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Sample records for teleost fundulus heteroclitus

  1. Functional and structural characterization of a eurytolerant calsequestrin from the intertidal teleost Fundulus heteroclitus.

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    A Carl Whittington

    Full Text Available Calsequestrins (CSQ are high capacity, medium affinity, calcium-binding proteins present in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR of cardiac and skeletal muscles. CSQ sequesters Ca²⁺ during muscle relaxation and increases the Ca²⁺-storage capacity of the SR. Mammalian CSQ has been well studied as a model of human disease, but little is known about the environmental adaptation of CSQ isoforms from poikilothermic organisms. The mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus, is an intertidal fish that experiences significant daily and seasonal environmental fluctuations and is an interesting study system for investigations of adaptation at the protein level. We determined the full-length coding sequence of a CSQ isoform from skeletal muscle of F. heteroclitus (FCSQ and characterized the function and structure of this CSQ. The dissociation constant (K(d of FCSQ is relatively insensitive to changes in temperature and pH, thus indicating that FCSQ is a eurytolerant protein. We identified and characterized a highly conserved salt bridge network in FCSQ that stabilizes the formation of front-to-front dimers, a process critical to CSQ function. The functional profile of FCSQ correlates with the natural history of F. heteroclitus suggesting that the eurytolerant function of FCSQ may be adaptive.

  2. Thermal acclimation and subspecies-specific effects on heart and brain mitochondrial performance in a eurythermal teleost (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Dillon James; Bryant, Heather J; Schulte, Patricia M

    2017-04-15

    Mitochondrial performance may play a role in setting whole-animal thermal tolerance limits and their plasticity, but the relative roles of adjustments in mitochondrial performance across different highly aerobic tissues remain poorly understood. We compared heart and brain mitochondrial responses to acute thermal challenges and to thermal acclimation using high-resolution respirometry in two locally adapted subspecies of Atlantic killifish ( Fundulus heteroclitus ). We predicted that 5°C acclimation would result in compensatory increases in mitochondrial performance, while 33°C acclimation would cause suppression of mitochondrial function to minimize the effects of high temperature on mitochondrial metabolism. In contrast, acclimation to both 33 and 5°C decreased mitochondrial performance compared with fish acclimated to 15°C. These adjustments could represent an energetic cost-saving mechanism at temperature extremes. Acclimation responses were similar in both heart and brain; however, this effect was smaller in the heart, which might indicate its importance in maintaining whole-animal thermal performance. Alternatively, larger acclimation effects in the brain might indicate greater thermal sensitivity compared with the heart. We detected only modest differences between subspecies that were dependent on the tissue assayed. These data demonstrate extensive plasticity in mitochondrial performance following thermal acclimation in killifish, and indicate that the extent of these responses differs between tissues, highlighting the importance and complexity of mitochondrial regulation in thermal acclimation in eurytherms. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Acid-base responses to feeding and intestinal Cl- uptake in freshwater- and seawater-acclimated killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, an agastric euryhaline teleost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chris M; Bucking, Carol; Grosell, Martin

    2010-08-01

    Marine teleosts generally secrete basic equivalents (HCO(3)(-)) and take up Na(+) and Cl(-) in the intestine so as to promote absorption of H(2)O. However, neither the integration of these functions with feeding nor the potential role of the gut in ionoregulation and acid-base balance in freshwater have been well studied. The euryhaline killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) is unusual in lacking both an acid-secreting stomach and a mechanism for Cl(-) uptake at the gills in freshwater. Responses to a satiation meal were evaluated in both freshwater- and seawater-acclimated killifish. In intact animals, there was no change in acid or base flux to the external water after the meal, in accord with the absence of any post-prandial alkaline tide in the blood. Indeed, freshwater animals exhibited a post-prandial metabolic acidosis ('acidic tide'), whereas seawater animals showed no change in blood acid-base status. In vitro gut sac experiments revealed a substantially higher rate of Cl(-) absorption by the intestine in freshwater killifish, which was greatest at 1-3 h after feeding. The Cl(-) concentration of the absorbate was higher in preparations from freshwater animals than from seawater killifish and increased with fasting. Surprisingly, net basic equivalent secretion rates were also much higher in preparations from freshwater animals, in accord with the 'acidic tide'; in seawater preparations, they were lowest after feeding and increased with fasting. Bafilomycin (1 micromol l(-1)) promoted an 80% increase in net base secretion rates, as well as in Cl(-) and fluid absorption, at 1-3 h post-feeding in seawater preparations only, explaining the difference between freshwater and seawater fish. Preparations from seawater animals at 1-3 h post-feeding also acidified the mucosal saline, and this effect was associated with a marked rise in P(CO(2)), which was attenuated by bafilomycin. Measurements of chyme pH from intact animals confirmed that intestinal fluid (chyme) pH and

  4. 17 beta-estradiol affects osmoregulation in Fundulus heteroclitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mancera, J.M.; Smolenaars, M.; Laiz-Carrion, R.; Rio, M. del; Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.; Flik, G.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of 17beta-estradiol (ED on osmoregulatory performance was examined in the euryhaline killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus. Fish were injected once with 1, 2 and 5 mug g(-1) E-2 and, 6 h after injection, transferred from I ppt seawater (SW) to full strength SW (40 ppt) or from SW to I ppt SW.

  5. Genetic linkage map and comparative genome analysis for the estuarine Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus)

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    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Genetic linkage maps are valuable tools in evolutionary biology; however, their availability for wild populations is extremely limited. Fundulus heteroclitus...

  6. Oogenesis in Fundulus heteroclitus. I. Preliminary observations on oocyte maturation in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, R.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN); Selman, K.

    1978-01-01

    During the breeding season, the ovary of Fundulus heteroclitus contains follicles of all sizes up to around 1.8 mm in diameter and continuously ovulates eggs (1.7 mm) into the ovarian lumen. Vitellogenic follicles appear to extend up to 1.3 mm, while those larger than 1.4 mm are undergoing hydration concomitant with maturation. If feeding ceases, vitellogenesis appears to stop and maturational stages flush out of the ovary. Refeeding causes reappearance of maturational stages. A culture procedure was developed for dissected F. heteroclitus follicles, and a size range (1.3 to 1.4 mm) was defined which responded to added hormones by undergoing the same maturational changes (germinal vesicle breakdown, fusion, and peripheral detachment of oil droplets, appearance of activability) as occurs in vivo, although the extent of hydration was not quite as extensive. Ovulation, however, did not consistently occur in vitro. Both 11-deoxycorticosterone and progesterone are potent inducers of maturation in vitro, with median effective doses being 10 to 20 ng/ml. Hydrocortisone is about one-tenth as active. Human chorionic gonadotropin promotes maturational changes in about 25% of the follicles over a broad concentration range (1 to 100 IU/ml). The environmental and hormonal mechanisms which influence oocyte maturation in teleosts are discussed in relation to our findings for F. heteroclitus.

  7. Targeted Approach to Identify Genetic Loci Associated with Evolved Dioxin Tolerance in Atlantic Killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extreme tolerance to highly toxic dioxin-like contaminants (DLCs) has evolved independently and contemporaneously in (at least) four populations of Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus). Surprisingly, the magnitude and phenotype of DLC tolerance is similar among these killi...

  8. Fundulus heteroclitus gonadotropins.5: Small scale chromatographic fractionation of pituitary extracts into components with different steroidogenic activities using homologous bioassays

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    Petrino Teresa R

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fractionation and characterization of gonadotropins (GtH from Fundulus heteroclitus pituitary extracts were carried out using a biocompatible liquid chromatographic procedure (Pharmacia FPLC system. Chromatographic fractions were monitored for gonadotropic activities (induction of oocyte maturation and steroid production using homologous follicle bioassays in vitro. Size-exclusion chromatography eluted gonadotropic activity in one major protein peak (Mr ~ 30,000. Anion-exchange and hydrophobic-interaction chromatography (HIC yielded two distinct peaks of 17beta-estradiol (E2- and 17alpha-hydroxy,20beta-dihydroprogesterone (DHP-promoting activity with associated oocyte maturation. Two-dimensional chromatography (chromatofocusing followed by HIC resolved pituitary extracts into two active fractions; both induced E2 synthesis, but one was relatively poor in eliciting DHP and testosterone production. Thus, using homologous bioassays, at least two quantitatively different gonadotropic (steroidogenic activities: an E2-promoting gonadotropin (GtH I-like and a DHP-promoting gonadotropin (GtH II-like, which has a lower isoelectric point but greater hydrophobicity than the former, can be distinguished from F. heteroclitus pituitaries by a variety of chromatographic procedures. This study complements previous biochemical and molecular data in F. heteroclitus and substantiates the duality of GtH function in a multiple-spawning teleost.

  9. Expression of aquaporin 3 in gills of the Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus): Effects of seawater acclimation

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    Jung, Dawoon; Sato, J. Denry; Shaw, Joseph R.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Estuarine fish, such as the Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus), are constantly and rapidly exposed to changes in salinity. Although ion transport in killifish gills during acclimation to increased salinity has been studied extensively, no studies have examined the role of aquaglyceroporin 3 (AQP3), a water, glycerol, urea, and ammonia transporter, during acclimation to increased salinity in this sentinel environmental model organism. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that transfer from freshwater to seawater decreases AQP3 gene and protein expression in the gill of killifish. Transfer from freshwater to seawater decreased AQP3 mRNA in the gill after 1 day, but had no effect on total gill AQP3 protein abundance as determined by western blot. Quantitative confocal immunocytochemistry confirmed western blot studies that transfer from freshwater to seawater did not change total AQP3 abundance in the gill; however, immunocytochemistry revealed that the amount of AQP3 in pillar cells of secondary lamellae decreased in seawater fish, whereas the amount of AQP3 in mitochondrion rich cells (MRC) in primary filaments of the gill increased in seawater fish. This response of AQP3 expression is unique to killifish compared to other teleosts. Although the role of AQP3 in the gill of killifish has not been completely elucidated, these results suggest that AQP3 may play an important role in the ability of killifish to acclimate to increased salinity. PMID:22193757

  10. Investigating the effect of chemical stress and resource limitation on fish populations: A case study with Fundulus heteroclitus

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    Modeling exposure and recovery of fish and wildlife populations after stressor mitigation serves as a basis for evaluating population status and remediation success. The Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) is an important and well-studied model organism for understanding t...

  11. Next-generation sequencing yields the complete mitochondrial genome of the mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus.

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    Zhu, Ting; Feng, Shaoshu; Liu, Xin; Li, Qingwei

    2017-01-01

    Fundulus heteroclitus (Actinopteri, Cyprinodontiformes, Fundulidae), with a remarkable tolerance to osmotic stress and water temperatures, are regarded as a significant evolution model. Herein, we report the assembled complete sequence of the mummichog mitochondrial genome based on the next-generation sequencing data. The mitogenome is determined to be 16 528 bp in length and shows an organization typical of vertebrate mitochondrial genomes, including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and 1 control region (D-loop). Overall GC content of the genome is 39.72%. Using Oryzias latipes as the outgroup, the phylogenetic analysis of 16 complete mitochondrial genomes from Cyprinodontiformes showed that F. heteroclitus together with other three Fundulus species form a cluster with strong bootstrap supports. The genus Fundulus is closely related to the genus Xenotoca.

  12. PAH-induced sublethal narcosis alters the bioenergetics and bioaccumulation of Fundulus heteroclitus

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    Merten, A. [NOAA Office of Response and Restoration, Hazardous Materials and Response, Seattle (United States); Beard, E.; Baker, B. [Univ. of Maryland, Solomons (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Accumulation of non-polar narcotic chemicals in organisms alters their metabolic rates and, therefore their energetic demands. Since exposure of these hydrophobic chemicals is primarily through the diet, we hypothesize that decreasing metabolic rates caused by accumulation of narcotics reduces feeding which, in turn, decreases further exposure to the narcotic. Thus, dietary exposure to and accumulation of narcotics may cause a negative feedback, reducing net bioaccumulation. The purpose of this short paper is to discuss the results of a long-term fish contaminant exposure study and to describe a fish bioenergetics model coupled to a PCBbioaccumulation model. The laboratory component consisted of exposing the estuarine fish Fundulus heteroclitus to environmentally-relevant levels of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) through their diet. We developed the model to further examine and understand the consequences of sublethal narcosis at both the individual and population levels of Fundulus heteroclitus.

  13. Annotation of the Nuclear Receptors in an Estuarine Fish species, Fundulus heteroclitus

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    William S. Baldwin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear receptors (NRs are ligand-dependent transcription factors that respond to various internal as well as external cues such as nutrients, pheromones, and steroid hormones that play crucial roles in regulation and maintenance of homeostasis and orchestrating the physiological and stress responses of an organism. We annotated the Fundulus heteroclitus (mummichog; Atlantic killifish nuclear receptors. Mummichog are a non-migratory, estuarine fish with a limited home range often used in environmental research as a field model for studying ecological and evolutionary responses to variable environmental conditions such as salinity, oxygen, temperature, pH, and toxic compounds because of their hardiness. F. heteroclitus have at least 74 NRs spanning all seven gene subfamilies. F. heteroclitus is unique in that no RXRα member was found within the genome. Interestingly, some of the NRs are highly conserved between species, while others show a higher degree of divergence such as PXR, SF1, and ARα. Fundulus like other fish species show expansion of the RAR (NR1B, Rev-erb (NR1D, ROR (NR1F, COUPTF (NR2F, ERR (NR3B, RXR (NR2B, and to a lesser extent the NGF (NR4A, and NR3C steroid receptors (GR/AR. Of particular interest is the co-expansion of opposing NRs, Reverb-ROR, and RAR/RXR-COUPTF.

  14. Fundulus as the Premier Teleost Model in Environmental Biology: Opportunities for New Insights Using Genomics

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    A strong foundation of basic and applied research documents that the estuarine fish Fundulus heteroclitus and related species are unique laboratory and field models for understanding how individuals and populations interact with their environment. In this paper we summarize an ex...

  15. Harmful Algal Bloom Toxins: c-Fos Protein Expression in the Brain of Killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus

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    2006-04-21

    Aquatic Toxicology 78 (2006) 350–357 Harmful algal bloom toxins alter c-Fos protein expression in the brain of killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus J.D...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 J.D. Salierno et al. / Aquatic Toxicology 78 (2006) 350–357 351 induction can be used as...cryoprotectant solution and stored at 20 ◦C until processed for immunocytochemistry (Watson et l., 1986). 352 J.D. Salierno et al. / Aquatic Toxicology 78 (2006

  16. Expression of CYP1C1 and CYP1A in Fundulus heteroclitus during PAH-induced carcinogenesis

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    Wang Lu [Pharmacology and Environmental Toxicology, University of Mississippi, University, MS (United States); Camus, Alvin C. [Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Dong, Wu; Thornton, Cammi [Pharmacology and Environmental Toxicology, University of Mississippi, University, MS (United States); Willett, Kristine L., E-mail: kwillett@olemiss.edu [Pharmacology and Environmental Toxicology, University of Mississippi, University, MS (United States)

    2010-09-15

    CYP1C1 is a relatively newly identified member of the cytochrome P450 family 1 in teleost fish. However, CYP1C1's expression and physiological roles relative to the more recognized CYP1A in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) induced toxicities are unclear. Fundulus heteroclitus fry were exposed at 6-8 days post-hatch (dph) and again at 13-15 dph for 6 h to dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) control, 5 mg/L benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), or 5 mg/L dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA). Fry were euthanized at 0, 6, 18, 24 and 30 h after the second exposure. In these groups, both CYP1A and CYP1C1 protein expression were induced within 6 h after the second exposure. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) results from fry revealed strongest CYP1C1 expression in renal tubular and intestinal epithelial cells. Additional fish were examined for liver lesions 8 months after initial exposure. Gross lesions were observed in 20% of the BaP and 35% of the DMBA-treated fish livers. Histopathologic findings included foci of cellular alteration and neoplasms, including hepatocellular adenoma, hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangioma. Strong CYP1A immunostaining was detected diffusely in altered cell foci and on the invading margin of hepatocelluar carcinomas. Lower CYP1A expression was seen in central regions of the neoplasms. In contrast, CYP1C1 was only detectable and highly expressed in proliferated bile duct epithelial cells. Our CYP1C1 results suggest the potential for tissue specific CYP1C1-mediated PAH metabolism but not a more chronic role in progression to liver hepatocellular carcinoma.

  17. Ryanodine receptor and FK506 binding protein 1 in the Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus): A phylogenetic and population-based comparison.

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    Holland, Erika B; Goldstone, Jared V; Pessah, Isaac N; Whitehead, Andrew; Reid, Noah M; Karchner, Sibel I; Hahn, Mark E; Nacci, Diane E; Clark, Bryan W; Stegeman, John J

    2017-11-01

    Non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (NDL PCBs) activate ryanodine receptors (RyR), microsomal Ca 2+ channels of broad significance. Teleost fish may be important models for NDL PCB neurotoxicity, and we used sequencing databases to characterize teleost RyR and FK506 binding protein 12 or 12.6kDa (genes FKBP1A; FKBP1B), which promote NDL PCB-triggered Ca 2+ dysregulation. Particular focus was placed on describing genes in the Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) genome and searching available RNA-sequencing datasets for single nucleotide variants (SNV) between PCB tolerant killifish from New Bedford Harbor (NBH) versus sensitive killifish from Scorton Creek (SC), MA. Consistent with the teleost whole genome duplication (tWGD), killifish have six RyR genes, corresponding to a and b paralogs of mammalian RyR1, 2 and 3. The presence of six RyR genes was consistent in all teleosts investigated including zebrafish. Killifish have four FKBP1; one FKBP1b and three FKBP1a named FKBP1aa, FKBP1ab, likely from the tWGD and a single gene duplicate FKBP1a3 suggested to have arisen in Atherinomorphae. The RyR and FKBP1 genes displayed tissue and developmental stage-specific mRNA expression, and the previously uncharacterized RyR3, herein named RyR3b, and all FKBP1 genes were prominent in brain. We identified a SNV in RyR3b encoding missense mutation E1458D. In NBH killifish, 57% were heterozygous and 28% were homozygous for this SNV, whereas almost all SC killifish (94%) lacked the variant (n≥39 per population). The outlined sequence differences between mammalian and teleost RyR and FKBP1 together with outlined population differences in SNV frequency may contribute to our understanding of NDL PCB neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Photoperiod-dependent negative feedback effects of thyroid hormones in Fundulus heteroclitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C.L.; Stetson, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    In Fundulus heteroclitus, an annual cycle in the response of the thyroid to ovine thyroid-stimulating hormone (oTSH) is characterized by maximal thyroxin (T4) secretion in mid-winter and minimal T4 secretion in summer. Four daily injections of oTSH, given in winter caused serum T4 to plateau at elevated levels for several days, while in summer fish similar treatment resulted in far more fluctuating titers of serum T4; maximum levels were similar in both groups. The difference in sustenance rather than magnitude of Peak T4 led to an examination of the negative feedback effects of thyroid hormones as they might relate to these seasonal changes. Radioiodine uptake by thyroid follicles served as a simple, but effective bioassay for endogenous TSH. Fish collected in summer were more sensitive to negative feedback of T3 than those collected in winter; feedback effects of T4 in the two groups were not significantly different. The effects of specific photoperiods on negative feedback sensitivity to T3 and T4 were also tested. Exposure of winter fish for one month to long days (LD 14:10) enhanced the degree of reduction of iodine uptake caused by T4 in the aquarium water (10 micrograms/100 ml). Negative feedback in short-day (LD 8:16) winter fish was not demonstrated. It is concluded that long days increase and short days diminish the negative feedback sensitivity of the hypothalamus-pituitary axis to thyroid hormones in F. heteroclitus. Such photoperiodically induced changes may act to aid in the year-round maintenance of T4 levels necessary for seasonal adaptation and survival

  19. Dietary cadmium and benzo(a)pyrene increased intestinal metallothionein expression in the fish Fundulus heteroclitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesijadi, Guritno; Rezvankhah, Saeid; Perez-Matus, Alejandro; Mitelberg, A.; Torruellas, K.; Van Veld, P. A.

    2008-10-17

    To test the effect of dietary exposure to cadmium and benzo(a)pyrene on induction of metallothionein mRNA in the Fundulus heteroclitus, fish were individually fed a pelletized gel food containing cadmium, benzo(a)pyrene, or a combination of the two over a period of seven days, then analyzed for relative levels of metallothionein mRNA in the intestine, liver, and gill using real-time RT-qPCR. An initial experiment with only cadmium exposure showed an apparent 10-fold induction in the intestine, but no induction in liver or gill. Ingestion of contaminated pellets varied in individual fish, and because it was possible to monitor individual ingestion rates with our method, individual cadmium doses were estimated from the amount of ingested cadmium. When the levels of metallothionein mRNA were related to the dose to each fish, a linear dose-response relationship was observed for the intestine, but not the other organs, which showed no induction. In a second experiment, dose was controlled by placing the entire daily cadmium dose into a single contaminated pellet that was fed first (thereby, effectively controlling the effect of variable ingestion rates), and the interaction between cadmium and benzo(a)pyrene was also investigated. The intestine was again the primary organ for metallothionein induction by cadmium, with a 20-fold increase in metallothionein mRNA over control levels. When benzo(a)pyrene was administered together with cadmium, induction of metallothionein was potentiated by the presence of benzo(a)pyrene, with the main effect seen in the intestine, where already high levels of induction by cadmium alone increased by 1.74-fold when benzo(a)pyrene was present.

  20. Morpholino Gene Knockdown in Adult Fundulus heteroclitus: Role of SGK1 in Seawater Acclimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notch, Emily G.; Shaw, Joseph R.; Coutermarsh, Bonita A.; Dzioba, Marisa; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    The Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) is an environmental sentinel organism used extensively for studies on environmental toxicants and salt (NaCl) homeostasis. Previous research in our laboratory has shown that rapid acclimation of killifish to seawater is mediated by trafficking of CFTR chloride channels from intracellular vesicles to the plasma membrane in the opercular membrane within the first hour in seawater, which enhances chloride secretion into seawater, thereby contributing to salt homeostasis. Acute transition to seawater is also marked by an increase in both mRNA and protein levels of serum glucocorticoid kinase 1 (SGK1) within 15 minutes of transfer. Although the rise in SGK1 in gill and its functional analog, the opercular membrane, after seawater transfer precedes the increase in membrane CFTR, a direct role of SGK1 in elevating membrane CFTR has not been established in vivo. To test the hypothesis that SGK1 mediates the increase in plasma membrane CFTR we designed two functionally different vivo-morpholinos to knock down SGK1 in gill, and developed and validated a vivo-morpholino knock down technique for adult killifish. Injection (intraperitoneal, IP) of the splice blocking SGK1 vivo-morpholino reduced SGK1 mRNA in the gill after transition from fresh to seawater by 66%. The IP injection of the translational blocking and splice blocking vivo-morpholinos reduced gill SGK1 protein abundance in fish transferred from fresh to seawater by 64% and 53%, respectively. Moreover, knock down of SGK1 completely eliminated the seawater induced rise in plasma membrane CFTR, demonstrating that the increase in SGK1 protein is required for the trafficking of CFTR from intracellular vesicles in mitochondrion rich cells to the plasma membrane in the gill during acclimation to seawater. This is the first report of the use of vivo-morpholinos in adult killifish and demonstrates that vivo-morpholinos are a valuable genetic tool for this environmentally

  1. Heritable oxidative phosphorylation differences in a pollutant resistant Fundulus heteroclitus population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Xiao; Crawford, Douglas L.; Nacci, Diane E.; Oleksiak, Marjorie F.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Laboratory reared fish from a highly polluted and clean reference population were compared. • Oxidative phosphorylation (e.g., State 3, enzymes, and proton LEAK) was quantified. • Laboratory reared F3 fish from polluted population displayed higher routine metabolism and complex II activity but lower complex I enzyme activity. • Enhanced OxPhos metabolism and toxicity resistance were retained in laboratory reared F3 fish from the polluted population. - Abstract: Populations can adapt to stress including recent anthropogenic pollution. Our published data suggests heritable differences in hepatocyte oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) metabolism in field-caught killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from the highly polluted Elizabeth River, VA, USA, relative to fish from a nearby, relatively unpolluted reference site in King’s Creek VA. Consistent with other studies showing that Elizabeth River killifish are resistant to some of the toxic effects of certain contaminants, OxPhos measurements in hepatocytes from field-caught King’s Creek but not field-caught Elizabeth River killifish were altered by acute benzo [a] pyrene exposures. To more definitively test whether the enhanced OxPhos metabolism and toxicity resistance are heritable, we measured OxPhos metabolism in a laboratory-reared F3 generation from the Elizabeth River population versus a laboratory-reared F1 generation from the King’s Creek population and compared these results to previous data from the field-caught fish. The F3 Elizabeth River fish compared to F1 King’s Creek fish had significantly higher State 3 respiration (routine metabolism) and complex II activity, and significantly lower complex I activity. The consistently higher routine metabolism in the F3 and field-caught Elizabeth River fish versus F1 and field-caught King’s Creek fish implies a heritable change in OxPhos function. The observation that LEAK, E-State, Complex I and Complex II were different in laboratory bred

  2. Heritable oxidative phosphorylation differences in a pollutant resistant Fundulus heteroclitus population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Xiao, E-mail: xdu@rsmas.miami.edu [Marine Biology and Ecology, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149 (United States); Crawford, Douglas L. [Marine Biology and Ecology, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149 (United States); Nacci, Diane E. [Population Ecology Branch, Atlantic Ecology Division, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 27 Tarzwell Dr., Narragansett, RI 02882 (United States); Oleksiak, Marjorie F., E-mail: moleksiak@rsmas.miami.edu [Marine Biology and Ecology, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Laboratory reared fish from a highly polluted and clean reference population were compared. • Oxidative phosphorylation (e.g., State 3, enzymes, and proton LEAK) was quantified. • Laboratory reared F3 fish from polluted population displayed higher routine metabolism and complex II activity but lower complex I enzyme activity. • Enhanced OxPhos metabolism and toxicity resistance were retained in laboratory reared F3 fish from the polluted population. - Abstract: Populations can adapt to stress including recent anthropogenic pollution. Our published data suggests heritable differences in hepatocyte oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) metabolism in field-caught killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from the highly polluted Elizabeth River, VA, USA, relative to fish from a nearby, relatively unpolluted reference site in King’s Creek VA. Consistent with other studies showing that Elizabeth River killifish are resistant to some of the toxic effects of certain contaminants, OxPhos measurements in hepatocytes from field-caught King’s Creek but not field-caught Elizabeth River killifish were altered by acute benzo [a] pyrene exposures. To more definitively test whether the enhanced OxPhos metabolism and toxicity resistance are heritable, we measured OxPhos metabolism in a laboratory-reared F3 generation from the Elizabeth River population versus a laboratory-reared F1 generation from the King’s Creek population and compared these results to previous data from the field-caught fish. The F3 Elizabeth River fish compared to F1 King’s Creek fish had significantly higher State 3 respiration (routine metabolism) and complex II activity, and significantly lower complex I activity. The consistently higher routine metabolism in the F3 and field-caught Elizabeth River fish versus F1 and field-caught King’s Creek fish implies a heritable change in OxPhos function. The observation that LEAK, E-State, Complex I and Complex II were different in laboratory bred

  3. Comparison of De Novo Transcriptome Assemblers and k-mer Strategies Using the Killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Satshil B; Zadlock, Frank J; Zhang, Ziping; Murphy, Wyatt R; Bentivegna, Carolyn S

    2016-01-01

    in this study identified the need for choosing metrics centered on user defined research goals. Based on the evaluation metrics performed, the Bridger assembly was able to construct the best assembly of the testis transcriptome in Fundulus heteroclitus.

  4. Genetic architecture of evolved tolerance to PCBs in the estuarine fish Fundulus heteroclitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Populations of Atlantic killifish (F. heteroclitus) resident to coastal estuarine habitats contaminated with halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) exhibit heritable resistance to the early life-stage toxicity associated with these compounds. Beyond our knowledge of the aryl hy...

  5. Co-selection of Mercury and Multiple Antibiotic Resistances in Bacteria Exposed to Mercury in the Fundulus heteroclitus Gut Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Nicole A; Janssen, Sarah E; Reinfelder, John R; Barkay, Tamar

    2016-12-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria is currently one of the most serious challenges to human health. To combat this problem, it is critical to understand the processes and pathways that result in the creation of antibiotic resistance gene pools in the environment. In this study, we examined the effects of mercury (Hg) exposure on the co-selection of Hg and antibiotic-resistant bacteria that colonize the gastrointestinal tract of the mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), a small, estuarine fish. We examined this connection in two experimental systems: (i) a short-term laboratory exposure study where fish were fed Hg-laced food for 15 days and (ii) an examination of environmental populations from two sites with very different levels of Hg contamination. In the lab exposure study, fish muscle tissue accumulation of Hg was proportional to food Hg concentration (R 2  = 0.99; P antibiotics was more common in Hg-resistant as compared to Hg-sensitive bacterial colonies that were isolated from fish ingesta (P antibiotic resistances. Together, our results highlight the possibility for the creation of antibiotic resistance gene pools as a result of exposure to Hg in contaminated environments.

  6. When evolution is the solution to pollution: Key principles, and lessons from rapid repeated adaptation of killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Andrew; Clark, Bryan W; Reid, Noah M; Hahn, Mark E; Nacci, Diane

    2017-09-01

    For most species, evolutionary adaptation is not expected to be sufficiently rapid to buffer the effects of human-mediated environmental changes, including environmental pollution. Here we review how key features of populations, the characteristics of environmental pollution, and the genetic architecture underlying adaptive traits, may interact to shape the likelihood of evolutionary rescue from pollution. Large populations of Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) persist in some of the most contaminated estuaries of the United States, and killifish studies have provided some of the first insights into the types of genomic changes that enable rapid evolutionary rescue from complexly degraded environments. We describe how selection by industrial pollutants and other stressors has acted on multiple populations of killifish and posit that extreme nucleotide diversity uniquely positions this species for successful evolutionary adaptation. Mechanistic studies have identified some of the genetic underpinnings of adaptation to a well-studied class of toxic pollutants; however, multiple genetic regions under selection in wild populations seem to reflect more complex responses to diverse native stressors and/or compensatory responses to primary adaptation. The discovery of these pollution-adapted killifish populations suggests that the evolutionary influence of anthropogenic stressors as selective agents occurs widely. Yet adaptation to chemical pollution in terrestrial and aquatic vertebrate wildlife may rarely be a successful "solution to pollution" because potentially adaptive phenotypes may be complex and incur fitness costs, and therefore be unlikely to evolve quickly enough, especially in species with small population sizes.

  7. Effects of a mixture of non-ortho- and mono-ortho-polychlorinated biphenyls on reproduction in Fundulus heteroclitus (Linnaeus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, D.E.; Gutjahr-Gobell, R.; Pruell, R.J.; Bergen, B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Narragansett, RI (United States); McElroy, A.E. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Marine Sciences Research Center

    1998-07-01

    To assess the effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on reproduction, female Fundulus heteroclitus were exposed to a mixture of non-ortho- and mono-ortho-PCBs, mimicking the mixture found in fish collected from New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, USA, a PCB-contaminated estuary. Exposure was by intraperitoneal injection of the mixture dissolved in corn oil. Doses of 0.76, 3.8, and 19 {micro}g PCB mixture per gram of wet weight produced liver concentrations of 2.99, 12.2, and 32.8 {micro}g non-ortho- and mono-ortho-PCBs per gram of dry liver, with dioxin toxic equivalency concentrations (TEQs) of 0.0963, 0.409, and 0.720 ng/g, respectively. Female mortality was 58%, and egg production was reduced by 77% at the highest dose, compared to controls. Food consumption declined with increasing PCB concentration, suggesting that PCBs act indirectly to reduce fecundity through an energetic effect. Pituitary gonadotropin content appeared to be suppressed at the highest dose, but the ability of ovarian follicles to produce estradiol and testosterone in vitro was not impaired. Significant residue-effects linkages were found, with TEQ emerging as a potential indicator of adverse effects. Mortality was directly related, and egg production was inversely related to log{sub 10}TEQ. Multiple regression analysis indicated that egg production was directly related to pituitary gonadotropin content and food consumption.

  8. Later life swimming performance and persistent heart damage following subteratogenic PAH mixture exposure in the Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Daniel R; Thompson, Jasmine; Chernick, Melissa; Hinton, David E; Di Giulio, Richard T

    2017-12-01

    High-level, acute exposures to individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and complex PAH mixtures result in cardiac abnormalities in developing fish embryos. Whereas acute PAH exposures can be developmentally lethal, little is known about the later life consequences of early life, lower level PAH exposures in survivors. A population of PAH-adapted Fundulus heteroclitus from the PAH-contaminated Superfund site, Atlantic Wood Industries, Elizabeth River, Portsmouth, Virginia, United States, is highly resistant to acute PAH cardiac teratogenicity. We sought to determine and characterize long-term swimming performance and cardiac histological alterations of a subteratogenic PAH mixture exposure in both reference killifish and PAH-adapted Atlantic Wood killifish embryos. Killifish from a relatively uncontaminated reference site, King's Creek, Virginia, United States, and Atlantic Wood killifish were treated with dilutions of Elizabeth River sediment extract at 24 h post fertilization (hpf). Two proven subteratogenic dilutions, 0.1 and 1.0% Elizabeth River sediment extract (total PAH 5.04 and 50.4 µg/L, respectively), were used for embryo exposures. Then, at 5-mo post hatching, killifish were subjected to a swim performance test. A separate subset of these individuals was processed for cardiac histological analysis. Unexposed King's Creek killifish significantly outperformed the unexposed Atlantic Wood killifish in swimming performance as measured by Ucrit (i.e., critical swimming speed). However, King's Creek killifish exposed to Elizabeth River sediment extract (both 0.1 and 1.0%) showed significant declines in Ucrit. Histological analysis revealed the presence of blood in the pericardium of King's Creek killifish. Although Atlantic Wood killifish showed baseline performance deficits relative to King's Creek killifish, their pericardial cavities were nearly free of blood and atrial and ventricular alterations. These findings may explain, in part, the

  9. Spatial variability of metal bioaccumulation in estuarine killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) at the Callahan Mine Superfund site, Brooksville, ME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckman, Kate L.; Bugge, Deenie M.; Chen, Celia Y.

    2013-01-01

    The former Callahan Mine Site in Brooksville, ME is an open-pit, hardrock mine site in an intertidal system, providing a unique opportunity to evaluate how metal-enriched sediments and overlying water impact estuarine food webs. Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb concentrations in sediment, whole water, and Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) were evaluated at sites in Goose Pond (the Callahan Mine Site) and at reference sites. The metal concentrations of sediment, water, and fish were spatially distinct and significantly higher at the Mine Site than in the reference estuary. Sediment concentrations were particularly elevated and were above probable effects levels (PEL) for all four metals adjacent to the tailings pile. Even in this well-mixed system, water metal concentrations were significantly elevated adjacent to the tailings pile and the concentrations of Cu and Zn were above ambient water quality criteria (AWQC) for chronic marine exposure. Neither organic matter in the sediment nor salinity or pH of the water explained the metal concentrations. Adjacent to the tailings pile, killifish body burdens were elevated and were significantly related to both sediment and aqueous concentrations. In conclusion, (1) the contaminated sediment and seepage from the tailings impoundment and waste rock pile 3 create a continual flux of metals into the water column, (2) the metals are bioavailable and are bioconcentrating as evident in the killifish tissue concentrations, and (3) Callahan Mine is directly affecting metal bioaccumulation in fauna residing in the Goose Pond estuary and, potentially, in Penobscot Bay via the ‘trophic nekton relay.’ PMID:24022459

  10. Effects of Anthropogenic Pollution on the Oxidative Phosphorylation Pathway of Hepatocytes from Natural Populations of Fundulus heteroclitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Xiao; Crawford, Douglas L.; Oleksiak, Marjorie F., E-mail: moleksiak@rsmas.miami.edu

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Fish from a highly polluted and clean reference population were compared. • Oxidative phosphorylation (e.g., State 3, enzymes, and proton LEAK) was quantified. • Polluted fish had lower LEAK, enzyme III and enzyme IV but higher enzyme I. • Exposures to PAH and PCB only affected individuals from the reference population. - Abstract: Persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), potentially target mitochondria and cause toxicity. We compared the effects of POPs on mitochondrial respiration by measuring oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) metabolism in hepatocytes isolated from lab-depurated Fundulus heteroclitus from a Superfund site contaminated with PAHs (Elizabeth River VA, USA) relative to OxPhos metabolism in individuals from a relatively clean, reference population (King’s Creek VA, USA). In individuals from the polluted Elizabeth River population, OxPhos metabolism displayed lower LEAK and lower activities in complex III, complex IV, and E State, but higher activity in complex I compared to individuals from the reference King’s Creek population. To test the supposition that these differences were due to or related to the chronic PAH contamination history of the Elizabeth River population, we compared the OxPhos functions of undosed individuals from the polluted and reference populations to individuals from these populations dosed with a PAH {benzo [α] pyrene (BaP)} or a PCB {PCB126 (3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl)}, respectively. Exposure to PAH or PCB affected OxPhos in the reference King’s Creek population but had no detectable effects on the polluted Elizabeth River population. Thus, PAH exposure significantly increased LEAK, and exposure to PCB126 significantly decreased State 3, E state and complex I activity in the reference King’s Creek population. These data strongly implicate an evolved tolerance in the Elizabeth River fish where dosed

  11. Embryonic-only arsenic exposure in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) reduces growth and alters muscle IGF levels one year later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymkowicz, Dana B; Sims, Kaleigh C; Castro, Noemi M; Bridges, William C; Bain, Lisa J

    2017-05-01

    Arsenic is a contaminant of drinking water and crops in many parts of the world. Epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic exposure is linked to decreased birth weight, weight gain, and proper skeletal muscle function. The goal of this study was to use killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) as a model to determine the long-term effects of embryonic-only arsenic exposure on muscle growth and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) pathway. Killifish embryos were exposed to 0, 50, 200 or 800ppb As III from fertilization until hatching. Juvenile fish were reared in clean water and muscle samples were collected at 16, 28, 40 and 52 weeks of age. There were significant reductions in condition factors, ranging from 12 to 17%, in the fish exposed to arsenic at 16, 28 and 40 weeks of age. However, by 52 weeks, no significant changes in condition factors were seen. Alterations in IGF-1R and IGF-1 levels were assessed as a potential mechanism by which growth was reduced. While there no changes in hepatic IGF-1 transcripts, skeletal muscle cells can also produce their own IGF-1 and/or alter IGF-1 receptor levels to help enhance growth. After a 200 and 800ppb embryonic exposure, fish grown in clean water for 16 weeks had IGF-1R transcripts that were 2.8-fold and 2-fold greater, respectively, than unexposed fish. Through 40 weeks of age, IGF1-R remained elevated in the 200ppb and 800ppb embryonic exposure groups by 1.8-3.9-fold, while at 52 weeks of age, IGF-1R levels were still significantly increased in the 800ppb exposure group. Skeletal muscle IGF-1 transcripts were also significantly increased by 1.9-5.1 fold through the 52 weeks of grow-out in clean by water in the 800ppb embryonic exposure group. Based on these results, embryonic arsenic exposure has long-term effects in that it reduces growth and increases both IGF-1 and IGF-1R levels in skeletal muscle even 1year after the exposure has ended. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Anthropogenic Pollution on the Oxidative Phosphorylation Pathway of Hepatocytes from Natural Populations of Fundulus heteroclitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Xiao; Crawford, Douglas L.; Oleksiak, Marjorie F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Fish from a highly polluted and clean reference population were compared. • Oxidative phosphorylation (e.g., State 3, enzymes, and proton LEAK) was quantified. • Polluted fish had lower LEAK, enzyme III and enzyme IV but higher enzyme I. • Exposures to PAH and PCB only affected individuals from the reference population. - Abstract: Persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), potentially target mitochondria and cause toxicity. We compared the effects of POPs on mitochondrial respiration by measuring oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) metabolism in hepatocytes isolated from lab-depurated Fundulus heteroclitus from a Superfund site contaminated with PAHs (Elizabeth River VA, USA) relative to OxPhos metabolism in individuals from a relatively clean, reference population (King’s Creek VA, USA). In individuals from the polluted Elizabeth River population, OxPhos metabolism displayed lower LEAK and lower activities in complex III, complex IV, and E State, but higher activity in complex I compared to individuals from the reference King’s Creek population. To test the supposition that these differences were due to or related to the chronic PAH contamination history of the Elizabeth River population, we compared the OxPhos functions of undosed individuals from the polluted and reference populations to individuals from these populations dosed with a PAH {benzo [α] pyrene (BaP)} or a PCB {PCB126 (3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl)}, respectively. Exposure to PAH or PCB affected OxPhos in the reference King’s Creek population but had no detectable effects on the polluted Elizabeth River population. Thus, PAH exposure significantly increased LEAK, and exposure to PCB126 significantly decreased State 3, E state and complex I activity in the reference King’s Creek population. These data strongly implicate an evolved tolerance in the Elizabeth River fish where dosed

  13. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin induces apoptotic cell death and cytochrome P4501A expression in developing Fundulus heteroclitus embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, B.H.; Bello, S.; Hahn, M.E.; Cantrell, S.; Wright, P.; Tillitt, D.E.; Di Giulio, R.T.

    2001-01-01

    Fundulus heteroclitus embryos were exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) during early development using nanoinjection or water bath exposure. TCDD caused developmental abnormalities that included hemorrhaging, loss of vascular integrity, edema, stunted development and death. The LC50 and LD50 of TCDD for Fundulus embryos were ???19.7??9.5 pg TCDD/??l (water bath) and 0.25??0.09 ng TCDD/g embryo (nanoinjection). To identify a possible cause for these developmental abnormalities we analyzed the effects of TCDD on apoptotic cell death and cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) expression in the embryos. TCDD exposure increased apoptotic cell death in several tissues including brain, eye, gill, kidney, tail, intestine, heart, and vascular tissue. CYP1A expression was also increased in the TCDD-exposed embryos predominantly in liver, kidney, gill, heart, intestine, and in vascular tissues throughout the embryo. There was co-occurrence of TCDD-induced apoptosis and CYP1A expression in some, but not all, cell types. In addition the dose response relationships for apoptosis and mortality were similar, while CYP1A expression appeared more sensitive to TCDD induction. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  14. Silver toxicity across salinity gradients: the role of dissolved silver chloride species (AgCl x ) in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) and medaka (Oryzias latipes) early life-stage toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Cole W; Bone, Audrey J; Auffan, Mélanie; Lindberg, T Ty; Arnold, Mariah C; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Wiesner, Mark R; Di Giulio, Richard T

    2016-08-01

    The influence of salinity on Ag toxicity was investigated in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) early life-stages. Embryo mortality was significantly reduced as salinity increased and Ag(+) was converted to AgCl(solid). However, as salinity continued to rise (>5 ‰), toxicity increased to a level at least as high as observed for Ag(+) in deionized water. Rather than correlating with Ag(+), Fundulus embryo toxicity was better explained (R(2) = 0.96) by total dissolved Ag (Ag(+), AgCl2 (-), AgCl3 (2-), AgCl4 (3-)). Complementary experiments were conducted with medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos to determine if this pattern was consistent among evolutionarily divergent euryhaline species. Contrary to Fundulus data, medaka toxicity data were best explained by Ag(+) concentrations (R(2) = 0.94), suggesting that differing ionoregulatory physiology may drive observed differences. Fundulus larvae were also tested, and toxicity did increase at higher salinities, but did not track predicted silver speciation. Alternatively, toxicity began to increase only at salinities above the isosmotic point, suggesting that shifts in osmoregulatory strategy at higher salinities might be an important factor. Na(+) dysregulation was confirmed as the mechanism of toxicity in Ag-exposed Fundulus larvae at both low and high salinities. While Ag uptake was highest at low salinities for both Fundulus embryos and larvae, uptake was not predictive of toxicity.

  15. Life-history patterns of the salt-marsh killifish Fundulus heteroclitus (L.) introduced in the estuary of the guadalquivir river (South West Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Delgado, C.

    1989-12-01

    Two thousand four hundred and eighty-four specimens from a population of Fundulus heteroclitus introduced into the southwestern Iberian Peninsula were used to carry out a study on age, growth and reproduction. In this new habitat the species displayed the same life-history tactics as in its original areas. The life-span was shorter, with a winter age-structure of 67·4% in 0 + group, 29·1% in 1 + group, 2·5% in 2 + group and 1·1% in 3 + group. Females showed a higher growth rate and a longer growth period than males and because of this they were always longer than males in all the age-groups. In both sexes growth stopped and the somatic condition was at a minimum from April to June, when the gonadosomatic index reached its highest values. The maximum average gonadosomatic index in females was four times higher than that of males. Specimens achieved maturity during the spawning season the year following birth at a minimum average total length of 45 mm for males and 60 mm for females. Fecundity was related to fish weight, total length and gonad weight. The overall sex ratio did not differ significantly from 1:1.

  16. Investigating the mechanisms of Ni uptake and sub-lethal toxicity in the Atlantic killifish Fundulus heteroclitus in relation to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, Tamzin A; Ransberry, Victoria E; McClelland, Grant B; Wood, Chris M

    2016-04-01

    The Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) is a resilient estuarine species that may be subjected to anthropogenic contamination of its natural habitat, by toxicants such as nickel (Ni). We investigated Ni accumulation and potential modes of Ni toxicity, in killifish, as a function of environmental salinity. Killifish were acclimated to 4 different salinities [0 freshwater (FW), 10, 30 and 100% seawater (SW)] and exposed to 5 mg/L of Ni for 96 h. Tissue Ni accumulation, whole body ions, critical swim speed and oxidative stress parameters were examined. SW was protective against Ni accumulation in the gills and kidney. Addition of Mg and Ca to FW protected against gill Ni accumulation, suggesting competition with Ni for uptake. Concentration-dependent Ni accumulation in the gill exhibited saturable relationships in both FW- and SW-acclimated fish. However SW fish displayed a lower Bmax (i.e. lower number of Ni binding sites) and a lower Km (i.e. higher affinity for Ni binding). No effect of Ni exposure was observed on critical swim speed (Ucrit) or maximum rate of oxygen consumption (MO2max). Markers of oxidative stress showed either no effect (e.g. protein carbonyl formation), or variable effects that appeared to depend more on salinity than on Ni exposure. These data indicate that the killifish is very tolerant to Ni toxicity, a characteristic that may facilitate the use of this species as a site-specific biomonitor of contaminated estuaries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evolution of tolerance to PCBs and susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen (Vibrio harveyi) in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from New Bedford (MA, USA) harbor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nacci, Diane [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Atlantic Ecology Division, Narragansett, RI (United States)], E-mail: nacci.diane@epa.gov; Huber, Marina [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Atlantic Ecology Division, Narragansett, RI (United States)], E-mail: akualtzin@yahoo.com; Champlin, Denise [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Atlantic Ecology Division, Narragansett, RI (United States)], E-mail: champlin.denise@epa.gov; Jayaraman, Saro [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Atlantic Ecology Division, Narragansett, RI (United States)], E-mail: jayaraman.saro@epa.gov; Cohen, Sarah [San Francisco State University, Department of Biology, Romberg Tiburon Center, San Francisco, CA (United States)], E-mail: sarahcoh@sfsu.edu; Gauger, Eric [University of Rhode Island, Department of Fisheries, Aquaculture, and Veterinary Sciences, Kingston, RI (United States)], E-mail: ejgauger@yahoo.com; Fong, Allison [University of Rhode Island, Department of Fisheries, Aquaculture, and Veterinary Sciences, Kingston, RI (United States)], E-mail: fonga@hawaii.edu; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta [University of Rhode Island, Department of Fisheries, Aquaculture, and Veterinary Sciences, Kingston, RI (United States)], E-mail: gomezchi@uri.edu

    2009-03-15

    A population of the non-migratory estuarine fish Fundulus heteroclitus (Atlantic killifish) resident to New Bedford (NB), Massachusetts, USA, an urban harbor highly contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), demonstrates recently evolved tolerance to some aspects of PCB toxicity. PCB toxicology, ecological theory, and some precedence supported expectations of increased susceptibility to pathogens in NB killifish. However, laboratory bacterial challenges of the marine pathogen Vibrio harveyi to wild fish throughout the reproductive season and to their mature laboratory-raised progeny demonstrated comparable survival by NB and reference killifish, and improved survival by NB males. These results are inconsistent with hypothesized trade-offs of adaptation, and suggest that evolved tolerance in NB killifish may include mechanisms that minimize the immunosuppressive effects of PCBs. Compensatory strategies of populations persisting in highly contaminated environments provide a unique perspective for understanding the long-term ecological effects of toxic chemicals. - Killifish resident to a highly PCB-contaminated estuary survive pathogenic bacterial challenges well, suggesting their tolerance to PCB immunosuppression.

  18. Evolution of tolerance to PCBs and susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen (Vibrio harveyi) in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from New Bedford (MA, USA) harbor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nacci, Diane; Huber, Marina; Champlin, Denise; Jayaraman, Saro; Cohen, Sarah; Gauger, Eric; Fong, Allison; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta

    2009-01-01

    A population of the non-migratory estuarine fish Fundulus heteroclitus (Atlantic killifish) resident to New Bedford (NB), Massachusetts, USA, an urban harbor highly contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), demonstrates recently evolved tolerance to some aspects of PCB toxicity. PCB toxicology, ecological theory, and some precedence supported expectations of increased susceptibility to pathogens in NB killifish. However, laboratory bacterial challenges of the marine pathogen Vibrio harveyi to wild fish throughout the reproductive season and to their mature laboratory-raised progeny demonstrated comparable survival by NB and reference killifish, and improved survival by NB males. These results are inconsistent with hypothesized trade-offs of adaptation, and suggest that evolved tolerance in NB killifish may include mechanisms that minimize the immunosuppressive effects of PCBs. Compensatory strategies of populations persisting in highly contaminated environments provide a unique perspective for understanding the long-term ecological effects of toxic chemicals. - Killifish resident to a highly PCB-contaminated estuary survive pathogenic bacterial challenges well, suggesting their tolerance to PCB immunosuppression

  19. The reproductive activity of Fundulus heteroclitus females from Woods Hole, Massachusetts, as compared with more southern locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, R.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN); Selman, K.

    1981-01-01

    During 1976 to 1979, inclusive, female F. heteroclitus (>4 g) were collected three to four times per week every week during May and early June, in localities around Woods Hole, Massachusetts. When these populations were immediately examined (at least ten fish per sample) it was found that >90% of the females carried oocytes in the final stages of maturation as well as ovulated eggs once offshore water temperatures rose above 11C. These observations contrast with those of other authors who found that most of the females collected from a Delaware marsh immediately before the full moon had follicles with a diameter of 1.9 mm or greater, and that a significant number also had such follicles immediately before the new moon. Between these times (particularly five to six days after full or new moon) the largest follicles in the ovary averaged only 1.3 to 1.4 mm in diameter. A second variance among observations concerns the temporal pattern for the annual cessation of egg production. This pattern has not been precisely defined for Woods Hole as well as other populations of F. heteroclitus, but it appears that in general breeding terminates around early summer at Woods Hole, whereas it continues throughout the summer at more southern locations. (JMT)

  20. Role of DNA methylation of AHR1 and AHR2 promoters in differential sensitivity to PCBs in Atlantic Killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Karchner, Sibel I.; Hahn, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) inhabiting the PCB-contaminated Superfund site in New Bedford Harbor (MA, USA) have evolved genetic resistance to the toxic effects of these compounds. They also lack induction of cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and other aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-dependent responses after exposure to AHR agonists, suggesting an overall down-regulation of the AHR signaling pathway. In this study, we hypothesized that the genetic resistance is due to altered AHR expression resulting from hypermethylation of DNA in the promoter region of AHR genes in fish inhabiting New Bedford Harbor. To test this hypothesis, we cloned and sequenced AHR1 and AHR2 promoter regions and employed bisulfite conversion-polymerase chain reaction (BS-PCR) followed by clonal analysis to compare the methylation status of CpG islands of AHR1 and AHR2 in livers of adult killifish collected from New Bedford Harbor and a reference site (Scorton Creek, MA). No significant differences in methylation profiles were observed in either AHR1 or AHR2 promoter regions between NBH and SC fish. However, hypermethylation of the AHR1 promoter correlated with low expression of transcripts in the liver in both populations. In comparison to AHR1, hepatic mRNA expression of AHR2 is high and its promoter is hypomethylated. Taken together, our results suggest that genetic resistance to contaminants in NBH fish is not due to altered methylation of AHR promoter regions, but that promoter methylation may control tissue-specific expression of AHR genes in killifish. PMID:21111492

  1. Effects of benzo[a]pyrene on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from a creosote-contaminated and reference site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Dawoon; Cho, Youngeun; Collins, Leonard B.; Swenberg, James A.; Di Giulio, Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a known genotoxicant that affects both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA (mtDNA, nDNA). Here, we examined mtDNA and nDNA damage in the Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from a highly contaminated Superfund site (Elizabeth River, VA, USA) and from a reference site (King's Creek, VA, USA) that were dosed with 10 mg/kg BaP. Using the long amplicon quantitative PCR technique, we observed similar increases in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage in King's Creek fish treated with BaP. Killifish from the Elizabeth River showed high levels of basal nDNA and mtDNA damage compared to fish from the reference site, but the level of damage induced due to BaP treatment was much lower in Elizabeth River killifish compared to King's Creek fish. Laboratory-reared offspring from both populations showed increased BaP-induced damage in mtDNA, relative to nDNA. Similar to the adult experiment, the Elizabeth River larvae had higher levels of basal DNA damage than those from the reference site, but were less impacted by BaP exposure. Measurements of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-deoxyguanine by LC-MS/MS) showed no differences among treatment groups, suggesting that the majority of DNA damage is from covalent binding of BaP metabolites to DNA. This study shows for the first time that mitochondria can be an important target of BaP toxicity in fish, indicating that BaP exposures could have important energetic consequences. Results also suggest that multi-generational exposures in the wild may lead to adaptations that dampen DNA damage arising from BaP exposure.

  2. Effects of benzo[a]pyrene on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from a creosote-contaminated and reference site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dawoon; Cho, Youngeun; Collins, Leonard B; Swenberg, James A; Di Giulio, Richard T

    2009-10-19

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a known genotoxicant that affects both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA (mtDNA, nDNA). Here, we examined mtDNA and nDNA damage in the Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from a highly contaminated Superfund site (Elizabeth River, VA, USA) and from a reference site (King's Creek, VA, USA) that were dosed with 10 mg/kg BaP. Using the long amplicon quantitative PCR technique, we observed similar increases in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage in King's Creek fish treated with BaP. Killifish from the Elizabeth River showed high levels of basal nDNA and mtDNA damage compared to fish from the reference site, but the level of damage induced due to BaP treatment was much lower in Elizabeth River killifish compared to King's Creek fish. Laboratory-reared offspring from both populations showed increased BaP-induced damage in mtDNA, relative to nDNA. Similar to the adult experiment, the Elizabeth River larvae had higher levels of basal DNA damage than those from the reference site, but were less impacted by BaP exposure. Measurements of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-deoxyguanine by LC-MS/MS) showed no differences among treatment groups, suggesting that the majority of DNA damage is from covalent binding of BaP metabolites to DNA. This study shows for the first time that mitochondria can be an important target of BaP toxicity in fish, indicating that BaP exposures could have important energetic consequences. Results also suggest that multi-generational exposures in the wild may lead to adaptations that dampen DNA damage arising from BaP exposure.

  3. Decreased vitellogenin inducibility and 17β-estradiol levels correlated with reduced egg production in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from Newark Bay, NJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugel, Sean M; White, Lori A; Cooper, Keith R

    2011-09-01

    Aquatic species inhabiting polluted estuaries are exposed to complex mixtures of xenobiotics which can alter normal reproduction. We previously reported that female Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from the highly contaminated Newark Bay, NJ (USA) exhibited an inhibition of oocyte development due to reduced vitellogenin (egg-yolk precursor) levels. Our hypothesis was that the inhibition of oocyte development in Newark Bay killifish is due to (1) deficient levels of circulating 17β-estradiol, and (2) a decreased sensitivity of the vitellogenin pathway to physiological doses of 17β-estradiol. In the first study, adult naïve killifish from Tuckerton, NJ (reference) were caged at Tuckerton and Newark Bay. After 1 month, males caged at Newark Bay exhibited inductions of hepatic vitellogenin and estrogen receptor α, which were transient and returned to basal levels after 2 months (p≤0.05). In the second study, fecundity and 17β-estradiol levels were measured in reproductively active adult females from Tuckerton and Newark Bay. Tuckerton females produced 140 eggs per female and Newark Bay females produced 11 eggs per female. Embryos from Newark Bay had 34% greater mortality and 28% less hatch, relative to Tuckerton. In addition, embryo mass and yolk-volume of Newark Bay embryos compared to Tuckerton embryos was 16% and 25% lower, respectively. Circulating 17β-estradiol levels in Newark Bay females (0.26 ng/mL) were measured to be 8-fold lower than Tuckerton females (2.25 ng/mL). In the third study, adult killifish from both sites were dosed with 17β-estradiol to assess the sensitivity of the vitellogenin pathway. At doses of 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 ng/g body weight, induction levels of circulating vitellogenin in Newark Bay males were significantly inhibited by 97, 99, 98 and 44%, respectively, compared to Tuckerton males. At doses of 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ng/g body weight, induction levels of circulating vitellogenin in Newark Bay females were inhibited

  4. The chlorinated AHR ligand 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) promotes reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during embryonic development in the killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzuaga, Xabier; Wassenberg, Deena; Giulio, Richard D.; Elskus, Adria

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to dioxin-like chemicals that activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) can result in increased cellular and tissue production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Little is known of these effects during early fish development. We used the fish model, Fundulus heteroclitus, to determine if the AHR ligand and pro-oxidant 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) can increase ROS production during killifish development, and to test a novel method for measuring ROS non-invasively in a living organism. The superoxide-sensitive fluorescent dye, dihydroethidium (DHE), was used to detect in ovo ROS production microscopically in developing killifish exposed to PCB126 or vehicle. Both in ovo CYP1A activity (ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase, EROD) and in ovo ROS were induced by PCB126. In ovo CYP1A activity was inducible by PCB126 concentrations as low as 0.003 nM, with maximal induction occurring at 0.3 nM PCB126. These PCB126 concentrations also significantly increased in ovo ROS production in embryonic liver, ROS being detectable as early as 5 days post-fertilization. These data demonstrate that the pro-oxidant and CYP1A inducer, PCB126, increases both CYP1A activity and ROS production in developing killifish embryos. The superoxide detection assay (SoDA) described in this paper provides a semi-quantitative, easily measured, early indicator of altered ROS production that can be used in conjunction with simultaneous in ovo measurements of CYP1A activity and embryo development to explore functional relationships among biochemical, physiological and developmental responses to AHR ligands.

  5. AHR-related activities in a creosote-adapted population of adult atlantic killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, two decades post-EPA superfund status at the Atlantic Wood Site, Portsmouth, VA USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdylo, Josephine V; Vogelbein, Wolfgang; Bain, Lisa J; Rice, Charles D

    2016-08-01

    Atlantic killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, are adapted to creosote-based PAHs at the US EPA Superfund site known as Atlantic Wood (AW) on the southern branch of the Elizabeth River, VA USA. Subsequent to the discovery of the AW population in the early 1990s, these fish were shown to be recalcitrant to CYP1A induction by PAHs under experimental conditions, and even to the time of this study, killifish embryos collected from the AW site are resistant to developmental deformities typically associated with exposure to PAHs in reference fish. Historically, however, 90 +% of the adult killifish at this site have proliferative hepatic lesions including cancer of varying severity. Several PAHs at this site are known to be ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). In this study, AHR-related activities in AW fish collected between 2011 and 2013 were re-examined nearly 2 decades after first discovery. This study shows that CYP1A mRNA expression is three-fold higher in intestines of AW killifish compared to a reference population. Using immunohistochemistry, CYP1A staining in intestines was uniformly positive compared to negative staining in reference fish. Livers of AW killifish were examined by IHC to show that CYP1A and AHR2 protein expression reflect lesions-specific patterns, probably representing differences in intrinsic cellular physiology of the spectrum of proliferative lesions comprising the hepatocarcinogenic process. We also found that COX2 mRNA expression levels were higher in AW fish livers compared to those in the reference population, suggesting a state of chronic inflammation. Overall, these findings suggest that adult AW fish are responsive to AHR signaling, and do express CYP1A and AHR2 proteins in intestines at a level above what was observed in the reference population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. AHR-related activities in a creosote-adapted population of adult atlantic killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, two decades post-EPA superfund status at the Atlantic Wood Site, Portsmouth, VA USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojdylo, Josephine V.; Vogelbein, Wolfgang; Bain, Lisa J.; Rice, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • AHR-related activities in creosote-adapted adult killifish were examined. • Creosote-adapted adult killifish have elevated intestine CYP1A. • Creosote-adapted adult killifish have elevated liver COX2 mRNA expression. • Most creosote-adapted adult killifish have lesions varying in severity. • Liver lesions in creosote-adapted adult killifish express CYP1A and AHR2 proteins. - Abstract: Atlantic killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, are adapted to creosote-based PAHs at the US EPA Superfund site known as Atlantic Wood (AW) on the southern branch of the Elizabeth River, VA USA. Subsequent to the discovery of the AW population in the early 1990s, these fish were shown to be recalcitrant to CYP1A induction by PAHs under experimental conditions, and even to the time of this study, killifish embryos collected from the AW site are resistant to developmental deformities typically associated with exposure to PAHs in reference fish. Historically, however, 90 +% of the adult killifish at this site have proliferative hepatic lesions including cancer of varying severity. Several PAHs at this site are known to be ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). In this study, AHR-related activities in AW fish collected between 2011 and 2013 were re-examined nearly 2 decades after first discovery. This study shows that CYP1A mRNA expression is three-fold higher in intestines of AW killifish compared to a reference population. Using immunohistochemistry, CYP1A staining in intestines was uniformly positive compared to negative staining in reference fish. Livers of AW killifish were examined by IHC to show that CYP1A and AHR2 protein expression reflect lesions-specific patterns, probably representing differences in intrinsic cellular physiology of the spectrum of proliferative lesions comprising the hepatocarcinogenic process. We also found that COX2 mRNA expression levels were higher in AW fish livers compared to those in the reference population, suggesting a

  7. AHR-related activities in a creosote-adapted population of adult atlantic killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, two decades post-EPA superfund status at the Atlantic Wood Site, Portsmouth, VA USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojdylo, Josephine V. [Department of Biological Sciences, Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Vogelbein, Wolfgang [The College of William & Mary, Gloucester Point, VA 23062 (United States); Bain, Lisa J. [Department of Biological Sciences, Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Rice, Charles D., E-mail: cdrice@clemson.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • AHR-related activities in creosote-adapted adult killifish were examined. • Creosote-adapted adult killifish have elevated intestine CYP1A. • Creosote-adapted adult killifish have elevated liver COX2 mRNA expression. • Most creosote-adapted adult killifish have lesions varying in severity. • Liver lesions in creosote-adapted adult killifish express CYP1A and AHR2 proteins. - Abstract: Atlantic killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, are adapted to creosote-based PAHs at the US EPA Superfund site known as Atlantic Wood (AW) on the southern branch of the Elizabeth River, VA USA. Subsequent to the discovery of the AW population in the early 1990s, these fish were shown to be recalcitrant to CYP1A induction by PAHs under experimental conditions, and even to the time of this study, killifish embryos collected from the AW site are resistant to developmental deformities typically associated with exposure to PAHs in reference fish. Historically, however, 90 +% of the adult killifish at this site have proliferative hepatic lesions including cancer of varying severity. Several PAHs at this site are known to be ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). In this study, AHR-related activities in AW fish collected between 2011 and 2013 were re-examined nearly 2 decades after first discovery. This study shows that CYP1A mRNA expression is three-fold higher in intestines of AW killifish compared to a reference population. Using immunohistochemistry, CYP1A staining in intestines was uniformly positive compared to negative staining in reference fish. Livers of AW killifish were examined by IHC to show that CYP1A and AHR2 protein expression reflect lesions-specific patterns, probably representing differences in intrinsic cellular physiology of the spectrum of proliferative lesions comprising the hepatocarcinogenic process. We also found that COX2 mRNA expression levels were higher in AW fish livers compared to those in the reference population, suggesting a

  8. Zinc chloride rapidly stimulates efflux transporters in renal proximal tubules of killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaremba, Alexander; Miller, David S; Fricker, Gert

    2017-11-01

    Multidrug resistance-related protein 2 (Mrp2) is an ATP-driven efflux pump at the luminal membrane in renal proximal tubules. It acts as detoxification mechanism by transporting xenobiotics and metabolic products into urine. The trace element zinc is essential for cellular growth, differentiation and survival. It modulates immune response and is used as dietary supplement. Here, we found that 0.1-10μM ZnCl 2 rapidly stimulated transport of the Mrp2 probe substrate Texas Red (TR) in isolated killifish renal proximal tubules, which provide an established model system to measure efflux transporter activity by using fluorescent probe substrates, confocal microscopy and image analysis. This stimulation was insensitive to the translation inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX), but it was quickly reversed by removing ZnCl 2 from the incubation medium. ZnCl 2 -induced transport stimulation was abolished by inhibitors and antagonists of the endothelin receptor type B (ET B )/nitric oxide synthase (NOS)/protein kinase C (PKC) pathway. Moreover, ZnCl 2 -induced effects were blocked by inhibition of PKCα using Gö6976 and PKCα inhibitor peptide C2-4. Both the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY 294002 and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin abolished ZnCl 2 -induced transport stimulation. Furthermore, the stimulating effects of ZnCl 2 were blocked by GSK650394, an inhibitor of the downstream target serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1). ZnCl 2 also stimulated transport mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and Breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp). This is the first report about zinc affecting efflux transporter activity and demonstrates that ZnCl 2 triggers a suite of signaling events to evoke a rapid stimulation of ABC transporter-mediated efflux in killifish proximal tubules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular Regulation of the Induction of Cytochrome P-450E in the Estuarine Fish Fundulus Heteroclitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    adrenocorticotropin. J. biol. Chem. 260: 5760-5767. Jones, P.B.C., D.R. Galeazzi , J.M. Fisher, and J.P. Whitlock, Jr. 1985. Control of cytochrome P...1450 gene expression by dioxin. Sci. 227: 1499-1502. Jones, P.B.C., L.K. Durrin, D.R. Galeazzi , and J.P. Whitlock, Jr. 1986. Control of cytochrome P

  10. Osmotic versus adrenergic control of ion transport by ionocytes of Fundulus heteroclitus in the cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Janet C; Mercer, Evan W; Gerber, Lucie; Robertson, George N; Marshall, William S

    2017-01-01

    In eurythermic vertebrates, acclimation to the cold may produce changes in physiological control systems. We hypothesize that relatively direct osmosensitive control will operate better than adrenergic receptor mediated control of ion transport in cold vs. warm conditions. Fish were acclimated to full strength seawater (SW) at 21°C and 5°C for four weeks, gill samples and blood were taken and opercular epithelia mounted in Ussing style chambers. Short-circuit current (I sc ) at 21°C and 5°C (measured at acclimation temperature), was significantly inhibited by the α 2 -adrenergic agonist clonidine but the ED 50 dose was significantly higher in cold conditions (93.8±16.4nM) than in warm epithelia (47.8±8.1nM) and the maximum inhibition was significantly lower in cold (-66.1±2.2%) vs. warm conditions (-85.6±1.3%), indicating lower sensitivity in the cold. β-Adrenergic responses were unchanged. Hypotonic inhibition of I sc , was higher in warm acclimated (-95%), compared to cold acclimated fish (-75%), while hypertonic stimulations were the same, indicating equal responsiveness to hyperosmotic stimuli. Plasma osmolality was significantly elevated in cold acclimated fish and, by TEM, gill ionocytes from cold acclimated fish had significantly shorter mitochondria. These data are consistent with a shift in these eurythermic animals from complex adrenergic control to relatively simple biomechanical osmotic control of ion secretion in the cold. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Mitochondrial Fitness, Gene Expression, and Hypoxic Stress in a Hybrid Population of the Killifish, Fundulus Heteroclitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The physiological link between oxygen availability and mitochondrial function is well established. However, whether or not fitness variation is associated with mitochondrial genotypes in the field remains a contested topic in evolutionary biology. In this study we draw on a popul...

  12. The effects of oil, dispersant, and emulsions on the survival and behavior of an estuarine teleost and an intertidal amphipod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, R.G.; Trivelpiece, W.; Miller, D.S.

    1982-04-01

    Killfish (Fundulus heteroclitus) and amphipods (Gammarus oceanicus) were exposed seperately to either a No. 2 fuel oil, AP dispersant, or emulsions of the two in a static system. Both species exhibited a concentration-dependent response to all three treatments. However, emulsification of oil with dispersant clearly increased its lethal effect on killfish survival, but did not cause a differential change in behavioral parameters such as schooling, chafing, substrate nipping, activity, or depth preference. Killfish exposed to conditions of thermal or osmotic stress were more sensitive to the lethal effects of emulsions. In contrast, emulsions caused quantitative changes in amphipod activity and precopulatory behavior, but did not increase mortality beyond that caused by exposure to oil alone. Changes in salinity had little effect on amphipod sensitivity to emulsions, but decreasing temperature did result in increased survival.

  13. Uptake and loss of absorbed dissolved cadmium to Clarias ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-06-16

    Jun 16, 2006 ... Res NATO Sci. Comm. Conf. 7: 187-195 London. Eisler R, Gardner GR (1973). Acute toxicology to an estuarine teleost of mistures of cadmuim, copper, and zinc salts. J. Fish. Biol. 5: 131 – 142. Eisler R (1974). Radio cadmium exchange with seawater by. Fundulus heteroclitus (L) (Pisces: Cyprinodontidae) ...

