WorldWideScience

Sample records for telecommuting

  1. Telecommuters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Matthew

    2000-01-01

    Describes telecommuting, which occurs whenever an employee is paid for work done at an alternate worksite and total commuting time is thereby reduced. Discusses the pros and cons and examines the characteristics that make jobs and people suitable for telecommuting. Includes a self-assessment to determine whether telecommuting is a good option.…

  2. Tracking telecommuting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stastny, P.

    2007-03-15

    Many employees are now choosing to work from home using laptops and telephones. Employers in the oil and gas industry are now reaping a number of benefits from their telecommuting employees, including increased productivity; higher levels of employee satisfaction, and less absenteeism. Providing a telecommunication option can prove to be advantageous for employers wishing to hire or retain employees. Telecommuting may also help to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This article provided details of Teletrips Inc., a company that aids in the production of corporate social responsibility reports. Teletrips provides reports that document employee savings in time, vehicle depreciation maintenance, and gasoline costs. Teletrips currently tracks 12 companies in Calgary, and plans to grow through the development of key technology partnerships. The company is also working with the federal government to provide their clients with emission trading credits, and has forged a memorandum of understanding with the British Columbia government for tracking emissions. Calgary now openly supports telecommuting and is encouraging businesses in the city to adopt telecommuting on a larger scale. It was concluded that the expanding needs for road infrastructure and the energy used by cars to move workers in and out of the city are a massive burden to the city's tax base. 1 fig.

  3. The Future of Telecommuting

    OpenAIRE

    Handy, Susan; Mokhtarian, Patricia

    1996-01-01

    Interest in telecommuting is growing among workers, employers, transportation planners, communities, the telecommunications industry, and others. But actual levels of telecommuting appear to be increasing slowly, although there is little reliable data on trends. The future of telecommuting depends on whether employers provide the opportunity to telecommute and whether workers take advantage of this opportunity; government policies can encourage both. This article addresses that future by outl...

  4. Beyond telecommuting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loken, S.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Niles, J. [Global Telematics, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Although there has been considerable discussion about how telecommunications will affect the demand for transportation, most studies have focused on substituting telecommunications for transportation. For example, telephone and video conferencing can replace travel for meetings; electronic mail can replace postal service. More importantly, people can telecommute part-time or full- time using telecommunications instead of traveling to work. There are many other examples of reducing or eliminating travel by telecommunicating, but what may not be obvious is how telecommunications stimulates travel. As the volume of telecommunications traffic increases, travel has been stimulated in a number of important ways. Increased telecommunications has fostered economic growth that has, in turn, increased travel. With increased use of telecommunications, people move farther apart so economic and social trips become, on the average, longer. to ensure that society continues to benefit from this stimulation, the government will have to devote considerable attention to developing the telecommunications infrastructure and to supporting appropriate telecommunications policy. In particular, governments must learn to allocate resources and attention reasonably to ensure that systems support economic and social growth.

  5. How Telecommuting Transforms Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hequet, Marc

    1994-01-01

    Looks at the advantages--increased productivity and compliance with federal clean air regulations--and disadvantages--cost of setting up telecommunications and distractions at home--of telecommuting and the management issues involved. Offers suggestions for setting up a telecommuting program. (JOW)

  6. TDM Status Report - Telecommuting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Experience with telecommuting suggests it can be an effective strategy for : reducing commuter traffic. However, home based and satellite strategies deserve : careful planning, assessment and evaluation in future applications. Specific : effectivenes...

  7. Telecommuting. Factors to consider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arruda, K A

    2001-10-01

    1. Telecommuting is a work arrangement in which employees work part time or full time from their homes or smaller telework centers. They communicate with employers via computer. 2. Telecommuting can raise legal issues for companies. Can telecommuting be considered a reasonable accommodation under the Americans With Disabilities Act? When at home, is a worker injured within the course and scope of their employment for purposes of workers' compensation? 3. Occupational and environmental health nurses may need to alter existing programs to meet the distinct needs of telecommuters. Often, there are ergonomic issues and home office safety issues which are not of concern to other employees. Additionally, occupational and environmental health nurses may have to offer programs in new formats (e.g., Internet or Intranet programs) to effectively communicate with teleworkers.

  8. Telecommuting: The Wired Worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilles, Jack M.

    1982-01-01

    Examines the use of home computers and how they allow the worker to work at home rather than commuting. Discusses the growing trend of telecommuting, cost of operation, how it will affect company structure, and productivity. (CT)

  9. Telecommuting: stress and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, J T; Smith, A L; Wood, D L

    1994-06-01

    Occupational stress and social support were measured in adults, 15 working as telecommuters, 9 working at home, and 14 working in a company office. Analysis showed telecommuters and office workers perceived more support than those working at home. Telecommuters also reported less stress and a stronger preference for this new work option.

  10. Telecommuting in the Federal Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-01

    goals that the organization sought to accomplish with telecommuting programs, such as reduced absenteeism or increased sales. Further, he...allowing SWDIV to keep a greater portion of its corporate knowledge base. 2. Reduced Absenteeism Another key benefit of telecommuting to organizations...that employee absenteeism can be reduced by up to 45% under telecommuting arrangements, SWDIV could realistically assume that it would achieve similar

  11. Telecommuting in the Federal Workforce

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morrow, Lora

    2001-01-01

    ... arrangements for civilian employees. Telecommuting goals include the ability to attract and retain the highest caliber employees, increase employee morale, and enable employees to obtain a better balance between work and family...

  12. Telecommuting in the Federal Workforce

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, Lora E.

    2001-01-01

    One of President Clinton’s family-friendly initiatives includes PL 106-346, which requires Executive agencies and departments to aggressively develop, implement, and encourage telecommuting arrangements for civilian employees. Telecommuting goals include the ability to attract and retain the highest caliber employees, increase employee morale, and enable employees to obtain a better balance between work and family. This research determines if the successes realized and lessons learned i...

  13. Initial investigation and comparative analysis of telecommuting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Currently, there is a limited encouragement from the management on awareness and benefits of telecommuting shared to the employer, employees, and organization. ... Keywords: Industrial Revolution 4.0; telecommuting; work life balance; ...

  14. Telecommuting: Implications for Business Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmquist, Donna; Risk, Shirley

    1991-01-01

    Advantages to telecommuting are flexibility, control, productivity, morale, quality of life, and, for employers, access to a wider skill pool. Disadvantages are frustration, isolation, sweatshop potential, and resentment of co-workers. Business education should emphasize keyboarding, telecommunications, time management, and communication skills in…

  15. Telecommuting resistance, soft but strong: Development of telecommuting over time, and related rhetoric, in three organisations

    OpenAIRE

    Rognes, Jon

    2002-01-01

    Telecommuting, or working part of the time from another location than the office, normally from home, has been tried by several organisations in the recent years. This has not always been a success. Still, many arguments in favour of telecommuting are forwarded by previous studies. This paper investigates the development of telecommuting in three organisations, and elaborates on mechanisms behind the fact that the practice of telecommuting has not been as widespread as expected. The study is ...

  16. TELECOMMUTING: Overview of Challenges Facing Federal Agencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    RObertson, Robert

    2001-01-01

    .... Last spring, the House Majority Leader asked us to identify potential regulatory, tax, and liability barriers that concern private sector employers considering telecommuting programs for their employees...

  17. Development and Implementation of a Telecommuting Evaluation Framework, and Modeling the Executive Telecommuting Adoption Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, V. P.; Mahmassani, H. S.

    2002-02-01

    This work proposes and implements a comprehensive evaluation framework to document the telecommuter, organizational, and societal impacts of telecommuting through telecommuting programs. Evaluation processes and materials within the outlined framework are also proposed and implemented. As the first component of the evaluation process, the executive survey is administered within a public sector agency. The survey data is examined through exploratory analysis and is compared to a previous survey of private sector executives. The ordinal probit, dynamic probit, and dynamic generalized ordinal probit (DGOP) models of telecommuting adoption are calibrated to identify factors which significantly influence executive adoption preferences and to test the robustness of such factors. The public sector DGOP model of executive willingness to support telecommuting under different program scenarios is compared with an equivalent private sector DGOP model. Through the telecommuting program, a case study of telecommuting travel impacts is performed to further substantiate research.

  18. Relationships between Telecommuting Workers and Their Managers: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinsch, N. Lamar, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Finds that telecommuters, in interviews, consistently reported that telecommuting had been a success with few disadvantages, whereas questionnaire results suggest that the relationship between the telecommuter and his or her manager may deteriorate after an initial "honeymoon" phase has passed. Suggests that age and sex may affect a telecommuter's…

  19. The management issues of implementing telecommuting: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Bane, Chuck Howard, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This thesis is a case study of the implementation of telecommuting by CalComp at the Telecommuting Workcenter of Riverside County and is a real life example of the management issues that surround telecommuting. The issues brought forth in this study will enable those responsible for implementing a telecommuting program to better understand the impact of this change on their organization and how a telecommuting center may be used in th...

  20. Telecommuters: the work force of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancer, D A; Moe, J K

    1995-01-01

    Telecommuters are the work force of the future. The dawning of the information age, with its explosion of telecommunication technology, presents new opportunities for healthcare agencies to extend their borders far beyond traditional physical boundaries. The virtual workplace can become a reality and position healthcare agencies to be geographically dispersed throughout their community. The authors describe a pioneering effort to use telecommunications to retain a valuable employee and create a healthcare agency's first virtual workplace. Strategies for success in telecommuting also are provided from both the telecommuter's and the manager's viewpoints.

  1. The Rebound Effect: A Simulation Model of Telecommuting

    OpenAIRE

    Reitan, Fredrik Aadne

    2014-01-01

    This thesis aims to highlight the relationship between telecommuting and the rebound effect with respect to greenhouse gas emissions. This was done by gathering and analyzing the latest research from various fields that could provide information about telecommuting and the rebound effect. By surveying these fields, an informative and well-documented framework for modeling telecommuting and the rebound effect was made possible. The simulation model simulated the adoption of telecommuting in Lo...

  2. The Effectiveness of Telecommuting as a Transportation Control Measure

    OpenAIRE

    Sampath, Srikanth; Saxena, Somitra; Mokhtarian, Patricia L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the potential of telecommuting as a strategy for managing travel demand. In particular, the paper focuses on the travel and air quality implications of telecommuting. A study of travel impacts has been carried out using data obtained from the State of California Telecommuting Pilot Project. This paper presents preliminary findings from the first known empirical study of the emission impacts of telecommuting. Previously-reported travel-related findings include sign...

  3. 48 CFR 307.108-70 - Telecommuting of contractor employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Telecommuting of... Telecommuting of contractor employees. (a) SOWs/PWSs shall permit offerors or contractors to specify their own... telecommuting) for any part of an SOW/PWS, after determining that the work or any portion thereof must be...

  4. 48 CFR 7.108 - Additional requirements for telecommuting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... for telecommuting. 7.108 Section 7.108 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... telecommuting. In accordance with section 1428 of Public Law 108-136, an agency shall generally not discourage a... the agency, including security requirements, cannot be met if telecommuting is permitted. The...

  5. Security Concerns in Telecommuting within the Information Technology Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chithambo, Loyce Maosa

    2011-01-01

    Since the availability of remote access technology, most companies have adopted telecommuting as part of business operations. Although some research has identified policies and procedures when individuals telecommute, limited research exists about existing policies and procedures for telecommuters. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive…

  6. Implications of Telecommuting in a Library Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meglio, Delores

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of telecommuting possibilities focuses on a program at Information Access Company that allows indexers and abstractors to work at home. Employer and employee expectations are discussed, equipment provisions are described, employee benefits are examined, and implications for the library environment are suggested. (LRW)

  7. Contextual factors and contingent reward leadership: employer adoption of telecommuting

    OpenAIRE

    MARGARITA MAYO; JUAN CARLOS PASTOR; LUIS GOMEZ - MEJIA; CRISTINA CRUZ

    2008-01-01

    Using a contingency perspective, this paper examines the conditions under which telecommuting is most likely to be adopted with data obtained from a sample of 122 CEOs. We hypothesized that telecommuting fits better in younger organizations, firms with a higher proportion of women and international employees in workforce, and companies that offer variable pay. We found evidence that confirm the prediction that telecommuting, a high proportion of international employees, and the use of variabl...

  8. An Evaluation of Telecommuting As a Trip Reduction Measure

    OpenAIRE

    Kitamura, Ryuichi; Mokhtarian, Patricia L.; Pendyala, Ram M.

    1991-01-01

    Telecommuting, which is the performance of work at home or at a center close to home using telecommunications, has attracted growing interest among planners and researchers as a strategy for reducing traveldemand. This paper investigates the potential of telecommuting as a trip reduction measure, using data obtained from a telecommuting pilot project involving State of California government employees. In this pilot project, a three-day trip diary was administered, before and after te...

  9. The Effects of Telecommuting Intensity on Employee Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Rachel Mosher; Benevent, Richele; Schulte, Patricia; Rinehart, Christine; Crighton, K Andrew; Corcoran, Maureen

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the influence of the intensity of telecommuting on employee health. Study design comprised a longitudinal analysis of employee demographic data, medical claims, health risk assessment data, and remote connectivity hours. Data from Prudential Financial served as the setting. Active employees ages 18 to 64 years who completed the health risk assessment between 2010 and 2011 were the study subjects. Measures included telecommuting status and intensity, and eight indicators of health risk status (obesity, depression, stress, tobacco use, alcohol abuse, poor nutrition, physical inactivity, and an overall risk measure), with employee age, sex, race-ethnicity, job grade, management status, and work location as control variables. Health risks were determined for nontelecommuters and telecommuters working remotely ≤8, 9 to 32, 33 to 72, and ≥73 hours per month. Longitudinal models for each health risk were estimated, controlling for demographic and job characteristics. Telecommuting health risks varied by telecommuting intensity. Nontelecommuters were at greater risk for obesity, alcohol abuse, physical inactivity, and tobacco use, and were at greater overall risk than at least one of the telecommuting groups. Employees who telecommuted ≤8 hours per month were significantly less likely than nontelecommuters to experience depression. There was no association between telecommuting and stress or nutrition. Results suggest that employees may benefit from telecommuting opportunities. © 2016 by American Journal of Health Promotion, Inc.

  10. Oceanographic Telecommuting: Going to Sea Virtually

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Deborah K.; Lemmond, Peter

    2005-09-01

    Oceanography in the 21st century is on the verge of changing the way it does business. Telecommuting from office to sea is about to make the same impact as telecommuting between home and the office did 20 years ago. A recent geophysical survey highlighted the role that telecommuting will soon play in ocean research. In June 2005, R/V Knorr was in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean conducting a geophysical survey of a region centered at 13°N along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in the general area of the diffuse triple junction between the North America (NA),Africa (AF), and South America (SA) plates. This region is particularly notable because of a unique zone of seismicity that occurs ~70 km west of the ridge axis between 14°20'N and 12°50'N.The survey conducted on this cruise (KN182-3) was a first step toward understanding how slow spreading lithosphere is deforming in the NA-SA-AF triple junction region.

  11. Telecommuting from an Electronic Cottage: Negotiating Potholes and Toll Booths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craumer, Pat; Marshall, Lucy

    1997-01-01

    Though telecommuting has been found to increase employee productivity as much as 20%, not all employers and workers embrace the concept. This article examines the pros and cons of telecommuting by presenting case studies of remote employment and a self-owned business. Provides a bibliography of print and nonprint resources for remote working and a…

  12. Selected Communication Variables and Telecommuting Participation Decisions: Data from Telecommuting Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinsch, N. Lamar, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Shows that relationship duration (in a vignette describing a manager and an employee) significantly affected whether respondents thought the employee should telecommute; and that managerial reaction to criticism and managerial loyalty significantly affected forecasts of the worker's and manager's working together successfully. Suggests that…

  13. Characteristics That Differentiate Telecommuting from Non-Telecommuting Professionals in the Quality Assurance and Quality Control Arena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claybon, Tina S.

    2013-01-01

    The interest in working from home in contrast to going to an office continues to be a growing phenomenon. This research examined personal characteristics of telecommuters and non-telecommuters including age, gender, years of working for the organization, and job satisfaction in the quality control and quality assurance arena. This study aimed to…

  14. Impact of Telecommuting on Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Household Travel

    OpenAIRE

    Pendyala, Ram M.; Goulias, Konstandinos G.; Kitamura, Ryuichi

    1992-01-01

    A spatial and temporal analysis of travel diary data collected during the State of California Telecommuting Pilot project is performed to determine the impacts of telecommuting on household travel behavior. The analysis is based on geocoded trip data where missing trips and trip attributes have been augmented to the extent possible. The results confirm the earlier finding that the Pilot Project telecommuters substantially reduced travel; on telecommuting days, the telecommuters made virtually...

  15. Minnesota urban partnership agreement national evaluation : telecommuting test plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-17

    This report presents the telecommuting test plan for the Minnesota Urban Partnership Agreement (UPA) under the United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) UPA Program. The Minnesota UPA projects focus on reducing congestion by employing str...

  16. A Theoretical Synthesis of Telecommuting and Incidence of Family Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Watson Frank

    2000-01-01

    The rapid advancement of computer and telecommunications technology has made working in the home a practicality. Dubbed ?telecommuting,? this manner of work describes a circumstance where the employee, through the use of some form of telecommunications device (most often a computer with some form of modem), works at a location other than a centralized office (Hill, Hawkings & Miller, 1996). In many cases, the location of work is the home. Current estimates place the number of telecommuters ...

  17. Energy, emissions, and social consequences of telecommuting. Technical Report One

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    By reducing transportation use, telecommuting can help reduce some of the social costs of travel (traffic congestion, time lost, emissions, dependence on imported fuels, accident deaths and property damage). These positive direct effects will be both offset and supplemented by indirect effects of telecommuting: improved traffic flow, latent demand (people will start driving more), and increased urban sprawl. The study indicates that the energy and emissions benefits of telecommuting are not likely to be entirely offset by latent travel demand or by the geographical expansion of cities; perhaps half the potential reduction in vehicle-miles traveled will be replaced by new traffic. From a fuel-use perspective, the indirect benefit of lower average emissions and fuel consumption rates appears sufficient to offset impacts from the third indirect effect, additional travel brought about by increased suburbanization. Substantial levels of telecommuting will also reduce the need for highway capacity expansion, saving capital, maintenance, and urban land. Telecommuting and its benefits will be concentrated in the largest, most congested, and most polluted urban areas (20--25% in the NYC and LA areas; 50% in the 10 largest cities; 90% in the 75 largest).Telecommuting may also have a synergistic beneficial effect on other transportation strategies, e.g., congestion pricing, parking fees, taxes discouraging travel during peak periods, etc. Other beneficial effects may include greater presence of adults at home and on residential communities. Effects of improved telecommunications technology on transportation, freight, economy, industrial operations are discussed, including implications of an ``information superhighway.``

  18. Arahan Intensitas Pemanfaatan Ruang Perdagangan Jasa Berdasarkan Peluang Telecommuting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariyaningsih Ariyaningsih

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Pergerakan bekerja dari kawasan perumahan menuju pusat kota yang umumnya didominasi kegiatan perdagangan jasa, menyebabkan arus kendaraan meningkat pada jam-jam puncak. Sementara perkembangan dunia teknologi dan informasi memberikan peluang bagi para pekerja di bidang jasa untuk mengurangi pergerakannya dengan menerapkan telecommuting, di mana para pekerja menggantikan pergerakannya dengan bekerja dari rumah atau tempat lain dengan memanfaatkan teknologi komunikasi dan informasi. Analisis yang digunakan adalah analisis crosstab dan chi-square untuk menguji variabel-variabel yang mempengaruhi preferensi pekerja dalam melakukan telecommuting. Sedangkan untuk mendapatkan peluang telecommuting mengunakan metode peramalan telecommuting yang ditemukan oleh Mokhtarian (1996 [2]. Hasil dari peluang tersebut nantinya akan direpresentasikan dalam jumlah penurunan pergerakan bekerja yang secara langsung mengurangi volume kendaraan di Mayjen Sungkono. Penelitian ini menghasilkan peluang telecommuting sebesar 9,9% - 42,95% dari total pergerakan pekerja. Dari simulasi telecommuting tersebut didapatkan peningkatan DS dari 0,96 menjadi 0,87. Namun ini belum memenuhi kriteria jalan arteri sekunder. Maka dibuatlah dua skenario. Skenario pertama dengan DS 0,7 menghasilkan trip ceiling 529,1 smp/hari. Skenario kedua dengan DS 0,79 menghasilkan trip ceiling 1437,92 smp/jam. Untuk arahan pemanfaatan ruang dapat digunakan penerapan corridor system building untuk masing-masing luas lantai. Jika luas eksisting melebihi dari trip ceiling, maka arahan diberlakukan untuk bangunan baru atau alih fungsi lahan.

  19. Telecommuting Academics Within an Open Distance Education Environment of South Africa: More Content, Productive, and Healthy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deon Harold Tustin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Outside an academic setting, telecommuting has become fairly popular in recent years. However, research on telecommuting practices within a higher education environment is fairly sparse, especially within the higher distance education sphere. Drawing on existing literature on telecommuting and the outcome of a valuation study on the success of an experimental telecommuting programme at the largest distance education institution in South Africa, this article presents discerning findings on telecommuting practices. In fact, the research builds on evolutionary telecommuting assessment methods of the direct or indirect effect (work based and affective impact (emotional on multiple stakeholder groups. This holistic approach allowed for comparative analysis between telecommuting and nontelecommuting academics with regard to the impact of telecommuting practices. The research reveals high levels of support for telecommuting practices that are associated with high levels of work productivity and satisfaction, lower levels of emotional and physical fatigue, and reduced work stress, frustration, and overload. The study also reveals higher levels of student satisfaction with academic support from telecommuters than nontelecommuters. Overall, the critique presents insightful findings on telecommuting practices within an academic setting, which clearly signal a potential for a shift in the office culture of higher distance education institutions in the years to come. The study makes a significant contribution to a limited collection of empirical research on telecommuting practices within the higher distance education sector and guides institutions in refining and/or redefining future telecommuting strategies or programmes.

  20. Personality Traits of White-Collar Telecommuters: Perceptions of Graduating Business Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomo-David, Ewuuk; Griffin, Frank

    2001-01-01

    Business students (n=730) identified traits they perceived important for successful telecommuters. Independence, honesty, dependability, resourcefulness, initiative, and ethical behavior were most highly rated. Reinforcement of these traits to prepare for telecommuting was recommended. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  1. Successful telecommuting program in the public and private sectors : report to Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Telecommuting encompasses a variety of non-traditional work arrangements that move work to people, rather than people to work. Recent interest in telecommuting on the part of businesses, public agencies, employees, and policy makers has been generate...

