals, are thought to have a significant role in the evolution of this phase, they have evaded structural study of their internal organization. Here we report the capture of cellulose nanocrystal tactoids in a polymer matrix. This method allows us to visualize, for the first time, the arrangement of cellulose nanocrystals within individual tactoids by electron microscopy. Furthermore, we can follow the structural evolution of the liquid crystalline phase from tactoids to iridescent-layered films. Our insights into the early nucleation events of cellulose nanocrystals give important information about the growth of cholesteric liquid crystalline phases, especially for cellulose nanocrystals, and are crucial for preparing photonics-quality films.

  1. White light generation using CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystals hybridized with InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizamoglu, S; Ozel, T; Sari, E; Demir, H V

    2007-01-01

    We introduce white light generation using CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystals of single, dual, triple and quadruple combinations hybridized with InGaN/GaN LEDs. Such hybridization of different nanocrystal combinations provides the ability to conveniently adjust white light parameters including the tristimulus coordinates (x,y), correlated colour temperature (T c ) and colour rending index (R a ). We present the design, growth, fabrication and characterization of our white hybrid nanocrystal-LEDs that incorporate combinations of (1) yellow nanocrystals (λ PL = 580 nm) on a blue LED (λ EL = 440 nm) with (x,y) = (0.37,0.25), T c = 2692 K and R a 14.69; (2) cyan and red nanocrystals (λ PL = 500 and 620 nm) on a blue LED (λ EL = 440 nm) with (x,y) = (0.37,0.28), T c = 3246 K and R a = 19.65; (3) green, yellow and red nanocrystals (λ PL = 540, 580 and 620 nm) on a blue LED (λ EL = 452 nm) with (x,y) = (0.30,0.28), T c = 7521 K and R a = 40.95; and (4) cyan, green, yellow and red nanocrystals (λ PL = 500, 540, 580 and 620 nm) on a blue LED (λ EL = 452 nm) with (x,y) = (0.24,0.33), T c = 11 171 K and R a 71.07. These hybrid white light sources hold promise for future lighting and display applications with their highly adjustable properties

  2. Hydrogenation of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol at room temperature: Boosting palladium nanocrystals efficiency by coupling with copper via liquid phase pulsed laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hanbit; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Kim, Yujin; Lee, Seunghee; Ma, Rory; Lim, Manho; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • PdCu bimetallic nanospheres fabricated by laser ablation. • Physical characterizations of synthesized PdCu nanospheres. • Assessments of catalytic performance of PdCu nanospheres for the reduction of nitrophenol. • Significant improvement of the catalytic activity in PdCu bimetallic nanocrystals. - Abstract: Ultra-dispersed bimetallic nanomaterials have attracted much attention in the hydrogenation of highly toxic aromatic nitro compounds to aromatic amines owing to their high stability, superior activity, reusability, and unique optical and electronic properties, as compared to monometalic nanocrystals. However, the lack of facile and economically controllable strategies of producing highly pure ultra-dispersed bimetallic nanocatalysts limits their practical industrial applications. Considering the above obstacles, we present a simple and effective strategy for the formation of bimetallic (PdCu) nanocrystals by liquid phase pulsed laser ablation using a bulk Pd metal plate submerged in CuCl 2 solutions with different concentrations, in contrast to the complex and costly experimental methods used previously. The microstructural and optical properties of the synthesized nanocrystals indicate that the obtained bimetallic nanostructures are highly pure and monodispersed. Moreover, bimetallic PdCu nanostructures show a higher catalytic activity than monometallic Pd nanocrystals for the hydrogenation of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol at room temperature, also exhibiting high stability for up to four recycles. The mechanism of the enhanced catalytic activity and stability of bimetallic nanocrystals is discussed in detail. Finally, we believe that the presented design strategy and utilization of bimetallic nanocrystals for catalytic applications enables the development of novel bimetallic nanostructures by liquid phase pulsed laser ablation and their catalytic application for environmental remediation.

  3. Hydrogenation of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol at room temperature: Boosting palladium nanocrystals efficiency by coupling with copper via liquid phase pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hanbit; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Kim, Yujin; Lee, Seunghee; Ma, Rory; Lim, Manho, E-mail: mhlim@pusan.ac.kr; Kim, Tae Kyu, E-mail: tkkim@pusan.ac.kr

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • PdCu bimetallic nanospheres fabricated by laser ablation. • Physical characterizations of synthesized PdCu nanospheres. • Assessments of catalytic performance of PdCu nanospheres for the reduction of nitrophenol. • Significant improvement of the catalytic activity in PdCu bimetallic nanocrystals. - Abstract: Ultra-dispersed bimetallic nanomaterials have attracted much attention in the hydrogenation of highly toxic aromatic nitro compounds to aromatic amines owing to their high stability, superior activity, reusability, and unique optical and electronic properties, as compared to monometalic nanocrystals. However, the lack of facile and economically controllable strategies of producing highly pure ultra-dispersed bimetallic nanocatalysts limits their practical industrial applications. Considering the above obstacles, we present a simple and effective strategy for the formation of bimetallic (PdCu) nanocrystals by liquid phase pulsed laser ablation using a bulk Pd metal plate submerged in CuCl{sub 2} solutions with different concentrations, in contrast to the complex and costly experimental methods used previously. The microstructural and optical properties of the synthesized nanocrystals indicate that the obtained bimetallic nanostructures are highly pure and monodispersed. Moreover, bimetallic PdCu nanostructures show a higher catalytic activity than monometallic Pd nanocrystals for the hydrogenation of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol at room temperature, also exhibiting high stability for up to four recycles. The mechanism of the enhanced catalytic activity and stability of bimetallic nanocrystals is discussed in detail. Finally, we believe that the presented design strategy and utilization of bimetallic nanocrystals for catalytic applications enables the development of novel bimetallic nanostructures by liquid phase pulsed laser ablation and their catalytic application for environmental remediation.

  4. Glass-ceramic optical fiber containing Ba2TiSi2O8 nanocrystals for frequency conversion of lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zaijin; Xiao, Xusheng; Wang, Xin; Ma, Zhijun; Lewis, Elfed; Farrell, Gerald; Wang, Pengfei; Ren, Jing; Guo, Haitao; Qiu, Jianrong

    2017-03-30

    A glass-ceramic optical fiber containing Ba 2 TiSi 2 O 8 nanocrystals fabricated using a novel combination of the melt-in-tube method and successive heat treatment is reported for the first time. For the melt-in-tube method, fibers act as a precursor at the drawing temperature for which the cladding glass is softened while the core glass is melted. It is demonstrated experimentally that following heat treatment, Ba 2 TiSi 2 O 8 nanocrystals with diameters below 10 nm are evenly distributed throughout the fiber core. Comparing to the conventional rod-in-tube method, the melt-in-tube method is superior in terms of controllability of crystallization to allow for the fabrication of low loss glass-ceramic fibers. When irradiated using a 1030 nm femtosecond laser, an enhanced green emission at a wavelength of 515 nm is observed in the glass-ceramic fiber, which demonstrates second harmonic generation of a laser action in the fabricated glass-ceramic fibers. Therefore, this new glass-ceramic fiber not only provides a highly promising development for frequency conversion of lasers in all optical fiber based networks, but the melt-in-tube fabrication method also offers excellent opportunities for fabricating a wide range of novel glass-ceramic optical fibers for multiple future applications including fiber telecommunications and lasers.

  5. Annealing temperature and environment effects on ZnO nanocrystals embedded in SiO2: a photoluminescence and TEM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Kantisara; Baudin, Pierre; Vu, Quang Vinh; Aad, Roy; Couteau, Christophe; Lérondel, Gilles

    2013-12-06

    We report on efficient ZnO nanocrystal (ZnO-NC) emission in the near-UV region. We show that luminescence from ZnO nanocrystals embedded in a SiO2 matrix can vary significantly as a function of the annealing temperature from 450°C to 700°C. We manage to correlate the emission of the ZnO nanocrystals embedded in SiO2 thin films with transmission electron microscopy images in order to optimize the fabrication process. Emission can be explained using two main contributions, near-band-edge emission (UV range) and defect-related emissions (visible). Both contributions over 500°C are found to be size dependent in intensity due to a decrease of the absorption cross section. For the smallest-size nanocrystals, UV emission can only be accounted for using a blueshifted UV contribution as compared to the ZnO band gap. In order to further optimize the emission properties, we have studied different annealing atmospheres under oxygen and under argon gas. We conclude that a softer annealing temperature at 450°C but with longer annealing time under oxygen is the most preferable scenario in order to improve near-UV emission of the ZnO nanocrystals embedded in an SiO2 matrix.

  6. Synthesis of Multicolor Core/Shell NaLuF4:Yb3+/Ln3+@CaF2 Upconversion Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to synthesize high-quality hierarchical core/shell nanocrystals from an efficient host lattice is important to realize efficacious photon upconversion for applications ranging from bioimaging to solar cells. Here, we describe a strategy to fabricate multicolor core @ shell α-NaLuF4:Yb3+/Ln3+@CaF2 (Ln = Er, Ho, Tm upconversion nanocrystals (UCNCs based on the newly established host lattice of sodium lutetium fluoride (NaLuF4. We exploited the liquid-solid-solution method to synthesize the NaLuF4 core of pure cubic phase and the thermal decomposition approach to expitaxially grow the calcium fluoride (CaF2 shell onto the core UCNCs, yielding cubic core/shell nanocrystals with a size of 15.6 ± 1.2 nm (the core ~9 ± 0.9 nm, the shell ~3.3 ± 0.3 nm. We showed that those core/shell UCNCs could emit activator-defined multicolor emissions up to about 772 times more efficient than the core nanocrystals due to effective suppression of surface-related quenching effects. Our results provide a new paradigm on heterogeneous core/shell structure for enhanced multicolor upconversion photoluminescence from colloidal nanocrystals.

  7. Microscopic theory of cation exchange in CdSe nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Florian D; Spiegel, Leo L; Norris, David J; Erwin, Steven C

    2014-10-10

    Although poorly understood, cation-exchange reactions are increasingly used to dope or transform colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots). We use density-functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to develop a microscopic theory that explains structural, optical, and electronic changes observed experimentally in Ag-cation-exchanged CdSe nanocrystals. We find that Coulomb interactions, both between ionized impurities and with the polarized nanocrystal surface, play a key role in cation exchange. Our theory also resolves several experimental puzzles related to photoluminescence and electrical behavior in CdSe nanocrystals doped with Ag.

  8. Charge sharing and charge loss in a cadmium-zinc-telluride fine-pixel detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaskin, J.A.; Sharma, D.P.; Ramsey, B.D.

    2003-01-01

    Because of its high atomic number, room temperature operation, low noise, and high spatial resolution a cadmium-zinc-telluride multi-pixel detector is ideal for hard X-ray astrophysical observation. As part of on-going research at MSFC to develop multi-pixel CdZnTe detectors for this purpose, we have measured charge sharing and charge loss for a 4x4 (750 μm pitch), 1 mm thick pixel array and modeled these results using a Monte-Carlo simulation. This model was then used to predict the amount of charge sharing for a much finer pixel array (with a 300 μm pitch). Future work will enable us to compare the simulated results for the finer array to measured values

  9. Structural, Mechanical and Thermodynamic Properties under Pressure Effect of Rubidium Telluride: First Principle Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidai K.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available First-principles density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate the structural, elastic and thermodynamic properties of rubidium telluride in cubic anti-fluorite (anti-CaF2-type structure. The calculated ground-state properties of Rb2Te compound such as equilibrium lattice parameter and bulk moduli are investigated by generalized gradient approximation (GGA-PBE that are based on the optimization of total energy. The elastic constants, Young’s and shear modulus, Poisson ratio, have also been calculated. Our results are in reasonable agreement with the available theoretical and experimental data. The pressure dependence of elastic constant and thermodynamic quantities under high pressure are also calculated and discussed.

  10. Heavily doped GaAs:Te layers grown by MOVPE using diisopropyl telluride as a source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniltsev, V. M.; Demidov, E. V.; Drozdov, M. N.; Drozdov, Yu. N., E-mail: drozdyu@ipmras.ru; Kraev, S. A.; Surovegina, E. A.; Shashkin, V. I.; Yunin, P. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    The capabilities of GaAs epitaxial layers extremely heavily doped with tellurium by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy using diisopropyl telluride as a source are studied. It is shown that tellurium incorporation into GaAs occurs to an atomic concentration of 10{sup 21} cm{sup –3} without appreciable diffusion and segregation effects. Good carrier concentrations (2 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup –3}) and specific contact resistances of non-alloyed ohmic contacts (1.7 × 10{sup –6} Ω cm{sup 2}) give grounds to use such layers to create non-alloyed ohmic contacts in electronic devices. A sharp decrease in the electrical activity of Te atoms, a decrease in the electron mobility, and an increase in the contact resistance at atomic concentrations above 2 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup –3} are detected.

  11. Effect of ball milling time on thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khade, Poonam; Bagwaiya, Toshi; Bhattacharaya, Shovit; Singh, Ajay; Jha, Purushottam; Shelke, Vilas

    2018-04-01

    The effect of different milling time on thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) was investigated. The nanomaterial was prepared by varying the ball milling time and followed by hot press sintering. The crystal structure and phase formation were verified by X-ray diffraction and Raman Spectroscopy. The experimental results show that electrical conductivity increases whereas thermal conductivity decreases with increasing milling time. The negative sign of seebeck coefficient indicate the n-type nature with majority charge carriers of electrons. A maximum figure of merit about 0.55 is achieved for l5hr ball milled Bi2Te3 sample. The present study demonstrates the simple and cost-effective method for synthesis of Bi2Te3 thermoelectric material at large scale thermoelectric applications.

  12. High pressure and doping effects on the Curie temperature in chromium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grazhdankina, N.P.; Bersenev, Yu.S.

    1976-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the effect of hydrostatic pressure (up to 12 kbars) on the Curie temperature Tsub(c) of solid CrTsub(1-x)Xsub(x) solutions (X=Se, Sb) are presented for x concentration values up to 0.5. The baric coefficients γ=Tsub(c)sup(-1)(dTsub(c)/dP) for all alloys investigated are negative. However the γ(x) dependence is determined by the X alloy component and correspondingly by the nature of the compression which may be either isotropic (X=Se) or anisotropic (X=Sb). Possible mechanisms of exchange spin coupling in the alloys investigated are discussed on the basis of the data obtained. It is concluded that two types of exchange interactions coexist in chromium telluride: indirect exchange of localized electrons via the anion and interaction between collectivized electrons in the narrow 3d band energy determines the Curie temperature

  13. Trace analysis in cadmium telluride by heavy ion induced X-ray emission and by SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharager, C.; Stuck, R.; Siffert, P.; Cailleret, J.; Heitz, Ch.; Lagarde, G.; Tenorio, D.

    1979-01-01

    The possibilities of using both selective heavy ion induced X-ray emission and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), for the identification of impurities present at low concentrations in cadmium telluride are examined. The relative concentrations of the impurities along CdTe crystals have been determined by exciting the X-ray emission of the elements in several slices with Ar and Kr ions and by comparing the relative characteristic X-ray emission yields. As a consequence of the quasimolecular inner shell ionization mechanism in heavy ion-atom collisions, Ar and Kr ions allow a strong excitation of the main impurities seen by SIMS namely Si, Cl and Ge, As, with only a minor contribution of Cd and Te. From the changes of the concentrations of the various impurities along the crystal, informations about segregation coefficients and compensation can be obtained

  14. Angular dependence of magnetization reversal in epitaxial chromium telluride thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pramanik, Tanmoy, E-mail: pramanik.tanmoy@utexas.edu; Roy, Anupam, E-mail: anupam@austin.utexas.edu; Dey, Rik, E-mail: rikdey@utexas.edu; Rai, Amritesh; Guchhait, Samaresh; Movva, Hema C.P.; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2017-09-01

    Highlights: • Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in epitaxial Cr{sub 2}Te{sub 3} has been investigated. • Presence of a relatively strong second order anisotropy contribution is observed. • Magnetization reversal is explained quantitatively using a 1D defect model. • Relative roles of nucleation and pinning in magnetization reversal are discussed. • Domain structures and switching process are visualized by micromagnetic simulation. - Abstract: We investigate magnetic anisotropy and magnetization reversal mechanism in chromium telluride thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We report existence of strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in these thin films, along with a relatively strong second order anisotropy contribution. The angular variation of the switching field observed from the magnetoresistance measurement is explained quantitatively using a one-dimensional defect model. The model reveals the relative roles of nucleation and pinning in the magnetization reversal, depending on the applied field orientation. Micromagnetic simulations are performed to visualize the domain structure and switching process.

  15. First operation of cesium telluride photocathodes in the TTF injector RF gun

    CERN Document Server

    Sertore, D; Flöttmann, K; Stephan, F; Zapfe, K; Michelato, P

    2000-01-01

    During the run 1998/1999 a new injector based on a laser-driven RF gun was brought in operation at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac at DESY, in order to produce the beam structure and quality required either by TeV collider and SASE FEL experiments. High quantum efficiency cesium telluride photocathodes, prepared at Milano and transferred to DESY, have been successfully operated in the RF gun. A bunch charge of 50 nC, only limited by space charge effects, was achieved. The photocathodes have shown an operative lifetime of several months. A new cathode surface finishing has showed a promising decrease of the photocathode dark current. Measurements of dark current, quantum efficiency and lifetime are reported.

  16. Cellulose nanocrystal properties and their applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mahdi jonoobi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this work is to provide an overview of recent research in the area of cellulose nonmaterials production from different sources. Due to their abundance, their renewability, high strength and stiffness, being eco-friendly, and low weight; numerous studies have been reported on the isolation of cellulose nanomaterials from different cellulosic sources and their use in high performance applications. This work covers an introduction into the nano cellulose definition as well as used methods for isolation of nanomaterials (nanocrystals from various sources. The rod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNC can be isolated from sources like wood, plant fibers, agriculture and industrial bio residues, tunicates, and bacterial cellulose using acid hydrolysis process. Following this, the paper focused on characterization methods, materials properties and structure. The current review is a comprehensive literature regarding the nano cellulose isolation and demonstrates the potential of cellulose nanomaterials to be used in a wide range of high-tech applications.

  17. Tunable plasmonic lattices of silver nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Andrea; Sinsermsuksakul, Prasert; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-18

    Silver nanocrystals are ideal building blocks for plasmonicmaterials that exhibit a wide range of unique and potentially usefuloptical phenomena. Individual nanocrystals display distinct opticalscattering spectra and can be assembled into hierarchical structures thatcouple strongly to external electromagnetic fields. This coupling, whichis mediated by surface plasmons, depends on their shape and arrangement.Here we demonstrate the bottom-up assembly of polyhedral silvernanocrystals into macroscopic two-dimensional superlattices using theLangmuir-Blodgett technique. Our ability to control interparticlespacing, density, and packing symmetry allows for tunability of theoptical response over the entire visible range. This assembly strategyoffers a new, practical approach to making novel plasmonic materials forapplication in spectroscopic sensors, sub-wavelength optics, andintegrated devices that utilize field enhancement effects.

  18. Extracting hot carriers from photoexcited semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2014-12-10

    This research program addresses a fundamental question related to the use of nanomaterials in solar energy -- namely, whether semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) can help surpass the efficiency limits, the so-called “Shockley-Queisser” limit, in conventional solar cells. In these cells, absorption of photons with energies above the semiconductor bandgap generates “hot” charge carriers that quickly “cool” to the band edges before they can be utilized to do work; this sets the solar cell efficiency at a limit of ~31%. If instead, all of the energy of the hot carriers could be captured, solar-to-electric power conversion efficiencies could be increased, theoretically, to as high as 66%. A potential route to capture this energy is to utilize semiconductor nanocrystals. In these materials, the quasi-continuous conduction and valence bands of the bulk semiconductor become discretized due to confinement of the charge carriers. Consequently, the energy spacing between the electronic levels can be much larger than the highest phonon frequency of the lattice, creating a “phonon bottleneck” wherein hot-carrier relaxation is possible via slower multiphonon emission. For example, hot-electron lifetimes as long as ~1 ns have been observed in NCs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. In colloidal NCs, long lifetimes have been demonstrated through careful design of the nanocrystal interfaces. Due to their ability to slow electronic relaxation, semiconductor NCs can in principle enable extraction of hot carriers before they cool to the band edges, leading to more efficient solar cells.

  19. Structural phase transitions in niobium oxide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuvakkumar, R.; Hong, Sun Ig

    2015-09-01

    Niobium oxide nanocrystals were successfully synthesized employing the green synthesis method. Phase formation, microstructure and compositional properties of 1, 4 and 7 days incubation treated samples after calcinations at 450 °C were examined using X-ray diffraction, Raman, photoluminescence (PL), infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectra and transmission electron microscopic characterizations. It was observed that phase formation of Nb2O5 nanocrystals was dependent upon the incubation period required to form stable metal oxides. The characteristic results clearly revealed that with increasing incubation and aging, the transformation of cubic, orthorhombic and monoclinic phases were observed. The uniform heating at room temperature (32 °C) and the ligation of niobium atoms due to higher phenolic constituents of utilized rambutan during aging processing plays a vital role in structural phase transitions in niobium oxide nanocrystals. The defects over a period of incubation and the intensities of the PL spectra changing over a period of aging were related to the amount of the defects induced by the phase transition.

  20. Digital fabrication

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The Winter 2012 (vol. 14 no. 3) issue of the Nexus Network Journal features seven original papers dedicated to the theme “Digital Fabrication”. Digital fabrication is changing architecture in fundamental ways in every phase, from concept to artifact. Projects growing out of research in digital fabrication are dependent on software that is entirely surface-oriented in its underlying mathematics. Decisions made during design, prototyping, fabrication and assembly rely on codes, scripts, parameters, operating systems and software, creating the need for teams with multidisciplinary expertise and different skills, from IT to architecture, design, material engineering, and mathematics, among others The papers grew out of a Lisbon symposium hosted by the ISCTE-Instituto Universitario de Lisboa entitled “Digital Fabrication – A State of the Art”. The issue is completed with four other research papers which address different mathematical instruments applied to architecture, including geometric tracing system...

  1. Low-cost superior solid-state symmetric supercapacitors based on hematite nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shaomin; Yu, Lin; Lan, Bang; Sun, Ming; Cheng, Gao; Liao, Shuhuan; Cao, Han; Deng, Yulin

    2016-12-01

    We present a facile method for the fabrication of hematite nanocrystal-carbon cloth (Fe2O3-CC) composite. Hierarchical manganite is chosen as the sacrificial precursor, that does not contribute to the component of final iron oxide but can be in situ dissolved by the acid produced from the Fe3+ hydrolysis. This method effectively enhances the specific surface area and conductivity of hematite (Fe2O3) by attaching Fe2O3 nanocrystals (around 5 nm) firmly on the surface of carbon fibers. The obtained Fe2O3-CC can be directly used as a binder-free electrode for a supercapacitor. Interestingly, the composite electrode exhibits synergistic electrochemical capacitance (electrochemical double-layer capacitance and pseudo-capacitance). It manifests a very high areal capacitance of 1.66 F cm-2 (1660 F g-1) at 2 mA cm-2 and excellent cycling performance at large current densities (88.6% retention at 30 mA cm-2 after 5000 cycles) in a three-electrode testing system, which is among the best performances reported in the literature. Importantly, when fabricated as a solid-state flexible symmetric supercapacitor it still shows a maximum energy density of 8.74 mW h cm-3 and power density of 253.9 mW cm-3. Additionally, its good flexibility makes it suitable for portable devices.

  2. Strongly emissive perovskite nanocrystal inks for high-voltage solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkerman, Quinten A.; Gandini, Marina; di Stasio, Francesco; Rastogi, Prachi; Palazon, Francisco; Bertoni, Giovanni; Ball, James M.; Prato, Mirko; Petrozza, Annamaria; Manna, Liberato

    2016-12-01

    Lead halide perovskite semiconductors have recently gained wide interest following their successful embodiment in solid-state photovoltaic devices with impressive power-conversion efficiencies, while offering a relatively simple and low-cost processability. Although the primary optoelectronic properties of these materials have already met the requirement for high-efficiency optoelectronic technologies, industrial scale-up requires more robust processing methods, as well as solvents that are less toxic than the ones that have been commonly used so successfully on the lab-scale. Here we report a fast, room-temperature synthesis of inks based on CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals using short, low-boiling-point ligands and environmentally friendly solvents. Requiring no lengthy post-synthesis treatments, the inks are directly used to fabricate films of high optoelectronic quality, exhibiting photoluminescence quantum yields higher than 30% and an amplified spontaneous emission threshold as low as 1.5 μJ cm-2. Finally, we demonstrate the fabrication of perovskite nanocrystal-based solar cells, with open-circuit voltages as high as 1.5 V.

  3. Perovskite Nanocrystals as a Color Converter for Visible Light Communication

    KAUST Repository

    Dursun, Ibrahim; Shen, Chao; Parida, Manas R.; Pan, Jun; Sarmah, Smritakshi P.; Priante, Davide; AlYami, Noktan; Liu, Jiakai; Saidaminov, Makhsud I.; Alias, Mohd Sharizal; Abdelhady, Ahmed L.; Ng, Tien Khee; Mohammed, Omar F.; Ooi, Boon S.; Bakr, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Visible light communication (VLC) is an emerging technology that uses light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or laser diodes for simultaneous illumination and data communication. This technology is envisioned to be a major part of the solution to the current bottlenecks in data and wireless communication. However, the conventional lighting phosphors that are typically integrated with LEDs have limited modulation bandwidth and thus cannot provide the bandwidth required to realize the potential of VLC. In this work, we present a promising light converter for VLC by designing solution-processed CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) with a conventional red phosphor. The fabricated CsPbBr3 NCs phosphor-based white light converter exhibits an unprecedented modulation bandwidth of 491 MHz, which is ~ 40 times greater than that of conventional phosphors, and the capability to transmit a high data rate of up to 2 Gbit/s. Moreover, this perovskite enhanced white light source combines ultrafast response characteristics with a high color rendering index of 89 and a low correlated color temperature of 3236 K, thereby enabling dual VLC and solid-state lighting functionalities.

  4. Facile Synthesis of Monodisperse Gold Nanocrystals Using Virola oleifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milaneze, Bárbara A.; Oliveira, Jairo P.; Augusto, Ingrid; Keijok, Wanderson J.; Côrrea, Andressa S.; Ferreira, Débora M.; Nunes, Otalíbio C.; Gonçalves, Rita de Cássia R.; Kitagawa, Rodrigo R.; Celante, Vinícius G.; da Silva, André Romero; Pereira, Ana Claudia H.; Endringer, Denise C.; Schuenck, Ricardo P.; Guimarães, Marco C. C.

