WorldWideScience

Sample records for teichoic acid polymerase

  1. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  2. Teichoic acid-containing muropeptides from Streptococcus pneumoniae as substrates for the pneumococcal autolysin.

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Bustos, J F; Tomasz, A

    1987-01-01

    Pneumococcal cell walls in which the normal phosphorylcholine component of the wall teichoic acids is replaced with phosphorylethanolamine cannot absorb the homologous autolytic enzyme and are completely resistant to autolytic degradation (S. Giudicelli and A. Tomasz, J. Bacteriol. 158:1188-1190, 1984). We have now isolated and characterized soluble teichoic acid-containing muropeptides from such cell walls and tested them as substrates for the pneumococcal autolytic enzyme. Both choline- and...

  3. Wall teichoic acid protects Staphylococcus aureus from inhibition by Congo red and other dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takashi; Campbell, Jennifer; Kim, Younghoon; Swoboda, Jonathan G; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Walker, Suzanne; Gilmore, Michael S

    2012-09-01

    Polyanionic polymers, including lipoteichoic acid and wall teichoic acid, are important determinants of the charged character of the staphylococcal cell wall. This study was designed to investigate the extent to which teichoic acid contributes to protection from anionic azo dyes and to identify barriers to drug penetration for development of new antibiotics for multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. We studied antimicrobial activity of azo dyes against S. aureus strains with or without inhibition of teichoic acid in vitro and in vivo. We observed that inhibition of wall teichoic acid expression resulted in an ∼1000-fold increase in susceptibility to azo dyes such as Congo red, reducing its MIC from >1024 to Congo red susceptibility. Based on this finding, combination therapy was tested using the highly synergistic combination of Congo red plus tunicamycin at sub-MIC concentrations (to inhibit wall teichoic acid biosynthesis). The combination rescued Caenorhabditis elegans from a lethal challenge of S. aureus. Our studies show that wall teichoic acid confers protection to S. aureus from anionic azo dyes and related compounds, and its inhibition raises the prospect of development of new combination therapies based on this inhibition.

  4. Attachment of pneumococcal autolysin to wall teichoic acids, an essential step in enzymatic wall degradation.

    OpenAIRE

    Giudicelli, S; Tomasz, A

    1984-01-01

    High concentrations of choline and phosphorylcholine blocked the adsorption of pneumococcal autolytic enzyme to homologous cell walls and inhibited enzymatic cell wall hydrolysis in a noncompetitive manner. Enzyme adsorption had an absolute requirement for the presence of choline residues in the wall teichoic acid. Other amino alcohols and derivatives such as ethanolamine, monomethylaminoethanolamine , and phosphorylethanolamine had no effect on enzyme adsorption or hydrolytic activity. It is...

  5. TarO-specific inhibitors of wall teichoic acid biosynthesis restore β-lactam efficacy against methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ho; Wang, Hao; Labroli, Marc; Koseoglu, Sandra; Zuck, Paul; Mayhood, Todd; Gill, Charles; Mann, Paul; Sher, Xinwei; Ha, Sookhee; Yang, Shu-Wei; Mandal, Mihir; Yang, Christine; Liang, Lianzhu; Tan, Zheng; Tawa, Paul; Hou, Yan; Kuvelkar, Reshma; DeVito, Kristine; Wen, Xiujuan; Xiao, Jing; Batchlett, Michelle; Balibar, Carl J; Liu, Jenny; Xiao, Jianying; Murgolo, Nicholas; Garlisi, Charles G; Sheth, Payal R; Flattery, Amy; Su, Jing; Tan, Christopher; Roemer, Terry

    2016-03-09

    The widespread emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has dramatically eroded the efficacy of current β-lactam antibiotics and created an urgent need for new treatment options. We report an S. aureus phenotypic screening strategy involving chemical suppression of the growth inhibitory consequences of depleting late-stage wall teichoic acid biosynthesis. This enabled us to identify early-stage pathway-specific inhibitors of wall teichoic acid biosynthesis predicted to be chemically synergistic with β-lactams. We demonstrated by genetic and biochemical means that each of the new chemical series discovered, herein named tarocin A and tarocin B, inhibited the first step in wall teichoic acid biosynthesis (TarO). Tarocins do not have intrinsic bioactivity but rather demonstrated potent bactericidal synergy in combination with broad-spectrum β-lactam antibiotics against diverse clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci as well as robust efficacy in a murine infection model of MRSA. Tarocins and other inhibitors of wall teichoic acid biosynthesis may provide a rational strategy to develop Gram-positive bactericidal β-lactam combination agents active against methicillin-resistant staphylococci. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Targeting Wall Teichoic Acid in Situ with Branched Polyethylenimine Potentiates β-Lactam Efficacy against MRSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxley, Melissa A; Wright, Summer N; Lam, Anh K; Friedline, Anthony W; Strange, Stoffel J; Xiao, Min T; Moen, Erika L; Rice, Charles V

    2017-10-12

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a medical concern. Here, we show that branched polyethylenimine (BPEI), a nontoxic, cationic polymer, restores MRSA's susceptibility to β-lactam antibiotics. Checkerboard assays with MRSA demonstrated synergy between BPEI and β-lactam antibiotics. A time-killing curve showed BPEI to be bactericidal in combination with oxacillin. BPEI did not potentiate efficacy with vancomycin, chloramphenicol, or linezolid. When exposed to BPEI, MRSA increased in size and had difficulty forming septa. BPEI electrostatically binds to wall teichoic acid (WTA), a cell wall anionic polymer of Gram-positive bacteria that is important for localization of certain cell wall proteins. Lack of potentiation in a WTA knockout mutant supports the WTA-based mechanism. These data suggest that BPEI may prevent proper localization of cell wall machinery by binding to WTA; leading to cell death when administered in combination with β-lactam antibiotics. Negligible in vitro toxicity suggests the combination could be a viable treatment option.

  7. Receptor binding proteins of Listeria monocytogenes bacteriophages A118 and P35 recognize serovar-specific teichoic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielmann, Regula; Habann, Matthias; Eugster, Marcel R. [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Lurz, Rudi [Max-Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Calendar, Richard [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3202 (United States); Klumpp, Jochen, E-mail: jochen.klumpp@hest.ethz.ch [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Loessner, Martin J. [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-03-15

    Adsorption of a bacteriophage to the host requires recognition of a cell wall-associated receptor by a receptor binding protein (RBP). This recognition is specific, and high affinity binding is essential for efficient virus attachment. The molecular details of phage adsorption to the Gram-positive cell are poorly understood. We present the first description of receptor binding proteins and a tail tip structure for the siphovirus group infecting Listeria monocytogenes. The host-range determining factors in two phages, A118 and P35 specific for L. monocytogenes serovar 1/2 have been determined. Two proteins were identified as RBPs in phage A118. Rhamnose residues in wall teichoic acids represent the binding ligands for both proteins. In phage P35, protein gp16 could be identified as RBP and the role of both rhamnose and N-acetylglucosamine in phage adsorption was confirmed. Immunogold-labeling and transmission electron microscopy allowed the creation of a topological model of the A118 phage tail. - Highlights: • We present the first description of receptor binding proteins and a tail tip structure for the Siphovirus group infecting Listeria monocytogenes. • The host-range determining factors in two phages, A118 and P35 specific for L. monocytogenes serovar 1/2 have been determined. • Rhamnose residues in wall teichoic acids represent the binding ligands for both receptor binding proteins in phage A118. • Rhamnose and N-acetylglucosamine are required for adsorption of phage P35. • We preset a topological model of the A118 phage tail.

  8. A Sheep in Wolf's Clothing: Listeria innocua Strains with Teichoic Acid-Associated Surface Antigens and Genes Characteristic of Listeria monocytogenes Serogroup 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Zheng; Fiedler, Franz; Kathariou, Sophia

    2000-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4b has been implicated in numerous food-borne epidemics and in a substantial fraction of sporadic listeriosis. A unique lineage of the nonpathogenic species Listeria innocua was found to express teichoic acid-associated surface antigens that were otherwise expressed only by L. monocytogenes of serotype 4b and the rare serotypes 4d and 4e. These L. innocua strains were also found to harbor sequences homologous to the gene gtcA, which has been shown to be essential for teichoic acid glycosylation in L. monocytogenes serotype 4b. Transposon mutagenesis and genetic studies revealed that the gtcA gene identified in this lineage of L. innocua was functional in serotype 4b-like glycosylation of the teichoic acids of these organisms. The genomic organization of the gtcA region was conserved between this lineage of L. innocua and L. monocytogenes serotype 4b. Our data are in agreement with the hypothesis that, in this lineage of L. innocua, gtcA was acquired by lateral transfer from L. monocytogenes serogroup 4. The high degree of nucleotide sequence conservation in the gtcA sequences suggests that such transfer was relatively recent. Transfer events of this type may alter the surface antigenic properties of L. innocua and may eventually lead to evolution of novel pathogenic lineages through additional acquisition of genes from virulent listeriae. PMID:11029438