  2. The Impact of Gender, Occupation, and Presence of Children on Telecommuting Motivations and Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhtarian, Patricia L.; Bagley, Michael N.; Salomon, Ilan

    1998-01-01

    Accurate forecasts of the adoption and impacts of telecommuting depend on an understanding of what motivates individuals to adopt telecommuting and what constraints prevent them from doing so, since these motivations and constraints offer insight into who is likely to telecommute under what circumstances. Telecommuting motivations and constraints are likely to differ by various segments of society. In this study, we analyze differences in these variables due to gender, occupation, and presenc...

  3. Telecommuting Academics Within an Open Distance Education Environment of South Africa: More Content, Productive, and Healthy?

    OpenAIRE

    Deon Harold Tustin

    2014-01-01

    Outside an academic setting, telecommuting has become fairly popular in recent years. However, research on telecommuting practices within a higher education environment is fairly sparse, especially within the higher distance education sphere. Drawing on existing literature on telecommuting and the outcome of a valuation study on the success of an experimental telecommuting programme at the largest distance education institution in South Africa, this article presents discerning findings on tel...

  4. Telecommuting in the 21st Century: An Examination of Managerial Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broman, Noel C.

    2014-01-01

    Telecommuting has become a strategic benefit for modern companies to lower costs and to improve productivity and efficiency. People in industries such as information technology consider telecommuting to be acceptable work practice. Telecommuting provides many benefits for some organizations. In this study, the researcher examined whether there are…

  5. Telecommuting Academics within an Open Distance Education Environment of South Africa: More Content, Productive, and Healthy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tustin, Deon Harold

    2014-01-01

    Outside an academic setting, telecommuting has become fairly popular in recent years. However, research on telecommuting practices within a higher education environment is fairly sparse, especially within the higher distance education sphere. Drawing on existing literature on telecommuting and the outcome of a valuation study on the success of an…

  6. Analyzing the preference for non-exclusive forms of telecommuting: Modeling and policy implications

    OpenAIRE

    Bagley, Michael N.; Mokhtarian, Patricia L.

    1997-01-01

    This study examines three models of the individual’s preference for home- and center-based telecommuting. Issues concerning the estimation of discrete models when the alternatives are non-exclusive are discussed. Two binary logit models are presented, one on the preference to telecommute from a center versus not telecommuting from a center (adjusted p2 = 0.24), and the other on the preference to telecommute from a center over telecommuting from home (adjusted 2 =0.64). A nested logit model is...

  7. Telecommuting (Work-At-Home) at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinidhi, Saragur M.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents a study in evaluating the viability of providing a work-at-home (telecommuting) program for Lewis Research Center's corporate employees using Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN). Case studies have been presented for a range of applications from casual data access to interactive access. The network performance of telemedia applications were studied against future requirements for such level of remote connectivity. Many of the popular ISDN devices were characterized for network and service functionality. A set of recommendations to develop a telecommuting policy have been proposed.

  8. The home-work balance of telecommuters: ten years after

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casimir, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2001, my doctoral dissertation on the impact of telecommuting on the division of labour in the domestic setting ended with the notion that boundaries between work and home are increasingly blurred. In this study, I investigated if this trend actually took place, by means of an analysis of

  9. Telecommuting to Work: Using Technology to Work at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Richard E.; Hartman, Susan

    1984-01-01

    Describes experience of Boulder Public Library, where management and support personnel established pre-experiment baseline data for comparison with quantitative and qualitative results of experiment to determine the impact of telecommuting (work-at-home) on worker productivity. Background, methodology, equipment enhancements, and data analysis are…

  10. Telecommuting for Original Cataloging at the Michigan State University Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Leah; Hyslop, Colleen

    1995-01-01

    Working conditions in library technical services departments can be a problem for catalogers in need of a quiet work environment. Based on a successful program for indexers at the National Agriculture Library, a proposal for an experimental telecommuting program for original cataloging at the Michigan State University Libraries was developed and…

  11. Organizational Perceptions of Telecommuting in the Private Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galusha, Repps J.

    2011-01-01

    The Internet has provided more organizations the opportunity to adopt telecommuting as a means to recruit and retain employees, boost productivity, and trim facility costs. This study expands on the work of a previous study by Hoang, Nickerson, Beckman, and Eng, in 2008 which found that private organizations, due to perceptions of organizational…

  12. El teletrabajo como tendencia del mercado laboral / Telecommuting as a labor market tendency

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Sánchez, Rebeca

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with telecommuting as the last transition of the work environment, through the history of economic thought. It is analyzed from different key aspects such as, its conceptualization and proposal for classification, workers rights, motivation, and telecommuting workers’ profiles, as well as areas of application. Telecommuting is a labor market tendency that is currently transforming the idea that humans need to leave home and move physically to a place of work;...

  13. An Analysis of Engagement of Those Who Telecommute vs Those Who Do Not

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    began the telework arrangement (Strum, 2002). This would help to reduce turnover and absenteeism . What Are the Pitfalls of Telecommuting ...AIR APPR AN ANALYSIS OF ENGAGEMENT OF THOSE WHO TELECOMMUTE VS. THOSE WHO DO NOT THESIS Daniel J. Boeh, Captain, USAF AFIT/GAQ...Analysis of Engagement of Those Who Telecommute vs. Those Who Do Not THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Systems and

  14. Security for Telecommuting and Broadband Communications: Recommendations of the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuhn, D

    2002-01-01

    This document is intended to assist those responsible - users, system administrators, and management - for telecommuting security, by providing introductory information about broadband communication...

  15. A framework for providing telecommuting as a reasonable accommodation: some considerations on a comparative case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Shelley; Weiss, Sally; Moon, Nathan W; Baker, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Telecommuting, whether full time, part time, or over short periods when the need arises, can be an important accommodation for employees with disabilities. Indeed, telecommuting may be the only form of accommodation that offers employees whose disabilities fluctuate a means to stay consistently and gainfully employed. This article describes one employer's experience in considering a request for telecommuting as a reasonable accommodation for a particular employee. Drawing on real-life examples, both positive and negative, this article provides a win/win framework for decision-making that can help employers evaluate the use of telecommuting as a possible accommodation and facilitates open and ongoing communication between employer and employee.

  16. The telecommuting and the contact center’s quality life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas de Biasi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The conditions  and  the habits  of  a person can implicate  in her  health  and  productivity  at the job. This affirmation  is  more significant in  high stress  professions  like  contact  center’s  agent. This paper analyzes the work at home, or telecommuting, and its contribution to enterprise’s quality of work life and productivity improve. A quantitative research with a great national con-tact center company proves the telecommuting workability  for  the  regularization  of  basic  as-pects of workers life.

  17. The telecommuting and the contact center’s quality life

    OpenAIRE

    Pera, Fábio Augusto; Biasi, Douglas de

    2007-01-01

    The conditions  and  the habits  of  a person can implicate  in her  health  and  productivity  at the job. This affirmation  is  more significant in  high stress  professions  like  contact  center’s  agent. This paper analyzes the work at home, or telecommuting, and its contribution to enterprise’s quality of work life and productivity improve. A quantitative research with a great national con-tact center company proves the telecommuting workability  for  the  regularization  of  basic  as-...

  18. Telecommuting: Occupational health considerations for employee health and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, M L

    2000-06-01

    1. Information technology has moved "work" out of a centralized location. Employees who telecommute pose significant challenges and considerations for the practice of occupational health nursing. 2. Employer and employee benefits associated with telecommuting are reportedly associated with high levels of job satisfaction. However, the occupational health and safety risks of this new work environment need to be fully assessed and understood. 3. The ergonomic controls to minimize the risk of repetitive motion injuries are the same for both office and home locations. Additional attention need to be paid to implementing risk controls for other physical hazards and psychosocial considerations, as well as personal safety and security issues. 4. The scope of occupational health nursing practice needs to remain dynamic, recognizing the impact new technologies have on the workplace, to continue to meet the needs of the changing workplace.

  19. Adoption of Telecommuting in Two California State Agencies

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhtarian, Patricia L.; Salomon, Ilan; Saxena, Somitra; Sampath, Srikanth; Cheung, Peter; Le, Kate; Bagley, Michael

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents results from the field test of a survey designed to collect data on the individual decision to telecommute. The field test was conducted primarily to assess whether a cover letter from the employer would induce a response bias. The survey was administered with two cover letters to the Sacramento-based Franchise Tax Board (FTB) and the San Francisco-based Public Utilities Commission (PUC). The cover letter type had a small (insignificant) impact on the response rate, but...

  1. How Effective Is Telecommuting? Assessing the Status of Our Scientific Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Tammy D; Golden, Timothy D; Shockley, Kristen M

    2015-10-01

    Telecommuting has become an increasingly popular work mode that has generated significant interest from scholars and practitioners alike. With recent advances in technology that enable mobile connections at ever-affordable rates, working away from the office as a telecommuter has become increasingly available to many workers around the world. Since the term telecommuting was first coined in the 1970s, scholars and practitioners have debated the merits of working away from the office, as it represents a fundamental shift in how organizations have historically done business. Complicating efforts to truly understand the implications of telecommuting have been the widely varying definitions and conceptualizations of telecommuting and the diverse fields in which research has taken place.Our objective in this article is to review existing research on telecommuting in an effort to better understand what we as a scientific community know about telecommuting and its implications. In so doing, we aim to bring to the surface some of the intricacies associated with telecommuting research so that we may shed insights into the debate regarding telecommuting's benefits and drawbacks. We attempt to sift through the divergent and at times conflicting literature to develop an overall sense of the status of our scientific findings, in an effort to identify not only what we know and what we think we know about telecommuting, but also what we must yet learn to fully understand this increasingly important work mode.After a brief review of the history of telecommuting and its prevalence, we begin by discussing the definitional challenges inherent within existing literature and offer a comprehensive definition of telecommuting rooted in existing research. Our review starts by highlighting the need to interpret existing findings with an understanding of how the extent of telecommuting practiced by participants in a study is likely to alter conclusions that may be drawn. We then review

  2. Telecommuting, Control, and Boundary Management: Correlates of Policy Use and Practice, Job Control, and Work-Family Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Lautsch, Brenda A.; Eaton, Susan C.

    2006-01-01

    We examine professionals' use of telecommuting, perceptions of psychological job control, and boundary management strategies. We contend that work-family research should distinguish between descriptions of flexibility use (formal telecommuting policy user, amount of telecommuting practiced) and how the individual psychologically experiences…

  3. Technology Enabled Work: The Role of Self-Efficacy in Determining Telecommuter Adjustment and Structuring Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuram, Sumita; Wiesenfeld, Batia; Garud, Raghu

    2003-01-01

    Responses from 31.5% of 723 telecommuters revealed a positive association between self-efficacy and both adjustment to teleworking and behaviors for structuring work. The more extensive the telecommuting, the stronger these positive relationships. Women were more proactive in structuring work behavior. (Contains 43 references.) (SK)

  4. The Impact of Gender, Occupation, and Presence of Children on Telecommuting Motivations and Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtarian, Patricia L.; Bagley, Michael N.; Salomon, Ilan

    1998-01-01

    Discussion of telecommuting motivations and constraints focuses on a study that analyzed differences in variables due to gender, occupation, and presence of children for 583 employees of the city of San Diego. Research hypotheses are discussed, and implications for forming policies to support telecommuting are suggested. (Author/LRW)

  5. The good, the bad, and the unknown about telecommuting: meta-analysis of psychological mediators and individual consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajendran, Ravi S; Harrison, David A

    2007-11-01

    What are the positive and negative consequences of telecommuting? How do these consequences come about? When are these consequences more or less potent? The authors answer these questions through construction of a theoretical framework and meta-analysis of 46 studies in natural settings involving 12,883 employees. Telecommuting had small but mainly beneficial effects on proximal outcomes, such as perceived autonomy and (lower) work-family conflict. Importantly, telecommuting had no generally detrimental effects on the quality of workplace relationships. Telecommuting also had beneficial effects on more distal outcomes, such as job satisfaction, performance, turnover intent, and role stress. These beneficial consequences appeared to be at least partially mediated by perceived autonomy. Also, high-intensity telecommuting (more than 2.5 days a week) accentuated telecommuting's beneficial effects on work-family conflict but harmed relationships with coworkers. Results provide building blocks for a more complete theoretical and practical treatment of telecommuting. (c) 2007 APA

  6. Research on the Current Telecommuting Trends in United States and European Union Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Georgiana PICU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the context of globalization and due to the accelerated progress made in information and communication technology, more and more companies offer their employees the option of telecommuting. For the past twenty years, telecommuting has been on an asceding trend, an incresing number of people embracing the ability to work from home, using a computer and internet connection to communicate for their jobs. The goal of the paper is to explain the overall notion of telecommuting and to analyze the current trends in the United States and European Union markets. Another objective is to assess the advantages and disadvantages of telecommuting and the important role played by this concept within the striving purpose of corporations to achieve their strategic targets. The study is based upon specialized literature reviews regarding the emergence of telecommuting and the role it plays in organizations. A comparative analysis was conducted by the authors on two regional markets, United States and the European Union, in order to assess the trend in telecommuting and the factors that influence it. The outcome of the research shows that although the benefits of telecommuting are numerous, it does not come without challenges, both being applicable for both the employer, as well as for the employee. The research results of this study can be used by organizations when considering to offer their employees flexible work opportunities which can positively influence the long term business performance.

  7. Security for Telecommuting and Broadband Communications: Recommendations of the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, D. R.; Tracy, Miles C.; Frankel, Sheila E.

    2002-08-01

    This document is intended to assist those responsible - users, system administrators, and management - for telecommuting security, by providing introductory information about broadband communication security and policy, security of home office systems, and considerations for system administrators in the central office. It addresses concepts relating to the selection, deployment, and management of broadband communications for a telecommuting user. This document is not intended to provide a mandatory framework for telecommuting or home office broadband communication environments, but rather to present suggested approaches to the topic.

  8. An Analysis of Engagement of Those Who Telecommute vs Those Who Do Not

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boeh, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    .... The public sector, however, has been slow to implement telecommuting programs. Buckingham and Coffman of the Gallup Organization have done extensive research into what they call "engagement," and as to what comprises an engaged employee...

  9. Travel Diary-Based Emissions Analysis of Telecommuting for the Puget Sound Demonstration Project

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Dennis K; Koenig, Brett E; Mokhtarian, Patricia L

    1994-01-01

    Transportation control measures are often implemented for their environmental benefits, but there is a need to quantify what benefits actually occur. Telecommuting has the potential to reduce the number of daily trips and miles traveled with personal vehicles and consequently, the overall emissions resulting from vehicle activity. This research, sponsored by the Washington State Energy Office (WSEO), studies the emissions impacts of telecommuting for the participants of the Puget Sound Teleco...

  10. Using Travel Diary Data to Estimate the Emissions Impacts of Transportation Strategies: The Puget Sound Telecommuting Demonstration Project

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Dennis K.; Koenig, Brett E.; Mokhtarian, Patricia L.

    1996-01-01

    Transportation control measures are often implemented for their environmental benefits, but there is a need to quantify what benefits actually occur. Telecommuting has the potential to reduce the number of daily trips and miles traveled with personal vehicles and, consequently, the overall emissions resulting from vehicle activity. This search studies the emissions impacts of telecommuting for the participants of the Puget Sound Telecommuting Demonstration Project (PSTDP). The California Air ...

  11. Using Travel Diary Data to Estimate the Emissions Impacts of Transportation Strategies: The Puget Sound Telecommuting Demonstration Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Dennis K; Koenig, Brett E; Mokhtarian, Patricia L

    1996-01-01

    Transportation control measures are often implemented for their environmental benefits, but there is a need to quantify what benefits actually occur. Telecommuting has the potential to reduce the number of daily trips and miles traveled with personal vehicles and, consequently, the overall emissions resulting from vehicle activity. This search studies the emissions impacts of telecommuting for the participants of the Puget Sound Telecommuting Demonstration Project (PSTDP). The California Air Resources Board's emissions models, EMFAC7F and BURDEN7F, are used to estimate the emissions on telecommuting days and non-telecommuting days, based on travel diaries completed by program participants. This study, among the first of its kind, represents the most sophisticated application of emissions models to travel diary data. Analysis of the travel diary data and the emissions model output supports the hypothesis that telecommuting has beneficial transportation and air quality impacts. The most important results are that telecommuting decreases the number of daily trips (by 30%), the vehicle-miles traveled (VMT) (by 63%), and the number of cold starts (by 44%), especially those taking place in early morning. These reductions are shown to have a large effect on daily emissions, with a 50% to 60% decrease in pollutants generated by a telecommuter's personal vehicle use on a telecommuting day. These net savings are almost entirely due to the elimination of commute trips, as non-commute trips increased by 0.33 trips per person-day (9% of the total trips), and the non-commute VMT increased by 2.2 miles. Overall reduc- tions in travel and emissions of this magnitude are observed because the telecommuters in this sample are long-distance commuters, with commutes twice as long as the regional average. However, even as telecommuting adoption moves into the mainstream, its net impacts are still expected to be beneficial- a reduction in VMT and in emissions. It is important to note

  12. Telecommuting. Hearing on H.R. 5082, A Bill To Promote the Use of Telecommuting, before the Subcommittee on Telecommunications and Finance of the Committee on Energy and Commerce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    This hearing on H.R. 5082, "The Telecommuting Act of 1992," focuses on how the developing telecommunications infrastructure can provide major benefits to the environment, employers, and the daily life of working people, who now have the ability to telecommute to their office from some alternative work site located nearer to their home.…

  13. Telecommuting and Earnings Trajectories Among American Women and Men 1989–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Jennifer L.; Noonan, Mary C.

    2016-01-01

    While flexibility in the location of work hours has shown positive organizational effects on productivity and retention, less is known about the earnings effects of telecommuting. We analyze weekly hours spent working from home using the 1989–2008 panels of the National Longitudinal Study of Youth. We describe the demographic and occupational characteristics of the employees engaged in telecommuting, then track their earnings growth with fixed-effects models, focusing on gender and parental status. Results show substantial variation in the earnings effects of telecommuting based on the point in the hours distribution worked from home. Working from home rather than the office produces equal earnings growth in the first 40 hours worked, but “taking work home” or overtime telecommuting yields significantly smaller increases than overtime worked on-site. Yet most observed telecommuting occurs precisely during this low-yield overtime portion of the hours distribution. Few gender or parental status differences emerged in these processes. These trends reflect potentially widespread negative consequences of the growing capacity of workers to perform their work from any location. Rather than enhancing true flexibility in when and where employees work, the capacity to work from home mostly extends the work day and encroaches into what was formerly home and family time. PMID:27833214

  14. Telecommuting and Earnings Trajectories Among American Women and Men 1989-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Jennifer L; Noonan, Mary C

    2016-09-01

    While flexibility in the location of work hours has shown positive organizational effects on productivity and retention, less is known about the earnings effects of telecommuting. We analyze weekly hours spent working from home using the 1989-2008 panels of the National Longitudinal Study of Youth. We describe the demographic and occupational characteristics of the employees engaged in telecommuting, then track their earnings growth with fixed-effects models, focusing on gender and parental status. Results show substantial variation in the earnings effects of telecommuting based on the point in the hours distribution worked from home. Working from home rather than the office produces equal earnings growth in the first 40 hours worked, but "taking work home" or overtime telecommuting yields significantly smaller increases than overtime worked on-site. Yet most observed telecommuting occurs precisely during this low-yield overtime portion of the hours distribution. Few gender or parental status differences emerged in these processes. These trends reflect potentially widespread negative consequences of the growing capacity of workers to perform their work from any location. Rather than enhancing true flexibility in when and where employees work, the capacity to work from home mostly extends the work day and encroaches into what was formerly home and family time.

  15. Telecommuting's differential impact on work-family conflict: is there no place like home?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Timothy D; Veiga, John F; Simsek, Zeki

    2006-11-01

    The literature on the impact of telecommuting on work-family conflict has been equivocal, asserting that telecommuting enhances work-life balance and reduces conflict, or countering that it increases conflict as more time and emotional energy are allocated to family. Surveying 454 professional-level employees who split their work time between an office and home, the authors examined how extensively working in this mode impacts work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict, as well as the contextual impact of job autonomy, scheduling flexibility, and household size. As hypothesized, the findings suggest that telecommuting has a differential impact on work-family conflict, such that the more extensively individuals work in this mode, the lower their work-to-family conflict, but the higher their family-to-work conflict. Additionally, job autonomy and scheduling flexibility were found to positively moderate telecommuting's impact on work-to-family conflict, but household size was found to negatively moderate telecommuting's impact on family-to-work conflict, suggesting that contextual factors may be domain specific. (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved

  16. Not Extent of Telecommuting, But Job Characteristics as Proximal Predictors of Work-Related Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Elst, Tinne; Verhoogen, Ronny; Sercu, Maarten; Van den Broeck, Anja; Baillien, Elfi; Godderis, Lode

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the curvilinear relationship between extent of telecommuting and work-related well-being (ie, burnout, work engagement, and cognitive stress complaints), as well as to test whether job characteristics act as explanatory mechanisms underlying this relationship. A sample of 878 employees from an international telecommunication company with a long history of telecommuting participated in a survey on psychosocial risk factors and well-being at work. Mediation path analyses were conducted to test the hypotheses. Social support from colleagues, participation in decision-making, task autonomy, and work-to-family conflict, but not extent of telecommuting, were directly related to work-related well-being. Extent of telecommuting was indirectly related to well-being via social support. Employers should invest in creating good work environments in general, among both telecommuters and nontelecommuters.

  17. Academics Telecommuting in Open and Distance Education Universities: Issues, challenges, and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheuk Fan Ng

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Research in distance and online education has focused on how to improve students’ learning and support services. Faculty satisfaction, as one of the five pillars in Sloan-Consortium’s quality framework for online education, has received less attention in research. Besides online teaching, little research has examined the experiences of academics working in institutions where the faculty is dispersed geographically. Outside the academy, teleworking or telecommuting has become quite popular in recent years. Most research to-date has been conducted in information technology-related corporations and government departments, but hardly any in post-secondary educational institutions. Drawing on a literature review of research in telecommuting or teleworking, this paper discusses the potential benefits and drawbacks of telecommuting for academics and their families, and the potential opportunities for – and challenges faced – by their distance and online education institutions.