    2016-10-01

    The development of new routes and strategies for nanotechnology applications that only employ green synthesis has inspired investigators to devise natural systems. Among these systems, the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using plant extracts has been actively developed as an alternative, efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally safe method for producing nanoparticles, and this approach is also suitable for large-scale synthesis. This study reports reproducible and completely natural gold nanocrystals that were synthesized using Virola oleifera extract. V. oleifera resin is rich in epicatechin, ferulic acid, gallic acid, and flavonoids (i.e., quercetin and eriodictyol). These gold nanoparticles play three roles. First, these nanoparticles exhibit remarkable stability based on their zeta potential. Second, these nanoparticles are functionalized with flavonoids, and third, an efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly mechanism can be employed to produce green nanoparticles with organic compounds on the surface. Our model is capable of reducing the resin of V. oleifera, which creates stability and opens a new avenue for biological applications. This method does not require painstaking conditions or hazardous agents and is a rapid, efficient, and green approach for the fabrication of monodisperse gold nanoparticles.

  5. Engineering of Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Light Emitting Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Todescato

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanocrystals are rapidly spreading into the display and lighting markets. Compared with liquid crystal and organic LED displays, nanocrystalline quantum dots (QDs provide highly saturated colors, wide color gamut, resolution, rapid response time, optical efficiency, durability and low cost. This remarkable progress has been made possible by the rapid advances in the synthesis of colloidal QDs and by the progress in understanding the intriguing new physics exhibited by these nanoparticles. In this review, we provide support to the idea that suitably engineered core/graded-shell QDs exhibit exceptionally favorable optical properties, photoluminescence and optical gain, while keeping the synthesis facile and producing QDs well suited for light emitting applications. Solid-state laser emitters can greatly profit from QDs as efficient gain materials. Progress towards fabricating low threshold, solution processed DFB lasers that are optically pumped using one- and two-photon absorption is reviewed. In the field of display technologies, the exploitation of the exceptional photoluminescence properties of QDs for LCD backlighting has already advanced to commercial levels. The next big challenge is to develop the electroluminescence properties of QD to a similar state. We present an overview of QLED devices and of the great perspectives for next generation display and lighting technologies.

  6. Stress evolution of Ge nanocrystals in dielectric matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahariqushchi, Rahim; Raciti, Rosario; Emre Kasapoğlu, Ahmet; Gür, Emre; Sezen, Meltem; Kalay, Eren; Mirabella, Salvatore; Aydinli, A.

    2018-05-01

    Germanium nanocrystals (Ge NCs) embedded in single and multilayer silicon oxide and silicon nitride matrices have been synthesized using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition followed by conventional furnace annealing or rapid thermal processing in N2 ambient. Compositions of the films were determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The formation of NCs under suitable process conditions was observed with high resolution transmission electron microscope micrographs and Raman spectroscopy. Stress measurements were done using Raman shifts of the Ge optical phonon line at 300.7 cm-1. The effect of the embedding matrix and annealing methods on Ge NC formation were investigated. In addition to Ge NCs in single layer samples, the stress on Ge NCs in multilayer samples was also analyzed. Multilayers of Ge NCs in a silicon nitride matrix separated by dielectric buffer layers to control the size and density of NCs were fabricated. Multilayers consisted of SiN y :Ge ultrathin films sandwiched between either SiO2 or Si3N4 by the proper choice of buffer material. We demonstrated that it is possible to tune the stress state of Ge NCs from compressive to tensile, a desirable property for optoelectronic applications. We also observed that there is a correlation between the stress and the crystallization threshold in which the compressive stress enhances the crystallization, while the tensile stress suppresses the process.

  7. Perovskite Nanocrystals as a Color Converter for Visible Light Communication

    KAUST Repository

    Dursun, Ibrahim

    2016-05-31

    Visible light communication (VLC) is an emerging technology that uses light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or laser diodes for simultaneous illumination and data communication. This technology is envisioned to be a major part of the solution to the current bottlenecks in data and wireless communication. However, the conventional lighting phosphors that are typically integrated with LEDs have limited modulation bandwidth and thus cannot provide the bandwidth required to realize the potential of VLC. In this work, we present a promising light converter for VLC by designing solution-processed CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) with a conventional red phosphor. The fabricated CsPbBr3 NCs phosphor-based white light converter exhibits an unprecedented modulation bandwidth of 491 MHz, which is ~ 40 times greater than that of conventional phosphors, and the capability to transmit a high data rate of up to 2 Gbit/s. Moreover, this perovskite enhanced white light source combines ultrafast response characteristics with a high color rendering index of 89 and a low correlated color temperature of 3236 K, thereby enabling dual VLC and solid-state lighting functionalities.

  8. SAXS and EXAFS studies of ion beam synthesized Au nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluth, P.; Johannessen, B.; Cookson, D.J.; Foran, G.J.; Ridgway, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    We have used small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to investigate Au nanocrystals (NCs) fabricated by high dose ion implantation into thin SiO 2 and subsequent annealing at different temperatures. Size distributions were determined from SAXS and structural parameters were extracted from EXAFS measurements, the latter analyzed as a function of NC size. Increasing implantation dose leads to an increasing average NC size and broadening of the size distribution. A significant size-dependent bond length contraction with respect to bulk material was observed. For samples annealed at 1100 deg. C our analysis suggests that an increased structural disorder is predominantly located at the NC surface. Post-implantation annealing at temperatures of 500 deg. C and 800 deg. C for 1 h in forming gas had no detectable influence on the NC size distribution, however, a significant influence on the structural parameters, in particular increased disorder was observed. This is potentially the result of stress induced disorder due to the different thermal expansion of the NC and matrix materials

  9. Solution synthesis of telluride-based nano-barbell structures coated with PEDOT:PSS for spray-printed thermoelectric generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Eun Jin; Kang, Young Hun; Jang, Kwang-Suk; Lee, Changjin; Cho, Song Yun

    2016-05-01

    Solution-processable telluride-based heterostructures coated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (Te-Bi2Te3/PEDOT:PSS) were synthesized through a solution-phase reaction at low temperatures. The water-based synthesis yielded PEDOT:PSS-coated Te-Bi2Te3 nano-barbell structures with a high Seebeck coefficient that can be stably dispersed in water. These hybrid solutions were deposited onto a substrate by the spray-printing method to prepare thermoelectric generators. The thermoelectric properties of the Te-Bi2Te3/PEDOT:PSS hybrid films were significantly enhanced by a simple acid treatment due to the increased electrical conductivity, and the power factor of those materials can be effectively tuned over a wide range depending on the acid concentration of the treatment. The power factors of the synthesized Te-Bi2Te3/PEDOT:PSS hybrids were optimized to 60.05 μW m-1 K-2 with a Seebeck coefficient of 93.63 μV K-1 and an electrical conductivity of 69.99 S cm-1. The flexible thermoelectric generator fabricated by spray-printing Te-Bi2Te3/PEDOT:PSS hybrid solutions showed an open-circuit voltage of 1.54 mV with six legs at ΔT = 10 °C. This approach presents the potential for realizing printing-processable hybrid thermoelectric materials for application in flexible thermoelectric generators.Solution-processable telluride-based heterostructures coated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (Te-Bi2Te3/PEDOT:PSS) were synthesized through a solution-phase reaction at low temperatures. The water-based synthesis yielded PEDOT:PSS-coated Te-Bi2Te3 nano-barbell structures with a high Seebeck coefficient that can be stably dispersed in water. These hybrid solutions were deposited onto a substrate by the spray-printing method to prepare thermoelectric generators. The thermoelectric properties of the Te-Bi2Te3/PEDOT:PSS hybrid films were significantly enhanced by a simple acid treatment due to the increased electrical conductivity, and

  10. Extraordinary Interfacial Stitching between Single All-Inorganic Perovskite Nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez, Leyre; Lin, Junhao; De Weerd, Chris; Poirier, Lucas; Boehme, Simon C.; Von Hauff, Elizabeth; Fujiwara, Yasufumi; Suenaga, Kazutomo; Gregorkiewicz, Tom

    2018-01-01

    All-inorganic cesium lead halide perovskite nanocrystals are extensively studied because of their outstanding optoelectronic properties. Being of a cubic shape and typically featuring a narrow size distribution, CsPbX3 (X = Cl, Br, and I) nanocrystals are the ideal starting material for the

  11. Synthesis and preservation of graphene-supported uranium dioxide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Hanyu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Wang, Haitao [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, Texas Tech University, 911 Boston Ave., Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Burns, Peter C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, 251 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); McNamara, Bruce K.; Buck, Edgar C. [Nuclear Chemistry & Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Na, Chongzheng, E-mail: chongzheng.na@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, Texas Tech University, 911 Boston Ave., Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Graphene-supported uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) nanocrystals are potentially important fuel materials. Here, we investigate the possibility of synthesizing graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals in polar ethylene glycol compounds by the polyol reduction of uranyl acetylacetone under boiling reflux, thereby enabling the use of an inexpensive graphene precursor graphene oxide into a one-pot process. We show that triethylene glycol is the most suitable solvent with an appropriate reduction potential for producing nanometer-sized UO{sub 2} crystals compared to monoethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, and polyethylene glycol. Graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized with triethylene glycol show evidence of heteroepitaxy, which can be beneficial for facilitating heat transfer in nuclear fuel particles. Furthermore, we show that graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized by polyol reduction can be readily stored in alcohols, impeding oxidation from the prevalent oxygen in air. Together, these methods provide a facile approach for preparing and storing graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals for further investigation and development under ambient conditions. - Highlights: • UO{sub 2} nanocrystals are synthesized using polyol reduction method. • Triethylene glycol is the best reducing agent for nano-sized UO{sub 2} crystals. • UO{sub 2} nanocrystals grow on graphene through heteroepitaxy. • Graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals can be stored in alcohols to prevent oxidation.

  12. Characterization of Ge-nanocrystal films with photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostedt, C.; Buuren, T. van; Willey, T.M.; Nelson, A.J.; Franco, N.; Moeller, T.; Terminello, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    The Ge 3d core-levels of germanium nanocrystal films have been investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy. The experiments indicate bulk-like coordinated atoms in the nanocrystals and suggest structured disorder on the nanoparticle surface. The results underline the importance of the surface on the overall electronic structure of this class of nanostructured materials

  13. Group IV nanocrystals with ion-exchangeable surface ligands and methods of making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Lance M.; Nichols, Asa W.; Chernomordik, Boris D.; Anderson, Nicholas C.; Beard, Matthew C.; Neale, Nathan R.

    2018-01-09

    Methods are described that include reacting a starting nanocrystal that includes a starting nanocrystal core and a covalently bound surface species to create an ion-exchangeable (IE) nanocrystal that includes a surface charge and a first ion-exchangeable (IE) surface ligand ionically bound to the surface charge, where the starting nanocrystal core includes a group IV element.

  14. Photoluminescence from Si nanocrystals in silica: The effect of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheylan, S.; Elliman, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of H passivation on the PL emission of Si nanocrystals produced in silica by ion-implantion and annealing is shown to depend on the implant fluence. At low fluences, where the nanocrystals are small, passivation causes an enhancement of the emission intensity that is uniform over the full spectral range and therefore appears to be independent of nanocrystal size. For higher fluences, where the average size and size distribution of the nanocrystals are larger, the enhancement occurs preferentially at longer wavelengths, giving rise to a red-shift in the emission spectra. Both the enhancement and the red-shift increase monotonically with increasing fluence. These data are shown to be consistent with a model in which the probability to contain a non-radiative defect increases with nanocrystal size

  15. Isolating and moving single atoms using silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2010-09-07

    A method is disclosed for isolating single atoms of an atomic species of interest by locating the atoms within silicon nanocrystals. This can be done by implanting, on the average, a single atom of the atomic species of interest into each nanocrystal, and then measuring an electrical charge distribution on the nanocrystals with scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) or electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) to identify and select those nanocrystals having exactly one atom of the atomic species of interest therein. The nanocrystals with the single atom of the atomic species of interest therein can be sorted and moved using an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The method is useful for forming nanoscale electronic and optical devices including quantum computers and single-photon light sources.

  16. Facile synthesis of water-soluble curcumin nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Zoran M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, facile synthesis of water soluble curcumin nanocrystals is reported. Solvent exchange method was applied to synthesize curcumin nanocrystals. Different techniques were used to characterize the structural and photophysical properties of curcumin nanocrystals. We found that nanocurcumin prepared by this method had good chemical and physical stability, could be stored in the powder form at room temperature, and was freely dispersible in water. It was established that the size of curcumin nanocrystals was varied in the range of 20-500 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-Vis analyses showed the presence of tetrahydrofuran inside the curcumin nanocrystals. Also, it was found that nanocurcumin emitted photoluminescencewith yellow-green colour. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172003

  17. Plasmonic light-sensitive skins of nanocrystal monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Shahab; Gungor, Kivanc; Mutlugun, Evren; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2013-04-01

    We report plasmonically coupled light-sensitive skins of nanocrystal monolayers that exhibit sensitivity enhancement and spectral range extension with plasmonic nanostructures embedded in their photosensitive nanocrystal platforms. The deposited plasmonic silver nanoparticles of the device increase the optical absorption of a CdTe nanocrystal monolayer incorporated in the device. Controlled separation of these metallic nanoparticles in the vicinity of semiconductor nanocrystals enables optimization of the photovoltage buildup in the proposed nanostructure platform. The enhancement factor was found to depend on the excitation wavelength. We observed broadband sensitivity improvement (across 400-650 nm), with a 2.6-fold enhancement factor around the localized plasmon resonance peak. The simulation results were found to agree well with the experimental data. Such plasmonically enhanced nanocrystal skins hold great promise for large-area UV/visible sensing applications.

  18. Structure impact on the thermal and electronic properties of bismuth telluride by ab-initio and molecular dynamics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Termentzidis, K; Pokropivny, A; Xiong, S-Y; Chumakov, Y; Volz, S; Woda, M; Cortona, P

    2012-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics and ab-initio methods to predict the thermal and electronic properties of new materials with high figures of merit. The simulated systems are bulk bismuth tellurides with antisite and vacancy defects. Optimizations of the materials under investigation are performed by the SIESTA code for subsequent calculations of force constants, electronic properties, and Seebeck coefficients. The prediction of the thermal conductivity is made by Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) using the LAMMPS code. The thermal conductivity of bulk bismuth telluride with different stoichiometry and with a number of substitution defects is calculated. We have found that the thermal conductivity can be decreased by 60% by introducing vacancy defects. The calculated thermal conductivities for the different structures are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  19. Green synthesis of water soluble semiconductor nanocrystals and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying

    II-VI semiconductor nanomaterials, e.g. CdSe and CdTe, have attracted great attention over the past decades due to their fascinating optical and electrical properties. The research presented here focuses on aqueous semiconductor nanomaterials. The work can be generally divided into three parts: synthesis, property study and application. The synthetic work is devoted to develop new methods to prepare shape- and structure-controlled II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals including nanoparticles and nanowires. CdSe and CdSe CdS semiconductor nanocrystals have been synthesized using sodium citrate as a stabilizer. Upon prolonged illumination with visible light, photoluminescence quantum yield of those quantum dots can be enhanced up to 5000%. The primary reason for luminescence enhancement is considered to be the removing of specific surface states (photocorrosion) and the smoothing of the CdSe core surface (photoannealing). CdTe nanowires are prepared through self-organization of stabilizer-depleted CdTe nanoparticles. The dipolar-dipolar attraction is believed to be the driving force of nanowire formation. The rich surface chemistry of CdTe nanowire is reflected by the formation of silica shell with different morphologies when nanowires with different capping ligands are used. Te and Se nanowires are prepared by chemical decomposition of CdTe and CdSe nanoparticles in presence of an external chemical stimulus, EDTA. These results not only provide a new example of NP→NW transformation, but also lead to a better understanding of the molecular process occurring in the stabilizer-depleted nanoparticles. The applications of those semiconductor materials are primarily based on the construction of nano-structured ultrathin films with desirable functions by using layer-by-layer technique (LBL). We demonstrate that light-induced micro-scale multicolor luminescent patterns can be obtained on photoactivable CdSe/CdS nanoparticles thin films by combining the advantages of LBL as

  20. Z-Contrast STEM Imaging and EELS of CdSe Nanocrystals: Towards the Analysis of Individual Nanocrystal Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erwin, M.; Kadavanich, A.V.; Kippeny, T.; Pennycook, S.J.; Rosenthal, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    We have applied Atomic Number Contract Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (Z-Contrast STEM) and STEM/EELS (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy) towards the study of colloidal CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals embedded in MEH-PPV polymer films. Unlike the case of conventional phase-contrast High Resolution TEM, Z-Contrast images are direct projections of the atomic structure. Hence they can be interpreted without the need for sophisticated image simulation and the image intensity is a direct measure of the thickness of a nanocrystal. Our thickness measurements are in agreement with the predicted faceted shape of these nanocrystals. Our unique 1.3A resolution STEM has successfully resolve3d the sublattice structure of these CdSe nanocrystals. In [010] projection (the polar axis in the image plane) we can distinguish Se atom columns from Cd columns. Consequently we can study the effects of lattice polarity on the nanocrystal morphology. Furthermore, since the STEM technique does not rely on diffraction, it is superbly suited to the study of non-periodic detail, such as the surface structure of the nanocrystals. EELS measurements on individual nanocrystals indicate a significant amount (equivalet to 0.5-1 surface monolayers) of oxygen on the nanocrystals, despite processing in an inert atmosphere. Spatially resolved measurements at 7A resolution suggest a surface oxide layer. However, the uncertainty in the measurement precludes definitive assignment at this time. The source of the oxygen is under investigation as well

  1. Effects of chemical intermixing on electrical and thermal contact conductances at metallized bismuth and antimony telluride interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devender,; Mehta, Rutvik J.; Ramanath, Ganpati, E-mail: Ramanath@rpi.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Lofgreen, Kelly; Mahajan, Ravi [Intel Corporation, Assembly Test and Technology Development, Chandler, Arizona 85226 (United States); Yamaguchi, Masashi [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian [Department of Mechanical Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Tailoring electrical and thermal contact conductivities (Σ{sub c} and Γ{sub c}) across metallized pnictogen chalcogenide interfaces is key for realizing efficient thermoelectric devices. The authors report that Cu, Ni, Ti, and Ta diffusion and interfacial telluride formation with n-Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and p-Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} influence both Σ{sub c} and Γ{sub c}. Cu metallization yields the highest Γ{sub c} and the lowest Σ{sub c}, correlating with maximal metal diffusion and copper telluride formation. Ni diffuses less and yields the highest Σ{sub c} with Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} due to p-type nickel telluride formation, which diminishes Σ{sub c} improvement with n-Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} interfaces. Ta and Ti contacts yield the lowest properties similar to that in Ni-metallized structures. These correlations between interfacial diffusion and phase formation on electronic and thermal transport properties will be important for devising suitable metallization for thermoelectric devices.

  2. Diffusion of iron in β-iron telluride (Fe1.12Te) by Moessbauer spectroscopy and tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magara, Masaaki; Tsuji, Toshihide; Naito, Keiji

    1993-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of iron in a β-iron telluride (Fe 1.12 Te) polycrystalline sample was measured by Moessbauer diffusional line broadening method which relates to the collapse of coherence in gamma-ray photon by the atomic jump at local sites. The diffusion coefficient of iron along the c-axis in nearly single crystal of β-iron telluride was also measured by tracer technique which shows the results of an atom transport in long distance. The activation energies for the diffusion of iron in Fe 1.12 Te obtained by the Moessbauer spectroscopy and the tracer method were 91.5±5.4 and 106±23 kJ/mol, respectively. The diffusion coefficients of iron in β-iron telluride obtained by Moessbauer line broadening are in fair agreement with the values averaged from that along c-axis obtained by tracer method and that along a- and b-axes obtained from reaction rate constant between iron and tellurium by the previous study of the present authors. (orig.)

  3. Gas-phase synthesis of semiconductor nanocrystals and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Rajib

    Luminescent nanomaterials is a newly emerging field that provides challenges not only to fundamental research but also to innovative technology in several areas such as electronics, photonics, nanotechnology, display, lighting, biomedical engineering and environmental control. These nanomaterials come in various forms, shapes and comprises of semiconductors, metals, oxides, and inorganic and organic polymers. Most importantly, these luminescent nanomaterials can have different properties owing to their size as compared to their bulk counterparts. Here we describe the use of plasmas in synthesis, modification, and deposition of semiconductor nanomaterials for luminescence applications. Nanocrystalline silicon is widely known as an efficient and tunable optical emitter and is attracting great interest for applications in several areas. To date, however, luminescent silicon nanocrystals (NCs) have been used exclusively in traditional rigid devices. For the field to advance towards new and versatile applications for nanocrystal-based devices, there is a need to investigate whether these NCs can be used in flexible and stretchable devices. We show how the optical and structural/morphological properties of plasma-synthesized silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) change when they are deposited on stretchable substrates made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Synthesis of these NCs was performed in a nonthermal, low-pressure gas phase plasma reactor. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of direct deposition of NCs onto stretchable substrates. Additionally, in order to prevent oxidation and enhance the luminescence properties, a silicon nitride shell was grown around Si NCs. We have demonstrated surface nitridation of Si NCs in a single step process using non?thermal plasma in several schemes including a novel dual-plasma synthesis/shell growth process. These coated NCs exhibit SiNx shells with composition depending on process parameters. While measurements including

  4. Formation of noble metal nanocrystals in the presence of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Justin Lockheart

    One of the most promising, yet least studied routes for producing biocompatible nanostructures involves synthesis in the presence of biomolecules. I hypothesized that globular proteins could provide a suitable framework to regulate the formation of noble metal nanocrystals. As proof of concept, I designed two novel synthesis protocols utilizing bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein to regulate the formation of gold nanocrystals. In the first case, the standard protocol for polyol reduction was modified by replacing ethylene glycol with glycerin, replacing synthetic polymers with BSA as protecting agent, and decreasing the reaction temperature. In the second case, the Brust-Schiffrin two-phase reduction was modified by replacing alkylthiols with BSA as protecting agent, which facilitated a strictly aqueous phase synthesis. Due to superior product yield and rapid reduction at room temperature, the aqueous protocol became the foundation for subsequent studies. I extended this approach to produce well-dispersed ˜2nm silver, gold, and platinum nanocrystals. Having demonstrated the feasibility of BSA-functionalized nanocrystals, some potential uses were explored. BSA-functionalized silver nanocrystals were employed in a broader study on the interaction of silver nanocrystals with HIV. BSA-functionalized gold nanocrystals were utilized for in vivo dosage of a contrast enhancing agent to bacteria. BSA-functionalized platinum nanocrystals were studied as hydrogenation catalysts. Since many intriguing uses for protein-functionalized nanocrystals involve incorporation into biosystems, I sought to enhance biocompatibility by using ascorbic acid as reducing agent. Initial experiments revealed elongated and branched nanocrystals. Such structures were not observed in previous synthesis protocols with BSA, so I hypothesized ascorbic acid was driving their formation. To test my assertion, I reduced ionic gold in an aqueous solution of ascorbic acid, thereby discovering a new method

  5. Semiconductor nanocrystals for novel optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jong-Sik

    Inspired by the promise of enhanced spectral response, photorefractive polymeric composites photosensitized with semiconductor nanocrystals have emerged as an important class of materials. Here, we report on the photosensitization of photorefractive polymeric composites at visible wavelengths through the inclusion of narrow band-gap semiconductor nanocrystals composed of PbS. Through this approach, internal diffraction efficiencies in excess of 82%, two-beam-coupling gain coefficients in excess of 211 cm-1, and response times 34 ms have been observed, representing some of the best figures-of-merit reported on this class of materials. In addition to providing efficient photosensitization, however, extensive studies of these hybrid composites have indicated that the inclusion of nanocrystals also provides an enhancement in the charge-carrier mobility and subsequent reduction in the photorefractive response time. Through this approach with PbS as charge-carrier, unprecedented response times of 399 micros were observed, opening the door for video and other high-speed applications. It is further demonstrated that this improvement in response time occurs with little sacrifice in photorefractive efficiency and with internal diffraction efficiencies of 72% and two- beam-coupling gain coefficients of 500 cm-1 being measured. A thorough analysis of the experimental data is presented, supporting the hypothesized mechanism of the enhanced charge mobility without the accompaniment of superfluous traps. Finally, water soluble InP/ZnS and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots interacted with CPP and Herceptin to apply them as a bio-maker. Both of quantum dots showed the excellent potential for use in biomedical imaging and drug delivery applications. It is anticipated that these approaches can play a significant role in the eventual commercialization of these classes of materials.

  6. Silicon Nanocrystal Synthesis in Microplasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ken

    Nanocrystalline silicon particles with grains smaller than 5 nm are widely recognized as a key material in optoelectronic devices, lithium battery electrodes, and bio-medical labels. Another important characteristic is that silicon is an environmentally safe material that is used in numerous silicon technologies. To date, several synthesis methods such as sputtering, laser ablation, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) based on low-pressure silane chemistry (SiH4) have been developed for precise control of size and density distributions of silicon nanocrystals. In this study, we explore the possibility of microplasma technologies for efficient production of mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon particles on a micrometer-scale, continuous-flow plasma reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Mixtures of argon, hydrogen, and silicon tetrachloride were activated using a very-high-frequency (144 MHz) power source in a capillary glass tube with volume of less than 1 μl. Fundamental plasma parameters of the microplasma were characterized using optical emission spectroscopy, which respectively indicated electron density of 1015 cm-3, argon excitation temperature of 5000 K, and rotational temperature of 1500 K. Such high-density non-thermal reactive plasma can decompose silicon tetrachloride into atomic silicon to produce supersaturated silicon vapor, followed by gas-phase nucleation via three-body collision: particle synthesis in high-density plasma media is beneficial for promoting nucleation processes. In addition, further growth of silicon nuclei can be terminated in a short-residence-time reactor. Micro-Raman scattering spectra showed that as-deposited particles are mostly amorphous silicon with a small fraction of silicon nanocrystals. Transmission electron micrography confirmed individual 3-15 nm silicon nanocrystals. Although particles were not mono-dispersed, they were well separated and not coagulated.