  9. Analysis of Staphylococcus aureus wall teichoic acid glycoepitopes by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy provides novel insights into the staphylococcal glycocode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunert, Tom; Jovanovic, Dijana; Sirisarn, Wanchat; Johler, Sophia; Weidenmaier, Christopher; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Xia, Guoqing

    2018-01-30

    Surface carbohydrate moieties are essential for bacterial communication, phage-bacteria and host-pathogen interaction. Most Staphylococcus aureus produce polyribitolphosphate type Wall teichoic acids (WTAs) substituted with α- and/or β-O-linked N-acetyl-glucosamine (α-/β-O-GlcNAc) residues. GlcNAc modifications have attracted particular interest, as they were shown to govern staphylococcal adhesion to host cells, to promote phage susceptibility conferring beta-lactam resistance and are an important target for antimicrobial agents and vaccines. However, there is a lack of rapid, reliable, and convenient methods to detect and quantify these sugar residues. Whole cell Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy could meet these demands and was employed to analyse WTAs and WTA glycosylation in S. aureus. Using S. aureus mutants, we found that a complete loss of WTA expression resulted in strong FTIR spectral perturbations mainly related to carbohydrates and phosphorus-containing molecules. We could demonstrate that α- or β-O-GlcNAc WTA substituents can be clearly differentiated by chemometrically assisted FTIR spectroscopy. Our results suggest that whole cell FTIR spectroscopy represents a powerful and reliable method for large scale analysis of WTA glycosylation, thus opening up a complete new range of options for deciphering the staphylococcal pathogenesis related glycocode.

  10. Effects of lactic acid bacteria in kimoto on sake brewing. Part 2. ; Promotion mechanism of enzymolysis in rice by teichoic acid. Kimotochu no nyusankin no seishu jozo ni oyobosu eikyo. 2. ; Kimotochu no nyusankin ni yuraisuru teikosan no. alpha. kamai yokai sokushin sayo kisaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizoguchi, H.; Tsurumoto, M.; Furukawa, A.; Kawasaki, T. (Kikumasamune Sake Brewing Co. Ltd, Hyogo (Japan))

    1991-07-25

    In order to elucidate promotion mechanism of dissolution of {alpha}-rice (pregelatinized rice) by teichoic acid. adsorption of teichoic acid and {alpha}-amylase onto rice protein oryzenin was investigated by experiments. Teichoic acid was adsorbed well onto oryzenin and reduced adsorption of {alpha}-amylase. Adsorption of {alpha}-amylase onto rice powder was decreased logarithmically in proportion to the teichoic acid added. Both teichoic acid and {alpha}-amylase were adsorbed by histone, abundant in basic amino acids, and by anion-exchange resin. Adsorption of {alpha}-amylase onto them was reduced by coexistence with teichoic acid. As the results of experiments, it was inferred that teichoic acid became dissolvable through autolysis by lactic acid bacteria in kimoto, changed the state of electric charge on oryzenin surfaces through adsorption onto oryzenin by phosphoric group, decreasing adsorption of {alpha}-amylase onto oryzenin and increasing free {alpha}-amylase in the liquid phase, and thus increased the dissolution of {alpha}-rice. 9 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization of the Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract Is Modulated by Wall Teichoic Acid, Capsule, and Surface Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Misawa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the nose, throat, skin, and gastrointestinal (GI tract of humans. GI carriage of S. aureus is difficult to eradicate and has been shown to facilitate the transmission of the bacterium among individuals. Although staphylococcal colonization of the GI tract is asymptomatic, it increases the likelihood of infection, particularly skin and soft tissue infections caused by USA300 isolates. We established a mouse model of persistent S. aureus GI colonization and characterized the impact of selected surface antigens on colonization. In competition experiments, an acapsular mutant colonized better than the parental strain Newman, whereas mutants defective in sortase A and clumping factor A showed impaired ability to colonize the GI tract. Mutants lacking protein A, clumping factor B, poly-N-acetyl glucosamine, or SdrCDE showed no defect in colonization. An S. aureus wall teichoic acid (WTA mutant (ΔtagO failed to colonize the mouse nose or GI tract, and the tagO and clfA mutants showed reduced adherence in vitro to intestinal epithelial cells. The tagO mutant was recovered in lower numbers than the wild type strain in the murine stomach and duodenum 1 h after inoculation. This reduced fitness correlated with the in vitro susceptibility of the tagO mutant to bile salts, proteases, and a gut-associated defensin. Newman ΔtagO showed enhanced susceptibility to autolysis, and an autolysin (atl tagO double mutant abrogated this phenotype. However, the atl tagO mutant did not survive better in the mouse GI tract than the tagO mutant. Our results indicate that the failure of the tagO mutant to colonize the GI tract correlates with its poor adherence and susceptibility to bactericidal factors within the mouse gut, but not to enhanced activity of its major autolysin.

  12. Chemical Genetic Analysis and Functional Characterization of Staphylococcal Wall Teichoic Acid 2-Epimerases Reveals Unconventional Antibiotic Drug Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Paul A.; Müller, Anna; Wolff, Kerstin A.; Fischmann, Thierry; Wang, Hao; Reed, Patricia; Hou, Yan; Li, Wenjin; Müller, Christa E.; Xiao, Jianying; Murgolo, Nicholas; Sher, Xinwei; Mayhood, Todd; Sheth, Payal R.; Mirza, Asra; Labroli, Marc; Xiao, Li; McCoy, Mark; Gill, Charles J.; Pinho, Mariana G.; Schneider, Tanja; Roemer, Terry (Merck); (Bonn); (FCT/UNL)

    2016-05-04

    Here we describe a chemical biology strategy performed in Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to identify MnaA, a 2-epimerase that we demonstrate interconverts UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-ManNAc to modulate substrate levels of TarO and TarA wall teichoic acid (WTA) biosynthesis enzymes. Genetic inactivation of mnaA results in complete loss of WTA and dramatic in vitro β-lactam hypersensitivity in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and S. epidermidis (MRSE). Likewise, the β-lactam antibiotic imipenem exhibits restored bactericidal activity against mnaA mutants in vitro and concomitant efficacy against 2-epimerase defective strains in a mouse thigh model of MRSA and MRSE infection. Interestingly, whereas MnaA serves as the sole 2-epimerase required for WTA biosynthesis in S. epidermidis, MnaA and Cap5P provide compensatory WTA functional roles in S. aureus. We also demonstrate that MnaA and other enzymes of WTA biosynthesis are required for biofilm formation in MRSA and MRSE. We further determine the 1.9Å crystal structure of S. aureus MnaA and identify critical residues for enzymatic dimerization, stability, and substrate binding. Finally, the natural product antibiotic tunicamycin is shown to physically bind MnaA and Cap5P and inhibit 2-epimerase activity, demonstrating that it inhibits a previously unanticipated step in WTA biosynthesis. In summary, MnaA serves as a new Staphylococcal antibiotic target with cognate inhibitors predicted to possess dual therapeutic benefit: as combination agents to restore β-lactam efficacy against MRSA and MRSE and as non-bioactive prophylactic agents to prevent Staphylococcal biofilm formation.

  13. D-Alanylation of Teichoic Acids and Loss of Poly-N-Acetyl Glucosamine in Staphylococcus aureus during Exponential Growth Phase Enhance IL-12 Production in Murine Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Lisbeth Drozd; Ingmer, Hanne; Frokiaer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    activity of EP bacteria. Furthermore, the mutant dltA unable to produce D-alanylated teichoic acids failed to induce IL-12 but like peptidoglycan and the toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands LPS and Pam3CSK4 the mutant stimulated increased macropinocytosis. In conclusion, the IL-12 response by DCs against S...

  14. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz [Livermore, CA

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.

  15. New Insights into DNA Polymerase Function Revealed by Phosphonoacetic Acid-Sensitive T4 DNA Polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Likui

    2017-11-20

    The bacteriophage T4 DNA polymerase (pol) and the closely related RB69 DNA pol have been developed into model enzymes to study family B DNA pols. While all family B DNA pols have similar structures and share conserved protein motifs, the molecular mechanism underlying natural drug resistance of nonherpes family B DNA pols and drug sensitivity of herpes DNA pols remains unknown. In the present study, we constructed T4 phages containing G466S, Y460F, G466S/Y460F, P469S, and V475W mutations in DNA pol. These amino acid substitutions replace the residues in drug-resistant T4 DNA pol with residues found in drug-sensitive herpes family DNA pols. We investigated whether the T4 phages expressing the engineered mutant DNA pols were sensitive to the antiviral drug phosphonoacetic acid (PAA) and characterized the in vivo replication fidelity of the phage DNA pols. We found that G466S substitution marginally increased PAA sensitivity, whereas Y460F substitution conferred resistance. The phage expressing a double mutant G466S/Y460F DNA pol was more PAA-sensitive. V475W T4 DNA pol was highly sensitive to PAA, as was the case with V478W RB69 DNA pol. However, DNA replication was severely compromised, which resulted in the selection of phages expressing more robust DNA pols that have strong ability to replicate DNA and contain additional amino acid substitutions that suppress PAA sensitivity. Reduced replication fidelity was observed in all mutant phages expressing PAA-sensitive DNA pols. These observations indicate that PAA sensitivity and fidelity are balanced in DNA pols that can replicate DNA in different environments.