  18. TELECOMMUTING AND HRM: A CASE STUDY OF AN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICE PROVIDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Fernandes Bernardino

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available With the development in information technology resources, a way of working has been standing out: telecommuting. This manner of working from a distance may offer a competitive advantage in attracting and retaining highly skilled professionals. The purpose of the research presented in this article is to identify guidelines for the implementation and management of telecommuting, as an alternative to overcome the shortage of qualified professionals in Information Technology (IT. The results, based on a case study of a Brazilian subsidiary of a multinational organization that provides IT services, shown that telecommuting (1 contributes to attracting and retaining qualified professionals in IT, (2 should be based on trustworthy relationships, (3 has to be supported by a strategy of decentralization of both structure and organizational assets.

  19. Estimating commute-travel implications of telecommuting by female employees in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mootaz M. Jaff

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A number of Malaysian cities are experiencing severe traffic congestion resulting from rapidly increasing vehicle ownership and usage, and the insufficient supply and inferior quality of public transport. The trend of congestion, frequent traffic accidents and air pollution is nowhere more prevalent in Kuala Lumpur where telecommuting is increasingly being perceived as a viable travel demand management strategy. Due to a number of unique travel characteristics of female commuters and the relatively large participation rate of women in the Malaysian work force, telecommuting by female employees seems a more relevant and potentially more crucial means of alleviating rush hour traffic in the Kuala Lumpur metropolitan area. The aim of this study is to estimate both the potential and actual travel implications of telecommuting by female employees. Therefore, this study is exploratory in nature as it mainly aims to explore the influence of the propagation of a phenomenon (i.e., telecommuting among female employees in Kuala Lumpur on travel demand, and is thus mainly a quantitative research. The travel implications estimated in this paper include the reduction in commute trips, with a particular emphasis on the reduction in single occupancy vehicles (SOVs entering the city of Kuala Lumpur during peak hours; vehicle and passenger-kilometers forgone; and time savings as a result of the elimination of the daily commute. The findings clearly show the potential of substantial reduction in vehicle and passenger-kilometers travelled, as well as potential time savings of more than 7000 employee-hours/day under an optimal adoption scenario. Furthermore, telecommuting by female employees could potentially result in a daily reduction of up to 7.8% of all SOVs entering Kuala Lumpur in 2019; however, there is a large gap between that potential reduction and the maximum actual reduction of 0.96%. Keywords: Travel implications, Telecommuting, Female employees, Single

  20. Telecommuting and health care: a potential for cost reductions and productivity gains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, S M; Pelfrey, S; Van Sell, M

    1995-12-01

    Health care administrators are striving to maintain positive operating margins while remaining responsive to community needs. As they look for ways to reduce costs and improve productivity, they may consider the benefits associated with telecommuting. Telecommuting refers to the work performed by organizational employees who use computers and telecommunication equipment to work at home or at remote sites one or more days a week. Benefits to the health care industry include release of valuable hospital space, reduced employee turnover, and increased productivity. The time away from the institution may provide administrators with valuable planning time, free from interruptions.

  1. Beyond telecommuting: A new paradigm for the effect of telecommunications on travel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niles, J.S.

    1994-09-01

    Conventional wisdom about social and economic behavior holds that the use of telecommunications is a natural substitute for transportation. For example, telephone calls can replace travel to meetings, and facsimile or electronic-mail transmission of documents substitutes for courier or postal delivery. The moving of information can replace the moving of period and goods. Vehicle traffic on the national transportation infrastructure can be replaced by digital traffic on what is now called the National Information Infrastructure (NII). A leading example is telecommuting. This means using telecommunications to replace commuting between home and work. Telecommuting is an optional way of expanding employees` work locations in those circumstances where it yields both improved organizational performance and employee satisfication. Telecommuting accounts for 7.6 million U.S. workers as of early 1993, up 15% from the 6.6 million counted in 1992. The growth of telecommuting has been strong for the past five years. No one has identified any reasons to suggest that this growth will abate in the forseeable future.

  2. Beyond telecommuting: A new paradigm for the effect of telecommunications on travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, J. S.

    1994-09-01

    Conventional wisdom about social and economic behavior holds that the use of telecommunications is a natural substitute for transportation. For example, telephone calls can replace travel to meetings, and facsimile or electronic-mail transmission of documents substitutes for courier or postal delivery. The moving of information can replace the moving of people and goods. Vehicle traffic on the national transportation infrastructure can be replaced by digital traffic on what is now called the national information infrastructure (NII). A leading example is telecommuting. This means using telecommunications to replace commuting between home and work. Telecommuting is an optional way of expanding employees' work locations in those circumstances where it yields both improved organizational performance and employee satisfaction. Telecommuting accounts for 7.6 million U.S. workers as of early 1993, up 15% from the 6.6 million counted in 1992. The growth of telecommuting has been strong for the past five years. No one has identified any reasons to suggest that this growth will abate in the forseeable future.

  3. Telecommuting and Learning Style Preference: An Examination of Learning Transfer in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Lisa C.

    2010-01-01

    Telecommuting learning style preferences were examined in an effort to determine the impact of learning transfer and if employees could benefit from blended training methodologies (i.e., online, face-to-face). Learning style preferences were examined in an effort to promote learning transfer and retention in the workplace. Employees in higher…

  4. Towards a Research Model for Distance Education-Contributions from the Telecommuting Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Geoffrey N.

    This paper draws on an extensive review of literature associated with telecommuting and looks at features that might affect the offering and take-up of distance education, particularly distance education involving computer applications, telecommunications and web-based, off-campus delivery of courses or components of courses. The issue is…

  5. The impact of telecommuting on residential relocation and residential preferences, a latent class modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, D.F.

    2010-01-01

    e advance of information and communication technologies (ICTs) has changed travellers’ appreciation of travel distance in various ways. In the context of telecommuting, ICT increasingly allows us to work from home one or more days per week. One hypothesis that has been put forward is that

  6. The Impact of Telecommuting Intensity on Employee Perception Outcomes: Job Satisfaction, Productivity, and Organizational Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyaanga, Solomon G.

    2012-01-01

    This research investigates the impact of telecommuting intensity (hours worked/week from home) on worker perceived outcomes such as job satisfaction, productivity, organizational commitment. Data was collected and analyzed from a large U.S. Federal Department. The conceptual research model and design include three key mediating variables, one…

  7. Telecommuters: between optimistic discourses and precarious contexts. An approach from the perspective of the argentinean case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Damián Rodríguez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article contributes to the knowledge regarding telecommuting in the case of Argentina by paying special attention to the perspectives of a multiplicity of actors whose interests in the matter are different and even contradictory if one bears in mind the capitallabor dichotomy. Using a qualitative methodology, an analysis of sources was carried out in order to examine what some specific government and mass media actors have to say about this work modality. Furthermore, eleven in-depth interviews with telecommuters were carried out in the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires (amba, according to its acronym in Spanish between 2013 and 2017. The comparison between these two sources of information revealed very different discourses, a fact that raises serious questions regarding the optimism with which this new labor modality tends to be considered most of the time. In order to contribute the knowledge regarding telecommuting, the article shows how this concept is understood by the Ministry of Labor, Employment, and Social Security (mteyss of Argentina through its Program for the Promotion of Employment in Telecommuting (propet, as well as by certain national newspapers like Clarín and La Nación. This exercise makes evident that the latter share an excessively optimistic outlook. Flexibility, freedom, creativity, and horizontality are some of the features that, in their view, characterize the work reality of telecommuters. However, the interviews showed that there is a great gap between what the abovementioned actors say about telecommuting and what happens in the day to day work of telecommuters. Although the latter recognize some of the advantages of this work modality, they also point out many negative aspects: the lack of clear hierarchical referents to whom they can address their concerns; unclear work objectives; and difficult-to-establish boundaries between the work environment and the home are some of the most evident

  8. The trade-off between trips and distance travelled in analyzing the emissions impacts of center-based telecommuting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtarian, P.L. [University of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Institute of Transportation Studies; Varma, K.V. [Decision Focus Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Several travel indicators were compared between telecommuting (TC) days and non-telecommuting days for a sample of 72 center-based telecommuters in California. Distance travelled decreased significantly on TC days, with average reductions of 51 person-miles (58%) and 35 vehicle-miles (53%). When weighted by telecommuting frequency, average reductions of 11.9% in PMT and 11.5% in VMT were found over a five-day work week. Person-trips and vehicle-trips increased slightly (but not significantly) on TC days. Despite the increase in trip rates, TC-day reductions were found for all pollutants analyzed: 15% for total organic gas emissions, 21% for carbon monoxide, 35% for oxides of nitrogen, and 51% for particulate matter. (author)

  9. An evaluation of performance by older persons on a simulated telecommuting task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharit, Joseph; Czaja, Sara J; Hernandez, Mario; Yang, Yulong; Perdomo, Dolores; Lewis, John E; Lee, Chin Chin; Nair, Sankaran

    2004-11-01

    Telecommuting work represents a strategy for managing the growing number of older people in the workforce. This study involved a simulated customer service telecommuting task that used e-mail to answer customer queries about media-related products and company policies. Participants included 27 "younger" older adults (50-65 years) and 25 "older" older adults (66-80 years). The participants performed the task for two 2-hr sessions a day over 4 consecutive days. Although both age groups showed significant improvement across sessions on many of the performance criteria, in general the improvements were more marked for the older age-group participants. However, the participants from both age groups had difficulty meeting some of the task performance requirements. These results are discussed in terms of training strategies for older workers.

  10. Telecommuting Technology Implementations: A Within- And Between-Subjects Longitudinal Field Study

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesh, Viswanath; Johnson, Philip

    2002-01-01

    This research examines the impact of technology design on the acceptance and long-term use of telecommuting systems. Specifically, we compare employee acceptance and sustained use of a traditional system designed based on the common "desktop metaphor," with a virtual-reality system designed to enhance social richness and tele-presence. This 1-year study incorporated a within- and between-subjects examination of 527 employees across 3 locations of a large organization. Results showed much high...

  11. Modeling Employees' Perceptions and Proportional Preferences of Work Locations: The Regular Workplace and Telecommuting Alternatives

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhtarian, Patricia; Bagley, Michael

    2000-01-01

    This paper develops measures of job and workplace perceptions, and examines the importance of those and other measures to the desired proportions of work time at each of three locations: regular workplace, home, and telecommuting center. Using data from 188 participants in the Neighborhood Telecenters Project, four job context perception factors were identified: productivity, job satisfaction, supervisor relationship, and co-worker interaction. Four generic workplace perception factors were i...

  12. Modeling the Choice of Telecommuting Frequency in California: An Exploratory Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mannering, Jill S.; Mokhtarian, Patricia L.

    1995-01-01

    This study explores the individual's choice of telecommuting frequency as a function of demographic, travel, work and attitudinal factors. To do this, multinomial logit models are estimated using data collected in a recent survey of employees from three public agencies in California. Separate models are estimated, one for data collected from the Franchise Tax Board in Sacramento, one for data from the Public Utilities Commission in San Francisco, and one for data collected from employees of t...

  13. Telecommuters: between optimistic discourses and precarious contexts. An approach from the perspective of the argentinean case

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro Damián Rodríguez; Julieta D´Errico

    2017-01-01

    The article contributes to the knowledge regarding telecommuting in the case of Argentina by paying special attention to the perspectives of a multiplicity of actors whose interests in the matter are different and even contradictory if one bears in mind the capitallabor dichotomy. Using a qualitative methodology, an analysis of sources was carried out in order to examine what some specific government and mass media actors have to say about this work modality. Furthermore, eleven in-depth inte...

  14. Teletrabalho: subjugação e construção de subjetividades Telecommuting: subjugating and building subjectivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel de Sá Affonso da Costa

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta resultados de pesquisa de tese que buscou contribuir para o entendimento do teletrabalho, abordando-o da perspectiva teórica do poder/ saber. Trata-se de entender o teletrabalho como discurso que subjuga os indivíduos, mas que, ao mesmo tempo, constrói novos sujeitos e subjetividades. A pesquisa investigou esse processo de assujeitamento, explorando como os teletrabalhadores fazem sentido da experiência do teletrabalho, pela análise de suas práticas discursivas. Para isso, foram realizadas entrevistas abertas com 25 teletrabalhadores em arranjo de home office, residentes na cidade do Rio de Janeiro. Todos os entrevistados mantêm vínculo empregatício com as empresas para as quais teletrabalham e desenvolvem tarefas que podem ser caracterizadas como intensivas em conhecimento.This paper article presents the research results of a thesis that aimed at understanding telecommuting from the power/knowledge theoretical perspective. In this sense, telecommuting is understood as a discourse that simultaneously subjugates and builds subjectivities. The article explores how telecommuters make sense out of their experience through the analysis of their discoursive practices. Twenty-five telecommuters residing in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were interviewed. All of them hold steady job positions and perform knowledge-intensive tasks.

  15. The telecommuting work and information society: different modalities and the workday

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irineu Francisco Barreto Junior

    2015-12-01

    the context of the new level of human sociability mediated communication and internet technologies, called the Information Society. The recearch conceptualizes preliminarily telecommuting as telework performed using computerized and telematic means and for longer range search in Comparative Law epistemological and analytical support for this designation. Despite the technological advances, the new modality labor endangers the classical privileges guaranteed by Brazilian law to workers, to establish new levels of middle workplace, subordination and other traditional paradigms characterizing the employment relationship. Finally, we find that teleworking is not just at home but the employee at any place where he is: satellite centers, telecentres; telecottages, nomadic or mobile, online or offline, since the used technology and computers.

  16. Home-based telecommuting and quality of life: further evidence on an employee-oriented human resource practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, Severin; Glaser, Jürgen

    2009-04-01

    Building on previous research, further evidence for the potential of home-based telecommuting as an employee-oriented human resource practice is provided from a study in the German public administration. Survey data from 1,008 public employees were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Mean age of the sample was 43.6 yr. (SD = 8.8 yr.), and 27.5% (277) of the participants were women. Analysis supported the roles of higher Autonomy and lower Work-Family Conflict as psychological mediators between Telecommunication Intensity and both Job Satisfaction and Quality of Life. Implications for the design of flexible working arrangements are discussed.

  17. Virtual transportation as a solution to urban transportation problems: a critical analysis of the potential of telecommuting as a work trip reduction strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buczynski, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    Recent advancements in technology have made virtual transportation a potential solution to the urban transportation crisis. Virtual transportation (also called telecommuting or teleworking) was defined as `a philosophy of allowing an employee to perform required tasks full-time or part-time from his or her choice of location by using information technology`. Virtual transportation would help ease peak travel demands during rush hours. The exhaust gases from automobiles with internal combustion engines emit pollutants such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, volatile organic compounds and nitrous oxides into the atmosphere, thus virtual transportation could contribute significantly to the improvement of air quality. Telecommuting also offers other advantages, for example, geographic constraints of time and space are removed and employees are able to locate anywhere with telecommunications networks. It was suggested that road pricing could be used to generate revenue to build networks of telecommunication centres. Road pricing could be an incentive for commuters to substitute physical travel with virtual travel. 23 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. Telecommuting: An Altered Work Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    11 Part-Time: Job Sharing. . . .... 12 Compressed Workweek (CWW): 4/40 CWW. ..... 16 Flexible Working Hours : Flexitime ...... 22...manent full time work form that varies in hours, days, or a combination of both. Flexible Working Hours . Flexible working hours is a work schedule where...Ronen & Primps, 1981). Flexible Working Hours : Flexitime Expanded Definition. Flexitime can be further defined as a work concept that allows the maximum

  19. Telecommuting: The Trade-Offs of Home Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraut, Robert E.

    1989-01-01

    Reports that relatively few people use their home as a primary work site and that those who do (substitutors, self-employed, and supplementers) balance their needs for employment flexibility against their needs for income. Discusses differing motivations and satisfactions, and the wage gap between home workers and conventional workers. (SR)

  20. Security for Telecommuting and Broadband Communications: Recommendations of the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-08-01

    Aware http://www.lavasoftusa.com/ Adware, Alexa 1.0-5.0, Aureate 1.0-3.0, Comet Cursor 1.0-2.0, Cydoor, Doubleclick, DSSAgent, EverAd, EzUla...Internet. Known as “voice over IP” (VOIP), the services convert speech to Internet messages and transmit them to a facility that interfaces with the...reporting, handling, prevention, and recognition . National Information Assurance Partnership (NIAP) - http://www.niap.nist.gov/ NIAP is a U.S

  1. San Francisco urban partnership agreement, national evaluation : telecommuting/TDM data test plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-01

    The Standards Requirements Document (SRD) collects information from the other National ITS Architecture program documents and reorganizes it in a manner intended to support the development of critical ITS standards. The key results in the SRD a...

  2. Academics Telecommuting in Open and Distance Education Universities: Issues, Challenges, and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Cheuk Fan

    2006-01-01

    Research in distance and online education has focused on how to improve students' learning and support services. Faculty satisfaction, as one of the five pillars in Sloan-Consortium's quality framework for online education, has received less attention in research. Besides online teaching, little research has examined the experiences of academics…

  3. The impact of telecommuting on the division of labour in the domestic setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casimir, G.J.

    2001-01-01

    When people start working at home, it is plausible that the division of labour within the home will change, in particular the division between men and women. Gerda Casimir studied these changes, by analysing the results of an Internet survey, to which 171 respondents reacted. The core of

  4. Telecommuters: the stay-at-home work force of the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eder, P.F.

    1983-06-01

    The spread of teleworkers who commute via telecommunications from their home offices will depend, despite the energy-saving and tax advantages of self-employment, on how fast the social climate accepts teleworking, whether software can be made friendlier, and whether legal issues of database networks are resolved. The societal changes associated with home offices can be either a positive reemphasis on the home or a negative electronic sweatshop and a way to export office work to low-wage areas. The author, who sees a gradual adoption of teleworking while these technological, societal, and marketing barriers are dealt with, develops a scenario for an information society of the future. (DCK)

  5. Opinions on cell phone use on airplanes, congestion, and telecommuting — from the 2006 and 2007 Omnibus Household Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The annual Omnibus Household Survey (OHS), administered by the U.S. Department of Transportations Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), asks respondents about their weekly travel habits, journey to work, opinions about the transportation syst...

  6. One Size Does Not Fit All: Personalized Incentives in Military Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    Telecommuting Value Distribution ........................................................ 12 Figure 7. Enlisted Telecommuting Value Distribution...geographic stability, telecommuting and condensed workweek opportunities (where operationally feasible), and other quality-of-life programs (e.g., child...assignments, a two-year sabbatical, and telecommuting one day per week (assume all four NMIs are operationally feasible). In this hypothetical case, it is

  7. Integrating Monetary and Non-monetary Reenlistment Incentives Utilizing the Combinatorial Retention Auction Mechanism (CRAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    107 A. MOTIVATION ... Telecommuting ............57 Figure 13. Reasons for Accepting the SRB...................60 Figure 14. Reasons for Declining the SRB... telecommuting , and additional money for dependents (education and daycare). This current thesis conducted a similar non-monetary incentive

  8. A Theoretical Framework for Turnover Intention of Air Force Enlisted Information Systems Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-25

    removal of poor performers, advancement opportunities for talented replacements, and decreases in pre-turnover withdrawal behaviors such as absenteeism ...in Employee Turnover Intentions and Its Determinants Among Telecommuters and Non- Telecommuters ,” Journal of Management Information Systems, 16: 147

  9. 48 CFR 15.304 - Evaluation factors and significant subfactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...)(4)(G)(i)). (6) If telecommuting is not prohibited, agencies shall not unfavorably evaluate an offer that includes telecommuting unless the contracting officer executes a written determination in...

  10. 48 CFR 13.106-2 - Evaluation of quotations or offers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 14 or 15 may be used. (2) If telecommuting is not prohibited, agencies shall not unfavorably evaluate an offer because it includes telecommuting unless the contracting officer executes a written...

  11. 76 FR 23357 - Affirmative Action and Nondiscrimination Obligations of Contractors and Subcontractors Regarding...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ... increased use of telecommuting and other work arrangements that do not include a physical office setting, as... establishment. This addition is proposed in light of the increased use of telecommuting and other flexible...

  12. Improving Organisational Effectiveness of Coalition Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    group processes. New York: John Wiley. (pp. 131- 185). [21] Harpaz, I. (2002). Advantages and disadvantages of telecommuting for the individual... telecommuting arrangements: Worker perception and managerial prescriptions. SAM Advanced Management Journal, 57(3), 35-42. Improving Organisational

  13. Research Article Special Issue

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    2018-05-16

    May 16, 2018 ... work empowered by ICTs is known as telecommuting [1] [2]. ... telecommuting practice in an organization is considered relevant to stay competitive in global market. ... of carbon, and retaining women in the workforce [12]. Indeed ..... 0. 5. Overall about telecommuting. Excellent. 4. 13.8. Good. 17. 58.6.

  14. Contingency-Focused Financial Management and Logistics for the U.S. Coast Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    for the Coast Guard and may assist with determining which business and operational areas are most in jeopardy of failure when stressed . Some areas... telecommuting policies, practices and organizational culture issues to ensure that personnel are experienced in telecommuting . It would be detrimental...and a crippling strain on IT staffs for logistics and financial management personnel to first attempt telecommuting in the days following a crisis

  15. Common Sense Guide to Mitigating Insider Threats 4th Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    more users to telecommute and use additional technologies, such as smartphones and tablet computers, to remotely access corporate information...corporate network via a laptop or other device. These functions allow telecommuters to access information on the go; however, they are entry points...enabling employees to telecommute and freely collaborate with other organizations. 2. getting a return on investment—Organizations need to weigh

  16. Planning Strategies for Transportation Fuel Consumption Reduction: An Evaluation of the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative’s Transportation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    illustrate alternatives to automobile travel to stakeholders. Specific strategic actions include promoting telecommuting , carpooling, and vanpooling...Systematics (2009), as well as Ewing et al (2007). VMT Reduction Strategies The HCEI advocates for promoting telecommuting , carpooling, and...Promote telecommuting Unknown; 1.4% Promote car- and van-pooling 2-5% Transit service studies TBD Quantify "true cost" of autos (parking fees) 2-12% VMT

  17. Assessment of BRAC 133 Final Environmental Assessment of July 2008 and Transportation Management Plan of July 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    employees are present at work every day due to many factors including vacation, illness, travel, flexible work schedule, and telecommuting . Of the 6,409...work week, compressed work week, and telecommuting are currently utilized by the employees who will be relocating to BRAC 133; the employee surveys... telecommute . Therefore, BRAC 133 could reasonably be expected to generate fewer trips on a daily basis than was incorporated into and modeled in the

  18. Army Contracting Command--Picatinny Telework Policy: Applying Lessons Learned from the Federal Government

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Telecommuting Initiative OPM Office of Personnel Management OMB Office of Management and Budget OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration...telework, such as telecommuting , flexible workplace, remote work, virtual work, and mobile work, which it states “are all used to refer to work done...gives a basic explanation of telework similar to that of OPM’s and again includes with the definition of telework terms like telecommuting , flexible

  19. 41 CFR 102-74.590 - What steps must agencies take to implement these laws and policies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... workplace arrangements, such as telecommuting, hoteling, virtual offices, and other distributive work... workplace arrangements, GSA will provide guidance, assistance, and oversight, as needed, regarding...