  7. Synthesis of Silicon Nanocrystals in Microplasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ken

    Nanocrystalline silicon particles with a grain size of at least less than 10 nm are widely recognized as one of the key materials in optoelectronic devices, electrodes of lithium battery, bio-medical labels. There is also important character that silicon is safe material to the environment and easily gets involved in existing silicon technologies. To date, several synthesis methods such as sputtering, laser ablation, and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) based on low-pressure silane chemistry (SiH4) have been developed for precise control of size and density distributions of silicon nanocrystals. We explore the possibility of microplasma technologies for the efficient production of mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon particles in a micrometer-scale, continuous-flow plasma reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Mixtures of argon, hydrogen, and silicon tetrachloride were activated using very high frequency (VHF = 144 MHz) power source in a capillary glass tube with a volume of less than 1 μ-liter. Fundamental plasma parameters of VHF capacitively coupled microplasma were characterized by optical emission spectroscopy, showing electron density of approximately 1015 cm-3 and rotational temperature of 1500 K, respectively. Such high-density non-thermal reactive plasma has a capability of decomposing silicon tetrachloride into atomic silicon to produce supersaturated atomic silicon vapor, followed by gas phase nucleation via three-body collision. The particle synthesis in high-density plasma media is beneficial for promoting nucleation process. In addition, further growth of silicon nuclei was able to be favorably terminated in a short-residence time reactor. Micro Raman scattering spectrum showed that as-deposited particles were mostly amorphous silicon with small fraction of silicon nanocrystals. Transmission electron micrograph confirmed individual silicon nanocrystals of 3-15 nm size. Although those particles were not mono-dispersed, they were

  8. Solvothermal crystallization of nanocrystals of metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, S; Amino, H; Iwamoto, S; Inoue, M

    2008-01-01

    Solvothermal crystallization of the hydroxide gels obtained by hydrolysis of alkoxides (Zr, Ta, Nb, ln, Sn, Ti and Al) was examined. Nanocrystals having high surface areas (S BET > 170 m 2 g -1 ) were obtained except for the product derived from indium isopropoxide. The effect of water in organic solvent upon the crystallinity of the product was investigated. The increase in the activity of water by using high concentration of alkoxide or intentional addition of water to the solvothermal medium led to crystal growth of the products. In contrast, decrease in activity of water by adding ethylene glycol before solvothermal treatment caused a decrease in crystallinity of the product

  9. Flame synthesis of zinc oxide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchan-Merchan, Wilson, E-mail: wmerchan-merchan@ou.edu [School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Farahani, Moien Farmahini [School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report a single-step flame method for the synthesis of Zn oxide nanocrystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diverse flame positions lead to a variation of Zn oxide nanocrystal growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The synthesized crystals have polyhedral, pipet- and needle-like shape. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High length-to-diameter aspect-ratio crystals appear in a higher temperature flame. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal growth mechanism corresponds to vapor-to-solid conversion. - Abstract: Distinctive zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals were synthesized on the surface of Zn probes using a counter-flow flame medium formed by methane/acetylene and oxygen-enriched air streams. The source material, a zinc wire with a purity of {approx}99.99% and diameter of 1 mm, was introduced through a sleeve into the oxygen rich region of the flame. The position of the probe/sleeve was varied within the flame medium resulting in growth variation of ZnO nanocrystals on the surface of the probe. The shape and structural parameters of the grown crystals strongly depend on the flame position. Structural variations of the synthesized crystals include single-crystalline ZnO nanorods and microprisms (ZMPs) (the ZMPs have less than a few micrometers in length and several hundred nanometers in cross section) with a large number of facets and complex axial symmetry with a nanorod protruding from their tips. The protruding rods are less than 100 nm in diameter and lengths are less than 1 {mu}m. The protruding nanorods can be elongated several times by increasing the residence time of the probe/sleeve inside the oxygen-rich flame or by varying the flame position. At different flame heights, nanorods having higher length-to-diameter aspect-ratio can be synthesized. A lattice spacing of {approx}0.26 nm was measured for the synthesized nanorods, which can be closely correlated with the (0 0 2) interplanar spacing of hexagonal ZnO (Wurtzite) cells

  10. Structure and Magnetic Properties of Lanthanide Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickerson, James Henry [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We have had considerable success on this project, particularly in the understanding of the relationship between nanostructure and magnetic properties in lanthanide nanocrystals. We also have successfully facilitated the doctoral degrees of Dr. Suseela Somarajan, in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Dr. Melissa Harrison, in the Materials Science Program. The following passages summarize the various accomplishments that were featured in 9 publications that were generated based on support from this grant. We thank the Department of Energy for their generous support of our research efforts in this area of materials science, magnetism, and electron microscopy.

  11. Solvothermal crystallization of nanocrystals of metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, S.; Amino, H.; Iwamoto, S.; Inoue, M.

    2008-07-01

    Solvothermal crystallization of the hydroxide gels obtained by hydrolysis of alkoxides (Zr, Ta, Nb, ln, Sn, Ti and Al) was examined. Nanocrystals having high surface areas (SBET > 170 m2 g-1) were obtained except for the product derived from indium isopropoxide. The effect of water in organic solvent upon the crystallinity of the product was investigated. The increase in the activity of water by using high concentration of alkoxide or intentional addition of water to the solvothermal medium led to crystal growth of the products. In contrast, decrease in activity of water by adding ethylene glycol before solvothermal treatment caused a decrease in crystallinity of the product.

  12. Growth and Characterization of (211)B Cadmium Telluride Buffer Layer Grown by Metal-organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy on Nanopatterned Silicon for Mercury Cadmium Telluride Based Infrared Detector Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintri, Shashidhar S.

    Mercury cadmium telluride (MCT or Hg1-xCdxTe) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is presently the material of choice for fabricating infrared (IR) detectors used in night vision based military applications. The focus of MCT epitaxy has gradually shifted since the last decade to using Si as the starting substrate since it offers several advantages. But the ˜19 % lattice mismatch between MCT and Si generates lots of crystal defects some of which degrade the performance of MCT devices. Hence thick CdTe films are used as buffer layers on Si to accommodate the defects. However, growth of high quality single crystal CdTe on Si is challenging and to date, the best MBE CdTe/Si reportedly has defects in the mid-105 cm -2 range. There is a critical need to reduce the defect levels by at least another order of magnitude, which is the main motivation behind the present work. The use of alternate growth technique called metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) offers some advantages over MBE and in this work MOVPE has been employed to grow the various epitaxial films. In the first part of this work, conditions for obtaining high quality (211)B CdTe epitaxy on (211)Si were achieved, which also involved studying the effect of having additional intermediate buffer layers such as Ge and ZnTe and incorporation of in-situ thermal cyclic annealing (TCA) to reduce the dislocation density. A critical problem of Si cross-contamination due to 'memory effect' of different reactant species was minimized by introducing tertiarybutylArsine (TBAs) which resulted in As-passivation of (211)Si. The best 8-10 µm thick CdTe films on blanket (non-patterned) Si had dislocations around 3×105 cm-2, which are the best reported by MOVPE till date and comparable to the highest quality films available by MBE. In the second part of the work, nanopatterned (211)Si was used to study the effect of patterning on the crystal quality of epitaxial CdTe. In one such study, patterning of ˜20 nm holes in SiO2

  13. Surface and Core Electronic Structure of Oxidized Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor A. Nama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio restricted Hartree-Fock method within the framework of large unit cell formalism is used to simulate silicon nanocrystals between 216 and 1000 atoms (1.6–2.65 nm in diameter that include Bravais and primitive cell multiples. The investigated properties include core and oxidized surface properties. Results revealed that electronic properties converge to some limit as the size of the nanocrystal increases. Increasing the size of the core of a nanocrystal resulted in an increase of the energy gap, valence band width, and cohesive energy. The lattice constant of the core and oxidized surface parts shows a decreasing trend as the nanocrystal increases in a size that converges to 5.28 Ǻ in a good agreement with the experiment. Surface and core convergence to the same lattice constant reflects good adherence of oxide layer at the surface. The core density of states shows highly degenerate states that split at the oxygenated (001-(1×1 surface due to symmetry breaking. The nanocrystal surface shows smaller gap and higher valence and conduction bands when compared to the core part, due to oxygen surface atoms and reduced structural symmetry. The smaller surface energy gap shows that energy gap of the nanocrystal is controlled by the surface part. Unlike the core part, the surface part shows a descending energy gap that proves its obedience to quantum confinement effects. Nanocrystal geometry proved to have some influence on all electronic properties including the energy gap.

  14. Interfacial interactions between calcined hydroxyapatite nanocrystals and substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masahiro; Furukawa, Keiko; Serizawa, Takeshi; Yanagisawa, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kawai, Tomoji; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2009-06-02

    Interfacial interactions between calcined hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals and surface-modified substrates were investigated by measuring adsorption behavior and adhesion strength with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and a contact-mode atomic force microscope (AFM), respectively. The goal was to develop better control of HAp-nanocrystal coatings on biomedical materials. HAp nanocrystals with rodlike or spherical morphology were prepared by a wet chemical process followed by calcination at 800 degrees C with an antisintering agent to prevent the formation of sintered polycrystals. The substrate surface was modified by chemical reaction with a low-molecular-weight compound, or graft polymerization with a functional monomer. QCM measurement showed that the rodlike HAp nanocrystals adsorbed preferentially onto anionic COOH-modified substrates compared to cationic NH2- or hydrophobic CH3-modified substrates. On the other hand, the spherical nanocrystals adsorbed onto NH2- and COOH-modified substrates, which indicates that the surface properties of the HAp nanocrystals determined their adsorption behavior. The adhesion strength, which was estimated from the force required to move the nanocrystal in contact-mode AFM, on a COOH-grafted substrate prepared by graft polymerization was almost 9 times larger than that on a COOH-modified substrate prepared by chemical reaction with a low-molecular-weight compound, indicating that the long-chain polymer grafted on the substrate mitigated the surface roughness mismatch between the nanocrystal and the substrate. The adhesion strength of the nanocrystal bonded covalently by the coupling reaction to a Si(OCH3)-grafted substrate prepared by graft polymerization was approximately 1.5 times larger than that when adsorbed on the COOH-grafted substrate.

  15. A Facile Fabrication of Silver-Coated Copper Nanowires by Galvanic Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated a general strategy to fabricate silver-coated copper nanowires by a galvanic replacement, which is guided by the chemical principle that metal ions (silver ions with a relatively high reduction potential can galvanically etch nanostructure made from a less metal (copper. Well-dispersed and high-yielded copper nanowires were initially synthesized and then introduced into silver-ammonia solution for the growth of silver nanocrystals on the nanowire surfaces under vigorous oscillation. The results of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope revealed that the silver nanocrystals were uniformly distributed on the copper nanowire surfaces to form Cu-Ag heterostructures. The concentration of silver-ammonia solution and the time of replacement reaction determine the size and density of the silver nanocrystals. Our investigation might pave the way to the synthesis of other bimetallic nanostructures via a facile, fast, and economical route.

  16. Preparation and physicochemical characterization of cellulose nanocrystals from industrial waste cotton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thambiraj, S.; Ravi Shankaran, D., E-mail: dravishankaran@hotmail.com

    2017-08-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of the preparation of cellulose nanocrystals from industrial waste cotton. - Highlights: • Cellulose microcrystals (CMCs) were synthesized from industrial waste cotton by controlled acid and basic hydrolysis. • Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) were synthesized from CMCs by controlled acid hydrolysis. • The synthesis process is simple and the CNCs possess liquid crystalline character, biocompatibility and sustainability. • The morphology of the CNCs were studied by AFM and TEM analysis. The average width is 10 ± 1 nm and length is 180 ± 60 nm. - Abstract: We aimed to develop a simple and low-cost method for the production of high-performance cellulose nanomaterials from renewable and sustainable resources. Here, cellulose microcrystals (CMCs) were prepared by controlled acidic and basic hydrolysis of cotton from textile industry wastes. The resulted CMCs were further converted into cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) with high crystallinity by acidic hydrolysis. The physicochemical characteristics and morphological feature of CMCs and CNCs were studied by various analytical techniques such as UV–vis spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fluorescence spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy (AFM), High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The isolated CNCs possess a needle-like morphological structure with the longitudinal and lateral dimensions of 180 ± 60 nm, 10 ± 1 nm, respectively. The AFM result reveals that the CNCs have a high aspect ratio of 40 ± 14 nm and the average thickness of 6.5 nm. The XRD and TEM analysis indicate that the synthesized CNCs possess face-centered cubic crystal structure. Preliminary experiments were carried out to fabricate CNCs incorporated poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) film. The results suggest that the concept of waste to wealth could be well

  17. Near-surface layer radiation color centers in lithium fluoride nanocrystals: Luminescence and composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voitovich, A.P., E-mail: voitovich@imaph.bas-net.by; Kalinov, V.S.; Stupak, A.P.; Novikov, A.N.; Runets, L.P.

    2015-01-15

    Lithium fluoride nanocrystals are irradiated by gamma quanta at 77 K. The radiation color centers formed in a near-surface layer of nanocrystals are studied. Absorption, luminescence and luminescence excitation spectra of the surface defects have been measured. It has been found that the luminescence excitation spectra for aggregated surface centers consist of two or three bands with not very much different intensities. Reactions of the surface centers separately with electrons and with anion vacancies have been investigated. Numbers of anion vacancies and electrons entering into the centers composition have been established and it has been found that F{sub S1}, F{sub S1}{sup −}, F{sub S2}, F{sub S2}{sup −}, F{sub S3}{sup +} and F{sub S3} types of the surface centers are formed. The degree of luminescence polarization has been defined and it has been determined that the polarization degree for F{sub S2}{sup +} centers changes sign under transition from one excitation band to another. It has been shown that during irradiation at 77 K radiation-induced defects are formed more efficiently on the surface than in the bulk. - Highlights: • Radiative color centers were fabricated in lithium fluoride nanocrystals. • The unique absorption and luminescence characteristics are inherent in the centers. • The reactions of these centers with electrons and anion vacancies were studied. • The degree of luminescence polarization was defined. • Numbers of anion vacancies and electrons forming the centers were established.

  18. Preparation and physicochemical characterization of cellulose nanocrystals from industrial waste cotton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thambiraj, S.; Ravi Shankaran, D.

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of the preparation of cellulose nanocrystals from industrial waste cotton. - Highlights: • Cellulose microcrystals (CMCs) were synthesized from industrial waste cotton by controlled acid and basic hydrolysis. • Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) were synthesized from CMCs by controlled acid hydrolysis. • The synthesis process is simple and the CNCs possess liquid crystalline character, biocompatibility and sustainability. • The morphology of the CNCs were studied by AFM and TEM analysis. The average width is 10 ± 1 nm and length is 180 ± 60 nm. - Abstract: We aimed to develop a simple and low-cost method for the production of high-performance cellulose nanomaterials from renewable and sustainable resources. Here, cellulose microcrystals (CMCs) were prepared by controlled acidic and basic hydrolysis of cotton from textile industry wastes. The resulted CMCs were further converted into cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) with high crystallinity by acidic hydrolysis. The physicochemical characteristics and morphological feature of CMCs and CNCs were studied by various analytical techniques such as UV–vis spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fluorescence spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy (AFM), High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The isolated CNCs possess a needle-like morphological structure with the longitudinal and lateral dimensions of 180 ± 60 nm, 10 ± 1 nm, respectively. The AFM result reveals that the CNCs have a high aspect ratio of 40 ± 14 nm and the average thickness of 6.5 nm. The XRD and TEM analysis indicate that the synthesized CNCs possess face-centered cubic crystal structure. Preliminary experiments were carried out to fabricate CNCs incorporated poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) film. The results suggest that the concept of waste to wealth could be well

  19. Self organized formation of Ge nanocrystals in multilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Zschintzsch-Dias, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to create a process which allows the tailored growth of Ge nanocrystals for use in photovoltic applications. The multilayer systems used here provide a reliable method to control the Ge nanocrystal size after phase separation. In this thesis, the deposition of GeOx/SiO2 and Ge:SiOx~ 2/SiO2 multilayers via reactive dc magnetron sputtering and the self-ordered Ge nanocrystal formation within the GeOx and Ge:SiOx~ 2 sublayers during subsequent annealing is investigated...

  20. PPLA-cellulose nanocrystals nanocomposite prepared by in situ polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula, Everton L. de; Pereirea, Fabiano V.; Mano, Valdir

    2011-01-01

    This work reports the preparation and and characterization of a PLLA-cellulose nanocrystals nanocomposite obtained by in situ polymerization. The nanocomposite was prepared by ring opening polymerization of the lactide dimer in the presence of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and the as-obtained materials was characterized using FTIR, DSC, XRD and TGA measurements. The incorporation of cellulose nanocrystals in PLLA using this method improved the thermal stability and increased the crystallinity of PLLA. These results indicate that the incorporation of CNCs by in situ polymerization improve thermal properties and has potential to improve also mechanical properties of this biodegradable polymer. (author)

  1. Influence of germanium nano-inclusions on the thermoelectric power factor of bulk bismuth telluride alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satyala, Nikhil; Zamanipour, Zahra; Norouzzadeh, Payam; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tahmasbi Rad, Armin; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-01-01

    Nanocomposite thermoelectric compound of bismuth telluride (Bi 2 Te 3 ) with 5 at. % germanium nano-inclusions was prepared via mechanically alloying and sintering techniques. The influence of Ge nano-inclusions and long duration annealing on the thermoelectric properties of nanostructured Bi 2 Te 3 were investigated. It was found that annealing has significant effect on the carrier concentration, Seebeck coefficient, and the power factor of the thermoelectric compound. The systematic heat treatment also reduced the density of donor type defects thereby decreasing the electron concentration. While the as-pressed nanocomposite materials showed n-type properties, it was observed that with the increase of annealing time, the nanocomposite gradually transformed to an abundantly hole-dominated (p-type) sample. The long duration annealing (∼500 h) resulted in a significantly enhanced electrical conductivity pertaining to the augmentation in the density and the structural properties of the sample. Therefore, a simultaneous enhancement in both electrical and Seebeck coefficient characteristics resulted in a remarkable increase in the thermoelectric power factor.

  2. N-hydroxysuccinimide-mediated photoelectrooxidation of aliphatic alcohols based on cadmium telluride nanoparticles decorated graphene nanosheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navaee, Aso; Salimi, Abdollah

    2013-01-01

    A simple nonenzymatic electrochemical protocol is proposed for the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols using formed N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) radical cation on the graphene nanosheets/L-cysteine/cadmium telluride quantum dot (QD) nanocomposite (GNs/Cys/CdTe) modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode. At first, graphene oxide (GO) is chemically synthesized from graphite after which Cys is covalently functionalized to GO through formation of amide bonds between carboxylic acid groups of GO and amine groups of Cys. The resulting GNs/Cys is used as a capping agent to synthesize CdTe QD nanoparticles. After the characterization of the as-made nanocomposite which confirmed the successful attachment of CdTe nanoparticles to the GNs, the ability of the GNs/Cys/CdTe modified GC electrode toward the nonenzymatic ethanol electrooxidation is examined in the presence of NHS as an effective mediating system. Our results revealed that the proposed system possess a good activity to NHS electrooxidation and subsequently, ethanol oxidation. Moreover, the GNs/Cys/CdTe modified electrode displayed a significant photoelectrocatalytic activity toward the ethanol oxidation upon illumination by visible light. The photoactive GNs/Cys/CdTe nanohybrid presented here showing favorable photoelectrochemical features for nonenzymatic aliphatic alcohols oxidation may hold great promise to the development of electrochemical sensors and biofuel cells

  3. Low-cost cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors based on electron-transport-only designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunett, B.A.; Lund, J.C.; Van Scyoc, J.M.; Hilton, N.R.; Lee, E.Y.; James, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this project was to utilize a novel device design to build a compact, high resolution, room temperature operated semiconductor gamma ray sensor. This sensor was constructed from a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystal. It was able to both detect total radiation intensity and perform spectroscopy on the detected radiation. CZT detectors produced today have excellent electron charge carrier collection, but suffer from poor hole collection. For conventional gamma-ray spectrometers, both the electrons and holes must be collected with high efficiency to preserve energy resolution. The requirement to collect the hole carriers, which have relatively low lifetimes, limits the efficiency and performance of existing experimental devices. By implementing novel device designs such that the devices rely only on the electron signal for energy information, the sensitivity of the sensors for detecting radiation can be increased substantially. In this report the authors describe a project to develop a new type of electron-only CZT detector. They report on their successful efforts to design, implement and test these new radiation detectors. In addition to the design and construction of the sensors the authors also report, in considerable detail, on the electrical characteristics of the CZT crystals used to make their detectors

  4. Study of a high-resolution, 3-D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y; Matteson, J L; Skelton, R T; Deal, A C; Stephan, E A; Duttweiler, F; Gasaway, T M; Levin, C S

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3-D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06±0.39% at 511 keV throughout most the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44±0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78±0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes – as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system. PMID:21335649

  5. Study of a high-resolution, 3D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y; Matteson, J L; Skelton, R T; Deal, A C; Stephan, E A; Duttweiler, F; Gasaway, T M; Levin, C S

    2011-03-21

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06 ± 0.39% at 511 keV throughout most of the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44 ± 0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78 ± 0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes-as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system.

  6. Heart imaging by cadmium telluride gamma camera European Program 'BIOMED' consortium

    CERN Document Server

    Scheiber, C; Chambron, J; Prat, V; Kazandjan, A; Jahnke, A; Matz, R; Thomas, S; Warren, S; Hage-Hali, M; Regal, R; Siffert, P; Karman, M

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium telluride semiconductor detectors (CdTe) operating at room temperature are attractive for medical imaging because of their good energy resolution providing excellent spatial and contrast resolution. The compactness of the detection system allows the building of small light camera heads which can be used for bedside imaging. A mobile pixellated gamma camera based on 2304 CdTe (pixel size: 3x3 mm, field of view: 15 cmx15 cm) has been designed for cardiac imaging. A dedicated 16-channel integrated circuit has also been designed. The acquisition hardware is fully programmable (DSP card, personal computer-based system). Analytical calculations have shown that a commercial parallel hole collimator will fit the efficiency/resolution requirements for cardiac applications. Monte-Carlo simulations predict that the Moire effect can be reduced by a 15 deg. tilt of the collimator with respect to the detector grid. A 16x16 CdTe module has been built for the preliminary physical tests. The energy resolution was 6.16...

  7. Measurement and Modeling of Blocking Contacts for Cadmium Telluride Gamma Ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Patrick R. [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States)

    2010-01-07

    Gamma ray detectors are important in national security applications, medicine, and astronomy. Semiconductor materials with high density and atomic number, such as Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), offer a small device footprint, but their performance is limited by noise at room temperature; however, improved device design can decrease detector noise by reducing leakage current. This thesis characterizes and models two unique Schottky devices: one with an argon ion sputter etch before Schottky contact deposition and one without. Analysis of current versus voltage characteristics shows that thermionic emission alone does not describe these devices. This analysis points to reverse bias generation current or leakage through an inhomogeneous barrier. Modeling the devices in reverse bias with thermionic field emission and a leaky Schottky barrier yields good agreement with measurements. Also numerical modeling with a finite-element physics-based simulator suggests that reverse bias current is a combination of thermionic emission and generation. This thesis proposes further experiments to determine the correct model for reverse bias conduction. Understanding conduction mechanisms in these devices will help develop more reproducible contacts, reduce leakage current, and ultimately improve detector performance.

  8. Cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon as adsorbent for removal of sunset yellow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, M.; Hekmati Jah, A.; Khodadoust, S.; Sahraei, R.; Daneshfar, A.; Mihandoost, A.; Purkait, M. K.

    2012-05-01

    Adsorption is a promising technique for decolorization of effluents of textile dyeing industries but its application is limited due to requirement of high amounts of adsorbent required. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded onto activated carbon (CdTN-AC) for the removal of sunset yellow (SY) dye from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch mode varying solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration, CdTN-AC dose, and temperature. In order to investigate the efficiency of SY adsorption on CdTN-AC, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models were studied. It was observed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits better than other kinetic models with good correlation coefficient. Equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy, entropy, activation energy, and sticking probability were also calculated. It was found that the sorption of SY onto CdTN-AC was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The proposed adsorbent is applicable for SY removal from waste of real effluents including pea-shooter, orange drink and jelly banana with efficiency more than 97%.

  9. Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride photon detector for epithermal neutron spectroscopy--pulse height response characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tardocchi, M.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Bracco, A.; D'Angelo, A.; Gorini, G.; Imberti, S.; Senesi, R.; Rhodes, N.J.; Schooneveld, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    The Resonance Detector Spectrometer was recently revised for neutron spectroscopic studies in the eV energy region. In this technique one makes use of a photon detector to record the gamma emission from analyser foils used as neutron-gamma converters. The pulse-height response of a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride photon detector to neutron capture emission from 238 U and 197 Au analyser foils was characterised in the neutron energy range 1-200 eV. The experiment was performed on the VESUVIO spectrometer at the ISIS neutron-pulsed source. A biparametric data acquisition, specifically developed for these measurements, allowed the simultaneous measurements of both the neutron time of flight and γ pulse-height spectra. Through the analysis of the γ pulse-height spectra the main components of the signal associated with resonant and non-resonant neutron absorption were identified. It was also shown that, in principle, energy discrimination can be used to improve the signal to background ratio of the neutron time-of-flight measurement

  10. Investigation of the Electronic Properties of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) Detectors using a Nuclear Microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRUNETT, BRUCE A.; DOYLE, BARNEY L.; JAMES, RALPH B.; VIZKELETHY, GYORGY; WALSH, DAVID S.

    1999-01-01

    The electronic transport properties of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) determine the charge collection efficiency (i.e. the signal quality) of CZT detectors. These properties vary on both macroscopic and microscopic scale and depend on the presence of impurities and defects introduced during the crystal growth. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) is a proven method to measure the charge collection efficiency. Using an ion microbeam, the charge collection efficiency can be mapped with submicron resolution, and the map of electronic properties (such as drift length) can be calculated from the measurement. A more sophisticated version of IBICC, the Time Resolved IBICC (TRIBICC) allows them to determine the mobility and the life time of the charge carriers by recording and analyzing the transient waveform of the detector signal. Furthermore, lateral IBICC and TRIBICC can provide information how the charge collection efficiency depends on the depth where the charge carriers are generated. This allows one to deduce information on the distribution of the electric field and transport properties of the charge carriers along the detector axis. IBICC and TRIBICC were used at the Sandia microbeam facility to image electronic properties of several CZT detectors. From the lateral TRIBICC measurement the electron and hole drift length profiles were calculated

  11. Effect of the interface on the mechanical properties and thermal conductivity of bismuth telluride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tang-Yu; Wang, Kuan-Yu; Fang, Te-Hua; Huang, Chao-Chun

    2018-02-01

    Bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) is a type of thermoelectric material used for energy generation that does not cause pollution. Increasing the thermoelectric conversion efficiency (ZT) is one of the most important steps in the development of thermoelectric components. In this study, we use molecular dynamics to investigate the mechanical properties and thermal conductivity of quintuple layers of Bi2Te3 nanofilms with different atomic arrangements at the interface and study the effects of varying layers, angles, and grain boundaries. The results indicate that the Bi2Te3 nanofilm perfect substrate has the ideal Young’s modulus and thermal conductivity, and the maximum yield stress is observed for a thickness of ∼90 Å. As the interface changed, the structural disorder of atomic arrangement affected the mechanical properties; moreover, the phonons encounter lattice disordered atomic region will produce scattering reduce heat conduction. The results of this investigation are helpful for the application of Bi2Te3 nanofilms as thermoelectric materials.

  12. Investigation of the electrochemical deposition of thick layers of cadmium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, J.