  14. RNA-Seq reveals complex genetic response to deepwater horizon oil release in Fundulus grandis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Tzintzuni I

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The release of oil resulting from the blowout of the Deepwater Horizon (DH drilling platform was one of the largest in history discharging more than 189 million gallons of oil and subject to widespread application of oil dispersants. This event impacted a wide range of ecological habitats with a complex mix of pollutants whose biological impact is still not yet fully understood. To better understand the effects on a vertebrate genome, we studied gene expression in the salt marsh minnow Fundulus grandis, which is local to the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico and is a sister species of the ecotoxicological model Fundulus heteroclitus. To assess genomic changes, we quantified mRNA expression using high throughput sequencing technologies (RNA-Seq in F. grandis populations in the marshes and estuaries impacted by DH oil release. This application of RNA-Seq to a non-model, wild, and ecologically significant organism is an important evaluation of the technology to quickly assess similar events in the future. Results Our de novo assembly of RNA-Seq data produced a large set of sequences which included many duplicates and fragments. In many cases several of these could be associated with a common reference sequence using blast to query a reference database. This reduced the set of significant genes to 1,070 down-regulated and 1,251 up-regulated genes. These genes indicate a broad and complex genomic response to DH oil exposure including the expected AHR-mediated response and CYP genes. In addition a response to hypoxic conditions and an immune response are also indicated. Several genes in the choriogenin family were down-regulated in the exposed group; a response that is consistent with AH exposure. These analyses are in agreement with oligonucleotide-based microarray analyses, and describe only a subset of significant genes with aberrant regulation in the exposed set. Conclusion RNA-Seq may be successfully applied to feral and

  15. Mitochondria in teleost spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa-Rodríguez, Patricio; Figueroa, Elías; Díaz, Rommy; Lee-Estevez, Manuel; Short, Stefania; Farías, Jorge G

    2017-05-01

    There is an extraordinary diversity of reproductive modes in teleost and this variability is related to the phylogenetic relationships and adaption to very different biotopes. As in all vertebrates, sperm is produced as the end product of the process of spermatogenesis, and regarding teleost the spermatozoa lack an acrosome in almost all species and motility is activated as a response to osmolarity and ion content of the aquatic medium where the sperm is released. In this context, mitochondria possess a fundamental role for fish spermatozoa motility and integrity, hence, fertilizing potential; they are the energy supplier that allows flagellar movement and their dysfunction could play a main role in structural and functional damage to the spermatozoa. The ATP production through oxidative phosphorylation provides not only energy for cell activities, which includes Na + /K + ATPase pump, endocytosis, protein synthesis and many other cell processes; but also produces reactive oxygen species, that under mitochondrial dysfunction causes oxidative stress. The assessment of mitochondrial function (e.g. through measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential) as well as ATP content (mostly supplied by mitochondrial respiration) can be useful as quality markers of fish spermatozoa. Also quantification of ROS and antioxidant status, strongly influenced by mitochondria, are used as complementary measurements. There is much information about sperm mitochondria and their function but studies of these aspects on fish reproduction are still required for applications in aquaculture. The real role of fish sperm mitochondria under short and long term storage and in vitro manipulation is not fully understood yet. Thus future research should focus on these matters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  16. MHC ANTIGEN-BINDING LOCUS SHOWS STRONG SIGNAL OF SELECTION AND HIGH VARIABILITY IN FUNDULUS HETEROCLITUS POPULATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The major histocompatibility system provides a unique genetic locus in vertebrates to assess genetic diversity and to look for the effects of selecti.on on the immune system. Fish population studies using MHC are fairly new, and thus far they have focused on endangered population...

  17. Exploring the effects of temperature and resource limitation on mercury bioaccumulation in Fundulus heteroclitus using dynamic energy budget modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynamic energy budget (DEB) theory provides a generalizable and broadly applicable framework to connect sublethal toxic effects on individuals to changes in population survival and growth. To explore this approach, we conducted growth and bioaccumulation studies that contribute t...

  18. Exploring the effects of temperature and resource limitation on mercury bioaccumulation, growth and energetics, and behavior in Fundulus heteroclitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquatic ecosystems are affected by changes in both temperature and resource availability. While higher temperatures may result in increased food consumption and increased mercury (Hg) accumulation, they may also increase growth and reduce Hg tissue concentration through somatic d...

  19. Control of Cl- transport in the operculum epithelium of Fundulus heteroclitus: long- and short-term salinity adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, E K; Hoffmann, E; Lang, F

    2002-01-01

    kinase A (PKA) inhibitors H-89 and KT 5720 had no effect after mannitol addition whereas isoproterenol stimulation was completely blocked by H-89. This indicates that PKA is involved in the activation of the apical Cl(-) channel via c-AMP whereas the shrinkage activation of the Na(+), K(+), 2Cl......(-) cotransporter is independent of PKA activation. The steady-state Cl(-) secretion was stimulated by an inhibitor of serine/threonine phosphatases of the PP-1 and PP-2A type and inhibited by a PKC inhibitor but not by a PKA inhibitor. Thus, it seems to be determined by continuous phosphorylation...... and dephosphorylation involving PKC but not PKA. The steady-state Cl(-) secretion and the maximal obtainable Cl(-) secretion were measured in freshwater-adapted fish and in fish retransferred to saltwater. No I(SC) could be measured in freshwater-adapted fish or in the fish within the first 18 h after transfer...

  20. Control of Cl-transport in the operculum epithelium of Fundulus heteroclitus : long- and short-term salinity adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, E.K.; Hoffmann, Erik; Lang, F.

    2002-01-01

    of the Na+, K+, 2CL(-) cotransporter is cell shrinkage. The protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor chelerythrine and the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7 had strong inhibitory effects on the mannitol activation of I-SC, thus both MLCK and PKC are involved. The two specific protein kinase A (PKA......) inhibitors H-89 and KT 5720 had no effect after mannitol addition whereas isoproterenol stimulation was completely blocked by H-89. This indicates that PKA is involved in the activation of the apical Cl- channel via c-AMP whereas the shrinkage activation of the Na+, K+, 2Cl(-) cotransporter is independent...... of PKA activation. The steady-state Cl- secretion was stimulated by an inhibitor of serine/threonine phosphatases of the PP-1 and PP-2A type and inhibited by a PKC inhibitor but not by a PKA inhibitor. Thus, it seems to be determined by continuous phosphorylation and dephosphorylation involving PKC...

  1. FISH (FUNDULUS HETEROCLITUS) POPULATIONS WITH DIFFERENT EXPOSURE HISTORIES DIFFER IN TOLERANCE OF CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS. (R826593)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. When evolution is the solution to pollution: Key principles, and lessons from rapid repeated adaptation of killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    For most species, evolutionary adaptation is not expected to be sufficiently rapid to buffer the effects of human-mediated environmental changes. Yet large persistent populations of small bodied fish residing in some of the most contaminated estuaries of the US have provided some...

  3. MHC and Evolution in Teleosts

    OpenAIRE

    Grimholt, Unni

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are key players in initiating immune responses towards invading pathogens. Both MHC class I and class II genes are present in teleosts, and, using phylogenetic clustering, sequences from both classes have been classified into various lineages. The polymorphic and classical MHC class I and class II gene sequences belong to the U and A lineages, respectively. The remaining class I and class II lineages contain nonclassical gene sequences that, de...

  4. Teleost Chemokines and Their Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Bird

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a superfamily of cytokines that appeared about 650 million years ago, at the emergence of vertebrates, and are responsible for regulating cell migration under both inflammatory and physiological conditions. The first teleost chemokine gene was reported in rainbow trout in 1998. Since then, numerous chemokine genes have been identified in diverse fish species evidencing the great differences that exist among fish and mammalian chemokines, and within the different fish species, as a consequence of extensive intrachromosomal gene duplications and different infectious experiences. Subsequently, it has only been possible to establish clear homologies with mammalian chemokines in the case of some chemokines with well-conserved homeostatic roles, whereas the functionality of other chemokine genes will have to be independently addressed in each species. Despite this, functional studies have only been undertaken for a few of these chemokine genes. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of chemokine biology in teleost fish. We have mainly focused on those species for which more research efforts have been made in this subject, specially zebrafish (Danio rerio, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, outlining which genes have been identified thus far, highlighting the most important aspects of their expression regulation and addressing any known aspects of their biological role in immunity. Finally, we summarise what is known about the chemokine receptors in teleosts and provide some analysis using recently available data to help characterise them more clearly.

  5. Ionoregulatory Aspects of the Osmorespiratory Compromise during Acute Environmental Hypoxia in 12 Tropical and Temperate Teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Lisa M; Val, Adalberto Luis; Almeida-Val, Vera F; Wood, Chris M

    2015-01-01

    In the traditional osmorespiratory compromise, as seen in the hypoxia-intolerant freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), the branchial modifications that occur to improve O2 uptake during hypoxia result in unfavorable increases in the fluxes of ions and water. However, at least one hypoxia-tolerant freshwater species, the Amazonian oscar (Astronotus ocellatus), shows exactly the opposite: decreased branchial flux rates of ions, water, and nitrogenous wastes during acute hypoxia. In order to find out whether the two strategies were widespread, we used a standard 2-h normoxia, 2-h hypoxia (20%-30% saturation), 2-h normoxic recovery protocol to survey 10 other phylogenetically diverse tropical and temperate species. Unidirectional influx and efflux rates of Na(+) and net flux rates of K(+), ammonia, and urea-N were measured. The flux reduction strategy was seen only in one additional species, the Amazonian tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum), which is similarly hypoxia tolerant and lives in the same ion-poor waters as the oscar. However, five other species exhibited evidence of the increased flux rates typical of the traditional osmorespiratory compromise in the trout: the rosaceu tetra (Hyphessobrycon bentosi rosaceus), the moenkhausia tetra (Moenkhausia diktyota), the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), the zebra fish (Danio rerio), and the goldfish (Carassius auratus). Four other species exhibited no marked flux changes during hypoxia: the cardinal tetra (Paracheirodon axelrodi), the hemigrammus tetra (Hemigrammus rhodostomus), the pumpkinseed sunfish (Lepomis gibbosus), and the Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus). Overall, a diversity of strategies exist; we speculate that these may be linked to differences in habitat and/or lifestyle.

  6. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Salinas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT, skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT, the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT. Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT+ B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture.

  7. Antifreeze proteins of teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, G L; Hew, C L; Davies, P L

    2001-01-01

    Marine teleosts at high latitudes can encounter ice-laden seawater that is approximately 1 degrees C colder than the colligative freezing point of their body fluids. They avoid freezing by producing small antifreeze proteins (AFPs) that adsorb to ice and halt its growth, thereby producing an additional non-colligative lowering of the freezing point. AFPs are typically secreted by the liver into the blood. Recently, however, it has become clear that AFP isoforms are produced in the epidermis (skin, scales, fin, and gills) and may serve as a first line of defense against ice propagation into the fish. The basis for the adsorption of AFPs to ice is something of a mystery and is complicated by the extreme structural diversity of the five antifreeze types. Despite the recent acquisition of several AFP three-dimensional structures and the definition of their ice-binding sites by mutagenesis, no common ice-binding motif or even theme is apparent except that surface-surface complementarity is important for binding. The remarkable diversity of antifreeze types and their seemingly haphazard phylogenetic distribution suggest that these proteins might have evolved recently in response to sea level glaciation occurring just 1-2 million years ago in the northern hemisphere and 10-30 million years ago around Antarctica. Not surprisingly, the expression of AFP genes from different origins can also be quite dissimilar. The most intensively studied system is that of the winter flounder, which has a built-in annual cycle of antifreeze expression controlled by growth hormone (GH) release from the pituitary in tune with seasonal cues. The signal transduction pathway, transcription factors, and promoter elements involved in this process are just beginning to be characterized.

  8. Nitric oxide inhibition of NaCl secretion in the opercular epithelium of seawater-acclimated killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerber, Lucie; Jensen, Frank B; Madsen, Steffen S

    2016-01-01

    ) supressed the NO-mediated decrease in Isc, and confirmed that the effect observed was elicited by release of NO. The effect of SNAP on Isc was abolished by inhibitors of the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), ODQ (10-6 mol l-1) and methylene blue (MB; 10-4 mol l-1), revealing NO signalling via the s...

  9. Development of a dynamic energy budget modeling approach to investigate the effects of temperature and resource limitation on mercury bioaccumulation in Fundulus heteroclitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynamic energy budget (DEB) theory provides a generalizable and broadly applicable framework to connect sublethal toxic effects on individuals to changes in population survival and growth. To explore this approach, we are developing growth and bioaccumulation studies that contrib...

  10. Development of a dynamic energy budget modeling approach to investigate the effects of temperature and resource limitation on mercury bioaccumulation in Fundulus heteroclitus-presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynamic energy budget (DEB) theory provides a generalizable and broadly applicable framework to connect sublethal toxic effects on individuals to changes in population survival and growth. To explore this approach, we are conducting growth and bioaccumulation studies that contrib...

  11. MOLECULAR CLONING OF CYP1A FROM THE ESTUARINE FISH FUNDULUS HETEROCLITUS AND PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF CYP1A GENES: UPDATE WITH NEW SEQUENCES. (R827102)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  12. Regulation of pregnane-X-receptor, CYP3A and P-glycoprotein genes in the PCB-resistant killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) population from New Bedford Harbor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gräns, Johanna; Wassmur, Britt; Fernández-Santoscoy, María [Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 463, SE 405 30 Gothenburg (Sweden); Zanette, Juliano; Woodin, Bruce R.; Karchner, Sibel I. [Biology Department, MS #32, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Nacci, Diane E.; Champlin, Denise; Jayaraman, Saro [Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Atlantic Ecology Division, United States Environmental Protection Agency, 27 Tarzwell Drive, Narragansett, RI 02882 (United States); Hahn, Mark E.; Stegeman, John J. [Biology Department, MS #32, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Celander, Malin C., E-mail: malin.celander@gu.se [Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 463, SE 405 30 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Basal levels of PXR and Pgp mRNA are lower in liver of fish from NBH than from SC. • Hepatic PXR, CYP3A and Pgp mRNA levels are induced by PCB in fish from NBH. • Both non-dioxin-like and dioxin-like PCBs induce PXR, CYP3A and Pgp in NBH fish. • Branchial PXR and CYP3A mRNA levels are induced by PCB 126 in fish from SC. • There is possible cross-talk between AhR and PXR signaling in killifish. - Abstract: Killifish survive and reproduce in the New Bedford Harbor (NBH) in Massachusetts (MA), USA, a site severely contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) for decades. Levels of 22 different PCB congeners were analyzed in liver from killifish collected in 2008. Concentrations of dioxin-like PCBs in liver of NBH killifish were ∼400 times higher, and the levels of non-dioxin-like PCBs ∼3000 times higher than in killifish from a reference site, Scorton Creek (SC), MA. The NBH killifish are known to be resistant to the toxicity of dioxin-like compounds and to have a reduced aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling response. Little is known about the responses of these fish to non-dioxin-like PCBs, which are at extraordinarily high levels in NBH fish. In mammals, some non-dioxin-like PCB congeners act through nuclear receptor 1I2, the pregnane-X-receptor (PXR). To explore this pathway in killifish, a PXR cDNA was sequenced and its molecular phylogenetic relationship to other vertebrate PXRs was determined. Killifish were also collected in 2009 from NBH and SC, and after four months in the laboratory they were injected with a single dose of either the dioxin-like PCB 126 (an AhR agonist) or the non-dioxin-like PCB 153 (a mammalian PXR agonist). Gills and liver were sampled three days after injection and transcript levels of genes encoding PXR, cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A), P-glycoprotein (Pgp), AhR2 and cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) were measured by quantitative PCR. As expected, there was little effect of PCB exposure on mRNA expression of AhR2 or CYP1A in liver and gills of NBH fish. In NBH fish, but not in SC fish, there was increased mRNA expression of hepatic PXR, CYP3A and Pgp upon exposure to either of the two PCB congeners. However, basal PXR and Pgp mRNA levels in liver of NBH fish were significantly lower than in SC fish. A different pattern was seen in gills, where there were no differences in basal mRNA expression of these genes between the two populations. In SC fish, but not in NBH fish, there was increased mRNA expression of branchial PXR and CYP3A upon exposure to PCB126 and of CYP3A upon exposure to PCB153. The results suggest a difference between the two populations in non-AhR transcription factor signaling in liver and gills, and that this could involve killifish PXR. It also implies possible cross-regulatory interactions between that factor (presumably PXR) and AhR2 in liver of these fish.

  13. The taxonomic placement of three fossil Fundulus species and the timing of divergence within the North American topminnows (Teleostei: Fundulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghedotti, Michael J; Davis, Matthew P

    2017-04-10

    The fossils species †Fundulus detillae, †F. lariversi, and †F. nevadensis from localities in the western United States are represented by well-preserved material with date estimations. We combined morphological data for these fossil taxa with morphological and DNA-sequence data to conduct a phylogenetic analysis and a tip-based divergence-time estimation for the family Fundulidae. The resultant phylogeny is largely concordant with the prior total-evidence phylogeny. The fossil species do not form a monophyletic group, and do not represent a discrete western radiation of Fundulus as previously proposed. The genus Fundulus diverged into subgeneric clades likely in the Eocene or Oligocene (mean age 34.6 mya, 53-23 mya), and all subgeneric and most species-group clades had evolved by the middle Miocene. †Fundulus lariversi is a member of subgenus Fundulus in which all extant species are found only in eastern North America, demonstrating that fundulids had a complicated biogeographic history. We confirmed †Fundulus detillae as a member of the subgenus Plancterus. †F. nevadensis is not classified in a subgenus but likely is related to the subgenera Plancterus and Wileyichthys.

  14. Current knowledge of nocardiosis in teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, S; Yoshida, T; Wang, P-C; Chen, S-C

    2018-03-01

    Nocardia sp. is the causative agent of nocardiosis, a lethal granulomatous disease of the skin, muscle, and various inner tissues affecting various teleost and shellfish. Four species of Nocardia have been isolated from diseased fish and shellfish, namely Nocardia asteroides, Nocardia seriolae, Nocardia salmonicida and Nocardia crassostreae. Therefore, in fish aquaculture, nocardiosis has caused severe economic losses, especially in the Asian region. Considerable research has been performed, since the first report of identified Nocardia sp. in fish, to characterize Nocardia sp. and identify rapid detection techniques, immune response against infection and prophylactic approaches. In this review, the current state of knowledge about nocardiosis in fish has been presented, including the pathogenesis, diagnosis, host immune response and vaccine development. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Lack of plasma kallikrein-kinin system cascade in teleosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marty Kwok-Shing Wong

    Full Text Available The kallikrein-kinin system (KKS consists of two major cascades in mammals: "plasma KKS" consisting of high molecular-weight (HMW kininogen (KNG, plasma kallikrein (KLKB1, and bradykinin (BK; and "tissue KKS" consisting of low molecular-weight (LMW KNG, tissue kallikreins (KLKs, and [Lys(0]-BK. Some components of the KKS have been identified in the fishes, but systematic analyses have not been performed, thus this study aims to define the KKS components in teleosts and pave a way for future physiological and evolutionary studies. Through a combination of genomics, molecular, and biochemical methods, we showed that the entire plasma KKS cascade is absent in teleosts. Instead of two KNGs as found in mammals, a single molecular weight KNG was found in various teleosts, which is homologous to the mammalian LMW KNG. Results of molecular phylogenetic and synteny analyses indicated that the all current teleost genomes lack KLKB1, and its unique protein structure, four apple domains and one trypsin domain, could not be identified in any genome or nucleotide databases. We identified some KLK-like proteins in teleost genomes by synteny and conserved domain analyses, which could be the orthologs of tetrapod KLKs. A radioimmunoassay system was established to measure the teleost BK and we found that [Arg(0]-BK is the major circulating form instead of BK, which supports that the teleost KKS is similar to the mammalian tissue KKS. Coincidently, coelacanths are the earliest vertebrate that possess both HMW KNG and KLKB1, which implies that the plasma KKS could have evolved in the early lobe-finned fish and descended to the tetrapod lineage. The co-evolution of HMW KNG and KLKB1 in lobe-finned fish and early tetrapods may mark the emergence of the plasma KKS and a contact activation system in blood coagulation, while teleosts may have retained a single KKS cascade.

  16. Epigenetics in teleost fish: From molecular mechanisms to physiological phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Carol; Ikert, Heather; Kostyniuk, Daniel J; Craig, Paul M; Navarro-Martin, Laia; Marandel, Lucie; Mennigen, Jan A

    2018-01-31

    While the field of epigenetics is increasingly recognized to contribute to the emergence of phenotypes in mammalian research models across different developmental and generational timescales, the comparative biology of epigenetics in the large and physiologically diverse vertebrate infraclass of teleost fish remains comparatively understudied. The cypriniform zebrafish and the salmoniform rainbow trout and Atlantic salmon represent two especially important teleost orders, because they offer the unique possibility to comparatively investigate the role of epigenetic regulation in 3R and 4R duplicated genomes. In addition to their sequenced genomes, these teleost species are well-characterized model species for development and physiology, and therefore allow for an investigation of the role of epigenetic modifications in the emergence of physiological phenotypes during an organism's lifespan and in subsequent generations. This review aims firstly to describe the evolution of the repertoire of genes involved in key molecular epigenetic pathways including histone modifications, DNA methylation and microRNAs in zebrafish, rainbow trout, and Atlantic salmon, and secondly, to discuss recent advances in research highlighting a role for molecular epigenetics in shaping physiological phenotypes in these and other teleost models. Finally, by discussing themes and current limitations of the emerging field of teleost epigenetics from both theoretical and technical points of view, we will highlight future research needs and discuss how epigenetics will not only help address basic research questions in comparative teleost physiology, but also inform translational research including aquaculture, aquatic toxicology, and human disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The odorant receptor repertoire of teleost fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alioto Tyler S

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vertebrate odorant receptors comprise three types of G protein-coupled receptors: the OR, V1R and V2R receptors. The OR superfamily contains over 1,000 genes in some mammalian species, representing the largest gene superfamily in the mammalian genome. Results To facilitate an informed analysis of OR gene phylogeny, we identified the complete set of 143 OR genes in the zebrafish genome, as well as the OR repertoires in two pufferfish species, fugu (44 genes and tetraodon (42 genes. Although the genomes analyzed here contain fewer genes than in mammalian species, the teleost OR genes can be grouped into a larger number of major clades, representing greater overall OR diversity in the fish. Conclusion Based on the phylogeny of fish and mammalian repertoires, we propose a model for OR gene evolution in which different ancestral OR genes or gene families were selectively lost or expanded in different vertebrate lineages. In addition, our calculations of the ratios of non-synonymous to synonymous codon substitutions among more recently expanding OR subgroups in zebrafish implicate residues that may be involved in odorant binding.

  18. The role of aquaporins in the kidney of euryhaline teleosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Morten Buch; Madsen, Steffen S

    2011-01-01

    WATER BALANCE IN TELEOST FISH IS MAINTAINED WITH CONTRIBUTIONS FROM THE MAJOR OSMOREGULATORY ORGANS: intestine, gills, and kidney. Overall water fluxes have been studied in all of these organs but not until recently has it become possible to approach the mechanisms of water transport at the molec......WATER BALANCE IN TELEOST FISH IS MAINTAINED WITH CONTRIBUTIONS FROM THE MAJOR OSMOREGULATORY ORGANS: intestine, gills, and kidney. Overall water fluxes have been studied in all of these organs but not until recently has it become possible to approach the mechanisms of water transport...... at the molecular level. This mini-review addresses the role of the kidney in osmoregulation with special emphasis on euryhaline teleosts. After a short review of current knowledge of renal functional morphology and regulation, we turn the focus to recent molecular investigations of the role of aquaporins in water...... and solute transport in the teleost kidney. We conclude that there is much to be achieved in understanding water transport and its regulation in the teleost kidney and that effort should be put into systematic mapping of aquaporins to their tubular as well as cellular localization....

  19. Small teleost fish provide new insights into human skeletal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, P E; Harris, M P; Huysseune, A; Winkler, C

    2017-01-01

    Small teleost fish such as zebrafish and medaka are increasingly studied as models for human skeletal diseases. Efficient new genome editing tools combined with advances in the analysis of skeletal phenotypes provide new insights into fundamental processes of skeletal development. The skeleton among vertebrates is a highly conserved organ system, but teleost fish and mammals have evolved unique traits or have lost particular skeletal elements in each lineage. Several unique features of the skeleton relate to the extremely small size of early fish embryos and the small size of adult fish used as models. A detailed analysis of the plethora of interesting skeletal phenotypes in zebrafish and medaka pushes available skeletal imaging techniques to their respective limits and promotes the development of new imaging techniques. Impressive numbers of zebrafish and medaka mutants with interesting skeletal phenotypes have been characterized, complemented by transgenic zebrafish and medaka lines. The advent of efficient genome editing tools, such as TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9, allows to introduce targeted deficiencies in genes of model teleosts to generate skeletal phenotypes that resemble human skeletal diseases. This review will also discuss other attractive aspects of the teleost skeleton. This includes the capacity for lifelong tooth replacement and for the regeneration of dermal skeletal elements, such as scales and fin rays, which further increases the value of zebrafish and medaka models for skeletal research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Embryonic adaptations and nutrition in the viviparous teleost Clinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the process of research in Holland during the war. No. 11,. Amsterdam. CORNISH, D.A. 1983. Reproductive biology and viviparity in the teleost Clinus dorsalis. (Perciformes: Clinidae). M.Sc. dissertation. Zoology Department, University of Stellenbosch. DEP:f;CHE, J. 1973. Infrastructure superficielle de la vesicule vitellaire.

  1. Recruitment and growth patterns of juvenile marine teleosts caught ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recruitment is, in general, brought about by the arrival of larvae/juveniles in the plankton, followed by the selection of suitable habitats (Luckhurst &. Luckhurst 1977; Russell, Anderson & Talbot 1977; Sale. 1980). Few data are available on recruitment patterns of teleosts in South African waters. Wallace (1975) gives a brief ...

  2. First report of metacestodes of Cyclustera ralli (Underwood and Dronen, 1986) (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea) from the fish intermediate host, Fundulus heteroclitus (Linnaeus, 1766) (Cyprinodontiformes: Fundulidae) from Virginia, U.S.A

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Scholz, Tomáš; Harris, C. E.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 1 (2006), s. 130-133 ISSN 1525-2647 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/04/0342; GA MŠk LC522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : metacestodes * fish * morphology Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 0.659, year: 2006

  3. Oocyte surface in four teleost fish species postspawning and fertilization

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzo,Elizete; Moura,Thais F.C.; Sato,Yoshimi; Bazzoli,Nilo

    1998-01-01

    Cytological and cytochemical studies were carried out to investigate the surface characteristics of oocytes of four teleost species from the São Francisco river. The fishes were submitted to hypophysation at the Três Marias Hybrobiology and Fishculture Station, Minas Gerais, Brazil, in January 1996. Postspawning, oocytes of the curimatãs Prochilodus affinis, Prochilodus marggravii and dourado Salminus brasiliensis were surrounded by a thick, three-layered zona pellucida with radial striae. Th...

  4. Calcium uptake in the skin of a freshwater teleost.

    OpenAIRE

    McCormick, S D; Hasegawa, S; Hirano, T

    1992-01-01

    The skin, particularly the opercular membrane of some teleosts, contains mitochondrion-rich "chloride" cells and has been widely used as a model to study branchial salt-extrusion mechanisms in seawater fish. Skin isolated from the operculum of the freshwater Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) can transport Ca2+ against an ionic and electrical gradient. Adaptation of Nile tilapia to a low-Ca2+ environment increased the capacity of the opercular membrane to transport Ca2+. The density of mito...

  5. Evolutionary history of the ABCB2 genomic region in teleosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palti, Y.; Rodriguez, M.F.; Gahr, S.A.; Hansen, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Gene duplication, silencing and translocation have all been implicated in shaping the unique genomic architecture of the teleost MH regions. Previously, we demonstrated that trout possess five unlinked regions encoding MH genes. One of these regions harbors ABCB2 which in all other vertebrate classes is found in the MHC class II region. In this study, we sequenced a BAC contig for the trout ABCB2 region. Analysis of this region revealed the presence of genes homologous to those located in the human class II (ABCB2, BRD2, ??DAA), extended class II (RGL2, PHF1, SYGP1) and class III (PBX2, Notch-L) regions. The organization and syntenic relationships of this region were then compared to similar regions in humans, Tetraodon and zebrafish to learn more about the evolutionary history of this region. Our analysis indicates that this region was generated during the teleost-specific duplication event while also providing insight about potential MH paralogous regions in teleosts. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. miRNAs associated with immune response in teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Rune; Høyheim, Bjørn

    2017-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as important post transcriptional regulators of gene expression. In higher vertebrates, a subset of miRNAs has been identified as important regulators of a number of key genes in immune system gene networks, and this paper review recent studies on miRNAs associated with immune response in teleost fish. Challenge studies conducted in several species have identified differently expressed miRNAs associated with viral or bacterial infection. The results from these studies point out several miRNAs that are likely to have evolutionary conserved functions that are related to immune response in teleost fish. Changed expression levels of mature miRNAs from the five miRNA genes miRNA-462, miRNA-731, miRNA-146, miRNA-181 and miRNA-223 are observed following viral as well as bacterial infection in several teleost fish. Furthermore, significant changes in expression of mature miRNAs from the five genes miRNA-21, miRNA-155, miRNA-1388, miRNA-99 and miRNA-100 are observed in multiple studies of virus infected fish while changes in expression of mature miRNA from the three genes miRNA-122, miRNA-192 and miRNA-451 are observed in several studies of fish with bacterial infections. Interestingly, some of these genes are not present in higher vertebrates. The function of the evolutionary conserved miRNAs responding to infection depends on the target gene(s) they regulate. A few target genes have been identified while a large number of target genes have been predicted by in silico analysis. The results suggest that many of the targets are genes from the host's immune response gene networks. We propose a model with expected temporal changes in miRNA expression if they target immune response activators/effector genes or immune response inhibitors, respectively. The best way to understand the function of a miRNA is to identify its target gene(s), but as the amount of genome resources for teleost fish is limited, with less well characterized genomes

  7. Removal of Lead from Synthetic Solutions by Protonated Teleosts Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aqeel Ashraf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead is considered as a general protoplasmic poison which is cumulative and slow acting. It is used in different industrial processes. Its contamination in water may cause serious environmental problems. So removal of lead from environment is very necessary. For its removal the most suitable and cheapest process is biosorption. It is a process of passive metal binding by biomass. The biosorbent used in this study is teleosts biomass (fish scales collected from local market. The purpose of this study is to search the effect of acid treatment on biosorbent and to optimize conditions for the uptake capacity of biosorbent. The optimal conditions for the Pb2+ biosorption capacity of teleosts biomass (fish scales as waste of white meat was investigated. For this purposes, the biomass was subjected to chemical treatments with mono, di and tri-protic acids such as hydrochloric acid, sulphuric acid and phosphoric acid. Among the treatment methods used, the highest Pb2+ uptake was obtained with hydrochloric acid treatment of biomass. The effect of pH, biomass granular size, biomass concentration and initial Pb2+ ion concentration was studied. The highest Pb2+ removal (65.39% was obtained at pH 4.0 for 50 mg L−1 initial lead ion concentration with biomass granular size 80 micron and concentration of 0.05 g. The uptake was 75.70 mg g−1. The equilibrium data were analyzed using the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The characteristic parameters for each isotherm were determined. Both the isotherms provided the best correlation for Pb2+ on to the biomass. These results showed that teleosts biomass (fish scales is a potential biomass to remove Pb2+ ions from synthetic solutions so also with lead contaminated water. These values can be compared with those observed for other biosorbents and it is considerably higher than the value obtained with the majority of the biosorbent.

  8. A phylogenetic perspective on the evolution of Mediterranean teleost fishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine N Meynard

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean Sea is a highly diverse, highly studied, and highly impacted biogeographic region, yet no phylogenetic reconstruction of fish diversity in this area has been published to date. Here, we infer the timing and geographic origins of Mediterranean teleost species diversity using nucleotide sequences collected from GenBank. We assembled a DNA supermatrix composed of four mitochondrial genes (12S ribosomal DNA, 16S ribosomal DNA, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and cytochrome b and two nuclear genes (rhodopsin and recombination activating gene I, including 62% of Mediterranean teleost species plus 9 outgroups. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic and dating analyses were calibrated using 20 fossil constraints. An additional 124 species were grafted onto the chronogram according to their taxonomic affinity, checking for the effects of taxonomic coverage in subsequent diversification analyses. We then interpreted the time-line of teleost diversification in light of Mediterranean historical biogeography, distinguishing non-endemic natives, endemics and exotic species. Results show that the major Mediterranean orders are of Cretaceous origin, specifically ~100-80 Mya, and most Perciformes families originated 80-50 Mya. Two important clade origin events were detected. The first at 100-80 Mya, affected native and exotic species, and reflects a global diversification period at a time when the Mediterranean Sea did not yet exist. The second occurred during the last 50 Mya, and is noticeable among endemic and native species, but not among exotic species. This period corresponds to isolation of the Mediterranean from Indo-Pacific waters before the Messinian salinity crisis. The Mediterranean fish fauna illustrates well the assembly of regional faunas through origination and immigration, where dispersal and isolation have shaped the emergence of a biodiversity hotspot.

  9. PIXE analysis of otoliths from several species of teleost fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Nobuaki; Sakamoto, Wataru; Maeda, Kuniko.

    1994-01-01

    In-air PIXE was used to analyze trace elements in otoliths from several species of teleost fish in order to examine the correlation between the trace elements concentrations and environmental conditions. Mn, Fe, Zn and Sr were detected accurately in the order of ppm by using the in-air PIXE. It seemed that concentrations of Sr and Zn in red sea bream otoliths increased in proportion to higher seawater temperature. In addition, there were significant differences in trace element composition between that of reared red sea bream and rockfish and that of wild ones. Preliminary results indicate that the PIXE is a powerful technique to investigate fish otoliths. (author)

  10. Parasite manipulation of brain monoamines in California killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis) by the trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J.C.; Korzan, W.J.; Carpenter, R.E.; Kuris, A.M.; Lafferty, K.D.; Summers, C.H.; Overli, O.

    2009-01-01

    California killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis) infected with the brain-encysting trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis display conspicuous swimming behaviours rendering them more susceptible to predation by avian final hosts. Heavily infected killifish grow and reproduce normally, despite having thousands of cysts inside their braincases. This suggests that E. californiensis affects only specific locomotory behaviours. We hypothesised that changes in the serotonin and dopamine metabolism, essential for controlling locomotion and arousal may underlie this behaviour modification. We employed micropunch dissection and HPLC to analyse monoamine and monoamine metabolite concentrations in the brain regions of uninfected and experimentally infected fish. The parasites exerted density-dependent changes in monoaminergic activity distinct from those exhibited by fish subjected to stress. Specifically, E. californiensis inhibited a normally occurring, stress-induced elevation of serotonergic metabolism in the raphae nuclei. This effect was particularly evident in the experimentally infected fish, whose low-density infections were concentrated on the brainstem. Furthermore, high E. californiensis density was associated with increased dopaminergic activity in the hypothalamus and decreased serotonergic activity in the hippocampus. In conclusion, the altered monoaminergic metabolism may explain behavioural differences leading to increased predation of the infected killifish by their final host predators. ?? 2008 The Royal Society.

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides as Mediators of Innate Immunity in Teleosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A. Katzenback

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have been identified throughout the metazoa suggesting their evolutionarily conserved nature and their presence in teleosts is no exception. AMPs are short (18–46 amino acids, usually cationic, amphipathic peptides. While AMPs are diverse in amino acid sequence, with no two AMPs being identical, they collectively appear to have conserved functions in the innate immunity of animals towards the pathogens they encounter in their environment. Fish AMPs are upregulated in response to pathogens and appear to have direct broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity towards both human and fish pathogens. However, an emerging role for AMPs as immunomodulatory molecules has become apparent—the ability of AMPs to activate the innate immune system sheds light onto the multifaceted capacity of these small peptides to combat pathogens through direct and indirect means. Herein, this review focuses on the role of teleost AMPs as modulators of the innate immune system and their regulation in response to pathogens or other exogenous molecules. The capacity to regulate AMP expression by exogenous factors may prove useful in modulating AMP expression in fish to prevent disease, particularly in aquaculture settings where crowded conditions and environmental stress pre-dispose these fish to infection.

  12. Oocyte surface in four teleost fish species postspawning and fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizete Rizzo

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytological and cytochemical studies were carried out to investigate the surface characteristics of oocytes of four teleost species from the São Francisco river. The fishes were submitted to hypophysation at the Três Marias Hybrobiology and Fishculture Station, Minas Gerais, Brazil, in January 1996. Postspawning, oocytes of the curimatãs Prochilodus affinis, Prochilodus marggravii and dourado Salminus brasiliensis were surrounded by a thick, three-layered zona pellucida with radial striae. The surface of spawned oocytes of the surubim, Pseudoplatystoma coruscans, was comprised of mucous coat located externally to a thin, two-layered and striated zona pellucida. Oocyte activation during fertilization, lead to cortical reaction, formation of a perivitelline space, reduction of the thickness of the zona pellucida and increase in the oocyte diameter in the four species. Following fertilization, many spermatozoa were embedded in the mucous coat of the surubim oocytes. During embryogenesis, this later coating became thicker, diffuse and less viscous while the zona pellucida (chorion was thinner in all studied species. Cytochemical analyses indicated species-specific differences in the oocyte surface after spawning. It was suggested that the mucous coat of surubim oocytes play a functional role during fertilization. The knowledge of the morphology of the oocyte surface of teleost is important for our understanding of the interactions between their eggs and surrounding environment and may also contribute significantly to phylogenetic studies.

  13. Phagocytosis in Teleosts. Implications of the New Cells Involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Ángeles Esteban

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Phagocytosis is the process by which cells engulf some solid particles to form internal vesicles known as phagosomes. Phagocytosis is in fact a specific form of endocytosis involving the vesicular interiorization of particles. Phagocytosis is essentially a defensive reaction against infection and invasion of the body by foreign substances and, in the immune system, phagocytosis is a major mechanism used to remove pathogens and/or cell debris. For these reasons, phagocytosis in vertebrates has been recognized as a critical component of the innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogens. Furthermore, more recent studies have revealed that phagocytosis is also crucial for tissue homeostasis and remodeling. Professional phagocytes in teleosts are monocyte/macrophages, granulocytes and dendritic cells. Nevertheless, in recent years phagocytic properties have also been attributed to teleost lymphocytes and thrombocytes. The possible implications of such cells on this important biological process, new factors affecting phagocytosis, evasion of phagocytosis or new forms of phagocytosis will be considered and discussed.

  14. "Brain sex differentiation" in teleosts: Emerging concepts with potential biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumaran, Balasubramanian; Sudhakumari, Cheni-Chery; Mamta, Sajwan-Khatri; Raghuveer, Kavarthapu; Swapna, Immani; Murugananthkumar, Raju

    2015-09-01

    "Brain sex differentiation" in teleosts is a contentious topic of research as most of the earlier reports tend to suggest that gonadal sex differentiation drives brain sex differentiation. However, identification of sex-specific marker genes in the developing brain of teleosts signifies brain-gonadal interaction during early sexual development in lower vertebrates. In this context, the influence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-gonadotropin (GTH) axis on gonadal sex differentiation, if any requires in depth analysis. Presence of seabream (sb) GnRH immunoreactivity (ir-) in the brain of XY Nile tilapia was found as early as 5days post hatch (dph) followed by qualitative reduction in the preoptic area-hypothalamus region. In contrast, in the XX female brain a steady ir- of sbGnRH was evident from 15dph. Earlier studies using sea bass already implied the importance of hypothalamic gonadotropic axis completion during sex differentiation period. Such biphasic pattern of localization was also seen in pituitary GTHs using heterologous antisera in tilapia. However, more recent analysis in the same species could not detect any sexually dimorphic pattern using homologous antisera for pituitary GTHs. Detailed studies on the development of hypothalamo-hypophyseal-gonadal axis in teleosts focusing on hypothalamic monoamines (MA) and MA-related enzymes demonstrated sex-specific differential expression of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) in the early stages of developing male and female brains of tilapia and catfish. The changes in Tph expression was in agreement with the levels of serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxytryptophan in the preoptic area-hypothalamus. Considering the stimulatory influence of 5-HT on GnRH and GTH release, it is possible to propose a network association between these correlates during early development, which may bring about brain sex dimorphism in males. A recent study from our laboratory during female brain sex development demonstrated high expression of

  15. Ecology of the brain trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis and its host, the California Killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J.C.; Hechinger, R.F.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, Armand M.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the distribution and abundance of the brain-encysting trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis and its second intermediate host, the California killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis), in 3 estuaries in southern California and Baja California. We quantified the density of fish and metacercariae at 13–14 sites per estuary and dissected 375 killifish. Density (numbers and biomass) was examined at 3 spatial scales, i.e., small replicate sites, habitats, and entire estuaries. At those same scales, factors that might influence metacercaria prevalence, abundance, and aggregation in host individuals and populations were also examined. Metacercaria prevalence was 94–100% among the estuaries. Most fish were infected with 100s to 1,000s of E. californiensis metacercariae, with mean abundance generally increasing with host size. Although body condition of fish did not vary among sites or estuaries, the abundance of metacercariae varied significantly among sites, habitats, estuaries, and substantially with host size and gender. Metacercariae were modestly aggregated in killifish (k > 1), with aggregation decreasing in larger hosts. Across the 3 estuaries, the total populations of killifish ranged from 9,000–12,000 individuals/ha and from 7–43 kg/ha. The component populations of E. californiensis metacercariae ranged from 78–200 million individuals/ha and from 0.1–0.3 kg/ha. Biomass of E. californiensis metacercariae constituted 0.5–1.7% of the killifish biomass in the estuaries. Our findings, in conjunction with previously documented effects of E. californiensis, suggest a strong influence of this parasite on the size, distribution, biomass, and abundance of its killifish host.

  16. Combined Effects of Deepwater Horizon Crude Oil and Environmental Stressors on Fundulus grandis Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Maria L; Jones, Elizabeth R; Klinkhamer, Christopher; Mahapatra, Cecon T; Serafin, Jennifer; Bosker, Thijs; Perkins, Christopher; Griffitt, Robert J; De Guise, Sylvain; Sepúlveda, Maria S

    2018-04-16

    In this study, we examined how sensitivity to oil changes in combination with environmental stressors in Fundulus grandis embryos. We exposed embryos (< 24 hours post fertilization) to a range of High Energy Water Accommodated Fraction (HEWAF) concentrations (0-50 ppb total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) made from Macondo oil in conjunction with various environmental conditions (temperature: 20, 30°C; salinity: 3, 7, 30 practical salinity units (PSU); DO: 2, 6 mg/L). Endpoints included mortality, hatching rates, and expression of cytochrome p450 1a and 1c (cyp1a, cyp1c) in hatched larvae. There was 100% mortality for all fish under the 2 ppm dissolved oxygen (DO) regimes. For the 6 mg/L DO treatments, mortality and mean lethal time were generally higher in the 30°C treatments versus the 20°C treatments. Oil increased mortality in fish exposed to the highest concentration in the 20-3-6 (°C-PSU-mg/L), 25-7-6, and 30-30-6 conditions. Hatching was driven by environmental conditions, with oil exposure only having a significant impact on hatching in the 25-7-6 and 30-30-6 groups at the highest HEWAF exposure. Expression of cyp1a was upregulated in most treatment groups versus the controls, with cyp1c expression exhibiting a similar pattern. These data suggest interactive effects among temperature, salinity, and PAHs, highlighting a need to further assess the effects of oil exposure under various environmental conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Phylogenetic consistencies among chondrichthyan and teleost fishes in their bioaccumulation of multiple trace elements from seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffree, Ross A., E-mail: R.Jeffree@iaea.org [IAEA Marine Environment Laboratories, 4, Quai Antoine 1er, MC 98000 (Monaco); Oberhansli, Francois; Teyssie, Jean-Louis [IAEA Marine Environment Laboratories, 4, Quai Antoine 1er, MC 98000 (Monaco)

    2010-07-15

    Multi-tracer experiments determined the accumulation from seawater of selected radioactive trace elements (Mn-54, Co-60, Zn-65, Cs-134, Am-241, Cd-109, Ag-110m, Se-75 and Cr-51) by three teleost and three chondrichthyan fish species to test the hypothesis that these phylogenetic groups have different bioaccumulation characteristics, based on previously established contrasts between the carcharhiniform chondrichthyan Scyliorhinus canicula (dogfish) and the pleuronectiform teleost Psetta maxima (turbot). Discriminant function analysis on whole body: water concentration factors (CFs) separated dogfish and turbot in two independent experiments. Classification functions grouped the perciform teleosts, seabream (Sparus aurata) and seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax), with turbot and grouped the chondrichthyans, undulate ray (Raja undulata; Rajiformes) and spotted torpedo (Torpedo marmorata; Torpediniformes), with dogfish, thus supporting our hypothesis. Hierarchical classificatory, multi-dimensional scaling and similarity analyses based on the CFs for the nine radiotracers, also separated all three teleosts (that aggregated lower in the hierarchy) from the three chondrichthyan species. The three chondrichthyans were also more diverse amongst themselves compared to the three teleosts. Particular trace elements that were more important in separating teleosts and chondrichthyans were Cs-134 that was elevated in teleosts and Zn-65 that was elevated in chondrichthyans, these differences being due to their differential rates of uptake rather than loss. Chondrichthyans were also higher in Cr-51, Co-60, Ag-110m and Am-241, whereas teleosts were higher only in Mn-54. These contrasts in bioaccumulation patterns between teleosts and chondrichthyans are interpreted in the context of both proximate causes of underlying differences in physiology and anatomy, as well as the ultimate cause of their evolutionary divergence over more than 500 million years before present (MyBP). Our results

  18. The immunoglobulin gene loci in the teleost Gasterosteus aculeatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yonghua; Wang, Tao; Guo, Yongchen; Zhao, Zhihui; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we have annotated both the immunoglobulin heavy (IgH) and light (IgL) chain genes in the stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), based on the recently released genome data. The IgH gene locus is arranged in a configuration of (V(n)-D-J-C(zeta)-D(3)-J(4)-C(mu)-C(delta))(3)-V(6)-D-J-C(zeta), which is structurally different from any of the known teleost IgH loci. The mu genes consistently exhibit a 4-CH encoding structure and all the zeta genes encode only three CH domains (lacking the equivalent exon of the zebrafish zetaCH2). As in many other teleosts, the stickleback delta genes contain multiple CH exons, but exist as three copies. The members of four V(H) gene families, containing 47 segments, were interspersed in the germline. The stickleback IgL chain genes are also organized in multiple clusters and located in three chromosomes (10, 11, and 15). Sequence and phylogenetic analyses revealed that two isotypes, L1 (kappa, including two subgroups, 1A and 1B) and L2 (sigma) could be identified. The transcriptional orientations of the V(L) segments were found to be either the same (only in L2 isotype) or opposite to (in L1A, 1B and 2 isotypes) those of the J(L) and C(L) segments, indicating that these segments would undergo rearrangement by deletion or inversion when expressed. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evolution of space dependent growth in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya D Gallo

    Full Text Available The relationship between growth rate and environmental space is an unresolved issue in teleosts. While it is known from aquaculture studies that stocking density has a negative relationship to growth, the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated, primarily because the growth rate of populations rather than individual fish were the subject of all previous studies. Here we investigate this problem in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus, which consists of a sighted surface-dwelling form (surface fish and several blind cave-dwelling (cavefish forms. Surface fish and cavefish are distinguished by living in spatially contrasting environments and therefore are excellent models to study the effects of environmental size on growth. Multiple controlled growth experiments with individual fish raised in confined or unconfined spaces showed that environmental size has a major impact on growth rate in surface fish, a trait we have termed space dependent growth (SDG. In contrast, SDG has regressed to different degrees in the Pachón and Tinaja populations of cavefish. Mating experiments between surface and Pachón cavefish show that SDG is inherited as a dominant trait and is controlled by multiple genetic factors. Despite its regression in blind cavefish, SDG is not affected when sighted surface fish are raised in darkness, indicating that vision is not required to perceive and react to environmental space. Analysis of plasma cortisol levels showed that an elevation above basal levels occurred soon after surface fish were exposed to confined space. This initial cortisol peak was absent in Pachón cavefish, suggesting that the effects of confined space on growth may be mediated partly through a stress response. We conclude that Astyanax reacts to confined spaces by exhibiting SDG, which has a genetic component and shows evolutionary regression during adaptation of cavefish to confined environments.

  20. The Genetic Basis for Evolved Tolerance to Dioxin-Like Compounds in Wild Atlantic Killifish: More Than the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Populations of Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) resident to some US urban estuaries have independently evolved extreme and inherited tolerance to toxic dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). To further understand the genetic basis for this trait, we densely genotyped families o...

  1. Genetic basis for evolved tolerance to dioxin-like pollutants in wild Atlantic killifish: more than the aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) resident to some US urban and industrialized estuaries demonstrate recently evolved and extreme tolerance to toxic dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Here we provide an unusually comprehensive accounting (69%) through Quantitative Trait Locu...

  2. Under Pressure: Interactions between Commensal Microbiota and the Teleost Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecelia Kelly

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Commensal microorganisms inhabit every mucosal surface of teleost fish. At these surfaces, microorganisms directly and indirectly shape the teleost immune system. This review provides a comprehensive overview of how the microbiota and microbiota-derived products influence both the mucosal and systemic immune system of fish. The cross talk between the microbiota and the teleost immune system shifts significantly under stress or disease scenarios rendering commensals into opportunists or pathogens. Lessons learnt from germ-free fish models as well as from oral administration of live probiotics to fish highlight the vast impact that microbiota have on immune development, antibody production, mucosal homeostasis, and resistance to stress. Future studies should dissect the specific mechanisms by which different members of the fish microbiota and the metabolites they produce interact with pathogens, with other commensals, and with the teleost immune system.

  3. A rich diversity of opercle bone shape among teleost fishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles B Kimmel

    Full Text Available The opercle is a prominent craniofacial bone supporting the gill cover in all bony fish and has been the subject of morphological, developmental, and genetic investigation. We surveyed the shapes of this bone among 110 families spanning the teleost tree and examined its pattern of occupancy in a principal component-based morphospace. Contrasting with expectations from the literature that suggest the local morphospace would be only sparsely occupied, we find primarily dense, broad filling of the morphological landscape, indicating rich diversity. Phylomorphospace plots suggest that dynamic evolution underlies the observed spatial patterning. Evolutionary transits through the morphospaces are sometimes long, and occur in a variety of directions. The trajectories seem to represent both evolutionary divergences and convergences, the latter supported by convevol analysis. We suggest that that this pattern of occupancy reflects the various adaptations of different groups of fishes, seemingly paralleling their diverse marine and freshwater ecologies and life histories. Opercle shape evolution within the acanthomorphs, spiny ray-finned fishes, appears to have been especially dynamic.

  4. Innervation of sonic muscles in teleosts: occipital vs. spinal nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuki, Atsushi; Somiya, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    The innervation of sonic muscles in teleosts has been categorized into three types: occipital nerve, spinal nerve, and a combination of occipital and spinal nerves. The innervation patterns of sonic muscles were examined (or re-examined) in seven sonic fish species (rockfish, pinecone fish, sweeper, tigerfish, piranha, dory, and pollack) that use the sonic muscles to vibrate the swimbladder. The peripheral nerves (occipital or spinal) were identified based on skeletal preparations. The sonic muscle innervation was of the occipital type in four species (rockfish, pinecone fish, sweeper, and tigerfish) and of the spinal type in three species (piranha, dory, and pollack); none of the seven species examined showed the combination type. Therefore, we hypothesized that innervation patterns could be divided simply into occipital and spinal types. Moreover, the present results revealed that previously reported innervation patterns are inaccurate for three species (tigerfish, piranha, and dory) re-examined in this study. Therefore, it is important to define the peripheral nerves precisely, by using skeletal preparations, in future investigations of sonic muscle innervation. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Cloning of stanniocalcin (STC) cDNAs of divergent teleost species: Monomeric STC supports monophyly of the ancient teleosts, the osteoglossomorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemiya, Yutaka; Irwin, David M; Youson, John H

    2006-10-01

    Molecular cloning of teleost stanniocalcin (STC) cDNAs was undertaken in two species of order Osteoglossiformes of subdivision Osteoglossomorpha and one species of each of orders Cypriniformes and Perciformes within the subdivision Euteleostei. The elephantnose (Gnathonemus petersii) and the butterflyfish (Pantadon buchholzi) are basal teleosts in different osteoglossiforme suborders yet their 218 amino acid (aa) mature hormones, from prehormones of 249 and 251aa, respectively, have only 10 cysteine residues. A substitution for cysteine at the intermonomeric disulfide linkage site, implies that their STCs exist as monomeric peptides, as is the case with STC from another osteoglossormorph, arawana [Amemiya, Y., Marra, L.E., Reyhani, N., Youson, J.H., 2002. Stanniocalcin from an ancient teleost: a monomeric form of the hormone and a possible extracorpuscular distribution. Mol. Cell. Endocrinol. 188, 141-150]. The STC cDNA of the generalized teleost and cyprinid, the white sucker (Catostomus commersoni), encodes a prehormone of 249aa with a signal peptide of 31aa and a mature protein of 218aa that possesses 11 cysteine residues. The latter feature is consistent with a previous analysis that white sucker mature STC is a glycosylated, homodimeric peptide [Amemiya, Y., Marra, L.E., Reyhani, N., Youson, J.H., 2002. Stanniocalcin from an ancient teleost: a monomeric form of the hormone and a possible extracorpuscular distribution. Mol. Cell. Endocrinol. 188, 141-150]. An open reading frame of the STC cDNA of the derived teleost and perciforme, the smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui), encodes a prehormone of 255aa with a signal peptide of 33aa and a mature protein of 222aa. The position of the 11 cysteines in smallmouth bass STC suggests that it exists as a homodimeric peptide. A phylogenetic analysis, using the new STC-1 amino acid sequences and those in the gene data base provided strong support for monophyly of the Osteoglossomorpha and indicated, with positioning of

  6. The spotted gar genome illuminates vertebrate evolution and facilitates human-to-teleost comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braasch, Ingo; Gehrke, Andrew R.; Smith, Jeramiah J.; Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Manousaki, Tereza; Pasquier, Jeremy; Amores, Angel; Desvignes, Thomas; Batzel, Peter; Catchen, Julian; Berlin, Aaron M.; Campbell, Michael S.; Barrell, Daniel; Martin, Kyle J.; Mulley, John F.; Ravi, Vydianathan; Lee, Alison P.; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Chalopin, Domitille; Fan, Shaohua; Wcisel, Dustin; Cañestro, Cristian; Sydes, Jason; Beaudry, Felix E. G.; Sun, Yi; Hertel, Jana; Beam, Michael J.; Fasold, Mario; Ishiyama, Mikio; Johnson, Jeremy; Kehr, Steffi; Lara, Marcia; Letaw, John H.; Litman, Gary W.; Litman, Ronda T.; Mikami, Masato; Ota, Tatsuya; Saha, Nil Ratan; Williams, Louise; Stadler, Peter F.; Wang, Han; Taylor, John S.; Fontenot, Quenton; Ferrara, Allyse; Searle, Stephen M. J.; Aken, Bronwen; Yandell, Mark; Schneider, Igor; Yoder, Jeffrey A.; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Meyer, Axel; Amemiya, Chris T.; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Holland, Peter W. H.; Guiguen, Yann; Bobe, Julien; Shubin, Neil H.; Di Palma, Federica; Alföldi, Jessica; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Postlethwait, John H.

    2016-01-01

    To connect human biology to fish biomedical models, we sequenced the genome of spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), whose lineage diverged from teleosts before the teleost genome duplication (TGD). The slowly evolving gar genome conserved in content and size many entire chromosomes from bony vertebrate ancestors. Gar bridges teleosts to tetrapods by illuminating the evolution of immunity, mineralization, and development (e.g., Hox, ParaHox, and miRNA genes). Numerous conserved non-coding elements (CNEs, often cis-regulatory) undetectable in direct human-teleost comparisons become apparent using gar: functional studies uncovered conserved roles of such cryptic CNEs, facilitating annotation of sequences identified in human genome-wide association studies. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that the sum of expression domains and levels from duplicated teleost genes often approximate patterns and levels of gar genes, consistent with subfunctionalization. The gar genome provides a resource for understanding evolution after genome duplication, the origin of vertebrate genomes, and the function of human regulatory sequences. PMID:26950095

  7. The spotted gar genome illuminates vertebrate evolution and facilitates human-teleost comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braasch, Ingo; Gehrke, Andrew R; Smith, Jeramiah J; Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Manousaki, Tereza; Pasquier, Jeremy; Amores, Angel; Desvignes, Thomas; Batzel, Peter; Catchen, Julian; Berlin, Aaron M; Campbell, Michael S; Barrell, Daniel; Martin, Kyle J; Mulley, John F; Ravi, Vydianathan; Lee, Alison P; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Chalopin, Domitille; Fan, Shaohua; Wcisel, Dustin; Cañestro, Cristian; Sydes, Jason; Beaudry, Felix E G; Sun, Yi; Hertel, Jana; Beam, Michael J; Fasold, Mario; Ishiyama, Mikio; Johnson, Jeremy; Kehr, Steffi; Lara, Marcia; Letaw, John H; Litman, Gary W; Litman, Ronda T; Mikami, Masato; Ota, Tatsuya; Saha, Nil Ratan; Williams, Louise; Stadler, Peter F; Wang, Han; Taylor, John S; Fontenot, Quenton; Ferrara, Allyse; Searle, Stephen M J; Aken, Bronwen; Yandell, Mark; Schneider, Igor; Yoder, Jeffrey A; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Meyer, Axel; Amemiya, Chris T; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Holland, Peter W H; Guiguen, Yann; Bobe, Julien; Shubin, Neil H; Di Palma, Federica; Alföldi, Jessica; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Postlethwait, John H

    2016-04-01

    To connect human biology to fish biomedical models, we sequenced the genome of spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), whose lineage diverged from teleosts before teleost genome duplication (TGD). The slowly evolving gar genome has conserved in content and size many entire chromosomes from bony vertebrate ancestors. Gar bridges teleosts to tetrapods by illuminating the evolution of immunity, mineralization and development (mediated, for example, by Hox, ParaHox and microRNA genes). Numerous conserved noncoding elements (CNEs; often cis regulatory) undetectable in direct human-teleost comparisons become apparent using gar: functional studies uncovered conserved roles for such cryptic CNEs, facilitating annotation of sequences identified in human genome-wide association studies. Transcriptomic analyses showed that the sums of expression domains and expression levels for duplicated teleost genes often approximate the patterns and levels of expression for gar genes, consistent with subfunctionalization. The gar genome provides a resource for understanding evolution after genome duplication, the origin of vertebrate genomes and the function of human regulatory sequences.

  8. Inter-specific differences in numerical abilities among teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrillo, Christian; Miletto Petrazzini, Maria Elena; Tagliapietra, Christian; Bisazza, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Adults, infants and non-human primates are thought to possess similar non-verbal numerical systems, but there is considerable debate regarding whether all vertebrates share the same numerical abilities. Despite an abundance of studies, cross-species comparison remains difficult because the methodology employed and the context of species examination vary considerably across studies. To fill this gap, we used the same procedure, stimuli, and numerical contrasts to compare quantity abilities of five teleost fish: redtail splitfin, guppies, zebrafish, Siamese fighting fish, and angelfish. Subjects were trained to discriminate between two sets of geometrical figures using a food reward. Fish initially were trained on an easy numerical ratio (5 vs. 10 and 6 vs. 12). Once they reached the learning criterion, they were subjected to non-reinforced probe trials in which the set size was constant but numerical ratios varied (8 vs. 12 and 9 vs. 12). They also were subjected to probe trials in which the ratio was constant, but the total set size was increased (25 vs. 50) or decreased (2 vs. 4). Overall, fish generalized to numerosities with a 0.67 ratio, but failed with a 0.75 ratio; they generalized to a smaller set size, but not to a larger one. Only minor differences were observed among the five species. However, in one species, zebrafish, the proportion of individuals reaching the learning criterion was much smaller than in the others. In a control experiment, zebrafish showed a similar lower performance in shape discrimination, suggesting that the observed difference resulted from the zebrafish's difficulty in learning this procedure rather than from a cross-species variation in the numerical domain.

  9. Inter-specific differences in numerical abilities among teleost fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eAgrillo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Adults, infants and non-human primates are thought to possess similar non-verbal numerical systems, but there is considerable debate regarding whether all vertebrates share the same numerical abilities. Despite an abundance of studies, cross-species comparison remains difficult because the methodology employed and the context of species examination vary considerably across studies. To fill this gap, we used the same procedure, stimuli and numerical contrasts to compare quantity abilities of five teleost fish: redtail splitfin, guppies, zebrafish, Siamese fighting fish, and angelfish. Subjects were trained to discriminate between two sets of geometrical figures using a food reward. Fish initially were trained on an easy numerical ratio (5 vs. 10 and 6 vs. 12. Once they reached the learning criterion, they were subjected to non-reinforced probe trials in which the set size was constant but numerical ratios varied (8 vs. 12 and 9 vs. 12. They also were subjected to probe trials in which the ratio was constant, but the total set size was increased (25 vs. 50 or decreased (2 vs. 4. Overall, fish generalized to numerosities with a 0.67 ratio, but failed with a 0.75 ratio; they generalized to a smaller set size, but not to a larger one. Only minor differences were observed among the five species. However, in one species, zebrafish, the proportion of individuals reaching the learning criterion was much smaller than in the others. In a control experiment, zebrafish showed a similar lower performance in shape discrimination, suggesting that the observed difference resulted from the zebrafish’s difficulty in learning this procedure rather than from a cross-species variation in the numerical domain.

  10. Characterization of hey bHLH genes in teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Christoph; Elmasri, Harun; Klamt, Barbara; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Gessler, Manfred

    2003-11-01

    Hairy-related basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors are targets of Delta-Notch signaling and represent essential components for a number of cell fate decisions during vertebrate embryogenesis. Hey genes encode a subfamily of hairy-related proteins that have been implicated in processes like somitogenesis, blood vessel and heart development. We have identified and characterized hey genes in three teleost fish lineages using degenerate PCR and database searches. Phylogenetic analysis of Hey proteins suggests a complex pattern of evolution with high divergence of hey2 in Takifugu rubripes (Fugu, Japanese pufferfish) and possibly loss in the related Tetraodon nigroviridis (the freshwater pufferfish). In addition, duplication of hey1 in both pufferfishes, Fugu and Tetraodon, was observed. Conversely, zebrafish (Danio rerio) has the same complement of three hey genes as known from mammals. All three hey genes show much more restricted gene expression profiles in zebrafish when compared to mouse. Importantly, while all three murine Hey genes are expressed in overlapping patterns in the presomitic mesoderm (PSM) and somites, in zebrafish only hey1 shows PSM and somite expression in a highly dynamic fashion. Therefore, while overlapping expression might account for redundancy of hey function in higher vertebrates, this is unlikely to be the case in zebrafish. In deltaD (dlD) deficient after-eight zebrafish mutants, the dynamic expression of hey1 in the PSM is impaired and completely lost in newly formed somitomeres. Overexpression of dlD on the other hand results in the ectopic expression of hey1 in the axial mesoderm. Hence, hey1 represents a target of Delta-Notch signaling dynamically expressed during somite formation in zebrafish.

  11. Demonstration of the Coexistence of Duplicated LH Receptors in Teleosts, and Their Origin in Ancestral Actinopterygians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gersende Maugars

    Full Text Available Pituitary gonadotropins, FSH and LH, control gonad activity in vertebrates, via binding to their respective receptors, FSHR and LHR, members of GPCR superfamily. Until recently, it was accepted that gnathostomes possess a single FSHR and a single LHR, encoded by fshr and lhcgr genes. We reinvestigated this question, focusing on vertebrate species of key-phylogenetical positions. Genome analyses supported the presence of a single fshr and a single lhcgr in chondrichthyans, and in sarcopterygians including mammals, birds, amphibians and coelacanth. In contrast, we identified a single fshr but two lhgcr in basal teleosts, the eels. We further showed the coexistence of duplicated lhgcr in other actinopterygians, including a non-teleost, the gar, and other teleosts, e.g. Mexican tetra, platyfish, or tilapia. Phylogeny and synteny analyses supported the existence in actinopterygians of two lhgcr paralogs (lhgcr1/ lhgcr2, which do not result from the teleost-specific whole-genome duplication (3R, but likely from a local gene duplication that occurred early in the actinopterygian lineage. Due to gene losses, there was no impact of 3R on the number of gonadotropin receptors in extant teleosts. Additional gene losses during teleost radiation, led to a single lhgcr (lhgcr1 or lhgcr2 in some species, e.g. medaka and zebrafish. Sequence comparison highlighted divergences in the extracellular and intracellular domains of the duplicated lhgcr, suggesting differential properties such as ligand binding and activation mechanisms. Comparison of tissue distribution in the European eel, revealed that fshr and both lhgcr transcripts are expressed in the ovary and testis, but are differentially expressed in non-gonadal tissues such as brain or eye. Differences in structure-activity relationships and tissue expression may have contributed as selective drives in the conservation of the duplicated lhgcr. This study revises the evolutionary scenario and nomenclature of

  12. Purifying selection on leptin genes in teleosts may be due to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-08-27

    Aug 27, 2014 ... c Indian Academy of Sciences. RESEARCH NOTE. Purifying selection on leptin genes in teleosts may be due to poikilothermy. SHANCHEN WANG, RIXIN WANG and TIANJUN XU. ∗. Laboratory of Fish Biogenetics and Immune Evolution, College of Marine Science, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhoushan.

  13. Linking species habitat and past palaeoclimatic events to evolution of the teleost innate immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbakken, Monica Hongrø; Voje, Kjetil Lysne; Jakobsen, Kjetill Sigurd; Jentoft, Sissel

    2017-04-26

    Host-intrinsic factors as well as environmental changes are known to be strong evolutionary drivers defining the genetic foundation of immunity. Using a novel set of teleost genomes and a time-calibrated phylogeny, we here investigate the family of Toll-like receptor ( TLR ) genes and address the underlying evolutionary processes shaping the diversity of the first-line defence. Our findings reveal remarkable flexibility within the evolutionary design of teleost innate immunity characterized by prominent TLR gene losses and expansions. In the order of Gadiformes, expansions correlate with the loss of major histocompatibility complex class II ( MHCII ) and diversifying selection analyses support that this has fostered new immunological innovations in TLR s within this lineage. In teleosts overall, TLRs expansions correlate with species latitudinal distributions and maximum depth. By contrast, lineage-specific gene losses overlap with well-described changes in palaeoclimate (global ocean anoxia) and past Atlantic Ocean geography. In conclusion, we suggest that the evolvability of the teleost immune system has most likely played a prominent role in the survival and successful radiation of this lineage. © 2017 The Authors.

  14. Toxicity of copper sulphate on some haematological parameters of a freshwater teleost Cyprinus carpio var. communis

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh, M.

    2001-01-01

    Haematological changes in a freshwater teleost, Cyprinus carpio var. communis, exposed to acute and sublethal toxicity of copper sulphate were studied. During the acute treatment, erythrocyte and leucocyte count, and haemoglobin content increased, whereas during the sublethal treatment, erythrocyte count and haemoglobin content decreased and leucocyte count increased.

  15. Evolution of the duplicated intracellular lipid-binding protein genes of teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, Ananda B; Parmar, Manoj B; Wright, Jonathan M

    2017-08-01

    Increasing organismal complexity during the evolution of life has been attributed to the duplication of genes and entire genomes. More recently, theoretical models have been proposed that postulate the fate of duplicated genes, among them the duplication-degeneration-complementation (DDC) model. In the DDC model, the common fate of a duplicated gene is lost from the genome owing to nonfunctionalization. Duplicated genes are retained in the genome either by subfunctionalization, where the functions of the ancestral gene are sub-divided between the sister duplicate genes, or by neofunctionalization, where one of the duplicate genes acquires a new function. Both processes occur either by loss or gain of regulatory elements in the promoters of duplicated genes. Here, we review the genomic organization, evolution, and transcriptional regulation of the multigene family of intracellular lipid-binding protein (iLBP) genes from teleost fishes. Teleost fishes possess many copies of iLBP genes owing to a whole genome duplication (WGD) early in the teleost fish radiation. Moreover, the retention of duplicated iLBP genes is substantially higher than the retention of all other genes duplicated in the teleost genome. The fatty acid-binding protein genes, a subfamily of the iLBP multigene family in zebrafish, are differentially regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms, which may account for the retention of iLBP genes in the zebrafish genome by the process of subfunctionalization of cis-acting regulatory elements in iLBP gene promoters.

  16. Aspects of the biology of three benthic-feeding teleosts from King's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Zoology, University of Port Elizabeth, Port Elizabeth. The lengths, abundance pattems and feeding habits of three species of benthic·feeding teleosts, Lithognathus mormyrus,. Lithognathus lithognathus and Umbrina capensis from King's. Beach, Algoa Bay are presented. Multiple regression analysis was.

  17. Early Life-Stage Responses of a Eurythemal Estuarine Fish, Mummichog (Fundulus hetereoclitus) to Fixed and Fluctuating Thermal Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaifer, J.

    2016-02-01

    The mummichog (Fundulus hetereoclitus) is an intertidal spawning fish that ranges from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to northeastern Florida. A notoriously hardy species, adults can tolerate a wide range of temperature typical of inshore, estuarine waters. This experiment assessed how a wide range of constant and fluctuating temperatures affect the survival, development, and condition of embryos and young larvae. Captive adults were provided nightly with spawning substrates that were inspected each morning for fertilized eggs. Young ( 8 hr post-fertilization) embryos (N = 25 per population) were assigned to either one of a wide range of constant temperatures (8 to 34 °C) generated by a thermal gradient block (TGB), or to one of 10 daily oscillating temperature regimes that spanned the TGB's mid temperature (21 °C). Water was changed and populations inspected for mortalities and hatching at 12-hr intervals. Hatch dates and mortalities were recorded, and larvae were either anesthetized and measured for size by analyzing digital images, or evaluated for persistence in a food-free environment. Mummichog embryos withstood all but the coldest constant regimes and the entire range of fluctuating ones although age at hatching varied substantially within and among experimental populations. Embryos incubated at warmer temperatures hatched out earlier and at somewhat smaller sizes than those experiencing cooler temperatures. Temperatures experienced by embryos had an inverse effect on persistence of larvae relying on yolk nutrition alone. Mummichog exhibited an especially plastic response to thermal challenges which reflects the highly variable nursery habitat used by this species.