  20. 75 FR 65049 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Omnibus Household Survey Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    .... OMB Control Number: 2139-0012. Affected Public: The target population for the OHS Program is the non... for dealing with congestion; Telecommuting information; Commuting costs; Availability of...

  1. 75 FR 18567 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Omnibus Household Survey Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ... extension of a currently approved information collection. OMB Control Number: 2139-0012. Affected Public... Number of days traveled Assessment of congestion Methods for dealing with congestion Telecommuting...

  2. A Multimedia over IP Integrated System for Military Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    stressed how communications requirements raise dramatically now, either in quantity either in quality, in order to effectively improve sensor...admission control based on network resources availability. We will stress the role of SIT and the characteristic of the Gatekeeper to act as the...considered: • Telecommuting - Telecommuting is a broad term referring to corporate employees who interact electronically with corporate resources

  3. Some Historical Thoughts on the ee-Learning Renaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilles, Jack M.

    2007-01-01

    Jack Nilles surveys the evolution of ee-learning at the University of Southern California, together with the first formal telecommuting demonstration program, from its beginnings in the early 1970s to the relevant trends in 2006. Although the basic technologies of telecommuting and ee-learning were in evidence in the 1970s, subsequent…

  4. Commuting from Electronic Cottage to Virtual Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Jeannette

    1996-01-01

    Although telecommuting has been found to increase productivity and morale in business environments, libraries rarely consider it. This article discusses telecommuting's potential impact on contact with users, length of employment, job descriptions, budgets, management style, communication, and workflow. This option may help libraries retain older…

  5. Recommendations for Enhancing U.S. Army Company Grade Officer Career Continuance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    developing alternative work sites near or on posts to provide spouses with the resources to be able to telecommute for a range of employers who are...spouse to get to work on time). • Allow officers who live close to post and who could come to post on short notice to work from home ( telecommuting

  6. Energy Security in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    disruptions in oil markets. Widespread adoption of telecommuting work policies, the implemen- tation of lower speed limits, or the promotion of ride...living closer to work or public transit; or selecting jobs on the basis of their telecommuting options. The heating indus- try provides an illustrative

  7. Initial Integrated Strategic Sustainability Plan for Fort Leonard Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    and quantify the benefits of various sustainable workforce staffing tools (e.g., flex time, job sharing, telecommuting , etc.). CPAC 0.1 3Q - 4Q...desk tops NEC G6 1Q — Track telecommuting hours CPAC 1Q — Calculate benefits - miles

  8. The Possible Effects of Potential Key Technological Developments on the Force Structure of the Australian Army in 2040

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    telecommute to deployments in 2040 apart from the possible need for maintenance. There have been many improvements in communication and are likely to be...geographically separate, theatres. It is entirely plausible that telepresence technologies will become sufficiently advanced by 2040 to allow telecommuting of

  9. Development of Policy on the Telecommunications-Transportation Tradeoff, Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilles, Jack M.; And Others

    To identify and evaluate the implications of potential communications and computer technology alternatives to urban transportation, an extensive research study was made of telecommuting--bringing workers toegether by communication instead of physically. An attempt was made to formulate practical statements on telecommuting network design, policies…

  10. Working from Home and the Willingness to Accept a Longer Commute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, D.W.; Meijers, E.J.; van Ham, M.

    It is generally found that workers are more inclined to accept a job that is located farther away from home if they have the ability to work from home one day a week or more (telecommuting). Such findings inform us about the effectiveness of telecommuting policies that try to alleviate congestion

  11. Development of Meta Level Communication Analysis using Temporal Data Crystallization and Its Application to Multi Modal Human Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1...don’t you allow your staffs to telecommute ? Mr.X: I will take your idea. Then we do not need a big building. Mr.U (working for Mr.X’s firm... Telecommuting …? Doesn’t it weaken our teamwork? Mr.X: I will then certainly introduce telecommuting partially. Mr.U: Partially… to what part? Mr.X: Maybe

  12. Department of Defense Office of Small Business Programs Strategic Plan 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-31

    strategy must consider generational differences in establishing a motivational work environment, and strive to create the appropriate diversity to...WHS CDR instrument. ! ! ! 1. The Deputy Director shall implement telecommuting . ! ! ! 2. The Deputy Director shall establish a formal workload

  13. Adult Health: Discover if You're at Risk of Job Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... solutions. Is job sharing an option? What about telecommuting or flexing your time? Would it help to ... and collaboration might help you cope with job stress and feelings of burnout. If you have access ...

  14. MIT Lincoln Laboratory Facts 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Positions filled by engineers and scientists at Lincoln Laboratory require problem-solving ability, analytical skills, and creativity ...balance, as well as offer- ing flexible work schedules, part-time employment, and telecommuting opportunities. Child Care The Lincoln Laboratory

  15. Virtual Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    Virtual work teams scattered around the globe are becoming a feature of corporate workplaces. Although most people prefer face-to-face meetings and interactions, reality often requires telecommuting. (JOW)

  16. 1999 status of the nation's highways, bridges and transit : conditions and performance : report to Congress : executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    This report presents the test plan for collecting and analyzing telecommuting/TDM data for the San Francisco Urban Partnership Agreement (UPA) under the United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) UPA Program. The San Francisco UPA projects...

  17. Recruiting and Retaining Cyberwarriors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-07

    2007 hearing of the House Oversight and Government Reform Subcommittee on Information Policy, Gregory Wilshusen, director of Information Technology at...Abbott Laboratories in Chicago, recruiters are reaching out to College students by offering flexible work schedules, telecommuting , full tuition

  18. United States Department of State Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    employment sources such as temporary hires, family member appointments, telecommuting , part- time and jobsharing arrangements, and contracts...primary responsibility for coordination and oversight with respect to science and technology agreements with foreign governments. GOAL: Stabilize

  19. 75 FR 19624 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    ... Transportation and Related Agencies Appropriations Act 2001; 5 U.S.C. 6120, Telecommuting in Executive Agencies... by telephone control offices to validate and reimburse participants for costs associated with...

  20. 34 CFR 361.48 - Scope of vocational rehabilitation services for individuals with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pursuing self-employment or telecommuting or establishing a small business operation as an employment... an employment outcome. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 1820...

  1. 78 FR 58681 - Affirmative Action and Nondiscrimination Obligations of Contractors and Subcontractors Regarding...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ...\\ OMB Control Number 1293-0005, Federal Contractor Veterans' Employment Report, VETS-100/VETS-100A, http... the context of telecommuting, work arrangements that do not include a physical office setting, and the...

  2. Enabling a Mobile Workforce: How to Implement Effective Teleworking at U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories - A Guidebook and Toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Lissa [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hall, Cheri [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Rambo, Christian [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Sustainability Performance Office; Sikes, Karen [CSRA Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Rukavina, Frank [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ischay, Christopher [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Stoddard Conrad, Emily [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Sustainability Performance Office; Bender, Sadie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moran, Mike [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Jeffrey [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nichols, Teresa A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ahl, Amanda G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Teleworking, also known as telecommuting, has grown in popularity in today’s workforce, evolving from an employment perk to a business imperative. Facilitated by improved mobile connectivity and ease of remote access, employees and organizations are increasingly embracing teleworking.

  3. Surface Warfare Officer Retention: Analysis of Individual Ready Reserve Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-22

    and accelerate (where possible) all life-work balance initiatives such as geographic stability, telecommuting , and off- and on-ramps. This research...also beginning to explore some “life-work balance” initiatives such as telecommuting and sabbaticals, primary retention efforts to-date have focused on...continue to stress the importance and interaction between improving leadership, work/life balance and 9

  4. All-Hazard Consequence Management Planning for the Water Sector: Preparedness, Emergency Response, and Recovery CIPAC Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    may include telecommuting , off-site access to SCADA, or other options for key staff. Logistics Document Employee Skills, Train, and Cross Train...can return to work after illness.  Establish policies for flexible worksite (e.g., telecommuting ) and flexible work hours (e.g., staggered shifts...particles. Residents are exhausted, stressed , and worried about where they will find the information they need to ensure their safety

  5. The Army’s Military Decision Making: Adequate or Update and Expand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-22

    requires creative efforts by every Soldier and Marine.”63 Expanding the soldier base would allow for greater creativity in order to better deal with...military can overcome these deficiencies? I believe that to achieve the initial stage of success would be to create a segment of soldier telecommuters ...problems. By expanding the thinking base, the Army can expand the breadth and depth into areas currently unreachable. Telecommuting allows for several

  6. Information Assurance and Information Technology: Training, Certification, and Personnel Management in the Department of Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-27

    flexible workforce...80 hours of work over 9 workdays, job-sharing, contingent workers, telecommuting Key workers get laptops and Intermediate Service...Digital Network lines to homes Extensive equipment and software for telecommuters Typical Silicon Valley QOL package includes workout facilities, dry...actual duties and responsibilities assigned to specific positions. B-4 Managers need to be creative in “selling” prospective employees on the nature

  7. A Sociotechnical Design for Implementing the Defense Data Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    outcomes of te work High satisfactionwith the work Knowledge of the Feedback actual results of Low absenteeism work activities Jand turnover EMPLOYEE...Physically distant locations are electronically joined. A logical extension of this is " telecommuting ", or the performance of work from the home rather...transaction costs by allowing transnission during off-peak hours. Telecommuting may find favor at sites such as the Navy Re- ,ional Data Centers (NARDAC

  8. Building and Maintaining Healthy Organizations: The Key to Future Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    If fights break out, if there are industrial accidents, if there is sabotage, if absenteeism increases, the organization is at the point of pushing...coordinators for eldercare; flexible work hours; telecommuting ; and four-day work weeks. Marriott Corporation and Cargill Inc., invite spouses 62 or... telecommuting options or remote work sites. Virtual offices can reduce real estate costs; the requisite supporting hardware/software packages usually cost

  9. Social Factors Impacting Recruitment and Retention of the Civilian Acquisition Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    productivity and enhancing performance, decreasing absenteeism and turnover, and inspiring work above and beyond what is asked of them…from the 1980s...These changes include giving faster, more frequent feedback, time off for community service, flextime and telecommuting opportunities. 11. A...flexible work schedules, part-time hires, and telecommuting . 3. Initiatives Underway a. Immediate Changes Initiative #1—Develop and Implement

  10. Department of Defense Implementation Plan for Pandemic Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    and Low Intensity Conflict (ASD(SO/LIC)) will provide policy oversight of the DoD Pandemic Influenza bilateral and multilateral international...flexible worksites (e.g., telecommuting ) and flexible work hours (e.g., staggered shifts) in the event of a pandemic. o Ensure development of active...however, special consideration must be given to “social distancing” in the workplace through 74 telecommuting , or other means, as an

  11. The Virtual Combat Air Staff. The Promise of Information Technologies,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-08-07

    and telecommuting . Companies that use these principles are demonstrating greater "agility" resulting in sig- nificant bottom-line success. This... telecommute . That is, they work at home or on the road, using a personal computer, interacting with the home office via telephone, modem, or fax machine. In...missions, such as airlift and in-flight refueling. The ATO essentially provided oversight to air operations involving on the order of 2,500 daily

  12. New Technologies and the World Ahead: The Top 20 Plus 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    robots will be able to perform tasking in an autonomous manner with- out active human oversight . The real questions are focused around (1) just how...of virtual communities and interest groups via the new communica- tions technology; a much higher diffusion of work via telecommut - ing, with a rise in...the number of telecommuters as a significant so- cioeconomic subgroup; rapid and widespread dissemination of knowledge (unlimited access for

  13. Auction Mechanisms For Allocating Individualized Non-monetary Retention Incentives in Complex Decision Environments: Evaluation Via Laboratory Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    15,000 and telecommuting at $8,000. In combination, these may become valued at $17,000. Again, reasons for sub-additive effects can only be...cost for most individuals, while sabbatical and telecommuting appear to cost the military more in relation to most people’s value for the NMIs. For...in controlled laboratory conditions. Davis and Holt continue with the concept and say, “Although the notion is somewhat novel in economics, there

  14. Results of the Navy Telework and Technology Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE...Background • In 2000, Public Law 106-346, §359, indicated that all executive agencies needed to introduce policies for telecommuting • Telework can be...indicated that all executive agencies had to introduce policies for telecommuting ; these policies have taken on additional importance in light of recent

  15. Gathering Ideas Online: Results of the Navy Personnel Command (NPC) Telework Virtual Suggestion Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT...participate in telecommuting (another term for telework), and in 2001, the Under Secretary of Defense memorandum provided a policy for telework within...Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education Telecommuting (Telework) Program (CHNAVPERSNOTE 5330). Washington, DC: Author. Commander, Navy

  16. Telepraca – ujęcie definicyjne, poruszane problemy i zalecenia na przyszłość

    OpenAIRE

    Hauk, Mateusz

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the notion of telework and show the most popular aspects of telecommuting. Detailed review of the literature points out that there is no one, widely accepted definition of telework. Thus, for the purpose of this article, telecommuting is defined as “Every sort of money-gained activity, caused by external motivation of the individual and/or induced by the organization, no matter what is the extent of time spent on teleworking. What is very important is th...

  17. Balancing Work Responsibilities and Family Needs: The Federal Civil Service Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    flexibility. This need not within the Federal Government. be the only alternative. Creative options are needed to achie%e and protect the rights...liLe a pr7nsonel en"’laved hi/ a telecommuting , and teleworking all refer to 1-g1 cheddhl. Imii e yoil ow n IOME. " paid employment away from the...traditional The Wall Street Journal office. Telecommuting and teleworking imply use of With the above quote, the Wall Street Journal high-tech

  18. Clinging to the Past: The Air Force’s War on Dual-Career Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE JUN 2014 2. REPORT...move…to a state where the laws are different…State law can be vastly different, especially with controlled substances…[such as] morphine, codeine...One telecommuter spouse (who is a telecommuter not by choice, but because of her Airman’s career) said she was told “you’ve made it as high as you’re

  19. Working from Home and the Willingness to Accept a Longer Commute

    OpenAIRE

    de Vos, Duco; Meijers, Evert J.; van Ham, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    It is generally found that workers are more inclined to accept a job that is located farther away from home if they have the ability to work from home one day a week or more (telecommuting). Such findings inform us about the effectiveness of telecommuting policies that try to alleviate congestion and transport related emissions, but they also stress that the geography of labour markets is changing due to information technology. We argue that estimates of the effect of working from home on com...

  20. Codifying Information Assurance Controls for Department of Defense (DoD) Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    this thesis would have never been possible. I would also like to thank my wife and children for their inspiration, motivation and encouragement... Telecommuting and Broadband Communications, August 2002. •SP 800-47, Security Guide for Interconnecting Information Technology Systems, September 2002

  1. Monetary and Non-monetary SWO Retention Bonuses: An Experimental Approach to the Combinatorial Retention Auction Mechanism (CRAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    aircraft carrier would not function properly nor could a guided missile destroyer fulfill its missions. Retention of qualified and motivated ...19 Jason Blake Ellis, “Variability of Valuation of Non-Monetary Incentives: Motivating and...this illustration offer individual values that exceed the Navy’s cost to provide the incentive for most individuals. On the other hand, telecommuting

  2. Peer Production in the U.S. Navy: Enlisting Coase’s Penguin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    and as a result, the net output of the project. This cannot be stressed enough, because it represents a significant advantage of PP over the firm... telecommuting and aligning reserve components with active duty personnel shortfalls. These policies are directed at affording individuals the freedom of

  3. Teleworking: Benefits and Pitfalls as Perceived by Professionals and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, Yehuda

    2000-01-01

    Interviews with 60 British teleworkers showed that working at home did not change their employee identity; time management skills were crucial; reduction of distractions was a prime benefit; and the home environment provided better relationships and support. Telecommuting resulted in changed attitudes, satisfaction, less stress, and better…

  4. Revolution in Military Manpower: The Citizen-Warrior Total Career Continuum Construct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-13

    stressed career-fields, professional military education, and other situations to provide additional 12 incentives for desired behaviors and force...authorized telecommuting workload. 33 An example of an accrued service obligation would be required active service for a specified period of time after

  5. Decreasing the Officer Accession Standard to Meet the 202k Manpower Requirement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-20

    accommodate their family and personal lives. They want jobs with flexibility, telecommuting options and the ability to go part time or leave the workforce... stress , high tempo training environment that has been highly efficient in screening those who are not qualified to be Marine officers. Within the

  6. Independent Engineering Assessment of the Army’s Transportation Plan for BRAC Recommendation #133 Project Fort Belvoir - Mark Center, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    development of the Transportation Plan did not recognize the traffic impact of pipeline development in the analysis process. As stressed in the ITE...service • Carpool, vanpool, “slug,” bicycle and pedestrian services • Express and local bus service • Flexible work hours and telecommuting

  7. Report of the Army Science Board Summer Study on Installations 2025

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    stresses , beha- vioral health problems, and injuries associated with war. Transform: IMCOM is modernizing installation management processes, policies...well. For example, "Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future" (Niels Bohr). Others stress that the future will be a lot like the...34homogenization" Endangered species Continuous and ubiquitous of society Islanding computing Telecommuting Wireless proliferation across appliances

  8. Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007: A Summary of Major Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-21

    costs of the program. Section 548 stresses that funding will supplement, not replace, funding provided by DOE under the Weatherization and State Energy... telecommuting programs. Reports to Congress are required for each of those programs. Section 1204 raises the Small Business Investment Act (SBIA

  9. An Analysis of Prior Enlisted Officer Retention at the 20-Year Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    U.S. workforce who handle multiple tasks under stressful circumstances, which makes them extremely marketable in the civilian sector. Headhunters...incentives that the DoD could offer include geographic stability, assignment choice, telecommuting , and sabbatical opportunities. A survey of junior

  10. Security Issues and Resulting Security Policies for Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    session, he drafts one more email to his therapist complaining about stress prior to retiring for the night. The next day, when he wakes up and returns... telecommuters or a web server to make internal information available to employees are identified upfront in the requirements analysis. The results of

  11. 75 FR 51328 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Notice of Request for Approval of a New Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    .... Fax: 1-202-493-2251. Mail: Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, West... cycle, internet usage and telecommuting. FHWA will be conducting a series of focus groups with... behavior, perspectives and social norms not covered through the statistical analysis. This is the first...

  12. Transportation | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    . Approximately 27% of NREL staff telecommutes at least one day per week, and approximately 35% of NREL staff work dioxide equivalent per mile. In 2005, NREL's fleet included 20 E-85 vehicles, 13 compressed natural gas E-85 vehicles, zero compressed natural gas vehicles, zero gas hybrid vehicles, two gasoline vehicles

  13. Paperless Contract Folder’s (PCF) DoD 5015.2 Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    affords the perspective necessary to creatively solve problems and suggest system improvements. These individuals will interface with the system...used while on TDY, to support contingency operations, or mobile workforce/ telecommuting 48 initiatives. It is organized like an electronic library

  14. Security Aspects of Computer Supported Collaborative Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    unstructured tasks at one end 11 and prescriptive tasks at the other. Unstructured tasks are those requiring creative input from a number of users and...collaborative technology begun to mature, it has begun to outstrip prevailing management attitudes. One barrier to telecommuting is the perception that

  15. A Meta-Analysis of the Antecedents of Voluntary Turnover in Studies Involving Active Duty Military Member Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    JoAP 2007 N N The Good, the Bad, and the Unknown About Telecommuting : Meta-Analysis of Psychological Mediators and Individual Consequences Gavin, J...Work, nonwork, & family influences Shalley, C. E., Gilson, L. L., & Blum, T. C. ACMJ 2000 ? N Matching Creativity Requirements and the Work

  16. MIT Lincoln Laboratory Facts 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    creativity . Representative Technical Positions ■■ Aerospace engineer ■■ Applications engineer ■■ Bioengineer ■■ Biologist 16 Facts 2012–2013...schedules, part-time employment, and telecommuting opportunities. Child Care The Technology Children’s Center facility in Lexington (TCC Lincoln

  17. Flexible Work Styles in the Corporate Research Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Katherine

    2000-01-01

    Explores the appropriateness for flexible work schedules for corporate librarians and provides insight into the benefits of flexible work arrangements in other industries. Highlights include technological changes that have changed roles and made resources available electronically; telecommuters; job sharing; and the effects of flexible…

  18. Analysis of the Effect of Historical Cultural Changes Relative to the Development of Affordability Excursions to Existing Parametric Cost Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-30

    the investigations. The output over the entire period of the test moved generally upward and exceeded the wildest estimates of the Stesters. Absenteeism ...Downside of Telecommuting ." Behavioral Sciences Newsletter XVII (March 14, 1988): 3-4. "The Make-or-Break Power of Corporate Culture." Behavioral

  19. Information Systems: How They Affect and Are Affected by Organization Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    perceived managerial benefits of telecommuting were increased productivity, increased employee satisfaction, and decreased labor costs. Over 76 percent of...acceptable behavior, and provides fair treatment of employees. One drawback of this tool is that worker performance may actually decrease to the levels...of interpersonal relationships * Selection for employment and promotion based on technical competence. This style attempts to minimize human factors

  20. Home Learning, Technology, and Tomorrow's Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieseberg, Rhonda L.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses characteristics and trends of home schools and workplaces. Use of computers and computer applications (CD-ROMS, interactive software, and networking) in home schooling provides a compatible environment for future home-based businesses and telecommuting trends. Sidebars include information on home schools on line; standardized test…

  1. European top managers' support for work-life arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Been, W.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357424662

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, work-life arrangements increasingly became an integral part of the organization of work. Arrangements such as telecommuting, flextime, part-time hours, and various types of leave arrangements are available to employees in many organizations. Top managers, such as CEOs, CFOs and

  2. The Australian Telecentre Program: A New Approach to Technology Transfer and Rural Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crellin, Ian R.