  16. Nucleic acid amplification: Alternative methods of polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Fakruddin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid amplification is a valuable molecular tool not only in basic research but also in application oriented fields, such as clinical medicine development, infectious diseases diagnosis, gene cloning and industrial quality control. A comperehensive review of the literature on the principles, applications, challenges and prospects of different alternative methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR was performed. PCR was the first nucleic acid amplification method. With the advancement of research, a no of alternative nucleic acid amplification methods has been developed such as loop mediated isothermal amplification, nucleic acid sequence based amplification, strand displacement amplification, multiple displacement amplification. Most of the alternative methods are isothermal obviating the need for thermal cyclers. Though principles of most of the alternate methods are relatively complex than that of PCR, they offer better applicability and sensitivity in cases where PCR has limitations. Most of the alternate methods still have to prove themselves through extensive validation studies and are not available in commercial form; they pose the potentiality to be used as replacements of PCR. Continuous research is going on in different parts of the world to make these methods viable technically and economically.

  17. α,β-D-constrained nucleic acids are strong terminators of thermostable DNA polymerases in polymerase chain reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Martínez

    Full Text Available (S(C5', R(P α,β-D- Constrained Nucleic Acids (CNA are dinucleotide building blocks that can feature either B-type torsional angle values or non-canonical values, depending on their 5'C and P absolute stereochemistry. These CNA are modified neither on the nucleobase nor on the sugar structure and therefore represent a new class of nucleotide with specific chemical and structural characteristics. They promote marked bending in a single stranded DNA so as to preorganize it into a loop-like structure, and they have been shown to induce rigidity within oligonucleotides. Following their synthesis, studies performed on CNA have only focused on the constraints that this family of nucleotides introduced into DNA. On the assumption that bending in a DNA template may produce a terminator structure, we investigated whether CNA could be used as a new strong terminator of polymerization in PCR. We therefore assessed the efficiency of CNA as a terminator in PCR, using triethylene glycol phosphate units as a control. Analyses were performed by denaturing gel electrophoresis and several PCR products were further analysed by sequencing. The results showed that the incorporation of only one CNA was always skipped by the polymerases tested. On the other hand, two CNA units always stopped proofreading polymerases, such as Pfu DNA polymerase, as expected for a strong replication terminator. Non-proofreading enzymes, e.g. Taq DNA polymerase, did not recognize this modification as a strong terminator although it was predominantly stopped by this structure. In conclusion, this first functional use of CNA units shows that these modified nucleotides can be used as novel polymerization terminators of proofreading polymerases. Furthermore, our results lead us to propose that CNA and their derivatives could be useful tools for investigating the behaviour of different classes of polymerases.

  18. Reverse Transcription of Threose Nucleic Acid by a Naturally Occurring DNA Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Matthew R; Chaput, John C

    2016-10-04

    Recent advances in polymerase engineering have enabled the replication of xenonucleic acid (XNA) polymers with backbone structures distinct from those found in nature. By introducing a selective amplification step into the replication cycle, functional XNA molecules have been isolated by in vitro selection with binding and catalytic activity. Despite these successes, coding and decoding genetic information in XNA polymers remains limited by the fidelity and catalytic efficiency of engineered XNA polymerases. In particular, the process of reverse transcribing XNA back into DNA for amplification by PCR has been problematic. Here, we show that Geobacillus stearothermophilus (Bst) DNA polymerase I functions as an efficient and faithful threose nucleic acid (TNA)-dependent DNA polymerase. Bst DNA polymerase generates ∼twofold more cDNA with threefold fewer mutations than Superscript II (SSII), which was previously the best TNA reverse transcriptase. Notably, Bst also functions under standard magnesium-dependent conditions, whereas SSII requires manganese ions to relax the enzyme's substrate specificity. We further demonstrate that Bst DNA polymerase can support the in vitro selection of TNA aptamers by evolving a TNA aptamer to human α-thrombin. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Viral Polymerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyung H.

    2016-01-01

    Viral polymerases play a central role in viral genome replication and transcription. Based on the genome type and the specific needs of particular virus, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and DNA-dependent RNA polymerases are found in various viruses. Viral polymerases are generally active as a single protein capable of carrying out multiple functions related to viral genome synthesis. Specifically, viral polymerases use variety of mechanisms to recognize initial binding sites, ensure processive elongation, terminate replication at the end of the genome, and also coordinate the chemical steps of nucleic acid synthesis with other enzymatic activities. This review focuses on different viral genome replication and transcription strategies, and the polymerase interactions with various viral proteins that are necessary to complete genome synthesis. PMID:22297518

  20. DNA polymerase betas from liver and testes of cherry salmon, Oncorhynchus masou: purification and characterization of DNA polymerase betas with acidic isoelectric points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T; Nishimura, S; Takahashi, K; Yoshikuni, M; Masaki, J; Hirai, T; Saneyoshi, M

    1996-01-01

    DNA polymerase betas from cherry salmon, Oncorhynchus masou, liver and testes were purified to near homogeneity, and no substantial differences between the enzymes were observed. The molecular weight of both enzymes, determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was 39,000. The amino acid sequences of the N-terminus of the liver and testes enzymes were determined and compared with that of the rat enzyme. Of the N-terminal 30 amino acid residues of salmon liver DNA polymerase beta, 21 (70%) were identical to those of the rat enzyme sequence. However, unlike most eukaryotic DNA polymerase betas, the isoelectric points (pIs) of the DNA polymerase betas from salmon liver and testes were both estimated to be 6.2, which is significantly different from the alkaline isoelectric points (pI = 8.5-9.5) established for other highly purified vertebrate DNA polymerase betas. The cherry salmon DNA polymerase betas were still active at below 10 degrees C, compared with the rat enzyme.

  1. Interaction of aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) with four nucleic acid binding proteins DNase I, RNase A, reverse transcriptase and Taq polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Utpal; Giri, Kalyan; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P.

    2009-12-01

    In the investigation of interaction of aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) with four biologically important proteins we observed inhibition of enzymatic activity of DNase I, RNase A, M-MLV reverse transcriptase and Taq polymerase by ATA in vitro assay. As the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is the main catalytic subunit of telomerase holoenzyme, we also monitored effect of ATA on telomerase activity in vivo and observed dose-dependent inhibition of telomerase activity in Chinese hamster V79 cells treated with ATA. Direct association of ATA with DNase I ( Kd = 9.019 μM)), RNase A ( Kd = 2.33 μM) reverse transcriptase ( Kd = 0.255 μM) and Taq polymerase ( Kd = 81.97 μM) was further shown by tryptophan fluorescence quenching studies. Such association altered the three-dimensional conformation of DNase I, RNase A and Taq polymerase as detected by circular dichroism. We propose ATA inhibits enzymatic activity of the four proteins through interfering with DNA or RNA binding to the respective proteins either competitively or allosterically, i.e. by perturbing three-dimensional structure of enzymes.

  2. Inhibition of non-templated nucleotide addition by DNA polymerases in primer extension using twisted intercalating nucleic acid modified templates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Güixens-Gallardo, Pedro; Hocek, Michal; Perlíková, Pavla

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 2 (2016), s. 288-291 ISSN 0960-894X R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA polymerases * nucleotide addition * primer extension * oligonucleotides * twisted intercalating nucleic acid Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.454, year: 2016

  3. Cross-coupling reactions of nucleoside triphosphates followed by polymerase incorporation. Construction and applications of base-functionalized nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocek, Michal; Fojta, Miroslav

    2008-07-07

    Construction of functionalized nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) via polymerase incorporation of modified nucleoside triphosphates is reviewed and selected applications of the modified nucleic acids are highlighted. The classical multistep approach for the synthesis of modified NTPs by triphosphorylation of modified nucleosides is compared to the novel approach consisting of direct aqueous cross-coupling reactions of unprotected halogenated nucleoside triphosphates. The combination of cross-coupling of NTPs with polymerase incorporation gives an efficient and straightforward two-step synthesis of modified nucleic acids. Primer extension using biotinylated templates followed by separation using streptavidine-coated magnetic beads and DNA duplex denaturation is used for preparation of modified single stranded oligonucleotides. Examples of using this approach for electrochemical DNA labelling and bioanalytical applications are given.

  4. Method and apparatus for purifying nucleic acids and performing polymerase chain reaction assays using an immiscible fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Chung-Yan; Light, Yooli Kim; Piccini, Matthew Ernest; Singh, Anup K.

    2017-10-31

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed toward devices, systems, and methods for purifying nucleic acids to conduct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. In one example, a method includes generating complexes of silica beads and nucleic acids in a lysis buffer, transporting the complexes through an immiscible fluid to remove interfering compounds from the complexes, further transporting the complexes into a density medium containing components required for PCR where the nucleic acids disassociate from the silica beads, and thermocycling the contents of the density medium to achieve PCR. Signal may be detected from labeling agents in the components required for PCR.