  18. Relaxin gene family in teleosts: phylogeny, syntenic mapping, selective constraint, andexpression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen Peter

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the relaxin family of signaling molecules has been shown to play diverse roles in mammalian physiology, but little is known about its diversity or physiology in teleosts, an infraclass of the bony fishes comprising ~ 50% of all extant vertebrates. In this paper, 32 relaxin family sequences were obtained by searching genomic and cDNA databases from eight teleost species; phylogenetic, molecular evolutionary, and syntenic data analyses were conducted to understand the relationship and differential patterns of evolution of relaxin family genes in teleosts compared with mammals. Additionally, real-time quantitative PCR was used to confirm and assess the tissues of expression of five relaxin family genes in Danio rerio and in situ hybridization used to assess the site-specific expression of the insulin 3-like gene in D. rerio testis. Results Up to six relaxin family genes were identified in each teleost species. Comparative syntenic mapping revealed that fish possess two paralogous copies of human RLN3, which we call rln3a and rln3b, an orthologue of human RLN2, rln, two paralogous copies of human INSL5, insl5a and insl5b, and an orthologue of human INSL3, insl3. Molecular evolutionary analyses indicated that: rln3a, rln3b and rln are under strong evolutionary constraint, that insl3 has been subject to moderate rates of sequence evolution with two amino acids in insl3/INSL3 showing evidence of positively selection, and that insl5b exhibits a higher rate of sequence evolution than its paralogue insl5a suggesting that it may have been neo-functionalized after the teleost whole genome duplication. Quantitative PCR analyses in D. rerio indicated that rln3a and rln3b are expressed in brain, insl3 is highly expressed in gonads, and that there was low expression of both insl5 genes in adult zebrafish. Finally, in situ hybridization of insl3 in D. rerio testes showed highly specific hybridization to interstitial Leydig

  19. Comparative phylogenomic analyses of teleost fish Hox gene clusters: lessons from the cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuehl Jennifer V

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teleost fish have seven paralogous clusters of Hox genes stemming from two complete genome duplications early in vertebrate evolution, and an additional genome duplication during the evolution of ray-finned fish, followed by the secondary loss of one cluster. Gene duplications on the one hand, and the evolution of regulatory sequences on the other, are thought to be among the most important mechanisms for the evolution of new gene functions. Cichlid fish, the largest family of vertebrates with about 2500 species, are famous examples of speciation and morphological diversity. Since this diversity could be based on regulatory changes, we chose to study the coding as well as putative regulatory regions of their Hox clusters within a comparative genomic framework. Results We sequenced and characterized all seven Hox clusters of Astatotilapia burtoni, a haplochromine cichlid fish. Comparative analyses with data from other teleost fish such as zebrafish, two species of pufferfish, stickleback and medaka were performed. We traced losses of genes and microRNAs of Hox clusters, the medaka lineage seems to have lost more microRNAs than the other fish lineages. We found that each teleost genome studied so far has a unique set of Hox genes. The hoxb7a gene was lost independently several times during teleost evolution, the most recent event being within the radiation of East African cichlid fish. The conserved non-coding sequences (CNS encompass a surprisingly large part of the clusters, especially in the HoxAa, HoxCa, and HoxDa clusters. Across all clusters, we observe a trend towards an increased content of CNS towards the anterior end. Conclusion The gene content of Hox clusters in teleost fishes is more variable than expected, with each species studied so far having a different set. Although the highest loss rate of Hox genes occurred immediately after whole genome duplications, our analyses showed that gene loss continued and is

  20. Thrash, flip, or jump: the behavioral and functional continuum of terrestrial locomotion in teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Alice C; Ashley-Ross, Miriam A; Hsieh, S Tonia

    2013-08-01

    Moving on land versus in water imposes dramatically different requirements on the musculoskeletal system. Although many limbed vertebrates, such as salamanders and prehistoric tetrapodomorphs, have an axial system specialized for aquatic locomotion and an appendicular system adapted for terrestrial locomotion, diverse extant teleosts use the axial musculoskeletal system (body plus caudal fin) to move in these two physically disparate environments. In fact, teleost fishes living at the water's edge demonstrate diversity in natural history that is reflected in a variety of terrestrial behaviors: (1) species that have only incidental contact with land (such as largemouth bass, Micropterus) will repeatedly thrash, which can roll an individual downhill, but cannot produce effective overland movements, (2) species that have occasional contact with land (like Gambusia, the mosquitofish, which evade predators by stranding themselves) will produce directed terrestrial movement via a tail-flip jump, and (3) species that spend more than half of their lives on land (like the mudskipper, Periopthalmus) will produce a prone-jump, a behavior that allows the fish to anticipate where it will land at the end of the flight phase. Both tail-flip and prone jumps are characterized by a two-phase movement consisting of body flexion followed by extension-a movement pattern that is markedly similar to the aquatic fast-start. Convergence in kinematic pattern between effective terrestrial behaviors and aquatic fast starts suggests that jumps are an exaptation of a neuromuscular system that powers unsteady escape behaviors in the water. Despite such evidence that terrestrial behaviors evolved from an ancestral behavior that is ubiquitous among teleosts, some teleosts are unable to move effectively on land-possibly due to morphological trade-offs, wherein specialization for one environment comes at a cost to performance in the other. Indeed, upon emergence onto land, gravity places an

  1. Seasonal diet composition of Fundulus lima (Cyprinodontiformes: Fundulidae in two oasis systems of Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinora Acosta Zamorano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fundulus lima inhabits river drainage systems and is threatened after the introduction of cichlids in the area. To support conservation programs, the spatial and temporal variation of the diet composition of this endangered killifish, was determined in two oasis systems of Baja California Sur, Mexico (San Ignacio and La Purisima river drainages, during rainy and dry seasons. F. lima was captured by using passive and active capture techniques. A total of 192 stomach contents of F. lima was analyzed. The contribution of each prey item in the diet composition was quantified by means of the indices of occurrence frequency (% OF, numerical (%N and volume (%V percentages. The relative importance of each prey item was determined according to the percentage of the Relative Importance Index (%RII. The similarity of the diet was calculated between hydrological basins (populations combined by basin, seasons (rainy versus dry months, sexes and size classes, by using Schoener’s resource overlap index. We used two ecological indices to determine the type of feeding strategy exhibited by the fish: (1 niche breadth of Levins and (2 proportional similarity of Feisinger. Sand was the most abundant item in the stomach content of killifishes from both drainages (39% and 47%, respectively. Diet composition was similar for both drainages (74% as well as among their respective size classes; however, it was different between sexes. In both drainages, F. lima predated mainly on diatom algae, dipterous and trichopteran larvae, and fish scales during the dry season; while it preferred dipterous larvae, filamentous algae and ostracods in the rainy season. A feeding strategy of opportunist type was exhibited by F. lima during the rainy season, changing to specialist type during the dry season. This information will be the basis for future investigations related to the conservation of this endangered species and its habitat. Rev. Biol. Trop. 59 (4: 1669-1678. Epub 2011

  2. Rapid evolution of piRNA pathway in the teleost fish: implication for an adaptation to transposon diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Minhan; Chen, Feng; Luo, Majing; Cheng, Yibin; Zhao, Huabin; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2014-05-19

    The Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway is responsible for germline specification, gametogenesis, transposon silencing, and genome integrity. Transposable elements can disrupt genome and its functions. However, piRNA pathway evolution and its adaptation to transposon diversity in the teleost fish remain unknown. This article unveils evolutionary scene of piRNA pathway and its association with diverse transposons by systematically comparative analysis on diverse teleost fish genomes. Selective pressure analysis on piRNA pathway and miRNA/siRNA (microRNA/small interfering RNA) pathway genes between teleosts and mammals showed an accelerated evolution of piRNA pathway genes in the teleost lineages, and positive selection on functional PAZ (Piwi/Ago/Zwille) and Tudor domains involved in the Piwi-piRNA/Tudor interaction, suggesting that the amino acid substitutions are adaptive to their functions in piRNA pathway in the teleost fish species. Notably five piRNA pathway genes evolved faster in the swamp eel, a kind of protogynous hermaphrodite fish, than the other teleosts, indicating a differential evolution of piRNA pathway between the swamp eel and other gonochoristic fishes. In addition, genome-wide analysis showed higher diversity of transposons in the teleost fish species compared with mammals. Our results suggest that rapidly evolved piRNA pathway in the teleost fish is likely to be involved in the adaption to transposon diversity. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  3. Relative contributions of copper oxide nanoparticles and dissolved copper to Cu uptake kinetics of Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chuanjia; Castellon, Benjamin T.; Matson, Cole W.; Aiken, George R.; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2017-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal-based nanomaterials may be due to the uptake of metals in both dissolved and nanoparticulate forms, but the relative contributions of these different forms to overall metal uptake rates under environmental conditions are not quantitatively defined. Here, we investigated the linkage between the dissolution rates of copper(II) oxide (CuO) nanoparticles (NPs) and their bioavailability to Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) embryos, with the aim of quantitatively delineating the relative contributions of nanoparticulate and dissolved species for Cu uptake. Gulf killifish embryos were exposed to dissolved Cu and CuO NP mixtures comprising a range of pH values (6.3–7.5) and three types of natural organic matter (NOM) isolates at various concentrations (0.1–10 mg-C L–1), resulting in a wide range of CuO NP dissolution rates that subsequently influenced Cu uptake. First-order dissolution rate constants of CuO NPs increased with increasing NOM concentration and for NOM isolates with higher aromaticity, as indicated by specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA), while Cu uptake rate constants of both dissolved Cu and CuO NP decreased with NOM concentration and aromaticity. As a result, the relative contribution of dissolved Cu and nanoparticulate CuO species for the overall Cu uptake rate was insensitive to NOM type or concentration but largely determined by the percentage of CuO that dissolved. These findings highlight SUVA and aromaticity as key NOM properties affecting the dissolution kinetics and bioavailability of soluble metal-based nanomaterials in organic-rich waters. These properties could be used in the incorporation of dissolution kinetics into predictive models for environmental risks of nanomaterials.

  4. Seasonal diet composition of Fundulus lima (Cyprinodontiformes: Fundulidae in two oasis systems of Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinora Acosta Zamorano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fundulus lima inhabits river drainage systems and is threatened after the introduction of cichlids in the area. To support conservation programs, the spatial and temporal variation of the diet composition of this endangered killifish, was determined in two oasis systems of Baja California Sur, Mexico (San Ignacio and La Purisima river drainages, during rainy and dry seasons. F. lima was captured by using passive and active capture techniques. A total of 192 stomach contents of F. lima was analyzed. The contribution of each prey item in the diet composition was quantified by means of the indices of occurrence frequency (% OF, numerical (%N and volume (%V percentages. The relative importance of each prey item was determined according to the percentage of the Relative Importance Index (%RII. The similarity of the diet was calculated between hydrological basins (populations combined by basin, seasons (rainy versus dry months, sexes and size classes, by using Schoener’s resource overlap index. We used two ecological indices to determine the type of feeding strategy exhibited by the fish: (1 niche breadth of Levins and (2 proportional similarity of Feisinger. Sand was the most abundant item in the stomach content of killifishes from both drainages (39% and 47%, respectively. Diet composition was similar for both drainages (74% as well as among their respective size classes; however, it was different between sexes. In both drainages, F. lima predated mainly on diatom algae, dipterous and trichopteran larvae, and fish scales during the dry season; while it preferred dipterous larvae, filamentous algae and ostracods in the rainy season. A feeding strategy of opportunist type was exhibited by F. lima during the rainy season, changing to specialist type during the dry season. This information will be the basis for future investigations related to the conservation of this endangered species and its habitat. Rev. Biol. Trop. 59 (4: 1669-1678. Epub 2011

  5. Influence of euthanasia method on blood and gill variables in normoxic and hypoxic Gulf killifish Fundulus grandis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larter, K F; Rees, B B

    2017-06-01

    In many experiments, euthanasia, or humane killing, of animals is necessary. Some methods of euthanasia cause death through cessation of respiratory or cardiovascular systems, causing oxygen levels of blood and tissues to drop. For experiments where the goal is to measure the effects of environmental low oxygen (hypoxia), the choice of euthanasia technique, therefore, may confound the results. This study examined the effects of four euthanasia methods commonly used in fish biology (overdose of MS-222, overdose of clove oil, rapid cooling and blunt trauma to the head) on variables known to be altered during hypoxia (haematocrit, plasma cortisol, blood lactate and blood glucose) or reflecting gill damage (trypan blue exclusion) and energetic status (ATP, ADP and ATP:ADP) in Gulf killifish Fundulus grandis after 24 h exposure to well-aerated conditions (normoxia, 7·93 mg O 2  l -1 , c. 150 mm Hg or c. 20 kPa) or reduced oxygen levels (0·86 mg O 2  l -1 , c. 17 mm Hg or c. 2·2 kPa). Regardless of oxygen treatment, fish euthanized by an overdose of MS-222 had higher haematocrit and lower gill ATP:ADP than fish euthanized by other methods. The effects of 24 h hypoxic exposure on these and other variables, however, were equivalent among methods of euthanasia (i.e. there were no significant interactions between euthanasia method and oxygen treatment). The choice of an appropriate euthanasia method, therefore, will depend upon the magnitude of the treatment effects (e.g. hypoxia) relative to potential artefacts caused by euthanasia on the variables of interest. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  6. Salinity Regulates Claudin mRNA and Protein Expression in the Teleost Gill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tipsmark, Christian K; Baltzegar, David A; Ozden, Ozkan

    2008-01-01

    The teleost gill carries out NaCl uptake in fresh water (FW) and NaCl excretion in seawater (SW). This transformation with salinity requires close regulation of ion transporter capacity and epithelial permeability. This study investigates the regulation of tight junctional claudins during salinity...... was localized deep in the FW gill filament, whereas staining was found apically in SW gill. Claudin 4-like proteins are localized predominantly in the filament outer epithelial layer and staining appears more intense in gill of FW versus SW fish. Additionally, tilapia claudin 28a and 30 genes were characterized......, and mRNA expression was found to increase during FW acclimation. These studies are the first to detect putative claudin proteins in teleosts and show their localization and regulation with salinity in gill epithelium. The data indicate that claudins may be important in permeability changes associated...

  7. N-acetylcysteine manipulation fails to elicit an increase in glutathione in a teleost model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birnie-Gauvin, Kim; Larsen, Martin Hage; Aarestrup, Kim

    2018-01-01

    be synthesized from administered N-acetylcysteine (NAC). NAC has therefore often been used in a wide range of taxa to manipulate levels of GSH. Our objective was to validate this approach in a wild temperate teleost fish model, the brown trout (Salmo trutta). We used intracoelomic injections of NAC in saline...... and vegetable shortening, at two different concentrations (100 and 400 mg/kg), with the appropriate controls and shams, under controlled laboratory settings. We found that NAC failed to elicit an increase in GSH over three time periods and concluded that NAC is not an effective method to enhance GSH levels...... in teleost fish using the concentrations and vehicles tested here. We emphasize the importance of validation studies across all new species/taxa when possible and suggest that more investigation is required with regard toNAC manipulation in fish if this approach is to be used...

  8. Quantitative proteomics in teleost fish: Insights and challenges for neuroendocrine and neurotoxicology research

    OpenAIRE

    Martyniuk, Christopher J.; Popesku, Jason T.; Chown, Brittany; Denslow, Nancy D.; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2011-01-01

    Neuroendocrine systems integrate both extrinsic and intrinsic signals to regulate virtually all aspects of an animal’s physiology. In aquatic toxicology, studies have shown that pollutants are capable of disrupting the neuroendocrine system of teleost fish, and many chemicals found in the environment can also have a neurotoxic mode of action. Omics approaches are now used to better understand cell signaling cascades underlying fish neurophysiology and the control of pituitary hormone release,...

  9. Discovery of toll-like receptor 13 exists in the teleost fish: Miiuy croaker (Perciformes, Sciaenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanjin; Bi, Xueyi; Chu, Qing; Xu, Tianjun

    2016-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an indispensable role in the immune response for pathogen recognition and triggering not only innate immunity but also adaptive immunity. Here we report the TLR13 homologue, one member of TLRs, in Perciformes (especially Sciaenidae). And we used the miiuy croaker as represented species for further functional experiments. Former study reported the TLR13 only expressed in murine, and we are the first to report the teleost TLR13 (mmiTLR13). MmiTLR13 expressed highly in immune defense related tissues, such as the liver, spleen, and kidney, and Vibrio anguillarum or poly(I:C) infection showed the immune response of mmiTLR13. Further luciferase reporter assays showed the ability for activation of ISRE luciferase reporter, but it failed to active NF-κB. And further gene silence by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) confirmed the results. Immunofluorescence of mmiTLR13 presents the cytoplasmic distribution in Hela cell. In addition, the Toll/interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domain of mammal TLR5 exhibits high identity with TLR13, which indicated the high homology between TLR5 and TLR13. These findings will lay the fundamental cornerstone for further research of teleost TLR13 and expand the horizon for better understand the teleost TLRs system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Prolactin and teleost ionocytes: new insights into cellular and molecular targets of prolactin in vertebrate epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breves, Jason P.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Karlstrom, Rolf O.

    2014-01-01

    The peptide hormone prolactin is a functionally versatile hormone produced by the vertebrate pituitary. Comparative studies over the last six decades have revealed that a conserved function for prolactin across vertebrates is the regulation of ion and water transport in a variety of tissues including those responsible for whole-organism ion homeostasis. In teleost fishes, prolactin was identified as the “freshwater-adapting hormone”, promoting ion-conserving and water-secreting processes by acting on the gill, kidney, gut and urinary bladder. In mammals, prolactin is known to regulate renal, intestinal, mammary and amniotic epithelia, with dysfunction linked to hypogonadism, infertility, and metabolic disorders. Until recently, our understanding of the cellular mechanisms of prolactin action in fishes has been hampered by a paucity of molecular tools to define and study ionocytes, specialized cells that control active ion transport across branchial and epidermal epithelia. Here we review work in teleost models indicating that prolactin regulates ion balance through action on ion transporters, tight-junction proteins, and water channels in ionocytes, and discuss recent advances in our understanding of ionocyte function in the genetically and embryonically accessible zebrafish (Danio rerio). Given the high degree of evolutionary conservation in endocrine and osmoregulatory systems, these studies in teleost models are contributing novel mechanistic insight into how prolactin participates in the development, function, and dysfunction of osmoregulatory systems across the vertebrate lineage.

  11. Growth and the regulation of myotomal muscle mass in teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Ian A; Bower, Neil I; Macqueen, Daniel J

    2011-05-15

    Teleost muscle first arises in early embryonic life and its development is driven by molecules present in the egg yolk and modulated by environmental stimuli including temperature and oxygen. Several populations of myogenic precursor cells reside in the embryonic somite and external cell layer and contribute to muscle fibres in embryo, larval, juvenile and adult stages. Many signalling proteins and transcription factors essential for these events are known. In all cases, myogenesis involves myoblast proliferation, migration, fusion and terminal differentiation. Maturation of the embryonic muscle is associated with motor innervation and the development of a scaffold of connective tissue and complex myotomal architecture needed to generate swimming behaviour. Adult muscle is a heterogeneous tissue composed of several cell types that interact to affect growth patterns. The development of capillary and lymphatic circulations and extramuscular organs--notably the gastrointestinal, endocrine, neuroendocrine and immune systems--serves to increase information exchange between tissues and with the external environment, adding to the complexity of growth regulation. Teleosts often exhibit an indeterminate growth pattern, with body size and muscle mass increasing until mortality or senescence occurs. The dramatic increase in myotomal muscle mass between embryo and adult requires the continuous production of muscle fibres until 40-50% of the maximum body length is reached. Sarcomeric proteins can be mobilised as a source of amino acids for energy metabolism by other tissues and for gonad generation, requiring the dynamic regulation of muscle mass throughout the life cycle. The metabolic and contractile phenotypes of muscle fibres also show significant plasticity with respect to environmental conditions, migration and spawning. Many genes regulating muscle growth are found as multiple copies as a result of paralogue retention following whole-genome duplication events in teleost

  12. Allometric growth of the trunk leads to the rostral shift of the pelvic fin in teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yumie; Tamura, Mika; Aita, Yusuke; Fujimura, Koji; Murakami, Yasunori; Okabe, Masataka; Okada, Norihiro; Tanaka, Mikiko

    2010-11-01

    The pelvic fin position among teleost fishes has shifted rostrally during evolution, resulting in diversification of both behavior and habitat. We explored the developmental basis for the rostral shift in pelvic fin position in teleost fishes using zebrafish (abdominal pelvic fins) and Nile tilapia (thoracic pelvic fins). Cell fate mapping experiments revealed that changes in the distribution of lateral plate mesodermal cells accompany the trunk-tail protrusion. Presumptive pelvic fin cells are originally located at the body wall adjacent to the anterior limit of hoxc10a expression in the spinal cord, and their position shifts rostrally as the trunk grows. We then showed that the differences in pelvic fin position between zebrafish and Nile tilapia were not due to changes in expression or function of gdf11. We also found that hox-independent motoneurons located above the pelvic fins innervate into the pelvic musculature. Our results suggest that there is a common mechanism among teleosts and tetrapods that controls paired appendage positioning via gdf11, but in teleost fishes the position of prospective pelvic fin cells on the yolk surface shifts as the trunk grows. In addition, teleost motoneurons, which lack lateral motor columns, innervate the pelvic fins in a manner independent of the rostral-caudal patterns of hox expression in the spinal cord. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Arginine Vasotocin Preprohormone Is Expressed in Surprising Regions of the Teleost Forebrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Rodriguez-Santiago

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nonapeptides play a fundamental role in the regulation of social behavior, among numerous other functions. In particular, arginine vasopressin and its non-mammalian homolog, arginine vasotocin (AVT, have been implicated in regulating affiliative, reproductive, and aggressive behavior in many vertebrate species. Where these nonapeptides are synthesized in the brain has been studied extensively in most vertebrate lineages. While several hypothalamic and forebrain populations of vasopressinergic neurons have been described in amniotes, the consensus suggests that the expression of AVT in the brain of teleost fish is limited to the hypothalamus, specifically the preoptic area (POA and the anterior tuberal nucleus (putative homolog of the mammalian ventromedial hypothalamus. However, as most studies in teleosts have focused on the POA, there may be an ascertainment bias. Here, we revisit the distribution of AVT preprohormone mRNA across the dorsal and ventral telencephalon of a highly social African cichlid fish. We first use in situ hybridization to map the distribution of AVT preprohormone mRNA across the telencephalon. We then use quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to assay AVT expression in the dorsomedial telencephalon, the putative homolog of the mammalian basolateral amygdala. We find evidence for AVT preprohormone mRNA in regions previously not associated with the expression of this nonapeptide, including the putative homologs of the mammalian extended amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and septum. In addition, AVT preprohormone mRNA expression within the basolateral amygdala homolog differs across social contexts, suggesting a possible role in behavioral regulation. We conclude that the surprising presence of AVT preprohormone mRNA within dorsal and medial telencephalic regions warrants a closer examination of possible AVT synthesis locations in teleost fish, and that these may be more similar to what is observed in mammals and

  14. New insights into evolution of IgT genes coming from Antarctic teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, Stefano; Buonocore, Francesco; Albanese, Fabio; Scapigliati, Giuseppe; Gerdol, Marco; Oreste, Umberto; Coscia, Maria Rosaria

    2015-12-01

    Cloning and characterization of IgT heavy chain genes were performed in the Antarctic Notothenioid teleost Trematomus bernacchii and in a non-Antarctic Notothenioid species, Bovichtus diacanthus, belonging to a phyletically basal lineage of Notothenioids. Compared to IgT from other non-Antarctic teleost species, including B. diacanthus, T. bernacchii IgT lacked most of the second constant domain but maintained only a few amino acid residues, which could be aligned to B. diacanthus CH2 domain. By analyzing several cDNA clones from a single specimen, three differently sized IgT transcript variants, named Long, Short and Shortest, were identified. Genomic analysis of T. bernacchii and B. diacanthus IgH loci revealed that, in the case of T. bernacchii, within the intron between the exons coding for the entire first and second constant domains a reminiscence of the ancestral second exon was present. The Long and Short variants were found to be encoded by indel alleles, whereas the Shortest variant was generated by alternative splicing that led to the CH2 exonic remnant skipping. Through comparison between genomic and cDNA sequences we hypothesized the presence of three different copies of the IgT heavy chain gene, one of which being considered the functional gene since the corresponding transcripts were identified. Moreover, either Long or Short exonic variants were found to be used in IgT heavy chain membrane form in an unbiased manner, as seen for the secretory form. Phylogenetic analysis was performed on the constant region from all teleost IgT available to date, including IgT from another Antarctic Notothenioid species, Notothenia coriiceps, identified by searching the transcriptome. The loss of almost an entire domain together with the conservation of some amino acids such as proline, glycine and cysteine in the CH2 domain remnant, could be interpreted as another distinctive feature of the Antarctic fish genome evolution, providing also new insights into the

  15. Hepatic steatosis associated with microsporidiosis in teleost fishes from Marajó Island, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCELA VIDEIRA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A total of 40 specimens of the teleost fish Gobioides grahamae Palmer & Wheeler, 1955 were obtained from the municipality of Salvaterra on Marajó Island in the Brazilian state of Pará. Their livers were removed and processed for light microscopy. Overall, 90% of the specimens presented some degree of steatosis of the liver, which was invariably associated with the presence of Microsporidium sp. The present study confirms the occurrence of steatosis in G. grahamae associated with parasitic infections by Microsporidium. The findings indicate that the condition of otherwise healthy fishes in their natural environment may be affected negatively by parasites.

  16. Chromosome Formation During Fertilization in Eggs of the Teleost Oryzias latipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamatsu, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Upon fertilization, eggs shift their cell cycle from the meiotic to the mitotic pattern for embryogenesis. The information on chromosome formation has been accumulated by various experiments using inhibitors to affect formation and behavior of chromosomes in the cycle of cell proliferation. Based on experimental results on meiosis and early stages of development of the teleost Oryzias latipes, we discuss the roles of the activities of histone H1 kinase, microtubule-associated protein kinase, DNA polymerase, DNA topoisomerase, and other cytoplasmic factors in formation and separation of chromosomes.

  17. Myoarchitecture and vasculature of the heart ventricle in some freshwater teleosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, K; Vicentini, CA; Orsi, AM; Cruz, C

    2002-01-01

    The morphological characteristics of the ventricular myocardium and of coronary vascularization were studied in three freshwater teleost species, Piaractus mesopotamicus,Colossoma macropomum and Clarias gariepinus (African catfish), by correlating their ventricular shapes and swimming habits. In Piaractus mesopotamicus and Colossoma macropomum, species with highly active swimming habits, the cardiac ventricle showed a pyramidal shape and a richly vascularized myocardium consisting of an outer compact layer and inner spongy layer. In Clarias gariepinus, aless active species, we observed a saccular ventricle with a mixed myocardium and coronary arteries, in contrast to the ventricular structure of other species described in the literature. PMID:12090393

  18. The Asian arowana (Scleropages formosus) genome provides new insights into the evolution of an early lineage of teleosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bian, Chao; Hu, Yinchang; Ravi, Vydianathan

    2016-01-01

    The Asian arowana (Scleropages formosus), one of the world's most expensive cultivated ornamental fishes, is an endangered species. It represents an ancient lineage of teleosts: the Osteoglossomorpha. Here, we provide a high-quality chromosome-level reference genome of a female golden-variety aro......The Asian arowana (Scleropages formosus), one of the world's most expensive cultivated ornamental fishes, is an endangered species. It represents an ancient lineage of teleosts: the Osteoglossomorpha. Here, we provide a high-quality chromosome-level reference genome of a female golden...

  19. Hepcidin-Dependent Regulation of Erythropoiesis during Anemia in a Teleost Fish, Dicentrarchus labrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, João V; Caldas, Carolina; Ramos, Miguel F; Rodrigues, Pedro N S

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is a common disorder, characterized by abnormally low levels of red blood cells or hemoglobin. The mechanisms of anemia development and response have been thoroughly studied in mammals, but little is known in other vertebrates, particularly teleost fish. In this study, different degrees of anemia were induced in healthy European sea bass specimens (Dicentrarchus labrax) and at pre-determined time points hematological parameters, liver iron content and the expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis and hematopoiesis, with particular attention on hepcidins, were evaluated. The experimental anemia prompted a decrease in hamp1 expression in all tested organs, in accordance to an increased need for iron absorption and mobilization, with slight increases in hamp2 in the kidney and intestine. The liver was clearly the major organ involved in iron homeostasis, decreasing its iron content and showing a gene expression profile consistent with an increased iron release and mobilization. Although both the spleen and head kidney are involved in erythropoiesis, the spleen was found to assume a more preponderant role in the recovery of erythrocyte levels. The intestine was also involved in the response to anemia, through the increase of iron transporting genes. Administration of Hamp1 or Hamp2 mature peptides showed that only Hamp1 affects hematological parameters and liver iron content. In conclusion, the molecular mechanisms of response to anemia present in sea bass are similar to the ones described for mammals, with these results indicating that the two hepcidin types from teleosts assume different roles during anemia.

  20. Hepcidin-Dependent Regulation of Erythropoiesis during Anemia in a Teleost Fish, Dicentrarchus labrax.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João V Neves

    Full Text Available Anemia is a common disorder, characterized by abnormally low levels of red blood cells or hemoglobin. The mechanisms of anemia development and response have been thoroughly studied in mammals, but little is known in other vertebrates, particularly teleost fish. In this study, different degrees of anemia were induced in healthy European sea bass specimens (Dicentrarchus labrax and at pre-determined time points hematological parameters, liver iron content and the expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis and hematopoiesis, with particular attention on hepcidins, were evaluated. The experimental anemia prompted a decrease in hamp1 expression in all tested organs, in accordance to an increased need for iron absorption and mobilization, with slight increases in hamp2 in the kidney and intestine. The liver was clearly the major organ involved in iron homeostasis, decreasing its iron content and showing a gene expression profile consistent with an increased iron release and mobilization. Although both the spleen and head kidney are involved in erythropoiesis, the spleen was found to assume a more preponderant role in the recovery of erythrocyte levels. The intestine was also involved in the response to anemia, through the increase of iron transporting genes. Administration of Hamp1 or Hamp2 mature peptides showed that only Hamp1 affects hematological parameters and liver iron content. In conclusion, the molecular mechanisms of response to anemia present in sea bass are similar to the ones described for mammals, with these results indicating that the two hepcidin types from teleosts assume different roles during anemia.

  1. The cytochemical demonstration of catalase and D-amino acid oxidase in the microbodies of teleost kidney cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, M.; Wendelaar Bonga, S.D.

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of catalase and D-amino acid oxidase, marker enzymes for peroxisomes, was determined cytochemically in the kidney tubules of an euryhaline teleost, the three-spined stickleback. Catalase activity was localized with the diaminobenzidine technique. The presence of D-amino acid oxidase

  2. The hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis in teleosts and amphibians: Endocrine disruption and its consequences to natural populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, J.A.; Patino, R.

    2011-01-01

    Teleosts and pond-breeding amphibians may be exposed to a wide variety of anthropogenic, waterborne contaminants that affect the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Because thyroid hormone is required for their normal development and reproduction, the potential impact of HPT-disrupting contaminants on natural teleost and amphibian populations raises special concern. There is laboratory evidence indicating that persistent organic pollutants, heavy metals, pharmaceutical and personal care products, agricultural chemicals, and aerospace products may alter HPT activity, development, and reproduction in teleosts and amphibians. However, at present there is no evidence to clearly link contaminant-induced HPT alterations to impairments in teleost or amphibian population health in the field. Also, with the exception of perchlorate for which laboratory studies have shown a direct link between HPT disruption and adverse impacts on development and reproductive physiology, little is known about if or how other HPT-disrupting contaminants affect organismal performance. Future field studies should focus on establishing temporal associations between the presence of HPT-disrupting chemicals, the occurrence of HPT alterations, and adverse effects on development and reproduction in natural populations; as well as determining how complex mixtures of HPT contaminants affect organismal and population health. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  3. The hypothalamus–pituitary–thyroid axis in teleosts and amphibians: Endocrine disruption and its consequences to natural populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, J.A.; Patino, Reynaldo

    2011-01-01

    Teleosts and pond-breeding amphibians may be exposed to a wide variety of anthropogenic, waterborne contaminants that affect the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Because thyroid hormone is required for their normal development and reproduction, the potential impact of HPT-disrupting contaminants on natural teleost and amphibian populations raises special concern. There is laboratory evidence indicating that persistent organic pollutants, heavy metals, pharmaceutical and personal care products, agricultural chemicals, and aerospace products may alter HPT activity, development, and reproduction in teleosts and amphibians. However, at present there is no evidence to clearly link contaminant-induced HPT alterations to impairments in teleost or amphibian population health in the field. Also, with the exception of perchlorate for which laboratory studies have shown a direct link between HPT disruption and adverse impacts on development and reproductive physiology, little is known about if or how other HPT-disrupting contaminants affect organismal performance. Future field studies should focus on establishing temporal associations between the presence of HPT-disrupting chemicals, the occurrence of HPT alterations, and adverse effects on development and reproduction in natural populations; as well as determining how complex mixtures of HPT contaminants affect organismal and population health.

  4. Quantitative proteomics in teleost fish: insights and challenges for neuroendocrine and neurotoxicology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyniuk, Christopher J; Popesku, Jason T; Chown, Brittany; Denslow, Nancy D; Trudeau, Vance L

    2012-05-01

    Neuroendocrine systems integrate both extrinsic and intrinsic signals to regulate virtually all aspects of an animal's physiology. In aquatic toxicology, studies have shown that pollutants are capable of disrupting the neuroendocrine system of teleost fish, and many chemicals found in the environment can also have a neurotoxic mode of action. Omics approaches are now used to better understand cell signaling cascades underlying fish neurophysiology and the control of pituitary hormone release, in addition to identifying adverse effects of pollutants in the teleostean central nervous system. For example, both high throughput genomics and proteomic investigations of molecular signaling cascades for both neurotransmitter and nuclear receptor agonists/antagonists have been reported. This review highlights recent studies that have utilized quantitative proteomics methods such as 2D differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) in neuroendocrine regions and uses these examples to demonstrate the challenges of using proteomics in neuroendocrinology and neurotoxicology research. To begin to characterize the teleost neuroproteome, we functionally annotated 623 unique proteins found in the fish hypothalamus and telencephalon. These proteins have roles in biological processes that include synaptic transmission, ATP production, receptor activity, cell structure and integrity, and stress responses. The biological processes most represented by proteins detected in the teleost neuroendocrine brain included transport (8.4%), metabolic process (5.5%), and glycolysis (4.8%). We provide an example of using sub-network enrichment analysis (SNEA) to identify protein networks in the fish hypothalamus in response to dopamine receptor signaling. Dopamine signaling altered the abundance of proteins that are binding partners of microfilaments, integrins, and intermediate filaments, consistent with data suggesting dopaminergic

  5. Duplication of the dystroglycan gene in most branches of teleost fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giardina Bruno

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dystroglycan (DG complex is a major non-integrin cell adhesion system whose multiple biological roles involve, among others, skeletal muscle stability, embryonic development and synapse maturation. DG is composed of two subunits: α-DG, extracellular and highly glycosylated, and the transmembrane β-DG, linking the cytoskeleton to the surrounding basement membrane in a wide variety of tissues. A single copy of the DG gene (DAG1 has been identified so far in humans and other mammals, encoding for a precursor protein which is post-translationally cleaved to liberate the two DG subunits. Similarly, D. rerio (zebrafish seems to have a single copy of DAG1, whose removal was shown to cause a severe dystrophic phenotype in adult animals, although it is known that during evolution, due to a whole genome duplication (WGD event, many teleost fish acquired multiple copies of several genes (paralogues. Results Data mining of pufferfish (T. nigroviridis and T. rubripes and other teleost fish (O. latipes and G. aculeatus available nucleotide sequences revealed the presence of two functional paralogous DG sequences. RT-PCR analysis proved that both the DG sequences are transcribed in T. nigroviridis. One of the two DG sequences harbours an additional mini-intronic sequence, 137 bp long, interrupting the uncomplicated exon-intron-exon pattern displayed by DAG1 in mammals and D. rerio. A similar scenario emerged also in D. labrax (sea bass, from whose genome we have cloned and sequenced a new DG sequence that also harbours a shorter additional intronic sequence of 116 bp. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of DG protein products in all the species analysed including two teleost Antarctic species (T. bernacchii and C. hamatus. Conclusion Our evolutionary analysis has shown that the whole-genome duplication event in the Class Actinopterygii (ray-finned fish involved also DAG1. We unravelled new important molecular genetic details

  6. The calcium channel β2 (CACNB2 subunit repertoire in teleosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueller Rachel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiomyocyte contraction is initiated by influx of extracellular calcium through voltage-gated calcium channels. These oligomeric channels utilize auxiliary β subunits to chaperone the pore-forming α subunit to the plasma membrane, and to modulate channel electrophysiology 1. Several β subunit family members are detected by RT-PCR in the embryonic heart. Null mutations in mouse β2, but not in the other three β family members, are embryonic lethal at E10.5 due to defects in cardiac contractility 2. However, a drawback of the mouse model is that embryonic heart rhythm is difficult to study in live embryos due to their intra-uterine development. Moreover, phenotypes may be obscured by secondary effects of hypoxia. As a first step towards developing a model for contributions of β subunits to the onset of embryonic heart rhythm, we characterized the structure and expression of β2 subunits in zebrafish and other teleosts. Results Cloning of two zebrafish β2 subunit genes (β2.1 and β2.2 indicated they are membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK-family genes. Zebrafish β2 genes show high conservation with mammals within the SH3 and guanylate kinase domains that comprise the "core" of MAGUK proteins, but β2.2 is much more divergent in sequence than β2.1. Alternative splicing occurs at the N-terminus and within the internal HOOK domain. In both β2 genes, alternative short ATG-containing first exons are separated by some of the largest introns in the genome, suggesting that individual transcript variants could be subject to independent cis-regulatory control. In the Tetraodon nigrovidis and Fugu rubripes genomes, we identified single β2 subunit gene loci. Comparative analysis of the teleost and human β2 loci indicates that the short 5' exon sequences are highly conserved. A subset of 5' exons appear to be unique to teleost genomes, while others are shared with mammals. Alternative splicing is temporally and

  7. Quantitative proteomics in teleost fish: Insights and challenges for neuroendocrine and neurotoxicology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyniuk, Christopher J.; Popesku, Jason T.; Chown, Brittany; Denslow, Nancy D.; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroendocrine systems integrate both extrinsic and intrinsic signals to regulate virtually all aspects of an animal’s physiology. In aquatic toxicology, studies have shown that pollutants are capable of disrupting the neuroendocrine system of teleost fish, and many chemicals found in the environment can also have a neurotoxic mode of action. Omics approaches are now used to better understand cell signaling cascades underlying fish neurophysiology and the control of pituitary hormone release, in addition to identifying adverse effects of pollutants in the teleostean central nervous system. For example, both high throughput genomics and proteomic investigations of molecular signaling cascades for both neurotransmitter and nuclear receptor agonists/antagonists have been reported. This review highlights recent studies that have utilized quantitative proteomics methods such as 2D differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) in neuroendocrine regions and uses these examples to demonstrate the challenges of using proteomics in neuroendocrinology and neurotoxicology research. To begin to characterize the teleost neuroproteome, we functionally annotated 623 unique proteins found in the fish hypothalamus and telencephalon. These proteins have roles in biological processes that include synaptic transmission, ATP production, receptor activity, cell structure and integrity, and stress responses. The biological processes most represented by proteins detected in the teleost neuroendocrine brain included transport (8.4%), metabolic process (5.5%), and glycolysis (4.8%). We provide an example of using sub-network enrichment analysis (SNEA) to identify protein networks in the fish hypothalamus in response to dopamine receptor signaling. Dopamine signaling altered the abundance of proteins that are binding partners of microfilaments, integrins, and intermediate filaments, consistent with data suggesting dopaminergic

  8. Sialic acid and cholesterol variations during oogenesis of an estuarine teleost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veena, K.B.; Chacko, J. [Cochin, Univ. of Science and Technology (India). Dept. of Chemical Oceanography; Radhakrishnan, C.K. [Cochin, Univ. of Science and Technology (India). Dept. of Marine Biology. Biochemistry and Microbiology

    1995-12-31

    The pituitary gland, ovaries and blood of the three different stages of maturity of Etroplus maculatus (Bloch) were subjected to biochemical analysis. The changes in the concentrations of sialic acid in the pituitary gland and blood were observed to related oogenesis. A similar trend in concentrations of cholesterol in the ovary and blood were also observed. The amount of Sialic acid and cholesterol has been reported to give the measure of glycoprotein hormones in the pituitary gland (LICHT and PAPKOFF, 1972) and steroid hormones (NORRIS, 1985). The variation in the concentration of sialic acid and cholesterol in the tissues of the estuarine teleost Etroplus maculatus observed during oogenesis, emphasises their important roles during ovarian development.

  9. Diversity of trypanorhynch metacestodes in teleost fishes from coral reefs off eastern Australia and New Caledonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beveridge Ian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanorhynch metacestodes were examined from teleosts from coral reefs in eastern Australia and from New Caledonia. From over 12,000 fishes examined, 33 named species of trypanorhynchs were recovered as well as three species of tentacularioids which are described but not named. Host-parasite and parasite-host lists are provided, including more than 100 new host records. Lacistorhynchoid and tentacularioid taxa predominated with fewer otobothrioid and gymnorhynchoids. Five species, Callitetrarhynchus gracilis, Floriceps minacanthus, Pseudotobothrium dipsacum, Pseudolacistorhynchus heroniensis and Ps. shipleyi, were particularly common and exhibited low host specificity. Limited data suggested a higher diversity of larval trypanorhynchs in larger piscivorous fish families. Several fish families surveyed extensively (Blenniidae, Chaetodontidae, Gobiidae, Kyphosidae and Scaridae yielded no trypanorhynch larvae. The overall similarity between the fauna of the Great Barrier Reef and New Caledonia was 45%. Where available, information on the adult stages in elasmobranchs has been included.

  10. The genomic and genetic toolbox of the teleost medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchmaier, Stephan; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Loosli, Felix

    2015-04-01

    The Japanese medaka, Oryzias latipes, is a vertebrate teleost model with a long history of genetic research. A number of unique features and established resources distinguish medaka from other vertebrate model systems. A large number of laboratory strains from different locations are available. Due to a high tolerance to inbreeding, many highly inbred strains have been established, thus providing a rich resource for genetic studies. Furthermore, closely related species native to different habitats in Southeast Asia permit comparative evolutionary studies. The transparency of embryos, larvae, and juveniles allows a detailed in vivo analysis of development. New tools to study diverse aspects of medaka biology are constantly being generated. Thus, medaka has become an important vertebrate model organism to study development, behavior, and physiology. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of established genetic and molecular-genetic tools that render medaka fish a full-fledged vertebrate system. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  11. Genome duplication in the teleost fish Tetraodon nigroviridis reveals the early vertebrate proto-karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaillon, Olivier; Aury, Jean-Marc; Brunet, Frédéric; Petit, Jean-Louis; Stange-Thomann, Nicole; Mauceli, Evan; Bouneau, Laurence; Fischer, Cécile; Ozouf-Costaz, Catherine; Bernot, Alain; Nicaud, Sophie; Jaffe, David; Fisher, Sheila; Lutfalla, Georges; Dossat, Carole; Segurens, Béatrice; Dasilva, Corinne; Salanoubat, Marcel; Levy, Michael; Boudet, Nathalie; Castellano, Sergi; Anthouard, Véronique; Jubin, Claire; Castelli, Vanina; Katinka, Michael; Vacherie, Benoît; Biémont, Christian; Skalli, Zineb; Cattolico, Laurence; Poulain, Julie; De Berardinis, Véronique; Cruaud, Corinne; Duprat, Simone; Brottier, Philippe; Coutanceau, Jean-Pierre; Gouzy, Jérôme; Parra, Genis; Lardier, Guillaume; Chapple, Charles; McKernan, Kevin J; McEwan, Paul; Bosak, Stephanie; Kellis, Manolis; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Guigó, Roderic; Zody, Michael C; Mesirov, Jill; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Birren, Bruce; Nusbaum, Chad; Kahn, Daniel; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc; Laudet, Vincent; Schachter, Vincent; Quétier, Francis; Saurin, William; Scarpelli, Claude; Wincker, Patrick; Lander, Eric S; Weissenbach, Jean; Roest Crollius, Hugues

    2004-10-21

    Tetraodon nigroviridis is a freshwater puffer fish with the smallest known vertebrate genome. Here, we report a draft genome sequence with long-range linkage and substantial anchoring to the 21 Tetraodon chromosomes. Genome analysis provides a greatly improved fish gene catalogue, including identifying key genes previously thought to be absent in fish. Comparison with other vertebrates and a urochordate indicates that fish proteins have diverged markedly faster than their mammalian homologues. Comparison with the human genome suggests approximately 900 previously unannotated human genes. Analysis of the Tetraodon and human genomes shows that whole-genome duplication occurred in the teleost fish lineage, subsequent to its divergence from mammals. The analysis also makes it possible to infer the basic structure of the ancestral bony vertebrate genome, which was composed of 12 chromosomes, and to reconstruct much of the evolutionary history of ancient and recent chromosome rearrangements leading to the modern human karyotype.

  12. Renal acid-base physiology in marine teleost, the long-horned sculpin (Myoxocephalus octodecimspinosus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maren, T H; Fine, A; Swenson, E R; Rothman, D

    1992-07-01

    We have sought to define urinary acid-base excretion in the marine teleost using the long-horned sculpin, Myoxocephalus octodecimspinosus. Urine flow (1.7 ml.h-1.kg-1) is relatively high, and glomerular filtration rate is very low (2.9 ml.h-1.kg-1). The urine-to-plasma ratio of inulin is 2. Renal clearance of p-aminohippurate is very high (108 ml.h-1.kg-1); phosphate and divalent cations are also secreted. In this framework we found urinary pH to average 6.6, but infusion of acid or alkali elicited a pH range of 6.1-7.8. Untreated fish may also have alkaline urine; so it is not surprising that precipitates of calcium or magnesium phosphate are sometimes found in bladder. These are of fine sandy quality and never cause blockage. Infusion of buffer (imidazole) increased the concentration of titratable acid 11-fold and output 2.5-fold. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors had no effect on any urinary component, and histochemical studies revealed that cytoplasm and membranes did not yield the specific cobalt stain for the enzyme. An alkaline load (NaHCO3) is rapidly dissipated by gill excretion, mediated in part by carbonic anhydrase. An acid load (HCl) is rapidly dissipated by gill excretion, not dependent on carbonic anhydrase, and some renal excretion. Comparison and contrast of the low rates of HCO3- reabsorption in the marine teleost (and elasmobranch) with those of mammals suggest strongly that renal carbonic anhydrase evolved in connection with these high reabsorptive rates beginning in freshwater fish and continuing through amphibia and birds.

  13. Transducin Duplicates in the Zebrafish Retina and Pineal Complex: Differential Specialisation after the Teleost Tetraploidisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagman, David; Callado-Pérez, Amalia; Franzén, Ilkin E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplications provide raw materials that can be selected for functional adaptations by evolutionary mechanisms. We describe here the results of 350 million years of evolution of three functionally related gene families: the alpha, beta and gamma subunits of transducins, the G protein involved in vision. Early vertebrate tetraploidisations resulted in separate transducin heterotrimers: gnat1/gnb1/gngt1 for rods, and gnat2/gnb3/gngt2 for cones. The teleost-specific tetraploidisation generated additional duplicates for gnb1, gnb3 and gngt2. We report here that the duplicates have undergone several types of subfunctionalisation or neofunctionalisation in the zebrafish. We have found that gnb1a and gnb1b are co-expressed at different levels in rods; gnb3a and gnb3b have undergone compartmentalisation restricting gnb3b to the dorsal and medial retina, however, gnb3a expression was detected only at very low levels in both larvae and adult retina; gngt2b expression is restricted to the dorsal and medial retina, whereas gngt2a is expressed ventrally. This dorsoventral distinction could be an adaptation to protect the lower part of the retina from intense light damage. The ontogenetic analysis shows earlier onset of expression in the pineal complex than in the retina, in accordance with its earlier maturation. Additionally, gnb1a but not gnb1b is expressed in the pineal complex, and gnb3b and gngt2b are transiently expressed in the pineal during ontogeny, thus showing partial temporal subfunctionalisation. These retina-pineal distinctions presumably reflect their distinct functional roles in vision and circadian rhythmicity. In summary, this study describes several functional differences between transducin gene duplicates resulting from the teleost-specific tetraploidisation. PMID:25806532

  14. Calcium dynamics and regulation in horizontal cells of the vertebrate retina: lessons from teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Country, Michael W; Jonz, Michael G

    2017-02-01

    Horizontal cells (HCs) are inhibitory interneurons of the vertebrate retina. Unlike typical neurons, HCs are chronically depolarized in the dark, leading to a constant influx of Ca 2+ Therefore, mechanisms of Ca 2+ homeostasis in HCs must differ from neurons elsewhere in the central nervous system, which undergo excitotoxicity when they are chronically depolarized or stressed with Ca 2+ HCs are especially well characterized in teleost fish and have been used to unlock mysteries of the vertebrate retina for over one century. More recently, mammalian models of the retina have been increasingly informative for HC physiology. We draw from both teleost and mammalian models in this review, using a comparative approach to examine what is known about Ca 2+ pathways in vertebrate HCs. We begin with a survey of Ca 2+ -permeable ion channels, exchangers, and pumps and summarize Ca 2+ influx and efflux pathways, buffering, and intracellular stores. This includes evidence for Ca 2+ -permeable α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and for voltage-gated Ca 2+ channels. Special attention is given to interactions between ion channels, to differences among species, and in which subtypes of HCs these channels have been found. We then discuss a number of unresolved issues pertaining to Ca 2+ dynamics in HCs, including a potential role for Ca 2+ in feedback to photoreceptors, the role for Ca 2+ -induced Ca 2+ release, and the properties and functions of Ca 2+ -based action potentials. This review aims to highlight the unique Ca 2+ dynamics in HCs, as these are inextricably tied to retinal function. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Unique hepatic cytosolic arginase evolved independently in ureogenic freshwater air-breathing teleost, Heteropneustes fossilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpee Srivastava

    Full Text Available Hepatic cytosolic arginase (ARG I, an enzyme of the urea cycle operating in the liver of ureotelic animals, is reported to be present in an ammoniotelic freshwater air-breathing teleost, Heteropneustes fossilis which has ureogenic potential. Antibodies available against mammalian ARG I showed no cross reactivity with the H. fossilis ARG I. We purified unique ARG I from H. fossilis liver. Purified ARG I is a homotrimer with molecular mass 75 kDa and subunit molecular mass of 24 kDa. The pI value of the enzyme was 8.5. It showed maximum activity at pH 10.5 and 55°C. The Km of purified enzyme for L-arginine was 2.65±0.39 mM. L-ornithine and N(ω-hydroxy-L-arginine showed inhibition of the ARG I activity, with Ki values 0.52±0.02mM and 0.08±0.006mM, respectively. Antibody raised against the purified fish liver ARG I showed exclusive specificity, and has no cross reactivity against fish liver ARG II and mammalian liver ARG I and ARG II. We found another isoform of arginase bound to the outer membrane of the mitochondria which was released by 150-200 mM KCl in the extraction medium. This isoform was immunologically different from the soluble cytosolic and mitochondrial arginase. The results of present study support that hepatic cytosolic arginase evolved in this ureogenic freshwater teleost, H. fossilis. Phylogenetic analysis confirms an independent evolution event that occurred much after the evolution of the cytosolic arginase of ureotelic vertebrates.

  16. Spatial distribution and cellular composition of adult brain proliferative zones in the teleost, Gymnotus omarorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina eOlivera-Pasilio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Proliferation of stem/progenitor cells during development provides for the generation of mature cell types in the CNS. While adult brain proliferation is highly restricted in the mammals, it is widespread in teleosts. The extent of adult neural proliferation in the weakly electric fish, Gymnotus omarorum has not yet been described. To address this, we used double thymidine analog pulse-chase labeling of proliferating cells to identify brain proliferation zones, characterize their cellular composition, and analyze the fate of newborn cells in adult G. omarorum. Short thymidine analog chase periods revealed the ubiquitous distribution of adult brain proliferation, similar to other teleosts, particularly Apteronotus leptorhynchus. Proliferating cells were abundant at the ventricular-subventricular lining of the ventricular-cisternal system, adjacent to the telencephalic subpallium, the diencephalic preoptic region and hypothalamus, and the mesencephalic tectum opticum and torus semicircularis. Extraventricular proliferation zones, located distant from the ventricular-cisternal system surface, were found in all divisions of the rombencephalic cerebellum. We also report a new adult proliferation zone at the caudal-lateral border of the electrosensory lateral line lobe. All proliferation zones showed a heterogeneous cellular composition. The use of short (24hs and long (30d chase periods revealed abundant fast cycling cells (potentially intermediate amplifiers, sparse slow cycling (potentially stem cells, cells that appear to have entered a quiescent state, and cells that might correspond to migrating newborn neural cells. Their abundance and migration distance differed among proliferation zones: greater numbers and longer range and/or pace of migrating cells were associated with subpallial and cerebellar proliferation zones.

  17. An electron microscopic investigation into the possible source of new muscle fibres in teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoiber, W; Sänger, A M

    1996-12-01

    This study is based on transmission electron microscopic (TEM) investigations of deep (fast, 'white') teleost fish muscle proliferation in early developmental stages of three European cyprinid species and the rainbow trout. Our fine structural findings provide evidence that early myotomal growth in these animals may utilize different mechanisms that are activated in close succession during early life history. First, initial enlargement of the deep muscle bulk in the embryo seems to be due to hypertrophy of the somite-cell derived stock of muscle fibres. Second, we suggest that deep muscle growth becomes additionally powered by attachment of presumptive myogenic cells that originate from and proliferate within the adjacent mesenchymal tissue lining. Third, mesenchyme-derived muscle cell precursors are thought to enter the myotomes via the myosepta. After migration between the pre-established muscle fibres these cells may function as myosatellite cells, thus at least partly providing the stem cell population for subsequent rapid hyperplastic growth. Finally, there is evidence that presumptive deep muscle satellite cells also proliferate by mitotic division in situ. A similar process of myogenic cell migration and proliferation may foster intermediate fibre differentiation. The model of myogenic cell migration is discussed in view of in vitro and in vivo data on satellite cell migratory power and with respect to temperature-induced and species dependent differences. As for the latter, our results indicate that patterns of muscle differentiation may diverge between a fast growing salmonid species and a moderately growing cyprinid species of similar final size. The model is compatible with the well-established idea that teleost muscle growth may rely on different subclasses of myosatellite cells.

  18. Biomarkers of Aryl-hydrocarbon Receptor Activity in Gulf Killifish (Fundulus grandis) From Northern Gulf of Mexico Marshes Following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubansky, Benjamin; Rice, Charles D; Barrois, Lester F; Galvez, Fernando

    2017-07-01

    Following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, shorelines throughout the Barataria Basin of the northern Gulf of Mexico in Louisiana were heavily oiled for months with Macondo-252 oil, potentially impacting estuarine species. The Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) has been identified as a sentinel species for the study of site-specific effects of crude oil contamination on biological function. In November and December 2010, 4-5 months after the Macondo well was plugged and new oil was no longer spilling into the Gulf waters, Gulf killifish were collected across the Barataria Basin from 14 sites with varying degrees of oiling. Fish collected from oiled sites exhibited biological indications of exposure to oil, including increase in cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) mRNA transcript and protein abundances in liver tissues. Immunohistochemistry revealed increases in gill, head kidney, and intestinal CYP1A protein at heavily oiled sites. Intestinal CYP1A protein was a sensitive indicator of exposure, indicating that intestinal tissue plays a key role in biotransformation of AHR ligands and that ingestion is a probable route of exposure, warranting additional consideration in future studies.

  19. Effects of various ecological factors on radiostrontium uptake in two euryhaline teleosts: Mugil auratus Risso and Pleuronectes platessa L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiard, J.-C.

    1975-11-01

    The effects of various ecological, biotic and abiotic factors (age, species, salinity, temperature, sediment, calcium overload, food) on the accumulation of 85 Sr were studied in two euryhaline Teleosts. Generally, all the physico-chemical and biotic factors tending to activate metabolism, slightly increased radiostrontium intake. Concentration factors were seldom above one for animals measured in toto. According to the concentration kinetics of 85 Sr, three types of organs were distinguished: bone-type tissues, soft tissues and digestive tract [fr

  20. Evolutionary analysis of TLR9 genes reveals the positive selection of extant teleosts in Perciformes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhihuang; Sun, Yuena; Wang, Rixin; Xu, Tianjun

    2013-08-01

    The innate immune system can recognize non-self through pattern recognition receptors. Toll-like receptors were the best-known members of these receptors, and they could sense, recognize, and bind pathogen-associated molecular patterns. TLRs played an important role in innate immune system and were conserved in both invertebrate and vertebrate lineages. Thereinto, TLR9 could detect unmethylated CpG motifs in dsDNA and was expected to undergo coevolution with its microbial ligands. It was known that aquatic and terrestrial organisms dwelled in different environments which contained different pathogens, and they had to adapt to their local environmental conditions. Therefore, we collected TLR9 genes from invertebrate to vertebrate to further explore whether the huge differences between aquatic and terrestrial environments affected the TLR9s evolution between aquatic and terrestrial organisms. Molecular evolution analysis detected positively selected sites in the ancestral lineages of vertebrates, teleosts, and Perciformes but not in the ancestral lineage of mammals. In PAML, site model revealed that extant mammalian TLR9 genes underwent positive selection. However, the positive selection of extant teleosts appeared primarily in Perciformes in which there were 14 positively selected sites. Among these sites, two of them were located on the amino acid insertions of the leucine-rich repeats which could create DNA binding sites, three were found on the convex surface which might possibly affect the flexibility of the TLR solenoids, and six were located on the β-face of concave surface which contained the ligand-binding sites of the TLR solenoids. In other ML methods, we also found three sites under selection that coincided with the codons identified by M8 and these sites were all located in LRRs. The diverse aquatic and terrestrial environments might possess different pathogens to make the living organisms adapt to their local environmental conditions. The positive

  1. A unique mode of tissue oxygenation and the adaptive radiation of teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, D J; Rummer, J L; Wilson, J M; Wang, S; Brauner, C J

    2014-04-15

    Teleost fishes constitute 95% of extant aquatic vertebrates, and we suggest that this is related in part to their unique mode of tissue oxygenation. We propose the following sequence of events in the evolution of their oxygen delivery system. First, loss of plasma-accessible carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the gill and venous circulations slowed the Jacobs-Stewart cycle and the transfer of acid between the plasma and the red blood cells (RBCs). This ameliorated the effects of a generalised acidosis (associated with an increased capacity for burst swimming) on haemoglobin (Hb)-O2 binding. Because RBC pH was uncoupled from plasma pH, the importance of Hb as a buffer was reduced. The decrease in buffering was mediated by a reduction in the number of histidine residues on the Hb molecule and resulted in enhanced coupling of O2 and CO2 transfer through the RBCs. In the absence of plasma CA, nearly all plasma bicarbonate ultimately dehydrated to CO2 occurred via the RBCs, and chloride/bicarbonate exchange was the rate-limiting step in CO2 excretion. This pattern of CO2 excretion across the gills resulted in disequilibrium states for CO2 hydration/dehydration reactions and thus elevated arterial and venous plasma bicarbonate levels. Plasma-accessible CA embedded in arterial endothelia was retained, which eliminated the localized bicarbonate disequilibrium forming CO2 that then moved into the RBCs. Consequently, RBC pH decreased which, in conjunction with pH-sensitive Bohr/Root Hbs, elevated arterial oxygen tensions and thus enhanced tissue oxygenation. Counter-current arrangement of capillaries (retia) at the eye and later the swim bladder evolved along with the gas gland at the swim bladder. Both arrangements enhanced and magnified CO2 and acid production and, therefore, oxygen secretion to those specialised tissues. The evolution of β-adrenergically stimulated RBC Na(+)/H(+) exchange protected gill O2 uptake during stress and further augmented plasma disequilibrium states

  2. Phylogenetic perspectives on the evolution of functional hermaphroditism in teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erisman, Brad E; Petersen, Christopher W; Hastings, Philip A; Warner, Robert R

    2013-10-01

    Hermaphroditism is taxonomically widespread among teleost fishes and takes on many forms including simultaneous, protogynous, and protandrous hermaphroditism, bidirectional sex change, and androdioecy. The proximate mechanisms that influence the timing, incidence, and forms of hermaphroditism in fishes are supported by numerous theoretical and empirical studies on their mating systems and sexual patterns, but few have examined aspects of sex-allocation theory or the evolution of hermaphroditism for this group within a strict phylogenetic context. Fortunately, species-level phylogenetic reconstructions of the evolutionary history of many lineages of fishes have emerged, providing opportunities for understanding fine-scale evolutionary pathways and transformations of sex allocation. Examinations of several families of fishes with adequate data on phylogeny, patterns of sex allocation, mating systems, and with some form of hermaphroditism reveal that the evolution and expression of protogyny and other forms of sex allocation show little evidence of phylogenetic inertia within specific lineages but rather are associated with particular mating systems in accordance with prevalent theories about sex allocation. Transformations from protogyny to gonochorism in groupers (Epinephelidae), seabasses (Serranidae), and wrasses and parrotfishes (Labridae) are associated with equivalent transformations in the structure of mating groups from spawning of pairs to group spawning and related increases in sperm competition. Similarly, patterns of protandry, androdioecy, simultaneous hermaphroditism, and bidirectional sex change in other lineages (Aulopiformes, Gobiidae, and Pomacentridae) match well with particular mating systems in accordance with sex-allocation theory. Unlike other animals and plants, we did not find evidence that transitions between hermaphroditism and gonochorism required functional intermediates. Two instances in which our general conclusions might not hold

  3. Exploring a Nonmodel Teleost Genome Through RAD Sequencing—Linkage Mapping in Common Pandora, Pagellus erythrinus and Comparative Genomic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Manousaki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Common pandora (Pagellus erythrinus is a benthopelagic marine fish belonging to the teleost family Sparidae, and a newly recruited species in Mediterranean aquaculture. The paucity of genetic information relating to sparids, despite their growing economic value for aquaculture, provides the impetus for exploring the genomics of this fish group. Genomic tool development, such as genetic linkage maps provision, lays the groundwork for linking genotype to phenotype, allowing fine-mapping of loci responsible for beneficial traits. In this study, we applied ddRAD methodology to identify polymorphic markers in a full-sib family of common pandora. Employing the Illumina MiSeq platform, we sampled and sequenced a size-selected genomic fraction of 99 individuals, which led to the identification of 920 polymorphic loci. Downstream mapping analysis resulted in the construction of 24 robust linkage groups, corresponding to the karyotype of the species. The common pandora linkage map showed varying degrees of conserved synteny with four other teleost genomes, namely the European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax, Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus, stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus, and medaka (Oryzias latipes, suggesting a conserved genomic evolution in Sparidae. Our work exploits the possibilities of genotyping by sequencing to gain novel insights into genome structure and evolution. Such information will boost the study of cultured species and will set the foundation for a deeper understanding of the complex evolutionary history of teleosts.

  4. Temporal pattern of loss/persistence of duplicate genes involved in signal transduction and metabolic pathways after teleost-specific genome duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato Yukuto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent genomic studies have revealed a teleost-specific third-round whole genome duplication (3R-WGD event occurred in a common ancestor of teleost fishes. However, it is unclear how the genes duplicated in this event were lost or persisted during the diversification of teleosts, and therefore, how many of the duplicated genes contribute to the genetic differences among teleosts. This subject is also important for understanding the process of vertebrate evolution through WGD events. We applied a comparative evolutionary approach to this question by focusing on the genes involved in long-term potentiation, taste and olfactory transduction, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, based on the whole genome sequences of four teleosts; zebrafish, medaka, stickleback, and green spotted puffer fish. Results We applied a state-of-the-art method of maximum-likelihood phylogenetic inference and conserved synteny analyses to each of 130 genes involved in the above biological systems of human. These analyses identified 116 orthologous gene groups between teleosts and tetrapods, and 45 pairs of 3R-WGD-derived duplicate genes among them. This suggests that more than half [(45×2/(116+45] = 56.5% of the loci, probably more than ten thousand genes, present in a common ancestor of the four teleosts were still duplicated after the 3R-WGD. The estimated temporal pattern of gene loss suggested that, after the 3R-WGD, many (71/116 of the duplicated genes were rapidly lost during the initial 75 million years (MY, whereas on average more than half (27.3/45 of the duplicated genes remaining in the ancestor of the four teleosts (45/116 have persisted for about 275 MY. The 3R-WGD-derived duplicates that have persisted for a long evolutionary periods of time had significantly larger number of interacting partners and longer length of protein coding sequence, implying that they tend to be more multifunctional than the singletons after the 3R-WGD. Conclusion

  5. Dominance of dietary intake of metals in marine elasmobranch and teleost fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, Teresa [Marine Sciences Research Center, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States); Fisher, Nicholas S., E-mail: nfisher@notes.cc.sunysb.edu [Marine Sciences Research Center, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Metal accumulation in marine fish is a global public health concern, because the consumption of seafood provides the largest dose of many toxic metals to humans. While water quality criteria often rely on aqueous exposures of metals to fish in developing safety guidelines, it is increasingly recognized that marine fish obtain an important fraction of their metal body burden from their diet. Using experimental data, we modeled the accumulation of six metals (Am, Cd, Cs, Co, Mn, Zn) from diet and from the aqueous phase in two marine fish species, the teleost Psetta maxima and elasmobranch Scyliorhinus canicula. We estimated steady-state metal concentrations and calculated the relative contributions of dietary and aqueous intake in both species. For both species > 60% and often > 90% of Mn, Cd, and Zn derives from dietary intake in these species, even at the lowest ingestion rates reported for these fish. At low ingestion rates, Am was obtained predominantly from the aqueous phase and Cs varied considerably depending on prey selection. Inter-specific differences were noted, especially in Co uptake. Model predictions of steady-state tissue metal concentrations are within the range of field measurements for these species. Our findings underscore the importance of including dietary exposure in understanding metal accumulation in marine fish.

  6. Mitochondrial aquaporin-8-mediated hydrogen peroxide transport is essential for teleost spermatozoon motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvigné, François; Boj, Mónica; Finn, Roderick Nigel; Cerdà, Joan

    2015-01-14

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), cause oxidative cell damage and inhibit sperm function. In most oviparous fishes that spawn in seawater (SW), spermatozoa may be exposed to harmful ROS loads associated with the hyperosmotic stress of axonemal activation and ATP synthesis from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. However, it is not known how marine spermatozoa can cope with the increased ROS levels to maintain flagellar motility. Here, we show that a marine teleost orthologue of human aquaporin-8, termed Aqp8b, is rapidly phosphorylated and inserted into the inner mitochondrial membrane of SW-activated spermatozoa, where it facilitates H2O2 efflux from this compartment. When Aqp8b intracellular trafficking and mitochondrial channel activity are immunologically blocked in activated spermatozoa, ROS levels accumulate in the mitochondria leading to mitochondrial membrane depolarisation, the reduction of ATP production, and the progressive arrest of sperm motility. However, the decreased sperm vitality underlying Aqp8b loss of function is fully reversed in the presence of a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant. These findings reveal a previously unknown detoxification mechanism in spermatozoa under hypertonic conditions, whereby mitochondrial Aqp8b-mediated H2O2 efflux permits fuel production and the maintenance of flagellar motility.

  7. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity is common in the enteric nervous system in teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Catharina

    2016-05-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of catecholamines and TH immunoreactivity is indicative of cells synthesising either adrenaline/noradrenaline or dopamine. In this study, the distribution of TH immunoreactivity was examined in two distantly related teleost species, zebrafish (Danio rerio) and shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius). In both species, TH-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies and varicose nerve fibres were common in the myenteric plexus of the intestine. However, no TH-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies were seen in the sculpin stomach. The TH-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies seemed to constitute a larger proportion of the total enteric population in shorthorn sculpin (50 ± 5 %, n = 3067 cells) compared with zebrafish (14 ± 2 %, n = 10,163 cells). In contrast, in sculpin, the TH-immunoreactive cells were smaller than the average enteric nerve cell bodies, whereas in zebrafish, the relationship was the opposite. In developing zebrafish larvae, TH-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies were common (approx. 75 % of the total population) at 3 days post-fertilization (dpf), but decreased in numbers between 3 and 7 dpf. In conclusion, in contrast to previous studies, TH-immunoreactive intrinsic neurons are common in the fish gut. Their role and function need to be further characterized in order to understand the potential importance of this enteric subpopulation in controlling various gut functions.