    2007-04-01

    This research thesis deals with the problem of electrochemical deposition of thick layers of cadmium telluride (CdTe) meeting the requirements of high energy radiation detection. The author first recalls the physicochemical properties of CdTe and the basic principles of radiology. He details the different criteria which define a material for X ray detection. He describes the experimental conditions, the nature and preparation of substrates, and the different electrochemical systems used in this research. He studies the impact of the applied potential on the material properties, and compares previously obtained results available in the literature with those obtained in the chosen pool conditions. He discusses the synthesis of CdTe thick layers for which different methods are tested: static in potential, static in intensity, pulsed. The coatings obtained with a given potential and then with a given current are investigated. Finally, the influence of a thermal treatment in presence or absence of a sintering agent on the morphology, the chemical composition, and the crystalline and electric properties of the deposited material is discussed, and the results of the behaviour under X rays of a electrodeposited layer are presented

  13. Reusable hydroxyapatite nanocrystal sensors for protein adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Chakarov, Dinko; Kasemo, Bengt; Tanaka, Junzo

    2010-01-01

    The repeatability of the adsorption and removal of fibrinogen and fetal bovine serum on hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystal sensors was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring technique. The HAp nanocrystals were coated on a gold-coated quartz sensor by electrophoretic deposition. Proteins adsorbed on the HAp sensors were removed by (i) ammonia/hydrogen peroxide mixture (APM), (ii) ultraviolet light (UV), (iii) UV/APM, (iv) APM/UV and (v) sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) treatments. FTIR spectra of the reused surfaces revealed that the APM and SDS treatments left peptide fragments or the proteins adsorbed on the surfaces, whereas the other methods successfully removed the proteins. The QCM-D measurements indicated that in the removal treatments, fibrinogen was slowly adsorbed in the first cycle because of the change in surface wettability revealed by contact angle measurements. The SDS treatment was not effective in removing proteins. The APM or UV treatment decreased the frequency shifts for the reused HAp sensors. The UV/APM treatment did not induce the frequency shifts but decreased the dissipation shifts. Therefore, we conclude that the APM/UV treatment is the most useful method for reproducing protein adsorption behavior on HAp sensors.

  14. Reusable hydroxyapatite nanocrystal sensors for protein adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motohiro Tagaya, Toshiyuki Ikoma, Nobutaka Hanagata, Dinko Chakarov, Bengt Kasemo and Junzo Tanaka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The repeatability of the adsorption and removal of fibrinogen and fetal bovine serum on hydroxyapatite (HAp nanocrystal sensors was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D monitoring technique. The HAp nanocrystals were coated on a gold-coated quartz sensor by electrophoretic deposition. Proteins adsorbed on the HAp sensors were removed by (i ammonia/hydrogen peroxide mixture (APM, (ii ultraviolet light (UV, (iii UV/APM, (iv APM/UV and (v sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS treatments. FTIR spectra of the reused surfaces revealed that the APM and SDS treatments left peptide fragments or the proteins adsorbed on the surfaces, whereas the other methods successfully removed the proteins. The QCM-D measurements indicated that in the removal treatments, fibrinogen was slowly adsorbed in the first cycle because of the change in surface wettability revealed by contact angle measurements. The SDS treatment was not effective in removing proteins. The APM or UV treatment decreased the frequency shifts for the reused HAp sensors. The UV/APM treatment did not induce the frequency shifts but decreased the dissipation shifts. Therefore, we conclude that the APM/UV treatment is the most useful method for reproducing protein adsorption behavior on HAp sensors.

  15. The hydrodynamic size of polymer stabilized nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, Karl M; Al-Somali, Ali M; Mejia, Michelle; Colvin, Vicki L [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, MS-60 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2007-11-28

    For many emerging applications, nanocrystals are surface functionalized with polymers to control self-assembly, prevent aggregation, and promote incorporation into polymer matrices and biological systems. The hydrodynamic diameter of these nanoparticle-polymer complexes is a critical factor for many applications, and predicting this size is complicated by the fact that the structure of the grafted polymer at a nanocrystalline interface is not generally established. In this work we evaluate using size-exclusion chromatography the overall hydrodynamic diameter of nanocrystals (Au, CdSe, d<5 nm) surface coated with polystyrene of varying molecular weight. The polymer is tethered to the nanoparticles via a terminal thiol to provide strong attachment. Our data show that at full coverage the polymer assumes a brush conformation and is 44% longer than the unbound polymer in solution. The brush conformation is confirmed by comparison with models used to describe polymer brushes at flat interfaces. From this work, we suggest an empirical formula which predicts the hydrodynamic diameter of polymer coated nanoparticles based on the size of the nanoparticle core and the size of the randomly coiled unbound polymer in solution.

  16. Fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals via supramolecular assembly of terpyridine-modified cellulose nanocrystals and terpyridine-modified perylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Mohammad L.; Moorefield, Charles M.; Elbatal, Hany S.; Newkome, George R.; Modarelli, David A.; Romano, Natalie C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Surfaces of cellulose nanocrystals were modified with terpyridine ligands. ► Fluorescent nanocrystals could be obtained via self-assembly of terpyridine-modified perylene dye onto the terpyridine-modified cellulose nanocrystals. ► Further self-assembly of azide-functionalized terpyridine onto the fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals was possible to obtain nanocellulosic material with expected use in bioimaging. - Abstract: Due to their natural origin, biocompatibility, and non-toxicity, cellulose nanocrystals are promising candidates for applications in nanomedicine. Highly fluorescent nanocellulosic material was prepared via surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals with 2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine side chains followed by supramolecular assembly of terpyridine-modified perylene dye onto the terpyridine-modified cellulose nanocrystals (CTP) via Ru III /Ru II reduction. The prepared terpyridine-modified cellulose-Ru II -terpyridine-modified perylene (CTP-Ru II -PeryTP) fluorescent nanocrystals were characterized using cross-polarized/magic angle spin 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS 13 C NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV–visible, and fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, further self-assembly of terpyridine units with azide functional groups onto CTP-Ru II -PeryTP was possible via repeating the Ru III /Ru II reduction protocol to prepare supramolecular fluorescent nanocrystals with azide functionality (CTP-Ru II -PeryTP-Ru II -AZTP). The prepared derivative may have potential application in bio-imaging since the terminal azide groups can be easily reacted with antigens via “Click” chemistry reaction.

  17. The upconversion luminescence and magnetism in Yb3+/Ho3+ co-doped LaF3 nanocrystals for potential bimodal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syamchand, Sasidharanpillai S.; George, Sony

    2016-12-01

    Biocompatible upconversion nanoparticles with multifunctional properties can serve as potential nanoprobes for multimodal imaging. Herein, we report an upconversion nanocrystal based on lanthanum fluoride which is developed to address the imaging modalities, upconversion luminescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Lanthanide ions (Yb3+ and Ho3+) doped LaF3 nanocrystals (LaF3 Yb3+/Ho3+) are fabricated through a rapid microwave-assisted synthesis. The hexagonal phase LaF3 nanocrystals exhibit nearly spherical morphology with average diameter of 9.8 nm. The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis estimated the doping concentration of Yb3+ and Ho3+ as 3.99 and 0.41%, respectively. The nanocrystals show upconversion luminescence when irradiated with near-infrared (NIR) photons of wavelength 980 nm. The emission spectrum consists of bands centred at 542, 645 and 658 nm. The stronger green emission at 542 nm and the weak red emissions at 645 and 658 nm are assigned to 5S2 → 5I8 and 5F5 → 5I8 transitions of Ho3+, respectively. The pump power dependence of luminescence intensity confirmed the two-photon upconversion process. The nanocrystals exhibit paramagnetism due to the presence of lanthanide ion dopant Ho3+ and the magnetization is 19.81 emu/g at room temperature. The nanocrystals exhibit a longitudinal relaxivity ( r 1) of 0.12 s-1 mM-1 and transverse relaxivity ( r 2) of 28.18 s-1 mM-1, which makes the system suitable for developing T2 MRI contrast agents based on holmium. The LaF3 Yb3+/Ho3+ nanocrystals are surface modified by PEGylation to improve biocompatibility and enhance further functionalisation. The PEGylated nanocrystals are found to be non-toxic up to 50 μg/mL for 48 h of incubation, which is confirmed by the MTT assay as well as morphological studies in HeLa cells. The upconversion luminescence and magnetism together with biocompatibility enables the adaptability of the present system as a nanoprobe for potential

  18. The upconversion luminescence and magnetism in Yb{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} co-doped LaF{sub 3} nanocrystals for potential bimodal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syamchand, Sasidharanpillai S., E-mail: syamchand.ss@gmail.com; George, Sony, E-mail: emailtosony@gmail.com [University of Kerala, Department of Chemistry (India)

    2016-12-15

    Biocompatible upconversion nanoparticles with multifunctional properties can serve as potential nanoprobes for multimodal imaging. Herein, we report an upconversion nanocrystal based on lanthanum fluoride which is developed to address the imaging modalities, upconversion luminescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Lanthanide ions (Yb{sup 3+} and Ho{sup 3+}) doped LaF{sub 3} nanocrystals (LaF{sub 3} Yb{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+}) are fabricated through a rapid microwave-assisted synthesis. The hexagonal phase LaF{sub 3} nanocrystals exhibit nearly spherical morphology with average diameter of 9.8 nm. The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis estimated the doping concentration of Yb{sup 3+} and Ho{sup 3+} as 3.99 and 0.41%, respectively. The nanocrystals show upconversion luminescence when irradiated with near-infrared (NIR) photons of wavelength 980 nm. The emission spectrum consists of bands centred at 542, 645 and 658 nm. The stronger green emission at 542 nm and the weak red emissions at 645 and 658 nm are assigned to {sup 5}S{sub 2} → {sup 5}I{sub 8} and {sup 5}F{sub 5} → {sup 5}I{sub 8} transitions of Ho{sup 3+}, respectively. The pump power dependence of luminescence intensity confirmed the two-photon upconversion process. The nanocrystals exhibit paramagnetism due to the presence of lanthanide ion dopant Ho{sup 3+} and the magnetization is 19.81 emu/g at room temperature. The nanocrystals exhibit a longitudinal relaxivity (r{sub 1}) of 0.12 s{sup −1} mM{sup −1} and transverse relaxivity (r{sub 2}) of 28.18 s{sup −1} mM{sup −1}, which makes the system suitable for developing T2 MRI contrast agents based on holmium. The LaF{sub 3} Yb{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} nanocrystals are surface modified by PEGylation to improve biocompatibility and enhance further functionalisation. The PEGylated nanocrystals are found to be non-toxic up to 50 μg/mL for 48 h of incubation, which is confirmed by the MTT assay as well as

  19. Hybrid photodetector based on CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals and PC71BM fullerene derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tengteng; Liu, Meihong; Li, Qingyan; Chen, Run; Liu, Xin

    2018-05-01

    Here, a hybrid perovskite-organic photodetector was fabricated by integrating CsPbBr3 nanocrystals (NCs) with [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM), exhibiting remarkable optoelectronic properties in terms of photoresponsivity (1.72 A/W), detectivity (1.76 × 107 Jones), external quantum efficiency (EQE) (530%) under the illumination of 405 nm laser, and photoresponse time is shorter than 0.1 ms due to the assistance of heterojunction on the separation of photoexcitons.

  20. One-step synthesis of hybrid nanocrystals with rational tuning of the morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Wei; Zheng, Tingting; Wang, Youcheng; Li, Xu; Zhao, Xu; Zeng, Jie; Hou, J G

    2014-11-12

    Metal-sulfide hybrid nanocrystals (HNCs) have been of great interest for their distinguished interfacial effect, which gives rise to unique catalytic properties. However, most of the reported metal-sulfide HNCs were synthesized via two-step approaches and few were fabricated based on the one-step strategies. Herein, we report a facile one-pot synthesis of CuPt-Cu2S, Pt-Cu2S HNCs, and CuPt nanocubes by simply changing the Pt precursor types. 1-Hexadecanethiol (HDT) was employed in this system to mediate the reduction of metal precursors and also as capping agent and sulfur source. Moreover, CuPd-Cu2S and Au-Cu2S HNCs were successfully prepared by using this one-step method. The catalytic properties of the obtained three nanocrystals were investigated in hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde. Results show that CuPt-Cu2S HNCs exhibited the highest conversion rate and the highest selectivity toward hydrocinnamaldehyde while 3-phenyl-1-propanol was the only product over Pt-Cu2S HNCs.

  1. Thermally Stable Cellulose Nanocrystals toward High-Performance 2D and 3D Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chao; Bian, Huiyang; Gao, Tingting; Jiang, Feng; Kierzewski, Iain Michael; Wang, Yilin; Yao, Yonggang; Chen, Liheng; Shao, Ziqiang; Zhu, J Y; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-08-30

    Cellulose nanomaterials have attracted much attention in a broad range of fields such as flexible electronics, tissue engineering, and 3D printing for their excellent mechanical strength and intriguing optical properties. Economic, sustainable, and eco-friendly production of cellulose nanomaterials with high thermal stability, however, remains a tremendous challenge. Here versatile cellulose nanocrystals (DM-OA-CNCs) are prepared through fully recyclable oxalic acid (OA) hydrolysis along with disk-milling (DM) pretreatment of bleached kraft eucalyptus pulp. Compared with the commonly used cellulose nanocrystals from sulfuric acid hydrolysis, DM-OA-CNCs show several advantages including large aspect ratio, carboxylated surface, and excellent thermal stability along with high yield. We also successfully demonstrate the fabrication of high-performance films and 3D-printed patterns using DM-OA-CNCs. The high-performance films with high transparency, ultralow haze, and excellent thermal stability have the great potential for applications in flexible electronic devices. The 3D-printed patterns with porous structures can be potentially applied in the field of tissue engineering as scaffolds.

  2. Low temperature synthesis and electrical characterization of germanium doped Ti-based nanocrystals for nonvolatile memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Li-Wei; Chang, Chun-Yen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tu, Chun-Hao; Wang, Pai-Syuan; Lin, Chao-Cheng; Chen, Min-Chen; Huang, Hui-Chun; Gan, Der-Shin; Ho, New-Jin; Chen, Shih-Ching; Chen, Shih-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Chemical and electrical characteristics of Ti-based nanocrystals containing germanium, fabricated by annealing the co-sputtered thin film with titanium silicide and germanium targets, were demonstrated for low temperature applications of nonvolatile memory. Formation and composition characteristics of nanocrystals (NCs) at various annealing temperatures were examined by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photon-emission spectroscopy, respectively. It was observed that the addition of germanium (Ge) significantly reduces the proposed thermal budget necessary for Ti-based NC formation due to the rise of morphological instability and agglomeration properties during annealing. NC structures formed after annealing at 500 °C, and separated well at 600 °C annealing. However, it was also observed that significant thermal desorption of Ge atoms occurs at 600 °C due to the sublimation of formatted GeO phase and results in a serious decrease of memory window. Therefore, an approach to effectively restrain Ge thermal desorption is proposed by encapsulating the Ti-based trapping layer with a thick silicon oxide layer before 600 °C annealing. The electrical characteristics of data retention in the sample with the 600 °C annealing exhibited better performance than the 500 °C-annealed sample, a result associated with the better separation and better crystallization of the NC structures.

  3. Elucidation of the enhanced ferromagnetic origin in Mn-doped ZnO nanocrystals embedded into a SiO2 matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sejoon; Lee, Youngmin; Kim, Deukyoung

    2013-01-01

    The origin of the enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn-doped ZnO (ZnO:Mn) nanocrystals is investigated. ZnO:Mn nanocrystals, which were fabricated by using a laser irradiation method with a 248-nm KrF excimer laser, exhibited two-times increase in the spontaneous magnetization (∼0.4 emu/cm 3 at 300 K) compared to the ZnO:Mn thin film (∼0.2 emu/cm 3 at 300 K). The increased exchange integral of J 1 /k B = 51.6 K in ZnO:Mn nanocrystals, in comparison with the ZnO:Mn thin film (J 1 /k B = 46.9 K), is indicative of the enhanced ferromagnetic exchange interaction. This is attributed to the large number of acceptor defects in the SiO 2 -capped ZnO:Mn nanocrystals. Namely, the holes bound to the acceptor defects form microscopic bound-magnetic-polarons with Mn ions; hence, long-range ferromagnetic coupling is enhanced. The results suggest that ferromagnetism in ZnO-based dilute magnetic semiconductors can be controlled by modulating the density of native point defects, which can be chemically and thermodynamically modified during the material synthesis or preparation.

  4. Elucidation of the enhanced ferromagnetic origin in Mn-doped ZnO nanocrystals embedded into a SiO₂ matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sejoon; Lee, Youngmin; Kim, Deukyoung [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-01

    The origin of the enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn-doped ZnO (ZnO:Mn) nanocrystals is investigated. ZnO:Mn nanocrystals, which were fabricated by using a laser irradiation method with a 248-nm KrF excimer laser, exhibited two-times increase in the spontaneous magnetization (∼0.4 emu/cm³ at 300 K) compared to the ZnO:Mn thin film (∼0.2 emu/cm³ at 300 K). The increased exchange integral of J₁/k{sub B} = 51.6 K in ZnO:Mn nanocrystals, in comparison with the ZnO:Mn thin film (J₁/k{sub B} = 46.9 K), is indicative of the enhanced ferromagnetic exchange interaction. This is attributed to the large number of acceptor defects in the SiO₂-capped ZnO:Mn nanocrystals. Namely, the holes bound to the acceptor defects form microscopic bound-magnetic-polarons with Mn ions; hence, long-range ferromagnetic coupling is enhanced. The results suggest that ferromagnetism in ZnO-based dilute magnetic semiconductors can be controlled by modulating the density of native point defects, which can be chemically and thermodynamically modified during the material synthesis or preparation.

  5. Hydrazine-mediated construction of nanocrystal self-assembly materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ding; Liu, Min; Lin, Min; Bu, Xinyuan; Luo, Xintao; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Bai

    2014-10-28

    Self-assembly is the basic feature of supramolecular chemistry, which permits to integrate and enhance the functionalities of nano-objects. However, the conversion of self-assembled structures to practical materials is still laborious. In this work, on the basis of studying one-pot synthesis, spontaneous assembly, and in situ polymerization of aqueous semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs), NC self-assembly materials are produced and applied to design high performance white light-emitting diode (WLED). In producing self-assembly materials, the additive hydrazine (N2H4) is curial, which acts as the promoter to achieve room-temperature synthesis of aqueous NCs by favoring a reaction-controlled growth, as the polyelectrolyte to weaken inter-NC electrostatic repulsion and therewith facilitate the one-dimensional self-assembly, and in particular as the bifunctional monomers to polymerize with mercapto carboxylic acid-modified NCs via in situ amidation reaction. This strategy is versatile for mercapto carboxylic acid-modified aqueous NCs, for example CdS, CdSe, CdTe, CdSe(x)Te(1-x), and Cd(y)Hg(1-y)Te. Because of the multisite modification with carboxyl, the NCs act as macromonomers, thus producing cross-linked self-assembly materials with excellent thermal, solvent, and photostability. The assembled NCs preserve strong luminescence and avoid unpredictable fluorescent resonance energy transfer, the main problem in design WLED from multiple NC components. These advantages allow the fabrication of NC-based WLED with high color rendering index (86), high luminous efficacy (41 lm/W), and controllable color temperature.

  6. Zinc-doping enhanced cadmium sulfide electrochemiluminescence behavior based on Au-Cu alloy nanocrystals quenching for insulin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenjuan; Wang, Chao; Li, Xiaojian; Khan, Malik Saddam; Sun, Xu; Ma, Hongmin; Fan, Dawei; Wei, Qin

    2017-11-15

    Novel and sensitive sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor was fabricated for insulin detection. Au-ZnCd 14 S combined nitrogen doping mesoporous carbons (Au-ZnCd 14 S/NH 2 -NMCs) acted as sensing platform and Au-Cu alloy nanocrystals were employed as labels to quench the ECL of Au-ZnCd 14 S/NH 2 -NMCs. Zinc-doping promoted the ECL behavior of CdS nanocrystals, with the best ECL emission obtained when the molar ratio of Zn/Cd was 1:14. Simultaneously, the modification of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and combination with NH 2 -NMC further enhanced the ECL emission of ZnCd 14 S due to its excellent conductivity and large specific surface area, which is desirable for the immunosensor construction. Au-Cu alloy nanocrystals were employed in the ECL system of ZnCd 14 S/K 2 S 2 O 8 triggering ECL quenching effects. The ECL spectra of ZnCd 14 S, acting as the energy donor, exhibited well overlaps with the absorption band of Au-Cu alloy nanocrystals which acted as the energy acceptor, leading to an effective ECL resonance energy transfer (ECL-RET). On the basis of the ECL quenching effects, a sensitive ECL immunosensor for insulin detection was successfully constructed with a linear response range of insulin concentration from 0.1pg/mL to 30ng/mL and the limit of detection was calculated to be 0.03pg/mL (S/N = 3). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Processing of ZnO nanocrystals by solochemical technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusatti, M.; Speckhahn, R.; Silva, L.A.; Rosario, J.A.; Lima, R.B.; Kuhnen, N.C.; Riella, H.G.; Campos, C.E.M.

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, we report the synthesis of high quality ZnO nanocrystals by solochemical technique. This synthetic strategy has been shown to have advantages over other methods of producing nanostructures in terms of low cost, efficiency, simplicity and uniformity of crystal structure. Zinc chloride solution at room temperature was mixed with sodium hydroxide solution at 50°C to produce ZnO nanocrystals. Transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the ZnO nanocrystals obtained. The structure of ZnO was refined by the Rietveld Method from X-ray diffraction data. These methods showed that the product consisted of pure ZnO nanocrystals and has, predominantly, a rod-like morphology. (author)

  8. Magneto-optical transitions in multilayer semiconductor nanocrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Climente, J; Jaskolski, W; Aliaga, J I

    2003-01-01

    Absorption spectra of chemically synthesized uniform and multilayer semiconductor nanocrystals in a magnetic field are investigated theoretically. The nanocrystals are modelled by spherical barrier/well potentials. The electron states are calculated within the effective mass model. A four-band k centre dot p Hamiltonian, accounting for the valence subband mixing, is used to obtain the hole states. The magneto-optical transition spectrum depends strongly on the size and composition of the nanocrystals. In the case of small uniform quantum dots, only the linear Zeeman splitting of the electron and hole energy levels is observed even for very strong magnetic fields. In larger nanocrystals, the quadratic magnetic interaction turns out to be important and the transition spectrum becomes complicated. The most complicated influence of the magnetic field is found in quantum dot-quantum well systems in which the lowest electron and hole states are localized in a thin spherical layer. It is shown that transitions that ...

  9. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals: Simple preparation, characterization and formation mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohandes, Fatemeh; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Fereshteh, Zeinab

    2014-01-01

    Crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles and nanorods have been successfully synthesized via a simple precipitation method. To control the shape and particle size of HAP nanocrystals, coordination ligands derived from 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde were first prepared, characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H-NMR) spectroscopies, and finally applied in the synthesis process of HAP. On the other hand, the HAP nanocrystals were also characterized by several techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). According to the FE-SEM and TEM micrographs, it was found that the morphology and crystallinity of the HAP powders depended on the coordination mode of the ligands. - Highlights: • HAP nanobundles and nanoparticles have been prepared by a precipitation method. • Morphologies of HAP nanocrystals were controlled by different coordination ligands. • The formation mechanism of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals was also considered

  10. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals: Simple preparation, characterization and formation mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohandes, Fatemeh [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fathi, Mohammadhossein [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dental Materials Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fereshteh, Zeinab [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-01

    Crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles and nanorods have been successfully synthesized via a simple precipitation method. To control the shape and particle size of HAP nanocrystals, coordination ligands derived from 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde were first prepared, characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H-NMR) spectroscopies, and finally applied in the synthesis process of HAP. On the other hand, the HAP nanocrystals were also characterized by several techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). According to the FE-SEM and TEM micrographs, it was found that the morphology and crystallinity of the HAP powders depended on the coordination mode of the ligands. - Highlights: • HAP nanobundles and nanoparticles have been prepared by a precipitation method. • Morphologies of HAP nanocrystals were controlled by different coordination ligands. • The formation mechanism of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals was also considered.

  11. Chemically Addressable Perovskite Nanocrystals for Light-Emitting Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Haizhu; Yang, Zhenyu; Wei, Mingyang; Sun, Wei; Li, Xiyan; Ye, Shuyang; Zhao, Yongbiao; Tan, Hairen; Kynaston, Emily L.; Schon, Tyler B.; Yan, Han; Lu, Zheng-Hong; Ozin, Geoffrey A.; Sargent, Edward H.; Seferos, Dwight S.

    2017-01-01

    Whereas organic–inorganic hybrid perovskite nanocrystals (PNCs) have remarkable potential in the development of optoelectronic materials, their relatively poor chemical and colloidal stability undermines their performance in optoelectronic devices

  12. Pyridine-induced Dimensionality Change in Hybrid Perovskite Nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ghada H.; Yin, Jun; Bose, Riya; Sinatra, Lutfan; Alarousu, Erkki; Yengel, Emre; AlYami, Noktan; Saidaminov, Makhsud I.; Zhang, Yuhai; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Bakr, Osman; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2017-01-01

    of pyridine during the synthesis of methylammonium lead bromide (MAPbBr) perovskite nanocrystals can transform three-dimensional (3D) cubes into two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that pyridine preferentially

  13. Rapid thermal synthesis of GaN nanocrystals and nanodisks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sofer, Z.; Sedmidubský, D.; Huber, Š.; Šimek, P.; Šaněk, F.; Jankovský, O.; Gregorová, E.; Fiala, R.; Matějková, Stanislava; Mikulics, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2013), 1411/1-1411/7 ISSN 1388-0764 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : gallium nitride * thermal ammonolysis * nanodisks * nanocrystals Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.278, year: 2013

  14. A single molecule switch based on two Pd nanocrystals linked

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Conducting molecule; nanocrystals; scanning tunneling microscopy; negative differential resistance. Abstract. Tunneling spectroscopy measurements have been carried out on a single molecule device formed by two Pd ... Current Issue : Vol.

  15. Nonvolatile memory effect of tungsten nanocrystals under oxygen plasma treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shih-Cheng; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Wei-Ren; Lo, Yuan-Chun; Wu, Kai-Ting; Sze, S.M.; Chen, Jason; Liao, I.H.; Yeh, Fon-Shan

    2010-01-01

    In this work, an oxygen plasma treatment was used to improve the memory effect of nonvolatile W nanocrystal memory, including memory window, retention and endurance. To investigate the role of the oxygen plasma treatment in charge storage characteristics, the X-ray photon-emission spectra (XPS) were performed to analyze the variation of chemical composition for W nanocrystal embedded oxide both with and without the oxygen plasma treatment. In addition, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses were also used to identify the microstructure in the thin film and the size and density of W nanocrystals. The device with the oxygen plasma treatment shows a significant improvement of charge storage effect, because the oxygen plasma treatment enhanced the quality of silicon oxide surrounding the W nanocrystals. Therefore, the data retention and endurance characteristics were also improved by the passivation.

  16. Self-aggregation of magnetic semiconductor EuS nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Yasuchika; Kamikubo, Hironari; Kataoka, Mikio; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Controlled formation of aggregates having organized structure of cube-shaped EuS nanocrystals is reported. The EuS aggregates in liquid media (methanol) were obtained by means of van der Waals interaction between EuS nanocrystals. The packing structure of the EuS aggregates is characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small angle X-ray scattering measurements (SAXS). TEM image indicates the EuS nanocrystals form self-aggregated 2D orthogonal lattice structure. The diffraction peak of (111) of SAXS profile shows that the cube-shaped EuS form 3D cubic superlattice. We successfully demonstrated that the aggregates of cube-shaped EuS nanocrystals formed cubic stacking structure.