  5. Simplifying Nucleic Acid Amplification from Whole Blood with Direct Polymerase Chain Reaction on Chitosan Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, Imaly A; Cao, Weidong; White, Ian M

    2017-03-21

    Tremendous advances have been made in the development of portable nucleic acid amplification devices for near-patient use. However, the true limitation in the realization of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) for near-patient applications is not the amplification reaction, it is the complexity of the sample preparation. Conventional approaches require several precise intervention steps during the protocol. There are numerous reports in the literature that mimic the sample preparation procedure within a lab-on-a-chip device or cartridge, but these systems require a high number of integrated steps, making the devices and/or their supporting equipment too complex to meet the necessary cost targets and regulatory requirements for near-patient applications. Here we report a simplified method to purify and amplify DNA from complex samples in a minimal number of steps. We show that chitosan-coated microparticles can lyse human cells and capture the released DNA in a single mechanical agitation step, and we show that bound DNA can be amplified directly from the microparticle surface when the magnetic microparticles are transferred to a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This procedure eliminates (i) the use of PCR-inhibiting reagents (e.g., chaotropic salts and alcohol) and (ii) the washing and elution steps that are required to remove these reagents and release DNA in typical NAAT sample preparation methods. To illustrate the use of this direct PCR method in diagnostics, we amplify human genomic DNA sequences from a ∼1 μL droplet of whole blood, and we amplify plasmid DNA spiked into whole blood droplets to represent circulating viral DNA or cell-free DNA. The qPCR threshold cycle for direct PCR from whole blood is comparable to that of direct PCR with purified DNA, demonstrating that the lysis and capture steps effectively bind DNA and sufficiently enable its amplification. Furthermore, the efficient amplification of plasmid DNA spiked into whole blood proves that

  6. Synthesis of nucleoside and nucleotide conjugates of bile acids, and polymerase construction of bile acid-functionalized DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ikonen, Satu; Macíčková-Cahová, Hana; Pohl, Radek; Šanda, Miloslav; Hocek, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 5 (2010), s. 1194-1201 ISSN 1477-0520 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GA203/09/0317 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : steroids * nucleosides * nucleoside triphosphates * DNA polymerase Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.451, year: 2010

  7. The steric gate amino acid tyrosine 112 is required for efficient mismatched-primer extension by human DNA polymerase kappa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Naoko; Sassa, Akira; Katafuchi, Atsushi; Grúz, Petr; Fujimoto, Hirofumi; Bonala, Radha-Rani; Johnson, Francis; Ohta, Toshihiro; Nohmi, Takehiko

    2009-05-26

    Human DNA is continuously damaged by exogenous and endogenous genotoxic insults. To counteract DNA damage and ensure the completion of DNA replication, cells possess specialized DNA polymerases (Pols) that bypass a variety of DNA lesions. Human DNA polymerase kappa (hPolkappa) is a member of the Y-family of DNA Pols and a direct counterpart of DinB in Escherichia coli. hPolkappa is characterized by its ability to bypass several DNA adducts [e.g., benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide-N(2)-deoxyguanine (BPDE-N(2)-dG) and thymine glycol] and efficiently extend primers with mismatches at the termini. hPolkappa is structurally distinct from E. coli DinB in that it possesses an approximately 100-amino acid extension at the N-terminus. Here, we report that tyrosine 112 (Y112), the steric gate amino acid of hPolkappa, which distinguishes dNTPs from rNTPs by sensing the 2'-hydroxy group of incoming nucleotides, plays a crucial role in extension reactions with mismatched primer termini. When Y112 was replaced with alanine, the amino acid change severely reduced the catalytic constant, i.e., k(cat), of the extending mismatched primers and lowered the efficiency, i.e., k(cat)/K(m), of this process by approximately 400-fold compared with that of the wild-type enzyme. In contrast, the amino acid replacement did not reduce the insertion efficiency of dCMP opposite BPDE-N(2)-dG in template DNA, nor did it affect the ability of hPolkappa to bind strongly to template-primer DNA with BPDE-N(2)-dG/dCMP. We conclude that the steric gate of hPolkappa is a major fidelity factor that regulates extension reactions from mismatched primer termini.

  8. [Inhibitors of nucleic acid synthesis as a means of identifying the forms of DNA-dependent DNA polymerases in Acholeplasma laidlawii PG-8 and of determining their functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skripal', I G; Bezuglyĭ, S V; Babichev, V V

    1993-01-01

    Antibiotics, inhibitors of nucleic acids' synthesis from the group of chromomycins (olivomycin of sodium salt), anthracyclines (carminomycin and doxorubicin) and streptonigrin (bruneomycin) have been studied for their effect on DNA synthesis in vitro performed by DNA polymerases (1st and 2nd forms) of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG-8. It has been stated that olivomycin inhibits the function of both the first and second forms of DNA polymerases in proportion to an increase of the antibiotic concentration in the medium. Carminomycin in the concentration of about 1 microgram/ml almost completely inhibited the activity of both DNA polymerases. However, doxorubicin also belonging to the group of anthracyclins completely inhibited the activity of the first form of DNA polymerase in the concentration of 1 microgram/ml and practically has no effect in the concentration up to 100 micrograms/ml on the activity of the second form possessing 3'-->5'-function. Streptonigrin also proved to be suitable for differentiate the forms of DNA polymerases and to determine their functions. The first form of DNA polymerase with 5'-->3'-polymerase and exonuclease functions was not sensitive by this antibiotic in the concentration of 1000 micrograms/ml, while the activity of the second form of DNA polymerase with 3'-->5'-exonuclease functions was fully inhibited by this concentration of the antibiotic in the medium. The combination of doxorhubicin and streptonigrin in the medium can be used to determine the form of DNA polymerases and to identify their 5'-->3'- or 3'-->5'-exonuclease function and for selectivity inhibition of the function of one or another DNA polymerase in the medium.

  9. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for sex and species determination with novel controls for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) template length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaensslen, R E; Berka, K M; Grosso, D A; Ruano, G; Pagliaro, E M; Messina, D; Lee, H C

    1992-01-01

    Human X and Y chromosome alpha-satellite sequences lying within higher order repeats were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) isolated from blood, bone, and several other tissues and specimens of potential forensic science interest. X and Y sequences could be coamplified under some of the PCR conditions employed. Monomorphic sequences in the 3'-apolipoprotein B gene (designated "H") and in an alpha-satellite higher order repeat on Chromosome 17 (p17H8, D17Z1) were likewise amplified in the specimens. X and Y sequence amplification can provide information about the sex of origin. Amplification of the X, H, and D17Z1 sequences was found to be primate-specific among the common animals tested and can thus provide species of origin information about a specimen. The authors suggest that amplification of X and D17Z1 or H sequences might provide "relaxed" and "stringent" controls for appropriate PCR amplification tests on forensic science specimens. Testing was carried out using PCR protocols that employed Thermophilus aquaticus (Taq) and Thermus flavis (Replinase) thermostable DNA polymerases.

  10. Molecular Recognition of Azelaic Acid and Related Molecules with DNA Polymerase I Investigated by Molecular Modeling Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawon, Jakaria; Khan, Akib Mahmud; Rahman, Adhip; Hoque, Mohammad Mazharol; Khan, Mohammad Abdul Kader; Sarwar, Mohammed G; Halim, Mohammad A

    2016-10-01

    Molecular recognition has central role on the development of rational drug design. Binding affinity and interactions are two key components which aid to understand the molecular recognition in drug-receptor complex and crucial for structure-based drug design in medicinal chemistry. Herein, we report the binding affinity and the nonbonding interactions of azelaic acid and related compounds with the receptor DNA polymerase I (2KFN). Quantum mechanical calculation was employed to optimize the modified drugs using B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. Charge distribution, dipole moment and thermodynamic properties such as electronic energy, enthalpy and free energy of these optimized drugs are also explored to evaluate how modifications impact the drug properties. Molecular docking calculation was performed to evaluate the binding affinity and nonbonding interactions between designed molecules and the receptor protein. We notice that all modified drugs are thermodynamically more stable and some of them are more chemically reactive than the unmodified drug. Promise in enhancing hydrogen bonds is found in case of fluorine-directed modifications as well as in the addition of trifluoroacetyl group. Fluorine participates in forming fluorine bonds and also stimulates alkyl, pi-alkyl interactions in some drugs. Designed drugs revealed increased binding affinity toward 2KFN. A1, A2 and A3 showed binding affinities of -8.7, -8.6 and -7.9 kcal/mol, respectively against 2KFN compared to the binding affinity -6.7 kcal/mol of the parent drug. Significant interactions observed between the drugs and Thr358 and Asp355 residues of 2KFN. Moreover, designed drugs demonstrated improved pharmacokinetic properties. This study disclosed that 9-octadecenoic acid and drugs containing trifluoroacetyl and trifluoromethyl groups are the best 2KFN inhibitors. Overall, these results can be useful for the design of new potential candidates against DNA polymerase I.