  8. Data smoothing techniques applied to proton microprobe scans of teleost hard parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, I.F.; Gauldie, R.W.; Coote, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    We use a proton microprobe to examine the distribution of elements in otoliths and scales of teleost (bony) fish. The elements of principal interest are calcium and strontium in otoliths and calcium and fluorine in scales. Changes in the distribution of these elements across hard structures may allow inferences about the life histories of fish. Otoliths and scales of interest are up to a centimeter in linear dimension and to reveal the structures of interest up to 200 sampling points are required in each dimension. The time needed to accumulate high X-ray counts at each sampling point can be large, particularly for strontium. To reduce microprobe usage we use data smoothing techniques to reveal changing patterns with modest X-ray count accumulations at individual data points. In this paper we review performance for revealing pattern at modest levels of X-ray count accumulations of a selection of digital filters (moving average smoothers), running median filters, robust locally weighted regression filters and adaptive spline filters. (author)

  9. Rhythmic expressed clock regulates the transcription of proliferating cellular nuclear antigen in teleost retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hang; Wang, Defeng; De Jesus Perez, Felipe; Xie, Rongrong; Liu, Zhipeng; Chen, Chun-Chun; Yu, Meijuan; Yuan, Liudi; Fernald, Russell D; Zhao, Sheng

    2017-07-01

    Teleost fish continues to grow their eyes throughout life with the body size. In Astatotilapia burtoni, the fish retina increases by adding new retinal cells at the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ) and in the outer nuclear layer (ONL). Cell proliferation at both sites exhibits a daily rhythm in number of dividing cells. To understand how this diurnal rhythm of new cell production is controlled in retinal progenitor cells, we studied the transcription pattern of clock genes in retina, including clock1a, clock1b, bmal1a (brain and muscle ARNT-Like), and per1b (period1b). We found that these genes have a strong diurnal rhythmic transcription during light-dark cycles but not in constant darkness. An oscillation in pcna transcription was also observed during light-dark cycles, but again not in constant darkness. Our results also indicate an association between Clock proteins and the upstream region of pcna (proliferating cellular nuclear antigen) gene. A luciferase reporter assay conducted in an inducible clock knockdown cell line further demonstrated that the mutation on predicted E-Boxes in pcna promoter region significantly attenuated the transcriptional activation induced by Clock protein. These results suggested that the diurnal rhythmic expression of clock genes in A. burtoni retina could be light dependent and might contribute to the daily regulation of the proliferation of the retina progenitors through key components of cell cycle machinery, for instance, pcna. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Gill chemoreceptors and cardio-respiratory reflexes in the neotropical teleost pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, C A C; Florindo, L H; Kalinin, A L; Milsom, W K; Rantin, F T

    2007-09-01

    This study examined the location and distribution of O(2) chemoreceptors involved in cardio-respiratory responses to hypoxia in the neotropical teleost, the pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus). Intact fish and fish experiencing progressive gill denervation by selective transection of cranial nerves IX and X were exposed to gradual hypoxia and submitted to intrabuccal and intravenous injections of NaCN while their heart rate, ventilation rate and ventilation amplitude were measured. The chemoreceptors producing reflex bradycardia were confined to, but distributed along all gill arches, and were sensitive to O(2) levels in the water and the blood. Ventilatory responses to all stimuli, though modified, continued following gill denervation, however, indicating the presence of internally and externally oriented receptors along all gill arches and either in the pseudobranch or at extra-branchial sites. Chemoreceptors located on the first pair of gill arches and innervated by the glossopharyngeal nerve appeared to attenuate the cardiac and respiratory responses to hypoxia. The data indicate that the location and distribution of cardio-respiratory O(2) receptors are not identical to those in tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) despite their similar habitats and close phylogenetic lineage, although the differences between the two species could reduce to nothing more than the presence or absence of the pseudobranch.

  11. A fourth teleost lineage possessing extra-oral teeth: the genus atherion (teleostei; atheriniformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sire, J Y; Allizard, F

    2001-12-01

    In the course of an evolutionary and developmental study on the dermal skeleton, our attention was drawn to the existence of denticles located outside the oral cavity in the atheriniform species Atherion elymus. These denticles, attached to the surface of most dermal bones of the head, are especially numerous on the snout, chin and the undersides of the lower region of the head, where they are aligned forming a crenulated keel. Using light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, we clearly demonstrate the dental (vs bony) nature of these denticles. They are small, conical elements mostly oriented backwards and are not ankylosed to the bone support. Ligaments originating from the internal and external surface of the base of the dentine cone link the denticles to the attachment bone, which itself merges with the bone support below. The denticles have the same form and structure as teeth, from which they differ only in having a larger base and a pulp cavity that is nearly completely filled with secondary dentine by centripetal deposition. This suggests that the denticles have a longer functional history than teeth. Atherion is now the fourth teleost lineage found to develop such denticles on the head.

  12. The toxicological application of transcriptomics and epigenomics in zebrafish and other teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tim D; Mirbahai, Leda; Chipman, J Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one of a number of teleost fish species frequently employed in toxicology. Toxico-genomics determines global transcriptomic responses to chemical exposures and can predict their effects. It has been applied successfully within aquatic toxicology to assist in chemical testing, determination of mechanisms and environmental monitoring. Moreover, the related field of toxico-epigenomics, that determines chemical-induced changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications and micro-RNA expression, is emerging as a valuable contribution to understanding mechanisms of both adaptive and adverse responses. Zebrafish has proven a useful and convenient model species for both transcriptomic and epigenetic toxicological studies. Despite zebrafish's dominance in other areas of fish biology, alternative fish species are used extensively in toxico-genomics. The main reason for this is that environmental monitoring generally focuses on species native to the region of interest. We are starting to see advances in the integration of high-throughput screening, omics techniques and bioinformatics together with more traditional indicator endpoints that are relevant to regulators. Integration of such approaches with high-throughput testing of zebrafish embryos, leading to the discovery of adverse outcome pathways, promises to make a major contribution to ensuring the safety of chemicals in the environment.

  13. Preference of the herbivorous marine teleost Siganus canaliculatus for different macroalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Cuihong; Zeng, Fangui; Wang, Shuqi; Li, Yuanyou

    2014-06-01

    The decomposition of a large amount of unexploited macroalgal resource along the coast of China often results in heavy environmental pollution. In order to pave a way of using macroalgae as the dietary ingredient of rabbitfish Siganus canaliculatus, one of a few farmed herbivorous marine teleosts in China, its preference (feeding selectivity) for different macroalgae was determined in this study. Seven seaweed species abundantly inhabiting the coast of east Guangdong Province were exposed simultaneously to rabbitfish juveniles in laboratory (multiple-choice feeding) with their content and absolute intake assayed. It was found that the most preferred algae were Ulva prolifera, Gracilaria lemaneiformis and Chaetomorpha linum, less preferred algae were U. pertusa and Porphyra haitanensis, and least preferred ones were Sargassum fusiforme and Corallina sessilis. Such an order did not change when one to four relatively preferred seaweeds were removed. The preferred seaweeds were richer in protein and soluble sugar thus higher in energy than the least preferred. In addition, this fish was found to favor filamentous and flat algae rather than calcified ones. Accordingly, the richness of nutrients and morphological characteristics determined the preference of S. canaliculatus for tested macroalgae.

  14. Habitat heterogeneity: importance of salt marsh pools and high marsh surfaces to fish production in two Gulf of Maine salt marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.A. MacKenzie; M. Dionne

    2008-01-01

    Both permanent high marsh pools and the intertidal surfaces of Spartina patens high marshes in southern Maine, USA, proved to be important habitat for resident mummichog Fundulus heteroclitus production. Manipulations of fish movement onto high marsh Surfaces revealed similar growth rates and production among fish that were (1) restricted to pools, (2) had access to...

  15. TEMPERATURE ACCLIMATION IN TILAPIA SPARRMAN//: SOME ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    plastic thyroid, induced by two months of thiourea treatment. Tissues were fixed in 10% formalin and sec- ..... CHAMBERS, H. A. 1953. Toxic effects of thiourea on the liver of the adult male killifish Fundulus heteroclitus (Linn.). Bull. Bingham. oceanogr. Coli. 14: 69-93. FORTUNE, P. Y. 1955. Comparative studies of the ...

  16. An update on MyoD evolution in teleosts and a proposed consensus nomenclature to accommodate the tetraploidization of different vertebrate genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Macqueen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MyoD is a muscle specific transcription factor that is essential for vertebrate myogenesis. In several teleost species, including representatives of the Salmonidae and Acanthopterygii, but not zebrafish, two or more MyoD paralogues are conserved that are thought to have arisen from distinct, possibly lineage-specific duplication events. Additionally, two MyoD paralogues have been characterised in the allotetraploid frog, Xenopus laevis. This has lead to a confusing nomenclature since MyoD paralogues have been named outside of an appropriate phylogenetic framework. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we initially show that directly depicting the evolutionary relationships of teleost MyoD orthologues and paralogues is hindered by the asymmetric evolutionary rate of Acanthopterygian MyoD2 relative to other MyoD proteins. Thus our aim was to confidently position the event from which teleost paralogues arose in different lineages by a comparative investigation of genes neighbouring myod across the vertebrates. To this end, we show that genes on the single myod-containing chromosome of mammals and birds are retained in both zebrafish and Acanthopterygian teleosts in a striking pattern of double conserved synteny. Further, phylogenetic reconstruction of these neighbouring genes using Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods supported a common origin for teleost paralogues following the split of the Actinopterygii and Sarcopterygii. CONCLUSION: Our results strongly suggest that myod was duplicated during the basal teleost whole genome duplication event, but was subsequently lost in the Ostariophysi (zebrafish and Protacanthopterygii lineages. We propose a sensible consensus nomenclature for vertebrate myod genes that accommodates polyploidization events in teleost and tetrapod lineages and is justified from a phylogenetic perspective.

  17. Identification of immunoreactive FSH and LH cells in the cichlid fish Cichlasoma dimerus during the ontogeny and sexual differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfi, Matías; Lo Nostro, Fabiana L; Shimizu, Akio; Pozzi, Andrea G; Meijide, Fernando J; Vazquez, Graciela Rey; Maggese, M Cristina

    2006-10-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) expressing cells were detected in pituitary, brain and ovary of the Perciform cichlid fish Cichlasoma dimerus. This detection was carried out by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blot techniques using antisera of the Cyprinodontiform Fundulus heteroclitus raised against the conservative region of the teleost betaFSH and the betaLH subunits. The estimated molecular weights were 24 kDa for LH and 19 and 15 kDa for FSH. In the adult pituitary, both cell types were distributed along mid and ventral zones of the proximal pars distalis (PPD, mid-immunoreactive cells), and along the ventral and dorsal external border of the pars intermedia (PI, high-immunoreactive cells). Double IHC showed that FSH and LH are mainly expressed in different pituitary cells. FSH cells were detected in the pituitary around day 21 after hatching (ah) (prior to sex differentiation), while LH cells were detected by day 60 ah (during the sexual differentiation period). A correlation between gonadal sex differentiation and FSH was demonstrated in a 15 days organ culture system. FSH and LH neurons were localized in the nucleus lateralis tuberis and their fibers project through the ventral hypothalamus, preoptic area and neurohypophysis. FSH neurons differentiated on day 21 ah, while LH neurons appeared on day 15 ah. In the ovary, the immunoreactivity for both FSH and LH was restricted to the cytoplasm of previtellogenic and early vitellogenic oocytes.

  18. Comparative proteomics analysis of teleost intermuscular bones and ribs provides insight into their development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Chun-Hong; Wan, Shi-Ming; Tomljanovic, Tea; Treer, Tomislav; Hsiao, Chung-Der; Wang, Wei-Min; Gao, Ze-Xia

    2017-02-10

    Intermuscular bones (IBs) and ribs both are a part of skeletal system in teleosts, but with different developing process. The chemical composition of fish IBs and ribs as well as the underlying mechanism about their development have not been investigated. In the present study, histological structures showed that one bone cavity containing osteoclasts were existed in ribs, but not in IBs of Megalobrama amblycephala. We constructed the first proteomics map for fish bones including IBs and ribs, and identified the differentially expressed proteins between IBs and ribs through iTRAQ LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis. The proteins extracted from IBs and ribs at 1- to 2-year old M. amblycephala were quantified 2,342 proteins, with 1,451 proteins annotated with GO annotation in biological processes, molecular function and cellular component. A number of bone related proteins as well as pathways were identified in the study. A total of 93 and 154 differently expressed proteins were identified in comparison groups of 1-IB-vs-1-Rib and 2-IB-vs-2-Rib, which indicated the obvious differences of chemical composition between these two bone tissues. The two proteins (vitronectin b precursor and matrix metalloproteinase-2) related to osteoclasts differentiation were significantly up-regulated in ribs compared with IBs (P development and differentiation. Subsequently, 11 and 13 candidate proteins in comparison group of 1-IB-vs-1-Rib and 1-IB-vs-2-IB related to bone development were validated by MRM assays. Our present study suggested the different key proteins involved in the composition of fish ribs and IBs as well as their growth development. These findings could provide important clues towards further understanding of fish skeletal system and the roles of proteins playing in regulating diverse biological processes in fish.

  19. The damage and repair of DNA in teleosts after administration of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupitza, G.H.G.

    1986-01-01

    14 C-MNU, dissolved in a DMSO-citratebuffer solution, was given intraperitoneally to Black Mollies (B.M.) and Poecilia formosa (P.f.). Gills, liver, tailfinmuscles, intestine, gonads and brain were removed from each fish and DNA was isolated by phenol extraction. The DNA was hydrolysed and then the purines were separated using HPLC. Methylation of purines was determined by a liquid scintillation counter. Maximum methylation was formed in the N-7 position of guanine in the DNA from intestine of B.M. The highest content of O 6 -methyl guanine was found in the DNA of tailfinmuscles of B.M. whereas DNA from brain of B.M. showed the maximum methylation in N-3 position of adenine. The methylation of the purines from B.M. showed the similar pattern as in P.f. but was quantitatively double the amount as that found in P.f. The methylation of O 6 -position of guanine and N-3 position of adenine occured earlier in P.f. than in B.M. Maximum methylation of purines from each of the organs investigated was found to occur after 1/2 to 8 hours. The amount of methylation as low as 10% of the maximum was observed in a period from 1/2 to 16 hours after the application of 14 C-MNU. Excision repair seems to be responsible for removal of N-3 methyl adenine and N-7 methyl guanine whereas O 6 -methyl guanine seems to be repaired by methyltransferases. Removal of methylgroups from O 6 -position of guanine and the excision repair known to exist in mammals and bacteria probably play a role in these two species of teleosts as well. (Author)

  20. Chronic granulomatous inflammation in teleost fish Piaractus mesopotamicus: histopathology model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson G Manrique

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study evaluated the cell kinetic and formation of granuloma during chronic inflammation induced by Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG in the skeletal muscle of Piaractus mesopotamicus, as a histopathology model to study innate immunity. Materials and methods. Sixty fish were divided in two groups: BCG-inoculated and non-inoculated fish and the inflammatory response analyzed 3, 7, 14, 21 and 33 days post-inoculation (DPI by histopathology after hematoxylin-eosin and Ziehl-Neelsen staining. Results. 3 DPI of BCG showed a diffuse inflammatory reaction mostly composed by mononuclear cells. The inflammation continued diffuse 7 DPI initiating the cellular organization surrounding the inoculum and have continued at 14 DPI with discrete presence of epithelioid-like type cells with acidophilic cytoplasm and floppy chromatin. Higher cellular organization (21 DPI surrounding the granuloma with intense peripheral mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate and nevertheless, an increase in the number of fibroblasts and macrophage-like cells was observed. The inflammatory process became less diffuse 33 DPI with formation of small amount of granuloma surrounded by the same type of reaction found in bigger granuloma. Both the young and old granuloma presented typical characteristic around the inoculum composed by a layer of epithelioid-like type cells, besides macrophages, some lymphocytes and abundant fibroblasts. Conclusions. This study showed the feasibility in the use of pacus to study chronic granulomatous inflammatory response induced by BCG, characterized by changes in the kinetics of inflammatory cells in skeletal muscle classifying as immune-epithelioid type, similar to granulomatous inflammation caused by M. marinum in teleost fish.

  1. Functional Identification of Dendritic Cells in the Teleost Model, Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassity, Elizabeth; Clark, Theodore G.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells are specialized antigen presenting cells that bridge innate and adaptive immunity in mammals. This link between the ancient innate immune system and the more evolutionarily recent adaptive immune system is of particular interest in fish, the oldest vertebrates to have both innate and adaptive immunity. It is unknown whether dendritic cells co-evolved with the adaptive response, or if the connection between innate and adaptive immunity relied on a fundamentally different cell type early in evolution. We approached this question using the teleost model organism, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), with the aim of identifying dendritic cells based on their ability to stimulate naïve T cells. Adapting mammalian protocols for the generation of dendritic cells, we established a method of culturing highly motile, non-adherent cells from trout hematopoietic tissue that had irregular membrane processes and expressed surface MHCII. When side-by-side mixed leukocyte reactions were performed, these cells stimulated greater proliferation than B cells or macrophages, demonstrating their specialized ability to present antigen and therefore their functional homology to mammalian dendritic cells. Trout dendritic cells were then further analyzed to determine if they exhibited other features of mammalian dendritic cells. Trout dendritic cells were found to have many of the hallmarks of mammalian DCs including tree-like morphology, the expression of dendritic cell markers, the ability to phagocytose small particles, activation by toll-like receptor-ligands, and the ability to migrate in vivo. As in mammals, trout dendritic cells could be isolated directly from the spleen, or larger numbers could be derived from hematopoietic tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. PMID:22427987

  2. Gill denervation eliminates the barostatic reflex in a neotropical teleost, the tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armelin, Vinicius Araújo; Braga, Victor Hugo da Silva; Teixeira, Mariana Teodoro; Rantin, Francisco Tadeu; Florindo, Luiz Henrique; Kalinin, Ana Lúcia

    2016-08-01

    The baroreflex is one of the most important regulators of cardiovascular homeostasis in vertebrates. It begins with the monitoring of arterial pressure by baroreceptors, which constantly provide the central nervous system with afferent information about the status of this variable. Any change in arterial pressure relative to its normal state triggers autonomic responses, which are characterized by an inversely proportional change in heart rate and systemic vascular resistance and which tend to restore pressure normality. Although the baroreceptors have been located in mammals and other terrestrial vertebrates, their location in fish is still not completely clear and remains quite controversial. Thus, the objective of this study was to locate the baroreceptors in a teleost, the Colossoma macropomum. To do so, the occurrence and efficiency of the baroreflex were both analyzed when this mechanism was induced by pressure imbalancements in intact fish (IN), first-gill-denervated fish (G1), and total-gill-denervated fish (G4). The pressure imbalances were initiated through the administration of the α1-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (100 µg kg(-1)) and the α1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin (1 mg kg(-1)). The baroreflex responses were then analyzed using an electrocardiogram that allowed for the measurement of the heart rate, the relationship between pre- and post-pharmacological manipulation heart rates, the time required for maximum chronotropic baroreflex response, and total heart rate variability. The results revealed that the barostatic reflex was attenuated in the G1 group and nonexistent in G4 group, findings which indicate that baroreceptors are exclusively located in the gill arches of C. macropomum.

  3. Cloning, functional characterization and nutritional regulation of Δ6 fatty acyl desaturase in the herbivorous euryhaline teleost Scatophagus argus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dizhi; Chen, Fang; Lin, Siyuan; Wang, Shuqi; You, Cuihong; Monroig, Óscar; Tocher, Douglas R; Li, Yuanyou

    2014-01-01

    Marine fish are generally unable or have low ability for the biosynthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) from C18 PUFA precursors, with some notable exceptions including the herbivorous marine teleost Siganus canaliculatus in which such a capability was recently demonstrated. To determine whether this is a unique feature of S. canaliculatus or whether it is common to the herbivorous marine teleosts, LC-PUFA biosynthetic pathways were investigated in the herbivorous euryhaline Scatophagus argus. A putative desaturase gene was cloned and functionally characterized, and tissue expression and nutritional regulation were investigated. The full-length cDNA was 1972 bp, containing a 1338 bp open-reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 445 amino acids, which possessed all the characteristic features of fatty acyl desaturase (Fad). Functional characterization by heterologous expression in yeast showed the protein product of the cDNA efficiently converted 18:3n-3 and 18:2n-6 to 18:4n-3 and 18:3n-6, respectively, indicating Δ6 desaturation activity. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that highest Δ6 fad mRNA expression was detected in liver followed by brain, with lower expression in other tissues including intestine, eye, muscle, adipose, heart kidney and gill, and lowest expression in stomach and spleen. The expression of Δ6 fad was significantly affected by dietary lipid and, especially, fatty acid composition, with highest expression of mRNA in liver of fish fed a diet with a ratio of 18:3n-3/18:2n-6 of 1.72:1. The results indicated that S. argus may have a different LC-PUFA biosynthetic system from S. canaliculatus despite possessing similar habitats and feeding habits suggesting that LC-PUFA biosynthesis may not be common to all marine herbivorous teleosts.

  4. Cloning, functional characterization and nutritional regulation of Δ6 fatty acyl desaturase in the herbivorous euryhaline teleost Scatophagus argus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dizhi Xie

    Full Text Available Marine fish are generally unable or have low ability for the biosynthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA from C18 PUFA precursors, with some notable exceptions including the herbivorous marine teleost Siganus canaliculatus in which such a capability was recently demonstrated. To determine whether this is a unique feature of S. canaliculatus or whether it is common to the herbivorous marine teleosts, LC-PUFA biosynthetic pathways were investigated in the herbivorous euryhaline Scatophagus argus. A putative desaturase gene was cloned and functionally characterized, and tissue expression and nutritional regulation were investigated. The full-length cDNA was 1972 bp, containing a 1338 bp open-reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 445 amino acids, which possessed all the characteristic features of fatty acyl desaturase (Fad. Functional characterization by heterologous expression in yeast showed the protein product of the cDNA efficiently converted 18:3n-3 and 18:2n-6 to 18:4n-3 and 18:3n-6, respectively, indicating Δ6 desaturation activity. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that highest Δ6 fad mRNA expression was detected in liver followed by brain, with lower expression in other tissues including intestine, eye, muscle, adipose, heart kidney and gill, and lowest expression in stomach and spleen. The expression of Δ6 fad was significantly affected by dietary lipid and, especially, fatty acid composition, with highest expression of mRNA in liver of fish fed a diet with a ratio of 18:3n-3/18:2n-6 of 1.72:1. The results indicated that S. argus may have a different LC-PUFA biosynthetic system from S. canaliculatus despite possessing similar habitats and feeding habits suggesting that LC-PUFA biosynthesis may not be common to all marine herbivorous teleosts.

  5. CRTAC1 homolog proteins are conserved from cyanobacteria to man and secreted by the teleost fish pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redruello, Begoña; Louro, Bruno; Anjos, Liliana; Silva, Nádia; Greenwell, Roger S; Canario, Adelino V M; Power, Deborah M

    2010-05-15

    Cartilage acidic protein 1 (CRTAC1) gene expression is used as a marker for chondrocyte differentiation in stem cell-based tissue engineering. It is also transcribed outside the skeleton where at least two different transcripts are expressed in lung and brain. In the pituitary gland of the teleost fish sea bream Sparus auratus, we have found a transcript with a high degree of sequence identity to CRTAC1 family members but lacking the EGF-like calcium-binding domain encoding sequence of CRTAC1 and designated it as CRTAC2. Database searches revealed many previously unidentified members of the CRTAC1 and CRTAC2 in phylogenetically distant organisms, such as cyanobacteria, bryophyta, lancelets, and diverse representatives of vertebrates. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the genes encoding CRTAC1 and CRTAC2 proteins coexist in teleost fish genomes. Structural prediction analysis identified the N-terminal region of the CRTAC1/CRTAC2 family members as a potential seven-bladed beta-propeller structure, closely related to those of integrin alpha chains and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase D1 protein families. This relationship is confirmed by phylogenetic analysis with the N-terminal domain of sea bream CRTAC2 as the most divergent sequence. Because teleost fishes are the only phylogenetic group where both CRTAC1 and CRTAC2 genes are present, they occupy a pivotal position in studies of the mechanisms governing the specific expression patterns of each gene/protein subfamily. This will be essential to elucidate their respective biological roles. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of a Potential Common Ancestor for Mammalian Cross-Presenting Dendritic Cells in Teleost Respiratory Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Soleto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are highly specialized antigen-presenting cells that bridge innate and adaptive immune responses in vertebrates, being key modulators in the initiation of specific responses. Although teleost fish present the main elements of a fully developed adaptive immune system, not many studies have focused on identifying specific DC subsets in teleost species. Previous work from our group identified in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss skin a DC subpopulation co-expressing CD8α and major histocompatibility complex II β on the cell surface. Interestingly, these CD8+ DCs expressed common unique markers of mammalian cross-presenting DCs, a DC subset with an important role in antigen presentation and activation of CD8+ T cytotoxic lymphocytes. In this study, we have identified a similar DC subset in rainbow trout gills that also transcribes molecules uniquely expressed on diverse mammalian cross-presenting DC populations such as CD8, CD103, CD141, Batf3, IFN regulatory protein 8, and toll-like receptor 3. Hence, we have undertaken a broad phenotypic and functional characterization of this new DC subset that includes the confirmation of novel capacities for DCs in teleost, such an IgM-binding capacity and responsiveness to CD40 ligand. Furthermore, our results show that in gills, this DC subset shows some different phenotypic and functional characteristics when compared with their homologs in the skin, suggesting an adaptation of the cells to different mucosal tissues or different maturation status depending on their location. Our findings contribute to increase our knowledge on fish cross-presenting DCs, an important cell population to take into account for the future design of mucosal vaccination strategies.

  7. Cardiac contractility in Antarctic teleost is modulated by nitrite through xanthine oxidase and cytochrome p-450 nitrite reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Filippo; Amelio, Daniela; Gattuso, Alfonsina; Cerra, Maria Carmela; Pellegrino, Daniela

    2015-09-15

    In mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates, nitrite anion, the largest pool of intravascular and tissue nitric oxide storage, represents a key player of many biological processes, including cardiac modulation. As shown by our studies on Antarctic teleosts, nitrite-dependent cardiac regulation is of great relevance also in cold-blooded vertebrates. This study analysed the influence elicited by nitrite on the performance of the perfused beating heart of two Antarctic stenotherm teleosts, the haemoglobinless Chionodraco hamatus (icefish) and the red-blooded Trematomus bernacchii. Since haemoglobin is crucial in nitric oxide homeostasis, the icefish, a naturally occurring genetic knockout for this protein, provides exclusive opportunities to investigate nitric oxide/nitrite signaling. In vivo, nitrite conversion to nitric oxide requires the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450, thus the involvement of these enzymes was also evaluated. We showed that, in C. hamatus and T. bernacchii, nitrite influenced cardiac performance by inducing a concentration-dependent positive inotropic effect which was unaffected by nitric oxide scavenging by PTIO in C. hamatus, while it was abolished in T. bernacchii. Specific inhibition of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450 revealed, in the two teleosts, that the nitrite-dependent inotropism required the nitrite reductase activity of both enzymes. We also found that xanthine oxidase is more expressed in C. hamatus than in T. bernacchii, while the opposite was observed concerning cytochrome P-450. Results suggested that in the heart of C. hamatus and T. bernacchii, nitrite is an integral physiological source of nitric oxide with important signaling properties, which require the nitrite reductase activity of xanthine oxidase and cytochrome P-450. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Structure of the female gonoduct of the viviparous teleost Poecilia reticulata (Poeciliidae) during nongestation and gestation stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano-Caballero, Juan Carlos; Uribe, Mari Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Female teleosts do not have oviducts because Müllerian ducts do not develop. Instead, the caudal region of the ovary, the gonoduct, connects to the exterior. Because of the lack of oviducts in viviparous teleosts, the embryos develop in the ovary, as an intraovarian gestation, unique in vertebrates. This is the first study to address the histology of the gonoduct in a viviparous teleost. The gonoduct of Poecilia reticulata was analyzed during previtellogenesis, vitellogenesis, and gestation. The gonoduct lacks germinal cells. From deep to superficial, the wall has simple cuboidal or columnar epithelium, loose connective tissue, longitudinal layer of smooth muscle, and visceral peritoneum. Cells of the immune system occur in the lumen and in the mucosa. The gonoduct was divided in three regions: 1) cephalic, 2) middle, and 3) caudal. At the initial part of each region, thin mucosal folds extend into the lumen. The cephalic region forms a tubular structure with light and irregular folds. The middle region has a wider lumen and is more irregular due to ventral invaginations and irregular and short mucosal folds; beneath the epithelium there are melano-macrophage centers. The caudal region is delimited from the middle region by folds; however, they are thinner than these of the other regions. Ventral invaginations form exocrine glands, and the smooth muscle is thicker than in the other regions. During gestation, cells of the immune system are abundant; melano-macrophage centers become larger and the glands exhibit desquamated cells. These observations suggest roles of the gonoduct in reducing the diameter of the lumen; receiving sperm during vitellogenesis; producing secretions, more abundant during vitellogenesis; and in immunological activity throughout the reproductive cycle. The ciliated epithelium and the thick muscle of the caudal region may be involved during birth. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Assessment of gold nanoparticle effects in a marine teleost (Sparus aurata) using molecular and biochemical biomarkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teles, M.; Fierro-Castro, C.; Na-Phatthalung, P.; Tvarijonaviciute, A.; Trindade, T.; Soares, A.M.V.M.; Tort, L.; Oliveira, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • AuNP effects were investigated at molecular and biochemical levels in Sparus aurata. • AuNP coated with PVP exerts more effects than AuNP coated with citrate. • AuNP-PVP induced changes in antioxidant, immune and apoptosis related-genes mRNA levels. • The increase in plasma TOS indicates that AuNP-PVP generates oxidative stress. • AuNP-PVP induced in S. aurata a non-monotonic response pattern. - Abstract: Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) are increasingly employed in a variety of applications and are likely to be increasing in the environment, posing a potential emerging environmental threat. Information on possible hazardous effects of engineered nanoparticles is urgently required to ensure human and environmental safety and promote the safe use of novel nanotechnologies. Nevertheless, there is a lack of comprehensive knowledge on AuNP effects in marine species. The present study aimed to assess AuNP effects in a marine teleost, Sparus aurata, by combining endpoints at different biological levels (molecular and biochemical). For that purpose, fish were exposed via water for 96 h to 4, 80 and 1600 μg L −1 of AuNP (∼40 nm) coated with citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Results revealed a significant impact of AuNP-PVP in the hepatic expression of antioxidant, immune and apoptosis related genes. Total oxidative status was increased in plasma after exposure to the lowest concentration of AuNP-PVP, although without altering the total antioxidant capacity. Furthermore, AuNP did not induce significant damage in the liver since the activity of neither hepatic indicator (aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase) increased. Overall, the present study demonstrated that AuNP, even with a biocompatible coating is able to alter oxidative status and expression of relevant target genes in marine fish. Another important finding is that effects are mainly induced by the lowest and intermediate concentrations of the PVP coated AuNP revealing the

  10. A new teleost (Osteichthyes, Actinopterygii from the Early Jurassic Posidonia shale of Northern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Arratia

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A new teleostean genus and species, Paraleptolepis wiedenrothi, is described from the Lower Liassic of Germany. The fish has an overall similarity with Leptolepis coryphaenoides (from different Lower Liassic European localities but differs from L. coryphaenoides in the presence of a few autapomorphies and also in the retention of several primitive features not present in L. coryphaenoides. Examples of autapomorphic characters are: two moderately large suborbital bones; preopercle triangular and with a notch at its posterior margin; large cleithrum with pronounced curvature anteriorly: pelvic axillary process formed by one small elongate bone; and long neural spines on preural centrum 1 and the ural centrum 1 + 2. Paraleptolepis n. gen. is more closely related to Leptolepis and extant teleosts than it is to Proleptolepis (from Lower Liassic localities. The new evidence supports the previous hypothesis that the family Leptolepididae sensu Nybelin is non-monophyletic. Several characters (e.g., concerning structure of vertebrae that previously were accepted to have arisen at the phylogenetic level of Leptolepis coryphaenoides, are found also to occur in Paraleptolepis n. gen. Eine neue Teleosteergattung und -art. Paraleptolepis wiedenrothi. wird aus dem unteren Lias Deutschlands beschrieben. Der Fisch hat eine generelle Ähnlichkeit mit Leptolepis coryphaenoides (bekannt von verschiedenen europäischen Lokalitäten des unteren Lias, aber unterscheidet sich von L. coryphaenoides in einigen Autapomorphien und in der Beibehaltung mehrerer primitiver Merkmale, die in L. coryphaenoides nicht vorhanden sind. Beispiele autapomorpher Merkmale sind: zwei verhält-nismäßig große suborbitale Knochen; ein dreieckiges Präoperculum mit einer Einbuchtung am hinteren Rand: ein großes Cleithrum mit einer ausgeprägten vorderen Einbuchtung; ein Axillarfortsatz am Beckengürtel, der aus einem schmalen langen Knochen gebildet wird; und lange Neuralfortsätze auf

  11. Assessment of gold nanoparticle effects in a marine teleost (Sparus aurata) using molecular and biochemical biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teles, M., E-mail: mteles0@gmail.com [Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Fierro-Castro, C. [Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Na-Phatthalung, P. [Department of Microbiology and Excellent Research Laboratory on Natural Products, Faculty of Science and Natural Product Research Center of Excellence, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90112 (Thailand); Tvarijonaviciute, A. [Department of Medicine and Animal Surgery, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Trindade, T. [Department of Chemistry & CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Soares, A.M.V.M. [Department of Biology & CESAM, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Tort, L. [Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Oliveira, M. [Department of Biology & CESAM, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • AuNP effects were investigated at molecular and biochemical levels in Sparus aurata. • AuNP coated with PVP exerts more effects than AuNP coated with citrate. • AuNP-PVP induced changes in antioxidant, immune and apoptosis related-genes mRNA levels. • The increase in plasma TOS indicates that AuNP-PVP generates oxidative stress. • AuNP-PVP induced in S. aurata a non-monotonic response pattern. - Abstract: Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) are increasingly employed in a variety of applications and are likely to be increasing in the environment, posing a potential emerging environmental threat. Information on possible hazardous effects of engineered nanoparticles is urgently required to ensure human and environmental safety and promote the safe use of novel nanotechnologies. Nevertheless, there is a lack of comprehensive knowledge on AuNP effects in marine species. The present study aimed to assess AuNP effects in a marine teleost, Sparus aurata, by combining endpoints at different biological levels (molecular and biochemical). For that purpose, fish were exposed via water for 96 h to 4, 80 and 1600 μg L{sup −1} of AuNP (∼40 nm) coated with citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Results revealed a significant impact of AuNP-PVP in the hepatic expression of antioxidant, immune and apoptosis related genes. Total oxidative status was increased in plasma after exposure to the lowest concentration of AuNP-PVP, although without altering the total antioxidant capacity. Furthermore, AuNP did not induce significant damage in the liver since the activity of neither hepatic indicator (aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase) increased. Overall, the present study demonstrated that AuNP, even with a biocompatible coating is able to alter oxidative status and expression of relevant target genes in marine fish. Another important finding is that effects are mainly induced by the lowest and intermediate concentrations of the PVP coated AuNP revealing

  12. A novel GH secretagogue, A233, exhibits enhanced growth activity and innate immune system stimulation in teleosts fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Rebeca; Ubieta, Kenia; Herrera, Fidel; Forellat, Alina; Morales, Reynold; de la Nuez, Ania; Rodriguez, Rolando; Reyes, Osvaldo; Oliva, Ayme; Estrada, Mario P

    2012-09-01

    In teleosts fish, secretion of GH is regulated by several hypothalamic factors that are influenced by the physiological state of the animal. There is an interaction between immune and endocrine systems through hormones and cytokines. GH in fish is involved in many physiological processes that are not overtly growth related, such as saltwater osmoregulation, antifreeze synthesis, and the regulation of sexual maturation and immune functions. This study was conducted to characterize a decapeptide compound A233 (GKFDLSPEHQ) designed by molecular modeling to evaluate its function as a GH secretagogue (GHS). In pituitary cell culture, the peptide A233 induces GH secretion and it is also able to increase superoxide production in tilapia head-kidney leukocyte cultures. This effect is blocked by preincubation with the GHS receptor antagonist [d-Lys(3)]-GHRP6. Immunoneutralization of GH by addition of anti-tilapia GH monoclonal antibody blocked the stimulatory effect of A233 on superoxide production. These experiments propose a GH-mediated mechanism for the action of A233. The in vivo biological action of the decapeptide was also demonstrated for growth stimulation in goldfish and tilapia larvae (P<0.001). Superoxide dismutase levels, antiprotease activity, and lectin titer were enhanced in tilapia larvae treated with this novel molecule. The decapeptide A233 designed by molecular modeling is able to function as a GHS in teleosts and enhance parameters of the innate immune system in the fish larvae.

  13. CsBAFF, a Teleost B Cell Activating Factor, Promotes Pathogen-Induced Innate Immunity and Vaccine-Induced Adaptive Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Sun

    Full Text Available B cell activating factor (BAFF is a member of the tumor necrosis factor family that is known to play an important role in B cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation in mammals. However, studies of BAFF in teleosts are very limited and its function, in particular that under in vivo conditions, is essentially unknown. In this study, we conducted in vivo as well as in vitro functional analyses of a BAFF homologue (CsBAFF from the teleost fish tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis. CsBAFF is composed of 261 residues and shares moderate sequence identities with known BAFFs of other teleosts. CsBAFF expression was most abundant in immune organs and was upregulated during bacterial infection. Purified recombinant CsBAFF (rCsBAFF bound to tongue sole lymphocytes and promoted cellular proliferation and survival. The results of an in vivo study showed that CsBAFF overexpression in tongue sole significantly enhanced macrophage activation and reduced bacterial infection in fish tissues, whereas knockdown of CsBAFF expression resulted in increased bacterial dissemination and colonization in fish tissues. Furthermore, vaccination studies showed that CsBAFF enhanced the immunoprotection of a DNA vaccine and augmented the production of specific serum antibodies. Taken together, these results provide the first in vivo evidence to indicate that teleost BAFF is an immunostimulator that significantly contributes to the innate antibacterial immune response and vaccine-induced adaptive immune response.

  14. Different environmental temperatures affect amino acid metabolism in the eurytherm teleost Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858) as indicated by changes in plasma metabolites.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costas, B.; Aragao, C.; Ruiz-Jarabo, I.; Vargas-Chacoff, L.; Arjona, F.J.; Mancera, J.M.; Dinis, M.T.; Conceicao, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) is a eurytherm teleost that under natural conditions can be exposed to annual water temperature fluctuations between 12 and 26 degrees C. This study assessed the effects of temperature on sole metabolic status, in particular in what concerns plasma free amino

  15. Identification of FXYD Protein Genes in a Teleost: Tissue-specific Expression and Response to Salinity Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tipsmark, Christian Kølbæk

    2008-01-01

    identified. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that six isoforms are homologues to the previously identified FXYD2, FXYD5, FXYD6, FXYD7, FXYD8 and FXYD9, while two additional isoforms were found (FXYD11 and FXYD12). Using quantitative PCR, tissue dependent expression of the different isoforms was analyzed......). In osmoregulatory tissues, one isoform was expressed predominantly in gill (FXYD11), one in kidney (FXYD2) and one equally in kidney and intestine (FXYD12). Expression of several FXYD genes in kidney and gill differed between fresh water and seawater salmon suggesting significance during osmoregulatory adaptations....... In addition to identify novel FXYD isoforms, these studies are the first to show the tissue dependence in their expression and modulation by salinity in any teleosts. Key words: Atlantic salmon, Na+,K+-ATPase, Osmoregulation, Salmo salar, QPCR....

  16. Ultrastructure of the spermatozoon of the digenean Lecithocladium excisum (Rudolphi, 1819) (Hemiuroidea: Hemiuridae), a parasite of marine teleosts in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Papa Ibnou; Diagne, Papa Mbagnick; Sène, Aminata; Bakhoum, Abdoulaye J S; Miquel, Jordi

    2012-09-01

    The present study describes the ultrastructure of the mature spermatozoon of Lecithocladium excisum (Rudolphi, 1819) (Digenea: Hemiuroidea: Hemiuridae) from the stomach of the marine teleost Scomber japonicus Houttuyn (Scombridae) captured in the Atlantic Ocean, off Dakar (Senegal). The ultrastructural organization of the spermatozoon of L. excisum follows the general model described in most digeneans. It presents two axonemes of the 9+'1' pattern of the Trepaxonemata, nucleus, mitochondrion and parallel cortical microtubules, among other characters. However, some particularities of the spermatozoon of L. excisum are (i) the presence of a membranous ornamentation not associated with cortical microtubules in its anterior extremity, (ii) the presence of a very reduced number of cortical microtubules located only in the ventral side of the spermatozoon and (iii) the absence of several structures described in most digeneans such as spine-like bodies and cytoplasmic expansions.

  17. Effects of gamma-irradiation on the rejection of transplanted scale melanophores in the teleost, Oryzias latipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, S.; Egami, N.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of gamma-irradiation on allograft rejection in the teleost, Oryzias latipes, were examined at 25 degrees C. The survival of melanophores in the transplanted scale was observed as an index of rejection. Allografts were rejected in non-irradiated fish within 7 days. In the gamma-irradiated recipients (2kR), the grafts were rejected more slowly, but still within 20 days. The gamma-ray effects, however, disappeared almost completely within 25 days after the irradiation. If the same recipient again received transplants, the secondary response occurred clearly and the melanophores were rejected very rapidly. The secondary response was suppressed by gamma-rays if the fish was irradiated just before the second transplantation. Immunologic memory against the first transplants disappeared within 30 days, a period shorter than that of mammals

  18. Expression and distribution of the glucocorticoid receptor DlGR1 in the teleost Dicentrarchus labrax brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolò Parrinello

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortisol is the main corticosteroid secreted by the interrenal cells of the head kidney and it exerts a role in mantaining the omeostatic status in fish. In teleosts its effects are mediated through intracellular receptors expressed in several tissues, that are ligand-dependent transcription factors by binding to specific tissue DNA sequences. In Dicentrarchus labrax we previously cloned and sequenced a glucocorticoid receptor, DlGR1, isolated from leukocytes of peritoneal cavity. In this work we showed mRNA expression and tissue immunohistochemical localization of brain DlGR1 by in situ hybridization assays, with a riboprobe with DlGR1 cDNA trascriptional activation domain, and by immunohistochemical methods, using a specific antibody for a selected sequence of the receptor tran- scriptional domain. The mRNA and the protein are expressed in pyramidal cells of the optic lobe and in the small globular neurons of the diencephalon.

  19. Plasma vitellogenin in male teleost fish from 43 rivers worldwide is correlated with upstream human population size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desforges, Jean-Pierre W.; Peachey, Brendan D.L.; Sanderson, Pauline M. [Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 30 Marie Curie Street, K1N 6N5, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); White, Paul A. [Environmental Health Sciences and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Blais, Jules M., E-mail: jules.blais@uottawa.c [Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 30 Marie Curie Street, K1N 6N5, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    It has been previously demonstrated that vitellogenin (VTG) - a precursor egg yolk protein - is produced in male fish exposed to estrogenic compounds in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent. However, little attention has been given to examine whether any patterns of male VTG production exists across fish species on a global scale. We hypothesized that a composite measure of human population size over river discharge would best explain variations of protein levels in male fish. We compiled VTG data in 13 fish species from 43 rivers receiving municipal WWTP effluent on 3 continents. We found that human population size explained 28% of the variation in male VTG concentrations, whereas population/flow rate failed to significantly correlate with VTG. We suggest this result may be explained by the low solubility of estrogenic compounds, resulting in localized contamination near WWTP outfalls, rather than dilution by river water. - Concentrations of vitellogenin in riverine teleost fish were related to population size.

  20. Blood Volume, Plasma Volume and Circulation Time in a High-Energy-Demand Teleost, the Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus Albacares)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brill, R.W.; Cousins, K.L.; Jones, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    We measured red cell space with 51Cr-labeled red blood cells, and dextran space with 500 kDa fluorescein-isothiocyanate-labeled dextran (FITC-dextran), in two groups of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares). Red cell space was 13.8+/-0.7 ml kg-1 (mean +/- s.e.m.) Assuming a whole- body hematocrit...... equal to the hematocrit measured at the ventral aortic sampling site and no significant sequestering of 51Cr-labeled red blood cells by the spleen, blood volume was 46.7+/-2.2 ml kg-1. This is within the range reported for most other teleosts (30-70 ml kg-1), but well below that previously reported...

  1. Lipoic acid and ascorbic acid affect plasma free amino acids selectively in the teleost fish pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terjesen, Bendik F; Park, Kwan; Tesser, Marcelo B; Portella, Maria C; Zhang, Yongfang; Dabrowski, Konrad

    2004-11-01

    Most studies on the antioxidants, lipoic acid (LA) and ascorbic acid (AA), focused on species that, unlike teleost fish, are not scurvy-prone, and are able to synthesize AA. The antioxidant properties of LA may make it useful in aquaculture nutrition, but several effects must first be investigated, and we address here plasma free amino acids (FAA). In mammals, LA and AA in high doses were claimed to alter plasma FAA profile; to our knowledge, however, no data are available in fish. We therefore studied the effects of dietary LA and AA on plasma FAA in the South American teleost fish pacu, which is being used increasingly in aquaculture. LA treatment decreased concentrations of 18 of 23 individual FAA; specifically, dispensable and total FAA were significantly affected. Ornithine was elevated (+26%) in LA-treated fish and significantly decreased ratios of plasma [Arg]/[Orn] and other individual [FAA]/[Orn] were observed. LA and AA both affected sulfur FAA concentrations. Plasma cystine levels were significantly increased in the LA-supplemented groups. AA had little effect on most amino acids, and no interaction with LA was detected. AA supplementation did, however, significantly lower taurine (-42%) and cystathionine (-31%) levels in plasma. No effect on the branched chain:aromatic amino acid ratios was observed. The data indicate that at the dietary level studied, LA and AA independently affect selected plasma FAA in pacu, and suggest that any use of LA in particular as a dietary supplement should take into account an altered plasma FAA profile.

  2. Homoeologous Recombination of the V1r1-V1r2 Gene Cluster of Pheromone Receptors in an Allotetraploid Lineage of Teleosts

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    Lei Zhong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to other olfactory receptor families that exhibit frequent lineage-specific expansions, the vomeronasal type 1 receptor (V1R family exhibits a canonical six-member repertoire in teleosts. V1r1 and V1r2 are present in no more than one copy in all examined teleosts, including salmons, which are ancient polyploids, implying strict evolutionary constraints. However, recent polyploids have not been examined. Here, we identified a young allotetraploid lineage of weatherfishes and investigated their V1r1-V1r2 cluster. We found a novel pattern that the parental V1r1-V1r2 clusters had recombined in the tetraploid genome and that the recombinant was nearly fixed in the tetraploid population. Subsequent analyses suggested strong selective pressure, for both a new combination of paralogs and homogeneity among gene duplicates, acting on the V1r1-V1r2 pair.

  3. Acidic Digestion in a Teleost: Postprandial and Circadian Pattern of Gastric pH, Pepsin Activity, and Pepsinogen and Proton Pump mRNAs Expression

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    Yúfera, Manuel; Moyano, F. J.; Astola, A.; Pousão-Ferreira, P.; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Two different modes for regulation of stomach acid secretion have been described in vertebrates. Some species exhibit a continuous acid secretion maintaining a low gastric pH during fasting. Others, as some teleosts, maintain a neutral gastric pH during fasting while the hydrochloric acid is released only after the ingestion of a meal. Those different patterns seem to be closely related to specific feeding habits. However, our recent observations suggest that this acidification pattern could ...

  4. The role of 'mineralocorticoids' in teleost fish: relative importance of glucocorticoid signaling in the osmoregulation and 'central' actions of mineralocorticoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideya; Sakamoto, Tatsuya

    2013-01-15

    It has long been held that cortisol, a glucocorticoid in many vertebrates, performs glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid actions in the teleost fish since it lacks aldosterone. However, in addition to the counterparts of tetrapod mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs), 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC) has been recently identified as a specific endogenous ligand for the MRs in teleosts. Here, we point out the minor role of mineralocorticoid signaling (i.e., DOC-MR) in the osmoregulation compared with those of glucocorticoid signaling (i.e., cortisol-glucocorticoid receptor [GR]), and review the current findings on the physiological roles of the DOC-MR in teleosts. Cortisol promotes both freshwater and seawater adaptation via the GRs in the osmoregulatory organs such as gills and gastrointestinal tracts, but the expressions of MR mRNA are abundant in the brains especially in the key components of the stress axis and cerebellums. Together with the behavioral effects of intracerebroventricular injection with DOC, the MR is suggested to play an important role in the brain dependent behaviors. Since the abundant expression of central MRs has been reported also in higher vertebrates and the MR is thought to be ancestral to the GR, the role of MR in fish might reflect the principal and original function of corticosteroid signaling. Functional evolution of corticosteroid systems is summarized and areas in need of research like our on-going experiments with MR-knockout medaka are outlined. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The short-lived annual fish Nothobranchius furzeri shows a typical teleost aging process reinforced by high incidence of age-dependent neoplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cicco, Emiliano; Tozzini, Eva Terzibasi; Rossi, Giacomo; Cellerino, Alessandro

    2011-04-01

    The annual fish Nothobranchius furzeri is the shortest-lived vertebrate which can be cultured in captivity. Here, we performed a histopathological analysis of age-related lesions in this species. Post-mortem analysis revealed lesions in liver (~90%), kidney (~75%), heart (~70%) and gonads (~40%) which are similar to those previously described in the small teleost Poecilia reticulata. In addition, a high incidence of neoplasias was observed in liver (~35%) and kidney (~25%). Different laboratory strains of N. furzeri show large genetic differences in longevity. Cross-sectional analysis revealed a clear age-dependent increase in the incidence of liver neoplasias which was accelerated in a short-lived strain. Cross-sectional analysis of gonads revealed sex-specific differences in the occurrence of lesions, with males being more severely affected than females. In conclusion, our analysis demonstrates that short life span in N. furzeri is a consequence of a typical teleost aging process which determines systemic failure of homeostasis functions rather than of a single organ or apparatus. Unlike other teleosts, however, this scenario is reinforced by high incidence of age-dependent neoplasias, making this species a promising model to analyze the molecular pathways of age-dependent spontaneous tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Two Virus-Induced MicroRNAs Known Only from Teleost Fishes Are Orthologues of MicroRNAs Involved in Cell Cycle Control in Humans.

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    Brian Dall Schyth

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are ~22 base pair-long non-coding RNAs which regulate gene expression in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells by binding to specific target regions in mRNAs to mediate transcriptional blocking or mRNA cleavage. Through their fundamental roles in cellular pathways, gene regulation mediated by miRNAs has been shown to be involved in almost all biological phenomena, including development, metabolism, cell cycle, tumor formation, and host-pathogen interactions. To address the latter in a primitive vertebrate host, we here used an array platform to analyze the miRNA response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss following inoculation with the virulent fish rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus. Two clustered miRNAs, miR-462 and miR-731 (herein referred to as miR-462 cluster, described only in teleost fishes, were found to be strongly upregulated, indicating their involvement in fish-virus interactions. We searched for homologues of the two teleost miRNAs in other vertebrate species and investigated whether findings related to ours have been reported for these homologues. Gene synteny analysis along with gene sequence conservation suggested that the teleost fish miR-462 and miR-731 had evolved from the ancestral miR-191 and miR-425 (herein called miR-191 cluster, respectively. Whereas the miR-462 cluster locus is found between two protein-coding genes (intergenic in teleost fish genomes, the miR-191 cluster locus is found within an intron of a protein-coding gene (intragenic in the human genome. Interferon (IFN-inducible and immune-related promoter elements found upstream of the teleost miR-462 cluster locus suggested roles in immune responses to viral pathogens in fish, while in humans, the miR-191 cluster functionally associated with cell cycle regulation. Stimulation of fish cell cultures with the IFN inducer poly I:C accordingly upregulated the expression of miR-462 and miR-731, while no stimulatory effect on miR-191 and

  7. A synthetic rainbow trout linkage map provides new insights into the salmonid whole genome duplication and the conservation of synteny among teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyomard, René; Boussaha, Mekki; Krieg, Francine; Hervet, Caroline; Quillet, Edwige

    2012-03-16

    Rainbow trout is an economically important fish and a suitable experimental organism in many fields of biology including genome evolution, owing to the occurrence of a salmonid specific whole-genome duplication (4th WGD). Rainbow trout is among some of the most studied teleosts and has benefited from substantial efforts to develop genomic resources (e.g., linkage maps. Here, we first generated a synthetic map by merging segregation data files derived from three independent linkage maps. Then, we used it to evaluate genome conservation between rainbow trout and three teleost models, medaka, stickleback and zebrafish and to further investigate the extent of the 4th WGD in trout genome. The INRA linkage map was updated by adding 211 new markers. After standardization of marker names, consistency of marker assignment to linkage groups and marker orders was checked across the three different data sets and only loci showing consistent location over all or almost all of the data sets were kept. This resulted in a synthetic map consisting of 2226 markers and 29 linkage groups spanning over 3600 cM. Blastn searches against medaka, stickleback, and zebrafish genomic databases resulted in 778, 824 and 730 significant hits respectively while blastx searches yielded 505, 513 and 510 significant hits. Homology search results revealed that, for most rainbow trout chromosomes, large syntenic regions encompassing nearly whole chromosome arms have been conserved between rainbow trout and its closest models, medaka and stickleback. Large conserved syntenies were also found between the genomes of rainbow trout and the reconstructed teleost ancestor. These syntenies consolidated the known homeologous affinities between rainbow trout chromosomes due to the 4th WGD and suggested new ones. The synthetic map constructed herein further highlights the stability of the teleost genome over long evolutionary time scales. This map can be easily extended by incorporating new data sets and should

  8. Chronic exposure to sublethal hexavalent chromium affects organ histopathology and serum cortisol profile of a teleost, Channa punctatus (Bloch)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Ashish K. [Department of Zoology, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India); Mohanty, Banalata, E-mail: drbana_mohanty@rediffmail.com [Department of Zoology, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India)

    2009-09-01

    Effects of chronic exposures (one and two months) to sublethal doses of hexavalent chromium (2 and 4 mg/L potassium dichromate) on organ histopathology and serum cortisol profile were investigated and their overall impact on growth and behavior of a teleost fish, Channa punctatus was elucidated. Histopathological lesions were distinct in the vital organs gill, kidney and liver. The gill lamellae became lifted, fused, and showed oedema. Hyperplasia and hypertrophy of lamellar epithelial cells were distinct with desquamation. Hypertrophy of epithelial cells of renal tubules and reduction in tubular lumens were observed in the trunk kidney. The atrophy of the head kidney interrenal cells and decreased serum cortisol level indicated exhaustion of interrenal activity. Hepatocyte vacuolization and shrinkage, nuclear pyknosis and increase of sinusoidal spaces were observed in the liver. Abnormal behavioral patterns and reduced growth rate were also noticed in the exposed fish. The chronic hexavalent chromium exposure thus by affecting histopathology of gill, kidney (including interrenal tissue) and liver could impair the vital functions of respiration, excretion, metabolic regulation and maintenance of stress homeostasis which in the long-run may pose serious threat to fish health and affect their population.

  9. Chronic exposure to sublethal hexavalent chromium affects organ histopathology and serum cortisol profile of a teleost, Channa punctatus (Bloch)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Ashish K.; Mohanty, Banalata

    2009-01-01

    Effects of chronic exposures (one and two months) to sublethal doses of hexavalent chromium (2 and 4 mg/L potassium dichromate) on organ histopathology and serum cortisol profile were investigated and their overall impact on growth and behavior of a teleost fish, Channa punctatus was elucidated. Histopathological lesions were distinct in the vital organs gill, kidney and liver. The gill lamellae became lifted, fused, and showed oedema. Hyperplasia and hypertrophy of lamellar epithelial cells were distinct with desquamation. Hypertrophy of epithelial cells of renal tubules and reduction in tubular lumens were observed in the trunk kidney. The atrophy of the head kidney interrenal cells and decreased serum cortisol level indicated exhaustion of interrenal activity. Hepatocyte vacuolization and shrinkage, nuclear pyknosis and increase of sinusoidal spaces were observed in the liver. Abnormal behavioral patterns and reduced growth rate were also noticed in the exposed fish. The chronic hexavalent chromium exposure thus by affecting histopathology of gill, kidney (including interrenal tissue) and liver could impair the vital functions of respiration, excretion, metabolic regulation and maintenance of stress homeostasis which in the long-run may pose serious threat to fish health and affect their population.

  10. Ultrastructural aspects of the myxosporean Henneguya astyanax n. sp. (Myxozoa: Myxobolidae), a parasite of the Amazonian teleost Astyanax keithi (Characidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, P; Corral, L; Matos, E; Azevedo, C

    2003-01-22

    This study reports light and electron microscopical aspects of a myxosporean found in the gills of the freshwater teleost Astyanax keithi Géry, Planquete & Le Bail, 1996 (family Characidae), collected from the estuarine region of the Amazon River, near Belém, Brazil. The prevalence of infection was 23%. In interlamellar spaces of the gills, ellipsoidal whitish cyst-like plasmodia structures were present, which contained spores. The spores had a spermatozoa-like appearance (47.8 +/- 0.71 microm in total length) with a fusiform body (15.2 +/- 0.77 pm in length, 5.7 +/- 0.71 microm in width and 4.2 +/- 0.31 microm in thickness), and each of the 2 valves presented a tapering tail (32.6 +/- 1.11 microm in length). The valves surrounded a binucleate sporoplasm cell and 2 polar capsules (5.0 +/- 0.13 microm in length, 1.5 +/- 0.07 microm in width) that contained 8 to 9 coils of the polar filament. In the sporoplasm, several unique sporoplasmosomes were visible. A synoptic table of spore measurements of known Brazilian Henneguya species is presented. The spores differed from those of previously described species. Based on spore morphology, it is concluded that this species belongs to the family Myxobolidae, genus Henneguya, and that it constitutes a new species: H. astyanax n. sp.

  11. Use of medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a model teleost to identify reproductive endpoints indicative of exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papoulias, D.M.; Tillitt, D.; Jones, S. [National Biological Service, Columbia, MO (United States); Noltie, D. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this research is to identify effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals on the reproductive system of fish at various stages of sexual differentiation and development. The model teleost used was the d-rR strain of medaka (Oryzias latipes) which has a heritable sex-linked color gene. In medaka, sex differences are first detected at the cellular level at hatch. In males, the mitotic activity of the primordial germ cells (PGC) is arrested while the PGCs of the females continue to divide. The germ cells of the gonochoristic medaka have been demonstrated to be totipotent with respective to gonia production. Because endogenous sex steroid hormones are believed to regulate this early process of sexual differentiation, the authors have hypothesized that mitotic activity in males and females exposed to endocrine disrupting chemicals will be different than unexposed individuals. Results are presented for tests conducted by injecting medaka eggs within 36 hours post-hatch with 3 doses of 2,3,7,8-TCDD (nominally 2.3, 1.3, 0.2 pg/embryo), a known anti-estrogen, dissolved in triolein.

  12. Tetrapod V1R-like ora genes in an early-diverging ray-finned fish species: the canonical six ora gene repertoire of teleost fish resulted from gene loss in a larger ancestral repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapilko, Veronika; Korsching, Sigrun I

    2016-01-27

    Chemical senses serve a multitude of essential functions across the animal kingdom. Vertebrates employ four GPCR families to detect odors, among them the v1r/ora gene family. The V1R family is known to evolve rapidly in the lobe-finned lineage giving rise to tetrapods, but the homologous ORA family consists of just six highly conserved genes in teleost fish, with direct orthologs in the lobe-finned fish coelacanth. Thus, the teleost repertoire of six canonical ora genes was assumed to be the ancestral feature before the divergence of ray-finned and lobe-finned fish. So far, this hypothesis has not been tested with earlier diverging ray-finned fish. We have newly identified the complete ora gene repertoires of five teleost species, and of spotted gar, a basal ray-finned fish, using thorough data mining and extensive phylogenetic analysis. The genomes of eight further teleost species were re-analyzed for their ORA repertoires. We report that direct orthologs of the six canonical ora genes (ora1-6) were present in all newly analyzed species, with faithfully preserved exon/intron structure and mostly preserved genomic arrangement in symmetric pairs for ora1-4. In four teleost species including medaka and cave fish we observe species-specific gene duplication events. Thus, the ora gene repertoire in teleost fish is not quite as strictly conserved as previously assumed. In fact, the examination of non-synonymous vs. synonymous substitution rates (dN/dS) shows pronounced negative selection in five of the six ora genes, but also rare occurrence of positive selection in ora3 and ora6. Surprisingly, spotted gar possesses beyond the six canonical genes three additional genes, ora7-8b, orthologous to coelacanth genes v1r07-10. No orthologs for these genes were found in teleosts and cartilaginous fish. Early diverging ray-finned fish such as the spotted gar possess several v1r-like genes previously assumed to be restricted to the lobe-finned lineage, but now found to be already

  13. An adult osteopetrosis model in medaka reveals the importance of osteoclast function for bone remodeling in teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Thuy Thanh; Witten, Paul Eckhard; Huysseune, Ann; Winkler, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Osteoclasts play important roles during bone growth and in maintaining bone health and bone homeostasis. Dysfunction or lack of osteoclasts leads to increased bone mass and osteopetrosis phenotypes in mouse and human. Here we report a severe osteopetrosis-like phenotype in transgenic medaka fish, in which membrane bound EGFP (mEGFP) was expressed in osteoclasts under control of the cathepsin K promoter (ctsk:mEGFP). In contrast to reporter lines with GFP expression in the cytoplasm of osteoclasts, adult fish of the mEGFP line developed bone defects indicative for an osteoclast dysfunction. Activity of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) was down-regulated and excess bone was observed in most parts of the skeleton. The osteopetrotic phenotype was particularly obvious at the neural and haemal arches that failed to increase their volume in growing fish. Excess bone caused severe constriction of the spinal cord and the ventral aorta. The continuation of tooth development and the failure to shed teeth resulted in severe hyperdontia. Interestingly, at the vertebral column vertebral body arches displayed a severe osteopetrosis, while vertebral centra had no or only a mild osteopetrotic phenotype. This confirms previous reports from cichlids that, different from the arches, allometric growth of fish vertebral centra initially does not depend on the action of osteoclasts. Independent developmental mechanism that shapes arches and vertebral centra can also lend support to the hypothesis that vertebral centra and arches function as independent developmental modules. Together, this medaka osteopetrosis model confirms the importance of proper osteoclast function during normal skeletal development in teleost fish that requires bone modeling and remodeling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cold-shock eliminates female nucleus in fertilized eggs to induce androgenesis in the loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, a teleost fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morishima Kagayaki

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgenesis (all-male inheritance is generally induced by means of irradiating the eggs to inactivate the maternal genome, followed by fertilization with normal sperm. In fish, the conventional technique for induced androgenesis has been applied for rapid fixation to traits, recovery of cryopreserved genotypes, sex-control, etc. A new method of androgenesis that eliminates the need to irradiate the egg was proposed using the loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (a teleost fish. Results When the eggs of wild-type females were fertilized with sperm of albino or orange phenotype males and cold-shocked at 0 to 3°C for 60 min duration just after fertilization, generally more than 30% (with a peak of 100% of the hatched progeny were androgenotes. While a few of them were the normal diploid, most of them turned out to be abnormal haploid. All-male inheritance was verified by the expression of the recessive color trait (albino or orange and microsatellite genotypes comprising only paternally derived alleles. Nuclear behavior after the cold-shock treatment was traced by microscopic observation of DAPI (4'6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-stained samples and hematoxylin-eosin stained histological sections, and the extrusion of egg (maternal nucleus was observed in eggs treated in the optimum timing. Conclusion In this paper, we demonstrate that cold-shock treatment (at 0 and 3°C of loach eggs for 60 min just after fertilization successfully induces androgenetic haploid development. The most likely mechanism of cold-shock induced androgenesis is an elimination of the egg nucleus together along with the second polar body and subsequent development of a decondensed sperm nucleus or male pronucleus.

  15. Air-breathing changes the pattern for temperature-induced pH regulation in a bimodal breathing teleost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsgaard, Christian; Thomsen, Mikkel Thy; Bayley, Mark; Wang, Tobias

    2017-11-09

    It is well established that ectothermic vertebrates regulate a lower arterial pH when temperature increases. Typically, water-breathers reduce arterial pH by altering plasma [HCO 3 - ], whilst air-breathers rely on ventilatory adjustments to modulate arterial PCO 2 . However, no studies have investigated whether the shift from water- to air-breathing within a species changes the mechanisms for temperature-induced pH regulation. Here, we used the striped catfish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus to examine how pH regulation is affected by water- versus air-breathing, since P. hypophthalmus can accommodate all gas exchange by its well-developed gills in normoxic water, but achieves the same metabolic rate with aerial oxygen uptake using its the swim-bladder when exposed to aquatic hypoxia. We, therefore, measured arterial acid-base status in P. hypophthalmus as temperature changed between 20 and 35 °C in either normoxic or severely hypoxic water. In normoxic water, where P. hypophthalmus relied entirely on branchial gas exchange, P. hypophthalmus exhibited the typical teleost reduction in plasma [HCO 3 - ] and arterial pH when temperature rose. However, when forced to increase air-breathing in hypoxic water, arterial PCO 2 fell due to a branchial hyperventilation, but it increased with temperature most likely due to passive CO 2 retention. We propose that the rise in arterial PCO 2 reflects a passive consequence of the progressive transition to air breathing at higher temperatures, and that this response fortuitously matches the new regulated pH a , relieving the requirement for branchial ion exchange.

  16. The glucocorticoid stress response is attenuated but unrelated to reproductive investment during parental care in a teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Constance M; Yick, Claire Y; Gilmour, Kathleen M; Van Der Kraak, Glen; Cooke, Steven J

    2011-01-15

    We investigated whether circulating glucocorticoids and androgens are correlated with reproductive investment in smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), a teleost fish with sole paternal care. Circulating cortisol and androgens prior to and 25 min following a standardized 3 min emersion stressor were quantified for non-reproductive and parental fish across the parental care period. To experimentally investigate the influence of reproductive investment on endocrine parameters, we manipulated brood size (reduced, enlarged, sham-treated, or unmanipulated) 24h prior to sampling parental fish. We predicted that fish guarding offspring would exhibit increased androgens and baseline cortisol levels, and an attenuated cortisol response to the stressor when compared with non-reproductive individuals. We further predicted that these effects would scale with reproductive investment. As predicted, parental care-providing fish exhibited lower post-stress plasma cortisol concentrations than non-reproductive fish. This difference was strongest early during parental care. However, no differences in baseline or post-stress cortisol concentrations were detected among parents guarding offspring with varying brood sizes. There was, however, a trend for parental fish to exhibit an increased cortisol response following brood manipulation, regardless of the direction of change in brood size, a response that likely reflected disturbance. No differences were found in baseline cortisol concentrations. Circulating androgens were found to be highest during early parental care, and no differences were found among parents guarding manipulated broods. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that the endocrine stress response is affected by reproductive status, but the response in this model species does not appear to be scaled according to reproductive investment as predicted by life-history theory. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Histochemical and morphological features of biopsied and stripped oocytes from the Brazilian endangered teleost pirapitinga, Brycon nattereri (Characiformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, Alexandre N; Orfão, Laura H; Rizzo, Elizete; Ninhaus-Silveira, Alexandre; Viveiros, Ana T M

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize biopsied and stripped oocytes from the Brazilian endangered teleost pirapitinga (Brycon nattereri) using histochemical and morphological analyses. Biopsied oocytes had a mean diameter of 2.225 mm (modal diameter: 2.312 mm), complete vitellogenesis and a central or slightly eccentric nucleus. Neutral polysaccharides were detected in the follicular cells, zona radiata and yolk globules, while acidic polysaccharides were detected in the follicular cells and cortical alveoli. Ten out of the 19 females treated with two doses of carp pituitary extract (cPE) released oocytes, which were also analysed. Stripping occurred 292 ± 39 degree-hours after the second dose of cPE and led to a mean spawning weight of 36.2 g, 10% spawning index, 241 oocytes/g of ova, 8222 oocytes/female and 23 oocytes/g of body weight. Stripped oocytes had a mean diameter of 2.33 mm and a mode at 2.375 mm, were weakly adhesive and coloration ranged from wine to brown. Under scanning electron microscopy, stripped oocytes exhibited a single funnel-shaped micropyle located at the animal pole and a zona radiata that measured 7.7 μm in thickness with eight pore canals/μm2. Oocyte morphology in Brycon nattereri is similar to that found in other species of the genus, except for the larger size and weaker adhesiveness. These findings provide essential information for a better understanding of the reproductive biology of B. nattereri and the establishment of conservation measures for this threatened species.

  18. Insight into the transgenerational effect of benzo[a]pyrene on bone formation in a teleost fish (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Frauke; Peterson, Drew R; Witten, P Eckhard; Guo, Bao-Sheng; Shanthanagouda, Adamane H; Ye, Rui R; Zhang, Ge; Au, Doris W T

    2015-12-01

    Recent cross-generational studies in teleost fish have raised the awareness that high levels of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) could affect skeletal integrity in the directly exposed F0 and their F1-F2. However, no further details were provided about the causes for abnormalities on the molecular and cellular level and the persistence of such sub-organismal impairments at the transgenerational scale (beyond F2). Adult Oryzias latipes were exposed to 1μg/L BaP for 21days. The F1-F3 were examined for skeletal deformities, histopathological alterations of vertebral bodies and differential expression of key genes of bone metabolism. Significant increase of dorsal-ventral vertebral compression was evident in ancestrally exposed larvae. Histopathological analysis revealed abnormal loss of notochord sheath, a lack of notochord epithelial integrity, reduced bone tissue and decreased osteoblast abundance. A significant downregulation of ATF4 and/or osterix and a high biological variability of COL10, coupled with a significant deregulation of SOX9a/b in the F1-F3 suggest that ancestral BaP exposure most likely perturbed chordoblasts, chondroblast and osteoblast differentiation, resulting in defective notochord sheath repair and rendering the vertebral column more vulnerable to compression. The present findings provide novel molecular and cellular insights into BaP-induced transgenerational bone impairment in the unexposed F3. From the ecological risk assessment perspective, BaP needs to be regarded as a transgenerational skeletal toxicant, which exerts a far-reaching impact on fish survival and fitness. Given that basic mechanisms of cartilage/bone formation are conserved between medaka and mammals, the results may also shed light on the potential transgenerational effect of BaP on the genesis of skeletal diseases in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Transspecies dimorphic allelic lineages of the proteasome subunit β-type 8 gene (PSMB8) in the teleost genus Oryzias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Fumi; Tsukamoto, Kentaro; Mehta, Ratnesh Bhai; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Magtoon, Wichian; Nonaka, Masaru

    2010-01-01

    The proteasome subunit β-type 8 (PSMB8) gene in the jawed vertebrate MHC genomic region encodes a catalytic subunit of the immunoproteasome involved in the generation of peptides to be presented by the MHC class I molecules. A teleost, the medaka (Oryzias latipes), has highly diverged dimorphic allelic lineages of the PSMB8 gene with only about 80% amino acid identity, termed “PSMB8d” and “PSMB8N,” which have been retained by most wild populations analyzed. To elucidate the evolutionary origin of these two allelic lineages, seven species of the genus Oryzias were analyzed for their PSMB8 allelic sequences using a large number of individuals from wild populations. All the PSMB8 alleles of these species were classified into one of these two allelic lineages based on their nucleotide sequences of exons and introns, indicating that the Oryzias PSMB8 gene has a truly dichotomous allelic lineage. Retention of both allelic lineages was confirmed except for one species. The PSMB8d lineage showed a higher frequency than the PSMB8N lineage in all seven species. The two allelic lineages showed curious substitutions at the 31st and 53rd residues of the mature peptide, probably involved in formation of the S1 pocket, suggesting that these allelic lineages show a functional difference in cleavage specificity. These results indicate that the PSMB8 dimorphism was established before speciation within the genus Oryzias and has been maintained for more than 30–60 million years under a strict and asymmetric balancing selection through several speciation events. PMID:21098669

  20. Sexual phenotype differences in zic2 mRNA abundance in the preoptic area of a protogynous teleost, Thalassoma bifasciatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine McCaffrey

    Full Text Available The highly conserved members of the zic family of zinc-finger transcription factors are primarily known for their roles in embryonic signaling pathways and regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation. This study describes sexual phenotype differences in abundances of zic2 mRNA in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus, a region strongly implicated in sexual behavior and function, in an adult teleost, Thalassoma bifasciatum. The bluehead wrasse (Thalassoma bifasciatum is a valuable model for studying neuroendocrine processes because it displays two discrete male phenotypes, initial phase (IP males and territorial, terminal phase (TP males, and undergoes socially-controlled protogynous sex change. Previously generated microarray-based comparisons suggested that zic2 was upregulated in the brains of terminal phase males relative to initial phase males. To further explore this difference, we cloned a 727 bp sequence for neural zic2 from field-collected animals. Riboprobe-based in situ hybridization was employed to localize zic2 signal in adult bluehead brains and assess the relative abundance of brain zic2 mRNA across sexual phenotypes. We found zic2 mRNA expression was extremely abundant in the granular cells of the cerebellum and widespread in other brain regions including in the thalamus, hypothalamus, habenula, torus semicircularis, torus longitudinalis, medial longitudinal fascicle and telencephalic areas. Quantitative autoradiography and phosphorimaging showed zic2 mRNA hybridization signal in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus was significantly higher in terminal phase males relative to both initial phase males and females, and silver grain analysis confirmed this relationship between phenotypes. No significant difference in abundance was found in zic2 signal across phenotypes in the habenula, a brain region not implicated in the control of sexual behavior, or cerebellum.