  17. Gram-scale synthesis of catalytic Co9S8 nanocrystal ink as a cathode material for spray-deposited, large-area dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Hao; Lu, Ming-De; Tung, Yung-Liang; Tuan, Hsing-Yu

    2013-10-22

    We report the development of Co9S8 nanocrystals as a cost-effective cathode material that can be readily combined with spraying techniques to fabricate large-area dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) devices and can be further connected with series or parallel cell architectures to obtain a relatively high output voltage or current. A gram-scale synthesis of Co9S8 nanocrystal is carried out via a noninjection reaction by mixing anhydrous CoCl2 with trioctylphosphine (TOP), dodecanethiol and oleylamine (OLA) at 250 °C. The Co9S8 nanocrystals possess excellent catalytic ability with respect to I(-)/I3(-) redox reactions. The Co9S8 nanocrystals are prepared as nanoinks to fabricate uniform, crack-free Co9S8 thin films on different substrates by using a spray deposition technique. These Co9S8 films are used as counter electrodes assembled with dye-adsorbed TiO2 photoanodes to fabricate DSSC devices having a working area of 2 cm(2) and an average power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.02 ± 0.18% under AM 1.5 solar illumination, which is comparable with the PCE of 7.2 ± 0.12% obtained using a Pt cathode. Furthermore, six 2 cm(2)-sized DSSC devices connected in series output an open-circuit voltage of 4.2 V that can power a wide range of electronic devices such as LED arrays and can charge commercial lithium ion batteries.

  18. Formation of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals. The aspect of nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudera, S.

    2007-08-17

    The present work describes different techniques to control some major parameters of colloidal nanocrystals. The individual techniques rely on the manipulation of the nucleation event. The sensitive control of the nanocrystals' size and shape is discussed. Furthermore the formation of hybrid nanocrystals composed of different materials is presented. The synthesis technique for the production of the different samples involves organic solvents and surfactants and reactions at elevated temperatures. The presence of magic size clusters offers a possibility to control the size of the nanocrystals even at very small dimensions. The clusters produced comprise ca. 100 atoms. In the case of CdSe, nanocrystals of this size emit a blue fluorescence and therefore extend the routinely accessible spectrum for this material over the whole visible range. Samples fluorescing in the spectral range from green to red are produced with standard recipes. In this work a reaction scheme for magic size clusters is presented and a theoretical model to explain the particular behaviour of their growth dynamics is discussed. The samples are investigated by optical spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis. A method to form branched nanocrystals is discussed. The branching point is analysed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and proves for the occurrence of a multiple twinned structure are strengthened by simulation of the observed patterns. Two different techniques to generate nanocrystals of this type are presented. The first relies on a seeded growth approach in which the nucleation of the second material is allowed only on de ned sites of the seeds. The second technique uses the tips of pre-formed nano-dumbbells as sacrificial domains. The material on the tips is replaced by gold. Hybrid materials are formed by a seeded-growth mechanism. Pre-formed nanocrystals provide the nucleation sites for the second material. (orig.)

  19. Formation of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals. The aspect of nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudera, S

    2007-08-17

    The present work describes different techniques to control some major parameters of colloidal nanocrystals. The individual techniques rely on the manipulation of the nucleation event. The sensitive control of the nanocrystals' size and shape is discussed. Furthermore the formation of hybrid nanocrystals composed of different materials is presented. The synthesis technique for the production of the different samples involves organic solvents and surfactants and reactions at elevated temperatures. The presence of magic size clusters offers a possibility to control the size of the nanocrystals even at very small dimensions. The clusters produced comprise ca. 100 atoms. In the case of CdSe, nanocrystals of this size emit a blue fluorescence and therefore extend the routinely accessible spectrum for this material over the whole visible range. Samples fluorescing in the spectral range from green to red are produced with standard recipes. In this work a reaction scheme for magic size clusters is presented and a theoretical model to explain the particular behaviour of their growth dynamics is discussed. The samples are investigated by optical spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis. A method to form branched nanocrystals is discussed. The branching point is analysed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and proves for the occurrence of a multiple twinned structure are strengthened by simulation of the observed patterns. Two different techniques to generate nanocrystals of this type are presented. The first relies on a seeded growth approach in which the nucleation of the second material is allowed only on de ned sites of the seeds. The second technique uses the tips of pre-formed nano-dumbbells as sacrificial domains. The material on the tips is replaced by gold. Hybrid materials are formed by a seeded-growth mechanism. Pre-formed nanocrystals provide the nucleation sites for the second material. (orig.)

  20. Growth of hexagonal NaGdF{sub 4} nanocrystals based on cubic Ln{sup 3+}: CaF{sub 2} precursors and the multi-color upconversion emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Lei; Chen, Daqin, E-mail: dqchen@fjirsm.ac.cn; Yu, Yunlong; Zhang, Rui; Ling, Hang; Xu, Ju; Huang, Feng; Wang, Yuansheng, E-mail: yswang@fjirsm.ac.cn

    2014-04-05

    Graphical abstract: We reported a novel hetero-valence cation exchange route to synthesize Ln: NaGdF4 upconversion nanocrystals for the first time. -- Highlights: • The Ln3+: NaGdF4 nanocrystals were synthesized based on the Ln3+: CaF2 precursors. • The microstructures of nanocrystals were characterized. • The multi-color upconversion emissions were easily realized. -- Abstract: Lanthanide-doped upconversion nanomaterials have attracted great attention recently for their potential applications in the fields of bio-label, three-dimensional display, solar cell and so on. In this article, we report a new strategy to prepare hexagonal Ln{sup 3+}:NaGdF{sub 4} upconversion nanocrystals. Unlike the routine way of synthesizing NaGdF{sub 4} nanocrystals through nucleation and growth, the formation of hexagonal NaGdF{sub 4} nanocrystals herein is realized based on the Ln{sup 3+}-doped cubic CaF{sub 2} precursors, following a hetero-valence cation exchange process between Gd{sup 3+}/Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. Evidently, Ln{sup 3+} dopants in the CaF{sub 2} precursors are retained in the finally formed hexagonal NaGdF{sub 4} nanocrystals and, subsequently, multi-color upconversion emissions are easily realized by simply adjusting the Ln{sup 3+} dopant species and contents in the CaF{sub 2} precursors. This novel hetero-valence cation exchange route may open up a new pathway to synthesize nanomaterials that cannot be fabricated directly.

  1. Inhibition of palm oil oxidation by zeolite nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kok-Hou; Awala, Hussein; Mukti, Rino R; Wong, Ka-Lun; Rigaud, Baptiste; Ling, Tau Chuan; Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Koleva, Iskra Z; Vayssilov, Georgi N; Mintova, Svetlana; Ng, Eng-Poh

    2015-05-13

    The efficiency of zeolite X nanocrystals (FAU-type framework structure) containing different extra-framework cations (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+)) in slowing the thermal oxidation of palm oil is reported. The oxidation study of palm oil is conducted in the presence of zeolite nanocrystals (0.5 wt %) at 150 °C. Several characterization techniques such as visual analysis, colorimetry, rheometry, total acid number (TAN), FT-IR spectroscopy, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and Karl Fischer analyses are applied to follow the oxidative evolution of the oil. It was found that zeolite nanocrystals decelerate the oxidation of palm oil through stabilization of hydroperoxides, which are the primary oxidation product, and concurrently via adsorption of the secondary oxidation products (alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and esters). In addition to the experimental results, periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to elucidate further the oxidation process of the palm oil in the presence of zeolite nanocrystals. The DFT calculations show that the metal complexes formed with peroxides are more stable than the complexes with alkenes with the same ions. The peroxides captured in the zeolite X nanocrystals consequently decelerate further oxidation toward formation of acids. Unlike the monovalent alkali metal cations in the zeolite X nanocrystals (K(+), Na(+), and Li(+)), Ca(2+) reduced the acidity of the oil by neutralizing the acidic carboxylate compounds to COO(-)(Ca(2+))1/2 species.

  2. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Haitao

    2007-01-01

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis and application of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based on high temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has become one of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. This method is first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkers in 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and later extended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well as anisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod. This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystal synthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied by characterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and products and following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on these results, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction between the precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth of nanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theory calculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursor decomposition and monomer formation pathway. Based on the proposed reaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses water as a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSe and CdS nanorods

  3. Size- and shape-dependent surface thermodynamic properties of nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qingshan; Xue, Yongqiang; Cui, Zixiang

    2018-05-01

    As the fundamental properties, the surface thermodynamic properties of nanocrystals play a key role in the physical and chemical changes. However, it remains ambiguous about the quantitative influence regularities of size and shape on the surface thermodynamic properties of nanocrystals. Thus by introducing interface variables into the Gibbs energy and combining Young-Laplace equation, relations between the surface thermodynamic properties (surface Gibbs energy, surface enthalpy, surface entropy, surface energy and surface heat capacity), respectively, and size of nanocrystals with different shapes were derived. Theoretical estimations of the orders of the surface thermodynamic properties of nanocrystals agree with available experimental values. Calculated results of the surface thermodynamic properties of Au, Bi and Al nanocrystals suggest that when r > 10 nm, the surface thermodynamic properties linearly vary with the reciprocal of particle size, and when r < 10 nm, the effect of particle size on the surface thermodynamic properties becomes greater and deviates from linear variation. For nanocrystals with identical equivalent diameter, the more the shape deviates from sphere, the larger the surface thermodynamic properties (absolute value) are.

  4. Cellulose nanocrystals from acacia bark-Influence of solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taflick, Ticiane; Schwendler, Luana A; Rosa, Simone M L; Bica, Clara I D; Nachtigall, Sônia M B

    2017-08-01

    The isolation of cellulose nanocrystals from different lignocellulosic materials has shown increased interest in academic and technological research. These materials have excellent mechanical properties and can be used as nanofillers for polymer composites as well as transparent films for various applications. In this work, cellulose isolation was performed following an environmental friendly procedure without chlorine. Cellulose nanocrystals were isolated from the exhausted acacia bark (after the industrial process of extracting tannin) with the objective of evaluating the effect of the solvent extraction steps on the characteristics of cellulose and cellulose nanocrystals. It was also assessed the effect of acid hydrolysis time on the thermal stability, morphology and size of the nanocrystals, through TGA, TEM and light scattering analyses. It was concluded that the extraction step with solvents was important in the isolation of cellulose, but irrelevant in the isolation of cellulose nanocrystals. Light scattering experiments indicated that 30min of hydrolysis was long enough for the isolation of cellulose nanocrystals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Continuous and rapid synthesis of nanoclusters and nanocrystals using scalable microstructured reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hyung Dae

    Recent advances in nanocrystalline materials production are expected to impact the development of next generation low-cost and/or high efficiency solar cells. For example, semiconductor nanocrystal inks are used to lower the fabrication cost of the absorber layers of the solar cells. In addition, some quantum confined nanocrystals display electron-hole pair generation phenomena with greater than 100% quantum yield, called multiple exciton generation (MEG). These quantum dots could potentially be used to fabricate solar cells that exceed the Schockley-Queisser limit. At present, continuous syntheses of nanoparticles using microreactors have been reported by several groups. Microreactors have several advantages over conventional batch synthesis. One advantage is their efficient heat transfer and mass transport. Another advantage is the drastic reduction in the reaction time, in many cases, down to minutes from hours. Shorter reaction time not only provides higher throughput but also provide better particle size control by avoiding aggregation and by reducing probability of oxidizing precursors. In this work, room temperature synthesis of Au11 nanoclusters and high temperature synthesis of chalcogenide nanocrystals were demonstrated using continuous flow microreactors with high throughputs. A high rate production of phosphine-stabilized Au11 nanoclusters was achieved using a layer-up strategy which involves the use of microlamination architectures; the patterning and bonding of thin layers of material (laminae) to create a multilayered micromixer in the range of 25-250 mum thick was used to step up the production of phosphine-stabilized Au11 nanoclusters. Continuous production of highly monodispersed phosphine-stabilized Au 11 nanoclusters at a rate of about 11.8 [mg/s] was achieved using a microreactor with a size of 1.687cm3. This result is about 30,000 times over conventional batch synthesis according to production rate/per reactor volume. We have elucidated the

  6. Processing and characterization of new oxy-sulfo-telluride glasses in the Ge-Sb-Te-S-O system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.; Jackson, J.; Petit, L.; Rivero-Baleine, C.; Richardson, K.

    2010-01-01

    New oxy-sulfo-telluride glasses have been prepared in the Ge-Sb-Te-S-O system employing a two-step melting process which involves the processing of a chalcogenide glass (ChG) and subsequent melting with TeO 2 or Sb 2 O 3 . The progressive incorporation of O at the expense of S was found to increase the density and the glass transition temperature and to decrease the molar volume of the investigated oxy-sulfo-telluride glasses. We also observed a shift of the vis-NIR cut-off wavelength to longer wavelength probably due to changes in Sb coordination within the glass matrix and overall matrix polarizability. Using Raman spectroscopy, correlations have been shown between the formation of Ge- and Sb-based oxysulfide structural units and the S/O ratio. Lastly, two glasses with similar composition (Ge 20 Sb 6 S 64 Te 3 O 7 ) processed by melting the Ge 23 Sb 7 S 70 glass with TeO 2 or the Ge 23 Sb 2 S 72 Te 4 glass with Sb 2 O 3 were found to have slightly different physical, thermal, optical and structural properties. These changes are thought to result mainly from the higher moisture content and sensitivity of the TeO 2 starting materials as compared to that of the Sb 2 O 3 . - Graphical abstract: In this paper, we discuss our most recent findings on the processing and characterization of new ChG glasses prepared with small levels of Te, melted either with TeO 2 or Sb 2 O 3 powders. We explain how these new oxy-sulfo-telluride glasses are prepared and we correlate the physical, thermal and optical properties of the investigated glasses to the structure changes induced by the addition of oxygen in the Ge-Sb-S-Te glass network.

  7. Magnetic Cellulose Nanocrystal Based Anisotropic Polylactic Acid Nanocomposite Films: Influence on Electrical, Magnetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Prodyut; Kumar, Amit; Katiyar, Vimal

    2016-07-20

    This paper reports a single-step co-precipitation method for the fabrication of magnetic cellulose nanocrystals (MGCNCs) with high iron oxide nanoparticle content (∼51 wt % loading) adsorbed onto cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and Raman spectroscopic studies confirmed that the hydroxyl groups on the surface of CNCs (derived from the bamboo pulp) acted as anchor points for the adsorption of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The fabricated MGCNCs have a high magnetic moment, which is utilized to orient the magnetoresponsive nanofillers in parallel or perpendicular orientations inside the polylactic acid (PLA) matrix. Magnetic-field-assisted directional alignment of MGCNCs led to the incorporation of anisotropic mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties in the fabricated PLA-MGCNC nanocomposites. Thermomechanical studies showed significant improvement in the elastic modulus and glass-transition temperature for the magnetically oriented samples. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and XRD studies confirmed that the alignment of MGCNCs led to the improvement in the percentage crystallinity and, with the absence of the cold-crystallization phenomenon, finds a potential application in polymer processing in the presence of magnetic field. The tensile strength and percentage elongation for the parallel-oriented samples improved by ∼70 and 240%, respectively, and for perpendicular-oriented samples, by ∼58 and 172%, respectively, in comparison to the unoriented samples. Furthermore, its anisotropically induced electrical and magnetic properties are desirable for fabricating self-biased electronics products. We also demonstrate that the fabricated anisotropic PLA-MGCNC nanocomposites could be laminated into films with the incorporation of directionally tunable mechanical properties. Therefore, the current study provides a novel noninvasive approach of orienting nontoxic bioderived CNCs in the presence of low

  8. Cellulose nanocrystals reinforced foamed nitrile rubber nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yukun; Zhang, Yuanbing; Xu, Chuanhui; Cao, Xiaodong

    2015-10-05

    Research on foamed nitrile rubber (NBR)/cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) nanocomposites is rarely found in the literatures. In this paper, CNs suspension and NBR latex was mixed to prepared the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites. We found that the CNs mainly located in the cell walls, effectively reinforcing the foamed NBR. The strong interaction between the CNs and NBR matrix restricted the mobility of NBR chains surrounding the CNs, hence increasing the crosslink density of the NBR matrix. CNs exhibited excellent reinforcement on the foamed NBR: a remarkable increase nearly 76% in the tensile strength of the foamed nanocomposites was achieved with a load of only 15 phr CNs. Enhanced mechanical properties make the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites a promising damping material for industrial applications with a potential to reduce the petroleum consumption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Making sense of nanocrystal lattice fringes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraundorf, P.; Qin Wentao; Moeck, Peter; Mandell, Eric

    2005-01-01

    The orientation dependence of thin-crystal lattice fringes can be gracefully quantified using fringe-visibility maps, a direct-space analog of Kikuchi maps [Nishikawa and Kikuchi, Nature (London) 121, 1019 (1928)]. As in navigation of reciprocal space with the aid of Kikuchi lines, fringe-visibility maps facilitate acquisition of crystallographic information from lattice images. In particular, these maps can help researchers to determine the three-dimensional lattice of individual nanocrystals, to 'fringe-fingerprint' collections of randomly oriented particles, and to measure local specimen thickness with only a modest tilt. Since the number of fringes in an image increases with maximum spatial-frequency squared, these strategies (with help from more precise goniometers) will be more useful as aberration correction moves resolutions into the subangstrom range

  10. Role of the inversion layer on the charge injection in silicon nanocrystal multilayered light emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tondini, S. [Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38123 Trento (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Informatica e Matematica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 213/a, 41125 Modena (Italy); Pucker, G. [Advanced Photonics and Photovoltaics Group, Bruno Kessler Foundation, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Trento (Italy); Pavesi, L. [Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38123 Trento (Italy)

    2016-09-07

    The role of the inversion layer on injection and recombination phenomena in light emitting diodes (LEDs) is here studied on a multilayer (ML) structure of silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) embedded in SiO{sub 2}. Two Si-NC LEDs, which are similar for the active material but different in the fabrication process, elucidate the role of the non-radiative recombination rates at the ML/substrate interface. By studying current- and capacitance-voltage characteristics as well as electroluminescence spectra and time-resolved electroluminescence under pulsed and alternating bias pumping scheme in both the devices, we are able to ascribe the different experimental results to an efficient or inefficient minority carrier (electron) supply by the p-type substrate in the metal oxide semiconductor LEDs.

  11. Efficient solution route to transparent ZnO semiconductor films using colloidal nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suehiro

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ZnO nanocrystals (NCs were synthesized by heating Zn (II acetylacetonate in oleic acid/oleylamine in the presence of 1,2-hexadecanediol at 220 °C. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and dynamic light scattering (DLS measurements revealed the formation of monodispersed ZnO NCs of ca. 7 nm. ZnO NC assembled films were fabricated on a glass substrate by deposition with the colloidal ZnO NCs dispersed in toluene. The film composed of the NCs showed good optical transparency in the visible to near-infrared region. A device coupling the ZnO NC film with a p-type Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS NC film exhibited an obvious diode-like current–voltage behavior. The results suggest that the transparent ZnO film has a potentiality to be used for an n-type window layer in some optoelectronic applications.

  12. What dictates which ion, I- or Br-, mediates the growth of cubic Pd nanocrystals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze-Hong; Wu, Ya-Jiao; Xue, Huan-Huan; Zhou, Lin-Nan; Geng, Wen-Chao; Yi, Hai-Bo; Li, Yong-Jun

    2018-04-25

    Cubic Pd nanocrystals (CPNCs) as one of typical nanostructures are generally fabricated using I- or Br- as capping ions. However, which ion, I- or Br-, exclusively mediates the growth of CPNCs in a given reaction system is not well understood. Herein, regardless of I- or Br- as the capping ion, we successfully achieved CPNCs in the same reaction system simply by adjusting the pH. Based on the Finke-Watzky kinetic model, an increase in pH accelerates the overall reduction rate of Pd2+, and the formation of CPNCs only occurs over the range of specific solution reduction rate constants (k1). This kinetically illuminates that the reduction rate of Pd2+ is the physicochemical parameter that determines which ion, I- or Br-, dictates the growth of CPNCs. Also, density functional theory (DFT) calculations further elucidate the dependence of the reduction rate of Pd2+ on pH and the configuration of the activated Pd2+ complex.

  13. Ge nanocrystals embedded in ultrathin Si3N4 multilayers with SiO2 barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahariqushchi, R.; Gundogdu, Sinan; Aydinli, A.

    2017-04-01

    Multilayers of germanium nanocrystals (NCs) embedded in thin films of silicon nitride matrix separated with SiO2 barriers have been fabricated using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). SiGeN/SiO2 alternating bilayers have been grown on quartz and Si substrates followed by post annealing in Ar ambient from 600 to 900 °C. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) as well as Raman spectroscopy show good crystallinity of Ge confined to SiGeN layers in samples annealed at 900 °C. Strong compressive stress for SiGeN/SiO2 structures were observed through Raman spectroscopy. Size, as well as NC-NC distance were controlled along the growth direction for multilayer samples by varying the thickness of bilayers. Visible photoluminescence (PL) at 2.3 and 3.1 eV with NC size dependent intensity is observed and possible origin of PL is discussed.

  14. Composite Films Formed by Cellulose nanocrystals and Latex Nanoparticles: Optical, Structural, and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollick, Brandon McRae

    This thesis describes the preparation of iridescent, birefringent, composite films composed of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), latex nanoparticles (NPs) and a NP crosslinker; hexanediamine (HDA). First, aqueous suspensions were prepared with varying quantities of CNCs, NPs and HDA before equilibrating for one week. The cholesteric (Ch) phase was then cast and dried into a film. The optical, structural and mechanical properties of the film was analyzed. Second, films with identical compositions of CNCs, NPs, and HDA were fabricated in three different ways to yield films of different morphology, (i) fast drying of an isotropic suspension, yielding an isotropic film, (ii) slow drying of an isotropic suspension, yielding a partially Ch films, (iii) slow drying of an equilibrated suspension, yielding a highly Ch film. The optical and mechanical properties of the films was analyzed.

  15. Magnetoresistance of drop-cast film of cobalt-substituted magnetite nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohiki, Shigemi; Nara, Koichiro; Mitome, Masanori; Tsuya, Daiju

    2014-10-22

    An oleic acid-coated Fe2.7Co0.3O4 nanocrystal (NC) self-assembled film was fabricated via drop casting of colloidal particles onto a three-terminal electrode/MgO substrate. The film exhibited a large coercivity (1620 Oe) and bifurcation of the zero-field-cooled and field-cooled magnetizations at 300 K. At 10 K, the film exhibited both a Coulomb blockade due to single electron charging as well as a magnetoresistance of ∼-80% due to spin-dependent electron tunneling. At 300 K, the film also showed a magnetoresistance of ∼-80% due to hopping of spin-polarized electrons. Enhanced magnetic coupling between adjacent NCs and the large coercivity resulted in a large spin-polarized current flow even at 300 K.

  16. Homogeneous Synthesis and Electroluminescence Device of Highly Luminescent CsPbBr3 Perovskite Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Song; Yang, Yanchun; Kang, Xiaojiao; Wang, Lan; Huang, Lijian; Pan, Daocheng

    2017-03-06

    Highly luminescent CsPbBr 3 perovskite nanocrystals (PNCs) are homogeneously synthesized by mixing toluene solutions of PbBr 2 and cesium oleate at room temperature in open air. We found that PbBr 2 can be easily dissolved in nonpolar toluene in the presence of tetraoctylammonium bromide, which allows us to homogeneously prepare CsPbBr 3 perovskite quantum dots and prevents the use of harmful polar organic solvents, such as N,N-dimethylformamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone. Additionally, this method can be extended to synthesize highly luminescent CH 3 NH 3 PbBr 3 perovskite quantum dots. An electroluminescence device with a maximal luminance of 110 cd/m 2 has been fabricated by using high-quality CsPbBr 3 PNCs as the emitting layer.

  17. Fabricated Elastin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Giselle C; Aghaei-Ghareh-Bolagh, Behnaz; Brackenreg, Edwin P; Hiob, Matti A; Lee, Pearl; Weiss, Anthony S

    2015-11-18

    The mechanical stability, elasticity, inherent bioactivity, and self-assembly properties of elastin make it a highly attractive candidate for the fabrication of versatile biomaterials. The ability to engineer specific peptide sequences derived from elastin allows the precise control of these physicochemical and organizational characteristics, and further broadens the diversity of elastin-based applications. Elastin and elastin-like peptides can also be modified or blended with other natural or synthetic moieties, including peptides, proteins, polysaccharides, and polymers, to augment existing capabilities or confer additional architectural and biofunctional features to compositionally pure materials. Elastin and elastin-based composites have been subjected to diverse fabrication processes, including heating, electrospinning, wet spinning, solvent casting, freeze-drying, and cross-linking, for the manufacture of particles, fibers, gels, tubes, sheets and films. The resulting materials can be tailored to possess specific strength, elasticity, morphology, topography, porosity, wettability, surface charge, and bioactivity. This extraordinary tunability of elastin-based constructs enables their use in a range of biomedical and tissue engineering applications such as targeted drug delivery, cell encapsulation, vascular repair, nerve regeneration, wound healing, and dermal, cartilage, bone, and dental replacement. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Investigations of portable cadmium telluride (CdTe(Cl)) detectors for clinical studies with radioactive indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojsen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The combination of small, portable γ-radiation-sensitive Cadmium Telluride (CdTE(Cl)) crystal detectors and portable solid state data storage memories makes it feasible to extend the measuring period in a number of clinical investigations based on the use of various radioisotopes and external detection. Blood sampling can be avoided in some cases. Continuous ambulatory monitoring of relevant physiological parameters is practicable, e.g. kidney function (GFR), left ventricular ejection fraction, subcutaneous blood flow, muscle blood flow and insulin absorption in diabetic patients. In the present methodological study the applicability of the 133-Xe washout technique to subcutaneous (s.c.) adipose tissue blood flow (SBF) has been investigated and adapted to the use of CdTe(Cl) detectors attached to the skin surface for the measurement of local 133-Xe-disappearance rate constants (k). Physical characterization of CdTe(Cl) detectors as γ-sensitive devices has been performed, and adequate counting sensitivities were found without detector energy-resolution properties. The CdTe(Cl) detectors are therefore suitable for single indicator studies. The measuring geometry of CdTe(Cl) detectors was studied and compared with that of stationary Sodium Iodide (NaI(Tl)) detectors in both phantom and in vivo investigations. The spatial properties of CdTe(Cl) detectors could to some extent be adjusted by pulse height discrimination and lead collimation. When long-term measurements were complicated by for instance physical activity of the patients, the small CdTe(Cl) detectors in general showed equal or better performance than the heavy and voluminous NaI(Tl) detectors. The free movement of the ambulatory patient and the avoidance of cable connections to stationary data-collecting systems gave improved possibilities for measurements of the relevant parameters. From this point of view, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors must be considered an important advance for radioactivity studies in

  19. A Fumonisins Immunosensor Based on Polyanilino-Carbon Nanotubes Doped with Palladium Telluride Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masikini, Milua; Mailu, Stephen N.; Tsegaye, Abebaw; Njomo, Njagi; Molapo, Kerileng M.; Ikpo, Chinwe O.; Sunday, Christopher Edozie; Rassie, Candice; Wilson, Lindsay; Baker, Priscilla G. L.; Iwuoha, Emmanuel I.