    Telecottages originated in Scandinavia in the 1980s in an attempt to reverse the decline of isolated communities by giving them access to information and services, facilities for training and distance education, and the opportunity to produce income through telecommuting. In 1992-1993, the Australian government began funding the Telecentre…

  3. The Mobile Worker in the Flexible Workplace. Trends and Issues Alert No. 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bettina Lankard

    New information technologies, changing work force demographics, rising customer expectations, transnational companies, and cost pressures are altering traditional views of what constitutes a workplace and have given rise to a new trend: the mobile worker in the flexible workplace. Two factors promote acceptance of telework or telecommuting: (1)…

  4. Engineering as a Social Activity: Preparing Engineers to Thrive in the Changing World of Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Fredricka F.; Mann, Derek T. Y.; Harris, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Key macro-trends are combining to create a new work context for the practice of engineering. Telecommuting and virtual teams create myriad possibilities and challenges related to managing work and workers. Social network technology tools allow for unprecedented global, 24/7 collaboration. Globalization has created hyper-diverse organizations,…

  5. The Future at Work. An Assessment of Changing Workplace Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interstate Conference of Employment Security Agencies, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Technological and demographic changes affect the nation's employment landscape. The most consistent trend of the century has been the shrinking workweek. By the year 2000, many workers will spend only 32 hours per week at work. Other workplace changes will continue the quest for more work satisfaction: technical trends (flextime/telecommuting);…

  6. What Mobile Learning and Working Remotely Can Learn from Each Other

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depryck, Koen

    2014-01-01

    To a large extent, developments in the workplace and in (especially formal) education still take place independently from each other, regardless of a strong (market driven) demand to bring both closer to each other. The divide is especially visible when looking at developments towards e-working (telecommuting, …) on the one hand and developments…

  7. Student Public Speaking: Creating the Confidence, Breaking through Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schornack, Gary R.; Beck, Charles E.

    As employers increase the use of teams and telecommuting in the workplace, the need for improved communication also accelerates both in written and oral modes. For oral communication or public speaking, a review of recent literature indicates this renewed emphasis, with numerous articles highlighting the need coming from disciplines ranging from…

  8. Mobility management and road safety.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    Mobility management stands for organizing 'smart travel' and focuses on reducing the amount of car mobility (particularly during peak hours) by stimulating travellers to refrain from travelling (telecommuting), to travel at a different time of day (avoiding peak hours) or to choose a different means

  9. Career Expectations and Perceptions of Part-Time MBA Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Lynn A.; Fish, Lauren A.

    2010-01-01

    In the U.S., part-time MBA students regard work/life balance as the critical factor that drives career expectations and perceptions. Job aspects and benefits/compensation closely follow in importance, while employee relations are valued less. Within work/life balance, students value job location, travel time, and telecommuting. Promotional…

  10. Attending a Presentation at a Distance in Real-Time via Skype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Barbara J.; Chang, Ching-Wen

    2010-01-01

    "Necessity is the mother of invention," as the saying goes, and in this case, it surely was. A telecommuting faculty for a Midwest public university wanted to see a graduate student's presentation as a guest speaker in an instructional technology course on campus. However, this faculty lives in another state, so that was impossible. As a daily…

  11. CrossTalk. The Journal of Defense Software Engineering. Volume 25, Number 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    both editorial oversight and technical review of the journal. CrossTalk’s mission is to encour- age the engineering development of software to improve...sending e-mail. (Robertson, 2011) Mobile Workers and related products - Telecommuting -- the home office - Pressure to provide tools and access to

  12. Disaster Response Contracting in a Post-Katrina World: Analyzing Current Disaster Response Strategies and Exploring Alternatives to Improve Processes for Rapid Reaction to Large Scale Disasters within the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    TELECOMMUTING / TELEWORKING..................................................60 E. NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL GLOBAL INFORMATION NETWORK ARCHITECTURE...issues. Much concern points to DHS’s failure to provide the broad federal oversight required by the National Response Plan (NRP). The NRP had only...Acquisition Officer did urgently request assistance from the DHS Office of the Inspector General (DHS-IG) for procurement oversight , and DHS-IG assigned

  13. How Can Civilian Retention in the Army Contracting Command Contracting Professional Community Be Affected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-30

    flexibility in the area of telecommuting and flexible schedules are things which have an interest for employees across the entire age spectrum (O’Shei, 2010...line or first level in an isolated vacuum without senior-level oversight would be problematic. This kind of employee needs higher level visibility

  14. Human Capital. Corps of Engineers Needs to Update Its Workforce Planning Process to More Effectively Address Its Current and Future Workforce Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management, the Federal Workforce, and the District of Columbia Committee on Homeland Security and...allows flex-time, telecommuting , or alternative work schedules. Page 17 GAO-08-596 Corps of Engineers Table 1: Examples of Human Capital...programs and policies; and provides analyses, recommendations, and other assistance to help Congress make informed oversight , policy, and funding

  15. The 2009 Influenza A(H1N1) Outbreak: Selected Legal Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-21

    primarily against marginalized, nonwhite persons underscores the need for legal oversight —if only so that affected communities can be assured of the absence...settings. Potential strategies and or guidance addressing telecommuting , alternative schedules, or modified operating hours for retail establishments

  16. U.S. Army Acquisition Workforce: Reflecting Modern Structural Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    provisions ensuring oversight over a massive infusion of contracts, state grants and other measures. Interviews with acquisition workforce specialists... telecommuting .”3 Incentives for retaining qualified acquisition workforce members are discussed. Surveys were analyzed primarily for contextual...and the players who now have a voice in this expanded system. One major change was the use of the Joint Requirements Oversight Council (JROC

  17. MIT Lincoln Laboratory 2011 Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Director, Assistant Director for Operations, and the Director’s Office Staff, in conjunction with the Steering Committee and with oversight from the...as offer- ing flexible work schedules, part-time employment, and telecommuting opportunities. Child Care The Technology Children’s Center facility

  18. Integrating Monetary and Non-Monetary Retention Incentives for the U.S. Navy Dental Corps Officers Utilizing the Combinatorial Retention Auction Mechanism (CRAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    include flexible work schedules, sabbaticals, educational opportunities, telecommuting , and so on. The types of incentives to be offered to employees vary...Guaranteed Promotion / Less Oversight from Leadership / Less Dependence on Contractors and Non-military Providers 48 Male 51 and above O-6 Single

  19. MIT Lincoln Laboratory 2010 Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Associate Director, Assistant Director for Operations, and the Director’s Office Staff, in conjunction with the Steering Committee and with oversight from...employees in maintaining such a balance, as well as offer- ing flexible work schedules, part-time employment, and telecommuting opportunities. Child Care

  20. Army Energy Strategy for the End of Cheap Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    increased fuel efficiency in any Army vehicles or other power generation equipment. This oversight results in a logistics system where, “over 70...become a victim of increasing energy costs. Living close to one’s job location as well as both telecommuting and teleconferencing will become the

  1. Department of Defense Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan FY 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    interoperability of equipment; and the management and oversight of contingency basing. Improved contingency base sustainability will also enhance mission...with communicating classified information from alternate work locations. In FY 2011, NGA developed and began implementing a telecommuting policy...operating procedures. DLA Disposition Services strengthened its oversight of the electronics demanufacturing process in FY 2011 by tightening

  2. 2012 Survey of Active Duty Spouses: Tabulations of Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Survey Reporting Tool. A team consisting of Deepika Batra, Malikah Dorvil, and Amy Campbell, SRA International, Inc., completed quality control for...would you prefer to take a virtual/ telecommuting position or an office/building position outside of your home...224 d. Not being able to stop or control worrying ........................................... 226 56. Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-4

  3. Little Green Lies: Dissecting the Hype of Renewables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 11 MAY...Analogy ii. Avoid Unintended Consequences B) Cultural Shifts (Load Flattening) i. Telecommuting ii. Dynamic Tollway Pricing C) Equipment Selection (Load

  4. Sustainable Offices: Small Practices for Big Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE MAY 2012 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES...16 Reducing Fuel Consumption • Participate in meetings via telephone • Telecommute or alternate work schedules • Carpool • Bike or walk around

  5. 76 FR 41274 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/ALL-033 Reasonable Accommodations Records...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ..., telecommuting, or reassignment to a vacant position; and/or (3) acquisition or modification of equipment or... the control of an agency for which information is retrieved by the name of an individual or by some... possession or under the control of DHS by complying with DHS Privacy Act regulations, 6 CFR Part 5. The...

  6. 75 FR 29933 - Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Design Standards for New Federal Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... Federal agency has significant control over the design of the building (e.g., ``lease-constructs''). DOE..., relocation facilities, telecommuting centers, similar Federal facilities, and any other buildings or..., harbor, flood control, reclamation or power projects, for chemical manufacturing or development projects...

  7. The Combinatorial Retention Auction Mechanism (CRAM): Integrating Monetary and Non-monetary Reenlistment Incentives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK xiii List of Abbreviations and Acronyms AC Air Traffic Controller (Navy rating) ACOL Annualized Cost...Sailors (air traffic controller and fire controlmen) and Officers (Surface Warfare Officers). Although the idea of flexible benefits packages has...platform of choice, billet of choice, geographic stability, leave sabbatical (for education and pregnancy) and telecommuting . Appendix A contains a

  8. Army Acquisition and Contracting Personnel Requirements: How are the Army’s Current Recruitment, Development and Retention Programs Meeting Current and Future Personnel Requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    shaping the makeup of the workforce, but rather focused more on controlling the number of personnel. To improve the acquisition process, DoD implemented...including internal controls ), personnel, organizations, training, policy and regulations, as well as looked into legislative solutions, to establish...programs, telecommuting policy, physical wellness programs, mobility and cross-functional developmental opportunities, availability of mentoring, coaching

  9. 75 FR 63404 - Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... facilities, warehouses, record centers, relocation facilities, telecommuting centers, similar Federal... is on or used in connection with river, harbor, flood control, reclamation or power projects, for... Federal agency may not have control over the design of a renovation of a leased building in which the...

  10. Army Sustainability and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE AUG 2010 2...strategies that DOD and the Army have implemented are policies such as buy-ing green products for cleaning and promoting tele- work or telecommuting

  11. 76 FR 19753 - Applications for New Awards; Vocational Rehabilitation Services Projects for American Indians...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    ... employment, including self-employment, telecommuting, or business ownership. Priority: In accordance with 34..., Application Control Center, Attention: (CFDA Number 84.250H) LBJ Basement Level 1, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW..., Application Control Center, Attention: (CFDA Number 84.250H) 550 12th Street, SW., Room 7041, Potomac Center...

  12. Department of Labor Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ..., consistent with the increasing emphasis on flexiplace and telecommuting, to allow for automated or electronic... development of adverse health effects; exposure assessment and monitoring methods; exposure control methods... assess current exposures and control methods being used to reduce employee exposures to beryllium. OSHA...

  13. Measurement of environmental impacts of telework adoption amidst change in complex organizations. AT and T survey methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkyns, Robert; Blazek, Michele; Roitz, Joseph [AT and T, 179 Bothin Road, 94930 Fairfax, CA (United States)

    2002-10-01

    Telecommuting practices and their environmental and organizational performance impacts have stimulated research across academic disciplines. Although telecommuting trends and impact projections are reported, few true longitudinal studies involving large organizations have been conducted. Published studies typically lack the research design elements to control a major confounding variable: rapid and widespread organizational change. Yet social science 'Best Practices' and market research industry quality control procedures exist that can help manage organizational change effects and other common sources of measurement error. In 1992, AT and T established a formal, corporate-wide telecommuting policy. A research and statistical modeling initiative was implemented to measure how flexible work arrangements reduce automotive emissions. Annual employee surveys were begun in 1994. As telecommuting benefits have been increasingly recognized within AT and T, the essential construct has been redefined as 'telework.' The survey's scope has expanded to address broader organization issues and provide guidance to multiple internal constituencies. This paper focuses upon the procedures used to reliably measure the adoption of telework practices and model their environmental impact, and contrasts those procedures with other, less reliable methodologies.

  14. 75 FR 21823 - Semiannual Agenda of Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ..., consistent with the increasing emphasis on flexiplace and telecommuting, to allow for automated or electronic... development of adverse health effects; exposure assessment and monitoring methods; exposure control methods... assess current exposures and control methods being used to reduce employee exposures to beryllium. OSHA...

  15. Allocating Non-Monetary Incentives for Navy Nurse Corps Officers: Menu Method vs. Bid Method Combinatorial Retention Auction Mechanism (CRAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Replicability and Control ..................................................................60 2. Procedural Regularity...sabbaticals, telecommuting , and childcare is difficult. In most cases, the administrative cost and other intangible cost could prove almost impossible...voluntary vs. non-voluntary selectees), and lack of control when it comes to their career paths were cited as negative contributors to recruitment and

  16. 75 FR 34298 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Vocational...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... prepare for and engage in gainful employment, including self-employment, telecommuting, or business... a signed copy of the SF 424 to the Application Control Center after following these steps: (1) Print.... (4) Fax the signed SF 424 to the Application Control Center at (202) 245-6272. We may request that...

  17. Research and Development for Advanced Tele-maintenance Capability with Remote Serial Console Access and Proactive Monitoring of Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    telemaintenance was the use of  conventional  access  solution  designed  for  telecommuters   and  tele‐supporters  in  the  Information  Technology...are:    1. Telecommuter   systems  (hardware,  software,  or  both)  are  in‐band  or  network‐ based access solution.   They work effectively when the...and  limitation of  access  motivated  by  political  agenda;  this  type  of  challenge  can’t  be  addressed  by  the  scope  of  the  research

  18. Managing the Work and Family Roles. Does Flexibility Reduce the Negative Interference? An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălina CICEI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Balancing work and family demands has become a great challenge for employees. By providing flexible benefits, organizations actively engage in endeavours aimed at reducing the negative interference between the two life spheres. Even if some empirical studies have examined the effects of family supportive initiatives, focusing on flexibility, however, the findings tend to lack consistency. If flexible benefits are traditionally associated with reduced levels of work-family conflict, in some studies no significant results have been reported. Another line of research suggests that flexibility can actually increase the negative work-family interface. From this perspective, the current study examines the relationship between the flexibility benefits used and work-family conflict, focusing especially on the role flextime and telecommuting. Using flexible benefits is negatively associated with time and strain-based conflict, the effects of flextime and telecommuting varying accordingly to the type of conflict examined. Limitations of the current study andfuture research directions are examined.

  19. The effect of alternative work arrangements on women's well-being: a demand-control model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelloway, E K; Gottlieb, B H

    1998-01-01

    The growth of women's participation in the labor force and evidence of the conflict they experience between job and family demands have spurred many employers to introduce alternative work arrangements such as flextime, job sharing, and telecommuting. Drawing on data gained from a sample of women (N = 998) in two large Canadian organizations, this study evaluates two mediational models of the impact of alternative work arrangements on women's stress and family role competence. Specifically, it tests and finds support for the hypotheses that (a) work arrangements involving scheduling flexibility (telecommuting and flextime) promote these aspects of women's well-being by increasing their perceived control over their time, and (b) arrangements involving reduced hours of employment (part-time employment and job sharing) promote well-being by reducing perceived job overload. Discussion of these findings centers on their implications for employed women, their employers, and future research.

  20. The impact of the residential built environment on work at home adoption frequency: An example from Northern California

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Wei (Laura); Mokhtarian, Patricia L.; Handy, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Working at home is widely viewed as a useful travel-reduction strategy, and it is partly for that reason that considerable research related to telecommuting and home-based work has been conducted in the last two decades. This study examines the effect of residential neighborhood built environment (BE) factors on working at home. After systematically presenting and categorizing various relevant elements of the BE and reviewing related studies, we develop a multinomial logit (MNL) model of work...

  1. Nuclear and Solar Energy: Implications for Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    sequestration, conservation, and telecommuting to several energy production changes to include both solar and nuclear options.FF80FF Stephen Pacala...nations from developing a weapons program when motivated to do so. India provides a useful historic example. India’s weapons program began with a...civilian power programs, for sufficiently motivated governments.FF162FF However, those who make such arguments

  2. The Role of Neighborhood Characteristics in the Adoption and Frequency of Working at Home: Empirical Evidence from Northern California

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Wei; Mokhtarian, Patricia; Handy, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Working at home is widely viewed as a useful travel-reduction strategy, and partly for that reason, considerable research related to telecommuting and home-based work has been conducted in the last two decades. The contribution of this study is to examine the effect of residential neighborhood built environment (BE) factors on working at home. Using data from a survey of eight neighborhoods in Northern California, we develop a multinomial logit (MNL) model of work-at-home (WAH) frequency. Pot...

  3. A Case Study Investigation into Creating a Joint Physical Evaluation Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury…. The service men and women who embody what is best about America should get the best care we have...operations are likely to suffer from at least one of the three signature injuries of the war – Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Major...shelf technologies with the purpose of broadening the use of telecommuting for all PDBR members. Medical professionals are a critical asset to this

  4. Evaluation of Post-Trial Reviews of Courts-Martial within the Department of the Navy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    Reserve judges use "flex drills" (roughly equivalent to telecommuting ) to review many appellate cases submitted for adjudication. These cases are mostly...significant stress " was evident in the Region Legal Service Office commands and was "especially acute" in field commands that were “operational or joint...Deployments and increased judge advocate requirements for which authorizations do not exist have imposed additional stress . The upcoming Section

  5. A Quantitative Methodology for Vetting Dark Network Intelligence Sources for Social Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Figure V-7 Source Stress Contributions for the Example ............................................ V-24  Figure V-8 ROC Curve for the Example...resilience is the ability of the organization “to avoid disintegration when coming under stress (Milward & Raab, 2006, p. 351).” Despite numerous...members of the network. Examples such as subordinates directed to meetings in place of their superiors, virtual participation via telecommuting

  6. A Systems Engineering Approach to Address Human Capital Management Issues in the Shipbuilding Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    sons Nicholas and David. They each experienced the highs and lows (and stress ) of the SEM PD-21 Program as much or more than I, and took up the...Langford, 2007b). For example, a 57 telecommuter (stakeholder) may have a problem with the speed of their home internet service. Needs derived...industry have echoed this need. In Keane’s (2007) presentation to the National Naval Engineering Education Conference, he stressed that successful

  7. Sustainability Product Properties in Building Information Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    preferred car- pool parking spots, preferred low-emitting/fuel-efficient vehicle parking spots, bike racks and telecommuting as options to promote good...most part, these have not been in a computable form. Fallon then stressed the importance of a common conceptual framework, using the IFC model...organizations would be formed with the help of Mr. Kalin. He stressed the goal of the project was to create templates that would be free to use

  8. CrossTalk. The Journal of Defense Software Engineering. Volume 14, Number 5, May 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    superb leadership, and adequate funding to fuel the program engine. A good start requires disciplined requirements generation and plotting the right course...multimedia products. • Self -contained, closed products. • Desk-top and portable computers. • Information documentation and support. The entire regulation...machines prefer certain e-mail clients. The Oracle sales force lives on laptops and prefers different e-mail clients. Some employees telecommute and

  9. Defense AT&L (Volume 35, Number 6, November-December 2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    you do? My creativity and nontraditional thinking make it possible for me to envision projects and solutions in eclectic ways. What are your interests...Generation Y’ers want jobs with flexibility and telecommuting options that allow them to work, yet at the same time give them the opportunity to leave the...Generation Y’ers are known for their ability to multitask. They seek out creative challenges and view colleagues as vast resources from whom to gain

  10. Impact of Homeland Security Communities of Learning: Developing a Strategy for Training and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    to work with others from different cultures to discuss and implement new ideas; 2. Emphasis on integrated creative problem solving capacity; 3...Advances in technology also allow for creative solutions to the problem of updated training for Emergency Responders. The panel felt that...on this discussion, the panel then re-defined flexible work schedules (Tr-6) to include telecommuting for those with this capability. The panel

  11. Cutting the Stovepipes: An Improved Staff Model for the Modern Unified Commander

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    quick to point out, their profit was the result of creating an environment that liberated people’s creativity , nurtured their commitment, and inspired...production networks, and telecommuting .”23 These businesses operate in an electronic world (vice physical) and are facilitated by an array of information...achieve the efficiencies and creativity businesses have gained in the virtual and reengineered environments, while at the same time retaining the

  12. U.S. Army War College: Key Strategic Issues List

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    soldier? 6. Leadership, Personnel Management, and Culture: a. What is the future of telecommuting in the Army and its implications on performance...FTAs) beneficial to all sectors of society? How can nations seek ways to benefit creatively and create sustainable long-term growth using FTA’s...Developing imaginative leaders who are able to produce creative solutions to complex problems. (USASOC G-3X) c. Study the impact of service members not

  13. Leadership and Diversity in the Canadian Forces: A Conceptual Model and Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    cooperative behaviour and produce more creative and higher quality solutions (Kossek et al., in press). The results of a recent meta-analysis, however...heterogeneous group (i.e., increased creativity and better problem solving). Finally, there can be drawbacks associated with diversity, including a...institute practices such as DRDC Toronto CR 2006-135 35 flextime, job sharing, and telecommuting for enlisted personnel than for civilians and in

  14. Commission on the National Guard and Reserves: Transforming the National Guard and Reserves into a 21st-Century Operational Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-31

    positions that last a lifetime are expected to be replaced with less permanent jobs; with new approaches to office jobs, such as telecommuting ; and...also spoke of relying on Google searches to find relevant information.251 Some employers are forming very creative and successful partnerships with...the way we think, the way we train, the way we exercise, and the way we fight.” To transform the military he “encourag[ed] a culture of creativity

  15. Proceedings of the Annual DTIC (Defense Technical Information Center) Users Conference Held at Alexandria, Virginia on 24-26 October 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-26

    34 telecommuting ," meaning people do not necessarily have to go from one place to another but all ■we need is for the information to flow from one... absentee ballot system. There are many users who for one reason or another cannot attend the annual meeting. These sites were essentially...newsletter and read it, the User Council established an absentee ballot system. We did receive a number of ballots that way. As best we could, we

  16. Environmental Impact Statement For the Disposal and Reuse of Hunters Point Shipyard Volume 2: Response to Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    absentee landlord, wage work for faceless distant others, under- employment, and ceding to owners elsewhere the power to make and keep these lands...however, (assets and sustained incomes) community control of land can succeed where the ’ absentee landlord’ approach fails. Attachment 1 to Comments of...parking 60 management guidelines; flexible work time/ telecommuting ; shuttle service; monitoring 61 of physical transportation improvements; ferry service

  17. Remote Working Technologies, Benefits and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, Gurjit

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: "More and more . . . work is becoming something you do, not a place you go to." - Woody Leonhard, The Underground Guide to Telecommuting (1995). Many organisations now have Remote Working initiatives, not just the large multi-nationals, but increasingly small and medium enterprises as well. There are many benefits of Remote Working which firms can exploit to increase performance such as cost savings, work-life balance, increased productivity, reduced absenteeism, loyalty, re...