  1. Gene expression of thyrotropin- and corticotrophin-releasing hormones is regulated by environmental salinity in the euryhaline teleost Sparus aurata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Jarabo, Ignacio; Martos-Sitcha, J A; Barragán-Méndez, C; Martínez-Rodríguez, G; Mancera, J M; Arjona, F J

    2018-04-01

    In euryhaline teleosts, the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid and hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal axes (HPT and HPI, respectively) are regulated in response to environmental stimuli such as salinity changes. However, the molecular players participating in this physiological process in the gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata), a species of high value for aquaculture, are still not identified and/or fully characterized in terms of gene expression regulation. In this sense, this study identifies and isolates the thyrotropin-releasing hormone (trh) mRNA sequence from S. aurata, encoding prepro-Trh, the putative factor initiating the HPT cascade. In addition, the regulation of trh expression and of key brain genes in the HPI axis, i.e., corticotrophin-releasing hormone (crh) and corticotrophin-releasing hormone-binding protein (crhbp), was studied when the osmoregulatory status of S. aurata was challenged by exposure to different salinities. The deduced amino acid structure of trh showed 65-81% identity with its teleostean orthologs. Analysis of the tissue distribution of gene expression showed that trh mRNA is, though ubiquitously expressed, mainly found in brain. Subsequently, regulation of gene expression of trh, crh, and crhbp was characterized in fish acclimated to 5-, 15-, 40-, and 55-ppt salinities. In this regard, the brain gene expression pattern of trh mRNA was similar to that found for the crh gene, showing an upregulation of gene expression in seabream acclimated to the highest salinity tested. Conversely, crhbp did not change in any of the groups tested. Our results suggest that Trh and Crh play an important role in the acclimation of S. aurata to hypersaline environments.

  2. Anti-oxidative defences are modulated differentially in three freshwater teleosts in response to ammonia-induced oxidative stress.

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    Amit Kumar Sinha

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and the antioxidant response induced by high environmental ammonia (HEA were investigated in the liver and gills of three freshwater teleosts differing in their sensitivities to ammonia. The highly ammonia-sensitive salmonid Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout, the less ammonia sensitive cyprinid Cyprinus carpio (common carp and the highly ammonia-resistant cyprinid Carassius auratus (goldfish were exposed to 1 mM ammonia (as NH4HCO3 for 0 h (control, 3 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h, 84 h and 180 h. Results show that HEA exposure increased ammonia accumulation significantly in the liver of all the three fish species from 24 h-48 h onwards which was associated with an increment in oxidative stress, evidenced by elevation of xanthine oxidase activity and levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA. Unlike in trout, H2O2 and MDA accumulation in carp and goldfish liver was restored to control levels (84 h-180 h; which was accompanied by a concomitant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, ascorbate peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbate content. Many of these defence parameters remained unaffected in trout liver, while components of the glutathione redox cycle (reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase enhanced to a greater extent. The present findings suggest that trout rely mainly on glutathione dependent defensive mechanism while carp utilize SOD, CAT and ascorbate as anti-oxidative sentinels. Hepatic cells of goldfish appear to utilize each of these protective systems, and showed more effective anti-oxidative compensatory responses towards HEA than carp, while trout were least effective. The present work also indicates that HEA exposure resulted in a relatively mild oxidative stress in the gills of all three species. This probably explains the almost complete lack of anti-oxidative responses in branchial tissue. This research suggests that oxidative stress, as well as the

  3. Anti-oxidative defences are modulated differentially in three freshwater teleosts in response to ammonia-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Amit Kumar; AbdElgawad, Hamada; Giblen, Terri; Zinta, Gaurav; De Rop, Michelle; Asard, Han; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress and the antioxidant response induced by high environmental ammonia (HEA) were investigated in the liver and gills of three freshwater teleosts differing in their sensitivities to ammonia. The highly ammonia-sensitive salmonid Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout), the less ammonia sensitive cyprinid Cyprinus carpio (common carp) and the highly ammonia-resistant cyprinid Carassius auratus (goldfish) were exposed to 1 mM ammonia (as NH4HCO3) for 0 h (control), 3 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h, 84 h and 180 h. Results show that HEA exposure increased ammonia accumulation significantly in the liver of all the three fish species from 24 h-48 h onwards which was associated with an increment in oxidative stress, evidenced by elevation of xanthine oxidase activity and levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Unlike in trout, H2O2 and MDA accumulation in carp and goldfish liver was restored to control levels (84 h-180 h); which was accompanied by a concomitant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbate content. Many of these defence parameters remained unaffected in trout liver, while components of the glutathione redox cycle (reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase) enhanced to a greater extent. The present findings suggest that trout rely mainly on glutathione dependent defensive mechanism while carp utilize SOD, CAT and ascorbate as anti-oxidative sentinels. Hepatic cells of goldfish appear to utilize each of these protective systems, and showed more effective anti-oxidative compensatory responses towards HEA than carp, while trout were least effective. The present work also indicates that HEA exposure resulted in a relatively mild oxidative stress in the gills of all three species. This probably explains the almost complete lack of anti-oxidative responses in branchial tissue. This research suggests that oxidative stress, as well as the antioxidant

  4. Diversity, molecular characterization and expression of T cell receptor γ in a teleost fish, the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax, L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Buonocore

    Full Text Available Two lineages of T cells, expressing either the αβ T cell receptor (TR or the γδ TR, exist in Gnathostomes. The latter type of T cells account for 1-10 % of T cells in blood and up to 30 % in the small intestine. They may recognize unconventional antigens (phosphorylated microbial metabolites, lipid antigens without the need of major histocompatibility class I (MH1 or class II (MH2 presentation. In this work we have described cloning and structural characterization of TR -chain (TRG from the teleost Dicentrarchus labrax. Further, by means of quantitative PCR analysis, we analyzed TRG expression levels both in poly I:C stimulated leukocytes in vitro, and following infection with betanodavirus in vivo. Two full length cDNAs relative to TRG, with the highest peptide and nucleotide identity with Japanese flounder, were identified. A multiple alignment analysis showed the conservation of peptides fundamental for TRG biological functions, and of the FGXG motif in the FR4 region, typical of most TR and immunoglobulin light chains. A 3D structure consisting of two domains mainly folded as beta strands with a sandwich architecture for each domain was also reported. TRG CDR3 of 8-18 AA in length and diversity in the TRG rearrangements expressed in thymus and intestine for a given V/C combination were evidenced by junction length spectratyping. TRG mRNA expression levels were high in basal conditions both in thymus and intestine, while in kidney and gut leukocytes they were up-regulated after in vitro stimulation by poly I:C. Finally, in juveniles the TRG expression levels were up-regulated in the head kidney and down-regulated in intestine after in vivo infection with betanodavirus. Overall, in this study the involvement of TRG-bearing T cells during viral stimulation was described for the first time, leading to new insights for the identification of T cell subsets in fish.

  5. Duplication of the IGFBP-2 gene in teleost fish: protein structure and functionality conservation and gene expression divergence.

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    Jianfeng Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2 is a secreted protein that binds and regulates IGF actions in controlling growth, development, reproduction, and aging. Elevated expression of IGFBP-2 is often associated with progression of many types of cancers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the identification and characterization of two IGFBP-2 genes in zebrafish and four other teleost fish. Comparative genomics and structural analyses suggest that they are co-orthologs of the human IGFBP-2 gene. Biochemical assays show that both zebrafish igfbp-2a and -2b encode secreted proteins that bind IGFs. These two genes exhibit distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns. During embryogenesis, IGFBP-2a mRNA is initially detected in the lens, then in the brain boundary vasculature, and subsequently becomes highly expressed in the liver. In the adult stage, liver has the highest levels of IGFBP-2a mRNA, followed by the brain. Low levels of IGFBP-2a mRNA were detected in muscle and in the gonad in male adults only. IGFBP-2b mRNA is detected initially in all tissues at low levels, but later becomes abundant in the liver. In adult males, IGFBP-2b mRNA is only detected in the liver. In adult females, it is also found in the gut, kidney, ovary, and muscle. To gain insights into how the IGFBP-2 genes may have evolved through partitioning of ancestral functions, functional and mechanistic studies were carried out. Expression of zebrafish IGFBP-2a and -2b caused significant decreases in the growth and developmental rates and their effects are comparable to that of human IGFBP-2. IGFBP-2 mutants with altered IGF binding-, RGD-, and heparin-binding sites were generated and their actions examined. While mutating the RGD and heparin binding sites had little effect, altering the IGF binding site abolished its biological activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that IGFBP-2 is a conserved regulatory protein and it inhibits

  6. Vulnerability of teleosts caught by the pelagic tuna longline fleets in South Atlantic and Western Indian Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena-Frédou, Flávia; Kell, Laurie; Frédou, Thierry; Gaertner, Daniel; Potier, Michel; Bach, Pascal; Travassos, Paulo; Hazin, Fábio; Ménard, Frédéric

    2017-06-01

    Productivity and Susceptibility Analysis (PSA) is a methodology for evaluating the vulnerability of a stock based on its biological productivity and susceptibility to fishing. In this study, we evaluated the vulnerability of 60 stocks of tuna, billfishes and other teleosts caught by the tuna longline fleets operating in the South Atlantic and Indian Ocean using a semi-quantitative PSA. We (a) evaluated the vulnerability of the species in the study areas; (b) compared the vulnerability of target and non-target species and oceans; (c) analyzed the sensitivity of data entry; and (d) compared the results of the PSA to other fully quantitative assessment methods. Istiophoridae exhibited the highest scores for vulnerability. The top 10 species at risk were: Atlantic Istiophorus albicans; Indian Ocean Istiompax indica; Atlantic Makaira nigricans and Thunnus alalunga; Indian Ocean Xiphias gladius; Atlantic T. albacares, Gempylus serpens, Ranzania laevis and X. gladius; and Indian Ocean T. alalunga. All species considered at high risk were targeted or were commercialized bycatch, except for the Atlantic G. serpens and R. laevis which were discarded, and may be considered as a false positive. Those species and others at high risk should be prioritized for further assessment and/or data collection. Most species at moderate risk were bycatch species kept for sale. Conversely, species classified at low risk were mostly discarded. Overall, species at high risk were overfished and/or subjected to overfishing. Moreover, all species considered to be within extinction risk (Critically Endangered, Endangered and Vulnerable) were in the high-risk category. The good concordance between approaches corroborates the results of our analysis. PSA is not a replacement for traditional stock assessments, where a stock is assessed at regular intervals to provide management advice. It is of importance, however, where there is uncertainty about catches and life history parameters, since it can

  7. Responses of an Amazonian teleost, the tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum), to low pH in extremely soft water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C M; Wilson, R W; Gonzalez, R J; Patrick, M L; Bergman, H L; Narahara, A; Val, A L

    1998-01-01

    Our goal was to compare the internal physiological responses to acid challenge in an acidophilic tropical teleost endemic to dilute low-pH waters with those in nonacidophilic temperate species such as salmonids, which have been the subjects of most previous investigations. The Amazonian tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum), which migrates between circumneutral water and dilute acidic "blackwater" of the Rio Negro, was exposed to a graded low-pH and recovery regime in representative soft water (Na+ = 15, Cl- = 16, Ca2+ = 20 mumol L-1). Fish were fitted with arterial catheters for repetitive blood sampling. Water pH was altered from 6.5 (control) to 5.0, 4.0, 3.0, and back to 6.5 (recovery) on successive days. Some deaths occurred at pH 3.0. Throughout the regime, there were no disturbances of blood gases (O2 and CO2 tensions and contents) or lactate levels, and only very minor changes in acid-base status of plasma and red cells. However, erythrocytic guanylate and adenylate levels increased at pH's less than or equal to 5.0. Down to pH 4.0, plasma glucose, cortisol, and total ammonia levels remained constant, but all increased at pH 3.0, denoting a stress response. Plasma Na+ and Cl- levels declined and plasma protein concentration increased at pH 3.0, indicative of ionoregulatory and fluid volume disturbance, and neither recovered upon return to pH 6.5. Cortisol and ammonia elevations also persisted. Transepithelial potential changed progressively from highly negative values (inside) at pH 6.5 to highly positive values at pH 3.0; these alterations were fully reversible. Experimental elevations in water calcium levels drove the transepithelial potential positive at circumneutral pH, attenuated or prevented changes in transepithelial potential at low pH, and reduced Na+ and Cl- loss rates to the water during acute low-pH challenges. In general, tambaqui exhibited responses to low pH that were qualitatively similar but quantitatively more resistant than those previously

  8. B Cell-Activating Factor Regulates Different Aspects of B Cell Functionality and Is Produced by a Subset of Splenic B Cells in Teleost Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafalla, Carolina; González, Lucia; Castro, Rosario; Granja, Aitor G.

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, B cell functionality is greatly influenced by cytokines released by innate cells, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, upon the early recognition of common pathogen patterns through invariant receptors. B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is one of these innate B cell-helper signals and plays a key role in the survival and differentiation of B cells. Although, evolutionarily, teleost fish constitute the first animal group in which adaptive immunity based on Ig receptors is present, fish still rely greatly on innate responses. In this context, we hypothesized that BAFF would play a key role in the control of B cell responses in fish. Supporting this, our results show that teleost BAFF recapitulates mammalian BAFF stimulating actions on B cells, upregulating the expression of membrane MHC II, improving the survival of fish naïve B cells and antibody-secreting cells, and increasing the secretion of IgM. Surprisingly, we also demonstrate that BAFF is not only produced in fish by myeloid cells but is also produced by a subset of splenic B cells. Thus, if this B cell-produced BAFF proves to be actively regulating this same B cell subset, our findings point to an ancient mechanism to control B cell differentiation and survival in lower vertebrates, which has been silenced in mammals in physiological conditions, but reemerges under pathological conditions, such as B cell lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. PMID:28360916

  9. Two Virus-Induced MicroRNAs Known Only from Teleost Fishes Are Orthologues of MicroRNAs Involved in Cell Cycle Control in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Bela-Ong, Dennis; Jalali, Seyed Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    regulation mediated by miRNAs has been shown to be involved in almost all biological phenomena, including development, metabolism, cell cycle, tumor formation, and host-pathogen interactions. To address the latter in a primitive vertebrate host, we here used an array platform to analyze the miRNA response...... in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) following inoculation with the virulent fish rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus. Two clustered miRNAs, miR-462 and miR-731 (herein referred to as miR-462 cluster), described only in teleost fishes, were found to be strongly upregulated, indicating......R-462 and miR-731 had evolved from the ancestral miR-191 and miR-425 (herein called miR-191 cluster), respectively. Whereas the miR-462 cluster locus is found between two protein-coding genes (intergenic) in teleost fish genomes, the miR-191 cluster locus is found within an intron of a protein...

  10. ERK, Akt, and STAT5 are differentially activated by the two growth hormone receptors subtypes of a teleost fish (Oncorhynchus mykiss

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    Jeffrey eKittilson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we found that the teleost fish, rainbow trout, possesses two growth hormone receptor (GHR subtypes that display distinct ligand binding and agonist-induced regulation features. In this study, we used Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells stably transfected individually with the two trout GHR subtypes, GHR1 and GHR2, to elucidate receptor-effector pathway linkages. Growth hormone (GH stimulated rapid (5-10 min phosphorylation of ERK, Akt, JAk2, and STAT5 in both GHR1- and GHR2-expressing cells; however; STAT5 was activated to a greater extent through GHR1 than through GHR2, whereas ERK and Akt were activated to a greater through GHR2 than through GHR1. Although blockade of the ERK pathway had no effect on the activation of Akt, inhibition of PI3k-Akt partially prevented activation of ERK, suggesting cross-talk between the ERK and PI3K-Akt pathways. JAK2 inhibition completely blocked activation of ERK, Akt, and STAT5, suggesting that all of these pathways link to GHR1 and GHR2 via JAK2. These findings establish important receptor-effector pathway linkages and suggest that the GHR subtypes of teleost fish may be functionally distinct.

  11. Nitrogen metabolism in tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum), a neotropical model teleost: hypoxia, temperature, exercise, feeding, fasting, and high environmental ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chris M; de Souza Netto, José Gadelha; Wilson, Jonathan M; Duarte, Rafael M; Val, Adalberto Luis

    2017-01-01

    The total rate of N-waste excretion (M N ) in juvenile tambaqui living in ion-poor Amazonian water comprised 85 % ammonia-N (M Amm-N ) and 15 % urea-N (M Urea-N ). Both occurred mainly across the gills with only ~5 % of M Amm-N and ~39 % of M Urea-N via the urine. Tambaqui were not especially tolerant to high environmental ammonia (HEA), despite their great resistance to other environmental factors. Nevertheless, they were able to maintain a continued elevation of M Amm-N during and after 48-h exposure to 2.5 mmol L -1 HEA. The normally negative transepithelial potential (-18 mV) increased to -9 mV during the HEA period, which would help to reduce branchial NH 4 + entry. During 3 h of acute environmental hypoxia (30 % saturation), M Amm-N declined, and recovered thereafter, similar to the response seen in other hypoxia-tolerant teleosts; M Urea-N did not change. However, during gradual hypoxia, M Amm-N remained constant, but M Urea-N eventually fell. The acute temperature sensitivities of M Amm-N and M N were low from 28 °C (acclimation) to 33 °C (Q10 ~1.5), but high (~3.8) from 33 to 38 °C, relative to [Formula: see text] (~1.9 throughout). In contrast, M Urea-N exhibited a different pattern over these temperature ranges (Q10 2.6 and 2.1, respectively). The nitrogen quotient (NQ = 0.16-0.23) was high at all temperatures, indicating a 60-85 % reliance on protein to fuel aerobic metabolism in these fasting animals. During steady-state aerobic exercise, [Formula: see text] and M Urea-N increased in parallel with velocity (up to 3.45 body lengths s -1 ), but M Amm (and thus M N ) remained approximately constant. Therefore, the NQ fell progressively, indicating a decreasing reliance on protein-based fuels, as work load increased. In group feeding trials using 45 % protein commercial pellets, tambaqui excreted 82 % (range 39-170 %) of the dietary N within 24 h; N-retention efficiency was inversely related to the ration voluntarily consumed. M

  12. Acidic digestion in a teleost: postprandial and circadian pattern of gastric pH, pepsin activity, and pepsinogen and proton pump mRNAs expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Yúfera

    Full Text Available Two different modes for regulation of stomach acid secretion have been described in vertebrates. Some species exhibit a continuous acid secretion maintaining a low gastric pH during fasting. Others, as some teleosts, maintain a neutral gastric pH during fasting while the hydrochloric acid is released only after the ingestion of a meal. Those different patterns seem to be closely related to specific feeding habits. However, our recent observations suggest that this acidification pattern could be modified by changes in daily feeding frequency and time schedule. The aim of this study was to advance in understanding the regulation mechanisms of stomach digestion and pattern of acid secretion in teleost fish. We have examined the postprandial pattern of gastric pH, pepsin activity, and mRNA expression for pepsinogen and proton pump in white seabream juveniles maintained under a light/dark 12/12 hours cycle and receiving only one morning meal. The pepsin activity was analyzed according to the standard protocol buffering at pH 2 and using the actual pH measured in the stomach. The results show how the enzyme precursor is permanently available while the hydrochloric acid, which activates the zymogen fraction, is secreted just after the ingestion of food. Results also reveal that analytical protocol at pH 2 notably overestimates true pepsin activity in fish stomach. The expression of the mRNA encoding pepsinogen and proton pump exhibited almost parallel patterns, with notable increases during the darkness period and sharp decreases just before the morning meal. These results indicate that white seabream uses the resting hours for recovering the mRNA stock that will be quickly used during the feeding process. Our data clearly shows that both daily illumination pattern and feeding time are involved at different level in the regulation of the secretion of digestive juices.

  13. Acidic digestion in a teleost: postprandial and circadian pattern of gastric pH, pepsin activity, and pepsinogen and proton pump mRNAs expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yúfera, Manuel; Moyano, Francisco J; Astola, Antonio; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Two different modes for regulation of stomach acid secretion have been described in vertebrates. Some species exhibit a continuous acid secretion maintaining a low gastric pH during fasting. Others, as some teleosts, maintain a neutral gastric pH during fasting while the hydrochloric acid is released only after the ingestion of a meal. Those different patterns seem to be closely related to specific feeding habits. However, our recent observations suggest that this acidification pattern could be modified by changes in daily feeding frequency and time schedule. The aim of this study was to advance in understanding the regulation mechanisms of stomach digestion and pattern of acid secretion in teleost fish. We have examined the postprandial pattern of gastric pH, pepsin activity, and mRNA expression for pepsinogen and proton pump in white seabream juveniles maintained under a light/dark 12/12 hours cycle and receiving only one morning meal. The pepsin activity was analyzed according to the standard protocol buffering at pH 2 and using the actual pH measured in the stomach. The results show how the enzyme precursor is permanently available while the hydrochloric acid, which activates the zymogen fraction, is secreted just after the ingestion of food. Results also reveal that analytical protocol at pH 2 notably overestimates true pepsin activity in fish stomach. The expression of the mRNA encoding pepsinogen and proton pump exhibited almost parallel patterns, with notable increases during the darkness period and sharp decreases just before the morning meal. These results indicate that white seabream uses the resting hours for recovering the mRNA stock that will be quickly used during the feeding process. Our data clearly shows that both daily illumination pattern and feeding time are involved at different level in the regulation of the secretion of digestive juices.

  14. Drying method has no substantial effect on δ(15)N or δ(13)C values of muscle tissue from teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessey, Cindy; Vanderklift, Mathew A

    2014-02-15

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) is a powerful tool in many fields of research that enables quantitative comparisons among studies, if similar methods have been used. The goal of this study was to determine if three different drying methods commonly used to prepare samples for SIA yielded different δ(15)N and δ(13)C values. Muscle subsamples from 10 individuals each of three teleost species were dried using three methods: (i) oven, (ii) food dehydrator, and (iii) freeze-dryer. All subsamples were analysed for δ(15)N and δ(13)C values, and nitrogen and carbon content, using a continuous flow system consisting of a Delta V Plus mass spectrometer and a Flush 1112 elemental analyser via a Conflo IV universal interface. The δ(13)C values were normalized to constant lipid content using the equations proposed by McConnaughey and McRoy. Although statistically significant, the differences in δ(15)N values between the drying methods were small (mean differences ≤0.21‰). The differences in δ(13)C values between the drying methods were not statistically significant, and normalising the δ(13)C values to constant lipid content reduced the mean differences for all treatments to ≤0.65‰. A statistically significant difference of ~2% in C content existed between tissues dried in a food dehydrator and those dried in a freeze-dryer for two fish species. There was no significant effect of fish size on the differences between methods. No substantial effect of drying method was found on the δ(15)N or δ(13)C values of teleost muscle tissue. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The first non-mammalian CXCR5 in a teleost fish: molecular cloning and expression analysis in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella

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    Xiao Fan S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemokines, a group of small and structurally related proteins, mediate chemotaxis of various cell types via chemokine receptors. In mammals, seven different CXC chemokine receptors denoted as CXCR1 to CXCR7 have been reported. However, the chemokine receptor CXCR5 has not been reported in other vertebrates. Results In the present study, the genomic sequence of CXCR5 was isolated from the grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella. The cDNA sequence of grass carp CXCR5 (gcCXCR5 consists of 1518 bp with a 43 bp 5' untranslated region (UTR and a 332 bp 3' UTR, with an open reading frame of 1143 bp encoding 381 amino acids which are predicted to have seven transmembrane helices. The characteristic residues (DRYLAIVHA and conserved cysteine residues are located in the extracellular regions and in the third to seventh transmembrane domains. The deduced amino acid sequence shows 37.6-66.6% identities with CXCR5 of mammals, avian and other fish species. The grass carp gene consists of two exons, with one intervening intron, spaced over 2081 bp of genomic sequence. Phylogenetic analysis clearly demonstrated that the gcCXCR5 is clustered with those in other teleost fish and then in chicken and mammals. Real-time PCR analysis showed that gcCXCR5 was expressed in all tested organs/tissues and its expression level was the highest in trunk kidney, followed by in the spleen. The expression of gcCXCR5 was significantly modulated by immunostimulants such as peptidoglycan (PGN, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid sodium salt (Poly I:C and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA. Conclusion The cDNA and genomic sequences of CXCR5 have been successfully characterized in a teleost fish, the grass carp. The CXCR5 has in general a constitutive expression in organs/tissues examined, whereas its expression was significantly up-regulated in immune organs and down-regulated in brain, indicating its potential role in immune response and central nervous

  16. Identification and expression of GnRH2 and GnRH3 in the black sea bass (Centropristis striata), a hermaphroditic teleost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Scott J; Decatur, Wayne A; Breton, Timothy S; Marquis, Timothy J; Hayes, Mary K; Berlinsky, David L; Sower, Stacia A

    2015-04-01

    We cloned two cDNAs for two gonadotropin-releasing hormones, GnRH2 (chicken GnRH-II) and GnRH3 (salmon GnRH), respectively, from the black sea bass (Centropristis striata). Black sea bass are protogynous hermaphroditic teleosts that change from females to males between 2 and 5 years of age. Similar to other GnRH precursors, the precursors of black sea bass GnRH2 and GnRH23 consisted of a signal peptide, decapeptide, a downstream processing site, and a GnRH-associated peptide. Our analyses failed to identify GnRH1. GnRH3 precursor transcript was more widely distributed in a variety of tissues compared with GnRH2. Further examination of GnRH expression and gonadal histology was done in black sea bass from three different size groups: small (11.4-44.1 g), medium (179.4-352.2 g) and large (393.8-607.3 g). Interestingly, GnRH3 expression occurred only in the pituitaries of males in the small and medium groups compared with expression of GnRH2. Future functional studies of the sea bass GnRHs will be valuable in elucidating the potential underlying neuroendocrine mechanisms of black sea bass reproduction and may ultimately contribute to management advances in this commercially important fish.

  17. Establishment of a hepatocyte line for studying biosynthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids from a marine teleost, the white-spotted spinefoot Siganus canaliculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Zhang, Q H; Dong, Y W; You, C H; Wang, S Q; Li, Y Q; Li, Y Y

    2017-08-01

    A hepatocyte line was established from the liver of white-spotted spinefoot Siganus canaliculatus to study the biosynthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA). The cells from the line, designated S. canaliculatus hepatocyte line (SCHL), grew and multiplied well in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM)-F12 medium supplemented with 20 mM 4-(2-hydroxyethyl) piperazine-1-ethanesulphonic acid (HEPES), 10% foetal bovine serum (FBS) and 0·5% rainbow trout Oncorhychus mykiss serum at 28° C, showing an epithelial-like morphology and the normal chromosome number of 48 (2n) and have been subcultured for over 60 passages. The identity of the hepatocytes was confirmed by periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining. The mRNA expression of all genes encoding the key enzymes for LC-PUFA biosynthesis including two desaturases (Δ4 Fad and Δ6-Δ5 Fad) and two elongases (Elovl4 and Elovl5), were detected in all cells from passages 5 to 60 and their expression levels became stable after passage 35 and showed responses to various PUFA incubation. This is similar to the situation determined in the liver of S. canaliculatus that were fed diets containing different fatty acids. These results indicated that SCHL was successfully established and can provide an in vitro tool to investigate lipid metabolism and regulatory mechanisms of LC-PUFA biosynthesis in teleosts, especially marine species. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  18. A study of the uptake and toxicity of some stable and radioactive pollutants in marine organisms: antimony, silver, cobalt and strontium in mollusks, crustaceans and teleosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiard, J.-C.

    1978-10-01

    Qualitative and quantitative results following direct aquatic contamination of mollusks, crustaceans and teleosts by 125 Sb, 110 Ag, 60 Co, 85 Sr are reported. The effects of a number of biotic and abiotic parameters on the contamination of the various organisms and the distribution and elimination of the radionuclides in the tissues were investigated. The transfer of sup(110m)Ag, 60 Co and 125 Sb was studied in several benthic food chains. The transfer factor (F.T.) between a given trophic level and the initial environment (seawater) was determined as well as various physiological parameters (percentages ingested, assimilated, eliminated via the feces or urine and/or the gills. Elimination and tissue uptake were followed in mollusks and crustaceans. The consequences of contamination by stable and radioactive pollutants on plants and animals were considered. Acute (lethal) toxicity of various metals or metalloids on marine organisms were quantified. More sensitive sublethal tests considering physiological functions or behaviour were used. Irradiation doses to experiment animals were calculated, showing the importance of the (internal or external distribution of radionuclides and individual geometries on the total exposure dose [fr

  19. The evolution and appearance of C3 duplications in fish originate an exclusive teleost c3 gene form with anti-inflammatory activity.

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    Gabriel Forn-Cuní

    Full Text Available The complement system acts as a first line of defense and promotes organism homeostasis by modulating the fates of diverse physiological processes. Multiple copies of component genes have been previously identified in fish, suggesting a key role for this system in aquatic organisms. Herein, we confirm the presence of three different previously reported complement c3 genes (c3.1, c3.2, c3.3 and identify five additional c3 genes (c3.4, c3.5, c3.6, c3.7, c3.8 in the zebrafish genome. Additionally, we evaluate the mRNA expression levels of the different c3 genes during ontogeny and in different tissues under steady-state and inflammatory conditions. Furthermore, while reconciling the phylogenetic tree with the fish species tree, we uncovered an event of c3 duplication common to all teleost fishes that gave rise to an exclusive c3 paralog (c3.7 and c3.8. These paralogs showed a distinct ability to regulate neutrophil migration in response to injury compared with the other c3 genes and may play a role in maintaining the balance between inflammatory and homeostatic processes in zebrafish.

  20. FLUCTUATING ASYMMETRY IN THE OTOLITH WIDTH AND LENGTH OF ADULT TELEOST (Beryx splendens LOWE, 1834 (FAMILY: BERCIDAE COLLECTED FROM THE ARABIAN SEA COASTS OF SULTANATE OF OMAN

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    H.K. Albusaidi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry was described for the otolith width and length of adult teleost Beryx splendens. The results showed that the level of asymmetry of the otolith width was the highest among the two asymmetry values obtained for the otolith of B. splendens. For the otolith width character, the results showed that the level of asymmetry at its highest value in fish ranging in length between 191–200 mm and in its lowest value in fish ranging in length between 121–180 mm. For the otolith length, the highest value of asymmetry is noticed in fish ranging in length between 231–244 mm and the lowest value in fish within the length of 121–190 mm. The possible cause of the asymmetry in this species has been discussed in relation to different pollutants and their presence in the area. No trend of increase in the asymmetry values with the fish length was noticed for the otolith width, but there is a weak trend of increase with the fish length in case of otolith length character.

  1. Comprehensive validation of T- and B-cell deficiency in rag1-null zebrafish: Implication for the robust innate defense mechanisms of teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Yumie; Shirouzu, Masamichi; Sugahara, Ryota; Yoshiura, Yasutoshi; Kiryu, Ikunari; Ototake, Mitsuru; Nagasawa, Takahiro; Somamoto, Tomonori; Nakao, Miki

    2017-08-08

    rag1 -/- zebrafish have been employed in immunological research as a useful immunodeficient vertebrate model, but with only fragmentary evidence for the lack of functional adaptive immunity. rag1-null zebrafish exhibit differences from their human and murine counterparts in that they can be maintained without any specific pathogen-free conditions. To define the immunodeficient status of rag1 -/- zebrafish, we obtained further functional evidence on T- and B-cell deficiency in the fish at the protein, cellular, and organism levels. Our developed microscale assays provided evidence that rag1 -/- fish do not possess serum IgM protein, that they do not achieve specific protection even after vaccination, and that they cannot induce antigen-specific CTL activity. The mortality rate in non-vaccinated fish suggests that rag1 -/- fish possess innate protection equivalent to that of rag1 +/- fish. Furthermore, poly(I:C)-induced immune responses revealed that the organ that controls anti-viral immunity is shifted from the spleen to the hepatopancreas due to the absence of T- and B-cell function, implying that immune homeostasis may change to an underside mode in rag-null fish. These findings suggest that the teleost relies heavily on innate immunity. Thus, this model could better highlight innate immunity in animals that lack adaptive immunity than mouse models.

  2. PSA-NCAM expression in the teleost optic tectum is related to ecological niche and use of vision in finding food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labak, I; Pavić, V; Zjalić, M; Blažetić, S; Viljetić, B; Merdić, E; Heffer, M

    2017-08-01

    In this study, tangential migration and neuronal connectivity organization were analysed in the optic tectum of seven different teleosts through the expression of polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) in response to ecological niche and use of vision. Reduced PSA-NCAM expression in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss optic tectum occurred in efferent layers, while in pike Esox lucius and zebrafish Danio rerio it occurred in afferent and efferent layers. Zander Sander lucioperca and European eel Anguilla anguilla had very low PSA-NCAM expression in all tectal layers except in the stratum marginale. Common carp Cyprinus carpio and wels catfish Silurus glanis had the same intensity of PSA-NCAM expression in all tectal layers. The optic tectum of all studied fishes was also a site of tangential migration with sustained PSA-NCAM and c-series ganglioside expression. Anti-c-series ganglioside immunoreactivity was observed in all tectal layers of all analysed fishes, even in layers where PSA-NCAM expression was reduced. Since the optic tectum is indispensable for visually guided prey capture, stabilization of synaptic contact and decrease of neurogenesis and tangential migration in the visual map are an expected adjustment to ecological niche. The authors hypothesize that this stabilization would probably be achieved by down-regulation of PSA-NCAM rather than c-series of ganglioside. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  3. Common functional targets of adaptive micro- and macro-evolutionary divergence in killifish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Andrew; Zhang, Shujun; Roach, Jennifer L; Galvez, Fernando

    2013-07-01

    Environmental salinity presents a key barrier to dispersal for most aquatic organisms, and adaptation to alternate osmotic environments likely enables species diversification. Little is known of the functional basis for derived tolerance to environmental salinity. We integrate comparative physiology and functional genomics to explore the mechanistic underpinnings of evolved variation in osmotic plasticity within and among two species of killifish; Fundulus majalis harbours the ancestral mainly salt-tolerant phenotype, whereas Fundulus heteroclitus harbours a derived physiology that retains extreme salt tolerance but with expanded osmotic plasticity towards the freshwater end of the osmotic continuum. Common-garden comparative hypo-osmotic challenge experiments show that F. heteroclitus is capable of remodelling gill epithelia more quickly and at more extreme osmotic challenge than F. majalis. We detect an unusual pattern of baseline transcriptome divergence, where neutral evolutionary processes appear to govern expression divergence within species, but patterns of divergence for these genes between species do not follow neutral expectations. During acclimation, genome expression profiling identifies mechanisms of acclimation-associated response that are conserved within the genus including regulation of paracellular permeability. In contrast, several responses vary among species including those putatively associated with cell volume regulation, and these same mechanisms are targets for adaptive physiological divergence along osmotic gradients within F. heteroclitus. As such, the genomic and physiological mechanisms that are associated with adaptive fine-tuning within species also contribute to macro-evolutionary divergence as species diversify across osmotic niches. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effects of dietary soyabean meal, inulin and oxytetracycline on intestinal microbiota and epithelial cell stress, apoptosis and proliferation in the teleost Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke-McKellep, Anne Marie; Penn, Michael H; Salas, Patricia Mora; Refstie, Ståle; Sperstad, Sigmund; Landsverk, Thor; Ringø, Einar; Krogdahl, Ashild

    2007-04-01

    Soyabean meal (SBM)-induced enteritis in the distal intestine of the teleost Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) and other salmonids may be considered a model for diet-related mucosal disorders in other animals and man. The role of the intestinal microbiota in its pathogenesis was explored. Compared to diets containing fishmeal (FM) as the sole protein source, responses to extracted SBM or the prebiotic inulin, with or without oxytetracycline (OTC) inclusion, were studied following a 3-week feeding trial. Intestinal microbiota, organosomatic indices and histology, as well as immunohistochemical detection of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and caspase-3-positive cells in the distal intestine, were studied. Distal intestine somatic indices (DISI) were higher in inulin and lower in SBM compared to FM-fed fish. The low DISI caused by SBM corresponded with histological changes, neither of which was affected by OTC, despite a significant decrease in adherent bacteria count. Image analysis of PCNA-stained sections showed a significant increase in the proliferative compartment length in SBM-fed fish, accompanied by apparent increases in reactivity to HSP70 and caspase-3 along the mucosal folds, indicating induction of cellular repair and apoptosis, respectively. Fish fed the SBM diet had higher total number as well as a more diverse population composition of adherent bacteria in the distal intestine. Thus SBM-induced enteritis is accompanied by induction of distal intestinal epithelial cell protective responses and changes in microbiota. Putative involvement of bacteria in the inflammatory response merits further investigation.

  5. TGF-β1 exerts opposing effects on grass carp leukocytes: implication in teleost immunity, receptor signaling and potential self-regulatory mechanisms.

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    Mu Yang

    Full Text Available In fish immunity, the regulatory role of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 has not been fully characterized. Here we examined the immunoregulatory effects of TGF-β1 in grass carp peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL and head kidney leukocytes (HKL. It is interesting that TGF-β1 consistently stimulated the cell viability and the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (Tnfα and Ifnγ and T/B cell markers [Cd4-like (Cd4l, Cd8α, Cd8β and Igμ] in PBL, which contrasted with its inhibitory tone in HKL. Further studies showed that grass carp TGF-β1 type I receptor, activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5, was indispensable for the immunoregulatory effects of TGF-β1 in PBL and HKL. Notably, TGF-β1 persistently attenuated ALK5 expression, whereas immunoneutralization of endogenous grass carp TGF-β1 could increase ALK5 mRNA and protein levels. It is consistent with the observation that TGF-β1 decreased the number of ALK5(+ leukocytes in PBL and HKL, revealing a negative regulation of TGF-β1 signaling at the receptor level. Moreover, transient treatment with TGF-β1 for 24 h was sufficient to induce similar cellular responses compared with the continuous treatment. This indicated a possible mechanism by which TGF-β1 triggered the down-regulation of ALK5 mRNA and protein, leading to the desensitization of grass carp leukocytes toward TGF-β1. Accordingly, our data revealed a dual role of TGF-β1 in teleost immunity in which it can serve as a positive or negative control device and provided additional mechanistic insights as to how TGF-β1 controls its signaling in vertebrate leukocytes.

  6. Spermiogenesis and spermatozoon ultrastructure of the bothriocephalidean cestode Clestobothrium crassiceps (Rudolphi, 1819), a parasite of the teleost fish Merluccius merluccius (Gadiformes: Merlucciidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marigo, Adji Mama; Delgado, Eulàlia; Torres, Jordi; Bâ, Cheikh Tidiane; Miquel, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Spermiogenesis and the ultrastructure of the spermatozoon of the bothriocephalidean cestode Clestobothrium crassiceps (Rudolphi, 1819), a parasite of the teleost fish Merluccius merluccius (Linnaeus, 1758), have been studied by means of transmission electron microscopy. Spermiogenesis involves firstly the formation of a differentiation zone. It is characterized by the presence of two centrioles associated with striated rootlets, an intercentriolar body and an electron-dense material in the apical region of this zone. Later, two flagella develop from the centrioles, growing orthogonally in relation to the median cytoplasmic process. Flagella then undergo a rotation of 90° until they become parallel to the median cytoplasmic process, followed by the proximodistal fusion of the flagella with the median cytoplasmic process. The nucleus elongates and afterwards it migrates along the spermatid body. Spermiogenesis finishes with the appearance of the apical cone surrounded by the single helical crested body at the base of the spermatid. Finally, the narrowing of the ring of arched membranes detaches the fully formed spermatozoon. The mature spermatozoon of C. crassiceps is filiform and contains two axonemes of the 9 + "1" trepaxonematan pattern, a parallel nucleus, parallel cortical microtubules, and electron-dense granules of glycogen. The anterior extremity of the gamete exhibits a short electron-dense apical cone and one crested body, which turns once around the sperm cell. The first axoneme is surrounded by a ring of thick cortical microtubules that persist until the appearance of the second axoneme. Later, these thick cortical microtubules disappear and thus, the mature spermatozoon exhibits two bundles of thin cortical microtubules. The posterior extremity of the male gamete presents only the nucleus. Results are discussed and compared particularly with the available ultrastructural data on the former "pseudophyllideans". Two differences can be established

  7. A novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR in teleost fish: carp SITR is involved in the nitric oxide-mediated response to a protozoan parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla M S Ribeiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system relies upon a wide range of germ-line encoded receptors including a large number of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF receptors. Different Ig-like immune receptor families have been reported in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish. Most innate immune receptors of the IgSF are type I transmembrane proteins containing one or more extracellular Ig-like domains and their regulation of effector functions is mediated intracellularly by distinct stimulatory or inhibitory pathways.Carp SITR was found in a substracted cDNA repertoire from carp macrophages, enriched for genes up-regulated in response to the protozoan parasite Trypanoplasma borreli. Carp SITR is a type I protein with two extracellular Ig domains in a unique organisation of a N-proximal V/C2 (or I- type and a C-proximal V-type Ig domain, devoid of a transmembrane domain or any intracytoplasmic signalling motif. The carp SITR C-proximal V-type Ig domain, in particular, has a close sequence similarity and conserved structural characteristics to the mammalian CD300 molecules. By generating an anti-SITR antibody we could show that SITR protein expression was restricted to cells of the myeloid lineage. Carp SITR is abundantly expressed in macrophages and is secreted upon in vitro stimulation with the protozoan parasite T. borreli. Secretion of SITR protein during in vivo T. borreli infection suggests a role for this IgSF receptor in the host response to this protozoan parasite. Overexpression of carp SITR in mouse macrophages and knock-down of SITR protein expression in carp macrophages, using morpholino antisense technology, provided evidence for the involvement of carp SITR in the parasite-induced NO production.We report the structural and functional characterization of a novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR in a teleost fish and propose a role for carp SITR in the NO-mediated response to a protozoan parasite.

  8. Effect of taurine supplementation on hepatic metabolism and alleviation of cadmium toxicity and bioaccumulation in a marine teleost, red sea bream, Pagrus major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hano, Takeshi; Ito, Katsutoshi; Kono, Kumiko; Ito, Mana; Ohkubo, Nobuyuki; Mochida, Kazuhiko

    2017-02-01

    This study was performed to unravel the mechanism of the beneficial action of taurine on marine teleost fish, red sea bream (Pagrus major), by analyzing the hepatic metabolism. Moreover, the ameliorative effects of the nutrient against cadmium toxicity and bioaccumulation were further evaluated. The fish were fed a diet containing 0 % (TAU0 %), 0.5 % (TAU0.5 %), or 5.0 % (TAU5.0 %) taurine for 40-55 days (d) and subjected to cadmium acute toxicity and bioaccumulation tests. Taurine deficiency in feed severely affected growth and the hepatic metabolic profiles of the fish, including a remarkable increase in myo-inositol, aspartate, and ß-alanine in the TAU0 % group, which indicates a complementary physiological response to taurine deficiency. For the acute toxicity test, fish were fed the test diets for 55 d and were then exposed to different dose of cadmium ranging from 0 to 5.6 mg/L for 96 h. Fish fed taurine had a higher tolerance to cadmium than those not fed taurine. For the bioaccumulation test, fish were fed the test diets for 40 d and then were chronically exposed to 0.2 mg/L of cadmium for 28 d followed by depuration for 21 d. Cadmium concentrations in the liver and muscle of fish fed TAU5.0 % were significantly lower than those of fish fed TAU0 % for the first 7 d of exposure and the first 7 d of elimination. Our findings suggest a possible mechanism for the beneficial role played by taurine and that the inclusion of taurine in fish aquaculture feed may reduce cadmium contamination of fish intended for human consumption.

  9. Cortisol-induced masculinization: does thermal stress affect gonadal fate in pejerrey, a teleost fish with temperature-dependent sex determination?

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    Ricardo S Hattori

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gonadal fate in many reptiles, fish, and amphibians is modulated by the temperature experienced during a critical period early in life (temperature-dependent sex determination; TSD. Several molecular processes involved in TSD have been described but how the animals "sense" environmental temperature remains unknown. We examined whether the stress-related hormone cortisol mediates between temperature and sex differentiation of pejerrey, a gonochoristic teleost fish with marked TSD, and the possibility that it involves glucocorticoid receptor- and/or steroid biosynthesis-modulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Larvae maintained during the period of gonadal sex differentiation at a masculinizing temperature (29 degrees C; 100% males consistently had higher cortisol, 11-ketotestoterone (11-KT, and testosterone (T titres than those at a feminizing temperature (17 degrees C; 100% females. Cortisol-treated animals had elevated 11-KT and T, and showed a typical molecular signature of masculinization including amh upregulation, cyp19a1a downregulation, and higher incidence of gonadal apoptosis during sex differentiation. Administration of cortisol and a non-metabolizable glucocorticoid receptor (GR agonist (Dexamethasone to larvae at a "sexually neutral" temperature (24 degrees C caused significant increases in the proportion of males. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest a role of cortisol in the masculinization of pejerrey and provide a possible link between stress and testicular differentiation in this gonochoristic TSD species. Cortisol role or roles during TSD of pejerrey seem(s to involve both androgen biosynthesis- and GR-mediated processes. These findings and recent reports of cortisol effects on sex determination of sequential hermaphroditic fishes, TSD reptiles, and birds provide support to the notion that stress responses might be involved in various forms of environmental sex determination.

  10. Structural and functional characterization of salmon STAT1, STAT2 and IRF9 homologs sheds light on interferon signaling in teleosts

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    Mehrdad Sobhkhez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian IRF9 and STAT2, together with STAT1, form the ISGF3 transcription factor complex, which is critical for type I interferon (IFN-induced signaling, while IFNγ stimulation is mediated by homodimeric STAT1 protein. Teleost fish are known to possess most JAK and STAT family members, however, description of their functional activity in lower vertebrates is still scarce. In the present study we have identified two different STAT2 homologs and one IRF9 homolog from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar. Both proteins have domain-like structures with functional motifs that are similar to higher vertebrates, suggesting that they are orthologs to mammalian STAT2 and IRF9. The two identified salmon STAT2s, named STAT2a and STAT2b, showed high sequence identity but were divergent in their transactivation domain (TAD. Like STAT1, ectopically expressed STAT2a and b were shown to be tyrosine phosphorylated by type I IFNs and, interestingly, also by IFNγ. Microscopy analyses demonstrated that STAT2 co-localized with STAT1a in the cytoplasm of unstimulated cells, while IFNa1 and IFNγ stimulation seemed to favor their nuclear localization. Overexpression of STAT2a or STAT2b together with STAT1a activated a GAS-containing reporter gene construct in IFNγ-stimulated cells. The highest induction of GAS promoter activation was found in IFNγ-stimulated cells transfected with IRF9 alone. Taken together, these data suggest that salmon STAT2 and IRF9 may have a role in IFNγ-induced signaling and promote the expression of GAS-driven genes in bony fish. Since mammalian STAT2 is primarily an ISGF3 component and not involved in IFNγ signaling, our finding features a novel role for STAT2 in fish.

  11. Early intrauterine embryonic development of the bothriocephalidean cestode Clestobothrium crassiceps (Rudolphi, 1819), a parasite of the teleost Merluccius merluccius (L., 1758) (Gadiformes: Merlucciidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderski, Zdzisław; Miquel, Jordi; Torres, Jordi; Delgado, Eulàlia

    2013-07-01

    The early intrauterine embryonic development of the bothriocephalidean cestode Clestobothrium crassiceps (Rudolphi, 1819), a parasite of the teleost Merluccius merluccius (L., 1758), was studied by means of light (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Contrary to the generic diagnosis given in the CABI Keys to the cestode parasites of vertebrates, the eggs of C. crassiceps, the type of species of Clestobothrium Lühe, 1899, are operculate and embryonated. Our LM and TEM results provide direct evidence that an operculum is present and that the eggs exhibit various stages of intrauterine embryonic development, and in fact represent a good example of early ovoviviparity. The intrauterine eggs of this species are polylecithal and contain numerous vitellocytes, generally ∼30, which are pushed to the periphery and remain close to the eggshell, whereas the dividing zygote and later the early embryo remain in the egg centre. During early intrauterine embryonic development, several cleavage divisions take place, which result in the formation of three types of blastomeres, i.e. macro-, meso- and micromeres. These can be readily differentiated at the TEM level, not only by their size, but also by the ultrastructural characteristics of their nuclei and cytoplasmic organelles. The total number of blastomeres in these early embryos, enclosed within the electron-dense eggshells, can be up to ∼20 cells of various sizes and characteristics. Mitotic divisions of early blastomeres were frequently observed at both LM and TEM levels. Simultaneously with the mitotic cleavage divisions leading to blastomere multiplication and their rapid differentiation, there is also a deterioration of some blastomeres, mainly micromeres. A similar degeneration of vitellocytes begins even earlier. Both processes show a progressive degeneration of both vitellocytes and micromeres, and are good examples of apoptosis, a process that provides nutritive substances, including lipids, for the

  12. Sequence and Expression Analysis of Interferon Regulatory Factor 10 (IRF10 in Three Diverse Teleost Fish Reveals Its Role in Antiviral Defense.

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    Qiaoqing Xu

    Full Text Available Interferon regulatory factor (IRF 10 was first found in birds and is present in the genome of other tetrapods (but not humans and mice, as well as in teleost fish. The functional role of IRF10 in vertebrate immunity is relatively unknown compared to IRF1-9. The target of this research was to clone and characterize the IRF10 genes in three economically important fish species that will facilitate future evaluation of this molecule in fish innate and adaptive immunity.In the present study, a single IRF10 gene was cloned in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella and Asian swamp eel Monopterus albus, and two, named IRF10a and IRF10b, in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. The fish IRF10 molecules share highest identities to other vertebrate IRF10s, and have a well conserved DNA binding domain, IRF-associated domain, and an 8 exon/7 intron structure with conserved intron phase. The presence of an upstream ATG or open reading frame (ORF in the 5'-untranslated region of different fish IRF10 cDNA sequences suggests potential regulation at the translational level, and this has been verified by in vitro transcription/translation experiments of the trout IRF10a cDNA, but would still need to be validated in fish cells.Both trout IRF10 paralogues are highly expressed in thymus, blood and spleen but are relatively low in head kidney and caudal kidney. Trout IRF10b expression is significantly higher than IRF10a in integumentary tissues i.e. gills, scales, skin, intestine, adipose fin and tail fins, suggesting that IRF10b may be more important in mucosal immunity. The expression of both trout IRF10 paralogues is up-regulated by recombinant IFN-γ. The expression of the IRF10 genes is highly induced by Poly I:C in vitro and in vivo, and by viral infection, but is less responsive to peptidoglycan and bacterial infection, suggesting an important role of fish IRF10 in antiviral defense.

  13. Effects of coal leachates on fish gametogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, R.

    1985-04-01

    Coal leachates were examined for toxic effects on fish spermatogensis. Non-breeding mummichogs, Fundulus heteroclitus, were induced to undergo testicular recrudescence in the laboratory by 6 weeks exposure to 20C and a photoperiod of 16L:8D. Sperm production was assessed by counting condensed heads in hemacytometers after testes were homogenized for 3 min in 200 ml of 1% NaCl and 0.05% Triton X100. Analysis of variance and Duncan's multiple range test revealed a significant (P less than .001) reduction in sperm production by fish exposed to some, but not all coal leachates. Sperm production during the breeding season by six field populations of Fundulus, either adjacent to, or 2 miles upstream from coal-fired power plants were not significantly different from one another.

  14. Phytoplankton growth, dissipation, and succession in estuarine environments. Renewal proposal and annual summary report, August 1, 1977--July 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seliger, H H

    1978-01-01

    The directions of the research program in understanding the dynamics of the natural phytoplankton populations of the Chesapeake Bay, the methodology, the statistical analysis, and the description of the system are parallel to the requirements for environmental impact studies. Results are reported for the following studies: development of instrumentation and the synoptic isopleth methodology for relating the dynamic distributions of natural phytoplankton populations to water circulation patterns; phytoplankton cage experiments for assessment of nutrient dynamics; sub-lethal concentrations and effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; and studies on concentration and time kinetics of induction of liver aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase system in Fundulus heteroclitus by benzopyrene and 3-methyl cholanthrene. (HLW)

  15. Differences in Ca2+-management between the ventricle of two species of neotropical teleosts: the jeju, Hoplerythrinus unitaeniatus (Spix & Agassiz, 1829, and the acara, Geophagus brasiliensis (Quoy & Gaimard, 1824

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Jones Costa

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the physiological role of the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR of two neotropical teleosts, the jeju, Hoplerythrinus unitaeniatus (Erythrinidae, and the acara, Geophagus brasiliensis (Cichlidae. While the in vivo heart frequency (fH - bpm of acara (79.6 ± 6.6 was higher than that of the jeju (50.3 ± 2.7, the opposite was observed for the ventricular inotropism (Fc - mN/mm² at 12 bpm (acara = 28.66 ± 1.86 vs. jeju = 36.09 ± 1.67. A 5 min diastolic pause resulted in a strong potentiation of Fc (≅ 90% of strips from jeju, which was completely abolished by ryanodine. Ryanodine also resulted in a ≅ 20% decrease in the Fc developed by strips from jeju at both subphysiological (12 bpm and physiological (in vivo frequencies. However, this effect of ryanodine reducing the Fc from jeju was completely compensated by adrenaline increments (10-9 and 10-6 M. In contrast, strips from acara were irresponsive to ryanodine, irrespective of the stimulation frequency, and increases in adrenaline concentration (to 10-9 and 10-6 M further increased Fc. These results reinforce the hypothesis of the functionality of the SR as a common trait in neotropical ostariophysian (as jeju, while in acanthopterygians (as acara it seems to be functional mainly in 'athletic' species.

  16. Assessment of spermatogenesis and plasma sex steroids in a seasonal breeding teleost: a comparative study in an area of influence of a tributary, downstream from a hydroelectric power dam, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Fabricio F T; Thomé, Ralph G; Arantes, Fabio P; Castro, Antonio Carlos S; Sato, Yoshimi; Bazzoli, Nilo; Rizzo, Elizete

    2012-12-01

    River damming and building of hydroelectric power plants interrupt the reproductive migration routes and change the major physicochemical parameters of water quality, with drastic consequences for populations of migratory fishes. The goal of this study was to evaluate proliferation and cell death during spermatogenesis and serum profiles of sex steroids in Prochilodus argenteus, from the São Francisco River, downstream from the Três Marias Dam. A total of 257 adult males were caught quarterly during a reproductive cycle in two sites: the first 34 km of the river after the dam (site 1) and the second 34-54 km after the dam (site 2), after the confluence with a tributary, the Abaeté River. Seasonal changes in the testicular activity associated with morphometric analyses of germ cells as well as proliferation and testicular apoptosis support a more active spermatogenesis in fish from site 2, where higher levels of sex steroids and gonadosomatic index (GSI) were also found. In site 1, fish presented low serum levels of testosterone, 17β-estradiol and 17α-hydroxyprogesterone and a low GSI during gonadal maturation. Spermatogonial proliferation (PCNA) and apoptosis (TUNEL) were more elevated in fish from site 1, but spermatocytes were mainly labelled in fish from site 2. Overall, these data demonstrate changes in testicular activity and plasma sex steroids in a neotropical teleost fish living downstream from a hydroelectric dam, supplying new data on fish reproduction in regulated rivers. Moreover, morphometric analyses associated with sex steroids profiles provide reliable tools to assess fish spermatogenesis under environmental stress conditions.

  17. Support of ASTP/KOSMOS fundulus embryo development experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, P. M.; Keefe, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Results from the Kosmos Biosatellite 782 flight are presented. Experiments with fish hatchlings are discussed along with postflight observation and testing. The preparation of fertilized eggs for the experiments is described.

  18. The remarkable reproductive diversity of teleost fishes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, Carl; Wootton, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 4 (2016), s. 1208-1215 ISSN 1467-2960 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Hermaphroditism * mating system * self-fertilization * sex determination * unisexuality * viviparity Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 9.013, year: 2016

  19. Neuronal mechanisms of learning in teleost fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Hurtado-Parrado

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Two predominant approaches for studying the neurobiology of learning in fish are reviewed: brain lesions and chemical stimulation. Habituation, sensitization, Pavlovian Conditioning, spatial behavior, and emotional learning are the specific processes analyzed. Regarding the effect of brain lesions, telencephalic ablations produced impairment of habituation learning; conversely,cerebellum lesions caused deficiencies in classical conditioning of eye-retraction and spatial learning (similar effects observed in mammals suggest that the functions of the cerebellum may have evolved early in vertebratehistory. Medium Pallium (MP areas have been identified as criticalfor emotional learning in fish. Furthermore, neurobehavioral functions of MP seem to be similar to the functions of the amygdala in mammals. Relating to neurochemical processes, NMDA receptor antagonists affected the acquisition of avoidance and fear conditioning in a dose-dependent manner. Alternatively, Nitric Oxide (NO and cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate (cGMP seem to be involved in the consolidation process of emotional learning.

  20. Adaptation of teleosts to very high salinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laverty, Gary; Skadhauge, Erik

    2012-01-01

    increase drinking rates and water absorption across the intestine by solute-linked transport. This process requires increased activity, expression levels and possibly changes in subunit isoforms of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pumps, along with increases in other components of the NaCl absorptive pathway...... with intestinal water absorption and with the properties of the gill epithelium. While there is much that is still not completely understood, recent work has begun to look at these adaptations at the cellular and molecular level. As with seawater osmoregulation, fish adapting to hypersaline conditions generally....... Additionally, recent studies have demonstrated the importance of luminal anion exchange activity and of luminal alkalinization, which can support absorption against increasing osmotic gradients by promoting divalent ion precipitation (CaCO(3)) and by conversion of HCO(3)(-) ions to CO(2). The steepness...

  1. Nerve endings in the heart of teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S

    1979-01-01

    The nerve endings in the heart of fishes were studied using silver impregnation techniques. The heart chambers are profusely innervated by the sympathetic, parasympathetic (vagal) and postganglionic fibers of the intracardiac ganglia situated at the sinuatrial and the atrioventricular junctions. The plexuses are composed of medullated and nonmedullated fibers. The nerve fibers generally end freely and are slightly branched or unbranched terminations of myelinated and unmyelinated fibers. Moreover, a few nerve fibers end redundant in the form of end-rings, bulb-like, bush-like, club-shaped end end-coil like structures. The complex unencapsulated types of endings are also found in the myocardium of the atrium and the ventricle. The encapsulated endings (Vater-Pacinian; Krause end-bulb) could not be observed.

  2. Teleosts in hypoxia : Aspects of anaerobic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Thillart, G.; van Waarde, Aren

    1985-01-01

    Moderate hypoxia can be tolerated by many fish species, while only some species survive severe hypoxia or anoxia. Hypoxia usually activates anaerobic glycolysis, which may be temporary when the animals are able to improve their oxygen extraction capacity. Switching over to aerobic metabolism allows

  3. Composition and spatial distribution of the fish community in temporal ponds of the marshland of Doñana National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Moreno-Valcárcel

    2015-10-01

    The fish community in the ponds consisted of 10 species, with exotic species being the most frequent (Cyprinus carpio, Fundulus heteroclitus and Gambusia holbrooki and also contributing the most abundance and biomass. The existence of spatial correlation between ponds indicated that structure of the fish community varied in relation to its location. This was corrected through the inclusion of spatial variables (connectivity variables. Results of BIO-ENV showed that the connectivity variables were the most correlated with the structure of the fish community, and the variables vegetative cover and pond area were also important. The best possible combination of the variables in relation to the distribution patterns of the fish community showed a correlation index of about 50%, while other factors such as predation and the biology of the species could be fundamental mechanisms affecting the fish composition in the temporal ponds of the marshland of Doñana National Park.

  4. Dietary CdSe/ZnS quantum dot exposure in estuarine fish: Bioavailability, oxidative stress responses, reproduction, and maternal transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blickley, T. Michelle, E-mail: TMBlickley@dow.com [Marine Science and Conservation, Duke University Marine Laboratory, Beaufort, NC (United States); Integrated Toxicology and Environmental Health Program, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Matson, Cole W., E-mail: Cole_Matson@baylor.edu [Integrated Toxicology and Environmental Health Program, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology (CEINT), Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Vreeland, Wyatt N., E-mail: vreeland@nist.gov [Biochemical Science Div., National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Rittschof, Daniel, E-mail: ritt@duke.edu [Marine Science and Conservation, Duke University Marine Laboratory, Beaufort, NC (United States); Integrated Toxicology and Environmental Health Program, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Di Giulio, Richard T., E-mail: richd@duke.edu [Integrated Toxicology and Environmental Health Program, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology (CEINT), Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); McClellan-Green, Patricia D., E-mail: pdmcclel@ncsu.edu [Dept. of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Center for Marine Sciences and Technology, North Carolina State University, Morehead City, NC (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Fundulus heteroclitus were fed diets containing CdSe/ZnS QDs for 85 days. • QDs or their degradation products accumulated in the intestine and liver. • Cadmium was detected in the eggs from parents fed QDs. • No significant changes in total glutathione or lipid peroxidation were observed. • mRNA expression of genes involved with oxidative stress pathways were measured. - Abstract: Continued development, use, and disposal of quantum dots (QDs) ensure their entrance into aquatic environments where they could pose a risk to biological organisms as whole nanoparticles or as degraded metal constituents. Reproductive Fundulus heteroclitus were fed a control diet with lecithin, diets containing 1 or 10 μg of lecithin-encapsulated CdSe/ZnS QD/day, or a diet containing 5.9 μg CdCl{sub 2}/day for 85 days. Cadmium concentrations in liver, intestine, and eggs were quantified with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In fish fed 10 μg QD/day, QDs or their degradation products traversed the intestinal epithelia and accumulated in the liver. Less than 0.01% of the QD's cadmium was retained in the liver or intestinal tissues. This compares to 0.9% and 0.5% of the cadmium in the intestine and liver, respectively of fish fed a CdCl{sub 2} diet. Cadmium was also detected in the eggs from parents fed 10 μg QD/day. No significant changes in hepatic total glutathione, lipid peroxidation, or expression of genes involved in metal metabolism or oxidative stress were observed. While QDs in the diet are minimally bioavailable, unusual levels of vitellogenin transcription in male fish as well as declining fecundity require further investigation to determine if endocrine disruption is of environmental concern.

  5. Genetic basis for rapidly evolved tolerance in the wild ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) residing in some urban and industrialized estuaries of the US eastern seaboard demonstrate recently evolved and extreme tolerance to toxic aryl hydrocarbon pollutants, characterized as dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Here we provide an unusually comprehensive accounting (69%) through Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) analysis of the genetic basis for DLC tolerance in killifish inhabiting an urban estuary contaminated with PCB congeners, the most toxic of which are DLCs. Consistent with mechanistic knowledge of DLC toxicity in fish and other vertebrates, the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (ahr2) region accounts for 17% of trait variation; however, QTLs on independent linkage groups and their interactions have even greater explanatory power (44%). QTLs interpreted within the context of recently available Fundulus genomic resources and shared synteny among fish species suggest adaptation via inter-acting components of a complex stress response network. Some QTLs were also enriched in other killifish populations characterized as DLC tolerant and residing in distant urban estuaries contaminated with unique mixtures of pollutants. Together, our results suggest that DLC tolerance in killifish represents an emerging example of parallel contemporary evolution that has been driven by intense human-mediated selection on natural populations. This manuscript describes experimental studies that contribute to our understanding of the ecological

  6. Fish abundances in shoreline habitats and submerged aquatic vegetation in a tidal freshwater embayment of the Potomac River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Richard T; Jones, R Christian

    2012-05-01

    Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) is considered an important habitat for juvenile and small forage fish species, but many long-term recruitment surveys do not effectively monitor fish communities in SAV. To better understand the impact of recent large increases of SAV on the fish community in tidal freshwater reaches of the Potomac River, we compared traditional seine sampling from shore with drop ring sampling of SAV beds (primarily Hydrilla) in a shallow water (depths, shoreline and SAV habitats in late summer of three different years (2007, 2008, and 2009). For the dominant species (Fundulus diaphanus, Lepomis macrochirus, Etheostoma olmstedi, Morone americana, Lepomis gibbosus, and Fundulus heteroclitus), density was nearly always higher in SAV, but overall, species richness was highest in shoreline habitats sampled with seines. Although historical monitoring of fish in Gunston Cove (and throughout Chesapeake Bay) is based upon seine sampling (and trawl sampling in deeper areas), the high densities of fish and larger areal extent of SAV indicated that complementary sampling of SAV habitats would produce more accurate trends in abundances of common species. Because drop ring samples cover much less area than seines and may miss rare species, a combination of methods that includes seine sampling is needed for biodiversity assessment. The resurgence of SAV in tidal freshwater signifies improving water quality, and methods we evaluated here support improved inferences about population trends and fish community structure as indicators of ecosystem condition.

  7. Measuring titratable alkalinity by single versus double endpoint titration: An evaluation in two cyprinodont species and implications for characterizing net H+ flux in aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brix, Kevin V; Wood, Chris M; Grosell, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, Na(+) uptake and acid-base balance in the euryhaline pupfish Cyprinodon variegatus variegatus were characterized when fish were exposed to pH 4.5 freshwater (7mM Na(+)). Similar to the related cyprinodont, Fundulus heteroclitus, Na(+) uptake was significantly inhibited when exposed to low pH water. However, it initially appeared that C. v. variegatus increased apparent net acid excretion at low pH relative to circumneutral pH. This result is opposite to previous observations for F. heteroclitus under similar conditions where fish were observed to switch from apparent net H(+) excretion at circumneutral pH to apparent net H(+) uptake at low pH. Further investigation revealed disparate observations between these studies were the result of using double endpoint titrations to measure titratable alkalinity fluxes in the current study, while the earlier study utilized single endpoint titrations to measure these fluxes (i.e.,. Cyprinodon acid-base transport is qualitatively similar to Fundulus when characterized using single endpoint titrations). This led to a comparative investigation of these two methods. We hypothesized that either the single endpoint methodology was being influenced by a change in the buffer capacity of the water (e.g., mucus being released by the fish) at low pH, or the double endpoint methodology was not properly accounting for ammonia flux by the fish. A series of follow-up experiments indicated that buffer capacity of the water did not change significantly, that excretion of protein (a surrogate for mucus) was actually reduced at low pH, and that the double endpoint methodology does not properly account for NH(3) excretion by fish under low pH conditions. As a result, it overestimates net H(+) excretion during low pH exposure. After applying the maximum possible correction for this error (i.e., assuming that all ammonia is excreted as NH(3)), the double endpoint methodology indicates that net H(+) transport was reduced to

  8. LIPID CONTENT AND CONDITION IN AN ESTUARINE TELEOST

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    related to feeding level, and was not affected by temperature although food intake at 15°C was half that at ... (27° 02'E/32° 02'S) in relation to that of similar fish captured in the open Kowie estuary. (26° 54'E/33° 36'S). ... The fat content of the food items of R. holubi was determined in a Sohxlet apparatus using anhydrous ...

  9. Embryonic adaptations and nutrition in the viviparous teleost Clinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Embryos of Clinus dorsalis absorb nutrients from the embiyotrophe, secreted by the follicular epithelium. Autoradiographic studies revealed that the principal areas of nutrient absorption are the embryonic gut and epidermis. A histological and electron microscopic study of embryonic structure revealed an extensively ...

  10. Juveniles, food and the surf zone habitat: implications for teleost ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The length composition, abundance patterns and feeding habits of juvenile Diplodus sargus capensis, Lithognathus mormyrus, Pomadasys olivaceum, Rhabdosargus globiceps, Sarpa salpa and Trachurus trachurus are given. Zooplankton, in the form of copepods, chaetognaths, crustacean larvae and mysids, constituted a ...

  11. researcii note haematological studies on some freshwater teleosts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were preformed on plasna (Hattingh, 1972) except in the case of pH, pCOz, pOz, haemoglobin concentrations. (Hb), red blood cell count (RBCC), and glucose. In. Table I Ht refers to haematrocrit, ESR to erythrocyte sedimentation rate and TPP to total plawna protein con- centration. The fish were acchrnatned at 18 t loC at a.