  11. Determination of ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid resistance in Campylobacter jejuni with a fluorogenic polymerase chain reaction assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padungtod, Pawin; Kaneene, John B; Wilson, David L; Bell, Julia; Linz, John E

    2003-02-01

    A fluorogenic polymerase chain reaction assay for the gyrA gene was used to determine the frequency of a Thr-86 mutation in Campylobacter jejuni isolates from food animals and humans in northern Thailand and to investigate the correlation between this mutation and bacterial resistance to fluoroquinolones. Eighty-four isolates of C. jejuni were used: 65 from healthy chickens on farms, 16 from chickens at the slaughterhouse, 1 from chicken meat at the market, and 1 from a healthy farm worker. The microbroth dilution technique was used for in vitro susceptibility testing. MIC breakpoints established by the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System were used to categorize the resistance of C. jejuni to ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid. Sixty of the 84 C. jejuni isolates tested carried the Thr-86 mutation in the gyrA gene. All isolates with ciprofloxacin MICs of > or = 2 mg/liter carried the mutation, and no isolates with nalidixic acid MICs of < or = 16 mg/liter carried the Thr-86-to-Ile mutation. There was a very strong association between ciprofloxacin resistance and the presence of the mutation (kappa = 0.971, P < 0.01). The association between the presence of the Thr-86-to-Ile mutation and nalidixic acid resistance was weaker (kappa 0.859: P < or = 0.01).

  12. Identification of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria by using polymerase chain reaction-amplified variable regions of 16S rRNA and specific DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klijn, N; Weerkamp, A H; de Vos, W M

    1991-01-01

    Specific DNA probes based on variable regions V1 and V3 of 16S rRNA of lactic acid bacteria were designed. These probes were used in hybridization experiments with variable regions amplified by using the polymerase chain reaction. In this way, a rapid and sensitive method was developed for the identification and classification of Lactococcus and Leuconostoc species. Images PMID:1723586

  13. Study on Suitability of KOD DNA Polymerase for Enzymatic Production of Artificial Nucleic Acids Using Base/Sugar Modified Nucleoside Triphosphates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Obika

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, KOD and its related DNA polymerases have been used for preparing various modified nucleic acids, including not only base-modified nucleic acids, but also sugar-modified ones, such as bridged/locked nucleic acid (BNA/LNA which would be promising candidates for nucleic acid drugs. However, thus far, reasons for the effectiveness of KOD DNA polymerase for such purposes have not been clearly elucidated. Therefore, using mutated KOD DNA polymerases, we studied here their catalytic properties upon enzymatic incorporation of nucleotide analogues with base/sugar modifications. Experimental data indicate that their characteristic kinetic properties enabled incorporation of various modified nucleotides. Among those KOD mutants, one achieved efficient successive incorporation of bridged nucleotides with a 2′-ONHCH2CH2-4′ linkage. In this study, the characteristic kinetic properties of KOD DNA polymerase for modified nucleoside triphosphates were shown, and the effectiveness of genetic engineering in improvement of the enzyme for modified nucleotide polymerization has been demonstrated.

  14. Inhibitory Effects of Glycyrrhetinic Acid on DNA Polymerase and Inflammatory Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Ishida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the inhibitory effect of three glycyrrhizin derivatives, such as Glycyrrhizin (compound 1, dipotassium glycyrrhizate (compound 2 and glycyrrhetinic acid (compound 3, on the activity of mammalian pols. Among these derivatives, compound 3 was the strongest inhibitor of mammalian pols α, β, κ, and λ, which belong to the B, A, Y, and X families of pols, respectively, whereas compounds 1 and 2 showed moderate inhibition. Among the these derivatives tested, compound 3 displayed strongest suppression of the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS in a cell-culture system using mouse macrophages RAW264.7 and peritoneal macrophages derived from mice. Moreover, compound 3 was found to inhibit the action of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB in engineered human embryonic kidney (HEK 293 cells. In addition, compound 3 caused greater reduction of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-(TPA- induced acute inflammation in mouse ear than compounds 1 and 2. In conclusion, this study has identified compound 3, which is the aglycone of compounds 1 and 2, as a promising anti-inflammatory candidate based on mammalian pol inhibition.

  15. Switching between polymerase and exonuclease sites in DNA polymerase ε

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganai, Rais A.; Bylund, Göran O.; Johansson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The balance between exonuclease and polymerase activities promotes DNA synthesis over degradation when nucleotides are correctly added to the new strand by replicative B-family polymerases. Misincorporations shift the balance toward the exonuclease site, and the balance tips back in favor of DNA synthesis when the incorrect nucleotides have been removed. Most B-family DNA polymerases have an extended β-hairpin loop that appears to be important for switching from the exonuclease site to the polymerase site, a process that affects fidelity of the DNA polymerase. Here, we show that DNA polymerase ε can switch between the polymerase site and exonuclease site in a processive manner despite the absence of an extended β-hairpin loop. K967 and R988 are two conserved amino acids in the palm and thumb domain that interact with bases on the primer strand in the minor groove at positions n−2 and n−4/n−5, respectively. DNA polymerase ε depends on both K967 and R988 to stabilize the 3′-terminus of the DNA within the polymerase site and on R988 to processively switch between the exonuclease and polymerase sites. Based on a structural alignment with DNA polymerase δ, we propose that arginines corresponding to R988 might have a similar function in other B-family polymerases. PMID:25550436

  16. Deoxyribonucleic acid repair in Escherichia coli mutants deficient in the 5'----3' exonuclease activity of deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase I and exonuclease VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, J.W.; Masker, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    A series of Escherichia coli strains deficient in the 5'----3' exonuclease activity associated with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) polymerase I (exonuclease VI) and exonuclease VII has been constructed. Both of these enzymes are capable of pyrimidine dimer excision in vitro. These strains were examined for conditional lethality, sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) and X-irradiation, postirradiation DNA degradation, and ability to excise pyrimidine dimers. It was found that strains deficient in both exonuclease VI (polAex-) and exonuclease VII (xseA-) are significantly reduced in their ability to survive incubation at elevated temperature (43 degrees C) beyond the reduction previously observed for the polAex single mutants. The UV and X-ray sensitivity of the exonuclease VI-deficient strains was not increased by the addition of the xseA7 mutation. Mutants deficient in both enzymes are about as efficient as wild-type strains at excising dimers produced by up to 40 J/m2 UV. At higher doses strains containing only polAex- mutations show reduced ability to excise dimers; however, the interpretation of dimer excision data at these doses is complicated by extreme postirradiation DNA degradation in these strains. The additional deficiency in the polAex xseA7 double-mutant strains has no significant effect on either postirradiation DNA degradation or the apparent deficiency in dimer excision at high UV doses observed in polAex single mutants

  17. Separation of promotion factor on enzymatic dissolution of rice from autolyzate of lactic acid bacteria. Kimotochu yori bunrisareta nyusankin ni yoru jomai yokai sokushin to sayo inshi no bunkaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizoguchi, H.; Tsurumoto, M.; Furukawa, A.; Kawasaki, T. (Kikumasamune Sake Brewing Co. Ltd., Hyogo (Japan))

    1991-07-25

    The autolyzate of lactic acid bacteria was found out to promote dissolution of {alpha}-rice with koji to some extent. Several strains of lactic acid bacteria tested provided the ability to enhance the dissolution. Additionally, the stimulatory effect in dissolution was found out in the fraction of polysaccharide in dialyzed solution. The effective fraction comprised components of teichoic acid, i.e., glucose, gluycerol, phosphoric acid, and alanine. A teichoic acid prepared from purified cell wall also stimulated dissolution of {alpha}-rice. The elution of teichoic acid in the lactate buffer containing 2%(w v) glucose was affected by the temperature and the concentration of ethanol. Almost the whole amount of teichoic acid was eluted in 4 days under the condition of 20 centigrade and 10%(v v) ethanol. In the small-scale sake brewing test, an improvement of material dissolution by the stimulatory effect was recognized by the addition of a reasonable amount of teichoic acid. 13 refs., 6 figs., 4tabs.