  18. AFMC Civilian Retention: Forecasting Policy on the Future of the Civilian Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    encourage the expansion of flexible work schedules, job sharing, part-time employment , alternative work schedules, telecommuting , and satellite work...Daft & Steers, 1986). If a person is not receiving the same perceived benefits as another, he may feel inequity which leads to dissatisfaction (Daft... drawbacks were that the commission worked in a vacuum without guidance and faulty data. The Defense Base Closure and Realignment Act of 1990

  19. Optimizing the Long-Term Capacity Expansion and Protection of Iraqi Oil Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    remotely using only a computer and a high-speed internet connection. I only wish that the Navy as a whole were as receptive to telecommuting as you...INTRODUCTION Formula for success: Rise early, work hard , strike oil. Jean Paul Getty (1892-1976), American Industrialist and Founder of the Getty...In truth , Iraq has neglected its lifeblood industry for far too long and requires a capital expansion and security plan - as well as the financial

  20. Education in the Information Age, Conference Proceedings April 17-19, 1999,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-08-13

    more about being a beginner. Also, our culture is hard on beginners, claiming they’re wet behind the ears, new kids on the block, and rookies... telecommuting from anywhere to anywhere. Coupled with extensive desktop computing power, collaborative planning and telepresence will be the norm. This, EC/EDI...and by extension, worth paying more for? The truth is that technical performance is only one part of what’s needed to describe how we living

  1. Productivity Improvement by the Crawford Slip Method. How to Write, Publish, Instruct, Supervise, and Manage for Better Job Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    improvers of many kinds. This fear. Anonymous slip writing lets the truth come instruction begins with preservice courses for under- through. graduates. It...into something grand. might be achieved the hard way, with too much cost in That will beat what you can do alone from blank paper. money, material, time...not office cutter, local networks is " Telecommuting ," or working at from 20 Pound bond paper home instead of the central company office. Travel 8 48

  2. Imported Oil and U.S. National Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Facing the Hard Truths About Energy: A Comprehensive View to 2030 of Global Oil and Natural Gas, Washington, D.C., July 2007. As of February 14, 2009...example, if consumers could switch easily from commuting by car to mass transit or telecommuting when fuel costs rise, the effects on the U.S. economy...levels by 2011. Higher gas prices have apparently hit the Belarusian economy hard . The Lukashenko government has been looking for loans to cover

  3. U.S. Army War College Key Strategic Issues List

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    post “operational or strategic event,” compare the pre-event modeled outcome to the post- event ground truth . Considering the elements of PMESII...Personnel Management, and Culture: 1. What is the future of telecommuting in the Army and its implications on performance and productivity? 2. On...requirements. VI. Underground Facilities as a National Security Challenge: 1. The construction and employment of Hard and Deeply Buried Targets (HDBTs

  4. The Energy Conversation: The First 3 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    emerging clear and present reality] 7“Facing the Hard Truths about Energy” National Petroleum Council, 2007. www.npchardtruthsreport.org 8 Verrastro and...commuting five days/week, dispersing eight tons of pollutants into the environment and using 233 hours for travel to and from work w Telecommuting three... The Energy Conversation the first 3 years Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of

  5. CrossTalk: The Journal of Defense Software Engineering. Volume 18, Number 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Bollinger The MITRE Corporation1 Progress brings new dangers: Powerful home computers, inexpensive high-speed Internet access, telecommuting , and software...been using for years. Sure enough, GIANT was able to finish removing the hard - core spyware. At some point, my Internet security package had been... The sad truth is that if you do nothing more than attach a Windows PC to the Internet over a high- speed line, it will be subjected to the first

  6. Measuring Multi-tasking Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    sociological factors pertaining to social structures and values. For example, telecommuting , job-sharing, and families’ attempts to decrease the amount...achievement strivings (actively working hard to achieve goals), and poly- chronicity ( the preference for working on more than one task at a time) with MT...Joslyn note (2000), this description of ADM makes it sound exceedingly easy. However, nothing could be farther from the truth . The task qualifies as an MT

  7. Job Search on the Internet, E-Recruitment, and Labor Market Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    CA,90407-2138 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11...United States offered the option of telecommuting at least one day a week, according to a 2008 survey by the...expression can easily deviate from zero . To estimate an unbiased estimate of  , which is the effect of 45 using the Internet, this study uses two

  8. Network Support for Group Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    telecommuting and ubiquitous computing [40], the advent of networked multimedia, and less expensive technology have shifted telecollaboration into...of Computer Engineering,Santa Cruz,CA,95064 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10...participants A and B, the payoff structure for choosing two actions i and j is P = Aij + Bij . If P = 0, then the interaction is called a zero -sum game, and

  9. Continuity of Operations Planning (COOP): A Strategy for Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-18

    5050 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR...a position of building an alternate command and control site from ground zero , with little time or thought going into the functions, capacities and...above, there are two other approaches available to leaders in selecting a site. One option is to allow employees to telecommute and work from home

  10. Air and Space Power Journal. Volume 23, Number 2, Summer 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    on to secre­ taries, refusing to allow telecommuting , and insisting that all staff work arrive in bound form. Those people slowly lost out in the...tomorrow to as far as 20 years in the future.5 As the technical director for global threat, i provide senior oversight and guidance to the group’s... oversight of its outlying terri­ tory, regular use and maintenance of aircraft, increased aviation training and proficiency, revenue-generation

  11. Civilian Talent Management: A Proposed Approach for the Aberdeen Proving Ground Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    in the critical skills necessary for effective oversight . For example, over the past 10 years, the Department’s contractual obligations have nearly...managers—to conduct effective oversight (Department of Defense Quadrennial Defense Review Report, February 10, 2010, p. 76). This was also a key concern...policy so that older workers will not feel compelled to retire as soon as they are eligible. Concepts such as flextime, part-time, telecommuting , and

  12. Report to Congress on the Activities of the DoD Office of Technology Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    protection, and protected remote access solutions for telecommuting . NetTop inventors/engineers of this technology will soon be engaged in a CRADA...from each Service and Defense Agency and representatives from the Joint Requirements Oversight Council. An annual call for TTI proposals is...Electronics Oversight Council proposed the start of the RH Microelectronics Advanced Technology Development (RHMATD) program. The program called for two

  13. Defense AT&L (Volume 36, Number 1, January-February 2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    Requirements Oversight Coun- cil-approved Ground Soldier System—the next version of Land Warrior, which supports Future Combat Systems and future force...servicemembers, and enhancing medical situational awareness for operational com- manders. Headquartered at Fort Detrick, Md., MC4 is under the oversight ...which I have re- trained myself to work around. He often works from home using telecommuting capa- bilities. A special telephone and voice-activated com

  14. Vision 2015: A Globally Networked and Integrated Intelligence Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    the third career (not job). • Telecommuting is a way of life, not an agency initiative. • Savvy in rapidly accessing and evaluating public...reinforced by policy and process. While we must have oversight into the full range of our partnership activities, their success ultimately comes down to...focused on product oversight and review. We will need leader- ship development programs, performance evaluation systems, and an incentive

  15. Achieving World Class: An Independent Review of the Design Plans for the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and the Fort Belvoir Community Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    There was an attempt to provide oversight , foster inclusion and develop an integrated healthcare delivery system within the current Service cultures...IT in the NCR. The “J6 JPG provides oversight of IM/IT initiatives for the Joint Operating Area (JOA).” (Rowland, 2009) Membership for the JPG...lateral violence; 3) supporting professional development; and 4) offering services such as child and elder care programs, telecommuting , flexible work

  16. The Prioritization of Critical Infrastructure for a Pandemic Outbreak in the United States Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-16

    stems mostly from a lack of common understanding and oversight mechanism in government or business for what fully constitutes most sectors and sub...and priorities during a pandemic event. This alignment will require substantial executive-level sponsorship, governance, and oversight to ensure...increase in telecommuting during a pandemic. The sector continues to work diligently refining best practices, business continuity plans, and homeland

  17. An Independent Review of the Design Plans for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and the Fort Belvoir Community Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    provide oversight , foster inclusion and develop an integrated healthcare delivery system within the current Service cultures. In May 2007, NCA military...provides oversight of IM/IT initiatives for the Joint Operating Area (JOA).” (Rowland, 2009) Membership for the JPG includes the Chief Information...professional development; and 4) offering services such as child and elder care programs, telecommuting , flexible work schedules, and employee

  18. Optimizing Security of Cloud Computing within the DoD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    expediency in new service roll out, availability (a loss of one component will not disconnect all components), and mobility (the ability to telecommute ).30...practices as well as oversight of administrative privileges and access.129  Scarce federal security guidance/procurement strategy. Comprehensive...systems; the intent of the program is to provide oversight without duplication of effort.258 The CCAC president is calling FedRAMP a “unified, risk

  19. Coordinating everyday life in the Netherlands. A holistic quantitative approach to the analysis of ICT-related and other work-life balance strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Hubers, C.; Schwanen, T.; Dijst, M.

    2011-01-01

    Due to women’s increased participation in the labour force, more and more family-households are now juggling paid labour and care-giving in space and time and do so in many different ways. Much research and policy about how households try to establish a satisfactory work-life balance single out particular coping strategies, such as telecommuting or the mobilizing of informal help by relatives or friends. While insightful, foregrounding single strategies may oversimplify the complex reality of...

  20. An Assessment of Talent Management Practices Targeting GS-12/13 Level Members of the Army Acquisition Corps Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE MAY 2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE An... Control , Strategy or Vision, Challenging Work, Collaboration or Teamwork, Work Culture, Shared Gains, Communication, Concern for People, Technology...As show in Figure 5, the top recruiting strategy, selected by both groups, was an emphasis on flex telework or telecommute programs (Holtshouse, 2009

  1. Medical Equipment Tele- and Condition-Based Maintenance with Enhanced Remote Diagnostic Access (RDA) and Computer Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE APR 2010 2. REPORT...The second is a ‘mechanical’ part that is controlled by circuit boards and is accessible by the technician via the serial console and running...was the use of conventional remote access solution designed for telecommuters or teleworkers in the Information Technology (IT) world, such as a

  2. A Case Study Investigation into Creating a Joint Physical Evaluation Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    technologies with the purpose of broadening the use of telecommuting for all PDBR members. Medical professionals are a critical asset to this work...Services to relinquish power and control , even with the promise of equal 24 contribution. This is especially true when it comes to making... control of the fit/unfit decision from the individual Service. There were a number of reasons voiced for this concern. Primarily, board members

  3. Retention Quick Polls of Three Navy Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE...sabbaticals, and telecommuting , which differ from traditional incentives in that they are non-monetary (Faram, 2007). Collecting Data on Retention... Controller (AC), Aviation Machinist’s Mate (AD), Aviation Electrician’s Mate (AE), Aerographer’s Mate (AG), Aviation Structural Mechanic (AM, AME

  4. FY2012 Annual Report for Director Operational Test & Evaluation (DOT&E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    or theft due to inconsistent telecommuting policies, IA vulnerabilities, inadequate control of budget targets, and large account imbalances. • DEAMS...currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2012 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FY2012 Annual...rules of engagement) to circumvent controls and processes; and they assess the audit processes that are in place to catch fraud or theft. In addition

  5. The Road to Success in Africa is Paved in Asphalt: Transportation Infrastructure Development in Emerging Economies as a Way to Achieve National Strategic Policy Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 13-06-2014...the Empire of Japan was quickly dominating the coastline and taking away the littoral region from Chinese control . Before the United States entered...systems that alert travelers to new routes, advanced rail systems, high occupancy vehicle lanes, bus lanes, flexible work hours, and telecommuting

  6. Knowledge Enabled Logistics (KEL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN...decentralization of work, globalization, telecommuting , emphasis on constant learning, and greater use of teams within the workplace. While these...visible within military Command and Control (C2) operations. The focus of the current report is on C2 within a logistics domain. 2.1

  7. Implantación de una Plataforma GNU/Linux en la gestión del hogar digital focalizada a la domótica,multimedia-ocio y las TICs.

    OpenAIRE

    Zálvez Rico, Juan Pedro

    2011-01-01

    In the near future, access to data and home automation systems in the home supported by the implementation of GNU-Linux operating systems in our homes, a reality of the first order for the implementation of real homes and automated digital awarding a cost reduction by the intensive use of the resources provided directly by the Open Software Community. The future possibilities seem almost endless: telecommuting, centralized household accounts, software distributed online training for young peo...

  8. A Feasibility Study of Implementing a Bring-Your-Own-Computing-Device Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    telecom charges is applicable to a corporate environment that allows for telecommuting or where employees require data access to their devices while...do not want to try to control their students’ computers, but the focus of BYOD in education is generally on educational outcomes (Sweeney, 2012). C...of the computer system, while application software is responsible for controlling the specific command tasks. Therefore, the relationship between

  9. Assessing the impacts of transport policies through energy system simulation: The case of the Medellin Metropolitan Area, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-Jaramillo, Juan Esteban; Arango-Aramburo, Santiago; Álvarez-Uribe, Karla C.; Jaramillo-Álvarez, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The transport sector contributes to climate change, and it has been the target of public interventions to improve quality of life and reduce CO_2 emissions. The Medellin metropolitan area (Colombia) has developed a mass transportation system called Metro de Medellin that integrates train lines, a tram line, BRTs, gondola lift systems, a bicycle-sharing system and hybrid buses to reduce traffic and CO_2 emissions. Despite these efforts, pollution is peaking, and the situation requires new plans. The aim of this paper is to quantify the emissions that will be avoided by the implementation of Medellin's Master Plan, the promotion of telecommuting, and the development of a transport energy model for Medellin between 2010 and 2040. The results indicate that combining the promotion of mass transportation and telecommuting could represent 5.65 MTons of CO_2 equivalent avoided by 2040 (9.4% reduction) and estimated total energy savings of 86,575.55 TJ. Therefore, it is necessary to implement complementary policies in order to achieve the commitment assumed by Colombia at the COP 21. The analytical framework used here could be applied to other regions in order to evaluate environmental and energy mitigation strategies, especially in the developing world where similar policies may be in place. - Highlights: • This paper models Aburra's valley transport sector using LEAP model platform. • Impact analysis includes: telecommuting, massive transport investments. • Implementing a combination of the scenarios decreases emissions by 9.4%. • Aggressive transport policies should be made to achieve mitigation targets.

  10. Interactions of Transportation and Telecommunications Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dholakia, N.; Mundorf, N.; Dholakia, R. R.; Xiao, J. J.

    2002-05-01

    This project was designed as a social science complement to the engineering studies supported by the University of Rhode Island (URI) Transportation Center (URITC). The project developed a behavioral knowledge base about the actual and intended transport and telecommunications behaviors of transportation users, with a particular focus on southern Rhode Island. Background studies, drawing from literature on telecommuting and travel behavior, led to the development of a generalized framework to understand the transport-telecom interactions. In particular, we developed working papers dealing with transport aspects of e-retailing and distance education. In the empirical part of this project, two major field studies were completed. The first of these was a survey of URI students, probing their car travel, carpool, bus use, and Internet use behaviors. The students were surveyed first by telephone, selected randomly from a list obtained from the Register's office. A total of 220 students responded to the telephone survey. Characteristics of the telephone survey respondents are shown in Appendix B. This was supplemented by an in-class survey of 107 students conveniently selected from the courses taught by the research faculty. This supplementary questionnaire probed the students more deeply regarding their motivations for transportation and technology use issues. The second major field study was a mail survey of southern Rhode Island residents. In this survey, we not only investigated actual travel and transport behaviors but also measured attitudes towards the environment and alternative transport and telecommuting solutions. At the time of writing this report, about 850 individuals had responded to our mail questionnaire. Characteristics of the resident sample are described in Appendix B. The results have laid the groundwork for our second year project where we plan to study the impact of specific interventions on transportation and telecommuting attitudes and intentions.

  11. Ökad arbetstrivsel och bättre resultat genom tjänstedesign : Att skapa möjlighet för distansarbete i naturen

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudron, Tjalling

    2014-01-01

    The report contains a survey on telecommuting in nature and how concepts around that information could look like. The client for the project is Lars Sandberg, Dotank AB in Karlstad. The project is implemented in the course Bachelor of Science in Innovation and Design, MSCG22 of the faculty of health, science and technology at Karlstad University in the spring of 2014. Working flexibly and remotely in the so-called knowledge based professions is growing. That nature is an important source of r...

  12. Don’t Work, Work at Home, or Commute? Discrete Choice Models of the Decision for San Francisco Bay Area Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Ory, D T; Mokhtarian, Patricia L

    2005-01-01

    Using socio-demographic, personality, and attitudinal data from 1,680 residents of the San Francisco Bay Area, we develop and estimate binary, multinomial, and nested logit models of the choice to work or not, whether or not to work at home, and whether to commute all of the time or some of the time (either by only working part time, or by working a compressed work week, or by telecommuting some of the time). To our knowledge, these are the first models of all these choices simultaneously. Th...

  13. Modeling the Joint Labor-Commute Engagement Decisions of San Francisco Bay Area Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Ory, David T.; Mokhtarian, Patricia L.

    2005-01-01

    Using socio-demographic, personality, and attitudinal data from 1,680 residents of the San Francisco Bay Area, we develop and estimate binary, multinomial, and nested logit models of the choice to work or not, whether or not to work at home, and whether to commute all of the time or some of the time (either by only working part time, or by working a compressed work week, or by telecommuting some of the time). To our knowledge, these are the first models of all these choices simultaneously. Th...

  14. Going the distance for certified cancer registrars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, Amanda; Kolender, Ellen R

    2009-01-01

    Cancer registry departments are using electronic technology to solve the local and national Certified Tumor Registrar (CTR) shortages. As demand for CTRs continues to increase without an accompanied increase in the supply of qualified personnel, cancer registry departments are looking for new solutions to this growing local and national trend. In order to solve this problem, some cancer registries have started using telecommunication to fill the empty positions within their departments. This is the case at Roper St. Francis Healthcare (RSFH) in Charleston, SC, where Cancer Registry Manager, Ellen Kolender, RHIA, CTR, used telecommuting to fill one full-time and one part-time CTR position.

  15. Computer-based and web-based radiation safety training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, C., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The traditional approach to delivering radiation safety training has been to provide a stand-up lecture of the topic, with the possible aid of video, and to repeat the same material periodically. New approaches to meeting training requirements are needed to address the advent of flexible work hours and telecommuting, and to better accommodate individuals learning at their own pace. Computer- based and web-based radiation safety training can provide this alternative. Computer-based and web- based training is an interactive form of learning that the student controls, resulting in enhanced and focused learning at a time most often chosen by the student.

  16. Defense AT&L Magazine: A Publication of the Defense Acquisition University. Volume 34, Number 3, DAU 184

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    costs for the hard - ware (wiring, connectors, special interface circuits) and modifications to the software of both the aircraft and the weapon. While...community are fond of saying “If it ain’t funded, it ain’t.” There is a kernel of truth here, a partial truth , but we recommend adding the word “yet...caught up in the PM’s problems. • Enables/facilitates alternate work schemes (such as telecommuting ) and operations across multiple time zones, such as

  17. Corporate Lessons for the DoD - Secretary of Defense Corporate Fellows’ Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    this could not be further from the truth . ―When you go through security at an airport, there is a group of people that check your carry-on luggage...their workforce. Johnson & Johnson’s hard -hitting motto Caring for the world…one person at a time™ is certainly a widely-held belief across the company...k)s, regardless of whether the employee contributes. 38 Working Mother cited the firm’s flextime, child care, and telecommuting options in naming

  18. Army Communicator. Volume 37, Number 2, Summer 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    telecommuting in the future but we have to start today by walking away from paper. If all our systems are “paperless” or “digital” then...unclassified Army publications, doctrine, and training content at the point of need. It’s all about the content. The truth is the majority of the Army’s...over 100,000 apps devel- oped and published for the iTunes apps store after just one year. “How hard can it be?” Similarly, the new Android

  19. How America Can Look Within to Achieve Energy Security and Reduce Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    ratio of the minimum energy required to do the job to the energy actually used. That is sometimes hard to do, but it is always possible to compare the ...consumer habits and VMT, for example, telecommuting and the impact of the Internet. These issues are not in the scope of this report. 7. The use of...Petroleum Council 2007, • Hard Truths ; citing U.S. EPA/NHTSA, Light-Duty Automotive Technology and Fuel Economy Trends: 1975-2006. C. Rodier, • A

  20. Model of distant improvement of professional skill of the Ukrainian coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrova O.A.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In article the conceptual model of organization and introduction of distant improvement of professional skill of coaches is developed and analyzed. Advantages of its introduction to coaches training, teachers and higher educational institutions which carry out a professional training for physical training and sports sphere are defined. It is developed the budgetary program project of distant improvement of professional skill of coaches on an example of National university of physical education and sports of Ukraine that consists of three stages: daily organizationally-adjusting session, independent telecommuting and daily final session with attestation.

  1. A Nation at War. Annual Strategy Conference (17th) Held at Carlisle Barracks, PA on 11-13 April 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Studies Institute,122 Forbes Avenue,Carlisle,PA,17013-5244 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS...Soviet Union, there is an idea of global control, this time in a Muslim “caliphate.”10 As in the Cold War, there also is a sense of a zero -sum game...phenomena—more women in the workplace, telecommuting , changing careers, 64 people working longer—will need to be reflected in the military structure

  2. Program Evaluation Metrics for U.S. Army Lifelong Learning Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. MONITOR ACRONYM ARI U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences 11. MONITOR ...e.g., technical support and planning); (3) telecommuting (largely the unique features of distance education); and (4) support (e.g., organizational...will be a greater reduction when I learn more about how to use the system. ()Reduced the time to zero ; I did not have to do admin tasks in class, so we

  3. Understanding Organizational Commitment and Satisfaction of TACOM Life Cycle Management Command Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics Associates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Eleven Mile Rd,Nancy Saxon,Warren,Mi,48397-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER #22622 9. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...people getting promoted because of who they know not what they have accomplished, zero accountability, no change or very slow change 7. my job and the...workout facility on-base, continue to support the VanPool, allow employees to be able to telecommute 1 day per week from home. Increase Accountability 1

  4. Potential transportation demand management programs and measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litman, T. [Victoria Transport Policy Institute, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    1997-02-07

    The advantages of transportation demand management (TDM) programs were discussed. TDM includes several policies, programs and measures designed to change travel patterns. TDM programs include commute trip reductions, pricing policies, land use management strategies, and programs to support alternative modes of transportation such as public transit, carpooling, bicycling, walking and telecommuting. TDM programs are designed to reduce traffic congestion and air pollution. Some other TDM programs and measures include: enabling programs, alternative mode encouragement, driving disincentives, parking programs, marginalizing user costs, reducing automobile ownership, and land use management.