    2015-01-01

    An impedimetric immunosensor for fumonisins was developed based on poly(2,5-dimethoxyaniline)-multi-wall carbon nanotubes doped with palladium telluride quantum dots onto a glassy carbon surface. The composite was assembled by a layer-by-layer method to form a multilayer film of quantum dots (QDs) and poly(2,5-dimethoxyaniline)-multi-wall carbon nanotubes (PDMA-MWCNT). Preparation of the electrochemical immunosensor for fumonisins involved drop-coating of fumonisins antibody onto the composite modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy response of the FB1 immunosensor (GCE/PT-PDMA-MWCNT/anti-Fms-BSA) gave a linear range of 7 to 49 ng L−1 and the corresponding sensitivity and detection limits were 0.0162 kΩ L ng−1 and 0.46 pg L−1, respectively, hence the limit of detection of the GCE/PT-PDMA-MWCNT immunosensor for fumonisins in corn certified material was calculated to be 0.014 and 0.011 ppm for FB1, and FB2 and FB3, respectively. These results are lower than those obtained by ELISA, a provisional maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI) for fumonisins (the sum of FB1, FB2, and FB3) established by the Joint FAO/WHO expert committee on food additives and contaminants of 2 μg kg−1 and the maximum level recommended by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for protection of human consumption (2–4 mg L−1). PMID:25558993

  20. Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride Focal Plane Array Performance Under Non-Standard Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Bruce, Carl F.; Green, Robert O.; Coles, J. B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper highlights a new technique that allows the Teledyne Scientific & Imaging LLC TCM6604A Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) Focal Plane Array (FPA) to operate at room temperature. The Teledyne MCT FPA has been a standard in Imaging Spectroscopy since its creation in the 1980's. This FPA has been used in applications ranging from space instruments such as CRISM, M3 and ARTEMIS to airborne instruments such as MaRS and the Next Generation AVIRIS Instruments1. Precise focal plane alignment is always a challenge for such instruments. The current FPA alignment process results in multiple cold cycles requiring week-long durations, thereby increasing the risk and cost of a project. These alignment cycles are necessary because optimal alignment is approached incrementally and can only be measured with the FPA and Optics at standard operating conditions, requiring a cold instrument. Instruments using this FPA are normally cooled to temperatures below 150K for the MCT FPA to properly function. When the FPA is run at higher temperatures the dark current increases saturating the output. This paper covers the prospect of warm MCT FPA operation from a theoretical and experimental perspective. We discuss the empirical models and physical laws that govern MCT material properties and predict the optimal settings that will result in the best MCT PA performance at 300K. Theoretical results are then calculated for the proposed settings. We finally present the images and data obtained using the actual system with the warm MCT FPA settings. The paper concludes by emphasizing the strong positive correlation between the measured values and the theoretical results.

  1. Spark plasma sintered bismuth telluride-based thermoelectric materials incorporating dispersed boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, H.R., E-mail: hugo.williams@leicester.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ambrosi, R.M. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Chen, K. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Friedman, U. [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ning, H.; Reece, M.J. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Robbins, M.C.; Simpson, K. [European Thermodynamics Ltd., 8 Priory Business Park, Wistow Road, Kibworth LE8 0R (United Kingdom); Stephenson, K. [European Space Agency, ESTEC TEC-EP, Keplerlaan 1, 2201AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2015-03-25

    Highlights: • Nano-B{sub 4}C reinforced Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} p-type thermoelectric produced by SPS. • Addition of B{sub 4}C up to 0.2 vol% to SPS’d material has little effect on zT. • Vickers hardness improved by 27% by adding 0.2 vol% B{sub 4}C. • Fracture toughness of SPS material: K{sub IC} = 0.80 MPa m{sup 1/2} by SEVNB. • Mechanical properties much better than commercial directionally solidified material. - Abstract: The mechanical properties of bismuth telluride based thermoelectric materials have received much less attention in the literature than their thermoelectric properties. Polycrystalline p-type Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} materials were produced from powder using spark plasma sintering (SPS). The effects of nano-B{sub 4}C addition on the thermoelectric performance, Vickers hardness and fracture toughness were measured. Addition of 0.2 vol% B{sub 4}C was found to have little effect on zT but increased hardness by approximately 27% when compared to polycrystalline material without B{sub 4}C. The K{sub IC} fracture toughness of these compositions was measured as 0.80 MPa m{sup 1/2} by Single-Edge V-Notched Beam (SEVNB). The machinability of polycrystalline materials produced by SPS was significantly better than commercially available directionally solidified materials because the latter is limited by cleavage along the crystallographic plane parallel to the direction of solidification.

  2. Spectroscopic, microscopic, and internal stress analysis in cadmium telluride grown by close-space sublimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manciu, Felicia S.; Salazar, Jessica G.; Diaz, Aryzbe; Quinones, Stella A.

    2015-01-01

    High quality materials with excellent ordered structure are needed for developing photovoltaic and infrared devices. With this end in mind, the results of our research prove the importance of a detailed, comprehensive spectroscopic and microscopic analysis in assessing cadmium telluride (CdTe) characteristics. The goal of this work is to examine not only material crystallinity and morphology, but also induced stress in the deposit material. A uniform, selective growth of polycrystalline CdTe by close-space sublimation on patterned Si(111) and Si(211) substrates is demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy images. Besides good crystallinity of the samples, as revealed by both Raman scattering and Fourier transform infrared absorption investigations, the far-infrared transmission data also show the presence of surface optical phonon modes, which is direct evidence of confinement in such a material. The qualitative identification of the induced stress was achieved by performing confocal Raman mapping microscopy on sample surfaces and by monitoring the existence of the rock-salt and zinc-blende structural phases of CdTe, which were associated with strained and unstrained morphologies, respectively. Although the induced stress in the material is still largely due to the high lattice mismatch between CdTe and the Si substrate, the current results provide a direct visualization of its partial release through the relaxation effect at crystallite boundaries and of preferential growth directions of less strain. Our study, thus offers significant value for improvement of material properties, by targeting the needed adjustments in the growth processes. - Highlights: • Assessing the characteristics of CdTe deposited on patterned Si substrates • Proving the utility of confocal Raman microscopy in monitoring the induced stress • Confirming the partial stress release through the grain boundary relaxation effect • Demonstrating the phonon confinement effect in low

  3. The crystal structures and powder diffraction patterns of the uranium tellurides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, R.L. (State Univ. of New York, Alfred, NY (USA). Inst. of Ceramic Superconductivity); Nichols, M.C.; Boehme, D.R. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA))

    1990-10-03

    A critical review of all of the reported structures and powder diffraction patterns in the uranium telluride system has been undertaken. Structures that are correct: Cubic -- UTe: no experimental pattern exists. Retain calculated 15--865. Cubic --U{sub 3}Te{sub 4}: retain the poor quality 12--610 but adopt the pattern calculated here. Cubic U{sub 2}Te{sub 3}: no experimental pattern exists. Adopt pattern calculated here. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 2}: Adopt the new pattern of Boehme et al. Monoclinic {alpha}UTe{sub 3} Adopt the new pattern of Boehme et al. Monoclinic {alpha}UTe{sub 3} Adopt the new pattern of Boehme et al. Orthorhombic {beta}UTe{sub 3}: Adopt pattern calculated here. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 5}: Adopt the new pattern of Boehme et al. Structures in need of refinement: Orthorhombic U{sub 2}Te{sub 3}:Adopt pattern calculated here over 34--807. Hexagonal U{sub 7}Te{sub 12}: Adopt pattern calculated here but retain 24--1368. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 1.78}: Adopt pattern calculated here and retain our modified 21--1404 reported for U{sub 4}Te{sub 7}. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 2.5}: Adopt pattern calculated here. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 3.4}: Accept recent pattern of Boehme et al. Phases for which no structures or reliable patterns exist: Orthorhombic U{sub 3}Te{sub 4}: no published pattern. Tetragonal U{sub 3}Te{sub 5}: three patterns 21--1407, 34--766 and 34--896 exit but all are of very poor quality. Phases which probably do not exist: Tetragonal UTe{sub 1.78}, Tetragonal UTe{sub 2}, Cubic UTe{sub 2} U{sub 3}Te{sub 7}(21--1402), U{sub 3}Te{sub 8}(21--1406).

  4. Light-emitting Ga-oxide nanocrystals in glass: a new paradigm for low-cost and robust UV-to-visible solar-blind converters and UV emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigaev, Vladimir N; Golubev, Nikita V; Ignat'eva, Elena S; Paleari, Alberto; Lorenzi, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Wide-bandgap nanocrystals are an inexhaustible source of tuneable functions potentially addressing most of the demand for new light emitting systems. However, the implementation of nanocrystal properties in real devices is not straightforward if a robust and stable optical component is required as a final result. The achievement of efficient light emission from dense dispersions of Ga-oxide nanocrystals in UV-grade glass can be a breakthrough in this regard. Such a result would permit the fabrication of low cost UV-to-visible converters for monitoring UV-emitting events on a large-scale - from invisible hydrogen flames to corona dispersions. From this perspective, γ-Ga₂O₃ nanocrystals are developed by phase separation in Ga-alkali-germanosilicate glasses, obtaining optical materials based on a UV transparent matrix. Band-to-band UV-excitation of light emission from donor-acceptor pair (DAP) recombination is investigated for the first time in embedded γ-Ga₂O₃. The analysis of the decay kinetics gives unprecedented evidence that nanosized confinement of DAP recombination can force a nanophase to the efficient response of exactly balanced DAPs. The results, including a proof of concept of UV-to-visible viewer, definitely demonstrate the feasibility of workable glass-based fully inorganic nanostructured materials with emission properties borrowed from Ga₂O₃ single-crystals and tailored by the nanocrystal size.

  5. Laser Photolysis and Thermolysis of Organic Selenides and Tellurides for Chemical Gas-phase Deposition of Nanostructured Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Pola

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser radiation-induced decomposition of gaseous organic selenides and tellurides resulting in chemical deposition of nanostructured materials on cold surfaces is reviewed with regard to the mechanism of the gas-phase decomposition and properties of the deposited materials. The laser photolysis and laser thermolysis of the Se and Te precursors leading to chalcogen deposition can also serve as a useful approach to nanostructured chalcogen composites and IVA group (Si, Ge, Sn element chalcogenides provided that it is carried out simultaneously with laser photolysis or thermolysis of polymer and IVA group element precursor.

  6. Reaction of 1-bromo-3-chloropropane with tellurium and dimethyl telluride in the system of hydrazine hydrate-alkali

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russavskaya, N.V.; Levanova, E.P.; Sukhomazova, Eh.N.; Grabel'nykh, V.A.; Elaev, A.V.; Klyba, L.V.; Zhanchipova, E.R.; Albanov, A.I.; Korotaeva, I.M.; Toryashinova, D.S.D.; Korchevin, N.A.

    2006-01-01

    A synthesis of oligomeric substance of thiocol type, the poly(trimethyleneditelluride), from 1-bromo-3-chloropropane and elemental tellurium is performed using a hydrazine hydrate-alkali system. Reductive splitting of the tellurocol followed by alkylation with methyl iodide give rise to preparation of bis(methyltelluro)propane, which was synthesized also from dimethyl telluride and 1,3-dihalopropanes using the N 2 H 4 ·H 2 O/KOH system. The reaction products were characterized by elementary analysis, NMR, and IR spectra. Mass spectra of the synthesized low molecular weight organotellurium compounds are considered [ru

  7. Photoluminescence behaviors of single CdSe/ZnS/TOPO nanocrystals: Adsorption effects of water molecules onto nanocrystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Masaru; Hasegawa, Atsushi; Iwami, Noriya; Nishiura, Ken; Ando, Naohisa; Nishiyama, Akira; Horiuchi, Hiromi; Tani, Toshiro

    2007-01-01

    We report here the distinctive modifications of photoluminescence (PL) behaviors in single CdSe/ZnS/TOPO nanocrystals depending on their environments. Long-time traces of PL intensity from single nanocrystals have been obtained in both vacuum and a wet nitrogen atmosphere. While all of the nanocrystals in both environments exhibit PL blinking behaviors, i.e. on-off intermittency of PL intensity, as usual, some of the nanocrystals in the wet nitrogen atmosphere show significant increase in duration time of on-events. As for the duration time of blinking off-events, it is for the moment associated with the occasional events of carrier capturing at trap sites on or near the nanocrystal surfaces. We propose a model in which adsorbed water molecules at the trap sites on the nanocrystal surfaces transform them under light irradiation, which eventually decreases the occurrence of the trapping events due to their inactivation. It in turn increases the PL on-times. In addition to the drastic modification of the blinking profile, we also found that in the PL time traces some kinds of undulated behaviors, i.e. continuous and rather low frequency fluctuation of PL intensity, appear during each on-event in vacuum while they disappear totally in the wet nitrogen atmosphere. These results are also described on the basis of the inactivation model of the trap sites introduced above

  8. Photo-sensitive Ge nanocrystal based films controlled by substrate deposition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavarache, Ionel; Maraloiu, Valentin Adrian; Negrila, Catalin; Prepelita, Petronela; Gruia, Ion; Iordache, Gheorghe

    2017-10-01

    Lowering the temperature of crystallization by deposition of thin films on a heated substrate represents the easiest way to find new means to develop and improve new working devices based on nanocrystals embedded in thin films. The improvements are strongly related with the increasing of operation speed, substantially decreasing the energy consumption and reducing unit fabrication costs of the respective semiconductor devices. This approach avoids major problems, such as those related to diffusion or difficulties in controlling nanocrystallites size, which appear during thermal treatments at high temperatures after deposition. This article reports on a significant progress given by structuring Ge nanocrystals (Ge-NCs) embedded in silicon dioxide (SiO2) thin films by heating the substrate at 400 °C during co-deposition of Ge and SiO2 by magnetron sputtering. As a proof-of-concept, a Si/Ge-NCs:SiO2 photo-sensitive structure was fabricated thereof and characterized. The structure shows superior performance on broad operation bandwidth from visible to near-infrared, as strong rectification properties in dark, significant current rise in the inversion mode when illuminated, high responsivity, high photo-detectivity of 1014 Jones, quick response and significant conversion efficiency with peak value reaching 850% at -1 V and about 1000 nm. This simple preparation approach brings an important contribution to the effort of structuring Ge nanocrystallites in SiO2 thin films at a lower temperature for the purpose of using these materials for devices in optoelectronics, solar cells and electronics on flexible substrates.

  9. The Role of Shape on Electronic Structure and Charge Transport in Faceted PbSe Nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Kaushik, Ananth P.; Lukose, Binit; Clancy, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    We have determined the effect of shape on the charge transport characteristics of nanocrystals. Our study looked at the explicit determination of the electronic properties of faceted nanocrystals that essentially probe the limit of current

  10. State of the art of nanocrystals technology for delivery of poorly soluble drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yuqi; Du, Juan; Wang, Lulu; Wang, Yancai, E-mail: wangyancai1999@163.com [Qilu University of Technology, School of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Engineering (China)

    2016-09-15

    Formulation of nanocrystals is a distinctive approach which can effectively improve the delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs, thus enticing the development of the nanocrystals technology. The characteristics of nanocrystals resulted in an exceptional drug delivery conductance, including saturation solubility, dissolution velocity, adhesiveness, and affinity. Nanocrystals were treated as versatile pharmaceuticals that could be delivered through almost all routes of administration. In the current review, oral, pulmonary, and intravenous routes of administration were presented. Also, the targeting of drug nanocrystals, as well as issues of efficacy and safety, were also discussed. Several methods were applied for nanocrystals production including top-down production strategy (media milling, high-pressure homogenization), bottom-up production strategy (antisolvent precipitation, supercritical fluid process, and precipitation by removal of solvent), and the combination approaches. Moreover, this review also described the evaluation and characterization of the drug nanocrystals and summarized the current commercial pharmaceutical products utilizing nanocrystals technology.

  11. Fundamental aspects of nucleation and growth in the solution-phase synthesis of germanium nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Codoluto, Stephen C.; Baumgardner, William J.; Hanrath, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Colloidal Ge nanocrystals (NCs) were synthesized via the solution phase reduction of germanium(ii) iodide. We report a systematic investigation of the nanocrystal nucleation and growth as a function of synthesis conditions including the nature

  12. Mechanical, barrier and morphological properties of starch nanocrystals-reinforced pea starch films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojing; Qiu, Chao; Ji, Na; Sun, Cuixia; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2015-05-05

    To characterize the pea starch films reinforced with waxy maize starch nanocrystals, the mechanical, water vapor barrier and morphological properties of the composite films were investigated. The addition of starch nanocrystals increased the tensile strength of the composite films, and the value of tensile strength of the composite films was highest when starch nanocrystals content was 5% (w/w). The moisture content (%), water vapor permeability, and water-vapor transmission rate of the composite films significantly decreased as starch nanocrystals content increased. When their starch nanocrystals content was 1-5%, the starch nanocrystals dispersed homogeneously in the composite films, resulting in a relatively smooth and compact film surface and better thermal stability. However, when starch nanocrystals content was more than 7%, the starch nanocrystals began to aggregate, which resulted in the surface of the composite films developing a longitudinal fibrous structure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. MC3T3-E1 cell response of amorphous phase/TiO{sub 2} nanocrystal composite coating prepared by microarc oxidation on titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Rui [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wei, Daqing, E-mail: daqingwei@hit.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yang, Haoyue; Feng, Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Cheng, Su [Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, Baoqiang; Wang, Yaming; Jia, Dechang; Zhou, Yu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Bioactive amorphous phase/TiO{sub 2} nanocrystal (APTN) composite coatings were fabricated by microarc oxidation (MAO) on Ti. The APTN coatings are composed of much amorphous phase with Si, Na, Ca, Ti and O elements and a few TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals. With increasing applied voltage, the micropore density of the APTN coating decreases and the micropore size of the APTN coating increases. The results indicate that less MC3T3-E1 cells attach on the APTN coatings as compared to Ti. However, the APTN coatings greatly enhance the cell proliferation ability and the activity of alkaline phosphatase. The amorphous phase and the concentrations of the released Ca and Si from the APTN coatings during cell culture have significant effects on the cell response. - Highlights: • Amorphous phase/TiO2 nanocrystal (APTN) composite coatings were fabricated. • The MC3T3-E1 cell response of the APTN coatings was evaluated. • The APTN coatings greatly enhanced the cell proliferation ability.

  14. The effect of TiO2 nanocrystal shape on the electrical properties of poly(styrene-b-methyl methacrylate) block copolymer based nanocomposites for solar cell application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, Laida; Gutierrez, Junkal; Di Mauro, A. Evelyn; Curri, M. Lucia; Tercjak, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanocrystals were synthesized into two shapes, namely spherical and rod-like and used for the fabrication of polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PSMMA) block copolymer based nanocomposites, which were employed as the active top layer of electro-devices for solar cell application. Electro-devices were designed using nanocomposites with high TiO 2 nanocrystal contents (50-70 wt%) and for comparison as-synthesized TiO 2 nanospheres (TiO 2 NSs) and TiO 2 nanorods (TiO 2 NRs) were also used. The morphology of the electro-devices was studied by atomic force microscopy showing good nanocrystal dispersion. The electrical properties of the devices were investigated by PeakForce tunneling atomic force microscopy and Keithley semiconductor analyzer, which showed higher electrical current values for devices containing TiO 2 NRs in comparison to TiO 2 NSs. Remarkably, the influence of the PSMMA block copolymer on the improvement of the conductivity of the electro-devices was also assessed, demonstrating that the self-assembling ability of block copolymer can be beneficial to improve charge transfer in the fabricated electro-devices, thus representing relevant systems to be potentially developed for photovoltaic applications. Moreover, the absorbance of the prepared electro-devices in solar irradiation range was confirmed by UV–vis spectroscopy characterization.

  15. Cellulose nanocrystals with tunable surface charge for nanomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; Alam, Md Nur; Sim, Goeun; Tufenkji, Nathalie; van de Ven, Theo G. M.

    2015-10-01

    Crystalline nanoparticles of cellulose exhibit attractive properties as nanoscale carriers for bioactive molecules in nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine. For applications in imaging and drug delivery, surface charge is one of the most important factors affecting the performance of nanocarriers. However, current methods of preparation offer little flexibility for controlling the surface charge of cellulose nanocrystals, leading to compromised colloidal stability under physiological conditions. We report a synthesis method that results in nanocrystals with remarkably high carboxyl content (6.6 mmol g-1) and offers continuous control over surface charge without any adjustment to the reaction conditions. Six fractions of nanocrystals with various surface carboxyl contents were synthesized from a single sample of softwood pulp with carboxyl contents varying from 6.6 to 1.7 mmol g-1 and were fully characterized. The proposed method resulted in highly stable colloidal nanocrystals that did not aggregate when exposed to high salt concentrations or serum-containing media. Interactions of these fractions with four different tissue cell lines were investigated over a wide range of concentrations (50-300 μg mL-1). Darkfield hyperspectral imaging and confocal microscopy confirmed the uptake of nanocrystals by selected cell lines without any evidence of membrane damage or change in cell density; however a charge-dependent decrease in mitochondrial activity was observed for charge contents higher than 3.9 mmol g-1. A high surface carboxyl content allowed for facile conjugation of fluorophores to the nanocrystals without compromising colloidal stability. The cellular uptake of fluoresceinamine-conjugated nanocrystals exhibited a time-dose dependent relationship and increased significantly with doubling of the surface charge.Crystalline nanoparticles of cellulose exhibit attractive properties as nanoscale carriers for bioactive molecules in nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine. For

  16. Protein Adsorption and Antibacterial Behavior for Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals Prepared by Hydrothermal Method

    OpenAIRE

    笠原, 英充; 小形, 信男; 荻原, 隆

    2005-01-01

    Homogeneous hydroxyapatite nanocrystals which have aspect ratio with more than four were synthesized by hydrothermal method. X-ray fluorescence analysis revealed that the Ca/P ratio of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals was maintaining start composition. The protein adsorption properties and bacteria-resistant of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals were investigated. The protein adsorption properties of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals were improvement after the hydrothermal treatment. Bacteria-resistant behavio...

  17. Aqueous dispersion of monodisperse magnetic iron oxide nanocrystals through phase transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, William W; Chang, Emmanuel; Sayes, Christie M; Drezek, Rebekah; Colvin, Vicki L

    2006-01-01

    A facile method was developed for completely transferring high quality monodisperse iron oxide nanocrystals from organic solvents to water. The as-prepared aqueous dispersions of iron oxide nanocrystals were extremely stable and could be functionalized for bioconjugation with biomolecules. These iron oxide nanocrystals showed negligible cytotoxicity to human breast cancer cells (SK-BR-3) and human dermal fibroblast cells. This method is general and versatile for many organic solvent-synthesized nanoparticles, including fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals

  18. The aggregation and characteristics of radiation-induced defects in lithium fluoride nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitovich, A. P.; Kalinov, V. S.; Korzhik, M. V.; Martynovich, E. F.; Runets, L. P.; Stupak, A. P.

    2013-02-01

    It has been established that diffusion activation energies for anion vacancies and centres ? in lithium fluoride nanocrystals are higher than those in bulk crystals. In nanocrystals, ? centres migrating in the range of the temperature close to room temperature is not observed and these centres remain stable. The ratio of centres ? and F 2 concentrations in nanocrystals is higher than in bulk crystals. A new type of colour centres, which is absent in bulk crystals, is discovered in nanocrystals.

  19. Controlled synthesis of novel octapod platinum nanocrystals under microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Lei; Chi, Quan; Zhao, Yanxi; Liu, Hanfan; Zhou, Zhongqiang; Li, Jinlin; Huang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Under microwave irradiation, novel octapod Pt nanocrystals were synthesized by reducing H 2 PtCl 6 in TEG with PVP as a stabilizer. The as-prepared Pt nanocrystals displayed a unique octapod nanostructure with five little mastoids in each concave center. The use of KI was crucial to the formation of novel Pt octapods. Novel Octapod Platinum Nanocrystals. - Highlights: • A novel octapod Pt nanocrystals different from the common octapod were obtained. • The use of KI was crucial to the formation of the novel Pt octapods. • Microwave was readily employed in controlled synthesis of the novel Pt octapods. - Abstract: Microwave was employed in the shape-controlled synthesis of Pt nanoparticles. Novel octapod Pt nanocrystals enclosed with (1 1 1) facets were readily synthesized with H 2 PtCl 6 as a precursor, tetraethylene glycol (TEG) as both a solvent and a reducing agent, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a stabilizer in the presence of an appropriate amount of KI under microwave irradiation for 140 s. The as-prepared Pt nanocrystals displayed a unique octapod nanostructure with five little mastoids in each concave center and exhibited higher electrocatalytic activity than commercial Pt black in the electro-oxidations of methanol and formic acid. The results demonstrated that the use of KI was crucial to the formation of Pt octapods. KI determined the formation of the novel octapod Pt nanocrystals by tuning up the reduction kinetics and adsorbing on the surfaces of growing Pt nanoparticles. The optimum molar ratio of H 2 PtCl 6 /KI/PVP was 1/30/45

  20. 3D FTO/FTO-Nanocrystal/TiO2 Composite Inverse Opal Photoanode for Efficient Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Xianglin; Ling, Han; Tan, Chiew Kei; Yeo, Loo Pin; Grimsdale, Andrew Clive; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2018-05-01

    A 3D fluorine-doped SnO 2 (FTO)/FTO-nanocrystal (NC)/TiO 2 inverse opal (IO) structure is designed and fabricated as a new "host and guest" type of composite photoanode for efficient photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting. In this novel photoanode design, the highly conductive and porous FTO/FTO-NC IO acts as the "host" skeleton, which provides direct pathways for faster electron transport, while the conformally coated TiO 2 layer acts as the "guest" absorber layer. The unique composite IO structure is fabricated through self-assembly of colloidal spheres template, a hydrothermal method and atomic layer deposition (ALD). Owing to its large surface area and efficient charge collection, the FTO/FTO-NC/TiO 2 composite IO photoanode shows excellent photocatalytic properties for PEC water splitting. With optimized dimensions of the SnO 2 nanocrystals and the thickness of the ALD TiO 2 absorber layers, the 3D FTO/FTO-NC/TiO 2 composite IO photoanode yields a photocurrent density of 1.0 mA cm -2 at 1.23 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) under AM 1.5 illumination, which is four times higher than that of the FTO/TiO 2 IO reference photoanode. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Depleted Nanocrystal-Oxide Heterojunctions for High-Sensitivity Infrared Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: 4.3 Electronic Sensing - Depleted Nanocrystal- Oxide Heterojunctions for High...reviewed journals: Final Report: 4.3 Electronic Sensing - Depleted Nanocrystal- Oxide Heterojunctions for High-Sensitivity Infrared Detection Report Title...PERCENT_SUPPORTEDNAME FTE Equivalent: Total Number: 1 1 Final Progress Report Project title: Depleted Nanocrystal- Oxide Heterojunctions for High

  2. Infrared Emitting and Photoconducting Colloidal Silver Chalcogenide Nanocrystal Quantum Dots from a Silylamide-Promoted Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yarema, Maksym; Pichler, Stefan; Sytnyk, Mykhailo; Seyrkammer, Robert; Lechner, Rainer T.; Fritz-Popovski, Gerhard; Jarzab, Dorota; Szendrei, Krisztina; Resel, Roland; Korovyanko, Oleksandra; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Paris, Oskar; Hesser, Guenter; Heiss, Wolfgang; Hesser, Günter

    Here, we present a hot injection synthesis of colloidal Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals (Ag(2)Se, Ag(2)Te, and Ag(2)S) that resulted in exceptionally small nanocrystal sizes in the range between 2 and 4 nm. Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals exhibit band gap energies within the near-infrared spectral region,

  3. Computational analysis of interfacial attachment kinetics and transport phenomena during liquid phase epitaxy of mercury cadmium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasin, Igal; Brandon, Simon [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Ben Dov, Anne; Grimberg, Ilana; Klin, Olga; Weiss, Eliezer [SCD-Semi-Conductor Devices, P.O. Box 2250/99, Haifa 31021 (Israel)

    2010-07-01

    Deposition of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) thin films, on lattice matched cadmium zinc telluride substrates, is often achieved via Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE). The yield and quality of these films, required for the production of infrared detector devices, is to a large extent limited by lack of knowledge regarding details of physical phenomena underlying the deposition process. Improving the understanding of these phenomena and their impact on the quality of the resultant films is therefore an important goal which can be achieved through relevant computational and/or experimental studies. We present a combined computational and experimental effort aimed at elucidating physical phenomena underlying the LPE of MCT via a slider growth process. The focus of the presentation will be results generated by a time-dependent three-dimensional model of mass transport, fluid flow, and interfacial attachment kinetics, which we have developed and applied in the analysis of this LPE process. These results, combined with experimental analyses, lead to an improved understanding of the role of different transport and kinetic phenomena underlying this growth process.