  18. Nucleolar targeting of proteins by the tandem array of basic amino acid stretches identified in the RNA polymerase I-associated factor PAF49

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushijima, Ryujiro; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Nagata, Izumi; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence to indicate that the regulation of subnuclear compartmentalization plays important roles in cellular processes. The RNA polymerase I-associated factor PAF49 has been shown to accumulate in the nucleolus in growing cells, but disperse into the nucleoplasm in growth-arrested cells. Serial deletion analysis revealed that amino acids 199-338 were necessary for the nucleolar localization of PAF49. Combinatorial point mutation analysis indicated that the individual basic amino acid stretches (BS) within the central (BS1-4) and the C-terminal (BS5 and 6) regions may cooperatively confer the nucleolar localization of PAF49. Addition of the basic stretches in tandem to a heterologous protein, such as the interferon regulatory factor-3, translocated the tagged protein into the nucleolus, even in the presence of an intrinsic nuclear export sequence. Thus, tandem array of the basic amino acid stretches identified here functions as a dominant nucleolar targeting sequence

  19. Effects of non-catalytic, distal amino acid residues on activity of E. coli DinB (DNA polymerase IV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jason M; Parasuram, Ramya; Rajput, Pradyumna R; Rozners, Eriks; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Beuning, Penny J

    2012-12-01

    DinB is one of two Y family polymerases in E. coli and is involved in copying damaged DNA. DinB is specialized to bypass deoxyguanosine adducts that occur at the N(2) position, with its cognate lesion being the furfuryl adduct. Active site residues have been identified that make contact with the substrate and carry out deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP) addition to the growing DNA strand. In DNA polymerases, these include negatively charged aspartate and glutamate residues (D8, D103, and E104 in E. coli DNA polymerase IV DinB). These residues position the essential magnesium ions correctly to facilitate nucleophilic attack by the primer hydroxyl group on the α-phosphate group of the incoming dNTP. To study the contribution of DinB residues to lesion bypass, the computational methods THEMATICS and POOL were employed. These methods correctly predict the known active site residues, as well as other residues known to be important for activity. In addition, these methods predict other residues involved in substrate binding as well as more remote residues. DinB variants with mutations at the predicted positions were constructed and assayed for bypass of the N(2) -furfuryl-dG lesion. We find a wide range of effects of predicted residues, including some mutations that abolish damage bypass. Moreover, most of the DinB variants constructed are unable to carry out the extension step of lesion bypass. The use of computational prediction methods represents another tool that will lead to a more complete understanding of translesion DNA synthesis. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A full-coordinate model of the polymerase domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and its interaction with a nucleic acid substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlik, R. F.; Meyer, D. J.; Shibata, M.; Roskwitalski, R.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.

    1994-01-01

    We present a full-coordinate model of residues 1-319 of the polymerase domain of HIV-I reverse transcriptase. This model was constructed from the x-ray crystallographic structure of Jacobo-Molina et al. (Jacobo-Molina et al., P.N.A.S. USA 90, 6320-6324 (1993)) which is currently available to the degree of C-coordinates. The backbone and side-chain atoms were constructed using the MAXSPROUT suite of programs (L. Holm and C. Sander, J. Mol. Biol. 218, 183-194 (1991)) and refined through molecular modeling. A seven base pair A-form dsDNA was positioned in the nucleic acid binding cleft to represent the template-primer complex. The orientation of the template-primer complex in the nucleic acid binding cleft was guided by the positions of phosphorus atoms in the crystal structure.

  1. Detection of maternal deoxyribonucleic acid in umbilical cord plasma by using fluorescent polymerase chain reaction amplification of short tandem repeat sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Margit; Orescovic, Irmgard; Schoell, Wolfgang M; Bianchi, Diana W; Pertl, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood is a source of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation. Although the first clinical applications have been encouraging, concern has been raised about contamination of umbilical blood by maternal cells, which might constitute a theoretical risk of graft-versus-host disease. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of maternal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) contamination in umbilical cord plasma by using fluorescent polymerase chain reaction amplification of highly polymorphic short tandem repeat DNA markers. Fifty-seven mother/child pairs were tested for the presence of maternal DNA sequences in cord plasma. After delivery, cord blood samples were collected via gravity. Maternal specific alleles were detected by using polymerase chain reaction amplification of 9 highly polymorphic short tandem repeat markers (D21S11, D21S1411, D21S1412, D18S386, D18S535, MBP-A, MBP-B, D13S631, and D13S634). All 57 mother-child pairs were informative for the identification of uniquely maternal alleles in at least 2 of 9 different short tandem repeat markers used per case. Uniquely maternal DNA sequences were found in 43 of 57 (75%) cord plasma samples. The results of our study demonstrate that maternal DNA is present in the majority of umbilical cord blood plasma samples. The technique described herein might have application in the screening of umbilical cord blood samples for the presence of contaminating maternal genetic material.

  2. Diagnosis of pediatric pulmonary tuberculosis with special reference to polymerase chain reaction based nucleic acid amplification test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreshtha Tiwari

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion/recommendation: The present study reinforces better case detection rate with PCR-based nucleic acid amplification test as compared with microscopy and culture in pediatric pulmonary TB. PCR showed a higher correlation with clinical diagnosis as compared with microscopy and solid culture. Hence, a molecular platform should be the test of choice for detecting PPTB.

  3. DNA polymerases and biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbrenner, Joos; Marx, Andreas

    2017-12-01

    A multitude of biotechnological techniques used in basic research as well as in clinical diagnostics on an everyday basis depend on DNA polymerases and their intrinsic capability to replicate DNA strands with astoundingly high fidelity. Applications with fundamental importance to modern molecular biology, including the polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing, would not be feasible without the advances made in characterizing these enzymes over the course of the last 60 years. Nonetheless, the still growing application scope of DNA polymerases necessitates the identification of novel enzymes with tailor-made properties. In the recent past, DNA polymerases optimized for diverse PCR and sequencing applications as well as enzymes that accept a variety of unnatural substrates for the synthesis and reverse transcription of modified nucleic acids have been developed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of a peptide nucleic acid polymerase chain reaction clamping assay for semiquantitative evaluation of genetically modified organism content in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peano, C; Lesignoli, F; Gulli, M; Corradini, R; Samson, M C; Marchelli, R; Marmiroli, N

    2005-09-15

    In the present study a peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-mediated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) clamping method was developed and applied to the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMO), to test PCR products for band identity and to obtain a semiquantitative evaluation of GMO content. The minimal concentration of PNA necessary to block the PCR was determined by comparing PCRs containing a constant amount of DNA in the presence of increasing concentration of target-specific PNA. The lowest PNA concentration at which specific inhibition took place, by the inhibition of primer extension and/or steric hindrance, was the most efficient condition. Optimization of PCR clamping by PNA was observed by testing five different PNAs with a minimum of 13 bp to a maximum of 15 bp, designed on the target sequence of Roundup Ready soybean. The results obtained on the DNA extracted from Roundup Ready soybean standard flour were verified also on DNA extracted from standard flours of maize GA21, Bt176, Bt11, and MON810. A correlation between the PNA concentration necessary for inducing PCR clamping and the percentage of the GMO target sequence in the sample was found.

  5. A new family of polymerases related to superfamily A DNA polymerases and T7-like DNA-dependent RNA polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind L

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Using sequence profile methods and structural comparisons we characterize a previously unknown family of nucleic acid polymerases in a group of mobile elements from genomes of diverse bacteria, an algal plastid and certain DNA viruses, including the recently reported Sputnik virus. Using contextual information from domain architectures and gene-neighborhoods we present evidence that they are likely to possess both primase and DNA polymerase activity, comparable to the previously reported prim-pol proteins. These newly identified polymerases help in defining the minimal functional core of superfamily A DNA polymerases and related RNA polymerases. Thus, they provide a framework to understand the emergence of both DNA and RNA polymerization activity in this class of enzymes. They also provide evidence that enigmatic DNA viruses, such as Sputnik, might have emerged from mobile elements coding these polymerases. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eugene Koonin and Mark Ragan.

  6. Detection of Shigella spp. nucleic acids in the synovial tissue of Tunisian rheumatoid arthritis patients and other forms of arthritis by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siala, Mariam; Rihl, Markus; Sellami, Hanen; Znazen, Abir; Sassi, Nadia; Laadhar, Lilia; Gdoura, Radhouane; Belghuith, Imen; Mrabet, Dalila; Baklouti, Sofien; Sellami, Slaheddine; Sibilia, Jean; Fourati, Hela; Hammami, Adnene; Cheour, Ilhem

    2018-02-05

    Enterobacterial components in the joints of patients are believed to contribute to a perpetuating inflammation leading to a reactive arthritis (ReA), a condition in which microbial agents cannot be recovered from the joint. At present, it is unclear whether nucleic acids from Shigella spp. are playing a pathogenic role in causing not only ReA but also other forms of arthritis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay (qPCR) is the method of choice for the identification of bacteria within the synovium. The aim of our study was to detect the presence of Shigella spp. nucleic acids in the synovial tissue (ST) of Tunisian arthritis patients. We investigated 57 ST samples from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) n = 38, undifferentiated oligoarthritis (UOA) n = 12, and spondyloarthritis (SpA) n = 7 patients; 5 ST samples from healthy individuals were used as controls. Shigella spp. DNA and mRNA transcripts encoding the virulence gene A (VirA) were examined using an optimized qPCR with newly designed primers and probes. Using qPCR, Shigella spp. DNA was found in 37/57 (65%) ST samples (24/38, i.e., 63.2% of RA, 8/12, i.e., 67% of UOA, and 5/7, i.e., 71.4% of SpA patients). Paired DNA and mRNA were extracted from 39 ST samples, whose VirA cDNA was found in 29/39 (74.4%) patients. qPCR did not yield any nucleic acids in the five healthy control ST samples. The qPCR assay was sensitive and showed a good intra- and inter-run reproducibility. These preliminary findings generated by an optimized, highly sensitive PCR assay underline a potential role of past gastrointestinal infections. In Tunisian patients, a bacterial etiology involving Shigella spp. in the manifestation of arthritic disorders including RA might be more common than expected.