  12. Recruitment and growth patterns of juvenile marine teleosts caught ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    : 521- 528. SALE, P.F. 1980. The ecology of fishes on coral reefs. Oceanogr. Mar. Bioi. Ann. Rev. 18: 367 -421. TALBOT, F.H. 1955. Notes on the biology of the white stumpnose. Rhabdosargus globiceps (Cuvier) and on the fish fauna of the.

  13. Adrenergic signaling in teleost fish liver, a challenging path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Elena; Moon, Thomas W

    2016-09-01

    Adrenergic receptors or adrenoceptors (ARs) belong to the huge family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that have been well characterized in mammals primarily because of their importance as therapeutic drug targets. ARs are found across vertebrates and this review examines the path to identify and characterize these receptors in fish with emphasis on hepatic metabolism. The absence of reliable and specific pharmacological agents led investigators to define the fish hepatic AR system as relying solely on a β2-AR, cAMP-dependent signaling transduction pathway. The use of calcium-radiometric imaging, purified membranes for ligand-binding studies, and perifused rather than static cultured fish hepatocytes, unequivocally demonstrated that both α1- and β2-AR signaling systems existed in the fish liver consistent with studies in mammals. Additionally, the use of molecular tools and phylogenetic analysis clearly demonstrated the existence of multiple AR-types and -subtypes in hepatic and other tissues of a number of fish species. This review also examines the use of β-blockers as pharmaceuticals and how these drugs that are now in the aquatic environment may be impacting aquatic species including fish and some invertebrates. Clearly there is a large conservation of structure and function within the AR system of vertebrates but there remain a number of key questions that need to be addressed before a clear understanding of these systems can be resolved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Marine teleost locates live prey through pH sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprio, John; Shimohara, Mami; Marui, Takayuki; Harada, Shuitsu; Kiyohara, Sadao

    2014-06-06

    We report that the Japanese sea catfish Plotosus japonicus senses local pH-associated increases in H(+)/CO2 equating to a decrease of ≤0.1 pH unit in ambient seawater. We demonstrated that these sensors, located on the external body of the fish, detect undamaged cryptic respiring prey, such as polychaete worms. Sensitivity is maximal at the natural pH of seawater (pH 8.1 to 8.2) and decreases dramatically in seawater with a pH <8.0. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Impacts of Low Temperature on the Teleost Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn H. Abram

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As poikilothermic vertebrates, fish can experience changes in water temperature, and hence body temperature, as a result of seasonal changes, migration, or efflux of large quantities of effluent into a body of water. Temperature shifts outside of the optimal temperature range for an individual fish species can have negative impacts on the physiology of the animal, including the immune system. As a result, acute or chronic exposure to suboptimal temperatures can impair an organisms’ ability to defend against pathogens and thus compromise the overall health of the animal. This review focuses on the advances made towards understanding the impacts of suboptimal temperature on the soluble and cellular mediators of the innate and adaptive immune systems of fishes. Although cold stress can result in varying effects in different fish species, acute and chronic suboptimal temperature exposure generally yield suppressive effects, particularly on adaptive immunity. Knowledge of the effects of environmental temperature on fish species is critical for both the optimal management of wild species and the best management practices for aquaculture species.

  16. Mechanistic basis of otolith formation during teleost inner ear development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, David; Freund, Jonathan B; Fraser, Scott E; Vermot, Julien

    2011-02-15

    Otoliths, which are connected to stereociliary bundles in the inner ear, serve as inertial sensors for balance. In teleostei, otolith development is critically dependent on flow forces generated by beating cilia; however, the mechanism by which flow controls otolith formation remains unclear. Here, we have developed a noninvasive flow probe using optical tweezers and a viscous flow model in order to demonstrate how the observed hydrodynamics influence otolith assembly. We show that rotational flow stirs and suppresses precursor agglomeration in the core of the cilia-driven vortex. The velocity field correlates with the shape of the otolith and we provide evidence that hydrodynamics is actively involved in controlling otolith morphogenesis. An implication of this hydrodynamic effect is that otolith self-assembly is mediated by the balance between Brownian motion and cilia-driven flow. More generally, this flow feature highlights an alternative biological strategy for controlling particle localization in solution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of multiple FXYD genes in a teleost fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tipsmark, Christian Kølbæk; Madsen, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    and gill differed between fresh water and seawater salmon. The present study identified novel FXYD isoforms and demonstrated the tissue dependence in their expression. Modulation of FXYD proteins in osmoregulatory organs in response to salinity substantiate the importance of these genes in ion transport...

  18. Toxicological effects of arsenic exposure in a freshwater teleost fish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High concentration of arsenic in groundwater in the north-eastern states of India has become a major cause of concern. Inorganic arsenic of geological origin is found in groundwater used as drinking-water in several parts of the world. Arsenic is used in various industries and agriculture and excessive arsenic finds its way ...

  19. Nongenomic actions of cortisol in the teleost lactotroph model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borski, Russell J; Tipsmark, Christian Kølbæk; Mita, M

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying rapid nongenomic effects of glucocorticoids is poorly understood. We have previously established that cortisol rapidly suppresses tilapia prolactin (PRL) release through a nongenomic, membrane action that involves rapid reductions in intracellular Ca2+. The aim of the pr......The mechanisms underlying rapid nongenomic effects of glucocorticoids is poorly understood. We have previously established that cortisol rapidly suppresses tilapia prolactin (PRL) release through a nongenomic, membrane action that involves rapid reductions in intracellular Ca2+. The aim...... of the present study was to investigate the role of phospholipase C (PLC)-IP3 in mediating cortisol's actions. During 30 min and 4-hour incubation, chicken GnRH-II induces a 2-4 fold increase in PRL release from the tilapia pituitary. The stimulatory effect of cGnRH-II was reduced by cortisol, cortisol-21......-hemisuccinate (HEF) and its membrane impermeant analog, HEF-BSA. Since GnRH induces PRL release, in part, via activation of PLC this suggests that cortisol may rapidly inhibit GnRH-induced PRL release by suppressing PLC activity. We also found that cortisol rapidly inhibits IP3 accumulation in tilapia RPD under...

  20. Stress and fear responses in the teleost pallium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Patricia Isabel da Mota E.; Martins, C.I.M.; Khan, Uniza Wahid

    2015-01-01

    largely unknown. In the present study the involvement of Dl and Dm in such responses was investigated by exposing Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to a standardized confinement stress and to skin extract from conspecifics. Nile tilapia develops a characteristic anticipatory behaviour to hand feeding......, and effects of skin extract on this behaviour and locomotor activity were studied to characterise threat sensitive behaviour. Nile tilapia responded behaviourally to conspecific alarm cues by reducing feeding anticipatory behaviour. This may reflect a general elevation of alertness, and further studies...

  1. Intestinal bicarbonate secretion by marine teleost fish - why and how?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Rod W.; Wilson, Jonathan M.; Grosell, Martin Hautopp

    2002-01-01

    Calcium, Precipitation, Osmoregulation, pH-stat titration, Water absorption, Chloride-bicarbonate exchange......Calcium, Precipitation, Osmoregulation, pH-stat titration, Water absorption, Chloride-bicarbonate exchange...

  2. Intestinal glucose transport and salinity adaptation in a euryhaline teleost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reshkin, S.J.; Ahearn, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    Glucose transport by upper and lower intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles of the African tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) was characterized in fish acclimated to either freshwater of full-strength sea water. D-[ 3 H]-glucose uptake by vesicles was stimulated by a transmembrane Na gradient, was electrogenic, and was enhanced by countertransport of either D-glucose or D-galactose. Glucose transport was greater in the upper intestine than in the lower intestine and in sea water animals rather than in fish acclimated to freshwater. Glucose influx (10-s uptake) involved both saturable and nonsaturable transport components. Sea water adaptation increased apparent glucose influx K/sub t/, J/sub max/, apparent diffusional permeability (P), and the apparent Na affinity of the cotransport system in both intestinal segments, but the stoichiometry of Na-glucose transfer (1:1) was unaffected by differential saline conditions or gut region. It is suggested that increased sugar transport in sea water animals is due to the combination of enhanced Na-binding properties and an increase in number or transfer rate of the transport proteins. Freshwater animals compensate for reduced Na affinity of the coupled process by markedly increasing the protein affinity for glucose

  3. Neuroendocrine effects of endocrine disruptors in teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Page, Yann; Vosges, Mélanie; Servili, Arianna; Brion, François; Kah, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Because a large proportion of potential endocrine disruptors (EDC) end up in surface waters, aquatic species are particularly vulnerable to their potential adverse effects. Recent studies identified a number of brain targets for EDC commonly present in environmentally relevant concentrations in surface waters. Among those neuronal systems disrupted by EDC are the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, the dopaminergic and serotoninergic circuits, and more recently the Kiss/GPR54 system, which regulates gonadotropin release. However, one of the most striking effects of EDC, notably estrogen mimics, is their impact on the cyp19a1b gene that encodes the brain aromatase isoform in fish. Moreover, this is the only example in which the molecular basis of endocrine disruption is fully understood. The aims of this review were to (1) synthesize the most recent discoveries concerning the EDC effects upon neuroendocrine systems of fish and (2) provide, when possible, the underlying molecular basis of disruption for each system concerned. The potential adverse effects of EDC on neurogenesis, puberty, and brain sexualization are also described. It is important to point out the future environmental, social, and economical issues arising from endocrine disruption studies in the context of risk assessment.

  4. Prolactin cells of a teleost, Heteropneustes fossilis , intoxicated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In short-term experiment, no change was noticed throughout the experiment in the histological structure and nuclear volume of prolactin cells of Metacid-50 treated fish. The chronical exposure of fish for long-term to Metacid-50-provoked hypocalcaemia. Up to 14 days there was no histological change in the prolactin cells of ...

  5. Reproduction in the live-bearing teleost Clinus superciliosus | Veith ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By studying embryonic mass increase, yolk availability and embryonic oxygen consumption, it was established that the embryos of C. superciliosus rely almost entirely on maternal secretions for their nutrients anq the species therefore displays an advanced form of viviparity. They breed throughout the year and the species ...

  6. LIPID CONTENT AND CONDITION IN AN ESTUARINE TELEOST

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since weight but not length of fish usually varies according to the feeding level or reproductive state, assessments of condition, "well-being", or "fatness" of fish have generally employed measurements of the length - weight ratio. These condition factor analyses have long been used in fisheries biology as a relatively rapid ...

  7. Embryonic adaptations and nutrition in the viviparous teleost Clinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    absorptive structures of viviparous species has thus been extensively studied, but very little physiological work on the relative importance of absorptive sites has been undertaken. D6pkhe (1976) homogenized whole embryos of Poecilia reticulata to demonstrate uptake of labelled L-leucine and. Veith (1980) reported uptake ...

  8. Juveniles, food and the surf zone habitat: implications for teleost ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L. mormyrus was well represented in trawl catches between Mossel Bay and Plettenberg Bay with the majority of fish caught above 120 mm TL (Buxton et al. 1984). No fish ofO-age group (below 72 mm) were caught in the latter trawl survey. The number of sand steen bras caught off King's Beach was highly variable (Figure ...

  9. The Genomic Basis for Evolved Pollution Tolerance in Killifish (Fundulus heterclitus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncovering the molecular mechanisms of adaptive variation is a leading challenge in evolutionary biology. Identifying genes that influence ecological traits can provide insight into the evolutionary processes behind genomic responses to environmental change. Here, we examine the...

  10. Impact of a commercial peat moss operation on water quality and biota in a small tributary of the Richibucto River, Kent County, New Brunswick, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surette, C; Brun, G L; Mallet, V N

    2002-05-01

    The St-Charles Plain (Kent County, New Brunswick, Canada) commercial peat moss operation has been ongoing since 1983. To process the peat, a dry extraction method is used that requires extensive drainage of the peat bog. The water is directed toward sedimentation ponds, where it drains into a small brook, which feeds into a river affected by tidal salt water. Water discharge from the bog contains large amounts of peat particles that deposit in the surrounding watershed. As a result, the pH of the freshwater sites that receive the drainage water from the commercial operation, is fairly acidic (pH 3.9-4.7). Water samples from or near the peat moss operation have a higher concentration of total phosphorous and total organic carbon. The peat particles contain relatively high levels of total mercury, as reflected by analysis of peat sediments. However, the water samples contained low levels of dissolved mercury. Indigenous samples of biota-namely, sand shrimps (Crangon septemspinosa) and mummichogs (Fundulus heteroclitus)-did not contain mercury levels higher in the impacted sites than in the reference sites. Introduced blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) did not accumulate significant amounts of mercury during a 62-day exposure in the study area. Overall, the data suggest that although relatively large amounts of mercury-containing peat particles are discharged into the ecosystem, bioaccumulation of mercury in the biota does not occur.

  11. Investigating the effect of chemical stress and resource ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modeling exposure and recovery of fish and wildlife populations after stressor mitigation serves as a basis for evaluating population status and remediation success. The Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) is an important and well-studied model organism for understanding the effects of pollutants and other stressors in estuarine and marine ecosystems. Herein, we develop a density dependent matrix population model for Atlantic killifish that analyzes both size-structure and age class-structure of the population so that we could readily incorporate output from a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model currently under development. This population modeling approach emphasizes application in conjunction with field monitoring efforts (e.g., through effects-based monitoring programs) and/or laboratory analysis to link effects due to chemical stress to adverse outcomes in whole organisms and populations. We applied the model using data for killifish exposed to dioxin-like compounds, taken from a previously published study. Specifically, the model was used to investigate population trajectories for Atlantic killifish with dietary exposures to 112, 296, and 875 pg/g of dioxin with effects on fertility and survival rates. All effects were expressed relative to control fish. Further, the population model was employed to examine age and size distributions of a population exposed to resource limitation in addition to chemical stress. For each dietary exposure concentration o

  12. Investigations of oil refinery effluent on fish in the field and laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J.; Munkittrick, K. [New Brunswick Univ., Saint John, NB (Canada). Canadian Rivers Inst., Dept. of Biology; MacLatchy, D.L. [Wilfrid Laurier Univ., Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    Canada's largest oil refinery located near Saint John, New Brunswick, produces 270 000 barrels of oil/day and discharges effluent into the Little River at a rate of 24 274 m{sup 3}/day. The impact of refinery effluent on fish in the receiving environment has been under investigation since 2003. The efforts were first complicated by low dissolved oxygen attributed to ballast water released with the effluent. A more recent study was then initiated to assess any potential recovery after ballast water was removed from the effluent and to determine the effects of refinery effluent on fish. Potential recovery in the receiving environment was assessed through monthly fish surveys and by comparing recent data to previous studies. In order to clarify the effects that refinery effluents may have on fish, both laboratory and field studies were conducted with mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) and northern redbelly dace (Chrosomus eos). Both these brackish water species and freshwater species, respectively, were resident species. The field studies with caged mummichog revealed an increase in liver size relative to fish size and a decrease in condition of the fish downstream of the effluent discharge. Female testosterone levels and liver detoxification enzymes were also elevated. It was concluded that the reactions occurring in the field are more complicated than could be simulated in the laboratory.

  13. Combined toxicity effects of chlorine, ammonia, and temperature on marine plankton. Progress report, November 1976--31 January 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, J. C.

    1978-02-01

    Studies on the effects of chlorine, chloramines, and temperature on marine plankton have been carried out for three years. Species studied include marine phytoplankton, lobster larvae (Homarus americanus), oyster larvae (Crassostrea virginica), copepods (Acartia tonsa), rotifers (Brachionas plicatilis), grass shrimp (Palamonetes pugio) summer flounder larvae (Paralichthys dentatus), larval and juvenile killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus), juvenile scup (Stenotomus versicolor), and juvenile winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus). In addition extensive studies on chlorine chemistry in seawater have been carried out. The major conclusions are that entrainment effects on permanent plankton such as phytoplankton, copepods, and rotifers are temporary, that is those organisms surviving chlorination and temperature shocks are capable of renewed and unrestricted growth once returned to the receiving water. Because chlorine is only applied for short periods daily in most power plants, the total population of the above organisms actually exposed to chlorine is small and the effects may be hardly measurable in receiving waters. However, chlorination effects on larval species that spawn intermittently could be catastrophic. In addition, there are many unanswered questions regarding the fate of chlorine that is dissipated in marine waters. Are the losses real and, if so, do they pose a toxicity threat to marine biota.

  14. Combined toxicity effects of chlorine, ammonia, and temperature on marine plankton. Progress report, September 16, 1975--September 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, J. C.; Ryther, J. H.

    1976-10-01

    Research on the combined effects of chlorine, ammmonia and temperature on marine plankton have been carried out for 20 months. To date continuous-flow bioassays have been conducted on lobster larvae (Homarus americanus), oyster larvae (Crassostrea virginica), copepods (Acartia tonsa), rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis), three juvenile and larval fish, killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus), scup (Stenotomus versicolor), and winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus), and phytoplankton (the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum). In addition, studies on zooplankton metabolism, filtration rates, and growth were carried out on exposed organisms. In general, the responses of invertebrates were distinctly different than those of fish: increasing mortality with increasing chlorine dose and greater sensitivity to chloramines than free chlorine in the former, and a threshold level of chlorine and greater sensitivity to free chlorine in the latter. Phytoplankton responses indicate that chlorine effects on primary producers are minimal compared to the serious effects on zooplankton, particularly larval forms that spawn intermittently. The overall conclusion of our studies is that chlorine application at power plants must be carried out with extreme caution and that serious consideration should be given to applying dechlorination at all coastal cooling systems.

  15. Combined toxicity effects of chlorine, ammonia, and temperature on marine plankton. Progress report, February 1, 1975--September 15, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryther, J. H.; Goldman, J. C.

    1975-10-01

    Research on the combined effects of chlorine, ammonia, and temperature on marine plankton have been carried out for 7/sup 1///sub 2/ months. Continuous-flow bioassay units have been constructed for larval species, juvenile fish, and phytoplankton. A detailed study on lobster (Homarus americanus) larvae and other studies on killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) larvae and juveniles, and juvenile scup (Stenotomus versicolor) and winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus) have been performed. Results to date indicate that there is an apparent and, as yet undetermined, chlorine demand of seawater; there is a differential toxic effect of chlorine and chloramines--lobsters were more sensitive to chloramines, whereas the fish species were more affected by free chlorine; respiration results indicate that significant stress occurs at toxicant levels below the onset of mortality, thus raising questions regarding the applicability of standard bioassay data; temperature elevation exerts a strong synergistic effect on chlorine-chloramine toxicity; and effects of exposure to halogen toxicity appear irreversible as revealed by persistent reductions in metabolic activity. It appears that chlorine toxicity to marine biota can occur even though chlorine residuals cannot be detected by current analytical techniques. These results support the findings of others that chlorine toxicity is a serious environmental pollutant. (auth)

  16. What is environmental stress? Insights from fish living in a variable environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Patricia M

    2014-01-01

    Although the term environmental stress is used across multiple fields in biology, the inherent ambiguity associated with its definition has caused confusion when attempting to understand organismal responses to environmental change. Here I provide a brief summary of existing definitions of the term stress, and the related concepts of homeostasis and allostasis, and attempt to unify them to develop a general framework for understanding how organisms respond to environmental stressors. I suggest that viewing stressors as environmental changes that cause reductions in performance or fitness provides the broadest and most useful conception of the phenomenon of stress. I examine this framework in the context of animals that have evolved in highly variable environments, using the Atlantic killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, as a case study. Consistent with the extreme environmental variation that they experience in their salt marsh habitats, killifish have substantial capacity for both short-term resistance and long-term plasticity in the face of changing temperature, salinity and oxygenation. There is inter-population variation in the sensitivity of killifish to environmental stressors, and in their ability to acclimate, suggesting that local adaptation can shape the stress response even in organisms that are broadly tolerant and highly plastic. Whole-organism differences between populations in stressor sensitivity and phenotypic plasticity are reflected at the biochemical and molecular levels in killifish, emphasizing the integrative nature of the response to environmental stressors. Examination of this empirical example highlights the utility of using an evolutionary perspective on stressors, stress and stress responses.

  17. Interaction of fish aryl hydrocarbon receptor paralogs (AHR1 and AHR2) with the retinoblastoma protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merson, Rebeka R., E-mail: rmerson@ric.edu [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Biology Department, Rhode Island College, 500 Mt. Pleasant Ave., Providence, RI 02908 (United States); Karchner, Sibel I.; Hahn, Mark E. [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States)

    2009-08-13

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates the toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related compounds. In some mammalian cell lines, TCDD induces G1 cell cycle arrest, which depends on an interaction between the AHR and the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (RB). Mammals possess one AHR, whereas fishes possess two or more AHR paralogs that differ in the domains important for AHR-RB interactions in mammals. To test the hypothesis that fish AHR paralogs differ in their ability to interact with RB, we cloned RB cDNA from Atlantic killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, and studied the interactions of killifish RB protein with killifish AHR1 and AHR2. In coimmunoprecipitation experiments, in vitro-expressed killifish RB coprecipitated with both AHR1 and AHR2. Consistent with these results, both killifish AHR1 and AHR2 interacted with RB in mammalian two-hybrid assays. These results suggest that both fish AHR1 and AHR2 paralogs may have the potential to influence cell proliferation through interactions with RB.

  18. Preliminary Insight into Winter Native Fish Assemblages in Guadiana Estuary Salt Marshes Coping with Environmental Variability and Non-Indigenous Fish Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Gonçalves

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to undertake a preliminary characterization of winter fish assemblages in the salt marsh areas of Guadiana lower estuary (South-East Portugal and discusses the potential risks of habitat dominance by a non-indigenous species (NIS. To this effect, six field campaigns were carried out in four sampling sites during winter season targeting the collection of fish species. A total of 48 samples were collected. Individuals from seven different taxa (marine and estuarine were collected, although the assemblage was dominated by two estuarine species—the native Pomatoschistus sp. (goby and the NIS Fundulus heteroclitus (mummichog. Goby was the most abundant taxa in the majority of salt marsh habitats, except for one specific, marsh pool, where extreme environmental conditions were registered, namely high temperature and salinity. Such conditions may have boosted the intrusion of mummichog in this area. This species is well adapted to a wide range of abiotic factors enabling them to colonize habitats where no predators inhabit. Impacts of mummichog introduction in the Guadiana salt marsh area are still unpredictable since this is the first time they have been recorded in such high density. Nevertheless, in scenarios of increased anthropogenic pressure and, consequently, habitat degradation, there is a potential risk of mummichog spreading to other habitats and therefore competing for space and food resources with native species.

  19. MHC ANTIGEN BINDING LOCUS DRB1 SHOWS STRONG SIGNAL OF SELECTION AND HIGH VARIABILITY IN FUNDULUS HETERCLITUS POPULATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The major histocompatibility system provides a unique complex of genetic loci in vertebrates to assess genetic diversity and to look for the effects of selection on the adaptive immune system. Studies using mammals and birds have demonstrated relationships between MHC genotyp...

  20. Morphology of a picky eater: a novel mechanism underlies premaxillary protrusion and retraction within cyprinodontiforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, L Patricia; Ferry-Graham, Lara A; Gibb, Alice C

    2008-01-01

    Upper jaw protrusion is hypothesized to improve feeding performance in teleost fishes by enhancing suction production and stealth of the feeding event. However, many cyprinodontiform fishes (mid-water feeders, such as mosquitofish, killifish, swordtails, mollies and pupfish) use upper jaw protrusion for "picking" prey out of the water column or off the substrate; this feeding mode may require improved jaw dexterity, but does not necessarily require increased stealth and/or suction production. We describe functional aspects of the bones, muscles and ligaments of the anterior jaws in three cyprinodontiform genera: Fundulus (Fundulidae), Gambusia and Poecilia (Poeciliidae). All three genera possess a premaxillomandibular ligament that connects the premaxilla of the upper jaw to the mandible. The architecture of this ligament is markedly different from the upper-lower jaw connections previously described for basal atherinomorphs or other teleosts, and this loose ligamentous connection allows for more pronounced premaxillary protrusion in this group relative to closely related outgroup taxa. Within poeciliids, a novel insertion of the second division of the adductor mandibulae (A2) onto the premaxilla has also evolved, which allows this jaw adductor to actively retract the premaxilla during mouth closing. This movement is in contrast with most other teleosts, where the upper jaw is retracted passively via pressure applied by the adduction of the lower jaw. We postulate that this mechanism of premaxillary protrusion mediates the cyprinodontiforms' ability to selectively pick specific food items from the water column, surface or bottom, as a picking-based feeding mechanism requires controlled and coordinated "forceps-like" movements of the upper and lower jaws. This mechanism is further refined in some poeciliids, where direct muscular control of the premaxillae may facilitate picking and/or scraping material from the substrate.

  1. Physiology is pivotal for interactions between salinity and acute copper toxicity to fish and invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosell, M; Blanchard, J; Brix, K V; Gerdes, R

    2007-08-30

    The present paper presents original data and a review of the copper (Cu) toxicity literature for estuarine and marine environments. For the first time, acute Cu toxicity across the full salinity range was determined. Killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, eggs were hatched in freshwater (FW), 2.5, 5, 10, 15, 22 and 35 ppt (seawater, SW) and juveniles were allowed to acclimate for 7 days prior to acute toxicity testing. Sensitivity was highest in FW (96 h LC50: 18 microg/l), followed by SW (96 h LC50: 294 microg/l) with fish at intermediate salinities being the most tolerant (96 h LC50 > 963 microg/l at 10 ppt). This approximately 50-fold, non-linear variation in sensitivity could not be accounted for by Cu speciation or competition among cations but can be explained by physiology. The relative Na(+) gradient from the blood plasma to the water is greatest in FW followed by SW and is smallest at 10 ppt. Regression of Cu toxicity versus the equilibrium potential for Na(+), which reflects the relative Na(+) gradient, revealed that 93% of the variation can be attributed to Na(+) gradients and thus osmoregulatory physiology. Examination of the existing literature on acute Cu toxicity in SW (defined as >25 ppt) confirmed that early life stages generally are most sensitive but this pattern may be attributable to size rather than developmental stage. Regardless of developmental stage and phylogeny, size clearly matters for Cu sensitivity. The existing literature on the influence of salinity on acute Cu toxicity as well as studies of mechanisms of Cu toxicity in fish and invertebrates are reviewed.

  2. A rapid transcriptome response is associated with desiccation resistance in aerially-exposed killifish embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angèle Tingaud-Sequeira

    Full Text Available Delayed hatching is a form of dormancy evolved in some amphibian and fish embryos to cope with environmental conditions transiently hostile to the survival of hatchlings or larvae. While diapause and cryptobiosis have been extensively studied in several animals, very little is known concerning the molecular mechanisms involved in the sensing and response of fish embryos to environmental cues. Embryos of the euryhaline killifish Fundulus heteroclitus advance dvelopment when exposed to air but hatching is suspended until flooding with seawater. Here, we investigated how transcriptome regulation underpins this adaptive response by examining changes in gene expression profiles of aerially incubated killifish embryos at ∼100% relative humidity, compared to embryos continuously flooded in water. The results confirm that mid-gastrula embryos are able to stimulate development in response to aerial incubation, which is accompanied by the differential expression of at least 806 distinct genes during a 24 h period. Most of these genes (∼70% appear to be differentially expressed within 3 h of aerial exposure, suggesting a broad and rapid transcriptomic response. This response seems to include an early sensing phase, which overlaps with a tissue remodeling and activation of embryonic development phase involving many regulatory and metabolic pathways. Interestingly, we found fast (0.5-1 h transcriptional differences in representatives of classical "stress" proteins, such as some molecular chaperones, members of signalling pathways typically involved in the transduction of sensor signals to stress response genes, and oxidative stress-related proteins, similar to that described in other animals undergoing dormancy, diapause or desiccation. To our knowledge, these data represent the first transcriptional profiling of molecular processes associated with desiccation resistance during delayed hatching in non-mammalian vertebrates. The exceptional transcriptomic

  3. Estimating movement and survival rates of a small saltwater fish using autonomous antenna receiver arrays and passive integrated transponder tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudershausen, Paul J.; Buckel, Jeffery A.; Dubreuil, Todd; O'Donnell, Matthew J.; Hightower, Joseph E.; Poland, Steven J.; Letcher, Benjamin H.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of small (12.5 mm long) passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and custom detection antennas for obtaining fine-scale movement and demographic data of mummichog Fundulus heteroclitus in a salt marsh creek. Apparent survival and detection probability were estimated using a Cormack Jolly Seber (CJS) model fitted to detection data collected by an array of 3 vertical antennas from November 2010 to March 2011 and by a single horizontal antenna from April to August 2011. Movement of mummichogs was monitored during the period when the array of vertical antennas was used. Antenna performance was examined in situ using tags placed in wooden dowels (drones) and in live mummichogs. Of the 44 tagged fish, 42 were resighted over the 9 mo monitoring period. The in situ detection probabilities of the drone and live mummichogs were high (~80-100%) when the ambient water depth was less than ~0.8 m. Upstream and downstream movement of mummichogs was related to hourly water depth and direction of tidal current in a way that maximized time periods over which mummichogs utilized the intertidal vegetated marsh. Apparent survival was lower during periods of colder water temperatures in December 2010 and early January 2011 (median estimate of daily apparent survival = 0.979) than during other periods of the study (median estimate of daily apparent survival = 0.992). During late fall and winter, temperature had a positive effect on the CJS detection probability of a tagged mummichog, likely due to greater fish activity over warmer periods. During the spring and summer, this pattern reversed possibly due to mummichogs having reduced activity during the hottest periods. This study demonstrates the utility of PIT tags and continuously operating autonomous detection systems for tracking fish at fine temporal scales, and improving estimates of demographic parameters in salt marsh creeks that are difficult or impractical to sample with active fishing gear.

  4. Effects of coal leachates on fish spermatogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, R.C

    1987-01-01

    The use of coal as a fuel source for power plants often involves the storage of coal on the plant site. Coal stored in this manner is subject to leaching by rain or groundwater, and the leachates may seep into surface waters. Coal leachates were examined for toxic effects on fish spermatogenesis. Nonbreeding mummichogs, Fundulus heteroclitus, were induced to enter breeding condition in the laboratory by exposure to 20{degree}C and a photoperiod of 16L:8D for 6 weeks. During this 6-weeks period, mummichogs were dosed in static exposure tanks with water extracts of coal (leachates). Chi-square analysis and Z test of proportions revealed a significant reduction in sperm production by fish exposed to some, but not all, coal leachates. This reduction was as much as 40-fold and occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Ordinarily, nonbreeding mummichogs collected immediately after the breeding season will not enter breeding condition in response to 16L:8D and 20{degree}C. Exposure of these photo-insensitive mummichogs to coal leachates under long photoperiod conditions for 8 weeks resulted in a significant increase in sperm production. Analysis of weekly sperm production by mummichogs from six field populations, either adjacent to or 2 miles upstream from coal-fired power plants, did not reveal significant differences during the breeding season. However, this sperm production was less than 1/10 that of a mummichog field population sampled concomitantly at the Chesapeake Bay Institute. The reduced sperm levels could not be related to reproductive toxin(s) contained in coal leachate. 13 refs., 1 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Pollutants and fish predator/prey behavior: A review of laboratory and field approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith S. WEIS, Allison CANDELMO

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fish behavior can be altered by contaminants. There is an extensive literature on laboratory behavioral assays, with many chemicals impairing feeding or predator avoidance. However, there is not extensive work on fishes that live in contaminated environments. Therefore, we then review our recent research on feeding and trophic relations of populations from contaminated estuaries compared with relatively unpolluted sites. The mummichog Fundulus heteroclitus, is a non-migratory fish; those from more contaminated areas are poor predators and slower to capture active prey (grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio. In the field, they consume much detritus and sediment, which is not nutritious. They are less active than fish from cleaner sites and more vulnerable to predation. They have altered thyroid glands and neurotransmitter levels, which may underlie altered behaviors. Fish from the reference site kept in tanks with sediment and food from the polluted site showed bioaccumulation and reduced prey capture after two months, although fish from the polluted site did not show significant improvement when maintained in a clean environment. Poor nutrition and predator avoidance may be responsible for their being smaller and having a shorter life span than reference fish. Bluefish Pomatomus saltatrix, are a marine species in which the young-of-the-year spend their first summer in estuaries. We found bioaccumulation of contaminants and reduced activity, schooling, and feeding in young-of-the-year bluefish from a relatively unpolluted site that were fed prey fish from a contaminated site. They also had altered thyroid glands and neurotransmitter levels. Many field-caught specimens had empty stomachs, which is rare in this species. In the fall, when they migrate back out to the ocean, they are smaller, slower, and more likely to starve or to be eaten than those that spent their summer in cleaner estuaries [Current Zoology 58 (1: 9-20, 2012].

  6. Evolved genetic and phenotypic differences due to mitochondrial-nuclear interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Z Baris

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos pathway is responsible for most aerobic ATP production and is the only pathway with both nuclear and mitochondrial encoded proteins. The importance of the interactions between these two genomes has recently received more attention because of their potential evolutionary effects and how they may affect human health and disease. In many different organisms, healthy nuclear and mitochondrial genome hybrids between species or among distant populations within a species affect fitness and OxPhos functions. However, what is less understood is whether these interactions impact individuals within a single natural population. The significance of this impact depends on the strength of selection for mito-nuclear interactions. We examined whether mito-nuclear interactions alter allele frequencies for ~11,000 nuclear SNPs within a single, natural Fundulus heteroclitus population containing two divergent mitochondrial haplotypes (mt-haplotypes. Between the two mt-haplotypes, there are significant nuclear allele frequency differences for 349 SNPs with a p-value of 1% (236 with 10% FDR. Unlike the rest of the genome, these 349 outlier SNPs form two groups associated with each mt-haplotype, with a minority of individuals having mixed ancestry. We use this mixed ancestry in combination with mt-haplotype as a polygenic factor to explain a significant fraction of the individual OxPhos variation. These data suggest that mito-nuclear interactions affect cardiac OxPhos function. The 349 outlier SNPs occur in genes involved in regulating metabolic processes but are not directly associated with the 79 nuclear OxPhos proteins. Therefore, we postulate that the evolution of mito-nuclear interactions affects OxPhos function by acting upstream of OxPhos.

  7. The Elizabeth River Story: A Case Study in Evolutionary Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giulio, Richard T.; Clark, Bryan W.

    2015-01-01

    The Elizabeth River system is an estuary in southeastern Virginia, surrounded by the towns of Chesapeake, Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Virginia Beach. The river has played important roles in U.S. history and has been the location of various military and industrial activities. These activities have been the source of chemical contamination in this aquatic system. Important industries, until the 1990s, included wood treatment plants that used creosote, an oil-derived product that is rich in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These plants left a legacy of PAH pollution in the river, and in particular Atlantic Wood Industries is a designated Superfund site now undergoing remediation. Numerous studies examined the distribution of PAH in the river and impacts on resident fauna. This review focuses on how a small estuarine fish with a limited home range, Fundulus heteroclitus (Atlantic killifish or mummichog), has responded to this pollution. While in certain areas of the river this species has clearly been impacted, as evidenced by elevated rates of liver cancer, some subpopulations, notably the one associated with the Atlantic Wood Industries site, displayed a remarkable ability to resist the marked effects PAH have on the embryonic development of fish. This review provides evidence of how pollutants have acted as evolutionary agents, causing changes in ecosystems potentially lasting longer than the pollutants themselves. Mechanisms underlying this evolved resistance, as well as mechanisms underlying the effects of PAH on embryonic development, are also described. The review concludes with a description of ongoing and promising efforts to restore this historic American river. PMID:26505693

  8. Not All Bones are Created Equal - Using Zebrafish and Other Teleost Species in Osteogenesis Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apschner, A.; Schulte-Merker, S.; Witten, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    Developmental osteogenesis and pathologies of mineralized tissues are areas of intense investigations in the mammalian field, but different from other areas of organ formation and developmental biology, zebrafish have been somewhat slow in joining the area of bone research. In recent years, however,

  9. Disruption of the endocrine control of final oocyte maturation in teleosts by xenobiotic chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, P.

    1999-07-01

    Final oocyte maturation (FOM) in fish and other vertebrates is under precise endocrine control and involves changes in hormone secretion at all levels of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis. Several potential sites and mechanisms of chemical disruption of the endocrine system controlling FOM by are discussed. Neurotoxic chemicals such as lead and PCBs can alter monoamine neurotransmitter function and xenoestrogens can interfere with steroid feedback mechanisms at the hypothalamus and pituitary to impair the neuroendocrine control of gonadotropin secretion. Chemicals which disrupt calcium homeostasis such as cadmium can interfere with calcium-dependent signal transduction pathway activated by reproductive hormones in the pituitary and gonads. Other xenobiotics may disrupt maturation-inducing steroid (MIS) function by impairing its synthesis or receptor binding. The problems in assessing endocrine disruption of FOM are discussed. The relatively few investigations reported in the literature on endocrine disruption of FOM in fishes by chemicals indicate that organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides at concentrations less than one ppb can impair induction of FOM in response to gonadotropin and the MIS. Moreover, evidence is presented that certain organochlorine pesticides block MIS action by binding to the MIS receptor which is localized on the oocyte plasma membrane. Steroid membrane receptor function may be particularly susceptible to interference by hydrophilic chemicals. Finally, an in vitro bioassay capable of screening many chemicals simultaneously for their ability to disrupt the endocrine control of FOM is described.

  10. Mucosal Immunity and B Cells in Teleosts: Effect of Vaccination and Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, David; Reyes-Lopez, Felipe E; Tort, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    Fish are subjected to several insults from the environment, which may endanger animal survival. Mucosal surfaces are the first line of defense against these threats, acting as a physical barrier to protect the animal but also functioning as an active immune tissue. Thus, four mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues (MALTs), which lead the immune responses in gut, skin, gills, and nose, have been described in fish. Humoral and cellular immunity, as well as their regulation and the factors that influence the response in these mucosal lymphoid tissues, are still not well known in most fish species. Mucosal B-lymphocytes and immunoglobulins (Igs) are key players in the immune response that takes place in those MALTs. The existence of IgT as a mucosal specialized Ig gives us the opportunity of measuring specific responses after infection or vaccination, a fact that was not possible until recently in most fish species. The vaccination process is influenced by several factors, being stress one of the main stimuli determining the success of the vaccine. Thus, one of the major goals in a vaccination process is to avoid possible situations of stress, which might interfere with fish immune performance. However, interaction between immune and neuroendocrine systems at mucosal tissues is still unknown. In this review, we will summarize the latest findings about B-lymphocytes and Igs in mucosal immunity and the effect of stress and vaccination on B-cell response at mucosal sites. It is important to point out that a limited number of studies have been published regarding stress in mucosa and very few about the influence of stress over mucosal B-lymphocytes.

  11. Mucosal immunity and B cells in teleosts: effect of vaccination and stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eParra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fish are subjected to several insults from the environment, which may endanger animal survival. Mucosal surfaces are the first line of defense against those threats and they act as a physical barrier to protect the animal but also function as immunologically active tissues. Thus, four mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues have been described in fish, which lead the immune responses in gut, skin, gills and nose. Humoral and cellular immunity, as well as its regulation and the factors that influence the response in these mucosal lymphoid tissues is still not well known in most of fish species. Mucosal B-lymphocytes and immunoglobulins (Igs are one of the key players in the immune response after vaccination. Recent findings about IgT in trout have delimited the compartmentalization of immune response in systemic and mucosal. The existence of IgT as a specialized mucosa Ig gives us the opportunity of measuring mucosal specific responses after vaccination, a fact that was not possible until recently in most of the fish species. Vaccination process is influenced by several factors, being stress one of the main stimuli determining the success of the vaccine. Thus, one of the major goals in a vaccination process is to avoid possible situations of stress, which might interfere with fish immune performance. However, the interaction between immune and neuroendocrine systems at mucosal tissues is still unknown. In this review we will summarized the latest findings about B-lymphocytes and immunoglobulins in mucosal immunity and the effect of stress and vaccines on B cell response at mucosal sites. It is important to point out that a small number of studies have been published regarding mucosal stress and very few about the influence of stress over mucosal B-lymphocytes.

  12. Mucosal Immunity and B Cells in Teleosts: Effect of Vaccination and Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Parra, David; Reyes-Lopez, Felipe E.; Tort, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    Fish are subjected to several insults from the environment, which may endanger animal survival. Mucosal surfaces are the first line of defense against those threats and they act as a physical barrier to protect the animal but also function as immunologically active tissues. Thus, four mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues have been described in fish, which lead the immune responses in gut, skin, gills and nose. Humoral and cellular immunity, as well as its regulation and the factors that influe...

  13. Embryonic suckling and maternal specializations in the live-bearing teleost Zoarces viviparus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Peter Vilhelm; Steffensen, John Fleng; Sørensen, Thomas Flarup

    2010-01-01

    The European eelpout follows an aplacental viviparous reproductive strategy, in which gestation lasts 4–5months. During the last months of development yolk reserves are depleted, and embryos depend on an external source of nutrients. Here we provide evidence for novel specialized physiological, m...

  14. The modelling of optimal visual pigments of dichromatic teleosts in green coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lythgoe, J N; Partridge, J C

    1991-01-01

    We have constructed a computer model that attempts to predict which pairs of rhodopsins are most suitable for making various luminosity and chromaticity discriminations in green coastal water. The model, which is based on the statistics of photon capture by retinal photoreceptors, predicts the optimal visual pigment pairs for different visual tasks. The results obtained from the model compare well with the rhodopsins possessed by dichromatic fish living at moderate depth in green coastal water.

  15. Band 3 protein function in teleost fish erythrocytes: effect of oxygenation-deoxygenation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Russo, A.; Tellone, E.; Ficarra, S.; Giardina, B.; Bellocco, E.; Lagana, G.; Leuzzi, U.; Kotyk, Arnošt; Galtieri, A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 1 (2008), s. 49-54 ISSN 0862-8408 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : erythrocytes * hemoglobin * band 3 protein Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  16. Isolation of RNA from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) spermatozoa: implications for teleost male fertility and beyond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertebrate sperm has been shown to provide more than paternal genomic material to the oocyte. For example, specific transcripts have been identified in bull sperm associated with fertility and with motility in boar sperm. Very little is currently known about functional, residual RNA in spermatozoa a...

  17. Isolation of RNA striped bass Monrone saxatilis spermatozoa: Implications for teleost male fertility and beyond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertebrate sperm has been shown to provide more than paternal genomic material to the oocyte. For example, specific transcripts have been identified in bull sperm associated with fertility and with motility in boar sperm. Very little is currently known about functional, residual RNA in spermatozoa a...

  18. Exercise- and Hypoxia-Induced Anaerobic Metabolism and Recovery: A Student Laboratory Exercise Using Teleost Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, B. B.; Boily, P.; Williamson, L. A. C.

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic metabolism is recruited in vertebrates under conditions of intense exercise or lowered environmental oxygen availability (hypoxia), typically resulting in the accumulation of lactate in blood and tissues. Lactate will be cleared over time after the reoxygenation of tissues, eventually returning to control levels. Here, we present a…

  19. Purifying selection on leptin genes in teleosts may be due to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table 1. Organisms and accession numbers of the Leptin cDNA sequences used in this paper. Species. Gene. Accession. Leptin. NM_001095714.1. Amphibian. Xenopus tropicalis. Mammal. Felis catus. Rattus norvegicus. Homo sapiens. Mus musculus. Oryctolagus cuniculus. Sus scrofa. Macaca mulatta. Canis lupus ...

  20. Reference genes to quantify gene expression during oogenesis in a teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloffre, Laurence A M; Andrade, André; Filipe, Alexandra I; Canario, Adelino V M

    2012-09-10

    Understanding the molecular events involved in the acquisition of competence during oogenesis is a key step to determine the secret of 'high quality' eggs for aquaculture. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is the technique of election to determine changes in transcript abundance in such studies, but choosing reference genes for normalization, in particular during oogenesis, remains a challenge. In the present study, transcription of 6 functionally distinct genes, β actin (ACTB), cathepsin D (CTSD), cathepsin Z (CTSZ), elongation factor 1 α (EEF1A), TATA binding protein (TBP) and tubulin A (TUBA1A) was assessed as normalizers of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI) gene expression in mRNA from Mozambique tilapia oocytes during oogenesis. Reverse transcription was equally efficient and varies little in all samples. Most of the genes considered for reference were stable during early stages of oogenesis but variations were observed during vitellogenesis. A single gene and up to 3 genes were shown to be insufficient for reliable normalization throughout the whole oogenesis. The combination of the genes ACTB, CTSD, EEF1A and CTSZ as reference was found to minimize variation and has the most stable expression pattern between maturation stages. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. X-ray-induced dicentric yields in lymphocytes of the teleost, Umbra limi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyama, I. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Environmental Health); Etoh, H. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Biology)

    1983-01-01

    A microculture technique was applied to the study of lymphocytes of Umbra limi, which have a low number of large meta- and submetacentric chromosomes (2n=22). On the 5th day (90 h) and later after initiation of culture at 20/sup 0/C, some cultures provided well spread metaphase chromosomes for analyses. After initiation, cultures were irradiated with 50, 100, 150 and 200 R of 200 kVp X-rays. The cultures were harvested on the 5th day, at which time all arrested metaphase chromosomes were in their first division. The dicentric yields induced in X-irradiated Umbra lymphocytes were observed to be significantly (P=0.05) lower than those in human lymphocytes. The resulting dose-response relationship for dicentric yield was described by the quadratic equation Y=aD+bD/sup 2/. The advantage of this method lies in the fact that small amounts (0.1 ml) of blood can be repeatedly withdrawn from the fish after a minimal interval of 2 weeks.

  2. X-ray-induced dicentric yields in lymphocytes of the teleost, Umbra limi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, I.; Etoh, H.

    1983-01-01

    A microculture technique was applied to the study of lymphocytes of Umbra limi, which have a low number of large meta- and submetacentric chromosomes (2n=22). On the 5th day (90 h) and later after initiation of culture at 20 0 C, some cultures provided well spread metaphase chromosomes for analyses. After initiation, cultures were irradiated with 50, 100, 150 and 200 R of 200 kVp X-rays. The cultures were harvested on the 5th day, at which time all arrested metaphase chromosomes were in their first division. The dicentric yields induced in X-irradiated Umbra lymphocytes were observed to be significantly (P=0.05) lower than those in human lymphocytes. The resulting dose-response relationship for dicentric yield was described by the quadratic equation Y=aD+bD 2 . The advantage of this method lies in the fact that small amounts (0.1 ml) of blood can be repeatedly withdrawn from the fish after a minimal interval of 2 weeks. (orig./AJ)

  3. Stress and food deprivation: linking physiological state to migration success in a teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midwood, Jonathan D; Larsen, Martin H; Aarestrup, Kim; Cooke, Steven J

    2016-12-01

    Food deprivation is a naturally occurring stressor that is thought to influence the ultimate life-history strategy of individuals. Little is known about how food deprivation interacts with other stressors to influence migration success. European populations of brown trout (Salmo trutta) exhibit partial migration, whereby a portion of the population smoltifies and migrates to the ocean, and the rest remain in their natal stream. This distinct, natural dichotomy of life-history strategies provides an excellent opportunity to explore the roles of energetic state (as affected by food deprivation) and activation of the glucocorticoid stress response in determining life-history strategy and survival of a migratory species. Using an experimental approach, the relative influences of short-term food deprivation and experimental cortisol elevation (i.e. intra-coelomic injection of cortisol suspended in cocoa butter) on migratory status, survival and growth of juvenile brown trout relative to a control were evaluated. Fewer fish migrated in both the food deprivation and cortisol treatments; however, migration of fish in cortisol and control treatments occurred at the same time while that of fish in the food deprivation treatment was delayed for approximately 1 week. A significantly greater proportion of trout in the food deprivation treatment remained in their natal stream, but unlike the cortisol treatment, there were no long-term negative effects of food deprivation on growth, relative to the control. Overall survival rates were comparable between the food deprivation and control treatments, but significantly lower for fish in the cortisol treatment. Food availability and individual energetic state appear to dictate the future life-history strategy (migrate or remain resident) of juvenile salmonids while experimental elevation of the stress hormone cortisol causes impaired growth and reduced survival of both resident and migratory individuals. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. The Müller-Lyer illusion in the teleost fish Xenotoca eiseni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovrano, Valeria Anna; da Pos, Osvaldo; Albertazzi, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    In the Müller-Lyer illusion, human subjects usually see a line with two inducers at its ends facing outwards as longer than an identical line with inducers at its ends facing inwards. We investigate the tendency for fish to perceive, in suitable conditions, line length according to the Müller-Lyer illusion. Redtail splitfins (Xenotoca eiseni, family Goodeidae) were trained to discriminate between two lines of different length. After reaching the learning criterion, the fish performed test trials, in which they faced two lines (black or red) of identical length, differing only in the context in terms of arrangement of the inducers, which were positioned at the ends of the line, either inward, outward, or perpendicular. Fish chose the stimulus that appear to humans as either longer or shorter, in accordance with the prediction of the Müller-Lyer illusion, consistently with the condition of the training. These results show that redtail splitfins tend to be subject to this particular illusion. The results of the study are discussed with reference to similar studies concerning the same illusion as recently observed in fish. Contrasting results are presented. The significance of the results in light of their possible evolutionary implications is also discussed.

  5. Retrograde trafficking of tracer protein by the internal ovarian epithelium in gravid goodeid teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, J F

    1990-02-01

    Gravid goodeid females harbor embryos in a preformed ovarian cavity for prolonged periods of gestation. Various nutrients for embryonic growth are provided by the internal ovarian epithelium (IOE). Its cells flatten during late stages of gestation and form an attenuated layer of cytoplasm covering a dense network of protruding capillaries, with the nuclear domains mostly recessing between the vascular meshes. The IOE in both Xenotoca eiseni and Girardinichthys viviparus exhibit morphological features associated with vesicular transport of macromolecules. The amounts of rough endoplasmic reticulum in the IOE cells seem insufficient to effectively synthesise proteinaceous secretions. Apparently, it rather serves as a transit route for serum-derived products. Cationized ferritin (CF) was injected into the ovarian cavity of gravid females. The electrostatic ligand spotwise attached to the luminal surface of the IOE and gained access by adsorptive micropinocytosis. Many tracer molecules were sequestered into lysosome-like vacuoles that became increasingly swollen after prolonged incubation intervals. In addition, CF traversed the IOE within small vesicles. At the basal pole of the cells the contents of transcytotic vesicles were evacuated, and localization of small CF-clusters was regularly in the basement lamina, in the underlying connective tissue, in vacuoles within migrant cells, in vesicular compartments of the capillary endothelia, in capillary lumina, and in intravascular leucocytes. Tracer molecules were never observed to enter stacked Golgi cisternae. Since the cationic marker probably follows retrograde pathways of the protein secretion, the experimental data support the morphologically derived conclusions that postulate a major role for the IOE in transepithelial transport.

  6. Altered steroid metabolism in several teleost species exposed to endocrine disrupting substances in refuse dump leachate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noaksson, E.; Linderoth, M.; Bosveld, A.T.C.; Balk, L.

    2003-01-01

    Endocrine disruption associated with reproductive failure has been reported previously in female perch (Perca fluviatilis) and roach (Rutilus rutilus) from Lake Molnbyggen in Sweden and in female brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) from Vadbäcken, a stream emptying into Molnbyggen. Both Molnbyggen

  7. Developmental biotechnology for aquaculture, with special reference to surrogate production in teleost fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaha, Etsuro; Saito, Taiju; Goto-Kazeto, Rie; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2007-07-01

    This review introduces surrogate production as a new technique for fish-seed production in aquaculture. Surrogate production in fish is a technique used to obtain the gametes of a certain genotype through the gonad of another genotype. It is achieved by inducing germ-line chimerism between different species during early development. Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the key material of this technique to induce germ-line chimera. In several species, it has been reported that PGCs differentiated from the blastomeres inherited some maternally supplied mRNA located in the terminal regions of the early cleavage furrows. PGCs from donor species (or strains) are isolated and transplanted into host species to induce the germ-line chimera. Four methods for inducing germ-line chimera are described: blastomere transplantation, blastoderm-graft transplantation, transplantation of PGC from the genital ridge, and transplantation visualised PGC with GFP fluorescence. Several problems preventing the successful induction of germ-line chimera in various fish species are discussed. Surrogate production, however, opens the possibility of efficient fish-seed production and effective breeding and transfer of biodiversity to an aquaculture strain. Conservation and efficient utilisation of genetic resources will be achieved through surrogate production combined with the cryopreservation of PGCs.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of teleost aicda genes. Pt 1 suppressors of promiscuous promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to better understand antibody affinity maturation in fishes we sought to identify gene regulatory elements that could drive expression of activated B-cell specific fluorescent reporter transgenes in zebrafish. Specifically the promoter and several non-coding regions of the channel catfish (...

  9. Isolation of a novel aquaglyceroporin from a marine teleost (Sparus auratus): function and tissue distribution.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, C.R.; Estevao, M.D.; Fuentes, J.; Cardoso, -; Fabra, M.; Passos, A.L.; Detmers, F.J.M.; Deen, P.M.T.; Cerda, J.; Power, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    The aquaporins (formerly called the major intrinsic protein family) are transmembrane channel proteins. The family includes the CHIP group, which are functionally characterised as water channels and the GLP group, which are specialised for glycerol transport. The present study reports the

  10. Stress and stress disorders in a teleost fish, the common carp Cyprinus carpio L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruane, N.M.

    2002-01-01

    Unlike research using mammalian animal models such as rats or mice, experimental fish often come from wild or commercial sources, leading to a lack of well defined experimental animal models. Isogenic carp offer us a well defined fish model for physiological research. The aim of this thesis

  11. Cell differentiation in the retina of an epibenthonic teleost, the Tench (Tinca tinca, Linneo 1758).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bejarano-Escobar, R.; Blasco, M.; Grip, W.J. de; Martin-Partido, G.; Francisco-Morcillo, J.

    2009-01-01

    Here we present a detailed study of the major events in the retinal histogenesis in a freshwater epibenthonic fish species, the Tench (Tinca tinca, Linneo 1758) during embryonic, prolarval, larval, and juvenile stages, using classical histological and immunohistological methods, providing a complete

  12. Respiratory Responses to Stimulation of Branchial Vagus Nerve Ganglia of a Teleost Fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballintijn, C.M.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of electrical stimulation of epibranchial vagus ganglia upon respiration of the carp were investigated. Single shocks evoked fast twitch responses in a number of respiratory muscles with latencies around 18 msec to the beginning and 30-35 msec to the peak of activity. Shocks given during

  13. Effects of Environmental Stressors on the Hematological Indices of Some Freshwater Teleosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nellie Lopez

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in blood values were observed in young adult freshwater fishes exposed to environmental stressors. Clarias batrachus (TL=221-391 mm; 68.7-371.4 g starved for 34, 47 and 53 days showed significant reductions in lymphocyte counts. Lymphocyte percentages decreased while neutrophil percentages increased in starved fish. Oreochromis niloticus (TL=105-172 mm; 19.1-77.6 g exposed for 30 days to 10 and 20 ppm ZnSO4 concentrations at pH 6.7-7.2 showed consistent reductions in total WBC and lymphocyte counts but insignificant changes in RBC-related values. O. niloticus (TL=56-124 mm; 4.0-21.7 g exposed for 96 h to 10, 20, and 30 ppm ZnSO4 concentrations showed a general tendency of reduction in RBC-reIated values and total and relative WBC counts.Exposure of O. niloticus (TL=56-106mm; 2.9-14.2 g for 96 h to 5, 10, and 20 ppm ZnSO4 at low ph (ph 3.1-3.8 elicited marked increases in neutrophil counts and reductions in lymphocyte and RBC counts. O. niloticus (TL=94-154 mm; 13.2-54.4 g subjected to 24 h and 48 h crowding showed increased hematocrit, neutrophilia, and lymphopenia. In Ophicephalus striatus (TL=259-306 mm; 123.2-192.8 g stressful effects of crowding and handling were less evident from the blood values obtained after 24 hand 48 h exposure.

  14. Induced reproduction in a migratory teleost species by water level drawdown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chayrra Chehade

    Full Text Available Captive reproduction is one of the problems faced in aquaculture requiring the manipulation of environmental factors and/or hormonal treatment. Thus, we seek to verify experimentally which gonadal changes were present in mature individuals of Astyanax altiparanae arising from decreased water level. Collections were made every four hours, initiated four hours before and finished 28 hours after stimulation, at the Fish Farming Station of Companhia Energética de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. The gonads were analyzed by light microscopy. The females had ovaries in the spawning capable phase until 12h; in 16h, in a more advanced stage of spawning capable phase; and, from 20h, in the regressing phase. Males had testes in the spawning capable phase until 8h; in 12h, in a more advanced stage of spawning capable phase; and, from 16h, the return to the spawning capable phase. The morphological description was corroborated by the proportion of cell classes. Females presented variation on the gonadosomatic index, but it was not found an emptying of the gonad for neither sex. The process of inducing reproduction with water level drawdown was considered satisfactory, since both sexes presented a reduction in the number of mature gametes at the end of the sample period.

  15. R-spondins are involved in the ovarian differentiation in a teleost, medaka (Oryzias latipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Linyan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mammals, R-spondin (Rspo, an activator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, has been shown to be involved in ovarian differentiation. However, the role of the Rspo/Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in fish gonads is still unknown. Results In the present study, full-length cDNAs of Rspo1, 2 and 3 were cloned from the gonads of medaka (Oryzias latipes. The deduced amino acid sequences of mRspo1-3 were shown to have a similar structural organization. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Rspo1, 2 and 3 were specifically clustered into three distinct clads. Tissue distribution revealed that three Rspo genes were abundantly expressed in the brain and ovary. Real-time PCR analysis around hatching (S33-5dah demonstrated that three Rspo genes were specifically enhanced in female gonads from S38. In situ hybridization (ISH analysis demonstrated that three Rspo genes were expressed in the germ cell in ovary, but not in testis. Fluorescence multi-color ISH showed that Rspo1 was expressed in both somatic cells and germ cells at 10dah. Exposure to ethinylestradiol (EE2 in XY individuals for one week dramatically enhanced the expression of three Rspo genes both at 0dah and in adulthood. Conclusions These results suggest that the Rspo-activating signaling pathway is involved in the ovarian differentiation and maintenance in medaka.

  16. R-spondins are involved in the ovarian differentiation in a teleost, medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In mammals, R-spondin (Rspo), an activator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, has been shown to be involved in ovarian differentiation. However, the role of the Rspo/Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in fish gonads is still unknown. Results In the present study, full-length cDNAs of Rspo1, 2 and 3 were cloned from the gonads of medaka (Oryzias latipes). The deduced amino acid sequences of mRspo1-3 were shown to have a similar structural organization. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Rspo1, 2 and 3 were specifically clustered into three distinct clads. Tissue distribution revealed that three Rspo genes were abundantly expressed in the brain and ovary. Real-time PCR analysis around hatching (S33-5dah) demonstrated that three Rspo genes were specifically enhanced in female gonads from S38. In situ hybridization (ISH) analysis demonstrated that three Rspo genes were expressed in the germ cell in ovary, but not in testis. Fluorescence multi-color ISH showed that Rspo1 was expressed in both somatic cells and germ cells at 10dah. Exposure to ethinylestradiol (EE2) in XY individuals for one week dramatically enhanced the expression of three Rspo genes both at 0dah and in adulthood. Conclusions These results suggest that the Rspo-activating signaling pathway is involved in the ovarian differentiation and maintenance in medaka. PMID:23217106

  17. Digenean species diversity in teleost fishes from the Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia (Western Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbel, H.; Châari, M.; Neifar, L.

    2012-01-01

    This study is the first attempt to survey the diversity of fish digeneans in the Gulf of Gabes (southern coast of Tunisia). A total of 779 fishes belonging to 32 species were sampled. 53 species of Digenea belonging to 15 families were recorded. Among these species, 24 are reported for the first time from the coast of Tunisia. We report one new host record, Lecithochirium sp. from Sardinella aurita. The Hemiuridae is the dominant family. A host-parasite list is presented with the information on the prevalence, abundance and mean intensity of each species collected. The diversity of Digenea is compared with other localities in the Mediterranean Sea and the northern east of Tunisia. The Gulf of Gabes shows the lowest diversity linked to the anthropogenic activities and impact of exotic species. The use of Digenea as indicators of the state of the ecosystem is discussed. PMID:22550623

  18. The African catfish, Clarias gariepinus, a model for the study of reproductive endocrinology in teleosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oordt, P.G.W.J. van; Goos, H.J.Th.

    1987-01-01

    In their natural habitat African catfish, Clarias gariepinus, show a discontinuous reproductive cycle. This cycle follows changes in the gonadotropic activity of the pituitary. Gonadotropin release has been shown to be under dual hypothalamic control, i.e. a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and

  19. Relationships between otolith size and fish length in some mesopelagic teleosts (Myctophidae, Paralepididae, Phosichthyidae and Stomiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, P; Malara, D; Ammendolia, G; Romeo, T; Andaloro, F

    2015-09-01

    Length-mass relationships and linear regressions are given for otolith size (length and height) and standard length (LS ) of certain mesopelagic fishes (Myctophidae, Paralepididae, Phosichthyidae and Stomiidae) living in the central Mediterranean Sea. The length-mass relationship showed isometric growth in six species, whereas linear regressions of LS and otolith size fit the data well for all species. These equations represent a useful tool for dietary studies on Mediterranean marine predators. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  20. Evidence for an apical Na-Cl cotransporter involved in ion uptake in a teleost fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroi, J.; Yasumasu, S.; McCormick, S.D.; Hwang, P.-P.; Kaneko, T.

    2008-01-01

    Cation-chloride cotransporters, such as the Na+/K +/2Cl- cotransporter (NKCC) and Na+/Cl - cotransporter (NCC), are localized to the apical or basolateral plasma membranes of epithelial cells and are involved in active ion absorption or secretion. The objectives of this study were to clone and identify 'freshwater-type' and 'seawater-type' cation-chloride cotransporters of euryhaline Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and to determine their intracellular localization patterns within mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs). From tilapia gills, we cloned four full-length cDNAs homologous to human cation-chloride cotransporters and designated them as tilapia NKCC1a, NKCC1b, NKCC2 and NCC. Out of the four candidates, the mRNA encoding NKCC1a was highly expressed in the yolk-sac membrane and gills (sites of the MRC localization) of seawater-acclimatized fish, whereas the mRNA encoding NCC was exclusively expressed in the yolk-sac membrane and gills of freshwater-acclimatized fish. We then generated antibodies specific for tilapia NKCC1a and NCC and conducted whole-mount immunofluorescence staining for NKCC1a and NCC, together with Na+/K+-ATPase, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3), on the yolk-sac membrane of tilapia embryos acclimatized to freshwater or seawater. The simultaneous quintuple-color immunofluorescence staining allowed us to classify MRCs clearly into four types: types I, II, III and IV. The NKCC1a immunoreactivity was localized to the basolateral membrane of seawater-specific type-IV MRCs, whereas the NCC immunoreactivity was restricted to the apical membrane of freshwater-specific type-II MRCs. Taking account of these data at the level of both mRNA and protein, we deduce that NKCC1a is the seawater-type cotransporter involved in ion secretion by type-IV MRCs and that NCC is the freshwater-type cotransporter involved in ion absorption by type-II MRCs. We propose a novel ion-uptake model by MRCs in freshwater that incorporates apically located NCC. We also reevaluate a traditional ion-uptake model incorporating NHE3; the mRNA was highly expressed in freshwater, and the immunoreactivity was found at the apical membrane of other freshwater-specific MRCs.

  1. Stomach contents of some shore-caught teleosts of Natal, South Mrica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1985-09-25

    Sep 25, 1985 ... Natal nearshore substratum were visually analysed for percentage composition. Commonly caught fish, namely. Rhabdosargus sarba, R. holubi, Pomadasys commersonni,. Trachinotus african us and T. bot/a, were opportunistic omnivorous predators and fed largely on sand mussels and benthic crustacea.

  2. Stomach contents of some shore-caught teleosts of Natal, South Mrica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Commonly caught fish, namely Rhabdosargus sarta, R. holubi, Pomadasys commersonni, Trachinotus africanus and T. botla, were opportunistic omnivorous predators and fed largely on sand mussels and benthic crustacea. Less frequently caught predatory fish (15 species) fed mainly on benthic crustacea and other ...

  3. LOCALIZATION OF Na+, K+-ATPASE AND OTHER ENZYMES IN TELEOST PSEUDOBRANCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendy, Leslie A.; Deter, Russell L.; Philpott, Charles W.

    1973-01-01

    In an effort to determine the subcellular localization of sodium- and potassium-activated adenosine triphosphatase (Na+, K+-ATPase) in the pseudobranch of the pinfish Lagodon rhomboides, this tissue was fractionated by differential centrifugation and the activities of several marker enzymes in the fractions were measured. Cytochrome c oxidase was found primarily in the mitochondrial-light mitochondrial (M+L) fraction. Phosphoglucomutase appeared almost exclusively in the soluble (S) fraction. Monoamine oxidase was concentrated in the nuclear (N) fraction, with a significant amount also in the microsomal (P) fraction but little in M+L or S. Na+, K+-ATPase and ouabain insensitive Mg2+-ATPase were distributed in N, M+L, and P, the former having its highest specific activity in P and the latter in M+L. Rate sedimentation analysis of the M+L fraction indicated that cytochrome c oxidase and Mg2+-ATPase were associated with a rapidly sedimenting particle population (presumably mitochondria), while Na+, K+-ATPase was found primarily in a slowly sedimenting component. At least 75% of the Na+, K+-ATPase in M+L appeared to be associated with structures containing no Mg2+-ATPase. Kinetic properties of the two ATPases were studied in the P fraction and were typical of these enzymes in other tissues. Na+, K+-ATPase activity was highly dependent on the ratio of Na+ and K+ concentrations but independent of absolute concentrations over at least a fourfold range. PMID:4349221

  4. Stereology as a tool to assess reproduction strategy and fecundity of teleost fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucholtz, Rikke Hagstrøm

    In fish stock assessment, spawning stock biomass (SSB) is used as an index of stock reproductive potential (SRP), and proportionality is assumed between SSB and recruitment, i.e. offspring production. SSB is calculated as the sum of biomass proportions of sexually mature individuals per age group...... and down-regulation, skipped spawning and spawning fidelity, and to understand how factors like condition may influence individual decision making and fitness regarding these reproductive traits. The stereological methods applied in this project constituted a powerful set of tools for quantification...... that an individual condition factor threshold may control timing of spawning. These results may all influence Central Baltic herring SRP...

  5. Molecular players involved in temperature-dependent sex determination and sex differentiation in Teleost fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie sex determination and differentiation are conserved and diversified. In fish species, temperature-dependent sex determination and differentiation seem to be ubiquitous and molecular players involved in these mechanisms may be conserved. Although how the ambient temperature transduces signals to the undifferentiated gonads remains to be elucidated, the genes downstream in the sex differentiation pathway are shared between sex-determining mechanisms. In this paper, we review recent advances on the molecular players that participate in the sex determination and differentiation in fish species, by putting emphasis on temperature-dependent sex determination and differentiation, which include temperature-dependent sex determination and genetic sex determination plus temperature effects. Application of temperature-dependent sex differentiation in farmed fish and the consequences of temperature-induced sex reversal are discussed. PMID:24735220

  6. Physiological roles of tryptophan in teleosts: current knowledge and perspectives for future studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoseini, Seyyed Morteza; Pérez-Jiménez, Amelia; Costas, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    from the neuroendocrine to the immune system in vertebrates. In aquaculture, extensive research has been performed to optimize the levels of tryptophan in the commercial diets for many fish species. Providing adequate levels of this amino acid is critically important for fish growth but also for fish......- mediated functions, along with its participation in the regulation of the immune system and its role as an antioxidant and antitoxic agent in fish....

  7. Effect of the temperature during antiviral immune response ontogeny in teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dios, Sonia; Romero, Alejandro; Chamorro, Rubén; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2010-12-01

    Zebrafish were used to investigate the expression levels of several antiviral and inflammatory genes (IL-1β, iNOS, TNF-α, TLR3, IFN-I, IFNγ, IRF3, MDA-5, Mx) constitutively and after viral stimulation during early development. We also determined how their expression was affected by changes in the temperature. The antiviral genes were almost completely inhibited at 15°C with the exception of TLR3. In contrast, IL-1β, iNOS and TNF-α expression was not obviously different between the two temperatures. At 15°C, most of the genes examined did not differ following stimulation with poly I:C or viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). However, at 28°C, all of the genes showed significant differences in at least some of the sampling points after poly I:C treatment with the largest differences observed for Mx. Mx expression in adult zebrafish was not significantly altered by temperature and poly I:C treatment led to a smaller increase in gene expression when compared to larval Mx levels. Thus, Mx seems to play an important role in viral immunity in larvae, when the adaptive immune response is not fully functional. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Stress and food deprivation: linking physiological state to migration success in a teleost fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midwood, J.D.; Larsen, Martin Hage; Aarestrup, Kim

    2016-01-01

    of the glucocorticoid stress response in determining life-history strategy and survival of a migratory species. Using an experimental approach, the relative influences of short-term FD and experimental cortisol elevation (i.e., intra-coelomic injection of cortisol suspended in cocoa butter) on migratory status...... for the cortisol treatment. Food availability and individual energetic state appear to dictate the future life-history strategy (migrate or remain resident) of juvenile salmonids while experimental elevation of the stress hormone cortisol caused impaired growth and reduced survival of both resident and migratory......Food deprivation (FD) is a naturally occurring stressor that is thought to influence the ultimate life-history strategy of individuals. Little is known about how FD interacts with other stressors to influence migration success. European populations of brown trout (Salmo trutta) exhibit partial...

  9. Geometry and mechanics of teleost gastrulation and the formation of primary embryonic axes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherdantseva, Elena M; Cherdantsev, Vladimir G

    2006-01-01

    Examination of normal shaping dynamics and immediate and long-term responses to blastoderm cutting in zebrafish and loach embryos prior to the onset of gastrulation and during the course of epiboly revealed that anteroposterior (AP) and dorsoventral (DV) polarity formation is connected with shaping of the blastoderm circumferential region, which stretches along and shrinks across its movement axes and originates the non-isotropic fields of tensile stresses. Based on data from cutting experiments and quantitative morphology, we reconstructed the movement-shaping patterns of epiboly and embryonic shield formation. We revealed that AP and DV axes originate as a mass cell movement subject to the movement-shaping equivalence principle, which means the spatial series of differently shaped areas corresponding to the time succession of the same area shaping. Maintenance of the main body axes in orthogonal orientation depends on the mechanical equilibrium principle allowing for converting shape asymmetry into that of tensile stresses and vice versa. The causal relationship between the main movement-shaping axes and that of embryonic polarity was proved in cutting experiments in which the DV axis direction was subject to rearrangement so as to adjust to the new direction of mass cell movement axes induced by healing the wound in the blastoderm circumferential region.