  4. An Ethology of Urban Fabric(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsch, Jonas; Thomsen, Bodil Marie Stavning

    2014-01-01

    The article explores a non-metaphorical understanding of urban fabric(s), shifting the attention from a bird’s eye perspective to the actual, textural manifestations of a variety of urban fabric(s) to be studied in their real, processual, ecological and ethological complexity within urban life. We...... effectuate this move by bringing into resonance a range of intersecting fields that all deal with urban fabric(s) in complementary ways (interaction design and urban design activism, fashion, cultural theory, philosophy, urban computing)....

  5. Scientific/Technical Report: Improvement in compensation and crystal growth of cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelvin G. Lynn; Kelly A. Jones

    2007-01-01

    Comparison of actual accomplishments with goals and objectives: (1) Growth of 12 ingots--Washington State University (WSU) more than met this goal for the project by growing 12 final ingots for the year. Nine of the twelve crystal growth ingots resolved gamma radiation at room temperature. The other three ingots where resistivity of ∼ 3 x 10 8 Ohm*cm for CG32a, CG36, and CG42 lower than expected, however none of these were tried with blocking contacts. All ingots were evaluated from tip to heel. In these three cases, the group III, dopant Aluminum (Al) was not detected to a level to compensate the Cd vacancies in the cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) thus the ingots were lower resistivity. The nine ingots that were successful radiation detectors averaged a bulk resistivity of 1.25 x 10 10 Ohm*cm and with a average μτ product for electrons of ∼ 2 x 10 -4 cm 2 /V with a 1/4 microsecond shaping time with samples ∼2 mm in thickness. (2) Attempt new compensations techniques--WSU also met this goal. Several doping schemes were attempted and investigated with various amounts of excess Tellurium added to the growth. The combination of Al and Erbium (Er) were first attempted for these ingots and subsequently CG34 was grown with Al, Er and Holmium. These compensation techniques produced radiation detectors and are currently under investigation. These growths were made with significant different doping levels to determine the affect of the dopants. CG43 was doped with Indium and Er. Indium was introduced instead of Al to determine if Indium is more soluble than Al for CZT and was less oxidized. This may decrease the amount of low resistivity ingots grown by doping with Indium instead of Al. (3) Grow large single crystals--Several changes in approach occurred in the crystal growth furnace. Steps were taken to maximize the crystal growth interface during growth by modifying liners, quartz, heat sinks, crucibles and various growth steps and temperature profiles. CG39 ingot

  6. Inhibition of autophagy contributes to the toxicity of cadmium telluride quantum dots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan J

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Junpeng Fan,1–4 Ming Shao,1–4 Lu Lai,3–5 Yi Liu,3–5 Zhixiong Xie1–4,6 1College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, 2Hubei Provincial Cooperative Innovation Center of Industrial Fermentation,3State Key Laboratory of Virology, 4Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (MOE, 5College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 6School of Life Science and Technology, Hubei Engineering University, Xiaogan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs are used as near-infrared probes in biologic and medical applications, but their cytological effects and mechanism of potential toxicity are still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of CdTe QDs of different sizes and investigated their mechanism of toxicity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A growth inhibition assay revealed that orange-emitting CdTe (O-CdTe QDs (half inhibitory concentration [IC50] =59.44±12.02 nmol/L were more toxic than green-emitting CdTe QDs (IC50 =186.61±19.74 nmol/L to S. cerevisiae. Further studies on toxicity mechanisms using a transmission electron microscope and green fluorescent protein tagged Atg8 processing assay revealed that O-CdTe QDs could partially inhibit autophagy at a late stage, which differs from the results reported in mammalian cells. Moreover, autophagy inhibited at a late stage by O-CdTe QDs could be partially recovered by enhancing autophagy with rapamycin (an autophagy activator, combined with an increased number of living cells. These results indicate that inhibition of autophagy acts as a toxicity mechanism of CdTe QDs in S. cerevisiae. This work reports a novel toxicity mechanism of CdTe QDs in yeast and provides valuable information on the effect of CdTe QDs on the processes of living cells. Keywords: CdTe quantum dots, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, toxicity, autophagy

  7. Enhanced thermoelectric properties of metal film on bismuth telluride-based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Wen Hsuan; Chen, Yi Ray; Tseng, Shih Chun; Yang, Ping Hsing; Wu, Ren Jye; Hwang, Jenn Yeu

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion barriers have a significant influence on the reliability and life time of thermoelectric modules. Although nickel is commonly used as a diffusion barrier in commercial thermoelectric modules, several studies have verified that Ni migrates to bismuth telluride-based material during high temperature cycles and causes a loss in efficacy. In this paper, the influence of metal layers coated to p-type and n-type Bi 2 Te 3 on the interface characterization and thermoelectric property is studied using a RF magnetron sputtering. The findings from this study demonstrate the structural and thermoelectric properties of p-type and n-type Bi 2 Te 3 coated with different metal layers. The crystalline phase and compositional change of the interface between the Bi 2 Te 3 materials and the metal layers were determined using an X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy. Formation of NiTe was observed in the sample of Ni/p-type Bi 2 Te 3 based films post-annealed in an N 2 atmosphere at 200 °C. In contrast, no Co x Te y was formed in the sample of Co/p-type Bi 2 Te 3 based films post-annealed at 200 °C. For as-deposited Ni/p-type and n-type Bi 2 Te 3 based legs, the Ni slightly diffused into the Bi 2 Te 3 based legs. A similar phenomenon also occurred in the as-deposited Co/p-type and n-type Bi 2 Te 3 based legs. The Seebeck coefficients of the Co contacts on the Bi 2 Te 3 based material displayed better behavior than those of the Ni contacts on the Bi 2 Te 3 based legs. Thus Co could be a suitable diffusion barrier for bulk Bi 2 Te 3 based material. The observed effects on the thermoelectric and structural properties of metal/Bi 2 Te 3 based material are crucial for understanding the interface between the diffusion barrier and thermoelectric materials. - Highlights: • Interface characterization of metal coated to p-type and n-type Bi 2 Te 3 is studied. • We examined the phase transformation of metal/Bi 2 Te 3 based films

  8. Thermodynamics of post-growth annealing of cadmium zinc telluride nuclear radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Aaron Lee

    Nuclear Radiation Detectors are used for detecting, tracking, and identifying radioactive materials which emit high-energy gamma and X-rays. The use of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors is particularly attractive because of the detector's ability to operate at room temperature and measure the energy spectra of gamma-ray sources with a high resolution, typically less than 1% at 662 keV. While CdZnTe detectors are acceptable imperfections in the crystals limit their full market potential. One of the major imperfections are Tellurium inclusions generated during the crystal growth process by the retrograde solubility of Tellurium and Tellurium-rich melt trapped at the growth interface. Tellurium inclusions trap charge carriers generated by gamma and X-ray photons and thus reduce the portion of generated charge carriers that reach the electrodes for collection and conversion into a readable signal which is representative of the ionizing radiation's energy and intensity. One approach in resolving this problem is post-growth annealing which has the potential of removing the Tellurium inclusions and associated impurities. The goal of this project is to use experimental techniques to study the thermodynamics of Tellurium inclusion migration in post-growth annealing of CdZnTe nuclear detectors with the temperature gradient zone migration (TGZM) technique. Systematic experiments will be carried out to provide adequate thermodynamic data that will inform the engineering community of the optimum annealing parameters. Additionally, multivariable correlations that involve the Tellurium diffusion coefficient, annealing parameters, and CdZnTe properties will be analyzed. The experimental approach will involve systematic annealing experiments (in Cd vapor overpressure) on different sizes of CdZnTe crystals at varying temperature gradients ranging from 0 to 60°C/mm (used to migrate the Tellurium inclusion to one side of the crystal), and at annealing temperatures ranging

  9. Preparation, characterization and catalytic effects of copper oxalate nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Gurdip; Kapoor, Inder Pal Singh; Dubey, Reena; Srivastava, Pratibha

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Prepared copper oxalate nanocrystals were characterized by FE-SEM and bright field TEM micrographs. Its catalytic activity was evaluated on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate using TG and TG-DSC techniques. Highlights: ► Preparation of nanocrystals (∼9.0 nm) of copper oxalate using Cu(NO 3 ) 2 ·2H 2 O, oxalic acid and acetone under thermal conditions. ► Method is simple and novel. ► Characterization using XRD, SEM, TEM, HRTEM and ED pattern. ► Catalytic activity of copper oxalate nanocrystals on AP thermal decomposition using thermal techniques (TG, TG-DSC and ignition delay). ► Kinetics of thermal decomposition of AP + CONs using isoconversional and model fitting kinetic approaches. - Abstract: Recent work has described the preparation and characterization of copper oxalate nanocrystals (CONs). It was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron diffraction pattern (ED). The catalytic activity of CONs on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and composite solid propellants (CSPs) has been done by thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and ignition delay measurements. Burning rate of CSPs was also found to be enhanced in presence of copper oxalate nanocrystals. Kinetics of thermal decomposition of AP with and without CONs has also been investigated. The model free (isoconversional) and model-fitting kinetic approaches have been applied to data for isothermal TG decomposition.

  10. Stabilizing Agents for Drug Nanocrystals: Effect on Bioavailability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Tuomela

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug nanocrystals are a versatile option for drug delivery purposes, and while the number of poorly soluble drug materials is all the time increasing, more research in this area is performed. Drug nanocrystals have a simple structure—a solid drug core is surrounded by a layer of stabilizing agent. However, despite the considerably simple structure, the selection of an appropriate stabilizer for a certain drug can be challenging. Mostly, the stabilizer selection is based purely on the requirement of physical stability, e.g., maintaining the nanosized particle size as long as possible after the formation of drug nanocrystals. However, it is also worth taking into account that stabilizer can affect the bioavailability in the final formulation via interactions with cells and cell layers. In addition, formation of nanocrystals is only one process step, and for the final formulation, more excipients are often added to the composition. The role of the stabilizers in the final formulation can be more than only stabilizing the nanocrystal particle size. A good example is the stabilizer’s role as cryoprotectant during freeze drying. In this review, the stabilizing effect, role of stabilizers in final nanocrystalline formulations, challenges in reaching in vitro–in vivo correlation with nanocrystalline products, and stabilizers’ effect on higher bioavailability are discussed.

  11. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachleben, Joseph Robert [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and 13C enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution 1H and 13C liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 Å. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time > 10-8 s-1. The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O2 and ultraviolet. A method for measuring 14N-1H J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T1 and T2 experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in 13C enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  12. Controlled synthesis of thorium and uranium oxide nano-crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudry, Damien; Apostolidis, Christos; Walter, Olaf; Gouder, Thomas; Courtois, Eglantine; Kubel, Christian; Meyer, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about the size and shape effects on the properties of actinide compounds. As a consequence, the controlled synthesis of well-defined actinide-based nano-crystals constitutes a fundamental step before studying their corresponding properties. In this paper, we report on the non-aqueous surfactant-assisted synthesis of thorium and uranium oxide nano-crystals. The final characteristics of thorium and uranium oxide nano-crystals can be easily tuned by controlling a few experimental parameters such as the nature of the actinide precursor and the composition of the organic system (e.g., the chemical nature of the surfactants and their relative concentrations). Additionally, the influence of these parameters on the outcome of the synthesis is highly dependent on the nature of the actinide element (thorium versus uranium). By using optimised experimental conditions, monodisperse isotropic uranium oxide nano-crystals with different sizes (4.5 and 10.7 nm) as well as branched nano-crystals (overall size ca. 5 nm), nano-dots (ca. 4 nm) and nano-rods (with ultra-small diameters of 1 nm) of thorium oxide were synthesised. (authors)

  13. Performance Parameters and Characterizations of Nanocrystals: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manasi M. Chogale

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Poor bioavailability of drugs associated with their poor solubility limits the clinical effectiveness of almost 40% of the newly discovered drug moieties. Low solubility, coupled with a high log p value, high melting point and high dose necessitates exploration of alternative formulation strategies for such drugs. One such novel approach is formulation of the drugs as “Nanocrystals”. Nanocrystals are primarily comprised of drug and surfactants/stabilizers and are manufactured by “top-down” or “bottom-up” methods. Nanocrystals aid the clinical efficacy of drugs by various means such as enhancement of bioavailability, lowering of dose requirement, and facilitating sustained release of the drug. This effect is dependent on the various characteristics of nanocrystals (particle size, saturation solubility, dissolution velocity, which have an impact on the improved performance of the nanocrystals. Various sophisticated techniques have been developed to evaluate these characteristics. This article describes in detail the various characterization techniques along with a brief review of the significance of the various parameters on the performance of nanocrystals.

  14. Increased electronic coupling in silicon nanocrystal networks doped with F4-TCNQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Alexandra; Oberg, Sven; Rayson, Mark J; Briddon, Patrick R

    2013-02-01

    The modification of the electronic structure of silicon nanocrystals using an organic dopant, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ), is investigated using first-principles calculations. It is shown that physisorbed F4-TCNQ molecules have the effect of oxidizing the nanocrystal, attracting the charge density towards the F4-TCNQ-nanocrystal interface, and decreasing the excitation energy of the system. In periodic F4-TCNQ/nanocrystal superlattices, F4-TCNQ is suggested to enhance exciton separation, and in the presence of free holes, to serve as a bridge for electron/hole transfer between adjacent nanocrystals.

  15. Properties of Nanocrystals-formulated Aluminosilicate Bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Conciauro

    2015-10-01

    insulating and/or mechanical properties. The nanocrystals- modified refractories showed variations in properties, with respect to the untreated aluminosilicate reference in heat- insulating performances (thermal diffusivities were measured by the “hot disk” technique. In general, they also showed improvements in mechanical compression resist‐ ance for all of the samples at 2 wt. %. The best heat insula‐ tion was obtained with the addition of nano-aluminium hydroxide at 2 wt. %, while the highest mechanical compres‐ sion breaking resistance was found with nano-CaCO3 at 2 wt. %. These outcomes were investigated with complemen‐ tary techniques, like mercury porosimetry for porosity, and Archimedes methods to measure physical properties like the bulk and apparent densities, apparent porosities and water absorption. The results show that the nano-alumini‐ um hydroxide modified bricks were the most porous, which could explain the best heat-insulating performances. There is a less straightforward explanation for the mechanical resistance results, as they may have relations with the characteristics of the pores. Furthermore, the nanoparti‐ cles may have possible reactions with the matrix during the heat treatments.

  16. Modified cellulose nanocrystal for vitamin C delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Seyedeh Parinaz; Berry, Richard M; Tam, Kam Chiu

    2015-04-01

    Cellulose nanocrystal grafted with chitosan oligosaccharide (CNC-CSOS) was used to encapsulate vitamin C and prepare CNCS/VC complexes using tripolyphosphte via ionic complexation. The stability of vitamin C and the antioxidant activity of the CNCS/VC complexes were elucidated. The formation of the complex was confirmed using DSC and UV-vis spectrophotometry, and TEM was used to study the morphology of the complexes. The encapsulation efficiency of vitamin C at pH 3 and 5 was 71.6% ± 6.8 and 91.0 ± 1.0, respectively. Strong exothermic peaks observed in isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) studies at pH 5 could be attributed to additional electrostatic interactions between CNC-CSOS and vitamin C at pH 5. The in vitro release of vitamin C from CNCS/VC complexes showed a sustained release of up to 20 days. The vitamin C released from CNCS/VC complex displayed higher stability compared with the control vitamin C solution, and this was also confirmed from the ITC thermograms. CNC-CSOS possessed a higher scavenging activity and faster antioxidant activity compared with its precursors, i.e., oxidized CNC and CSOS and their physical mixtures. Complexing vitamin C into CNC-CSOS particles yielded a dynamic antioxidant agent, where the vitamin C is released over time and displayed sustained antioxidant properties. Therefore, CNCS/VC can potentially be used in cosmeceutical applications as topical formulations.

  17. Predicting Nanocrystal Shape through Consideration of Surface-Ligand Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Bealing, Clive R.

    2012-03-27

    Density functional calculations for the binding energy of oleic acid-based ligands on Pb-rich {100} and {111} facets of PbSe nanocrystals determine the surface energies as a function of ligand coverage. Oleic acid is expected to bind to the nanocrystal surface in the form of lead oleate. The Wulff construction predicts the thermodynamic equilibrium shape of the PbSe nanocrystals. The equilibrium shape is a function of the ligand surface coverage, which can be controlled by changing the concentration of oleic acid during synthesis. The different binding energy of the ligand on the {100} and {111} facets results in different equilibrium ligand coverages on the facets, and a transition in the equilibrium shape from octahedral to cubic is predicted when increasing the ligand concentration during synthesis. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  18. Adsorption of vitamin E on mesoporous titania nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, C.J.; Lin, C.T.; Wu, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Tri-block nonionic surfactant and titanium chloride were used as starting materials for the synthesis of mesoporous titania nanocrystallite powders. The main objective of the present study was to examine the synthesis of mesoporous titania nanocrystals and the adsorption of vitamin E on those nanocrystals using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms. When the calcination temperature was increased to 300 o C, the reflection peaks in the XRD pattern indicated the presence of an anatase phase. The crystallinity of the nanocrystallites increased from 80% to 98.6% with increasing calcination temperature from 465 o C to 500 o C. The N 2 adsorption data and XRD data taken after vitamin E adsorption revealed that the vitamin E molecules were adsorbed in the mesopores of the titania nanocrystals.

  19. Recent Developments in Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Silver Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaohu; Zeng, Jie; Zhang, Qiang; Moran, Christine H; Xia, Younan

    2012-01-01

    This feature article introduces our recent work on understanding the roles played by citrate and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) as capping agents in seed-mediated syntheses of Ag nanocrystals with controlled shapes. We have demonstrated that citrate and PVP selectively bind to Ag(111) and Ag(100) surfaces, respectively, and thus favor the formation of Ag nanocrystals enclosed preferentially by {111} or {100} facets. In addition, we have quantified the coverage density of PVP adsorbed on the surface of Ag nanocubes. Based on the mechanistic understanding, a series of Ag nanocrystals with controlled shapes and sizes have been successfully synthesized by using different combinations of seeds and capping agents: single-crystal spherical/cubic seeds with citrate for cuboctahedrons and octahedrons or with PVP for cubes and bars; and plate-like seeds with citrate for enlarged thin plates or with PVP for thickened plates.

  20. Encapsulated Silicon Nanocrystals Formed in Silica by Ion Beam Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Han Woo; Woo, Hyung Joo; Kim, Joon Kon; Kim, Gi Dong; Hong, Wan; Ji, Young Yong

    2004-01-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) emission of Si nanocrystals synthesized by 400 keV Si ion implanted in SiO 2 is studied as a function of ion dose and annealing time. The formation of nanocrystals at around 600 nm from the surface was confirmed by RBS and HRTEM, and the Si nanocrystals showed a wide and very intense PL emission at 700-900 nm. The intensity of this emission showed a typical behaviour with a fast transitory increase to reach a saturation with the annealing time, however, the red shift increased continuously because of the Ostwald ripening. The oversaturation of dose derived a decrease of PL intensity because of the diminishment of quantum confinement. A strong enhancement of PL intensity by H passivation was confirmed also, and the possible mechanism is discussed

  1. Seeded Growth Route to Noble Calcium Carbonate Nanocrystal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminul Islam

    Full Text Available A solution-phase route has been considered as the most promising route to synthesize noble nanostructures. A majority of their synthesis approaches of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 are based on either using fungi or the CO2 bubbling methods. Here, we approached the preparation of nano-precipitated calcium carbonate single crystal from salmacis sphaeroides in the presence of zwitterionic or cationic biosurfactants without external source of CO2. The calcium carbonate crystals were rhombohedron structure and regularly shaped with side dimension ranging from 33-41 nm. The high degree of morphological control of CaCO3 nanocrystals suggested that surfactants are capable of strongly interacting with the CaCO3 surface and control the nucleation and growth direction of calcium carbonate nanocrystals. Finally, the mechanism of formation of nanocrystals in light of proposed routes was also discussed.

  2. Properties of magnetically diluted nanocrystals prepared by mechanochemical route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaz, P.; Skorvanek, I.; Fabian, M.; Kovac, J.; Steinbach, F.; Feldhoff, A.; Sepelak, V.; Jiang, J.; Satka, A.; Kovac, J.

    2010-01-01

    The bulk and surface properties of magnetically diluted Cd 0.6 Mn 0.4 S nanocrystals synthesized by solid state route in a planetary mill were studied. XRD, SEM, TEM (HRTEM), low-temperature N 2 sorption, nanoparticle size distribution as well as SQUID magnetometry methods have been applied. The measurements identified the aggregates of small nanocrystals, 5-10 nm in size. The homogeneity of produced particles with well developed specific surface area (15-66 m 2 g -1 ) was documented. The transition from the paramagnetic to the spin-glass-like phase has been observed below ∼40 K. The changes in the magnetic behaviour at low temperatures seem to be correlated with the formation of the new surface area as a consequence of milling. The magnetically diluted Cd 0.6 Mn 0.4 S nanocrystals are obtained in the simple synthesis step, making the process attractive for industrial applications.

  3. Adsorption of vitamin E on mesoporous titania nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, C.J., E-mail: cjshih@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Lin, C.T.; Wu, S.M. [School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-15

    Tri-block nonionic surfactant and titanium chloride were used as starting materials for the synthesis of mesoporous titania nanocrystallite powders. The main objective of the present study was to examine the synthesis of mesoporous titania nanocrystals and the adsorption of vitamin E on those nanocrystals using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms. When the calcination temperature was increased to 300 {sup o}C, the reflection peaks in the XRD pattern indicated the presence of an anatase phase. The crystallinity of the nanocrystallites increased from 80% to 98.6% with increasing calcination temperature from 465 {sup o}C to 500 {sup o}C. The N{sub 2} adsorption data and XRD data taken after vitamin E adsorption revealed that the vitamin E molecules were adsorbed in the mesopores of the titania nanocrystals.

  4. Broadband enhancement of infrared absorption in microbolometers using Ag nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Jerome K.; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Woo Choong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Hyun, Moon Seop; Kim, Hee Yeoun; Park, Jae Hong; Lee, Won-Oh

    2015-01-01

    High performance microbolometers are widely sought for thermal imaging applications. In order to increase the performance limits of microbolometers, the responsivity of the device to broadband infrared (IR) radiation needs to be improved. In this work, we report a simple, quick, and cost-effective approach to modestly enhance the broadband IR response of the device by evaporating Ag nanocrystals onto the light entrance surface of the device. When irradiated with IR light, strong fields are built up within the gaps between adjacent Ag nanocrystals. These fields resistively generate heat in the nanocrystals and underlying substrate, which is transduced into an electrical signal via a resistive sensing element in the device. Through this method, we are able to enhance the IR absorption over a broadband spectrum and improve the responsivity of the device by ∼11%

  5. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamad, Kimberly Sue [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  6. MEGACELL: A nanocrystal model construction software for HRTEM multislice simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroppa, Daniel G.; Righetto, Ricardo D.; Montoro, Luciano A.; Ramirez, Antonio J.

    2011-01-01

    Image simulation has an invaluable importance for the accurate analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM) results, especially due to its non-linear image formation mechanism. Because the as-obtained images cannot be interpreted in a straightforward fashion, the retrieval of both qualitative and quantitative information from HRTEM micrographs requires an iterative process including the simulation of a nanocrystal model and its comparison with experimental images. However most of the available image simulation software requires atom-by-atom coordinates as input for the calculations, which can be prohibitive for large finite crystals and/or low-symmetry systems and zone axis orientations. This paper presents an open source citation-ware tool named MEGACELL, which was developed to assist on the construction of nanocrystals models. It allows the user to build nanocrystals with virtually any convex polyhedral geometry and to retrieve its atomic positions either as a plain text file or as an output compatible with EMS (Electron Microscopy Software) input protocol. In addition to the description of this tool features, some construction examples and its application for scientific studies are presented. These studies show MEGACELL as a handy tool, which allows an easier construction of complex nanocrystal models and improves the quantitative information extraction from HRTEM images. -- Highlights: → A software to support the HRTEM image simulation of nanocrystals in actual size. → MEGACELL allows the construction of complex nanocrystals models for multislice image simulation. → Some examples of improved nanocrystalline system characterization are presented, including the analysis of 3D morphology and growth behavior.

  7. Passivation effects in B doped self-assembled Si nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puthen Veettil, B.; Wu, Lingfeng; Jia, Xuguang; Lin, Ziyun; Zhang, Tian; Yang, Terry; Johnson, Craig; Conibeer, Gavin; Perez-Würfl, Ivan; McCamey, Dane

    2014-01-01

    Doping of semiconductor nanocrystals has enabled their widespread technological application in optoelectronics and micro/nano-electronics. In this work, boron-doped self-assembled silicon nanocrystal samples have been grown and characterised using Electron Spin Resonance and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The passivation effects of boron on the interface dangling bonds have been investigated. Addition of boron dopants is found to compensate the active dangling bonds at the interface, and this is confirmed by an increase in photoluminescence intensity. Further addition of dopants is found to reduce the photoluminescence intensity by decreasing the minority carrier lifetime as a result of the increased number of non-radiative processes

  8. Organic-Inorganic Composites of Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Efficient Excitonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzelturk, Burak; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2015-06-18

    Nanocomposites of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals integrated into conjugated polymers are the key to soft-material hybrid optoelectronics, combining advantages of both plastics and particles. Synergic combination of the favorable properties in the hybrids of colloidal nanocrystals and conjugated polymers offers enhanced performance and new functionalities in light-generation and light-harvesting applications, where controlling and mastering the excitonic interactions at the nanoscale are essential. In this Perspective, we highlight and critically consider the excitonic interactions in the organic-inorganic nanocomposites to achieve highly efficient exciton transfer through rational design of the nanocomposites. The use of strong excitonic interactions in optoelectronic devices can trigger efficiency breakthroughs in hybrid optoelectronics.