  7. 16S Ribosomal Ribonucleic Acid Gene Polymerase Chain Reaction in the Diagnosis of Bloodstream Infections: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guoming; Fu, Zhuqing; Hu, Liren; Wang, Yueying; Zhao, Zuguo; Yang, Weiqing

    2015-01-01

    We aim to evaluate the accuracy of the 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test in the diagnosis of bloodstream infections through a systematic review and meta-analysis. A computerized literature search was conducted to identify studies that assessed the diagnostic value of 16S rRNA gene PCR test for bloodstream infections. Study quality was assessed using the revised Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) tool. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for each study. Summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve was used to summarize overall test performance. Statistical analysis was performed in Meta-DiSc 1.4 and Stata/SE 12.0 software. Twenty-eight studies were included in our meta-analysis. Using random-effect model analysis, the pooled sensitivity, specificity, PLR, NLR, and DOR were 0.87 (95% CI, 0.85-0.89), 0.94 (95% CI, 0.93-0.95), 12.65 (95% CI, 8.04-19.90), 0.14 (95% CI, 0.08-0.24), and 116.76 (95% CI, 52.02-262.05), respectively. The SROC curve indicated that the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.9690 and the maximum joint sensitivity and specificity (Q*) was 0.9183. In addition, heterogeneity was statistically significant but was not caused by the threshold effect. Existing data suggest that 16S rRNA gene PCR test is a practical tool for the rapid screening of sepsis. Further prospective studies are needed to assess the diagnostic value of PCR amplification and DNA microarray hybridization of 16S rRNA gene in the future.

  8. Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction assay and peptide nucleic acid-locked nucleic acid clamp method for RHOA mutation detection in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzima Nuhat, Sharna; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Komori, Daisuke; Hattori, Keiichiro; Suehara, Yasuhito; Fukumoto, Kota; Fujisawa, Manabu; Kusakabe, Manabu; Matsue, Kosei; Wakamatsu, Hirotake; Shimadzu, Mitsunobu; Chiba, Shigeru

    2018-03-01

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) is a subtype of nodal peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). Somatic RHOA mutations, most frequently found at the hotspot site c.50G > T, p.Gly17Val (G17V RHOA mutation) are a genetic hallmark of AITL. Detection of the G17V RHOA mutations assists prompt and appropriate diagnosis of AITL. However, an optimal detection method for the G17V RHOA mutation remains to be elucidated. We compared the sensitivity and concordance of next-generation sequencing (NGS), droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) and peptide nucleic acid-locked nucleic acid (PNA-LNA) clamp method for detecting the G17V RHOA mutation. G17V RHOA mutations were identified in 27 of 67 (40.3%) PTCL samples using NGS. ddPCR and PNA-LNA clamp method both detected G17V mutations in 4 samples in addition to those detected with NGS (31 of 67, 46.3%). Additionally, variant allele frequencies with ddPCR and those with NGS showed high concordance (P  T;50G > T], p.Gly17Leu in PTCL198; c.[50G > T;51A > C], p.Gly17Val in PTCL216; and c.50G > A, p.Gly17Glu in PTCL223) were detected using NGS. These sequence changes could not appropriately be detected using the ddPCR assay and the PNA-LNA clamp method although both indicated that the samples might have mutations. In total, 34 out of 67 PTCL samples (50.7%) had RHOA mutations at the p.Gly17 position. In conclusion, our results suggested that a combination of ddPCR/PNA-LNA clamp methods and NGS are best method to assist the diagnosis of AITL by detecting RHOA mutations at the p.Gly17 position. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  9. DNA Polymerase e - More Than a Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Pospiech

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive review of the structure and function of DNA polymerase e. Together with DNA polymerases a and d, this enzyme replicates the nuclear DNA in the eukaryotic cell. During this process, DNA polymerase a lays down RNA-DNA primers that are utilized by DNA polymerases d and e for the bulk DNA synthesis. Attempts have been made to assign these two enzymes specifically to the synthesis of the leading and the lagging strand. Alternatively, the two DNA polymerases may be needed to replicate distinct regions depending on chromatin structure. Surprisingly, the essential function of DNA polymerase e does not depend on its catalytic activity, but resides in the nonenzymatic carboxy-terminal domain. This domain not only mediates the interaction of the catalytic subunit with the three smaller regulatory subunits, but also links the replication machinery to the S phase checkpoint. In addition to its role in DNA replication, DNA polymerase e fulfils roles in the DNA synthesis step of nucleotide excision and base excision repair, and has been implicated in recombinational processes in the cell.

  10. T7-RNA Polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    T7-RNA Polymerase grown on STS-81. Structure-Function Relationships of RNA Polymerase: DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is the key enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of RNA, a process known as transcription. Principal Investigator's include Dr. Dan Carter, Dr. B.C. Wang, and Dr. John Rose of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  11. Interdependent genotoxic mechanisms of monomethylarsonous acid: Role of ROS-induced DNA damage and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 inhibition in the malignant transformation of urothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wnek, Shawn M.; Kuhlman, Christopher L.; Camarillo, Jeannie M.; Medeiros, Matthew K. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Liu, Ke J. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Lau, Serrine S. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, The University of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Gandolfi, A.J., E-mail: wnek@pharmacy.arizona.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Exposure of human bladder urothelial cells (UROtsa) to 50 nM of the arsenic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}), for 12 weeks results in irreversible malignant transformation. The ability of continuous, low-level MMA{sup III} exposure to cause an increase in genotoxic potential by inhibiting repair processes necessary to maintain genomic stability is unknown. Following genomic insult within cellular systems poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger protein, is rapidly activated and recruited to sites of DNA strand breaks. When UROtsa cells are continuously exposed to 50 nM MMA{sup III}, PARP-1 activity does not increase despite the increase in MMA{sup III}-induced DNA single-strand breaks through 12 weeks of exposure. When UROtsa cells are removed from continuous MMA{sup III} exposure (2 weeks), PARP-1 activity increases coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage levels. Paradoxically, PARP-1 mRNA expression and protein levels are elevated in the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} indicating a possible mechanism to compensate for the inhibition of PARP-1 activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 contain vicinal sulfhydryl groups which may act as a potential site for MMA{sup III} to bind, displace zinc ion, and render PARP-1 inactive. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrates the ability of MMA{sup III} to bind a synthetic peptide representing the zinc-finger domain of PARP-1, and displace zinc from the peptide in a dose-dependent manner. In the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} exposure, continuous 4-week zinc supplementation restored PARP-1 activity levels and reduced the genotoxicity associated with MMA{sup III}. Zinc supplementation did not produce an overall increase in PARP-1 protein levels, decrease the levels of MMA{sup III}-induced reactive oxygen species, or alter Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase levels. Overall, these results present two potential interdependent mechanisms in which MMA

  12. Are There Mutator Polymerases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Garcia-Diaz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are involved in different cellular events, including genome replication and DNA repair. In the last few years, a large number of novel DNA polymerases have been discovered, and the biochemical analysis of their properties has revealed a long list of intriguing features. Some of these polymerases have a very low fidelity and have been suggested to play mutator roles in different processes, like translesion synthesis or somatic hypermutation. The current view of these processes is reviewed, and the current understanding of DNA polymerases and their role as mutator enzymes is discussed.

  13. Use of spontaneously mutated human DNA as competitive internal standard for nucleic acid quantification by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudnicka, L.; Diaz, A.; Varga, J.; Jimenez, S.A.; Christiano, A.; Uitto, J.

    1995-01-01

    Quantification of gene expression is of increasing interest in many medical sciences. Methods based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs) are timesaving and require only very small amounts of RNA. A limiting factor, however, is the significant fluctuation in the efficacy of reverse transcription as well in the polymerase chain reactions. Various external and internal standards have been suggested for correcting these fluctuations. We describe a novel way of creating an internal standard for assessing the expression of type VII collagen in human cells. The total RNA of a patient with hereditary 'epidermilysis bulosa dystrophica' associated with a homozygous T to A point mutation in type VII collagen gene was reverse transcribed and a 382bp fragment of type VII collagen cDNA containing the mutation was amplified. The mutated cDNA, unlike normal type VII collagen cDNA could be cleaved by 'Ear I' endonuclease into 244bp and 138bp fragments. Semiquantitative PCR was performed with the mutated cDNA as internal standard and the studied cDNA sample in the same tube in the presence of α 32 P-labelled dCTP. The reaction was followed by 'Ear I' digestion, electrophoresis on a polyacrylamide gel and exposure to a X-ray film. In conclusion, we describe a timesaving method for creating internal standards for semiquantitative RT-PCR. (author). 12 refs, 3 figs

  14. A 21-amino acid peptide from the cysteine cluster II of the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii stimulates its nuclease activity which is Mre11-like and prefers manganese ion as the cofactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yulong; Tang, Xiao-Feng; Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Eriko; Matsui, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    Family D DNA polymerase (PolD) is a new type of DNA polymerase possessing polymerization and 3'-5' exonuclease activities. Here we report the characterization of the nuclease activity of PolD from Pyrococcus horikoshii. By site-directed mutagenesis, we verified that the putative Mre11-like nuclease domain in the small subunit (DP1), predicted according to computer analysis and structure inference reported previously, is the catalytic domain. We show that D363, H365 and H454 are the essential residues, while D407, N453, H500, H563 and H565 are critical residues for the activity. We provide experimental evidence demonstrating that manganese, rather than magnesium, is the preferable metal ion for the nuclease activity of PolD. We also show that DP1 alone is insufficient to perform full catalysis, which additionally requires the formation of the PolD complex and manganese ion. We found that a 21 amino acid, subunit-interacting peptide of the sequence from cysteine cluster II of the large subunit (DP2) stimulates the exonuclease activity of DP1 and the internal deletion mutants of PolD lacking the 21-aa sequence. This indicates that the putative zinc finger motif of the cysteine cluster II is deeply involved in the nucleolytic catalysis.