  10. Rhythmicity and plasticity of digestive physiology in a euryhaline teleost fish, permit (Trachinotus falcatus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazado, Carlo Cabacang; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg; Nguyen, Huy Quang

    2017-01-01

    experiment identified the rhythms of digestive factors throughout the light-dark (LD) cycle. Gastric luminal pH and pepsin activity showed significant daily variation albeit not rhythmic. These dynamic changes were likewise observed in several digestive enzymes, in which the activities of intestinal protease......, chymotrypsin and lipase exhibited significant daily rhythms. In the second experiment, the existence of feed anticipatory activity in the digestive factors was investigated by subjecting the fish to either periodic or random feeding. Anticipatory gastric acidification prior to feeding was identified...... feeding entrained digestive physiology and mediated anticipatory gastric acidification and intestinal enzymatic activities. This knowledge will be essential in developing feeding protocols and husbandry-related welfare strategies that will further advance this candidate finfish as an aquaculture species....

  11. Na2EDTA anticoagulant impaired blood samples from the teleost Piaractus mesopotamicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Heloisa Vaz Farias

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of Na heparin and Na2EDTA on blood of Piaractus mesopotamicus (360.7±42.4g, 26.4±1.0cm. Twenty fishes were sampled in two experiment trials, ten for erythrocyte fragility analysis and ten for hematologic and plasma biochemical study. The blood collected by venous-caudal puncture was fractioned and stored in anticoagulants solution: Na2EDTA 10%, Na2EDTA 3%, Na heparin 5000 IU and Na heparin 100 IU. Plasmatic levels of calcium presented in the Na2EDTA stored samples were about 80% lower than both heparin groups. Blood samples of P. mesopotamicus stored with Na2EDTA demonstrated increase in the hematocrit and MCV, and decrease in MCHC. The dose-response effect was observed in this study. The results are reinforced by the higher levels of plasmatic protein and hemolysis presented in the Na2EDTA 10% stored blood, confirming the deleterious effect of this anticoagulant treatment on the quality of blood samples. Na2EDTA is not indicated to store P. mesopotamicus blood samples, but sodium heparin at 100 IU is the most recommended anticoagulant, since this treatment presented the lower rate of alterations in the stored blood.

  12. Purifying selection on leptin genes in teleosts may be due to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Danio rerio. Epinephelus coioides. Oncorhynchus mykiss. Morone saxatilis. Salvelinus alpinus. Salvelinus alpinus. Takifugu rubripes. Oryzias latipes. Tetraodon nigroviridis. Salmo salar. Salmo salar. Hypophthalmichthys molitrix. Ctenopharyngodon idella. Carassius auratus. Carassius auratus. Cyprinus carpio. Cyprinus ...

  13. PACAP system evolution and its role in melanophore function in teleost fish skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, João C R; Félix, Rute C; Martins, Rute S T; Trindade, Marlene; Fonseca, Vera G; Fuentes, Juan; Power, Deborah M

    2015-08-15

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) administered to tilapia melanophores ex-vivo causes significant pigment aggregation and this is a newly identified function for this peptide in fish. The G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), adcyap1r1a (encoding Pac1a) and vipr2a (encoding Vpac2a), are the only receptors in melanophores with appreciable levels of expression and are significantly (p skin and that the melanin aggregating effect of PACAP results from the interaction of Pac1a with Ramp that attenuates cAMP-dependent PKA activity and favours the Ca(2+)/Calmodulin dependent pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterisation of kisspeptin system genes in an ovoviviparous teleost: Sebastes schlegeli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Huayu; He, Yan; Ma, Liman; Zhou, Xiaosu; Liu, Xiumei; Qi, Jie; Zhang, Quanqi

    2015-04-01

    Kisspeptins are neuropeptides that play important roles in the reproduction and the onset of puberty in vertebrate by activating their receptor, Kissr. In the present study, we first isolated kiss1 and kissr4 genes from an ovoviviparous fish, the black rockfish (Sebastes schlegeli) by homologue cloning. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the kiss and kissr of S. schlegeli belonged to kiss1 and kissr4 respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the kissr4 was expressed mainly in the brain and testis, while the kiss1 was expressed predominantly in the heart of both sexes. As for the different gonadal maturation stages the kiss1 showed different expression patterns in different tissues. During the early development stage, expression levels of the ligand and receptor genes showed similar increasing trends. The promoter region of kissr4 contained several putative transcription factor (TF) binding sites which may have the function of regulating kisspeptin system gene expression, providing potential targets for future in-depth investigation. These results together confirmed that the kisspeptin system in S. schlegeli may be involved in reproduction and other activities. Furthermore, our study laid the groundwork for further learning about the evolution and function of kisspeptin system in fish even vertebrate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor alpha of teleosts: in silico characterization and homology modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Ngoc Tuan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF- is known to be crucial in many biological activities of organisms. In this study, physicochemical properties and modeling of TNF- protein of fish was analyzed using in silico approach. TNF- proteins selected from fish species, including grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella, zebra fish (Danio rerio, Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus, goldfish (Carassius auratus, and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss were used in this study. Physicochemical characteristics with molecular weight, theoretical isoelectric point, extinction coefficient, aliphatic index, instability index, total number of negatively charged residues and positively charged residues, and grand average of hydropathicity were computed. All proteins were classified as transmembrane proteins. The “transmembrane region” and “TNF” domain were identified from protein sequences. The function prediction of proteins was also performed. Alpha helices and random coils were dominating in the secondary structure of the proteins. Three-dimensional structures were predicted and verified as good structures for the investigation of TNF- of fish by online server validation.

  16. Purifying selection on leptin genes in teleosts may be due to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-08-27

    Aug 27, 2014 ... intake in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Comp. Biochem. Phys. B. 150, 377–384. Nielsen R. and Yang Z. 1998 Likelihood models for detecting pos- itively selected amino acid sites and applications to the HIV-1 envelope gene. Genetics 148, 929–936. Ortiz R. M., Houser D. S., Wade C. E. and Ortiz ...

  17. Steroidogenesis in ovarian tissue of a viviparous teleost, the guppy Poecilia reticulata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambert, J.G.D.; Pot, M.G.E.

    1975-01-01

    1. 1. Homogenates of ovaries of 3- and 12-month-old guppies were incubated with pregnenolone-7α-3H and progesterone-4-14C, and with androstenedione-1,2-3H, respectively. 2. 2. From the double-labeled experiment, 17α-hydroxypregnenolone, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone,

  18. Four-bar linkage modelling in teleost pharyngeal jaws: computer simulations of bite kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubich, Justin R; Westneat, Mark W

    2006-01-01

    The pharyngeal arches of the red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) possess large toothplates and a complex musculoskeletal design for biting and crushing hard prey. The morphology of the pharyngeal apparatus is described from dissections of six specimens, with a focus on the geometric conformation of contractile and rotational elements. Four major muscles operate the rotational 4th epibranchial (EB4) and 3rd pharyngobranchial (PB3) elements to create pharyngeal bite force, including the levator posterior (LP), levator externus 3/4 (LE), obliquus posterior (OP) and 3rd obliquus dorsalis (OD). A biomechanical model of upper pharyngeal jaw biting is developed using lever mechanics and four-bar linkage theory from mechanical engineering. A pharyngeal four-bar linkage is proposed that involves the posterior skull as the fixed link, the LP muscle as input link, the epibranchial bone as coupler link and the toothed pharyngobranchial as output link. We used a computer model to simulate contraction of the four major muscles, with the LP as the dominant muscle, the length of which determined the position of the linkage. When modelling lever mechanics, we found that the effective mechanical advantages of the pharyngeal elements were low, resulting in little resultant bite force. By contrast, the force advantage of the four-bar linkage was relatively high, transmitting approximately 50% of the total muscle force to the bite between the toothplates. Pharyngeal linkage modelling enables quantitative functional morphometry of a key component of the fish feeding system, and the model is now available for ontogenetic and comparative analyses of fishes with pharyngeal linkage mechanisms. PMID:16822272

  19. Dietary tissue cadmium accumulation in an amazonian teleost (Tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum Cuvier, 1818

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AYO. Matsuo

    Full Text Available Understanding the effects of metal contamination in the Amazon basin is important because of the potential impact on this region of high biodiversity. In addition, the significance of fish as the primary source of protein for the local human population (living either alongside the Amazon River or in the city of Manaus highlights the need for information on the metal transfer through the food chain. Bioaccumulation of metals in fish can occur at significant rates through the dietary route, without necessarily resulting in death of the organism. The goal of this work was to expose an economic relevant species from the Amazon basin (tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum to dietary cadmium (Cd at concentrations of 0, 50, 100, 200, and 400 µg.g-1 dry food. Fish were sampled on days 15, 30, and 45 of the feeding trials. Tissues were collected for analysis of Cd concentration using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Cd accumulation in the tissues occurred in the following order: kidney > liver > gills > muscle. Relative to other freshwater fish (e.g., rainbow trout, tilapia, tambaqui accumulated remarkably high levels of Cd in their tissues. Although Cd is known to affect Ca2+ homeostasis, no mortality or growth impairment occurred during feeding trials.

  20. Dietary tissue cadmium accumulation in an amazonian teleost (Tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum Cuvier, 1818).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, A Y O; Val, A L

    2007-11-01

    Understanding the effects of metal contamination in the Amazon basin is important because of the potential impact on this region of high biodiversity. In addition, the significance of fish as the primary source of protein for the local human population (living either alongside the Amazon River or in the city of Manaus) highlights the need for information on the metal transfer through the food chain. Bioaccumulation of metals in fish can occur at significant rates through the dietary route, without necessarily resulting in death of the organism. The goal of this work was to expose an economic relevant species from the Amazon basin (tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum) to dietary cadmium (Cd) at concentrations of 0, 50, 100, 200, and 400 microg.g-1 dry food. Fish were sampled on days 15, 30, and 45 of the feeding trials. Tissues were collected for analysis of Cd concentration using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Cd accumulation in the tissues occurred in the following order: kidney > liver > gills > muscle. Relative to other freshwater fish (e.g., rainbow trout, tilapia), tambaqui accumulated remarkably high levels of Cd in their tissues. Although Cd is known to affect Ca2+ homeostasis, no mortality or growth impairment occurred during feeding trials.

  1. Blood parameters and metabolites in the teleost fish Colossoma macropomum exposed to sulfide or hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affonso, E G; Polez, V L P; Corrêa, C F; Mazon, A F; Araújo, M R R; Moraes, G; Rantin, F T

    2002-11-01

    Juvenile tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum, were exposed to sulfide and hypoxia for 12, 24, 48 and 96 h. Hemoglobin concentrations, red blood cell counts, and mean cell hemoglobin, were higher at 12 h in fish exposed to hypoxia. However, control fish and those exposed to sulfide and hypoxia had lower red blood cell count, hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit at 96 h. Methemoglobin was higher than in the controls, probably due to the hypoxemia induced by these stressors. Sulfhemoglobin was not detected in significant amounts in the blood of fish exposed to sulfide (in vivo), yet hemoglobin converted into sulfhemoglobin at 1-15 mM sulfide in vitro. Anaerobic metabolism seemed to be an important mechanism for adapting to sulfide exposure and blood pH returned to control values after 24 h of sulfide, preventing acidosis. The high sulfide tolerance in tambaqui is associated with its high tolerance to hypoxia.

  2. Transitory colour-change mechanism in a fresh-water teleost, Clarias batrachus (L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A K; Bhargava, H N

    1978-01-01

    The rate of colour change in the fish Clarias batrachus (L.) has been studied as a response from black to white background and vice versa. The 'Derived Ostwald Index (D.O.I.)' method proposed by Healey (1967) has been used to measure the melanophore responses of the fish. Observations show that the fish is quite sensitive to background responses. The rate of colour change is fast. The colour change is quite rapid in both, the paling and the darkening experiments in the beginning as compared to the later stages which are slow and gradual. The results indicate that the process of colour change is mainly under nervous control in the initial stages while in the later stages the chromatic response seems to be regulated mainly by hormone(s). The fish is better adapted on a white background (maximum paling 1.7 grades of D.O.I. scale in 10 hours) than on a black background (maximum darkening 6.35 grades of D.O.I. scale in 20 hours). It is suggested that chromatic control mechanisms in the fish include the sympathetic pigment-aggregating fibres constituting the nervous control and at least a pituitary principle, the melanophore-aggregating hormone (MAH) constituting the hormonal control.

  3. Chronic exposure of killifish to a highly polluted environment desensitizes estrogen-responsive reproductive and biomarker genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugel, Sean M., E-mail: Sean.Bugel@oregonstate.edu [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Bonventre, Josephine A. [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); White, Lori A. [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States); Tanguay, Robert L. [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Environmental Health Sciences Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Cooper, Keith R. [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Reproductive biomarker genes in Newark Bay killifish are desensitized to estrogen. • Gene desensitization indicates pre-transcriptional effects on estrogen signaling. • Desensitization does not have a metabolic or epigenetic basis (gene methylation). • Modulation of vitellogenin and choriogenin genes correlates with reproductive impacts. • Choriogenin L appears less prone to false negatives and may be a sensitive biomarker. - Abstract: Reproductive and endocrine disruption is commonly reported in aquatic species exposed to complex contaminant mixtures. We previously reported that Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from the chronically contaminated Newark Bay, NJ, exhibit multiple endocrine disrupting effects, including inhibition of vitellogenesis (yolk protein synthesis) in females and false negative vitellogenin biomarker responses in males. Here, we characterized the effects on estrogen signaling and the transcriptional regulation of estrogen-responsive genes in this model population. First, a dose–response study tested the hypothesis that reproductive biomarkers (vtg1, vtg2, chg H, chg Hm, chg L) in Newark Bay killifish are relatively less sensitive to 17β-estradiol at the transcriptional level, relative to a reference (Tuckerton, NJ) population. The second study assessed expression for various metabolism (cyp1a, cyp3a30, mdr) and estrogen receptor (ER α, ER βa, ER βb) genes under basal and estrogen treatment conditions in both populations. Hepatic metabolism of 17β-estradiol was also evaluated in vitro as an integrated endpoint for adverse effects on metabolism. In the third study, gene methylation was evaluated for promoters of vtg1 (8 CpGs) and vtg2 (10 CpGs) in both populations, and vtg1 promoter sequences were examined for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs). Overall, these studies show that multi-chemical exposures at Newark Bay have desensitized all reproductive biomarkers tested to estrogen. For example, at 10 ng

  4. Salinity-dependent copper accumulation in the guppy Poecilia vivipara is associated with CTR1 and ATP7B transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Evelise Sampaio; Abril, Sandra Isabel Moreno; Zanette, Juliano; Bianchini, Adalto

    2014-07-01

    Copper (Cu) accumulation and regulation of key-genes involved in Cu homeostasis were evaluated in freshwater- and saltwater-acclimated guppies Poecilia vivipara. Fish were exposed (96h) to environmentally relevant concentrations of dissolved Cu (0, 5.0, 9.0 and 20.0μg/L). In freshwater guppies, gill and liver Cu accumulation was dependent on Cu concentration in the exposure medium. In saltwater guppies, this dependence was observed only in the gut. These findings indicate that Cu accumulation was salinity- and tissue-dependent. Key genes involved in Cu metabolism were sequenced for the first time in P. vivipara. Transcripts coding for the high-affinity copper transporter (CTR1) and copper-transporting ATPase (ATP7B) were identified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene sequencing. The full-length CTR1 open reading frame (1560bp) and a partial ATP7B (690bp) were discovered. Predicted amino acid sequences shared high identities with the CTR1 of Fundulus heteroclitus (81%) and the ATP7B of Sparus aurata (87%). Basal transcriptional levels addressed by RT-qPCR in control fish indicate that CTR1 and ATP7B was highly transcribed in liver of freshwater guppies while CTR1 was highly transcribed in gut of saltwater guppies. This could explain the higher Cu accumulation observed in liver of freshwater guppies and in gut of saltwater guppies, because CTR1 is involved in Cu uptake. Reduced gill mRNA expression of CTR1 was observed in freshwater guppies exposed to 20.0μg/L Cu and in saltwater guppies exposed to 5.0μg/L Cu. In turn, reduced mRNA expression of gut ATP7B was observed in freshwater and salt water guppies exposed to 9.0 and 20.0μg/L Cu. Liver CTR1 and ATP7B transcription were not affected by Cu exposure. These findings suggest that gill CTR1 and gut ATP7B are down-regulated to limit Cu absorption after exposure to dissolved Cu, while liver CTR1 and ATP7B levels are maintained to allow Cu storage and detoxification. In conclusion, findings reported here

  5. Neuroendocrine and immune responses undertake different fates following tryptophan or methionine dietary treatment: tales from a teleost model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azeredo, Rita; Machado, M.; Afonso, A.

    2017-01-01

    cells proliferation. Differently, tryptophan effects on inflammatory transcripts suggested an inhibitory mode of action. This, together with a high production of brain monoamine and cortisol levels, suggests that tryptophan might mediate regulatory mechanisms of neuroendocrine and immune systems...... the immunomodulatory effect of these amino acids on the inflammatory and neuroendocrine responses in juveniles of European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax. To achieve this, goal fish were fed for 14 days methionine and tryptophan-supplemented diets (MET and TRP, respectively, 2x dietary requirement level) or a control......, brain monoamines, plasma cortisol, and immune-related gene expression showed distinct and sometimes opposite patterns regarding the effects of dietary amino acids. While neuroendocrine intermediates were not affected by any dietary treatment at the end of the feeding trial, both supplemented diets led...

  6. Cold-shock induced changes in the interrenal tissue of a fresh water tropical teleost, Colisa fasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, U; Srivastava, A K

    1978-01-01

    Interrenal tissue of Colisa is present in the head kidney as a collar around the right posterior cardinal vein. In the latter, a sphincter-like structure was observed. The adrenocortical cells are organized in irregularly grouped lobules, each lobule having a small lumen at its centre. There are usually 1-3 layers of such lobules around the vein. The chromaffin cells are interspersed between the adrenocortical cells and are readily identified because of their large size and almost transparent cytoplasm. Both the adrenocortical and chromaffin cells are irregular in shape with a single nucleus. Distinct hypertrophy of the adrenal cortical cells and their nuclei is observed at 171 minutes and 267 to 363 minutes following cold-shock (about +2 degrees C). Extrusion of the nucleoli through the nuclear membrane is noticed at 315 minutes. These changes indicate activation of the pituitary-interrenal axis subsequent to the stress of cold-shock. Size of the chromaffin cells and of their nuclei decreased at 75, 123 and 315 minutes post shock, suggesting release of catecholamines leading to the activation of the pituitary-interrenal axis.

  7. Acute effects of cadmium on osmoregulation of the freshwater teleost Prochilodus lineatus: Enzymes activity and plasma ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Alexandre O.F. da [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Laboratório de Ecofisiologia Animal, UEL, Londrina (Brazil); Programa Multicêntrico de Pós-graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, UEL, Londrina (Brazil); Centro de Ciências Humanas e da Educação, UENP, Jacarezinho (Brazil); Martinez, Cláudia B.R., E-mail: cbueno@uel.br [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Laboratório de Ecofisiologia Animal, UEL, Londrina (Brazil); Programa Multicêntrico de Pós-graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, UEL, Londrina (Brazil)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Cd effects were evaluated on plasma ions and ATPases of Prochilodus lineatus. • Fish were exposed to 1 and 10 μg Cd L{sup −1} for 24 and 96 h. • Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase decreased in gills and kidney after Cd exposure. • Gill Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase and plasma Ca{sup 2+} decreased after Cd exposure. • Cd concentrations set by Brazilian guidelines affect Ca{sup 2+} regulation of P. lineatus. - Abstract: Cadmium (Cd) is a trace element that is very toxic to fish. It is commonly found in surface waters contaminated with industrial effluents. When dissolved in water, Cd can rapidly cause physiological changes in the gills and kidneys of freshwater fish. The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute effects of Cd on the osmoregulation of the Neotropical fish Prochilodus lineatus. Juvenile fish were exposed to Cd at two concentrations [1 (Cd1) and 10 (Cd10) μg L{sup −1}] for 24 and 96 h. The effects of Cd were evaluated through the analysis of ions (Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, and Cl{sup −}) and plasma osmolality, and by measuring the activities of enzymes involved in osmoregulation obtained from the gills and kidney. Fish exposed to Cd for 24 and 96 h showed a decrease in Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity in the gills and kidney. The activity of carbonic anhydrase decreased in the gills after 24 h and in both tissues after 96 h of Cd exposure. The gill Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activity also decreased with Cd exposure, with a concomitant drop in the plasma concentration of Ca{sup 2+}. Despite the hypocalcemia, there were no changes in the concentration of the ions Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup −} or in plasma osmolality. Among the enzymes involved in ion transport, H{sup +}-ATPase was the only enzyme that showed increased activity in gills, whereas its activity in kidney remained unchanged. The results of this study demonstrate that waterborne Cd at the maximum concentrations set by Brazilian guidelines for freshwater affects the gills and kidney functions of P. lineatus. Acute exposure to Cd resulted in the decrease of the activity of enzymes, which culminated with the loss of the fish's ability to regulate the levels of calcium in the blood, leading to hypocalcemia.

  8. Mycobacterium stephanolepidis sp. nov., a rapidly growing species related to Mycobacterium chelonae, isolated from marine teleost fish, Stephanolepis cirrhifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukano, Hanako; Wada, Shinpei; Kurata, Osamu; Katayama, Kinya; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2017-08-01

    A previously undescribed rapidly growing, non-pigmented mycobacterium was identified based on biochemical and nucleic acid analyses, as well as growth characteristics. Seven isolates were cultured from samples collected from five thread-sail filefish (Stephanolepis cirrhifer) and two farmed black scraper (Thamnaconus modestus). Bacterial growth occurred at 15-35 °C on Middlebrook 7H11 agar. The bacteria were positive for catalase activity at 68 °C and urease activity, intermediate for iron uptake, and negative for Tween 80 hydrolysis, nitrate reduction, semi-quantitative catalase activity and arylsulfatase activity at day 3. No growth was observed on Middlebrook 7H11 agar supplemented with picric acid, and very little growth was observed in the presence of 5 % NaCl. α- and α'-mycolates were identified in the cell walls, and a unique profile of the fatty acid methyl esters and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) profiles of the protein and cell-wall lipids were acquired. Sequence analysis revealed that the seven isolates shared identical sequences for the 16S rRNA, rpoB, hsp65, recA and sodA genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the five gene sequences confirmed that the isolates were unique, but closely related to Mycobacterium chelonae. Antibiotic susceptibility testing revealed the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of clarithromycin against this novel species was Mycobacterium salmoniphilum. The hsp65 PCR restriction enzyme analysis pattern differed from those of M. chelonae and M. salmoniphilum. Based on these findings, the name Mycobacterium stephanolepidis sp. nov. is proposed for this novel species, with the type strain being NJB0901 T (=JCM 31611 T =KCTC 39843 T ).

  9. Neuroendocrine and Immune Responses Undertake Different Fates following Tryptophan or Methionine Dietary Treatment: Tales from a Teleost Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Azeredo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Methionine and tryptophan appear to be fundamental in specific cellular pathways involved in the immune response mechanisms, including stimulation of T-regulatory cells by tryptophan metabolites or pro-inflammatory effects upon methionine supplementation. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of these amino acids on the inflammatory and neuroendocrine responses in juveniles of European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax. To achieve this, goal fish were fed for 14 days methionine and tryptophan-supplemented diets (MET and TRP, respectively, 2× dietary requirement level or a control diet meeting the amino acids requirement levels (CTRL. Fish were sampled for immune status assessment and the remaining fish were challenged with intraperitoneally injected inactivated Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida and sampled either 4 or 24 h post-injection. Respiratory burst activity, brain monoamines, plasma cortisol, and immune-related gene expression showed distinct and sometimes opposite patterns regarding the effects of dietary amino acids. While neuroendocrine intermediates were not affected by any dietary treatment at the end of the feeding trial, both supplemented diets led to increased levels of plasma cortisol after the inflammatory insult, while brain monoamine content was higher in TRP-fed fish. Peripheral blood respiratory burst was higher in TRP-fed fish injected with the bacteria inoculum but only compared to those fed MET. However, no changes were detected in total antioxidant capacity. Complement factor 3 was upregulated in MET-fed fish but methionine seemed to poorly affect other genes expression patterns. In contrast, fish fed MET showed increased immune cells numbers both before and after immune challenge, suggesting a strong enhancing effect of methionine on immune cells proliferation. Differently, tryptophan effects on inflammatory transcripts suggested an inhibitory mode of action. This, together with a high production of brain monoamine and cortisol levels, suggests that tryptophan might mediate regulatory mechanisms of neuroendocrine and immune systems cooperation. Overall, more studies are needed to ascertain the role of methionine and tryptophan in modulating (stimulate or regulate fish immune and neuroendocrine responses.

  10. Steroid-dependent auditory plasticity for the enhancement of acoustic communication: recent insights from a vocal teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisneros, Joseph A

    2009-06-01

    The vocal plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus) has become an excellent model for identifying neural mechanisms of auditory perception that may be shared by all vertebrates. Recent neuroethological studies of the midshipman fish have yielded strong evidence for the steroid-dependent modulation of hearing sensitivity that leads to enhanced coupling of sender and receiver in this vocal-acoustic communication system. Previous work shows that non-reproductive females treated with either testosterone or 17beta-estradiol exhibit an increase in the degree of temporal encoding by the auditory saccular afferents to the dominant frequency content of male vocalizations produced during social-reproductive behaviors. The expanded frequency sensitivity of steroid treated females mimics the reproductive female's auditory phenotype and is proposed to improve the detection and localization of calling conspecific mates during the summer breeding season. This review focuses on the novel form of steroid-dependent auditory plasticity that is found in the adult midshipman fish and its association with the reproductive biology and behavior of this species. Evidence for midshipman reproductive-state and steroid-dependent auditory plasticity is reviewed and the potential mechanisms that lead to this novel form of adaptive plasticity are discussed.

  11. Post-duplication charge evolution of phosphoglucose isomerases in teleost fishes through weak selection on many amino acid sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato Yukuto

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The partitioning of ancestral functions among duplicated genes by neutral evolution, or subfunctionalization, has been considered the primary process for the evolution of novel proteins (neofunctionalization. Nonetheless, how a subfunctionalized protein can evolve into a more adaptive protein is poorly understood, mainly due to the limitations of current analytical methods, which can detect only strong selection for amino acid substitutions involved in adaptive molecular evolution. In this study, we employed a comparative evolutionary approach to this question, focusing on differences in the structural properties of a protein, specifically the electric charge, encoded by fish-specific duplicated phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi genes. Results Full-length cDNA cloning, RT-PCR based gene expression analyses, and comparative sequence analyses showed that after subfunctionalization with respect to the expression organ of duplicate Pgi genes, the net electric charge of the PGI-1 protein expressed mainly in internal tissues became more negative, and that of PGI-2 expressed mainly in muscular tissues became more positive. The difference in net protein charge was attributable not to specific amino acid sites but to the sum of various amino acid sites located on the surface of the PGI molecule. Conclusion This finding suggests that the surface charge evolution of PGI proteins was not driven by strong selection on individual amino acid sites leading to permanent fixation of a particular residue, but rather was driven by weak selection on a large number of amino acid sites and consequently by steady directional and/or purifying selection on the overall structural properties of the protein, which is derived from many modifiable sites. The mode of molecular evolution presented here may be relevant to various cases of adaptive modification in proteins, such as hydrophobic properties, molecular size, and electric charge.

  12. Roots of brain specializations: preferential left-eye use during mirror-image inspection in six species of teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorvano, V A; Rainoldi, C; Bisazza, A; Vallortigara, G

    1999-12-01

    It has recently been reported that predator inspection is more likely to occur when a companion (i.e. the mirror image of the test animal) is visible on the left rather than on the right side of mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki. This very unexpected outcome could be consistent with the hypothesis of a preferential use of the right eye during sustained fixation of a predator as well as of a preferential use of the left eye during fixation of conspecifics. We measured the time spent in monocular viewing during inspection of their own mirror images in females of six species of fish, belonging to different families-G. holbrooki, Xenotoca eiseni, Phoxinus phoxinus, Pterophyllum scalare, Xenopoecilus sarasinorun, and Trichogaster trichopterus. Results revealed a consistent left-eye preference during sustained fixation in all of the five species. Males of G. holbrooki, which do not normally show any social behaviour, did not exhibit any eye preferences during mirror-image inspection. We found, however, that they could be induced to manifest a left-eye preference, likewise females, if tested soon after capture, when some affiliative tendencies can be observed. These findings add to current evidence in a variety of vertebrate species for preferential involvement of structures located in the right side of the brain in response to the viewing of conspecifics.

  13. Tissue turnover rates and isotopic trophic discrimination factors in the endothermic teleost, pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Madigan

    Full Text Available Stable isotope analysis (SIA of highly migratory marine pelagic animals can improve understanding of their migratory patterns and trophic ecology. However, accurate interpretation of isotopic analyses relies on knowledge of isotope turnover rates and tissue-diet isotope discrimination factors. Laboratory-derived turnover rates and discrimination factors have been difficult to obtain due to the challenges of maintaining these species in captivity. We conducted a study to determine tissue- (white muscle and liver and isotope- (nitrogen and carbon specific turnover rates and trophic discrimination factors (TDFs using archived tissues from captive Pacific bluefin tuna (PBFT, Thunnus orientalis, 1-2914 days after a diet shift in captivity. Half-life values for (15N turnover in white muscle and liver were 167 and 86 days, and for (13C were 255 and 162 days, respectively. TDFs for white muscle and liver were 1.9 and 1.1‰ for δ(15N and 1.8 and 1.2‰ for δ(13C, respectively. Our results demonstrate that turnover of (15N and (13C in bluefin tuna tissues is well described by a single compartment first-order kinetics model. We report variability in turnover rates between tissue types and their isotope dynamics, and hypothesize that metabolic processes play a large role in turnover of nitrogen and carbon in PBFT white muscle and liver tissues. (15N in white muscle tissue showed the most predictable change with diet over time, suggesting that white muscle δ(15N data may provide the most reliable inferences for diet and migration studies using stable isotopes in wild fish. These results allow more accurate interpretation of field data and dramatically improve our ability to use stable isotope data from wild tunas to better understand their migration patterns and trophic ecology.

  14. Immunoglobulin light chain (IGL) genes in torafugu: Genomic organization and identification of a third teleost IGL isotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xi; Zhang, Fengjun; Watabe, Shugo; Asakawa, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report a genome-wide survey of immunoglobulin light chain (IGL) genes of torafugu (Takifugu rubripes) revealing multi-clusters spanning three separate chromosomes (v5 assembly) and 45 scaffolds (v4 assembly). Conventional sequence similarity searches and motif scanning approaches based on recombination signal sequence (RSS) motifs were used. We found that three IGL isotypes (L1, L2, and L3) exist in torafugu and that several loci for each isotype are present. The transcriptional orientations of the variable IGL (VL) segments were found to be either the same (in the L2 isotype) or opposite (in the L1 and L3 isotypes) to the IGL joining (JL) and constant (CL) segments, suggesting they can undergo rearrangement by deletion or inversion when expressed. Alignments of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) to corresponding germline gene segments revealed expression of the three IGL isotypes in torafugu. Taken together, our findings provide a genomic framework for torafugu IGL genes and show that the IG diversity of this species could be attributed to at least three distinct chromosomal regions. PMID:28098239

  15. Effect of feeding frequency on the daily rhythms of acidic digestion in a teleost fish (gilthead seabream).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yúfera, Manuel; Romero, María José; Pujante, Isabel M; Astola, Antonio; Mancera, Juan Miguel; Sánchez-Vázquez, F J; Moyano, Francisco Javier; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo

    2014-11-01

    Gilthead seabream is a fish species of great importance in Mediterranean aquaculture, attracting many studies on nutrition and chronobiology, although nothing is known about the effect of feeding frequency on the daily rhythms of the gastric digestion process. In this article, we investigated daily rhythms in stomach fullness, gastric and intestine pH, as well as pepsin activity and expression of pepsinogen and proton pump in juvenile fish under three different feeding protocols: (A) one daily meal at 9:00, (B) two daily meals at 9:00 and 17:00 and (C) continuous feeding during the daytime. The results revealed that feeding protocol affected significantly the rhythm of gastric pH and the pepsin activity pattern. The gastric pH exhibited significant daily rhythms in the three cases with the acrophase located at night in the regimes A and B and during daytime, in the regime C. In the regimes A and B, the pepsin activity peaked few hours after the meals, although the afternoon meal in B produced a higher peak. In the regime C, the peak occurred in the middle of the feeding period. Lowest total pepsin activity was observed in regime A, and the highest activity with the regime C. In contrast, the pepsinogen gene expression remained low along the daily cycle, with an expression peak just before or after the morning meal in regimes A and C, respectively. The proton pump gene expression was also practically constant with a peak right after the morning meal in the regime C. On the other hand, intestinal pH showed a postprandial increase after the first morning meal in all the three treatments, recovering the resting values in the dark period. Two meals and continuous feeding allowed a better and prolonged gastric digestion and consequently the juveniles exhibited better growth with the same daily ration of food. In short, while the gastric digestion pattern is mainly driven by pH changes induced by the time of food ingestion, the regulation of the intestinal digestion seems to be more independent of the feeding protocol.

  16. AUTOCHTHONOUS PHYTASE-PRODUCING BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACTS OF FOUR INDIAN FRESHWATER TELEOSTS: CHARACTERIZATION AND IDENTIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhas Kumar Dan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Phytase producing autochthonous bacteria have been isolated from the proximal intestine (PI and distal intestine (DI of three Indian major carps, rohu (Labeo rohita, catla (Catla catla and mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala and one minor carp, bata (Labeo bata. In modified phytase screening medium (MPSM, phytase-producing strains were recorded at higher densities in the PI of rohu and minimum in the PI of bata. Out of 45 isolates, 4 bacterial strains were selected as potent phytase producers according to quantitative enzyme assay. Maximum phytase activity was detected in LRF5 isolated from the PI of L. rohita followed by CCF2 isolated from the PI of C. catla. Among the selected isolates, three (LRF5, LRH2 and CMH1 were Gram positive rods, whereas CCF2 was Gram positive coccus. All the four isolates could tolerate a wide range of temperature (25–42 °C and pH (6.0-9.0. The isolate LRH2 was most thermostable as it was able to survive up to 55 oC. On the basis of 16SrDNA partial sequence analysis, isolates LRF5 and CCF2 were identified as Bacillus cereus (GenBank Accession no. KC894957.1 and Staphylococcus caprae (Accession no. KC894956.1, respectively. Whereas, the isolates LRH2 and CMH1 were most closely related to Bacillus licheniformis (Accession no. KF011267.1 and Lysinibacillus fusiformis (Accession No. KF011266.1, respectively.

  17. Pharmacological characterization of the oxytocic peptides in the pituitary of a marine teleost fish (pollachius virens) (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maetz, J.; Morel, F.

    1961-01-01

    Demonstration of the existence, in the neurohypophysis of a marine fish (pollachius virens), of an oxytocic-active peptide different to the oxytocin in mammals and to the arginine vasotocin. (authors) [fr

  18. The respiratory area of the gills of some teleost fishes in relation to their mode of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, de S.; Smit-Onel, M.E.; Videler, J.J.; Gils, van B.J.M.; Uffink, E.M.

    1977-01-01

    From computations (by means of graphic interpolation and graphic integration) of the respiratory area, and transposition of these values to a respiratory area of a standard fish of 200 g (A200 value), it could be made plausible that the relation between respiratory area and mode of life of the

  19. ORGANOPHOSPHATE-INDUCED ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION AND EMBRYONIC RETINAL CELL NECROSIS IN VIVO IN THE TELEOST (ORYZIAS LATIPES). (R825433)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  20. Post-duplication charge evolution of phosphoglucose isomerases in teleost fishes through weak selection on many amino acid sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yukuto; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2007-10-29

    The partitioning of ancestral functions among duplicated genes by neutral evolution, or subfunctionalization, has been considered the primary process for the evolution of novel proteins (neofunctionalization). Nonetheless, how a subfunctionalized protein can evolve into a more adaptive protein is poorly understood, mainly due to the limitations of current analytical methods, which can detect only strong selection for amino acid substitutions involved in adaptive molecular evolution. In this study, we employed a comparative evolutionary approach to this question, focusing on differences in the structural properties of a protein, specifically the electric charge, encoded by fish-specific duplicated phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi) genes. Full-length cDNA cloning, RT-PCR based gene expression analyses, and comparative sequence analyses showed that after subfunctionalization with respect to the expression organ of duplicate Pgi genes, the net electric charge of the PGI-1 protein expressed mainly in internal tissues became more negative, and that of PGI-2 expressed mainly in muscular tissues became more positive. The difference in net protein charge was attributable not to specific amino acid sites but to the sum of various amino acid sites located on the surface of the PGI molecule. This finding suggests that the surface charge evolution of PGI proteins was not driven by strong selection on individual amino acid sites leading to permanent fixation of a particular residue, but rather was driven by weak selection on a large number of amino acid sites and consequently by steady directional and/or purifying selection on the overall structural properties of the protein, which is derived from many modifiable sites. The mode of molecular evolution presented here may be relevant to various cases of adaptive modification in proteins, such as hydrophobic properties, molecular size, and electric charge.

  1. Ultrastructural study of the effect of heavy metals on the regenerating tail fin of the teleost fish, Oreochromis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.I. Atta

    2012-08-01

    In the tail fins of the specimens treated with Pb at 0.005 and 0.025 mg/l and Cd at 0.005 and 0.025 mg/l, at the seventh day postamputation, the lepidotrichia forming cells have dense patches of irregular lysosomes, swollen and degranulated rough endoplasmic reticulum, pyknotic mitochondria and vacuolated cytoplasm. In the tail fins of the specimens treated with Hg at 0.0006 mg/l, showed deformation of the lepidotrichia forming cells, there was an invasion of leucocytes and lysosomes. A progressive damage in the cytoplasmic organelles and in the fiber bundles of bones was also found. Also, the presence of collagen fibers as pathological condition.

  2. Acute effects of cadmium on osmoregulation of the freshwater teleost Prochilodus lineatus: Enzymes activity and plasma ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Alexandre O.F. da; Martinez, Cláudia B.R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Cd effects were evaluated on plasma ions and ATPases of Prochilodus lineatus. • Fish were exposed to 1 and 10 μg Cd L −1 for 24 and 96 h. • Na + /K + -ATPase and carbonic anhydrase decreased in gills and kidney after Cd exposure. • Gill Ca 2+ -ATPase and plasma Ca 2+ decreased after Cd exposure. • Cd concentrations set by Brazilian guidelines affect Ca 2+ regulation of P. lineatus. - Abstract: Cadmium (Cd) is a trace element that is very toxic to fish. It is commonly found in surface waters contaminated with industrial effluents. When dissolved in water, Cd can rapidly cause physiological changes in the gills and kidneys of freshwater fish. The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute effects of Cd on the osmoregulation of the Neotropical fish Prochilodus lineatus. Juvenile fish were exposed to Cd at two concentrations [1 (Cd1) and 10 (Cd10) μg L −1 ] for 24 and 96 h. The effects of Cd were evaluated through the analysis of ions (Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , and Cl − ) and plasma osmolality, and by measuring the activities of enzymes involved in osmoregulation obtained from the gills and kidney. Fish exposed to Cd for 24 and 96 h showed a decrease in Na + /K + -ATPase activity in the gills and kidney. The activity of carbonic anhydrase decreased in the gills after 24 h and in both tissues after 96 h of Cd exposure. The gill Ca 2+ -ATPase activity also decreased with Cd exposure, with a concomitant drop in the plasma concentration of Ca 2+ . Despite the hypocalcemia, there were no changes in the concentration of the ions Na + , K + , and Cl − or in plasma osmolality. Among the enzymes involved in ion transport, H + -ATPase was the only enzyme that showed increased activity in gills, whereas its activity in kidney remained unchanged. The results of this study demonstrate that waterborne Cd at the maximum concentrations set by Brazilian guidelines for freshwater affects the gills and kidney functions of P. lineatus. Acute exposure to Cd resulted in the decrease of the activity of enzymes, which culminated with the loss of the fish's ability to regulate the levels of calcium in the blood, leading to hypocalcemia

  3. Branchial versus intestinal silver toxicity and uptake in the marine teleost Parophrys vetulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosell, Martin Hautopp; Wood, C. M.

    2001-01-01

    Exposure to elevated waterborne silver as AgNO3 (4.07 µM=448 µg l-1) in seawater resulted in osmoregulatory disturbance in the lemon sole (Parophrys vetulus). The main effects were increased plasma Na+ and Cl- concentrations which translated into increased plasma osmolality. Plasma Mg2+ levels were...

  4. Food passage time through the alimentary tract of a brazilian teleost fish, Prochilodus scrofa (Steindachner, 1881 using radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Lamounier Barbieri

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available O tempo de passagem de alimentos através do trato digestivo do peixe detritívoro de água doce Prochilodus scrofa foi determinado com o uso de técnicas radiográficas e de sulfato de bário como meio de contraste. Os peixes foram mantidos em tanques com temperatura constante de 23ºC e receberam via oral, através de um cateter, uma mistura de 2,5 partes de ração peletizada moída e 1 parte de suspensão oral do meio de contraste (Celobar. As radiografias foram obtidas em intervalos de 3 horas. Imediatamente após a introdução da mistura, visualizou-se o preenchimento gástrico pelo contraste. Foi observado um esfíncter existente entre os estômagos cárdico e pilórico. Após 3 horas, 80 por cento do intestino proximal estava repleto. Após 6 horas, o contraste atingiu as porções proximal, média e distal do intestino. Após 9 horas, 70 por cento do intestino distal estava repleto, e após 12 horas, havia a marcação do segmento do reto (25 por cento da porção distal do intestino.

  5. Lethal toxicity of Lindane on a teleost fish, Anguilla anguilla from Albufera Lake (Spain): hardness and temperature effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, M D; Almar, M M; Andreu, E

    1988-02-01

    This paper reports the results of toxicity tests conducted using Anguilla anguilla under three different water temperature (15, 22 and 29 degrees C) and two hardness regimes (250 and greater than 600 ppm CaCO3). The 96-h LC50 increased in the experimental medium (p less than 0.05) by an order of magnitude from 0.32 to 0.45 mg/L between 15 and 29 degrees C. However in the natural medium it is similar (p greater than 0.05) (0.54 to 0.55 mg/L) for these same temperatures. The toxicity of Lindane on eels increased when the water hardness decreased. The 24, 48, 72 and 96-h LC50 for this fish in both media is less at 15 degrees C (96-h LC50 = 0.32 and 0.55 mg/L) than at 29 degrees C (96-h LC50 = 0.45 and 0.55 mg/L). These results suggest that the toxicity of Lindane presents a negative temperature coefficient.

  6. The unique hemoglobin system of Pleuragramma antarcticum, an antarctic migratory teleost. Structure and function of the three components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrini, M; D'Avino, R; Fago, A; Carratore, V; Kunzmann, A; Prisco, G

    1996-09-27

    Pleuragramma antarcticum (suborder Notothenioidei, family Nototheniidae) is the most abundant fish in the antarctic shelf. This pelagic species has a circum-antarctic distribution and is characterized by spawning migration. This species displays the highest multiplicity of major hemoglobins (three); the other notothenioids have a single one (except one species, having two) with relatively low oxygen affinity regulated by pH and organophosphates. The hemoglobins of P. antarcticum display strong Bohr and Root effects; however, they reveal important functional differences in subunit cooperativity and organophosphate regulation and, above all, in the response of oxygenation to temperature. Despite the substitution ValbetaE11 --> Ile found in Hb 2, which decreases the affinity in human mutants, the hemoglobins have similar oxygen affinity, higher than that of the other notothenioids. Hb 1 has the alpha chain in common with Hb 2 and the beta in common with Hb 3. The amino acid sequence of all four chains has been established. Thus the hematological features of P. antarcticum differ remarkably from those of antarctic notothenioids. This unique and sophisticated oxygen transport system may adequately meet the requirements of the unusual mode of life of this fish.

  7. A polyclonal antibody against mammalian FOS can be used as a cytoplasmic neuronal activity marker in a teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, T J; Maslam, S; Roberts, B L

    1995-05-01

    A polyclonal antibody raised against a conserved region of a mammalian FOS sequence was tested for its use as an activity marker in the rainbow trout. The FOS-like expression in the trout is entirely cytoplasmic and appears in a Nissl-like pattern. The reaction is specifically induced by both orthodromic and antidromic electrical stimuli and during motor responses evoked by natural stimulation, although some positive neurons are found at locations that are not obviously related to the presented stimuli. Following spinal nerve stimulation, antidromically activated motoneurons were found to be positive in the ipsilateral spinal cord. Orthodromic driving of spinal moto- and interneurons by stimulation of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) in the hindbrain evoked FOS-like immunoreactivity throughout the motor column in the spinal cord, but not in regions lying caudal to a lesion of the MLF-axons. Evoking about 25 startle responses by natural auditory stimulation gives FOS-like immunoreactivity in the Mauthner cell, which initiates the response, whereas positive Mauthner cells were never observed in control fish. The stimulation protocols that were used strongly activated the stimulated cells and so the observed FOS-like immunoreactivity might be related to an increase protein synthesis needed to restore their depleted transmitter levels.

  8. Haematological characteristics of Brazilian Teleosts: III. Parameters of the hybrid tambacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus Holmberg x Colossoma macropomum Cuvier (Osteichthyes, Characidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Tavares-Dias

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Fifty six specimens of the hybrid "tambacu" (Piaractus mesopotamicus Holmberg, 1887 male x Colossoma macropomum Cuvier, 1818 female were collected from fishfarm of Guariba, São Paulo, to evaluate their haematology. Fishes presented 400.0 to 3,100.0 g total weight and 20.0 to 52.0 cm total length. Haemoglobin, haematocrit, mean corpuscular haemoglobin content (MCHC and percentage of defense blood cells including leucocytes and thrombocytes, were studied. Statistical analysis showed positive correlation (P<0.01 between haematocrit, MCHC and haemoglobin rate. Nevertheless, thrombocytes and lymphocytes showed negative correlation (P<0.01.

  9. Effects of X-irradiation and thymectomy on the immune response of the marine teleost, Sebastiscus marmoratus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, T.

    1986-01-01

    Effects of X-irradiation and thymectomy on the immune response of the rock fish, S. marmoratus were studied. Animals were thymectomized and irradiated at the dose of 2000 R. In non-thymectomized and irradiated fish, injected with SRBC one week after irradiation, antibody production was completely suppressed and they required twice the time for rejection of scales allografted three days after irradiation. On the other hand, fish which were irradiated four days after thymectomy and injected one week after irradiation, showed a fairly high level of antibody, although, in the allograft rejection, no significant difference was observed when compared to the irradiated fish. Furthermore, animals thymectomized, irradiated and autoimplanted showed higher production of antibody when immunized three months after irradiation compared to matched controls. In the same manner, in the allograft rejection, a slight restoration was found in fish reconstituted with a non-irradiated thymus. From these results, it is considered that, as in mammals, the adult thymus of fish plays an important role in recovery from the damage to the immune system caused by irradiation. Furthermore, a combination of X-irradiation and thymectomy suggests that suppressor T-cells which are resistant to X-rays exist in the fish thymus

  10. Hydrodynamic patterns from fast-starts in teleost fish and their possible relevance to predator-prey interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesterok, Benedikt; Hanke, Wolf

    2013-02-01

    Fast-starts are distributed over a wide phylogenetic range of fish and are used for different purposes such as striking at prey or escaping from predators. Here we investigated 42 fast-starts of rainbow trouts (Oncorhynchus mykiss) elicited by a startle stimulus. We investigated the patterns of water movements left behind by the escaping fish and their possible value as a source of information to piscivorous predators that rely on hydrodynamic sensory systems. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements revealed a temporal extension of up to 25.5 min and a spatial extension of up to 1.53 m (extrapolated) for a certain flow structure called jet 1, that is the flow produced by the tail fin. Duration and spatial extension of jet 2, the flow produced by the body, were on average lower, and both jets differed in size. The fish escaped in a mean direction approximately parallel to jet 1, and antiparallel to jet 2, with a range well above 200°. This study quantified the flow patterns generated by escaping fish and, as piscivorous predators would greatly benefit from being able to analyse these flow patterns, provides cues for the behavioural and physiological investigation of hydrodynamic sensory systems.

  11. Heavy metals produce toxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis in the marine teleost fish SAF-1 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcillo, Patricia; Esteban, María Á; Cuesta, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    The use of cell lines to test the toxicity of aquatic pollutants is a valuable alternative to fish bioassays. In this study, fibroblast SAF-1 cells from the marine gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) were exposed for 24 h to the heavy metals Cd, Hg, MeHg (Methylmercury), As or Pb and the resulting cytotoxicity was assessed. Neutral red (NR), MTT-tetrazolio (MTT), crystal violet (CV) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) viability tests showed that SAF-1 cells exposed to the above heavy metals produced a dose-dependent reduction in the number of viable cells. Methylmercury showed the highest toxicity (EC50 = 0.01 mM) followed by As, Cd, Hg and Pb. NR was the most sensitive method followed by MTT, CV and LDH. SAF-1 cells incubated with each of the heavy metals also exhibited an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis cell death. Moreover, the corresponding gene expression profiles pointed to the induction of the metallothionein protective system, cellular and oxidative stress and apoptosis after heavy metal exposure for 24 h. This report describes and compares tools for evaluating the potential effects of marine contamination using the SAF-1 cell line. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Physiological impacts and bioaccumulation of dietary Cu and Cd in a model teleost: The Amazonian tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomin, Marina; Vilarinho, Gisele C; Castro, Katia F; Ferreira, Márcio; Duarte, Rafael M; Wood, Chris M; Val, Adalberto L

    2018-03-19

    Increasing anthropogenic activities in the Amazon have led to elevated metals in the aquatic environment. Since fish are the main source of animal protein for the Amazonian population, understanding metal bioaccumulation patterns and physiological impacts is of critical importance. Juvenile tambaqui, a local model species, were exposed to chronic dietary Cu (essential, 500 μg Cu/g food) and Cd (non-essential, 500 μg Cd/g food). Fish were sampled at 10-14, 18-20 and 33-36 days of exposure and the following parameters were analyzed: growth, voluntary food consumption, conversion efficiency, tissue-specific metal bioaccumulation, ammonia and urea-N excretion, O 2 consumption, P crit , hypoxia tolerance, nitrogen quotient, major blood plasma ions and metabolites, gill and gut enzyme activities, and in vitro gut fluid transport. The results indicate no ionoregulatory impacts of either of the metal-contaminated diets at gill, gut, or plasma levels, and no differences in plasma cortisol or lactate. The Cd diet appeared to have suppressed feeding, though overall tank growth was not affected. Bioaccumulation of both metals was observed. Distinct tissue-specific and time-specific patterns were seen. Metal burdens in the edible white muscle remained low. Overall, physiological impacts of the Cu diet were minimal. However dietary Cd increased hypoxia tolerance, as evidenced by decreased P crit , increased time to loss of equilibrium, a lack of plasma glucose elevation, decreased plasma ethanol, and decreased NQ during hypoxia. Blood O 2 transport characteristics (P 50 , Bohr coefficient, hemoglobin, hematocrit) were unaffected, suggesting that tissue level changes in metabolism accounted for the greater hypoxia tolerance in tambaqui fed with a Cd-contaminated diet. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Environmental Compliance Assessment System (ECAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-01

    characterize the impact of the spill. Verify that the following parameters are monitored in the receiving stream: - dissolved oxygen - fecal coliform bacteria ...or other microorganism, except viruses, bacteria or other microor- ganisms on or in living man or other living animals which the USEPA or the...cf jordani Lipstick Darter E Fundulus auroguntatus Undescribed Topminnow R Fundulus bifax Stippled Studflsh E Fundulus catenatus Northern Studfish T

  14. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator-like proteases in teleosts lack genuine receptor-binding epidermal growth factor-like domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, René; Kristensen, Thomas K.; Jensen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    PA by lacking the exon encoding the uPAR-binding epidermal growth factor-like domain; zfuPA-b differs from mammalian uPA by lacking two cysteines of the epidermal growth factor-like domain and a uPAR-binding sequence comparable with that found in mammalian uPA. Accordingly, no zfuPA-b binding activity could...

  15. Comparative study of the effect of acute and chronic mercuric chloride treatment on the activities of a few digestive enzymes of a Teleost fish, Channa punctatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastry, K.V.; Gupta, P.K.; Malik, P.V.

    1979-05-01

    In this study a comparison of the effect of exposure of Channa punctatus to LC(50) (1.8 mg/L) and a sublethal concentration (0.30 mg/L) of mercuric chloride on the activities of maltase, lactase leucyl-L-glycine dipeptidase and lipase has been made. After 96 hr of treatment, a slight elevation in maltase activity was recorded in all the portions of the digestive system. Lipase and leucyl-L-glycine dipeptidase showed inhibition in activity. Chronic treatment for 20 days revealed a significant inhibition in the activities of all the four enzymes.

  16. Digeneans from deep-sea marine teleosts off the Outer Hebrides, Scotland, including the description of Brachyenteron helicoleni sp. nov. (Zoogonidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bray, R. A.; Kuchta, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2006), s. 169-175 ISSN 1230-2821 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/04/0342; GA ČR GD524/03/H133; GA MŠk LC522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Lecithasteridae * Zoogonidae * Trifoliovarium allocytti Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 0.772, year: 2006

  17. Fisiología del envejecimiento en peces teleósteos del género Nothobranchius= Physiology of ageing in teleost fish of the genus Nothobranchius

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas Sánchez, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    El objetivo de esta Tesis Doctoral, titulada “Fisiología del envejecimiento en peces teleósteos del género Nothobranchius” es caracterizar el envejecimiento de dos especies del género Nothobranchius (N. korthausae y N. rachovii), considerando aspectos hasta ahora no estudiados en este género: las variaciones relacionadas con el envejecimiento en la composición de las membranas lipídicas mitocondriales, concretamente de las distintas especies fosfolipídicas y los ácidos grasos que las integran...

  18. HSP90 and pCREB alterations are linked to mancozeb-dependent behavioral and neurodegenerative effects in a marine teleost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zizza, Merylin; Di Lorenzo, Mariana; Laforgia, Vincenza; Furia, Emilia; Sindona, Giovanni; Canonaco, Marcello; Facciolo, Rosa Maria

    2017-01-01

    The pesticide mancozeb (mz) is recognized as a potent inducer of oxidative stress due to its ability to catalyze the production of reactive oxygen species plus inhibiting mitochondrial respiration thus becoming an environmental risk for neurodegenerative diseases. Despite numerous toxicological studies on mz have been directed to mammals, attention on marine fish is still lacking. Thus, it was our intention to evaluate neurobehavioral activities of ornate wrasses (Thalassoma pavo) exposed to 0.2 mg/l of mz after a preliminary screening test (0.07–0.3 mg/l). Treated fish exhibited an evident (p < 0.001) latency to reach T-maze arms (> 1000%) while exploratory attitudes (total arm entries) diminished (− 50%; p < 0.05) versus controls during spontaneous exploration tests. Moreover, they showed evident enhancements (+ 111%) of immobility in the cylinder test. Contextually, strong (− 88%; p < 0.01) reductions of permanence in light zone of the Light/Dark apparatus along with diminished crossings (− 65%) were also detected. Conversely, wrasses displayed evident enhancements (160%) of risk assessment consisting of fast entries in the dark side of this apparatus. From a molecular point of view, a notable activation (p < 0.005) of the brain transcription factor pCREB occurred during mz-exposure. Similarly, in situ hybridization supplied increased HSP90 mRNAs in most brain areas such as the lateral part of the dorsal telencephalon (Dl; + 68%) and valvula of the cerebellum (VCe; + 35%) that also revealed evident argyrophilic signals. Overall, these first indications suggest a possible protective role of the early biomarkers pCREB and HSP90 against fish toxicity. - Highlights: • Fish exposed to mancozeb exhibited an evident latency to reach T-maze arms. • Mancozeb caused immobility and reduction of explorative attitudes. • Fish exposed to mancozeb showed anxiogenic performances in the Light/Dark apparatus. • The brain of fish exposed to mancozeb supplied pCREB plus HSP90 mRNA up-regulations. • Some brain areas of fish exposed to mancozeb revealed an evident neurodegeneration.

  19. Spermiogenesis and biflagellate spermatozoon of the teleost fish Lampanyctus crocodilus (Myctophiformes, Myctophidae): ultrastructure and characterisation of its sperm basic nuclear proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribes, E; Cheema, M; González-Romero, R; Lloris, D; Ausió, J; Saperas, N

    2015-08-01

    We undertook an ultrastructural study of the spermiogenesis of the lanternfish Lampanyctus crocodilus (Myctophiformes, Myctophidae) with special emphasis on the condensation of chromatin and the biochemical characterisation of its sperm nuclear basic proteins (SNBPs). The round head of the early spermatid of L. crocodilus develops into a curved conical-shaped head in the spermatozoon. Two flagella, present even in the spermatid, are inserted laterally at the convex side of the sperm head. Both flagella possess an axoneme with a 9 + 0 instead of the typical 9 + 2 axonemal structure. Mitochondria undergo a characteristic redistribution during spermiogenesis. A reduced number of them are present lying away from the centrioles at both ends of the concave side of the sperm head. During the chromatin condensation stages in spermiogenesis, fibrogranular structures with granules of 25 ± 5 and 50 ± 5 nm can be observed in the early spermatid and develop into larger granules of about 150 ± 50 nm in the middle spermatid. The latter granules coalesce during the transition to the advanced spermatid and spermatozoon giving rise to highly condensed chromatin in the sperm cell. Protamines are the main SNBPs associated with this chromatin; however, they are unusually large and correspond to the largest protamines described in fish to date. Small stoichiometric amounts of histones and other basic proteins coexist with these protamines in the spermatozoon.

  20. Spermiogenesis and ultrastructure of the spermatozoon of Wardula capitellata (Digenea, Mesometridae), an intestinal parasite of the sparid teleost Sarpa salpa in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoum, Abdoulaye J S; Ndiaye, Papa Ibnou; Sène, Aminata; Bâ, Cheikh Tidiane; Miquel, Jordi

    2012-03-01

    The spermiogenesis process in Wardula capitellata begins with the formation of a differentiation zone containing two centrioles associated with striated rootlets and an intercentriolar body. Each centriole develops into a free flagellum orthogonal to a median cytoplasmic process. Later these flagella rotate and become parallel to the median cytoplasmic process, which already exhibits two electron-dense areas and spinelike bodies before its proximodistal fusion with the flagella. The final stage of the spermiogenesis is characterized by the constriction of the ring of arched membranes, giving rise to the young spermatozoon, which detaches from the residual cytoplasm. The mature spermatozoon of W. capitellata presents most of the classical characters reported in digenean spermatozoa such as two axonemes of different lengths of the 9 + "1" trepaxonematan pattern, nucleus, mitochondrion, two bundles of parallel cortical microtubules and granules of glycogen. However, some peculiarities such as two lateral expansions accompanied by external ornamentation of the plasma membrane and spinelike bodies characterize the mature sperm. Moreover, a new spermatological character is described for the first time, the so-called cytoplasmic ornamented buttons.

  1. In Vivo Molecular Responses of Fast and Slow Muscle Fibers to Lipopolysaccharide in a Teleost Fish, the Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo J. Magnoni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The physiological consequences of the activation of the immune system in skeletal muscle in fish are not completely understood. To study the consequences of the activation of the immune system by bacterial pathogens on skeletal muscle function, we administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS, an active component of Gram-negative bacteria, in rainbow trout and performed transcriptomic and proteomic analyses in skeletal muscle. We examined changes in gene expression in fast and slow skeletal muscle in rainbow trout at 24 and 72 h after LPS treatment (8 mg/kg by microarray analysis. At the transcriptional level, we observed important changes in metabolic, mitochondrial and structural genes in fast and slow skeletal muscle. In slow skeletal muscle, LPS caused marked changes in the expression of genes related to oxidative phosphorylation, while in fast skeletal muscle LPS administration caused major changes in the expression of genes coding for glycolytic enzymes. We also evaluated the effects of LPS administration on the fast skeletal muscle proteome and identified 14 proteins that were differentially induced in LPS-treated trout, primarily corresponding to glycolytic enzymes. Our results evidence a robust and tissue-specific response of skeletal muscle to an acute inflammatory challenge, affecting energy utilization and possibly growth in rainbow trout.

  2. Hepatic retinoid levels in seven fish species (teleosts) from a tropical coastal lagoon receiving effluents from iron-ore mining and processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alves Pereira Wilken, A.; van Hattum, A.G.M.; Brouwer, A.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the possible effects of Fe and trace element exposure on hepatic levels of retinoids in seven fish species. Concentrations of retinoids were measured in fish collected from a coastal lagoon in Brazil that receives effluents from an iron-ore mining and

  3. The Relationship between the Ionic Composition of the Environment and the Secretory Activity of the Endocrine Cell Types of Stannius Corpuscles in the Teleost Gasterosteus aculeatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.; Greven, J.A.A.; Veenhuis, M.

    1976-01-01

    The corpuscles of Stannius of threespined sticklebacks contain two glandular cell types of presumed endocrine nature. To elucidate the function of both cell types the secretory activity of the cells was studied in fully adapted seawater and freshwater fishes and in specimens transferred from sea

  4. Dietary taurine supplementation ameliorates the lethal effect of phenanthrene but not the bioaccumulation in a marine teleost, red sea bream, Pagrus major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hano, Takeshi; Ito, Mana; Ito, Katsutoshi; Kono, Kumiko; Ohkubo, Nobuyuki

    2017-03-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of dietary taurine on the hepatic metabolic profiles of red sea bream (Pagrus major) and on phenanthrene (a polyaromatic hydrocarbon) toxicity and bioaccumulation. The fish were fed a diet supplemented with 0% (TAU0%), 0.5% (TAU0.5%), or 5% (TAU5%) taurine for 40-55d and subjected to phenanthrene acute toxicity and bioaccumulation tests. Taurine deficiency in feed severely affected the hepatic metabolic profiles of fish, which indicated a complementary physiological response to taurine deficiency. For the acute toxicity test, fish were fed the test diets for 55d and were then exposed to 0-893µg/L phenanthrene for 96h. Tolerance to phenanthrene was significantly improved by 0.5% of taurine inclusion in feed relative to TAU0%, but not by 5.0% inclusion. Reduced glutathione in the liver, which acts as an oxygen-free radical scavenger, was associated with a reduction in the toxicity of phenanthrene. For the bioaccumulation test, fish were fed the test diets for 40d and were thereafter chronically exposed to 20µg/L phenanthrene for 13d followed by depuration for 3d. The activity of hepatic biomarker, ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase, was increased by phenanthrene exposure in the taurine inclusion groups. However, phenanthrene concentrations in the liver and muscle of fish fed TAU5.0% tended to be higher than those of fish fed TAU0% and TAU0.5% during the exposure period. These results indicate that 0.5% of taurine inclusion in feed plays an important role in the alleviation of phenanthrene toxicity but not bioaccumulation. Furthermore, larger amount of taurine inclusion (TAU5%) did not show marked beneficial effects against phenanthrene exposure. This study provides insight about a major concern of environmental contaminants into aquatic environment and can be effectively used for improvement of aquaculture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Binding and movement of silver in the intestinal epithelium of a marine teleost fish, the European flounder (Platichthys flesus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogstrand, C.; Wood, C. M.; Bury, N.R.

    2002-01-01

    The intestine has been indicated as a site of waterborne silver toxicity in marine fish and chronic effects at the intestine have been observed at concentrations far below acutely toxic level. Thus, models of silver toxicity to marine fish need to consider the intestine as a biotic ligand. The pr...

  6. Ovarian structure and oogenesis of the extremophile viviparous teleost Poecilia mexicana (Poeciliidae) from an active sulfur spring cave in Southern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Martínez, Aarón; Hernández-Franyutti, Arlette; Uribe, Mari Carmen; Contreras-Sánchez, Wilfrido Miguel

    2017-12-01

    The structure of the ovary and oogenesis of Poecilia mexicana from an active sulfur spring cave is documented. Poecilia mexicana is the only poeciliid adapted to a subterranean environment with high hydrogen sulfide levels and extreme hypoxic conditions. Twenty females were captured throughout one year at Cueva del Azufre, located in the State of Tabasco in Southern Mexico. Ovaries were processed with histological techniques. P. mexicana has a single, ovoid ovary with ovigerous lamella that project to the ovarian lumen. The ovarian wall presents abundant loose connective tissue, numerous melanomacrophage centers and large blood vessels, possibly associated with hypoxic conditions. The germinal epithelium bordering the ovarian lumen contains somatic and germ cells forming cell nests projecting into the stroma. P. mexicana stores sperm in ovarian folds associated with follicles at different developmental phases. Oogenesis in P. mexicana consisted of the following stages: (i) oogonial proliferation, (ii) chromatin nucleolus, (iii) primary growth, subdivided into: (a) one nucleolus, (b) multiple nucleoli, (c) droplet oils-cortical alveoli steps; (iv) secondary growth, subdivided in: (a) early secondary growth, (b) late secondary growth, and (c) full grown. Follicular atresia was present in all stages of follicular development; it was characterized by oocyte degeneration, where follicle cells hypertrophy and differentiate in phagocytes. The ovary and oogenesis are similar to these seen in other poeciliids, but we found frequent atretic follicles, melanomacrophage centers, reduced fecundity and increased of offspring size. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. IDENTIFICATION CHARACTERIZATION AND ONTOGENY OF A SECOND CYTOCHROME P450 3A GENE FROM THE FRESH WATER TELEOST MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES). (R825298)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  8. Telomere attrition and restoration in the normal teleost Oryzias latipes are linked to growth rate and telomerase activity at each life stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Hitoshi; Yamazaki, Hiromi; Nakamura, Ken-Ichi; Izumiyama-Shimomura, Naotaka; Aida, Junko; Suzuki, Hiroetsu; Tsuchida, Shuichi; Matsuura, Masaaki; Takubo, Kaiyo; Ishikawa, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    Telomere shortening occurs when cells divide, both in vitro and in vivo. On the other hand, telomerase is able to maintain telomere length in cells by adding TTAGGG repeats to the ends of telomeres. However, the interrelationships existing among telomere length, telomerase activity and growth in vertebrates remain to be clarified. In the present study we measured telomere length (terminal restriction fragment length), telomerase activity and body growth of Oryzias latipes from the embryo stage until senescence. During the rapid growth stage (age 0-7 months), telomeres shortened in parallel with decreasing telomerase activity. Then, during adolescence (age 7 months - 1 year), telomeres lengthened quickly as growth slowed and telomerase activity increased. In the adult stage (age 1-4 years) characterized by little growth, telomerase activity decreased gradually and telomeres shortened. Our data indicate that telomere attrition and restoration are linked to growth and telomerase activity, and suggest that critical loss of telomere homeostasis is associated with mortality in this animal.

  9. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF CDNA ENCODING CYTOCHROME P450 3A FROM THE FRESH WATER TELEOST MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES). (R825298)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  10. Identification of an oxytocinase/vasopressinase-like leucyl-cystinyl aminopeptidase (LNPEP) in teleost fish and evidence for hypothalamic mRNA expression linked to behavioral social status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Emma A; Walti, Kayla A; Newberry, Kathryn E; Lema, Sean C

    2017-09-01

    The vasotocin/vasopressin and isotocin/mesotocin/oxytocin family of nonapeptides regulate social behaviors and physiological functions associated with reproductive physiology and osmotic balance. While experimental and correlative studies provide evidence for these nonapeptides as modulators of behavior across all classes of vertebrates, mechanisms for nonapeptide inactivation in regulating these functions have been largely overlooked. Leucyl-cystinyl aminopeptidase (LNPEP) - also known as vasopressinase, oxytocinase, placental leucine aminopeptidase (P-LAP), and insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) - is a membrane-bound zinc-dependent metalloexopeptidase enzyme that inactivates vasopressin, oxytocin, and select other cyclic polypeptides. In humans, LNPEP plays a key role in the clearance of oxytocin during pregnancy. However, the evolutionary diversity, expression distribution, and functional roles of LNPEP remain unresolved for other vertebrates. Here, we isolated and sequenced a full-length cDNA encoding a LNPEP-like polypeptide of 1033 amino acids from the ovarian tissue of Amargosa pupfish, Cyprinodon nevadensis. This deduced polypeptide exhibited high amino acid identity to human LNPEP both in the protein's active domain that includes the peptide binding site and zinc cofactor binding motif (53.1% identity), and in an intracellular region that distinguishes LNPEP from other aminopeptidases (70.3% identity). Transcripts encoding this LNPEP enzyme (lnpep) were detected at highest relative abundance in the gonads, hypothalamus, forebrain, optic tectum, gill and skeletal muscle of adult pupfish. Further evaluation of lnpep transcript abundance in the brain of sexually-mature pupfish revealed that lnpep mRNAs were elevated in the hypothalamus of socially subordinate females and males, and at lower abundance in the telencephalon of socially dominant males compared to dominant females. These findings provide evidence of an association between behavioral social status and hypothalamic lnpep transcript abundance and suggest that variation in the rate of VT/IT peptide inactivation by LNPEP may be a contributing component in the mechanism whereby nonapeptides regulate social behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Morphology of the teleost ampullary organs in marine salmontail catfish Neoarius graeffei (Pisces: Ariidae) with comparative analysis to freshwater and estuarine conspecifics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Arnault R G; Whitehead, Darryl L; Bennett, Michael B; Tibbetts, Ian R

    2015-09-01

    We hypothesized that due to the relative conductivity of the environment, and to maintain sensory function, ampullary organs of marine Neoarius graeffei would differ morphologically from those described previously for estuarine and freshwater conspecifics. Unlike the ampullary systems of N. graeffei from freshwater and estuarine habitats, the ampullary pores of marine specimens occur in two distinct patterns; numerous pores seemingly randomly scattered on the head and ventro-lateral regions of the body, and pores arranged in distinctive vertical lines above the lateral line on the dorso-lateral body of the fish. Light and electron microscopy revealed that the ampullary organs also differed morphologically from estuarine and freshwater specimens in the presence of longer ampullary canals, a hitherto unreported canal wall composition, and in the collagen sheath surrounding both the canal and the ampulla proper within dermal connective tissues. Ampullary pores were wider in marine individuals and opened to the longest ampullary canals reported for this species. The canal wall was lined by cuboidal and squamous epithelial cells. Each ampullary canal opened into a single ampulla proper containing significantly more receptor cells than estuarine and freshwater conspecifics. The distribution of ampullary pores as well as the microstructure of the ampullary organs indicates that the electrosensory system of marine N. graeffei differs from those of estuarine and freshwater specimens in ways that would be expected to maintain the functionality of the system in a highly conductive, fully marine environment, and reveals the remarkable plasticity of this species' ampullary system in response to habitat conductivity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Embryonic and larval development of jundiá (Rhamdia quelen, Quoy and Gaimard, 1824, Pisces, TeleosteI), a South American catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, C R; Barcellos, L J G; Kreutz, L C; Quevedo, R M; Ritter, F; Silva, L B

    2006-11-01

    The jundiá (Rhamdia quelen, Quoy and Gaimard) is an endemic South American fish species. Because this species supports cold winters and grows faster during warm months, it has begun to be viewed as an ideal species for fish production in southern South America. In the present study, jundiá oocytes used were obtained by extrusion from females after hormone injection. Soon after hydration, the eggs were transferred to 50 L conic glass incubators, with constant and controlled water influx. Samples of fertilized eggs were transferred to Petri dishes and, examined under a stereoscopic microscope, were spherical, demersal, and non-adhesive with defined perivitelline space and resistant chorion. Cleavage stages occurred during the first 3.5 h. After hatching, larvae were transferred to 200 L glass fiber incubators. First signs of embryo movement were observed 21 h after fertilization; larval eclosion occurred 30.5 h after fertilization. Present findings may provide a basis for studies aimed at determining the complete ontogeny of jundiá and may be useful in eco-toxicological studies.