  5. Guide to calculating transportation demand management benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litman, T. [Victoria Transport Policy Institute, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    1997-02-14

    The full benefits of transportation demand management (TDM) programs were discussed. TDM includes several policies, programs and measures designed to change travel patterns. TDM programs include commute trip reductions, pricing policies, land use management strategies, and programs to support alternative modes of transportation such as public transit, carpooling, bicycling, walking and telecommuting. In addition to reduction in traffic congestion and reduction in air pollution, other impacts of TDM programs were also evaluated. The value of these impacts based on external cost savings was estimated. A list of documents, software and organizations which could be helpful for TDM planning and evaluation was provided. 34 refs., 14 tabs., 1 fig.

  6. Information security policies for governmental organisations, the minimum criteria

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngobeni, SJ

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available and retention of documents. 18) Incident response. The policy discusses issues concerning how an organisation responds quickly and effectively to a system or network security breach [13]. 19) Contingency planning. The policy needs to address contingency... _ 17. Document destruction and retention X _ X X 18. Incident response X X X X 19. Contingency planning X _ X X 20. Telecommuting and mobile computing _ _ X _ 21. Intrusion Detection Systems X X X X From Table 1 it can be detained that not all...

  7. Measures applicable to transportation sector in order to improve their greenhouse gas emission balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamure, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    The greenhouse effect gases emitted by transport vehicles are mainly carbon dioxide, methane and nitrogen dioxide; CO 2 emissions from transport vehicles (automobiles, aircraft) are growing and their relative importance is growing even more due to lowering of other CO 2 sources. Greenhouse gases from thermal engines are assessed as a function of engine and fuel types. Several solutions are proposed in order to reduce pollutant emissions: road traffic control (road pricing), automobile restricted utilization (speed, access areas, traffic and parking regulation), consumption regulation, collective transports (buses, mini buses), urban organization for pedestrian and bicycle transport, fuel substitution, life style modification tele-commuting, etc

  8. Travel demand policies for saving oil during a supply emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noland, Robert B.; Cowart, William A.; Fulton, Lewis M.

    2006-01-01

    An area of growing concern is the future stability of oil producing regions and the ability to maintain stability in international petroleum markets. The transport sector, in particular, is extremely vulnerable to short-term supply disruptions with consequent implications on economic activities in most countries. This paper analyses potential transport demand restraint strategies that could potentially mitigate the impact of short-term supply disruptions. Our analysis includes estimates of the potential fuel savings from several policies. Specifically, we examine various work-based policies (telecommuting, flexible work schedules), the potential of carpooling, speed limit reductions, driving bans and restrictions, increased public transport usage, and providing information on the effect of maintaining optimal tire pressures. The analysis uses various assumptions based on existing knowledge about how travelers may respond under emergency conditions to develop estimates of potential fuel savings. Results suggest that the most restrictive policies, such as driving bans and mandatory carpooling are the most effective. Other policies provide small reductions with some, such as telecommuting and flexible work schedules, having the potential to be easily implemented. Those policies, focussed on encouraging public transport use, are less effective and potentially more costly to implement

  9. Travel demand policies for saving oil during a supply emergency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noland, Robert B. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Centre for Transport Studies, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: r.noland@imperial.ac.uk; Cowart, William A. [ICF Consulting, Ltd., Egmont House, 25-31 Tavistock Place, Bloomsbury, London, WC1H 9SU (United Kingdom); Fulton, Lewis M. [International Energy Agency, 9 Rue de la Federation, Paris 75015 (France)

    2006-11-15

    An area of growing concern is the future stability of oil producing regions and the ability to maintain stability in international petroleum markets. The transport sector, in particular, is extremely vulnerable to short-term supply disruptions with consequent implications on economic activities in most countries. This paper analyses potential transport demand restraint strategies that could potentially mitigate the impact of short-term supply disruptions. Our analysis includes estimates of the potential fuel savings from several policies. Specifically, we examine various work-based policies (telecommuting, flexible work schedules), the potential of carpooling, speed limit reductions, driving bans and restrictions, increased public transport usage, and providing information on the effect of maintaining optimal tire pressures. The analysis uses various assumptions based on existing knowledge about how travelers may respond under emergency conditions to develop estimates of potential fuel savings. Results suggest that the most restrictive policies, such as driving bans and mandatory carpooling are the most effective. Other policies provide small reductions with some, such as telecommuting and flexible work schedules, having the potential to be easily implemented. Those policies, focussed on encouraging public transport use, are less effective and potentially more costly to implement.

  10. Virtual exclusion and telework: barriers and opportunities of technocentric workplace accommodation policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Paul M A; Moon, Nathan W; Ward, Andrew C

    2006-01-01

    Teleworking, a restructuring of the manner in which work occurs, based on information communication technologies (ICTs), is a promising way of further integrating people with disabilities into the workplace. In contrast to telecommuting, in which the work is primarily shifted in locale, telework is a restructuring of the tasks to be accomplished within the larger work setting which could result in "work" being done remotely, or collaboratively with coworkers (remotely or not) using ICTs. Drawing upon a review of the literature, this paper explores the relationship between telework and people with disabilities. While the advent of telecommuting and subsequently "teleworking" might open increased opportunities for the hiring of people with disabilities, it may also place severe constraints on the type of work, workplace environment and interactions, and accumulation of social capital for people with disabilities. Whereas much of the prevailing literature on telework and disability is often proscriptive in nature and is written with an audience of employers in mind, it is just as important to consider policy options from the standpoint of the employee as well. This paper proposes a number of policy approaches for the creation of an inclusive work environment for teleworkers with disabilities that can minimize, as much as possible, the social isolation faced by teleworkers with disabilities while maximizing their participation within the workplace community. Policy objectives for enhancing telework for people with disabilities fall into three general categories: 1) research, 2) outreach, and 3) interventions.

  11. Creating flexible work arrangements through idiosyncratic deals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, Severin; Rousseau, Denise M; Glaser, Jürgen

    2008-05-01

    A survey of 887 employees in a German government agency assessed the antecedents and consequences of idiosyncratic arrangements individual workers negotiated with their supervisors. Work arrangements promoting the individualization of employment conditions, such as part-time work and telecommuting, were positively related to the negotiation of idiosyncratic deals ("i-deals"). Worker personal initiative also had a positive effect on i-deal negotiation. Two types of i-deals were studied: flexibility in hours of work and developmental opportunities. Flexibility i-deals were negatively related and developmental i-deals positively related to work-family conflict and working unpaid overtime. Developmental i-deals were also positively related to increased performance expectations and affective organizational commitment, while flexibility i-deals were unrelated to either. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Impact of employee benefits on families with children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasekaran, Sangeeth; Choueiri, Roula; Neumeyer, Ann; Ajari, Ogheneochuko; Shui, Amy; Kuhlthau, Karen

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of this study are to evaluate the employee benefits parents of children with autism spectrum disorders have, how benefits are used, work change, and job satisfaction. We conducted a cross-sectional mailed survey study of 435 families with children with autism spectrum disorders residing in the United States. We received 161 surveys for a response rate of 37%. Families reported using the following benefits: 39% paid family leave, 19% unpaid family leave, 91% flexible work arrangements, and 86% telecommuting. Of respondents, 43% reported stopping work, cutting down on hours worked, or changing jobs because of their child's condition. Having paid family leave was a positive predictor for job satisfaction. Parents of children with autism spectrum disorders have an interest and need for alternative work arrangements. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Breastfeeding policies and breastfeeding support programs in the mother's workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinelli, Maria Enrica

    2012-10-01

    Women should never be forced to make a choice between mother-work and other work. Many women mistakenly think they cannot breastfeed if they plan to return to work, and thus they may not talk with their employers about their intention to breastfeed or how breastfeeding might be supported at their workplace. All breastfeeding policies and strategies underline the importance of providing support for lactating mothers and highlight the need to promote specific interventions in the workplace. Possible strategies for working mothers include having the mother keep the baby with her while she works, allowing the mother to go to the baby to breastfeed during the workday, telecommuting, offering flexible work schedules, maintaining part-time work schedules, and using on-site or nearby child care centres.

  14. Three Papers in International Health Policy: Modeling the Links between Economics and Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    though not  a  cure )  imposes  long‐term economic burden on  those  who  must  pay,  if  not  for  the  drugs,  then  for  enhanced  nutrition  and...treatment Vaccines &/or antivirals Quarantine, social distancing Treatment or natural cure Pool of Susceptible Pool of Exposed Pool of Infected...due  to  reduced  demand  or  due  to  workforce  disruptions  ( absenteeism   and  productivity loss due to telecommuting where this occurs) will be

  15. [Development of Diagrammatic Recording System for Choledochoscope and Its Clinical Application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhao; Hu, Liangshuo; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Xiaogang; Lyu, Yi

    2017-11-30

    To develop a diagrammatic recording system for choledochoscopy and evaluate the system with clinical application. To match the real-time image and procedure illustration during choledochoscopy examination, we combined video-image capture and speech recognition technology to quickly generate personalized choledochoscopy images and texts records. The new system could be used in sharing territorial electronic medical records, telecommuting, scientific research and education, et al. In the clinical application of 32 patients, the choledochoscopy diagrammatic recording system could significantly improve the surgeons' working efficiency and patients' satisfaction. It could also meet the design requirement of remote information interaction. The choledochoscopy diagrammatic recording system which is recommended could elevate the quality of medical service and promote academic exchange and training.

  16. Rapid urbanization and the need for sustainable transportation policies in Jakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukmana, D.

    2018-03-01

    Not only is Jakarta the largest metropolitan area in Southeast Asia, it is the also one of the most dynamic, though beset with most of the urban problems experienced in twenty-first century Southeast Asia. Batavia, colonial capital of the Netherland Indies in the first half of the 20th century was a small urban area of approximately 150,000 residents. In the second half, Batavia became Jakarta, the 28 million megacity capital of independent Indonesia. Among many urban problems, one major problem plagued Jakarta in the last two decades is traffic congestions. This paper discusses the extent to which rapid urbanization in Jakarta has contributed to the need for sustainable transportation policies in Jakarta. The development of MRT could be viable solutions to alleviate the acute traffic jams in Jakarta. Jakarta will need to implement other innovative sustainable transportation policies including promoting active live through more walking and bicycling, carpool matching services, shuttle services, telecommuting and downzoning in downtown areas.

  17. REMOTE WORK AS A PROMISING FORM OF LABOUR ORGANIZATION FOR RUSSIAN ENTREPRENEURIAL STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Gurova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote work (telecommuting is one of the modern technologies of the organization of the labor process, which is not yet widely used in domestic practice. However, in times of crisis, when entrepreneurial structures seek for the maximum reduction of expenses, it can be a tool to address many of the pressing issues related to the most effective use of production and labor resources.The article discusses the features of the remote work on a world level and in our country, detected its strengths and weaknesses for the participants of labour relations, as well as revealed the potential of this form of labor organization for achievement of optimum balance between expenses and efficiency of entrepreneurial structures.

  18. The issue: Innovation, information technology and climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-01-06

    This position paper by the Information Technology Association of Canada (ITAC) outlines the information technology community's position vis-a-vis the Federal Government's 'Climate Change Plan for Canada'. In general, the ITAC is in favour of the Government's plan, however, it asserts that the Plan falls short by not acknowledging the significant contributions that present and emerging information and communications technologies can make to the achievements of Canadian climate change goals. In this regard the paper draws attention to, and explains the significance of the actual and potential contributions made to climate change efforts by teleconferencing, video-conferencing, telecommuting, electronic commerce, and smart buildings technologies. 4 refs.

  19. Analysis of remote working practice AND CALCULATION OF ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Ermakov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to description of working from home practice at Allianz Insurance UK и Ernst & Young, UK & Ireland. It fulfilled the analysis of the best practices in the use of new forms of social and labor relations - remote work. The characteristics of using types of distance work, the policy of implementation and realization of such work in the company, the criteria for the transfer of employees to work remotely, the possibility of a flexible approach to workflow are given. The calculation of the economic efficiency of technology telecommuting at an aviation company of the Russian Federation is done. The method of calculating the cost-effectiveness based on several factors, such as costs for the organization and content of the workplace, change in labor productivity and others, was proposed by the authors. The calculation of economic efficiency by using the number of working hours, the impact on capital inputs and the impact on quit rates is considered.

  20. Teletrabajo y sostenibilidad empresarial. Una reflexión desde la gerencia del talento humano en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando E. Contreras

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores several points of view about Business Sustainability as a concept that can be related to the intensive use of Teleworking applied to job positions in companies, especially in economies of developing countries, and for this particular case, Colombia. Direct relationships between telecommuting, as a tangible example of that mentioned before, and some aspects that represent economic, social and environmental value creation are highlighted, based on a literature review. The provisional conclusion found, should help to prepare the way for understanding that a systematic, and appropriate adoption of new forms of working with the intensive use of ICT (as teleworking in countries like Colombia could be a direct activator of benefits at all levels, only if special conditions of environment, organization, and above all, adequate human resource management are taking into account. Otherwise the effects could be counter-productive in terms of achieving goals of development and welfare of companies, and finally, of the society itself.

  1. Role of force training in physical training of student basketball team players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Brynzak

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Presented results of the implementation of the program of strength training in the preparation of the annual cycle of student basketball team. The study involved 15 athletes. The testing program included the evaluation of home and remote speed (running 6 and 20 m with a high launch, speed and overall endurance (2x40 shuttle run test with and Cooper, speed-strength (high jump, strength (gets dynamometry. Strength training program was included in classes 3 times a week for two months before the start of the competition period. Found that the proposed program of strength training improves physical fitness of the players. Marked increase in the level of development of motor qualities of the players during the macrocycle. There was a significant increase in physical fitness of players on the team at the end of the competition period. Marked improvement in starting, telecommuting, speed and speed endurance. Increased overall endurance and strength, but the level of development is low.

  2. City of Portland: Businesses for an environmentally sustainable tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The sustainable business development program in Portland (OR) is known as BEST. BEST stands for Businesses for an Environmentally Sustainable Tomorrow. The Portland Energy Office operates BEST as a {open_quotes}one-stop service center{close_quotes} for business owners and managers. BEST provides information and assistance on resource efficient buildings and business practices. The results of BEST`s two years of operation have been generally impressive. Nearly 150 new or expanding businesses have been connected with utility design assistance programs. Businesses have also received assistance with water conservation, telecommuting, construction debris recycling, and alternative fuel vehicles. BEST has received local and national publicity and BEST services have been the topic at more than a dozen conferences, meetings, or other speaking engagements. A guidebook for communities wishing to start a similar program will be available in early 1996.

  3. Saving oil in a hurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none

    2005-07-01

    During 2004, oil prices reached levels unprecedented in recent years. Though world oil markets remain adequately supplied, high oil prices do reflect increasingly uncertain conditions. Many IEA member countries and non-member countries alike are looking for ways to improve their capability to handle market volatility and possible supply disruptions in the future. This book aims to provide assistance. It provides a new, quantitative assessment of the potential oil savings and costs of rapid oil demand restraint measures for transport. Some measures may make sense under any circumstances; others are primarily useful in emergency situations. All can be implemented on short notice ? if governments are prepared. The book examines potential approaches for rapid uptake of telecommuting, ?ecodriving?, and car-pooling, among other measures. It also provides methodologies and data that policymakers can use to decide which measures would be best adapted to their national circumstances. This ?tool box? may help countries to complement other measures for coping with supply disruptions, such as use of strategic oil stocks.

  4. The alternative workplace: changing where and how people work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apgar, M

    1998-01-01

    Today many organizations, including AT&T and IBM, are pioneering the alternative workplace--the combination of nontraditional work practices, settings, and locations that is beginning to supplement traditional offices. This is not a fad. Although estimates vary widely, it is safe to say that some 30 million to 40 million people in the United States are now either telecommuters or home-based workers. What motivates managers to examine how people spend their time at the office and where else they might do their work? Among the potential benefits for companies are reduced costs, increased productivity, and an edge in vying for and keeping talented employees. They can also capture government incentives and avoid costly sanctions. But at the same time, alternative workplace programs are not for everyone. Indeed, such programs can be difficult to adopt, even for those organizations that seem to be most suited to them. Ingrained behaviors and practical hurdles are hard to overcome. And the challenges of managing both the cultural changes and systems improvements required by an alternative workplace initiative are substantial. How should senior managers think about alternative workplace programs? What are the criteria for determining whether the alternative workplace is right for a given organization? What are the most common pitfalls in implementing alternative workplace programs? The author provides the answers to these questions in his examination of this new frontier of where and how people work.

  5. California court says disability benefits do not preclude suit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    A California appeals court reversed a lower court decision barring a worker from pursuing an HIV discrimination claim against his employer. [Name removed] claims that [name removed] violated California's Fair Employment and Housing Act when it rescinded accommodations that the bank had made earlier for HIV-related medical needs. The accommodations included a compressed work week and one day of telecommuting per week, which [name removed] performed well enough to earn a promotion. With a change in management, the accommodations were canceled, ostensibly to control costs. The lower court ruled that [name removed] was barred from suing his former employer because of statements on his disability insurance application. However, the appeals court ruled that [name removed]'s statements on the form were honest and did not preclude him from future litigation. Myron Quon, an attorney with Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund in Los Angeles, noted that [name removed]'s deft handling of the questions was vital to the success of the suit. [Name removed] had made comments and notations on the form, rather than just checking the appropriate yes or no boxes, and noted that he could return to work with a reasonable accommodation. Others applying for disability are cautioned to do the same to preserve their legal rights.

  6. Digital Nomads: Employment in the Online Gig Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverly Yuen Thompson

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1997, Tsugio Makimoto and David Manners published their future-looking manifesto Digital Nomad that, decades later, would present as a manifesto for a lifestyle movement. At the time, businesses and the US government were interested in looking at tele-commuting, productivity, and work-family balance. Critiques of a neoliberal economy provide insight into understanding the context of freelance and online, piecemeal employment. This article examines the types of employment that digital nomads engage in, based on in-depth interviews with thirty-eight self-identified digital nomads. The participants mostly originate from wealthy, industrialized nations, and have many class privileges, but are underemployed compared to what their socio-economic status would historically suggest. As most participants are in the Millennial Generation, an overview of the shifting socio-economic status of this age-cohort is examined in the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, and the European Union – notably their high educational achievements and increasingly precarious employment status. Many of the nomads were working part-time with their own micro-business, with few able to maintain full-time employment. Few have benefits such as healthcare, retirement, unemployment insurance, or family leave. While “freedom” is touted as the benefit of gig-work, by both industry management and digital nomad enthusiasts, this lifestyle marks a shift towards precarious employment – itself not a basis for economic freedom, nor security.

  7. LIDERANÇA NÃO PRESENCIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA FERNANDA MACHADO

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to new technology is being incorporated into a new concept in the daily work practices of organizations. Organizations were seen as geographic entities and are now increasingly understood as a space network. Nowadays many companies have adopted telecommuting work / home office is to save costs on infrastructure and / or to increase the quality of life of its employees. Such changes in business environments ask if there are changes in the attitude of leaders. In this new scenario the role of the leader is of increasing importance, thus becoming a competitive differentiator in the market. Leadership style, defined by the characteristics of the leader, interferes with the performance of followers as well as the success of the organization. The present study aims to map patterns of leadership behavior of virtual teams of companies in the field of Information Technology in Curitiba using theoretical base 3 styles of leadership and Lippit defined by White (1939: Authoritarian, Democratic and Liberal. From this study are sought answers to the following questions: What style of leadership is more assertive for teams managed the distance. The concepts of existing leadership meet this new reality.

  8. Utility enterprise solutions - the benefits of an open, integrated approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos, P. [Mincom Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

    2000-12-31

    An integrated data handling system, specifically designed to assist utilities to have the needed flexibility and integration capabilities in their systems that supports their front and back office functions, optimize operations, and deepen collaborative relationships with suppliers as well as customers during the transition phase from public utilities to a free market environment, are discussed. The proposed system provides asset management, materials management, human resources management and finance management modules, integrated to key utility functions such as customer information, geographic information, outage management, switching management, mobile computing, safety/lockout -tag and SCADA. Through the linkage of these systems, all data is available to utility decision-makers on a real-time basis, in the office, in the field or telecommuting from the 'virtual' office. The integrated solution described here will provide higher system reliability, increased responsiveness to customer service requests, optimized engineering analysis work by designers and technical experts, more streamlined job planning, optimization of personnel-related processes and reduction of inventory expenses. By shifting the focus from chasing paper or worrying about interface performance and by making asset management the core element of the management information system, utility professionals can concentrate on focusing on bottom-line performance and on managing, rather than performing critical activities.

  9. Does mothers' employment affect adolescents' weight and activity levels? Improving our empirical estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Molly A; Lippert, Adam M; Chandler, Kelly D; Lemmon, Megan

    2018-04-01

    Women's lives are marked by complex work and family routines - routines that have implications for their children's health. Prior research suggests a link between mothers' work hours and their children's weight, but few studies investigate the child health implications of increasingly common work arrangements, such as telecommuting and flexible work schedules. We examine whether changes in mothers' work arrangements are associated with changes in adolescents' weight, physical activity, and sedentary behavior using longitudinal data and fixed effects models to better account for mothers' social selection in to different work arrangements and children's underlying preferences. With data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health ( N = 10,518), we find that changes in mothers' work arrangements are not significantly associated with adolescents' weight gain or physical activity but are significantly associated with adolescents' sedentary behavior. Adolescents' sedentary behavior declines when mothers become more available after school and increases when mothers work more hours or become unemployed. In sum, after accounting for unobserved, stable traits, including mothers' selection into jobs with more or less flexibility, mothers' work arrangements are most strongly associated with adolescents' sedentary behavior.