  9. Acceptors in ZnO nanocrystals: A reinterpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlhoff, W.; Hoffmann, A.

    2012-12-01

    In a recent article, Teklemichael et al. reported on the identification of an uncompensated acceptor in ZnO nanocrystals using infrared spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in the dark and under illumination. Most of their conclusions, interpretations, and suggestions turned out to be erroneous. The observed EPR signals were interpreted to originate from axial and nonaxial VZn-H defects. We show that the given interpretation of the EPR results is based on misinterpretations of EPR spectra arising from defects in nanocrystals. The explanation of the infrared absorption lines is in conflict with recent results of valence band ordering and valence band splitting.

  10. Processing of Polymer Nanocomposites Reinforced with Polysaccharide Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Dufresne

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous suspensions of polysaccharide (cellulose, chitin or starch nanocrystals can be prepared by acid hydrolysis of biomass. The main problem with their practical use is related to the homogeneous dispersion of these nanoparticles within a polymeric matrix. Water is the preferred processing medium. A new and interesting way for the processing of polysaccharide nanocrystals-based nanocomposites is their transformation into a co-continuous material through long chain surface chemical modification. It involves the surface chemical modification of the nanoparticles based on the use of grafting agents bearing a reactive end group and a long compatibilizing tail.

  11. Coulomb gap triptych in a periodic array of metal nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianran; Skinner, Brian; Shklovskii, B I

    2012-09-21

    The Coulomb gap in the single-particle density of states (DOS) is a universal consequence of electron-electron interaction in disordered systems with localized electron states. Here we show that in arrays of monodisperse metallic nanocrystals, there is not one but three identical adjacent Coulomb gaps, which together form a structure that we call a "Coulomb gap triptych." We calculate the DOS and the conductivity in two- and three-dimensional arrays using a computer simulation. Unlike in the conventional Coulomb glass models, in nanocrystal arrays the DOS has a fixed width in the limit of large disorder. The Coulomb gap triptych can be studied via tunneling experiments.

  12. Photogenerated Exciton Dissociation in Highly Coupled Lead Salt Nanocrystal Assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Joshua J.; Luria, Justin; Hyun, Byung-Ryool; Bartnik, Adam C.; Sun, Liangfeng; Lim, Yee-Fun; Marohn, John A.; Wise, Frank W.; Hanrath, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Internanocrystal coupling induced excitons dissociation in lead salt nanocrystal assemblies is investigated. By combining transient photoluminescence spectroscopy, grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering, and time-resolved electric force microscopy, we show that excitons can dissociate, without the aid of an external bias or chemical potential gradient, via tunneling through a potential barrier when the coupling energy is comparable to the exciton binding energy. Our results have important implications for the design of nanocrystal-based optoelectronic devices. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  13. Preparation of ZnO nanocrystals via ultrasonic irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, D.; Jiang, Jianzhong; Hansen, P. L.

    2003-01-01

    A simple and rapid process has been developed for the preparation of nanometer-sized ZnO crystals via ultrasonic irradiation, by which pure ZnO nanocrystals with an average size of 6 nm and narrow size distribution can be synthesized in a short time and without using any solvents for the precipit......A simple and rapid process has been developed for the preparation of nanometer-sized ZnO crystals via ultrasonic irradiation, by which pure ZnO nanocrystals with an average size of 6 nm and narrow size distribution can be synthesized in a short time and without using any solvents...

  14. Photoluminescence of hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prtljaga, Nikola; D'Amato, Elvira; Pitanti, Alessandro; Guider, Romain; Froner, Elena; Larcheri, Silvia; Scarpa, Marina; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Stable aqueous solutions of undecylenic-acid-grafted silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) were prepared. The time evolution of the photoluminescence properties of these hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals has been followed on different timescales (hours and days). On a short timescale (hours), Si-nc tend to agglomerate while the PL lineshape and intensity are stable. Agglomeration can be reduced by using suitable surfactants. On a long timescale (days), oxidation of Si-nc occurs even in the presence of surfactants. These two observations render Si-nc very useful as a labeling agent for biosensing.

  15. Photoluminescence of hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prtljaga, Nikola; D'Amato, Elvira; Pitanti, Alessandro; Guider, Romain; Froner, Elena; Larcheri, Silvia; Scarpa, Marina; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2011-05-01

    Stable aqueous solutions of undecylenic-acid-grafted silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) were prepared. The time evolution of the photoluminescence properties of these hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals has been followed on different timescales (hours and days). On a short timescale (hours), Si-nc tend to agglomerate while the PL lineshape and intensity are stable. Agglomeration can be reduced by using suitable surfactants. On a long timescale (days), oxidation of Si-nc occurs even in the presence of surfactants. These two observations render Si-nc very useful as a labeling agent for biosensing.

  16. Photoluminescence of hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prtljaga, Nikola; D' Amato, Elvira; Pitanti, Alessandro; Guider, Romain; Froner, Elena; Larcheri, Silvia; Scarpa, Marina; Pavesi, Lorenzo, E-mail: nikolap@science.unitn.it [Department of Physics, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy)

    2011-05-27

    Stable aqueous solutions of undecylenic-acid-grafted silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) were prepared. The time evolution of the photoluminescence properties of these hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals has been followed on different timescales (hours and days). On a short timescale (hours), Si-nc tend to agglomerate while the PL lineshape and intensity are stable. Agglomeration can be reduced by using suitable surfactants. On a long timescale (days), oxidation of Si-nc occurs even in the presence of surfactants. These two observations render Si-nc very useful as a labeling agent for biosensing.

  17. Fundamental absorption edge of NiO nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, V.I., E-mail: visokolov@imp.uran.ru [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of RAS, S. Kovalevskaya Street 18, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Druzhinin, A.V. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of RAS, S. Kovalevskaya Street 18, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kim, G.A. [Institute of Organic Synthesis Ural Branch of RAS, S. Kovalevskaya Street 20, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Gruzdev, N.B.; Yermakov, A.Ye.; Uimin, M.A.; Byzov, I.V.; Shchegoleva, N.N.; Vykhodets, V.B.; Kurennykh, T.E. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of RAS, S. Kovalevskaya Street 18, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-01

    NiO nanocrystals with the average size of 5, 10 and 25 nm were synthesized by gas-condensation method. The well-defined increase of the optical density D near the fundamental absorption edge of NiO nanocrystals in the range of 3.5–4.0 eV observed after the annealing in air is caused by the oxygen content growth. It is the direct experimental evidence of the fact that p—d charge transfer transitions form the fundamental absorption edge.

  18. Fundamental absorption edge of NiO nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, V.I.; Druzhinin, A.V.; Kim, G.A.; Gruzdev, N.B.; Yermakov, A.Ye.; Uimin, M.A.; Byzov, I.V.; Shchegoleva, N.N.; Vykhodets, V.B.; Kurennykh, T.E.

    2013-01-01

    NiO nanocrystals with the average size of 5, 10 and 25 nm were synthesized by gas-condensation method. The well-defined increase of the optical density D near the fundamental absorption edge of NiO nanocrystals in the range of 3.5–4.0 eV observed after the annealing in air is caused by the oxygen content growth. It is the direct experimental evidence of the fact that p—d charge transfer transitions form the fundamental absorption edge

  19. Elucidating the Potential Biological Impact of Cellulose Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Camarero-Espinosa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose nanocrystals exhibit an interesting combination of mechanical properties and physical characteristics, which make them potentially useful for a wide range of consumer applications. However, as the usage of these bio-based nanofibers increases, a greater understanding of human exposure addressing their potential health issues should be gained. The aim of this perspective is to highlight how knowledge obtained from studying the biological impact of other nanomaterials can provide a basis for future research strategies to deduce the possible human health risks posed by cellulose nanocrystals.

  20. Photogenerated Exciton Dissociation in Highly Coupled Lead Salt Nanocrystal Assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Joshua J.

    2010-05-12

    Internanocrystal coupling induced excitons dissociation in lead salt nanocrystal assemblies is investigated. By combining transient photoluminescence spectroscopy, grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering, and time-resolved electric force microscopy, we show that excitons can dissociate, without the aid of an external bias or chemical potential gradient, via tunneling through a potential barrier when the coupling energy is comparable to the exciton binding energy. Our results have important implications for the design of nanocrystal-based optoelectronic devices. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  1. Fabrication and Prototyping Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The Fabrication and Prototyping Lab for composite structures provides a wide variety of fabrication capabilities critical to enabling hands-on research and...

  2. Fabrication of recyclable superhydrophobic cotton fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Wook; Park, Eun Ji; Jeong, Myung-Geun; Kim, Il Hee; Seo, Hyun Ook; Kim, Ju Hwan; Kim, Kwang-Dae; Kim, Young Dok

    2017-04-01

    Commercial cotton fabric was coated with SiO2 nanoparticles wrapped with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer, and the resulting material surface showed a water contact angle greater than 160°. The superhydrophobic fabric showed resistance to water-soluble contaminants and maintained its original superhydrophobic properties with almost no alteration even after many times of absorption-washing cycles of oil. Moreover, superhydrophobic fabric can be used as a filter to separate oil from water. We demonstrated a simple method of fabrication of superhydrophobic fabric with potential interest for use in a variety of applications.

  3. Irradiation-induced doping of Bismuth Telluride Bi2Te3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rischau, Carl Willem

    2014-01-01

    Bismuth Telluride Bi 2 Te 3 has attracted enormous attention because of its thermoelectric and topological insulator properties. Regarding its bulk band structure Bi 2 Te 3 is a band insulator with an energy gap of around 150-170 meV. However, the native anti-site defects that are present in real samples always dope this band insulator and shift the chemical potential into the valence or conduction band. In this PhD, the Fermi surface of as-grown and electron irradiated p-type Bi 2 Te 3 single crystals has been investigated extensively using electrical transport experiments. For moderate hole concentrations (p ∼< 5 x 10 18 cm -3 ), it is confirmed that electrical transport can be explained by a six-valley model and the presence of strong Zeeman-splitting. At high doping levels (p≅5 x 10 18 cm -3 ), the hole concentrations determined from Hall and Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) effect differ significantly which is attributed to an impurity/defect band introduced by the anti-site defects. In this work, we show that it is possible to dope p-type Bi 2 Te 3 in a very controlled manner using electron-irradiation by performing detailed in- and ex-situ electrical transport studies on samples irradiated at room and at low temperatures with 2.5 MeV electrons. These studies show that the defects induced at both irradiation temperatures act as electron donors and can thus be used to convert the conduction from p- to n-type. The point of optimal compensation is accompanied by an increase of the low-temperature resistivity by several orders of magnitude. Irradiation at room temperature showed that both the p-type samples obtained after irradiation to intermediate doses as well as the samples in which the conduction has been converted to n-type by irradiation, still have a well defined Fermi surface as evidenced by SdH oscillations. By studying the Hall coefficient in-situ during low temperature electron irradiation, the coexistence of electron- and hole-type carriers was evidenced

  4. Dental glass ionomer cement reinforced by cellulose microfibers and cellulose nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Rafael M.; Pereira, Fabiano V.; Mota, Felipe A.P.; Watanabe, Evandro; Soares, Suelleng M.C.S.; Santos, Maria Helena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate if the addition of cellulose microfibers (CmF) or cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) would improve the mechanical properties of a commercial dental glass ionomer cement (GIC). Different amounts of CmF and CNC were previously prepared and then added to reinforce the GIC matrix while it was being manipulated. Test specimens with various concentrations of CmF or CNC in their total masses were fabricated and submitted to mechanical tests (to evaluate their compressive and diametral tensile strength, modulus, surface microhardness and wear resistance) and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The incorporation of CmF in the GIC matrix did not greatly improve the mechanical properties of GIC. However, the addition of a small amount of CNC in the GIC led to significant improvements in all of the mechanical properties evaluated: compressive strength (increased up to 110% compared with the control group), elastic modulus increased by 161%, diametral tensile strength increased by 53%, and the mass loss decreased from 10.95 to 3.87%. Because the composites presented a considerable increase in mechanical properties, the modification of the conventional GIC with CNC can represent a new and promising dental restorative material. - Highlights: • Cellulose microfibers (CmF) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) were prepared. • The CmF and CNC were incorporated in commercial dental glass ionomer cement (GIC). • Small amount of CNC improved significantly all the mechanical properties evaluated. • Modified GIC with CNC can represent a new and promising dental restorative material.

  5. Preparation and Properties of Cellulose Laurate (CL/Starch Nanocrystals Acetate (SNA Bio-nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Yuan Huang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, a series of totally novel bio-nanocomposite films from cellulose laurate (CL and starch nanocrystals acetate (SNA were fabricated, and the properties of nanocomposite films were investigated in detail. SNA was obtained by modifying starch nanocrystals (SNs produced by sulfuric acid hydrolysis of corn starch with acetic anhydride. The favorable dispersity of SNA in chloroform made it ready to convert into nanocomposite films with CL via casting/evaporation method. The transmittance, thermal behavior, mechanical properties, barrier properties and hydrophobicity of CL/SNA nanocomposite films were investigated with UV-vis spectrophotometer, simultaneous thermal analyzer (STA, universal tensile tester/dynamic thermomechanical analysis (DMA, water vapor permeation meter/oxygen permeability tester, and contact angle tester, respectively. The transmittance of nanocomposite films decreased with the increase of SNA content. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA results showed that the introduction of SNA into CL matrix did not severely decrease the thermal behavior of CL/SNA nanocomposites. Moreover, non-linear and linear mechanical analysis reflected the enhancement of SNA. At lower contents of SNA (<5.0 wt%, the values of Young’s modulus, tensile strength and the elongation at break of nanocomposite films were comparable with those of neat CL. However, with the increase of SNA, the Young’s modulus and tensile strength were improved significantly and were accompanied by the decreased elongation at break. The water vapor permeability (WVP and oxygen permeability (PO2 of CL/SNA nanocomposite films were significantly improved by the addition of SNA.

  6. Role of Absorbing Nanocrystal Cores in Soft Photonic Crystals: A Spectroscopy and SANS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, Astrid; Carl, Nico; Schweins, Ralf; Karg, Matthias

    2018-01-23

    Periodic superstructures of plasmonic nanoparticles have attracted significant interest because they can support coupled plasmonic modes, making them interesting for plasmonic lasing, metamaterials, and as light-management structures in thin-film optoelectronic devices. We have recently shown that noble metal hydrogel core-shell colloids allow for the fabrication of highly ordered 2-dimensional plasmonic lattices that show surface lattice resonances as the result of plasmonic/diffractive coupling (Volk, K.; Fitzgerald, J. P. S.; Ruckdeschel, P.; Retsch, M.; König, T. A. F.; Karg, M. Reversible Tuning of Visible Wavelength Surface Lattice Resonances in Self-Assembled Hybrid Monolayers. Adv. Optical Mater. 2017, 5, 1600971, DOI: 10.1002/adom.201600971). In the present work, we study the photonic properties and structure of 3-dimensional crystalline superstructures of gold hydrogel core-shell colloids and their pitted counterparts without gold cores. We use far-field extinction spectroscopy to investigate the optical response of these superstructures. Narrow Bragg peaks are measured, independently of the presence or absence of the gold cores. All crystals show a significant reduction in low-wavelength scattering. This leads to a significant enhancement of the plasmonic properties of the samples prepared from gold-nanoparticle-containing core-shell colloids. Plasmonic/diffractive coupling is not evident, which we mostly attribute to the relatively small size of the gold cores limiting the effective coupling strength. Small-angle neutron scattering is applied to study the crystal structure. Bragg peaks of several orders clearly assignable to an fcc arrangement of the particles are observed for all crystalline samples in a broad range of volume fractions. Our results indicate that the nanocrystal cores do not influence the overall crystallization behavior or the crystal structure. These are important prerequisites for future studies on photonic materials built from core

  7. Colloidal PbS nanocrystals integrated to Si-based photonics for applications at telecom wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humer, M.; Guider, R.; Jantsch, W.; Fromherz, T.

    2013-05-01

    In the last decade, Si based photonics has made major advances in terms of design, fabrication, and device implementation. But due to Silicon's indirect bandgap, it still remains a challenge to create efficient Si-based light emitting devices. In order to overcome this problem, an approach is to develop hybrid systems integrating light-emitting materials into Si. A promising class of materials for this purpose is the class of semiconducting nanocrystal quantum dots (NCs) that are synthesized by colloidal chemistry. As their absorption and emission wavelength depends on the dot size, which can easily be controlled during synthesis, they are extremely attractive as building blocks for nanophotonic applications. For applications in telecom wavelength, Lead chalcogenide colloidal NCs are optimum materials due to their unique optical, electronic and nonlinear properties. In this work, we experimentally demonstrate the integration of PbS nanocrystals into Si-based photonic structures like slot waveguides and ring resonators as optically pumped emitters for room temperature applications. In order to create such hybrid structures, the NCs were dissolved into polymer resists and drop cast on top of the device. Upon optical pumping, intense photoluminescence emission from the resonating modes is recorded at the output of the waveguide with transmission quality factors up to 14000. The polymer host material was investigated with respect to its ability to stabilize the NC's photoluminescence emission against degradation under ambient conditions. The waveguide-ring coupling efficiency was also investigated as function of the NCs concentrations blended into the polymer matrix. The integration of colloidal quantum dots into Silicon photonic structures as demonstrated in this work is a very versatile technique and thus opens a large range of applications utilizing the linear and nonlinear optical properties of PbS NCs at telecom wavelengths.

  8. Amperometric Immunosensor Based on a Protein A/Deposited Gold Nanocrystals Modified Electrode for Carbofuran Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Sun

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an amperometric immunosensor modified with protein A/deposited gold nanocrystals (DpAu was developed for the ultrasensitive detection of carbofuran residues. First, DpAu were electrodeposited onto the Au electrode surface to absorb protein A (PA and improve the electrode conductivity. Then PA was dropped onto the surface of DpAu film, used for binding antibody Fc fragments. Next, anti-carbofuran monoclonal antibody was immobilized on the PA modified electrode. Finally, bovine serum albumin (BSA was employed to block the possible remaining active sites avoiding any nonspecific adsorption. The fabrication procedure of the immunosensor was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and cyclic voltammetry (CV, respectively. With the excellent electroconductivity of DpAu and the PA’s oriented immobilization of antibodies, a highly efficient immuno-reaction and detection sensitivity could be achieved. The influences of the electrodeposition time of DpAu, pH of the detection solution and incubation time on the current response of the fabricated immunosensor were investigated. Under optimized conditions, the current response was proportional to the concentration of carbofuran which ranged from 1 to 100 ng/mL and 100 ng/mL to 100 μg/mL. The detection limit was 0.1924 ng/mL. The proposed carbofuran immnuosensor exhibited high specificity, reproducibility, stability and regeneration performance, which may open a new door for ultrasensitive detection of carbofuran residues in vegetables and fruits.

  9. Structural Characterization of Bimetallic Nanocrystal Electrocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, David A [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Late transition metal nanocrystals find applications in heterogeneous catalysis such as plasmon-enhanced catalysis and as electrode materials for fuel cells, a zero-emission and sustainable energy technology. Their commercial viability for automotive transportation has steadily increased in recent years, almost exclusively due to the discovery of more efficient bimetallic nanocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode. Despite improvements to catalyst design, achieving high activity while maintaining durability is essential to further enhance their performance for this and other important applications in catalysis. Electronic effects arising from the generation of metal-metal interfaces, from plasmonic metals, and from lattice distortions, can vastly improve sorption properties at catalytic surfaces, while increasing durability.[1] Multimetallic lattice-strained nanoparticles are thus an interesting opportunity for fundamental research.[2,3] A colloidal synthesis approach is demonstrated to produce AuPd alloy and Pd@Au core-shell nanoicosahedra as catalysts for electro-oxidations. The nanoparticles are characterized using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (ac-STEM) and large solid angle energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on an FEI Talos 4-detector STEM/EDS system. Figure 1 shows bright-field (BF) and high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) ac-STEM images of the alloy and core-shell nanoicosahedra together with EDS line-scans and elemental maps. These structures are unique in that the presence of twin boundaries, alloying, and core-shell morphology could create highly strained surfaces and interfaces. The shell thickness of the core-shell structures observed in HAADF-STEM images is tuned by adjusting the ratio between metal precursors (Figure 2a-f) to produce shells ranging from a few to several monolayers. Specific activity was measured in ethanol electro-oxidation to examine the effect of shell thickness on

  10. Concentric Multiple Rings by Droplet Epitaxy: Fabrication and Study of the Morphological Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaschini C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present the Molecular Beam Epitaxy fabrication of complex GaAs/AlGaAs nanostructures by Droplet Epitaxy, characterized by the presence of concentric multiple rings. We propose an innovative experimental procedure that allows the fabrication of individual portions of the structure, controlling their diameter by only changing the substrate temperature. The obtained nanocrystals show a significant anisotropy between [110] and [1–10] crystallographic directions, which can be ascribed to different activation energies for the Ga atoms migration processes.

  11. Atomic-scale modeling of cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiawa

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), the most abundant nanomaterials in nature, are recognized as one of the most promising candidates to meet the growing demand of green, bio-degradable and sustainable nanomaterials for future applications. CNCs draw significant interest due to their high axial elasticity and low density-elasticity ratio, both of which are extensively researched over the years. In spite of the great potential of CNCs as functional nanoparticles for nanocomposite materials, a fundamental understanding of CNC properties and their role in composite property enhancement is not available. In this work, CNCs are studied using molecular dynamics simulation method to predict their material' behaviors in the nanoscale. (a) Mechanical properties include tensile deformation in the elastic and plastic regions using molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics and nanoindentation methods. This allows comparisons between the methods and closer connectivity to experimental measurement techniques. The elastic moduli in the axial and transverse directions are obtained and the results are found to be in good agreement with previous research. The ultimate properties in plastic deformation are reported for the first time and failure mechanism are analyzed in details. (b) The thermal expansion of CNC crystals and films are studied. It is proposed that CNC film thermal expansion is due primarily to single crystal expansion and CNC-CNC interfacial motion. The relative contributions of inter- and intra-crystal responses to heating are explored. (c) Friction at cellulose-CNCs and diamond-CNCs interfaces is studied. The effects of sliding velocity, normal load, and relative angle between sliding surfaces are predicted. The Cellulose-CNC model is analyzed in terms of hydrogen bonding effect, and the diamond-CNC model compliments some of the discussion of the previous model. In summary, CNC's material properties and molecular models are both studied in this research, contributing to

  12. Eu-doped ZnO-HfO2 hybrid nanocrystal-embedded low-loss glass-ceramic waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Subhabrata; N, Shivakiran Bhaktha B.

    2016-03-01

    We report on the sol-gel fabrication, using a dip-coating technique, of low-loss Eu-doped 70SiO2 -(30-x) HfO2-xZnO (x = 2, 5, 7 and 10 mol%) ternary glass-ceramic planar waveguides. Transmission electron microscopy and grazing incident x-ray diffraction experiments confirm the controlled growth of hybrid nanocrystals with an average size of 3 nm-25 nm, composed of ZnO encapsulated by a thin layer of nanocrystalline HfO2, with an increase of ZnO concentration from x = 2 mol% to 10 mol% in the SiO2-HfO2 composite matrix. The effect of crystallization on the local environment of Eu ions, doped in the ZnO-HfO2 hybrid nanocrystal-embedded glass-ceramic matrix, is studied using photoluminescence spectra, wherein an intense mixed-valence state (divalent as well as trivalent) emission of Eu ions is observed. The existence of Eu2+ and Eu3+ in the SiO2-HfO2-ZnO ternary matrix is confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Importantly, the Eu{}2+,3+-doped ternary waveguides exhibit low propagation losses (0.3 ± 0.2 dB cm-1 at 632.8 nm) and optical transparency in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum, which makes ZnO-HfO2 nanocrystal-embedded SiO2-HfO2-ZnO waveguides a viable candidate for the development of on-chip, active, integrated optical devices.

  13. Charge transport in silicon nanocrystal superlattices in the terahertz regime

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Hynek; Zajac, Vít; Kužel, Petr; Malý, P.; Gutsch, S.; Hiller, D.; Zacharias, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 19 (2015), "195443-1"-"195443-10" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-12386S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * charge transport * terahertz spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  14. A fractal model for intergranular fractures in nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, C.W.; Xiong, L.Y.; Zhou, X.Z.

    1993-09-01

    A fractal model for intergranular fractures in nanocrystals is proposed to explain the dependence of fracture toughness with grain size in this range of scale. Based on positron annihilation and internal friction experimental results, we point out that the assumption of a constant grain boundary thickness in previous models is too simplified to be true. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs

  15. Exciton Recombination in Formamidinium Lead Triiodide : Nanocrystals versus Thin Films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Hong-Hua; Protesescu, Loredana; Balazs, Daniel M.; Adjokatse, Sampson; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2017-01-01

    The optical properties of the newly developed near-infrared emitting formamidinium lead triiodide (FAPbI(3)) nanocrystals (NCs) and their polycrystalline thin film counterpart are comparatively investigated by means of steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence. The excitonic emission is

  16. Luminescence in Mn-doped CdS nanocrystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    and the Mn d levels occur at two different energies, allowed us to study the PL lifetime decay behaviour of both kinds of .... seen from the XRD analysis, the size of the nanocrystals .... levels couple to the CdS electronic states and the excited.

  17. Environmental friendly InP/ZnS nanocrystals

    OpenAIRE

    Coşkun, Yasemin

    2012-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, 2012. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2012. Includes bibliographical references leaves 80-89. Semiconductor nanocrystals are nanometer scale fluorescent crystallites with tunable optical properties, which can be controlled by the material composition and particle size. They can be prepared using various synthesis techniques and find applications in many different areas ranging from...

  18. The relationship between cellulose nanocrystal dispersion and strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizheng Cao; Pablo Zavattieri; Jeffrey Youngblood; Robert Moon; Jason Weiss

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the agglomeration of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and uses ultrasonication to disperse CNCs in cement pastes in an attempt to improve strength. Rheological measurements show that when the concentration of CNCs exceeds 1.35% by volume in deionized water, agglomerates start to develop. This experimental finding is comparable to the value obtained from...

  19. A simple synthesis and characterization of CuS nanocrystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Water-soluble CuS nanocrystals and nanorods were prepared by reacting copper acetate with thioacetamide in ... potential applications in solar cells, IR detectors and lubri- cation (Mane ... ted a solventless synthesis of Cu2S nanorods, by heating copper thiolate .... 2004 Nanoparticles: Building blocks for nano- technology ...

  20. Photoluminescence studies of Li-doped Si nanocrystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimešová, Eva; Vacík, Jiří; Holý, V.; Pelant, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 14 (2013), s. 1-7 ISSN 1847-9804 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : Si nanocrystals * photoluminescence * doping * Li-ion batteries Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.949, year: 2013