  13. Tapeworms (Cestoda: Proteocephalidea) of teleost fi shes from the Amazon River in Peru: additional records as an evidence of unexplored species diversity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de Chambrier, A.; Kuchta, Roman; Scholz, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 1 (2015), s. 149-163 ISSN 0035-418X R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Catfish * freshwater fish * Siluriformes * Peru * Pimelodidae * Amazon ia * species diversity * faunal survey Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 0.431, year: 2015

  14. Damage to the gills, skin and other tissues by lysenin and the coelomic fluid of the earthworm Eisenia foetida in two teleosts, Tanichthys albonubes and Oreochromis mossambicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Naoshi; Aizu, Masako; Kaneko, Toyoji; Sato, Tetsuji; Kobayashi, Hideshi

    2003-02-01

    Lysenin is a 33-kDa protein found in the coelomic fluid (CF) of the earthworm Eisenia foetida. Purified lysenin binds specifically to sphingomyelin (SM). In the present studies, we found that the white cloud mountain minnow Tanichthys albonubes and the Mozambique tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus died in solutions of lysenin (at concentrations above 2.5 microg/ml) and CF (0.6%, v/v) within 2 h. The gills of both species of fish were damaged similarly by lysenin and by CF. Most gill lamellae became irregularly bent or curled, with swelling of the epithelial cells of the lamellae. Red blood cells in the lamellar vascular sinuses, in the central venous sinuses, and in the blood vessels of the entire body became swollen and lysed, choking the sinuses. Epithelial cells in the skin were also damaged. When fish of both species were treated with lysenin or CF that had been incubated with SM-liposomes, they did not die. Their behavior remained normal and there was no damage to any cells or tissues. These findings suggest that SM might be involved in the lethal effects of lysenin and CF. It is likely that purified lysenin and lysenin in CF bound to SM in the cell membranes of the tissues mentioned above, damaging the cells. The presence of SM in the gills and skin was confirmed, supporting this hypothesis. The damage to gills and hemolysis might have resulted in lethal respiratory problems. Damage to the skin might disturb the exchange of ions through the skin, hastening death. Damage by lysenin and CF to epithelial cells of the cornea and the wall of the oral cavity was also recognized, but there was no such damage to the intestine. Copyright 2003, Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Roundup® exposure promotes gills and liver impairments, DNA damage and inhibition of brain cholinergic activity in the Amazon teleost fish Colossoma macropomum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz-Mota, Susana; Sadauskas-Henrique, Helen; Duarte, Rafael M; Val, Adalberto L; Almeida-Val, Vera M F

    2015-09-01

    Roundup Original® (RD) is a glyphosate-based herbicide used to control weeds in agriculture. Contamination of Amazon waters has increased as a consequence of anthropogenic pressure, including the use of herbicides as RD. The central goal of this study was to evaluate the toxic effects of RD on juveniles of tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum). Our findings show that biomarkers in tambaqui are organ specific and dependent on RD concentration. Alterations in gills structural and respiratory epithelium were followed by changes in hematological parameters such as concentration of hemoglobin, particularly in fish exposed to the higher concentration tested (75% of RD LC50 96 h). In addition, both RD concentrations affected the biotransformation process in gills of tambaqui negatively. Instead, liver responses suggest that a production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurred in fish exposed to RD, particularly in the animals exposed to 75% RD, as seen by imbalances in biotransformation and antioxidant systems. The increased DNA damage observed in red blood cells of tambaqui exposed to RD is in agreement with this hypothesis. Finally, both tested sub-lethal concentrations of RD markedly inhibited the cholinesterase activity in fish brain. Thus, we can suggest that RD is potentially toxic to tambaqui and possibly to other tropical fish species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Early life stress induces long-term changes in limbic areas of a teleost fish: the role of catecholamine systems in stress coping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vindas, Marco A.; Fokos, Stefanos; Pavlidis, Michail

    2018-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) shapes the way individuals cope with future situations. Animals use cognitive flexibility to cope with their ever-changing environment and this is mainly processed in forebrain areas. We investigated the performance of juvenile gilthead seabream, previously subjected...... to an ELS regime. ELS fish showed overall higher brain catecholaminergic (CA) signalling and lower brain derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf) and higher cfos expression in region-specific areas. All fish showed a normal cortisol and serotonergic response to acute stress. Brain dopaminergic activity...... and the expression of the α2Α adrenergic receptor were overall higher in the fish homologue to the lateral septum (Vv), suggesting that the Vv is important in CA system regulation. Interestingly, ELS prevented post-acute stress downregulation of the α2Α receptor in the amygdala homologue (Dm3). There was a lack...

  17. Comparison between biochemical responses of the teleost pacu and its hybrid tambacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus x Colossoma macropomum) to short-term nitrite exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, G; Avilez, I M; Hori, T S F

    2006-11-01

    Aquatic environmental factors are very changeable in short periods. Among these factors are pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, ammonia and ions. Nitrite, as one ion naturally present in aquatic systems, deserves particular consideration as it is highly toxic for many species. Among fish, nitrite may have harmful effects, such as methemoglobin (MtHb) formation, disruption to the gill and hepatic structure, which could result in hemolytic anemia and cell hypoxia by reducing the functional hemoglobin content. In this work, we compared hematological and metabolical responses of pacu and its hybrid tambacu exposed to 20 ppm of environmental nitrite. It was observed that the MtHb content was less than 18% in tambacu while pacu reached nearly 8%. These data reflect specific differences in nitrite uptake by the gill. The hematocrit of both fish was distinct; pacu did not have a typical response of poisoning by nitrite. This fact shows less skill of the hybrid to cope with environmental nitrite. Incipient hemolytic anemia was observed in pacu and both species presented a neoglycogenic profile. The glucose-provider character of the liver was more evident in tambacu. The white muscle of both species presented distinct metabolic behavior. While in pacu the white muscle was predominantly oxidative, in tambaqui the lactic fermentation was the most important metabolic profile. Metabolic and hematological observations in both species show that they present distinct metabolical strategies to cope with toxic effects of nitrite and there is no evidence that the hybrid is more resistant to nitrite.

  18. Effects of copper and cadmium on ion transport and gill metal binding in the Amazonian teleost tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) in extremely soft water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Aline Y O; Wood, Chris M; Val, Adalberto L

    2005-09-30

    Metal toxicity in fish is expected to be most severe in soft waters because of the low availability of cations (particularly Ca(2+)) to out-compete the metal forms for binding sites on the gills. Natural waters in the Amazon basin are typically soft due to regional geochemistry, but few studies have focused on metal toxicity in fish native to the basin. We assessed the ionoregulatory effects of waterborne copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd) on tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) in extremely soft water (10 micromoll(-1) Ca(2+)). Tambaqui had a very high tolerance to Cu (50-400 microgl(-1)), as indicated by a complete lack of inhibition of Na(+) uptake and an ability to gradually recover over 6h from elevated diffusive Na(+) losses caused by Cu. The insensitivity of active Na(+) influx to Cu further supports the notion that Amazonian fish may have a unique Na(+) transport system. Addition of 5-10 mgCl(-1) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) did not prevent initial (0-3h) negative Na(+) balance in tambaqui exposed to Cu. Exposure to 40 mgCl(-1) DOM prevented Na(+) losses in tambaqui even at 400 microgl(-1) Cu, probably because most Cu was complexed to DOM. Tambaqui exposed to waterborne Cd (10-80 microgl(-1)) experienced an average of 42% inhibition in whole body Ca(2+) uptake relative to controls within 3h of exposure to the metal. Inhibition of Ca(2+) uptake increased over time and, at 24h, Ca(2+) uptake was suppressed by 51% and 91% in fish exposed to 10 and 80 microgl(-1) Cd, respectively. Previous acclimation of fish to either elevated [Ca(2+)] or elevated [DOM] proved to be very effective in protecting against acute short-term metal accumulation at the gills of tambaqui in soft water (in the absence of the protective agent during metal exposure), suggesting a conditioning effect on gill metal binding physiology.

  19. Effects of copper and cadmium on ion transport and gill metal binding in the Amazonian teleost tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) in extremely soft water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Aline Y.O. [Laboratory of Ecophysiology and Molecular Evolution, National Institute for Research in the Amazon (INPA), Av. Andre Araujo, 2936 Aleixo, Manaus, Amazonas 69083-000 (Brazil)]. E-mail: matsuoaline@aol.com; Wood, Chris M. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. West, Hamilton, Ont., L8S 4K1 (Canada); Val, Adalberto L. [Laboratory of Ecophysiology and Molecular Evolution, National Institute for Research in the Amazon (INPA), Av. Andre Araujo, 2936 Aleixo, Manaus, Amazonas 69083-000 (Brazil)

    2005-09-30

    Metal toxicity in fish is expected to be most severe in soft waters because of the low availability of cations (particularly Ca{sup 2+}) to out-compete the metal forms for binding sites on the gills. Natural waters in the Amazon basin are typically soft due to regional geochemistry, but few studies have focused on metal toxicity in fish native to the basin. We assessed the ionoregulatory effects of waterborne copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd) on tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) in extremely soft water (10 {mu}mol l{sup -1} Ca{sup 2+}). Tambaqui had a very high tolerance to Cu (50-400 {mu}g l{sup -1}), as indicated by a complete lack of inhibition of Na{sup +} uptake and an ability to gradually recover over 6 h from elevated diffusive Na{sup +} losses caused by Cu. The insensitivity of active Na{sup +} influx to Cu further supports the notion that Amazonian fish may have a unique Na{sup +} transport system. Addition of 5-10 mg C l{sup -1} of dissolved organic matter (DOM) did not prevent initial (0-3 h) negative Na{sup +} balance in tambaqui exposed to Cu. Exposure to 40 mg C l{sup -1} DOM prevented Na{sup +} losses in tambaqui even at 400 {mu}g l{sup -1} Cu, probably because most Cu was complexed to DOM. Tambaqui exposed to waterborne Cd (10-80 {mu}g l{sup -1}) experienced an average of 42% inhibition in whole body Ca{sup 2+} uptake relative to controls within 3 h of exposure to the metal. Inhibition of Ca{sup 2+} uptake increased over time and, at 24 h, Ca{sup 2+} uptake was suppressed by 51% and 91% in fish exposed to 10 and 80 {mu}g l{sup -1} Cd, respectively. Previous acclimation of fish to either elevated [Ca{sup 2+}] or elevated [DOM] proved to be very effective in protecting against acute short-term metal accumulation at the gills of tambaqui in soft water (in the absence of the protective agent during metal exposure), suggesting a conditioning effect on gill metal binding physiology.

  20. Increased CYP1A1 and ribosomal protein L5 gene expression in a teleost: the response of juvenile chinook salmon to coal dust exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, P.M.; Devlin, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    Molecular studies on the sublethal physiological effects of coal dust exposure in vertebrates are sparse. Coal dust contamination of the marine environment occurs, for example, around coal loading and storage terminals. To determine the potential impact of coal dust exposure on juvenile chinook salmon, fish were exposed for an 8 day period to 60 mg L -1 , 200 mg L -1 or 500 mg L -1 of coal dust in sea water and the levels of CYP1A1 mRNA quantitated using RT-cPCR. Two control groups were utilized; one 'negative' control group was maintained in sea water only, whilst the second 'positive' control group was i.p. injected with beta-naphthoflavone (BNF: 50 mg kg -1 ). There was a significant increase in CYP1A1 expression in fish exposed to coal dust (ANOVA; P< 0.001), and in fish injected with BNF (t-test; P< 0.001), relative to controls. In addition, RT-PCR analysis indicated increased expression of a second gene in the fish exposed to coal dust. Sequence analysis identified the second coal-dust inducible gene as ribosomal protein L5. Both of these genes, CYP1A1 and L5, encode proteins vital in cellular metabolism. The enzyme encoded by CYP1A1 (P4501A1) plays an important role in the metabolic activation of PAHs to carcinogenic and mutagenic metabolites. L5 plays a crucial role in ribosome biogenesis. At present, the significance of the increased hepatic expression of L5 in coal dust exposed fish is unclear and warrants further investigation

  1. Influence of the mode of uptake on the elimination of cobalt 60 by a phanerogam, a mollusc, a crustacean and a freshwater teleost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiard-Triquet, C.

    1979-01-01

    60 Co enters the environment with radioactive wastes from nuclear power reactors and fuel reprocessing plants as well as a component of fallout from nuclear tests. A study of 60 Co in freshwater organisms has been carried out in order to compare the influence of different modes of uptake (immersion in contaminated water, ingestion of radioactive food, contamination by both food and water) upon the subsequent elimination. The loss of 60 Co by Canadian pondweed Elodea canadensis is monophasic. For animal species, this phenomenon is biphasic, independently of the mode of uptake. On the other hand, the biological half-life changes in relation to the vector of contamination. The same result is observed for the relative importance of the different compartments. This is easily explained because the mode of uptake determines the distribution of 60 Co in the organisms. The turnover of 60 Co in the organisms is slow and the physical half-life of this radionuclide is relatively important (Tsub(p) = 5.27 years). Thus, the possible consequences of the release of this pollutant on freshwater life must not be neglected. (author)

  2. Muscle growth and myosin isoform transitions during development of a small teleost fish, Poecilia reticulata (Peters) (Atheriniformes, Poeciliidae): a histochemical, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural and morphometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veggetti, A; Mascarello, F; Scapolo, P A; Rowlerson, A; Carnevali, C

    1993-04-01

    The myosin composition of lateral muscle in Poecilia reticulata from birth to adult was studied by ATPase histochemistry and immunostaining with myosin isoform-specific antibodies. At birth the muscle consists of two layers containing developmental isoforms of myosin. In deep layer fibres the developmental myosin is replaced by the adult fast-white isoform soon after birth. In the epaxial and hypaxial monolayer fibres the myosin composition present at birth (J1) is replaced within 3 days by another (J2). In some fibres, this J2 composition is retained in the adult, but in others it is slowly replaced by the adult slow-red muscle isoform. Close to the lateral line, all monolayer fibres are already in transition between the J2 myosin and the adult slow-red form at birth, and rapidly complete the transition to slow-red form. These fibres, together with others generated de novo in an underlying hyperplastic zone, form the red muscle layer of the adult. The pink muscle develops during the first month after birth, and by 31 days it consists of an outer, middle and inner layer. A few middle layer fibres are already present at birth, while the outer layer fibres first appear 3 days after birth. The thin inner layer is probably a transitional form between the middle pink and adult white types, and appears at about 31 days. A morphometric analysis showed that growth of the white muscle occurs principally by hypertrophy. Even at the magnification level of the electron microscope, no satellite cells or myoblasts which could give rise to new fibres were found in the white muscle, except in the far epaxial and hypaxial regions and only in the first 10 days. A zone of hyperplastic growth was also found lying just under the superficial monolayer close to the lateral line, and this presumably contributes fibres to the red and pink muscle layers.

  3. Effects on wildlife of aerial applications of strobane, DDT, and BHC to tidal marshes in Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, J.L.; Darsie, R.F.; Springer, P.F.

    1957-01-01

    The principal purpose of this study was to ascertain what effect on wildlife, if any, would result from the use of the new insecticide, Strobane, for mosquito control on tideland areas. Comparisons were made with DDT and BHC (43 per cent gamma isomer) commonly used in control operations. The investigation was carried out on the tidal marshes of Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna, Delaware. Four areas, all similar in habitat, were chosen-three as test plots for Strobane, BHC, and DDT, respectively, and the fourth as an untreated check. The insecticides in oil solution were applied by airplane at the rates of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 pound per acre for gamma isomer of BHC, DDT, and Strobane, respectively. The first application was made on the morning of July 27; and the second, on the evening of August 23, 1955. To assay the results of spraying, 14 testing devices were set up in each area. They consisted of cages, traps, and microscope slides placed in the streams and ponds. The estuarine fishes, Fundulus heteroclitus, Cyprinodon variegatus, Leiostornus xanthurus, and Ailugil curemu; blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus; fiddler crabs, Uca pugnux, Uca minux, and Sesarma reticulaturn; and certain sessile organisms were included in the tests. Analyses of variance on fish and blue crabs showed no significant difference between deaths occurring in treated and control plots, nor among the three treatments. Differential mortalities were suffered by fish caged in streams and ponds. Greater numbers died in the BHC-treated streams and in the DDT-treated ponds. Local concentrations of insecticide appeared to be the cause, although the magnitude of kill was not significantly greater than in control areas. Field observations and crab-pot counts showed that both the fish and blue crabs avoided the sites of high insecticide concentration. Certainly the majority of the free-living individuals in the treated areas were able to survive the sprays, and at the level tested showed no

  4. The Physiology Teacher, Vol. 5 No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Orr E., Ed.

    Outlined in this publication is a basic laboratory exercise which characterizes tubular secretion, using an isolated renal tubule preparation from teleost fish. Background information is given showing how these tubules of teleost fish, particularly marine teleosts, correspond to the proximal tubule of mammalian kidney. Materials needed, including…

  5. Ecomorphology and food habits of teleost fishes Trachinotus carolinus (Teleostei: Carangidae and Menticirrhus littoralis (Teleostei: Sciaenidae, inhabiting the surf zone off Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Prestrelo Palmeira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ecomorphology and food habits of juvenile Trachinotus carolinus and Menticirrhus littoralis caught in the surf zone of sandy beaches in Niterói, RJ, were investigated between July 2006 and May 2007. These fish species differ morphologically, but present similarities in their diet composition suggest some slight overlapping in their diet. The importance of food items was assessed using Kawakami and Vazzoler's feeding index. Morphometric variables were recorded to correlate with the diet composition of the different size classes for each species. A total of 210 fishes (Trachinotus carolinus - 122, Menticirrhus littoralis - 88, ranging between 24.2 mm and 112 mm total length, were analyzed, but the stomachs of only 84.8% of them contained food. Trachinotus carolinus presented mysids, Polychaetes and Emerita spp. as the predominant items in their diet. Formicidae and Isopoda were the most important items for class I individuals, whereas mysids and Emerita spp. were important for classes II and III. Class I individuals also showed smaller sized prey (amphipods and isopods and clupeid fish larvae in their diet. Emerita spp. dominated the food items of Menticirrhus littoralis regardless of the size class. Polychaetes, the second most important item was better represented in class sizes II and III. The main morphometric variable correlated with such differences included mouth position and diameter of the eye.A ecomorfologia e os hábitos alimentares de juvenis de Trachinotus carolinus e Menticirrhus littoralis capturados na zona de arrebentação de praias arenosas em Niterói, RJ, foram investigados entre julho de 2006 e Maio de 2007. Ambas as espécies diferem morfologicamente, mas apresentam semelhanças em sua dieta, sugerindo uma possível sobreposição alimentar. A importância dos itens alimentares foi avaliada utilizando o índice alimentar de Kawakami e Vazzoler. Variáveis morfométricas foram correlacionadas à dieta observada para diferentes classes de tamanho, para cada espécie. Um total de 210 peixes (Trachinotus carolinus - 122, Menticirrhus littoralis - 88, variando entre 24.2 mm e 112 mm de comprimento total, foram analisados, mas apenas 84.8% continham alimento. Trachinotus carolinus apresentou mysidáceos, poliquetas e Emerita spp. como os itens predominantes na dieta. Formicidae e Isopoda foram os itens mais importantes para a classe I de tamanho dos indivíduos, enquanto que mysidáceos e Emerita spp. foram importantes para as classes II e III. Indivíduos da classe I também apresentaram itens de menor tamanho (anfípodos e isópodos bem como larvas de peixes clupeídeos na dieta. Emerita spp. dominou a alimentação de Menticirrhus littoralis, independentemente da classe de tamanho. Poliquetas, o segundo item mais importante, foi mais bem representado na classe II e III de tamanho dos indivíduos. As principais variáveis morfométricas correlacionadas com essas diferenças incluíram a posição da boca e o diâmetro do olho.

  6. Androgen induces gonadal soma-derived factor, Gsdf, in XX gonads correlated to sex-reversal but not Dmrt1 directly, in the teleost fish, northern medaka (Oryzias sakaizumii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Yoshifumi; Myosho, Taijun; Sato, Tadashi; Sakaizumi, Mitsuru; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Tohru

    2016-11-15

    In the inbred HNI-II strain of Oryzias sakaizumii, Dmy and Gsdf are expressed in XY gonads from Stages 35 and 36, respectively, similarly to the inbred Hd-rR strain of Oryzias latipes. However, Dmrt1 respectively becomes detectable at Stage 36 and 5 days post hatching (dph) in the two strains. In XX HNI-II embryos, 17α-methyltestosterone (MT) induces Gsdf mRNA from Stage 36, accompanied by complete sex-reversal in all treated individuals (MT, 10 ng/mL), while Dmrt1 mRNA was first detectable at 5 dph. In XX d-rR, MT induced Gsdf mRNA expression and sex-reversal in only some of the treated individuals. Together, these results suggest the testis differentiation cascade in XY individuals differs between the HNI-II and Hd-rR strains. In addition, it is suggested that androgen-induced XX sex-reversal proceeds via an androgen-Gsdf-Dmrt1 cascade and that Gsdf plays an important role in sex-reversal in medaka. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Criopreservação do sêmen testicular do teleósteo piau-açu Leporimus macrocephalus Testicular sperm cryopreservation of the teleost 'piau-açu' Leporinus macrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.I.M.A. Ribeiro

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se metodologias de criopreservação para o sêmen do piau-açu Leporinus macrocephalus (Teleostei, Anostomidae. O volume de sêmen coletado diretamente dos testículos de seis peixes (446,7±165,1g de peso corporal foi de 0,4±0,2 ml. Testou-se a toxicidade dos crioprotetores dimetilsulfóxido (DMSO, dimetilacetamida, propilenoglicol, etilenoglicol e metanol nas concentrações de 5%, 10% e 15%. DMSO, dimetilacetamida e propilenoglicol foram os menos tóxicos e, por isso, utilizados na criopreservação do sêmen. Para este teste, o sêmen foi diluído 1:8 (v:v em soluções de cada crioprotetor(8,9%, concentração final às quais adicionaram-se gema de ovo de galinha (8,9%, concentração final, glicose (5% e água destilada (75%. A mistura foi então envasada em palhetas de 5ml de capacidade e imediatamente colocada em botijão de vapor de nitrogênio líquido. A taxa de motilidade espermática pós-descongelamento mais alta (40,8± 13,6 % foi obtida com sêmen criopreservado em diluente contendo DMSO e ativado em solução de NaHCO3 119mM. A taxa de fertilização, correspondente a 84,3±9,4% do controle, foi obtida com ovócitos de piau-açu fertilizados com sêmen congelado em solução de DMSO (8%, concentração final.Methods for cryopreservation of 'piau-açu' Leporinus macrocephalus (Teleostei, Anostomidae sperm were evaluated. Sperm collected directly from the testes of six fish (446.7±165.1g of body weight yielded 0.4±0.2 ml. The toxicity of the cryoprotectants dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO, dimethyl acetamide, propylene glycol, ethylene glycol and methanol, at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15%, was tested. DMSO, dimethyl acetamide and propylene glycol were the least toxic and were used to freeze the sperm. Sperm was diluted 1:8 (v:v in solutions made of 8.9% (final concentration of one of those crioprotectants to which 8.9% (final concentration of chicken yolk egg, 5% glucose and 75% distilled water were added. The mixture was then poured into 0.5-ml capacity straws and immediately deepened into a cryogenic shipper containing only liquid nitrogen vapor. The highest frozen/thawed sperm motility rate (40.8± 13.6 % was obtained with sperm cryopreserved in the DMSO containing diluent and activated in 119 mM NaHCO3. Piau-açu eggs fertilized with sperm previously cryopreserved in solution containing 8% (final concentration DMSO yielded a rate of fertilization of 84.3 ± 9.4% of the control.

  8. Environmental Impact Research Program. Ecological Effects of Rubble Weir Jetty Construction at Murrells Inlet, South Carolina. Volume 3. Community Structure and Habitat Utilization of Fishes and Decapods Associated with the Jetties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-01

    recreational fishing activities. 1. Fish Community Assessment Gill Net Collections: Three gill nets constructed of 30.5-m lengths of 2.44-m-deep, sinking ...Cyprinodontidae Fundulus maalis + Atheninidae Membras martinica+ Menidia menidia + Syngnathidae Hippocampus sp+ (Continued) 43 Table 14 . Continued

  9. Multiple kisspeptin receptors in early Osteichthyans provide new insights into the evolution of this receptor family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasquier, J.; Lafont, A._G.; Jeng, S.-R.

    2012-01-01

    a variable number of Kissr genes, from none in birds, one or two in teleosts, to three in an amphibian, xenopus. In order to get more insight into the evolution of Kissr gene family, we investigated the presence of Kissr in osteichthyans of key-phylogenetical positions: the coelacanth, a representative...... of early sarcopterygians, the spotted gar, a non-teleost actinopterygian, and the European eel, a member of an early group of teleosts (elopomorphs). We report the occurrence of three Kissr for the first time in a teleost, the eel. As measured by quantitative RT-PCR, the three eel Kissr were differentially...

  10. Long-term catch and effort trends in Eastern Cape Angling Week ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most commonly caught species were Argyrosomus japonicus (20.3%), Mustelus mustelus/Triakis megalopterus (13.0%) and Carcharias taurus (11.8%). Mean CPUE for all fish caught, teleosts and elasmobranchs, as well as the top four teleost and elasmobranch species, increased over the course of the study period, ...

  11. superciliosus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reproductive cycle of the viviparous teleost. Neotoca bilineata, a member of the family Goodeidae. I. The breeding cycle. Bioi. Bull. 76: 359-370. MENDOZA, G. 1956. Adaptations during gestation in the viviparous cyprinodont teleost, Hubbsina turneri.J. Morph. 99: 73-96. PENRITH, M.L. 1965. Note on an extension of the ...

  12. The behaviour and brain function of the Cichlid fish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the teleost forebrain houses a primitive limbic system the main functions of which would be general arousal and the selection of appropriate responses to the incoming external and endogenous (motivational) stimuli. Keywords: Brain Function, Teleost, telencephalon, Cichlid fish behaviour, limbic system, hippocampus ...

  13. Effect of cortisol on some osmoregulatory parameters of the teleost, Oreochromis niloticus L., after transference from freshwater to seawater Efeito do cortisol sobre parâmetros de osmorregulação do teleósteo, Oreochromis niloticus L., após a transferência de água doce para água salgada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fontaínhas-Fernandes

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This trial was conducted in order to determine the effects of cortisol on salt water acclimation of tilapia Oreochromis niloticus (L.. Tilapia (n=42 were injected intraperitoneally with cortisol and then were directly transferred from freshwater (FW to 15‰ salt water (SW. Changes in plasma osmolality, chloride ion concentration (Cl-, plasma level of cortisol and gill Na+, K+-ATPase activity were measured at 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 168 hours after transference to 15‰ SW. Plasma osmolality and Cl- increased immediately after transference until 12-24 h. The fish injected with cortisol (F showed higher plasma levels of cortisol than those from control group (C that maintained the initial levels during the experiment. Gill Na+, K+-ATPase activity of C fish began to increase at first hours after transference and peak at 48h. The differences between gill Na+, K+-ATPase activity of F and C groups were significant (PEste estudo foi realizado com o objectivo de testar os efeitos do cortisol na aclimatação da tilápia Oreochromis niloticus (L. à água salgada. As tilápias (n=42 foram injectadas intraperitonealmente com cortisol e directamente transferidas de água doce para água salobra (15‰. As alterações da osmolaridade, concentração em cloretos (Cl-, os níveis plasmáticos de cortisol e a actividade branquial da Na+, K+-ATPase foram medidas (6, 12, 24, 48, 72 e 168 horas após a transferência para água salobra. A osmolaridade e a concentração em Cl- aumentou imediatamente após a transferência até às 12-24h. O grupo injectado com cortisol (F mostrou níveis plasmáticos de cortisol mais elevados do que o grupo controlo (C que manteve os níveis iniciais durante a experiência. A actividade branquial da Na+, K+-ATPase dos peixes do grupo C começou às primeiras horas após a transferência e teve um pico às 48h. As diferenças entre a actividade enzimática da Na+, K+-ATPase dos grupos F e C foram significativas (P<0,05 em água doce, o que confirma o efeito exógeno do cortisol.

  14. Hematologia de teleósteos brasileiros com infecção parasitária. I. Variáveis do Leporinus macrocephalus Garavelo e Britski, 1988 (Anostomidae e Piaractus mesopotamicus Holmberg, 1887 (Characidae Haematology of parasitized Brazilian teleost fishes. I. Parameters of Leporinus macrocephalus Garavelo and Britski, 1988 (Anostomidae and Piaractus mesopotamicus Holmberg, 1887 (Characidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilermando Perecin

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Espécimes de Leporinus macrocephalus (piauçu e de Piaractus mesopotamicus (pacu foram colhidos em piscicultura do município de Franca (SP para avaliação dos efeitos da infecção parasitária sobre a taxa de hemoglobina e de hematócrito, a concentração de hemoglobina corpuscular média (CHCM, o fator relativo de condição (Kn e a distribuição percentual de células sangüíneas de defesa orgânica (leucócitos e trombócitos. Ambas as espécies apresentavam-se parasitadas por monogenea ou por monogenea e outros parasitas: monogenea e Trichodina sp; monogenea e Lernaea cyprinacea; monogenea e Piscinoodinium pillulare; monogenea e Ichthyophthirius multifiliis; monogenea, I. multifiliis e Trichodina sp. Os resultados demonstraram que os parâmetros estudados em L. macrocephalus e em P. mesopotamicus não foram significativamente (p > 0,05 alterados pelo parasitismo. A análise de regressão linear mostrou correlação negativa (p > 0,05 entre linfócitos e trombócitos em L. macrocephalus e correlação positiva (p > 0,01 da taxa de hemoglobina com o peso e com o comprimento total em P. mesopotamicus.Specimens of cultivated Leporinus macrocephalus (piauçu and Piaractus mesopotamicus (pacu were collected in a fishfarm at Franca, SP. Effects of parasite infection upon hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC, condition factor (Kn and differential count of defense cells (leucocyte and thrombocyte were evaluated. Both fish species were parasitized by monogenean; monogenean and Trichodina sp; monogenean and Lernaea cyprinacea; monogenean and Piscinoodinium pillulare; monogenean and Ichthyophthirius miltifiliis; monogenean, I. multifiliis and Trichodina sp. Parasitism did not influence (p > 0.05 the studied haematological characteristics in L. macrocephalus and P. mesopotamicus. Linnear regression showed negative correlation (p > 0.05 between lymphocytes and thrombocytes in L. macrocephalus and positive correlation (p > 0.01 of the hemoglobin rate with fish weight and fish length in P. mesopotamicus.

  15. The relationship between temperature and standard rate of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    teleost) fishes, while largely unknown, is essential to an understanding of the effects of temperature on fish energetics. This study quantifies the effect of temperature on the standard rate of metabolism in the African lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus.

  16. The impacts of neutralized acid mine drainage contaminated water on the expression of selected endocrine-linked genes in juvenile Mozambique tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus exposed in vivo

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Truter, JC

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available into watercourses. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the endocrine modulatory potential of neutralized AMD, using molecular biomarkers in the teleost fish Oreochromis mossambicus in exposure studies. Surface water was collected from six locations...

  17. Fish reproduction: strategies and tactics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Potts, G. W; Wootton, R. J

    1984-01-01

    This book comprises a much needed review of recent developments and new ideas in fish reproductive biology, with special reference to the adaptive significance of reproductive patterns observed in teleost fishes...

  18. Modulation of Aromatase Activity as a Mode of Action for Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals in a Marine Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    The steroidogenic enzyme aromatase catalyzes the conversion of androgens (androstenedione and testosterone) to estrogens (estrone and estradiol) and therefore plays a central role in reproduction. In contrast to most vertebrates, teleost fish have two distinct forms of aromatase....

  19. Water temperature and pH influence olfactory sensitivity to pre ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    olfactogram (EOG) study has shown sex and maturity differences in peripheral olfactory responses to the steroid pheromone in Salmo solar (Moore and. Scott 1991) and to the prostaglandin pheromone in teleost fish (Sorensen and Goetz 1993).

  20. Linking fearfulness and coping styles in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, C.I.; Silva, P.I.M.; Conceição, L.E.C.; Costas, B.; Höglund, E.; Overli, O.; Schrama, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Consistent individual differences in cognitive appraisal and emotional reactivity, including fearfulness, are important personality traits in humans, non-human mammals, and birds. Comparative studies on teleost fishes support the existence of coping styles and behavioral syndromes also in

  1. The Origin of Tooth Replacement : Three-dimensional Synchrotron Histology Visualizes the Dental Development of Silurian Stem Osteichthyans

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Donglei

    2017-01-01

    Mechanisms of tooth replacement distribute incongruently among extant gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates): a permanent tooth-generating dental lamina exists in chondrichthyans (cartilaginous fish) and tetrapods but not teleosts, whereas tooth shedding by basal hard tissue resorption occurs in tetrapods and teleosts but not chondrichthyans. Theories about the evolution of tooth development have been biased towards the chondrichthyan conveyor-belt replacement, since there has been no fossil eviden...

  2. United States of America. Report 7 [Marine Radioecology. Current Research and Future Scope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsley, S.J.

    1967-01-01

    Present research programme (long-term): Interrelationship of environmental salt concentration and concentration of dissolved radionuclides to the rate of accumulation of these nuclides by euryhaline teleosts. Objectives of this research are designed toward the definition of a function that will adequately described the rate of accumulation of selected radionuclides by euryhaline teleosts from littoral or estuarine environments. Concurrent studies are being made to determine the maximum concentration accumulated by these fish under conditions of chronic exposure to selected concentrations in the medium

  3. Jurassic fishes of Gondwana

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana López-Arbarello; Oliver W. M. Rauhut; Katrin Moser

    2008-01-01

    The Jurassic is an important period for understanding the origin of modern fish faunas, since it saw the first radiation - and in some cases the origin - of most modern groups. In chondrichthyans, neoselachian sharks and rays diversified during this time. In actinopterygians, the neopterygians, and among them the teleosts, experienced an important radiation, which led to the appearance of several of the modern teleosts groups. In the sarcopterygians, dipnoans and actinistians approached their...

  4. Populations genetically rifting within a complex geological system: The case of strong structure and low genetic diversity in the migratory freshwater catfish, Bagrus docmak, in East Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Basiita, Rose Komugisha; Zenger, Kyall Richard; Jerry, Dean Robert

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The complex geological history of East Africa has been a driving factor in the rapid evolution of teleost biodiversity. While there is some understanding of how macroevolutionary drivers have shaped teleost speciation in East Africa, there is a paucity of research into how the same biogeographical factors have affected microevolutionary processes within lakes and rivers. To address this deficiency, population genetic diversity, demography, and structure were investigated in a widely ...

  5. Revisiting available knowledge on teleostean thyroid hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazcano, Iván; Orozco, Aurea

    2018-03-21

    Teleosts are the most numerous class of living vertebrates. They exhibit great diversity in terms of morphology, developmental strategies, ecology and adaptation. In spite of this diversity, teleosts conserve similarities at molecular, cellular and endocrine levels. In the context of thyroidal systems, and as in the rest of vertebrates, thyroid hormones in fish regulate development, growth and metabolism by actively entering the nucleus and interacting with thyroid hormone receptors, the final sensors of this endocrine signal, to regulate gene expression. In general terms, vertebrates express the functional thyroid hormone receptors alpha and beta, encoded by two distinct genes (thra and thrb, respectively). However, different species of teleosts express thyroid hormone receptor isoforms with particular structural characteristics that confer singular functional traits to these receptors. For example, teleosts contain two thra genes and in some species also two thrb; some of the expressed isoforms can bind alternative ligands. Also, some identified isoforms contain deletions or large insertions that have not been described in other vertebrates and that have not yet been functionally characterized. As in amphibians, the regulation of some of these teleost isoforms coincides with the climax of metamorphosis and/or life transitions during development and growth. In this review, we aimed to gain further insights into thyroid signaling from a comparative perspective by proposing a systematic nomenclature for teleost thyroid hormone receptor isoforms and summarize their particular functional features when the information was available. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evolution and differential expression of a vertebrate vitellogenin gene cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kongshaug Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The multiplicity or loss of the vitellogenin (vtg gene family in vertebrates has been argued to have broad implications for the mode of reproduction (placental or non-placental, cleavage pattern (meroblastic or holoblastic and character of the egg (pelagic or benthic. Earlier proposals for the existence of three forms of vertebrate vtgs present conflicting models for their origin and subsequent duplication. Results By integrating phylogenetics of novel vtg transcripts from old and modern teleosts with syntenic analyses of all available genomic variants of non-metatherian vertebrates we identify the gene orthologies between the Sarcopterygii (tetrapod branch and Actinopterygii (fish branch. We argue that the vertebrate vtg gene cluster originated in proto-chromosome m, but that vtg genes have subsequently duplicated and rearranged following whole genome duplications. Sequencing of a novel fourth vtg transcript in labrid species, and the presence of duplicated paralogs in certain model organisms supports the notion that lineage-specific gene duplications frequently occur in teleosts. The data show that the vtg gene cluster is more conserved between acanthomorph teleosts and tetrapods, than in ostariophysan teleosts such as the zebrafish. The differential expression of the labrid vtg genes are further consistent with the notion that neofunctionalized Aa-type vtgs are important determinants of the pelagic or benthic character of the eggs in acanthomorph teleosts. Conclusion The vertebrate vtg gene cluster existed prior to the separation of Sarcopterygii from Actinopterygii >450 million years ago, a period associated with the second round of whole genome duplication. The presence of higher copy numbers in a more highly expressed subcluster is particularly prevalent in teleosts. The differential expression and latent neofunctionalization of vtg genes in acanthomorph teleosts is an adaptive feature associated with oocyte hydration

  7. Characterization and Evolution of the Spotted Gar Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukeena, Joshua M.; Galicia, Carlos A.; Wilson, Jacob D.; McGinn, Tim; Boughmann, Janette W.; Robison, Barrie D.; Postlethwait, John H.; Braasch, Ingo; Stenkamp, Deborah L.; Fuerst, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we characterize the retina of the spotted gar, Lepisosteus oculatus, a ray-finned fish. Gar did not undergo the whole genome duplication event that occurred at the base of the teleost fish lineage, which includes the model species zebrafish and medaka. The divergence of gars from the teleost lineage and the availability of a high quality genome sequence make it a uniquely useful species to understand how genome duplication sculpted features of the teleost visual system, including photoreceptor diversity. We developed reagents to characterize the cellular organization of the spotted gar retina, including representative markers for all major classes of retinal neurons and Müller glia. We report that the gar has a preponderance of predicted short-wavelength (SWS) shifted opsin genes, including a duplicated set of SWS1 (ultraviolet) sensitive opsin encoding genes, a SWS2 (blue) opsin encoding gene, and two rod opsin encoding genes, all of which were expressed in retinal photoreceptors. We also report that gar SWS1 cones lack the geometric organization of photoreceptors observed in teleost fish species, consistent with the crystalline photoreceptor mosaic being a teleost innovation. Of note the spotted gar expresses both exo-rhodopsin (RH1-1) and rhodopsin (RH1-2) in rods. Exo-rhodopsin is an opsin that is not expressed in the retina of zebrafish and other teleosts, but rather is expressed in regions of the brain. This study suggests that exo-rhodopsin is an ancestral actinopterygian (ray finned fish) retinal opsin, and in teleosts its expression has possibly been subfunctionalized to the pineal gland. PMID:27862951

  8. Resolution of ray-finned fish phylogeny and timing of diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Near, Thomas J; Eytan, Ron I; Dornburg, Alex; Kuhn, Kristen L; Moore, Jon A; Davis, Matthew P; Wainwright, Peter C; Friedman, Matt; Smith, W Leo

    2012-08-21

    Ray-finned fishes make up half of all living vertebrate species. Nearly all ray-finned fishes are teleosts, which include most commercially important fish species, several model organisms for genomics and developmental biology, and the dominant component of marine and freshwater vertebrate faunas. Despite the economic and scientific importance of ray-finned fishes, the lack of a single comprehensive phylogeny with corresponding divergence-time estimates has limited our understanding of the evolution and diversification of this radiation. Our analyses, which use multiple nuclear gene sequences in conjunction with 36 fossil age constraints, result in a well-supported phylogeny of all major ray-finned fish lineages and molecular age estimates that are generally consistent with the fossil record. This phylogeny informs three long-standing problems: specifically identifying elopomorphs (eels and tarpons) as the sister lineage of all other teleosts, providing a unique hypothesis on the radiation of early euteleosts, and offering a promising strategy for resolution of the "bush at the top of the tree" that includes percomorphs and other spiny-finned teleosts. Contrasting our divergence time estimates with studies using a single nuclear gene or whole mitochondrial genomes, we find that the former underestimates ages of the oldest ray-finned fish divergences, but the latter dramatically overestimates ages for derived teleost lineages. Our time-calibrated phylogeny reveals that much of the diversification leading to extant groups of teleosts occurred between the late Mesozoic and early Cenozoic, identifying this period as the "Second Age of Fishes."

  9. Evolution of ligand specificity in vertebrate corticosteroid receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deitcher David L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corticosteroid receptors include mineralocorticoid (MR and glucocorticoid (GR receptors. Teleost fishes have a single MR and duplicate GRs that show variable sensitivities to mineralocorticoids and glucocorticoids. How these receptors compare functionally to tetrapod MR and GR, and the evolutionary significance of maintaining two GRs, remains unclear. Results We used up to seven steroids (including aldosterone, cortisol and 11-deoxycorticosterone [DOC] to compare the ligand specificity of the ligand binding domains of corticosteroid receptors between a mammal (Mus musculus and the midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus, a teleost model for steroid regulation of neural and behavioral plasticity. Variation in mineralocorticoid sensitivity was considered in a broader phylogenetic context by examining the aldosterone sensitivity of MR and GRs from the distantly related daffodil cichlid (Neolamprologus pulcher, another teleost model for neurobehavioral plasticity. Both teleost species had a single MR and duplicate GRs. All MRs were sensitive to DOC, consistent with the hypothesis that DOC was the initial ligand of the ancestral MR. Variation in GR steroid-specificity corresponds to nine identified amino acid residue substitutions rather than phylogenetic relationships based on receptor sequences. Conclusion The mineralocorticoid sensitivity of duplicate GRs in teleosts is highly labile in the context of their evolutionary phylogeny, a property that likely led to neo-functionalization and maintenance of two GRs.

  10. Large number of ultraconserved elements were already present in the jawed vertebrate ancestor.

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jianli

    2009-03-01

    Stephen (2008) identified 13,736 ultraconserved elements (UCEs) in placental mammals and investigated their evolution in opossum, chicken, frog, and fugu. They found that there was a massive expansion of UCEs during tetrapod evolution and the substitution rate in UCEs showed a significant decline in tetrapods compared with fugu, suggesting they were exapted in tetrapods. They considered it unlikely that these elements are ancient but evolved at a higher rate in teleost fishes. In this study, we investigated the evolution of UCEs in a cartilaginous fish, the elephant shark and show that nearly half the UCEs were present in the jawed vertebrate ancestor. The substitution rate in UCEs is higher in fugu than in elephant shark, and approximately one-third of ancient UCEs have diverged beyond recognition in teleost fishes. These data indicate that UCEs have evolved at a higher rate in teleost fishes, which may have implications for their vast diversity and evolutionary success.

  11. ROLE OF SEROTONIN IN FISH REPRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvathy ePrasad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The neuroendocrine mechanism regulates reproduction through the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis which is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates. The HPG axis is regulated by a variety of internal as well as external factors. Serotonin, a monoamine neurotransmitter, is involved in a wide range of reproductive functions. In mammals, serotonin regulates sexual behaviours, gonadotropin release and gonadotropin-release hormone (GnRH secretion. However, the serotonin system in teleost may play unique role in the control of reproduction as the mechanism of reproductive control in teleosts is not always the same as in the mammalian models. In fish, the serotonin system is also regulated by natural environmental factors as well as chemical substances. In particular, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are commonly detected as pharmaceutical contaminants in the natural environment. Those factors may influence fish reproductive functions via the serotonin system. This review summarizes the functional significance of serotonin in the teleosts reproduction.

  12. Nocturnality constrains morphological and functional diversity in the eyes of reef fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitz Lars

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ambient light levels are often considered to drive the evolution of eye form and function. Diel activity pattern is the main mechanism controlling the visual environment of teleost reef fish, with day-active (diurnal fish active in well-illuminated conditions, whereas night-active (nocturnal fish cope with dim light. Physiological optics predicts several specific evolutionary responses to dim-light vision that should be reflected in visual performance features of the eye. Results We analyzed a large comparative dataset on morphological traits of the eyes in 265 species of teleost reef fish in 43 different families. The eye morphology of nocturnal reef teleosts is characterized by a syndrome that indicates better light sensitivity, including large relative eye size, high optical ratio and large, rounded pupils. Improved dim-light image formation comes at the cost of reduced depth of focus and reduction of potential accommodative lens movement. Diurnal teleost reef fish, released from the stringent functional requirements of dim-light vision have much higher morphological and optical diversity than nocturnal species, with large ranges of optical ratio, depth of focus, and lens accommodation. Conclusions Physical characteristics of the environment are an important factor in the evolution and diversification of the vertebrate eye. Both teleost reef fish and terrestrial amniotes meet the functional requirements of dim-light vision with a similar evolutionary response of morphological and optical modifications. The trade-off between improved dim-light vision and reduced optical diversity may be a key factor in explaining the lower trophic diversity of nocturnal reef teleosts.

  13. Duplicated leptin receptors in two species of eel bring new insights into the evolution of the leptin system in vertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Morini

    Full Text Available Since its discovery in mammals as a key-hormone in reproduction and metabolism, leptin has been identified in an increasing number of tetrapods and teleosts. Tetrapods possess only one leptin gene, while most teleosts possess two leptin genes, as a result of the teleost third whole genome duplication event (3R. Leptin acts through a specific receptor (LEPR. In the European and Japanese eels, we identified two leptin genes, and for the first time in vertebrates, two LEPR genes. Synteny analyses indicated that eel LEPRa and LEPRb result from teleost 3R. LEPRb seems to have been lost in the teleost lineage shortly after the elopomorph divergence. Quantitative PCRs revealed a wide distribution of leptins and LEPRs in the European eel, including tissues involved in metabolism and reproduction. Noticeably, leptin1 was expressed in fat tissue, while leptin2 in the liver, reflecting subfunctionalization. Four-month fasting had no impact on the expression of leptins and LEPRs in control European eels. This might be related to the remarkable adaptation of silver eel metabolism to long-term fasting throughout the reproductive oceanic migration. In contrast, sexual maturation induced differential increases in the expression of leptins and LEPRs in the BPG-liver axis. Leptin2 was strikingly upregulated in the liver, the central organ of the reproductive metabolic challenge in teleosts. LEPRs were differentially regulated during sexual maturation, which may have contributed to the conservation of the duplicated LEPRs in this species. This suggests an ancient and positive role of the leptin system in the vertebrate reproductive function. This study brings new insights on the evolutionary history of the leptin system in vertebrates. Among extant vertebrates, the eel represents a unique case of duplicated leptins and leptin receptors as a result of 3R.

  14. Adult and offspring size in the ocean over 17 orders of magnitude follows two life history strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neuheimer, Anna; Hartvig, Martin; Heuschele, Jan

    2015-01-01

    is observed along with variability in physical and biological forcing factors in space and time. We compiled adult and offspring size for 407 pelagic marine species covering more than 17 orders of magnitude in body mass including Cephalopoda, Cnidaria, Crustaceans, Ctenophora, Elasmobranchii, Mammalia......, Sagittoidea, and Teleost. We find marine life following one of two distinct strategies, with offspring size being either proportional to adult size (e.g., Crustaceans, Elasmobranchii, and Mammalia) or invariant with adult size (e.g., Cephalopoda, Cnidaria, Sagittoidea, Teleosts, and possibly Ctenophora). We...

  15. Características hematológicas de teleósteos brasileiros. I. Série vermelha e dosagens de cortisol e glicose do plasma sangüíneo de espécimes de Colossoma macropomum em condições de cultivo - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v20i0.4466 Hematological characteristics of Brazilian teleosts. I. Red blood cell and doses of blood plasma cortisol and glucose in Colossoma macropomum species in culture condition - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v20i0.4466

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Tavares-Dias

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Foram utilizados no presente trabalho 30 exemplares sexualmente imaturos de Colossoma macropomum Cuvier, 1818 (Osteichthyes: Characidae com 500 a 700g de peso total e 25,0 a 30,2cm de comprimento padrão, com aproximadamente um ano de idade. Tais indivíduos foram capturados em tanques da Estação de Piscicultura Usina São Geraldo, Sertãozinho (São Paulo, Brasil, e são provenientes de uma mesma desova. Foram determinados os valores médio da contagem total de eritrócitos, da hemoglobina, do hematócrito, do volume corpuscular médio (VCM, da hemoglobina corpuscular média (HCM, da concentração da hemoglobina corpuscular média (CHCM e dosados a glicose e o cortisol plasmático. Os resultados demonstraram que a contagem total de eritrócitos em Colossoma macropomum foi igual a 2830,6 x 103/μl, percentual de hematócrito 41,6%, concentração da hemoglobina 11,3g/100ml, VCM 150,0%, HCM 41,4pg, CHCM 27,7%, glicemia 116,7mg/dl e cortisol plasmático igual a 182,1ng/ml. O número de eritrócitos apresentou correlação positiva (α=0,05 com a taxa de hemoglobina e correlação altamente positiva (α=0,01 com o percentual de hematócrito, enquanto a taxa de hemoglobina mostrou correlação altamente positiva (α=0,01 com o percentual de hematócrito.Thirty approximately one-year-old sexually immature specimens of Colossoma macropomum Cuvier, 1818 (Osteichthyes: Characidae, total weight 500 to 700g, 25,0 to 30,2cm in standard length were used in this research work. Specimens were captured from tanks of Usina São Geraldo Fish Farm, Sertãozinho (São Paulo State, Brazil and came from a single spawning. Average values for total count of erythrocytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume (MCV, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC were determined. Plasma glucose and cortisol were dosed. Results showed that the total count of erythrocytes in Colossoma macropomum was 2830.6 x 103/μl, hematocrit 41.6%, hemoglobin concentration 11.3g/100ml, MCV 150.0%, MCH 41.4pg, MCHC 27.7%, plasma glucose 116.7mg/dl and cortisol 182.1ng/ml. The number of erythrocytes presented positive correlation (α=0.05 with the hemoglobin rate and a highly positive correlation (α=0.01 with the hematocrit percentage while the hemoglobin rate showed a highly positive correlation (α=0.01 with hematocrit percentage.

  16. To network or not to network, that is the question

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    during the evolution of teleost fishes (Makalowski 2001). ... methods are inadequate or because the phenomenon itself is completely ignored. .... Cambridge. University Press, Cambridge, UK. Linder C. R. and Rieseberg L. H. 2004 Reconstructing patterns of reticulate evolution in plants. Am. J. Bot. 91, 1700–1708.

  17. Feeding Relationships among Six Seagrass-associated Fishes in the Northeastern Gwangyang Bay, Southern Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joo Myun; Kwak, Seok Nam; Han, In-Seong

    2018-03-01

    We conducted dietary analyses of six seagrass-associated fish species inhabiting northeastern Gwangyang Bay, Korea. These six species consumed a variety of benthic invertebrates and teleosts, but their preferences for different food resources varied. Although all species consumed crustaceans, the contributions of different crustacean taxa differed among the species' diets. Caridean shrimps and crabs were a significant part of the Hexagrammos agrammus and H. otakii diets, respectively, while amphipods were consumed mainly by Sebastes inermis. Caridean shrimps and prawns were abundant within the Lateolabrax japonicas diet, but were not common prey resources for Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae or S. schlegelii. Polychaetes and ophiurids were ingested by P. yokohamae, and the former prey taxon also made moderate contributions to the diets of H. agrammus and L. japonicus. With the exception of P. yokohamae, the diets of all species included teleosts. Teleosts contributed the largest proportion of the S. schlegelii diet, followed by the S. inermis and L. japonicas diets; however, H. agrammus and H. otakii rarely consumed teleosts. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) ordination plots and permutational analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) revealed the variation in dietary composition among species and the contributions of each prey taxon. These interspecific differences in diet increase the range of food resources available to these fishes, thereby reducing competition for resources within the fish community in this region.

  18. Housekeeping genes for quantitative expression studies in the three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hibbeler, S.; Scharsack, J.P.; Becker, S.

    2008-01-01

    Background During the last years the quantification of immune response under immunological challenges, e.g. parasitation, has been a major focus of research. In this context, the expression of immune response genes in teleost fish has been surveyed for scientific and commercial purposes. Despite the

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ultrastructure of the corpuscles of Stannius (CS) of Heteropneustes fossilis reveals a homogenous cellular composition characterized by only one cell type, with large secretory granules and abundant ribosomal endoplasmic reticulum. These cells are comparable to the type 1 cell described in the CS of other teleosts; ...

  20. Plasma proteins of Barbus holubi and Clarias gariepinus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The plasma proteins of the teleosts, Barbus holubl and ClariDs gariepllUl3 were investigated by means of cel1u1ose-acetate and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Characteristic patterns were obtained with both methods for each species. It was found that the application of human nomenclature to the patterns obtained in ...

  1. Body extract of tail amputated zebrafish promotes culturing of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HJE

    After Broussonet (1786) reported that an adult fish could completely regenerate its fins after amputation, many studies focusing on fish fin regeneration have been conducted to examine the regeneration mechanism. (Akimenko et al., 1995; Poss et al., 2000). In particular, small teleost fish such as the zebra fish (Danio rerio).

  2. Field Verification Program (Aquatic Disposal). Effects of Black Rock Harbor Dredged Material on the Histopathology of The Blue Mussel Mytilus edulis and Polychaete Worm Nephtys incisa After Laboratory and Field Exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    mammalian tis- sues has played an important role in clinical, forensic , human, and veterinary modicine. The use of this field as a predictive tool in...P. 1970. "Histological and Hematological Responses of an Estuarine Teleost to Cadmium," Journal of Fisheries Research Board of Canada, Vol 27, pp

  3. Uptake and distribution of a copper, iron and zinc mixture in gill, liver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since polluted environments contain mixtures of different contaminants, the aim of this study was to investigate the time-integrated uptake of individual metals by a freshwater teleost, Tilapia sparrmanii following exposure to a metal mixture containing Cu, Fe and Zn. The metal concentrations used during the bioassays were ...

  4. Does magnesium hardness in hatching waters affect the fertilization and hatching success of hybrid catfish eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embryonic development is deemed to be the most sensitive stage in the life cycle of a teleost. As egg development takes outside the fish’s body, water hardness is one abioitic parameter, suggested to have a major effect on egg development and embryo survival. Ca2+ and Mg2+ contribute to water har...

  5. Evolutionary conservation of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) in bony fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kania, Per Walter; Sørensen, Rasmus Reng; Koch, Claus

    2010-01-01

    The complement system of fish is generally as complex as in mammals, and in addition Teleost fish often possess several genes encoding different subtypes of a given complement component, such as C3-1, C3-3 and C3-4. Initiators of both the classical (C1) and alternative pathway (factor B) have bee...

  6. Coronary blood flow in the anesthetized American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Bjarke; Elfwing, Magnus; Elsey, Ruth M.; Wang, Tobias; Crossley, Dane A.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary circulation of the heart evolved early within ectothermic vertebrates and became of vital importance to cardiac performance in some teleost fish, mammals and birds. In contrast, the role and function of the coronary circulation in ectothermic reptiles remains largely unknown. Here, we

  7. Electron microscopic studies of the corpuscles of Stannius of an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These cells are comparable to the type 1 cell described in the CS of other teleosts; type 2 cells, whose presence is ubiquitous in the CS of freshwater species are absent in ... Department of Zoology, Ranchi University, Ranchi 834 008, India; Institute of Cellular Signalling, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands ...

  8. The interbranchial lymphoid tissue of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L) extends as a diffuse mucosal lymphoid tissue throughout the trailing edge of the gill filament

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalum, Alf S; Austbø, Lars; Bjørgen, Håvard

    2015-01-01

    The teleost gill forms an extensive, semipermeable barrier that must tolerate intimate contact with the surrounding environment and be able to protect the body from external pathogens. The recent discovery of the interbranchial lymphoid tissue (ILT) has initiated an anatomical and functional inve...

  9. Ecology of diplostomid (Trematoda: Digenea) infection in freshwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The complex life cycles of most trematode parasites include three hosts. The first intermediate host is a snail, the second is normally a teleost fish and a piscivorous bird serves as the definitive host. Lymnaeid snails are most likely to be responsible for cercarial shedding, which infect exposed fish and in turn are eaten by ...

  10. Polarization of immune responses in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegertjes, Geert F.; Wentzel, Annelieke S.; Spaink, Herman P.; Elks, Philip M.; Fink, Inge R.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we support taking polarized immune responses in teleost fish from a 'macrophage first' point of view, a hypothesis that reverts the dichotomous T helper (TH)1 and TH2 driving forces by building on the idea of conservation of innate immune responses in lower

  11. Application of InterPro for the functional classification of the proteins ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... protein sequences against the sequences of other eukaryotes confirms the high representation of eukaryotic protein kinase in the organisms studied. The comparisons also show that, based on InterPro families, the trans-species evolution of MHC class I and II molecules in mammals and teleost fish can be recognized.

  12. Neogene stratigraphy of the Langenboom locality (Noord-Brabant, the Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnker, T.G.; Bor, T.J.; Wesselingh, F.P.; Munsterman, D.K.; Brinkhuis, H.; Burger, A.W.; Vonhof, H.B.; Post, K.; Hoedemakers, K.; Janse, A.C.; Taverne, N.

    2008-01-01

    The locality of Langenboom (eastern Noord-Brabant, the Netherlands), also known as Mill, is famous for its Neogene molluscs, shark teeth, teleost remains, birds and marine mammals. The stratigraphic context of the fossils, which have been collected from sand suppletions, was hitherto poorly

  13. Variations in fixation techniques for field emission SEM and TEM of zebrafish (Branchydanio rerio) embryo inner and outer membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalicharan, D; Jongebloed, WL; Rawson, DM; Zhang, TT

    1998-01-01

    The morphology of embryos of the fresh water teleost, Brachydania rerio (zebrafish), was examined in a parallel FE-SEM/TEM study, after various pre- and post-fixation regimes. Special attention was paid to the chorion, the contents of the peri-vitelline space, the plasma membrane, the syncytial

  14. Salinity ranges of some southern African fish species occurring in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors influencing the tolerance of fishes to low and high salinity regimes are discussed, with most species tolerant of low rather than high salinity conditions. This is important since most systems are subject to periodic freshwater flooding, especially during summer. The penetration of freshwater teleosts and elasmobranchs ...

  15. Molecular evolution of hemoglobins of Antarctic fishes (Notothenioidei)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, W.T.; Beintema, J.J; D Avino, R.; Tamburrini, M.; di Prisco, G.

    1997-01-01

    Amino acid sequences of alpha- and beta-chains of human hemoglobin and of hemoglobins of coelacanth and 24 teleost fish species, including 11 antarctic and two temperate Notothenioidei, were analyzed using maximum parsimony. Trees were derived for the alpha- and beta-chains separately and for

  16. gonads of Cheimerius nufar (Ehrenberg, 1820)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the hermaphroditic fish, Cheimerius nutar are described. The ovo-testis of the immature fish differentiates into ... sexuality, from synchronous hermaphroditism to gonochorism, have been reported for teleosts in ..... Formation of the lipid droplet initiates the pro- cess of nuclear migration in the next stage, when it displaces.

  17. Effects of graded taurine levels on juvenile cobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurine, which has multiple important physiological roles in teleost fish and mammals, is an amino acid not found in alternative protein sources not derived from animals. Although taurine is found in fish-meal-based feeds, its high water solubility leads to lower taurine levels in reduction-process-...

  18. Impaired swim bladder inflation in early-life stage fathead minnows exposed to a deiodinase inhibitor, iopanoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    The thyroid axis plays a critical role in teleost fish development. The present study investigated whether inhibition of deiodinase, the enzyme which converts thyroxine (T4), to the more biologically-active form, 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), would impact inflation of the posteri...

  19. Ontogeny of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) innate immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huttenhuis, B.T.; Taverne-Thiele, J.J.; Grou, C.P.O.; Bergsma, J.; Saeij, J.P.J.; Nakayasu, C.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.

    2006-01-01

    The ontogeny of the teleost innate immune system was studied in carp using cellular, histological and quantitative molecular techniques. Carp myeloid cells first appeared ventro-lateral of the aorta at 2 days post fertilization (the start of hatching), and subsequently around the sinuses of the vena

  20. The diet of the ragged-tooth shark Carcharias taurus Rafinesque ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ragged-tooth shark Carcharias taurus is a large predator of inshore coastal waters in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Born at about 1m long and attaining approximately 3m, stomach content analyses have shown that it feeds largely on teleosts and elasmobranchs, although cephalopods are taken to a lesser extent.

  1. The dusky kob Argyrosomus japonicus is a large sciaenid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    closed ... importance of squid and teleosts, and a concomitant decrease in the importance of crustacea with growth. Feeding frequency and ... It is concluded that A. japonicus is a top predator that influences the pelagic and demersal food chains of ...

  2. Macronutrient-induced differences in food intake relate with hepatic oxidative metabolism and hypothalamic regulatory neuropeptides in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Figueiredo-Silva, A.C.; Subramanian, S.; Schrama, J.W.; Kaushik, S.J.; Geurden, I.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how dietary macronutrient-induced changes in voluntary food intake (FI) relate to changes in markers of hepatic oxidative metabolism and in the expression of FI regulatory neuropeptides in a teleost model, the rainbow trout. Rainbow trout were fed for 6 weeks with one of four

  3. High prevalence of trypanosome co-infections in freshwater fishes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grybchuk-Ieremenko, A.; Losev, A.; Kostygov, A.Y.; Lukeš, Julius; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 6 (2014), s. 495-504 ISSN 0015-5683 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma, * blood parasites * mixed infections * phylogeny * 18S rRNA * teleosts Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.147, year: 2014

  4. Effects of calcium and magnesium hardness on the fertilization and hatching success of channel X blue hybrid catfish eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aquifer used for hybrid catfish hatcheries is less than 10 mg/L of calcium hardness and 1- 25 mg/L of magnesium hardness. Embryonic development is deemed to be the most sensitive stage in the life cycle of a teleost. As egg development takes outside the fish’s body, water hardness is one abioti...

  5. Pheromones and ovarian growth in the African catfish Clarias gariepinus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerd, van J.H.

    1990-01-01

    Pheromones are defined as 'substances which are secreted to the outside by an individual and received by a second individual of the same species, in which they release a specific reaction'. In teleost fish, pheromones play a role in a variety of social interactions. Sex pheromones are

  6. The pattern of trunk lateral line afferents and efferents in the rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, N. A.; Prins, M.; Kroese, A. B.

    1992-01-01

    The primary projections of the mechanosensory posterior lateral line nerve of the rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri, a teleost without lateral line specializations, were studied by applying horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The afferents project nearly exclusively to the nucleus medialis and a small nucleus

  7. Dietary evidence of mesopelagic and pelagic foraging by Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus L.) during autumn migrations to the Iceland Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olafsdottir, Droplaug; MacKenzie, Brian; Chosson-P, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    behavior, and bioenergetics of ABFT. Here, we report the dietary composition of ABFT during autumn migrations to the Iceland Basin south of the continental shelf of Iceland. A total of 36 prey species or higher taxa were observed in 421 stomach samples: 17 teleost fishes, 4 squid, 1 octopus, 12 crustaceans...

  8. USE OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES TO EVALUATE EFFECT OF ENDOGENOUS HORMONES AND A XENOBIOTIC PESTICIDE ON GROWTH OF SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have developed a teleost model to screen physiological effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on somatic growth. Growth is largely controlled by the endocrine system via the growth-hormone releasing hormone (GRF) - growth hormone (GH) - insulin-like growth factor (IG...

  9. Trypanorhynch cestodes are characterized by a tentacular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    Trypanorhynch cestodes are characterized by a tentacular apparatus with four eversible armed tenta- cles and two or four bothridia. In their life cycles, they use small crustaceans as first intermediate hosts and teleosts or other invertebrates such as cephalopo- ds as second intermediate hosts. The occurrence of.

  10. L-rhamnose-binding lectins (RBLs) in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus: characterization and expression profiling in mucosal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhamnose-binding lectins (RBLs) are crucial elements associated with innate immune responses to infections and have been characterized from a variety of teleost fishes. Our previous work highlighted a major role of a RBL (IpRBL1a) in mediating F. columnare adhesion and IpRBL1a showed higher expressi...

  11. beta-adrenoceptors mediate inhibition of lipolysis in adipocytes of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vianen, GJ; Obels, PP; Van Den Thillart, GEEJM; Zaagsma, J

    The regulation of triglyceride mobilization by catecholamines was investigated in the teleost fish Oreochromis mossambicus (tilapia) in vivo and in vitro. In vitro experiments were carried out with adipocytes that were isolated for the first time from fish adipose tissue. For the in vivo

  12. Características morfológicas do miocárdio ventricular de Tambaqui (Colossoma macropomun; Characidae, Cuvier, 1818

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Simões

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The neotropical teleost fish Colossoma macropomun an active swimming species showed cardiac ventricle with pyramidal shape and myocardium with mixed structure. The myocardium presented an outer compact layer and an inner spongy layer whose particular bilaminar structure hitherto has been correlated to swimmer habit as well as to ventricular shape.

  13. Structure and function of the digestive tract of the grasscarp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroband, H.W.J.

    1980-01-01

    CONCLUSIONS

    1. The grasscarp is a stomachless teleost. The intestine does not contain multicellular glands.

    2. The relative length of the grasscarp intestine increases from 0,7 x body length in young larvae to 2 x body length in adults. The gut length is the only morphological

  14. Does the endangered Knysna seahorse, Hippocampus capensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The Knysna seahorse, Hippocampus capensis, is an endangered teleost confined to three South African estuaries. Its abundance within these systems is low and distributions are patchy. Consequently, monitoring population sizes is labour- intensive. The aim of this study was to establish if Knynsa seahorses are ...

  15. Toxicological Evaluation of Ethanol Extract of Adenium obesum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL HORSFALL

    organisms like frogs, molluscs, insect larvae and fish weeds is a common problem in extensive and semi- extensive aquaculture (Edet and Ikpi, 2008). These organisms greatly decrease aquaculture productivity via predation and competition for .... estuarine teleost of mixtures of cadmium, copper and zinc salts. J Fish Biol 5: ...

  16. Publications | Page 235 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cadmium and calcium transport along the gastro-intestinal tract of rainbow trout : more than "gut feelings" on mechanisms of uptake (restricted access). Teleosts take up metals by two ... Recent "green" policies - limited environmental benefits and distorted imports : what should trade policymakers do? (restricted access).

  17. Publications | Page 236 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cadmium and calcium transport along the gastro-intestinal tract of rainbow trout : more than "gut feelings" on mechanisms of uptake (restricted access). Teleosts take up metals by two major pathways: gills and/or gut. Past research is heavily focused on branchial uptake despite evidence that the gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) is ...

  18. Search Results | Page 63 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 621 - 630 of 8519 ... Cadmium and calcium transport along the gastro-intestinal tract of rainbow trout : more than "gut feelings" on mechanisms of uptake. Teleosts take up metals by two major pathways: gills and/or gut. Past research is heavily focused on branchial uptake despite evidence that the gastro-intestinal tract ...

  19. Species composition and recruitment of tidal pool fishes in KwaZulu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fishes occurring in a lower shore tidal pool near Durban, South Africa, were collected using rotenone at monthly intervals for a year. Eighteen teleost families and 50 lower taxa of fishes were recorded. Cryptic Tripterygiidae, Blenniidae and Gobiidae were particularly abundant while Pomacentridae, Acanthuridae, ...

  20. Predatory pelagic fishes of the Bijagós Archipelago (Guinea-Bissau ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied the feeding ecology of the Crevalle jack Caranx hippos, West African Spanish mackerel Scomberomorus tritor and Guinean barracuda Sphyraena afra in the Bijagós Archipelago, Guinea-Bissau. These are the most abundant pelagic predatory teleost fishes in the area, but little is known about their ecology ...