  10. Cost effectiveness comparison of certain transportation measures to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in San Diego County, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva-Send, Nilmini; Anders, Scott; Narwold, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    California's overarching mandate to achieve 1990 levels of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in 2020 (AB 32, 2005), and the ensuing recent regulations (SB 375, CEQA updates) require local and regional governments to assess GHG mitigation policies, including on-road transportation. The regulations do not make cost-effectiveness a primary criteria for choosing measures but cost remains important to a variety of stakeholders. This communication summarizes results from GHG and cost analysis for seven actual San Diego County road transportation policies: telecommute, vanpools, a bicycle strategy, an increase in mass transit use, parking policies (parking pricing, preferred parking for electric vehicles), an increased local fuel tax and speed harmonization (signal re-timing, roundabouts). Net costs are calculated as the sum of direct costs and benefits to the administering agency, the employer and the individual. Net costs per metric ton GHG abated vary greatly across measures, from negative to high positive (more than US $1000). We find that local GHG cost cannot be sensibly compared to other carbon or GHG policy costs outside the local context for a variety of reasons, but especially because measures have not been adopted primarily for carbon or GHG abatement potential or on the basis of cost effectiveness

  11. Social sustainability of alternate transportation modes at the University of British Columbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cato, N. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). TREK Program

    2006-08-03

    As a result of the University of British Columbia's U-Pass program, more than $3 million per month has been saved in transportation cost savings for the university and its students. In addition, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have been reduced by 16,000 tonnes per year. This research study examined the social implications of the U-Pass program and examined the social sustainability of alternate transportation modes, including cycling, walking, carpooling, and telecommuting. The report was intended as a preliminary investigation, and provided recommendations for future quantitative research. The study identified the social factors that caused student to resist using alternative transportation modes. Social factors were then evaluated in order to determine changes that could be made to encourage sustainable transportation choices. Results of the study suggested that the lack of availability and frequency of public transit buses was a significant barrier for students. More frequent service in the evenings and on weekends was recommended. The expansion of all-door boarding was recommended to reduce travel times. Other recommendations included investigating the feasibility of dedicated bus lanes; improving comfort and increasing travel speed; and introducing more effective ways of communicating route and schedule information, including the development of software programs for electronic devices. 12 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig.

  12. Does mothers' employment affect adolescents' weight and activity levels? Improving our empirical estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly A. Martin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Women’s lives are marked by complex work and family routines — routines that have implications for their children’s health. Prior research suggests a link between mothers' work hours and their children’s weight, but few studies investigate the child health implications of increasingly common work arrangements, such as telecommuting and flexible work schedules. We examine whether changes in mothers’ work arrangements are associated with changes in adolescents’ weight, physical activity, and sedentary behavior using longitudinal data and fixed effects models to better account for mothers’ social selection in to different work arrangements and children’s underlying preferences. With data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (N = 10,518, we find that changes in mothers’ work arrangements are not significantly associated with adolescents’ weight gain or physical activity but are significantly associated with adolescents’ sedentary behavior. Adolescents’ sedentary behavior declines when mothers become more available after school and increases when mothers work more hours or become unemployed. In sum, after accounting for unobserved, stable traits, including mothers’ selection into jobs with more or less flexibility, mothers’ work arrangements are most strongly associated with adolescents’ sedentary behavior. Keywords: Obesity, Physical activity, Sedentary behavior, Adolescence, Maternal employment, Work arrangements

  13. REDUCING GREENHOUSE EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan A. SHAHEEN, Ph.D.

    2007-01-01

    Fortunately, transportation technologies and strategies are emerging that can help to meet the climate challenge. These include automotive and fuel technologies, intelligent transportation systems (ITS, and mobility management strategies that can reduce the demand for private vehicles. While the climate change benefits of innovative engine and vehicle technologies are relatively well understood, there are fewer studies available on the energy and emission impacts of ITS and mobility management strategies. In the future, ITS and mobility management will likely play a greater role in reducing fuel consumption. Studies are often based on simulation models, scenario analysis, and limited deployment experience. Thus, more research is needed to quantify potential impacts. Of the nine ITS technologies examined, traffic signal control, electronic toll collection, bus rapid transit, and traveler information have been deployed more widely and demonstrated positive impacts (but often on a limited basis. Mobility management approaches that have established the greatest CO2 reduction potential, to date, include road pricing policies (congestion and cordon and carsharing (short-term auto access. Other approaches have also indicated CO2 reduction potential including: low-speed modes, integrated regional smart cards, park-and-ride facilities, parking cash out, smart growth, telecommuting, and carpooling.

  14. Strategies for sustainable development and transport, some actual tendencies in Sweden and California; Strategier for baeredygtig udvikling og transport, nogle aktuelle tendenser i Sverige og Californien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudmundsson, H. [Danmarks Miljoeundersoegelser, og Handelshoejskolen i Koebenhavn (Denmark)

    1995-12-31

    The development and implementation of goals for pollution abatement is now a central element of transport policy, but currently in Denmark these goals are only short term, they are neither satisfactorily integrated nor are they based on sustainable criteria, it is stated. In California, USA, there is a tendency to change the type of car usage by producing a wider variation of types (including electric powered cars) and organizing car and van-pooling to an even higher degree. Car journeys to the workplace are curtailed by the initiation of telecommuting and compressed work weeks. Methods of economic control are on the increase, mostly to help promote technological development. Strong political barriers exist, and these may lead to an even closer connection between taxation and car etc. uses. Swedish initiatives in this respect are also described. These seem to be concentrated on the laying of demands on the types of vehicles and on automotive fuels and also on the taxation of pollution from exhaust gases and on petrol. The author hopes that Danish transport policy can be inspired by that of USA and Sweden. (ARW) 18 refs.

  15. Telemental health: responding to mandates for reform in primary healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kathleen M; Lieberman, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Telemental health (TMH) has established a niche as a feasible, acceptable, and effective service model to improve the mental healthcare and outcomes for individuals who cannot access traditional mental health services. The Accountability Care Act has mandated reforms in the structure, functioning, and financing of primary care that provide an opportunity for TMH to move into the mainstream healthcare system. By partnering with the Integrated Behavioral Healthcare Model, TMH offers a spectrum of tools to unite primary care physicians and mental health specialist in a mind-body view of patients' healthcare needs and to activate patients in their own care. TMH tools include video-teleconferencing to telecommute mental health specialists to the primary care setting to collaborate with a team in caring for patients' mental healthcare needs and to provide direct services to patients who are not progressing optimally with this collaborative model. Asynchronous tools include online therapies that offer an efficient first step to treatment for selected disorders such as depression and anxiety. Patients activate themselves in their care through portals that provide access to their healthcare information and Web sites that offer on-demand information and communication with a healthcare team. These synchronous and asynchronous TMH tools may move the site of mental healthcare from the clinic to the home. The evolving role of social media in facilitating communication among patients or with their healthcare team deserves further consideration as a tool to activate patients and provide more personalized care.

  16. Two executives, one career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Cynthia R; Murray, Shelley S

    2005-02-01

    For six years, Cynthia Cunningham and Shelley Murray shared an executive job at Fleet Bank. One desk, one chair, one computer, one telephone, and one voice-mail account. To their clients and colleagues, they were effectively one person, though one person with the strengths and ideas of two, seamlessly handing projects back and forth. Although their department was dissolved after the bank merged with Bank of America, the two continue to consider themselves a package-they have one resume, and they are seeking their next opportunity together. Their choice to share a job was not only a quality-of-life decision but one intended to keep their careers on course: "Taking two separate part-time jobs would have thrown us completely off track" they write in this first-person account."We're both ambitious people, and neither of us wanted just a job. We wanted careers" In this article, the two highly motivated women reveal their determination to manage the demands of both family and career. Flextime,telecommuting, and compressed workweeks are just some of the options open to executives seeking greater work/ life balance, and the job share, as described by Cunningham and Murray, could well be the next solution for those wishing to avoid major trade-offs between their personal and professional lives. Cunningham and Murray describe in vivid detail how they structured their unusual arrangement, how they sold themselves to management, and the hurdles they faced along the way. Theirs is a win-win story, for the company and for them.

  17. Success of strategies for combining employment and breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fein, Sara B; Mandal, Bidisha; Roe, Brian E

    2008-10-01

    Return to work is associated with diminished breastfeeding intensity and duration. Although more mothers breastfeed after returning to work now than earlier, research has not documented the strategies that mothers use for combining paid work and breastfeeding or their effect on breastfeeding outcomes. This study examined which strategies are associated with smaller decrements in breastfeeding intensity and longer durations. We analyzed 810 mothers from the Infant Feeding Practices Study II who worked and breastfed. We used regression and censored regression models to analyze 4 strategies that mothers used to combine these 2 activities: (1) feed directly from the breast only; (2) both pump and feed directly; (3) pump only; and (4) neither pump nor breastfeed during the work day. Outcomes were the difference in percentage of milk feeds that were breast milk between the month before and after return to work and duration of breastfeeding after return to work. Forty-three percent of mothers pumped milk at work only; 32% fed the infant directly from the breast only. These 2 strategies, along with pumping and feeding directly, were statistically similar and superior to neither pumping nor breastfeeding during the work day for the outcome of change in breastfeeding intensity. For the outcome of breastfeeding duration, the 2 strategies that included directly feeding from the breast were associated with longer duration than pumping only, whereas the strategy of neither pumping nor breastfeeding during the work day was associated with the shortest duration. Feeding the infant from the breast during the work day is the most effective strategy for combining breastfeeding and work. Ways to enable direct feeding include on-site child care, telecommuting, keeping the infant at work, allowing the mother to leave work to go to the infant, and having the infant brought to the work site. Establishing ways for mothers to feed from the breast after return to work is important to meet US

  18. The increased use of information and communication technology (ICT among employees: Implications for work-life interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wihan de Wet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Technology has become one of society’s everyday functional tools, changing rapidly and providing widespread mobility. In South Africa alone, the number of Internet users grew from 8,5 million to 24,9 million in only three years (2011-2014. Currently, 90 per cent of these users access this facility from their mobile devices. Statistics illustrate that South Africans are moving towards a continuously connected lifestyle, a situation in which information and communication technology (ICT seems to have become ubiquitous. Given the rapid growth of ITC technology and its absorption into people’s lives (both personally and professionally, the general aim of the present research was to investigate the use of ICT among employees and how it affects their work-life interaction (WLI. The researcher employed a qualitative research approach in accordance with which a sample of 25 employees was interviewed. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and processed by means of thematic analyses. Three themes with corresponding sub-themes were extracted: use of ICT (i.e. in both work and family domains; challenges that ICT use presents; and the way in which employees manage their WLI by means of ICT. The participants experienced WLI as mostly negative. However, they also mentioned two different approaches that helped them manage interaction between their work and family domains. These approaches entail 1 applying limits to their use of ICT, and 2 using ICT to create flexibility. This article advises that organisations should consider adopting ICT to assist their employees in the management of these two domains. This could be done in two ways. First, organisations could implement a code of conduct or provide guidelines for eliminating the intrusive and excessive use of ICT, especially after working hours. Secondly, organisations could pilot or implement flexible working hours and possible telecommuting initiatives.

  19. Air quality plans unveiled at Toronto's first Smog Summit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2000-06-23

    New federal and provincial initiatives to improve air quality were announced at the recent first-ever Toronto Smog Summit. An initial one million dollars have been pledged by the federal Minister of the Environment to support a framework for extending daily air quality forecasting across Canada, to begin within the next year. The funding will be used to increase the information base of existing air quality advisory programs in Ontario, and to create a daily air quality index immediately in other areas of the country most affected by smog. Existing air quality assessment programs will be expanded to include air quality models incorporating measurement and reporting of particulate matter levels. A second federal initiative also announced at the is meeting will be a corporate smog action plan, led by the Ontario regional offices of the federal departments of the Environment, Health Canada, and Public Works and Government Services. This program will include rapid response by federal government departments during Smog Alerts Days and measures to reduce the federal government's contribution to causing smog through encouragement of low or no emission options for employees, educational programs on best practices at home and at the office, reduction of employee travel through flextime and telecommuting, conversion of government vehicles to natural gas and other alternatives, and retrofitting government buildings for greater energy and water efficiency. A federal commitment of at least $200,000 was also announced by the Minister of Transport to support six sustainable transportation projects. The provincial Minister of the Environment announced the membership of the province's Anti-Smog Action Plan, which involves some 50 partners from industry associations, companies, government agencies and non-government organizations to help Ontario to meet its commitment to reduces nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds emissions by 45 per cent by 2015. A strategy for

  20. Families with school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Kathleen; Schneider, Barbara; Butler, Donnell

    2011-01-01

    Most working parents face a common dilemma--how to care for their children when they are not in school but the parents are at work. In this article Kathleen Christensen, Barbara Schneider, and Donnell Butler describe the predictable and unpredictable scheduling demands school-age children place on working couples and single working parents. The authors assess the potential capacity of schools to help meet the needs of working families through changes in school schedules and after-school programs and conclude that the flexibility parents need to balance family-work responsibilities probably cannot be found in the school setting. They argue that workplaces are better able than schools to offer the flexibility that working parents need to attend to basic needs of their children, as well as to engage in activities that enhance their children's academic performance and emotional and social well-being. Two types of flexible work practices seem especially well suited to parents who work: flextime arrangements that allow parents to coordinate their work schedules with their children's school schedules, and policies that allow workers to take short periods of time off--a few hours or a day or two-to attend a parent-teacher conference, for example, or care for a child who has suddenly fallen ill. Many companies that have instituted such policies have benefited through employees' greater job satisfaction and employee retention. Yet despite these measured benefits to employers, workplaces often fall short of being family friendly. Many employers do not offer such policies or offer them only to employees at certain levels or in certain types of jobs. Flexible work practices are almost nonexistent for low-income workers, who are least able to afford alternative child care and may need flexibility the most. Moreover the authors find that even employees in firms with flexible practices such as telecommuting may be reluctant to take advantage of them, because the workplace culture

  1. The use of technology to transform the home into a safe-haven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Luis

    2007-01-01

    a long period of time (quarantine) and would have all the mechanisms in place for getting food and water from supermarkets, drugs from the pharmacy, the children would be able to go to school from home (in turn their school grounds may become temporary hospitals), adults could telecommute to work and minor conditions could be consulted and treated through these systems (with the help of a Telehealth platform that would include electronic health records), etc.

  2. On the Need for Paid Maternity Leave in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, C. L.

    2007-12-01

    Maternity leave policies in the U.S. are among the worst in the world. The 12 weeks of un-paid family leave that the U.S. grants are only surpassed by South Korea's 8 un-paid weeks as the worst treatment to mothers and newborns in the developed world. California is the only state in the U.S. where two programs exist, the State Disability Insurance (SDI) and Paid Family Leave (PFL), which cover up to $840/week for up to 12 weeks (excluding a waiting period of 7 un-paid days combined for both SDI and PFL). Even with these State contributions, the average parent of a newborn in California receives less than the 100% paid 6 weeks of Portugal and the 100% paid 12 weeks of Mexico, with all other countries providing better treatment. For mothers and fathers, time at home during the first precious months after birth or adoption is critical to getting to know their babies. It can provide long-term benefits that improve a child's brain development, social development and overall well being. Parental leave results in better prenatal and postnatal care and more intense parental bonding over a child's life. It also improves the chance that a child will be immunized; as a result, it is associated with lower death rates for infants. But lawmakers and employers are denying those benefits to most families by refusing to provide paid parental leave. For some families, the economic burden of caring for a newborn alone results in financial hardship or ruin. Fortunately, about 12% of companies in the U.S. voluntarily choose to offer some sort of paid and/or longer maternity and family care leaves. Some companies offer on-site child care as a way to facilitate breastfeeding and bonding between new mothers and their babies. Other companies allow new parents to reduce their work schedule temporarily and to telecommute from their homes, both effective ways to guarantee work productivity without requiring the sacrifice of a newborn's right to better health through breastfeeding and bonding

  3. Lithography - Green and Getting Greener

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Harry J.

    2011-06-01

    Today, many energy-saving technologies and practices are enabled or made more effective through the use of nano-electronics. Such technologies include hybrid and all-electric cars, as well as controllers to increase the efficiency of photovoltaic panels. Telecommuting, which enables people to work without traveling from their homes, has been made possible by personal computers and the internet. Reducing the costs of nano-electronics will make possible increased opportunities for the use of products that reduce energy consumption. The most effective way to reduce costs is to improve efficiency. Increased efficiency also provides the benefit of reducing energy and material consumption in the manufacturing of nano-electronics. For example, reducing photochemical usage decreases costs but also reduces material consumption and the need for disposal. Reduction of scrap and rework are direct improvements in efficiency. Cycle time reduction enables greater responsiveness to demand, reducing the amount of material started in processing but never completed. Good process control reduces scrap and rework during manufacturing and results in circuits that have high performance, yet lower power consumption, when used. There are ready opportunities for making the most of the natural tendencies of businesses to innovate and improve efficiency. The semiconductor industry has historically adopted process improvements that have increased worker safety and reduced the consumption of hazardous materials. An early example was the transition from solvent to aqueous photoresist developers. Today, all types of development can be conducted in safer equipment that minimizes the release of hazardous chemicals to the air and water. Non-toxic solvents, such as ethyl lactate, have been widely adopted. There are many opportunities for further improvement. For example, over 90% of resist goes down the drain using conventional spin-coating process, so there is an opportunity for greatly improved

  4. Eco-efficiency of holiday homes; Vapaa-ajan asumisen ekotehokkuus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rytkoenen, A.; Kirkkari, A.-M. (eds.) (Work Efficiency Inst., Rajamaeki (Finland))

    2010-03-15

    The study is part of the Environmental Cluster Research Programme of the Ministry of the Environment and was done by seven research institutes. The study examined holiday homes in terms of their potential for enhancing sustainable consumption and eco-efficiency. The research focused on: constant heating and frost-proof plumbing, their acceptability, use of services and future needs, the operating requirements for home appliances, travel to cottages, and their macroeconomic effects. Next to construction and repair services summer cottage owners were interested in improvement of transport and health care services, telecommuting and the installation of constant heating systems and frost-proof plumbing. As of 2008, there were approximately 478,000 summer cottages. Each year, 4,000 new cottages are built, while 3,000 old cottages are extended, repaired and partly rebuilt so that they are almost like new buildings. Approximately 76 percent of all cottages are connected to the power grid. Just under one-third of all cottages are fitted for year-round use. Raising the level of cottage amenities increases their utilisation rate and energy consumption. Traditional, primarily summer-use cottages with wood-burning heat, bucket-drawn water and dry toilets are eco-efficient. Heating and travelling to cottages are the largest consumers of energy in cottage living. Travelling to cottages consumes approximately 1,070 GWh per year. The more that various electric appliances are used in the cottages and the more comfortable they become, the more often they are visited also during winter time and the higher are the energy and emission bills. Traffic to the holiday homes increases also because of growing mean distances between peopleAEs main residences and cottages and because of increased visits to friendsAE and relativesAE cottages and to rented holiday housing in Lapland and elsewhere. In 2005 total cottage electricity consumption was approximately 900 GWh/year. The average

  5. The possibilities of municipal operations to control greenhouse gas emissions of road traffic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeily, S.

    2004-07-01

    aimed to decrease greenhouse gases generated by municipal operations include different types of actions. These actions are making the public transport system more attractive, improving the preconditions of walking and biking, using a parking policy, arranging education of economical and proactive driving, making the possibilities better for telecommuting and car pooling as well as increasing people's environmental knowledge. Selecting the measures always starts by defining the municipal operations' emission sources and setting targets for these actions. Special features of different operations are considered when actions are chosen. After the implementation of actions the results of these actions are estimated. Implemented actions are further developed and new needs are recognized to complement the operations model. Decreasing greenhouse gas emissions generated by municipal operations demands constant monitoring, developing actions and identifying new needs to regenerate the operations model. (orig.)

  6. Energy thief or saving tool? On the use of information and communication technology in households; Energitjuv eller sparverktyg? Om anvaendning av informations- och kommunikationsteknologi i hushaall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Kristina; Toernqvist, Eva K.

    2009-08-15

    A development towards continued increased use of information- and communication technology (ICT) in the households is a fact that should be taken seriously from an energy perspective. Especially since a lot of ICT is subjected to strong political aspirations to become accessible to all citizens on their own conditions. According to a couple of prognoses, ICT is estimated to amount to 45 % of the household electricity within the nearest ten year period. In addition to the direct use that ICT stands for, the indirect use that origins from, for example, the production and discarding of devices as well as the use that is a consequence of changed behavioural patterns, such as telecommuting, must be taken into account in order to fully understand the use of ICT in an energy perspective. Furthermore, the risk for so called rebound-effects needs also to be considered. This means that the time-, energy- and money savings that can be achieved by means of (more energy efficient) ICT, are used for more ICT use or for other energy requiring activities. Among other things, research indicates that expected transport reductions do not occur. From the point of departure of the overall question of why the energy use within the so called function area 'information and entertainment' increases in households, the aim of the report is to analyze and to discuss driving forces for household members' increased possession and use of ICT in a broad sense (including, for example, tv, mp3, dvd- and cd players. The intention is also to make visible the complex social context in which the use of ICT takes place. The driving forces are complex since they can be related to the individual user's own interests and satisfaction, to the household's social context as well as to a social context outside the household, and to different, often contradictory, norms and values. This makes the development of simple saving measures more difficult, but knowledge of the complexity and

  7. Reminiscing about thesis work with E T Jaynes at Stanford in the 1950s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Frederick W.

    2013-11-01

    work there. I thought it sounded about right as an approximately two-three year position: repay some debts and look around at other possibilities (especially academe?). I left around June 1960 to take up this position in the research lab in Newport Beach. At about this same time (~late 1959), Ed was moving to his new 'chair' at Washington University in St Louis. I proceeded as quickly as I could to put together a thesis after arriving in Newport Beach; I wrote about what I had done, as best as I could in my naiveté about such undertakings. I wrote of the work I had done under Ed's kind and patient guidance for the two years in Palo Alto. I soon remembered that Ed had done a recent Stanford Microwave Lab report on our project; his writing was so much better than mine that I thought it witless to put out something as 'uneven' as I had written by then. At just this time that I was cobbling together a thesis, a consultant at Aeroneutronic, Jay Singer of UC Berkeley EE department, approached me in the hall, (no tele-commuting then!) asking if I might have something to contribute to a special issue of a journal of the IEEE he was editing, on the subject of 'Quantum Electronics'. (Comment: One of the earliest predecessors to the MRI, Jay Singer was then measuring the blood flow in rat tails and human arms; he holds two key MRI patents). I said I thought I did have something. The journal sounded appropriate, so I soon handed my 'thesis' to Jay, put Ed's name first (of course, since it consisted so largely of his words from the Microwave Lab report, but also since Ed was my 'guru'), ...and that was that...done [4]. From my perspective, it seemed to subsequently sink to the bottom of the sea, not to be seen by me again for many years until the elegant Walther-Rempe-Klein (WRK) experiments of 1987 on long-time coherent radiative behavior appeared [5]. They confirmed the long-time quantum-theoretical results of Eberly, Narozhny and Sanchez-Mondragon [6]. Bob Buley and I, while at