  15. Polymerase chain reaction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul L.; Hadley, Dean R.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Belgrader, Phil; Meyer, Peter L.

    2004-03-02

    A portable polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification and detection system includes one or more chamber modules. Each module supports a duplex assay of a biological sample. Each module has two parallel interrogation ports with a linear optical system. The system is capable of being handheld.

  16. Directed evolution of DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase and reverse transcriptase activity in a single polypeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jennifer L; Loakes, David; Jaroslawski, Szymon; Too, Kathleen; Holliger, Philipp

    2006-08-18

    DNA polymerases enable key technologies in modern biology but for many applications, native polymerases are limited by their stringent substrate recognition. Here we describe short-patch compartmentalized self-replication (spCSR), a novel strategy to expand the substrate spectrum of polymerases in a targeted way. spCSR is based on the previously described CSR, but unlike CSR only a short region (a "patch") of the gene under investigation is diversified and replicated. This allows the selection of polymerases under conditions where catalytic activity and processivity are compromised to the extent that full self-replication is inefficient. We targeted two specific motifs involved in substrate recognition in the active site of DNA polymerase I from Thermus aquaticus (Taq) and selected for incorporation of both ribonucleotide- (NTP) and deoxyribonucleotide-triphosphates (dNTPs) using spCSR. This allowed the isolation of multiple variants of Taq with apparent dual substrate specificity. They were able to synthesize RNA, while still retaining essentially wild-type (wt) DNA polymerase activity as judged by PCR. One such mutant (AA40: E602V, A608V, I614M, E615G) was able to incorporate both NTPs and dNTPs with the same catalytic efficiency as the wt enzyme incorporates dNTPs. AA40 allowed the generation of mixed RNA-DNA amplification products in PCR demonstrating DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase as well as reverse transcriptase activity within the same polypeptide. Furthermore, AA40 displayed an expanded substrate spectrum towards other 2'-substituted nucleotides and was able to synthesize nucleic acid polymers in which each base bore a different 2'-substituent. Our results suggest that spCSR will be a powerful strategy for the generation of polymerases with altered substrate specificity for applications in nano- and biotechnology and in the enzymatic synthesis of antisense and RNAi probes.

  17. Multisubunit RNA Polymerase Cleavage Factors Modulate the Kinetics and Energetics of Nucleotide Incorporation: An RNA Polymerase I Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appling, Francis D; Schneider, David A; Lucius, Aaron L

    2017-10-24

    All cellular RNA polymerases are influenced by protein factors that stimulate RNA polymerase-catalyzed cleavage of the nascent RNA. Despite divergence in amino acid sequence, these so-called "cleavage factors" appear to share a common mechanism of action. Cleavage factors associate with the polymerase through a conserved structural element of the polymerase known as the secondary channel or pore. This mode of association enables the cleavage factor to reach through the secondary channel into the polymerase active site to reorient the active site divalent metal ions. This reorientation converts the polymerase active site into a nuclease active site. Interestingly, eukaryotic RNA polymerases I and III (Pols I and III, respectively) have incorporated their cleavage factors as bona fide subunits known as A12.2 and C11, respectively. Although it is clear that A12.2 and C11 dramatically stimulate the polymerase's cleavage activity, it is not known if or how these subunits affect the polymerization mechanism. In this work we have used transient-state kinetic techniques to characterize a Pol I isoform lacking A12.2. Our data clearly demonstrate that the A12.2 subunit profoundly affects the kinetics and energetics of the elementary steps of Pol I-catalyzed nucleotide incorporation. Given the high degree of conservation between polymerase-cleavage factor interactions, these data indicate that cleavage factor-modulated nucleotide incorporation mechanisms may be common to all cellular RNA polymerases.

  18. A Single Amino Acid Mutation (I1012F) of the RNA Polymerase of Marine Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus Changes In Vitro Virulence to Rainbow Trout Gill Epithelial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Sung-Hyun; Thu, Beate J.; Skall, Helle Frank

    2014-01-01

    was used in a gain-of-virulence approach based on the JF-09 backbone. Mutations were introduced into the G, NV, and L genes, and seven different virus clones were obtained. For the first time, we show that a single amino acid mutation in conserved region IV of the L protein, I1012F, rendered the virus able...... to in vivo virulence. In vitro virulence to gill epithelial cells (GECs) has been used as a proxy for in vivo virulence, and here we extend these studies further with the purpose of identifying residues associated with in vitro virulence. Genotype Ia (DK-3592B) and III (NO/650/07) isolates, which...

  19. Assessment of nucleic acid modification induced by amotosalen and ultraviolet A light treatment of platelets and plasma using real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification of variable length fragments of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkour, Sonia; Chafets, Daniel M; Wen, Li; Dupuis, Kent; Castro, Grace; Green, Jennifer M; Stassinopoulos, Adonis; Busch, Michael P; Lee, Tzong-Hae

    2016-02-01

    Pathogen inactivation methods are increasingly used to reduce the risk of infections after transfusion of blood products. Photochemical treatment (PCT) of platelets (PLTs) and plasma with amotosalen and ultraviolet A (UVA) light inactivates pathogens and white blood cells through formation of adducts between amotosalen and nucleic acid that block replication, transcription, and translation. The same adducts block the amplification of nucleic acids using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a manner that correlates with the number of adducts formed, providing a direct quality control (QC). Current QC measures for PCT rely on indirect methods that measure the delivered UVA dose or percent residual amotosalen after illumination, rather than directly measuring nucleic acid modification. Endogenous mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is detectable in PLT and plasma units, was chosen as a target for the quantification of photochemically induced modifications. DNA was extracted from untreated or amotosalen and UVA-treated PLTs or plasma, and mtDNA fragments of variable lengths were quantified using a real-time PCR inhibition assay. PCT induced increasing real-time PCR inhibition of mtDNA amplification for larger amplicon sizes. Amplification was unaffected by treatment with amotosalen or UVA alone, whereas up to 3 log inhibition was observed after PCT. Blinded PCR testing of a panel of 110 samples each, from PLT or plasma components prepared for routine use within a blood center, allowed 100% discrimination between untreated and treated units. Our initial findings indicate that an adequately sensitive, quantitative real-time PCR inhibition assay targeting mtDNA could provide a valuable tool to confirm and monitor PCT. © 2015 The Authors. Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  20. Microfluidic polymerase chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltezos, George; Gomez, Alvaro; Zhong, Jiang; Gomez, Frank A.; Scherer, Axel

    2008-12-01

    We implement microfluidic technology to miniaturize a thermal cycling system for amplifying DNA fragments. By using a microfluidic thermal heat exchanger to cool a Peltier junction, we have demonstrated rapid heating and cooling of small volumes of solution. We use a miniature K-type thermocouple to provide a means for in situ sensing of the temperature inside the microrefrigeration system. By combining the thermocouple, two power supplies controlled by a relay system, and computer automation, we reproduce the function of a commercial polymerase chain reaction thermal cycler and demonstrate amplification of a DNA sample of about 1000 base pairs.

  1. Structural diversity and biological significance of lipoteichoic acid in Gram-positive bacteria: focusing on beneficial probiotic lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Yokota, Shinichi; Fukiya, Satoru; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell surface molecules are at the forefront of host-bacterium interactions. Teichoic acids are observed only in Gram-positive bacteria, and they are one of the main cell surface components. Teichoic acids play important physiological roles and contribute to the bacterial interaction with their host. In particular, lipoteichoic acid (LTA) anchored to the cell membrane has attracted attention as a host immunomodulator. Chemical and biological characteristics of LTA from various bacteria have been described. However, most of the information concerns pathogenic bacteria, and information on beneficial bacteria, including probiotic lactic acid bacteria, is insufficient. LTA is structurally diverse. Strain-level structural diversity of LTA is suggested to underpin its immunomodulatory activities. Thus, the structural information on LTA in probiotics, in particular strain-associated diversity, is important for understanding its beneficial roles associated with the modulation of immune response. Continued accumulation of structural information is necessary to elucidate the detailed physiological roles and significance of LTA. In this review article, we summarize the current state of knowledge on LTA structure, in particular the structure of LTA from lactic acid bacteria. We also describe the significance of structural diversity and biological roles of LTA.

  2. Prediction of Active Site and Distal Residues in E. coli DNA Polymerase III alpha Polymerase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasuram, Ramya; Coulther, Timothy A; Hollander, Judith M; Keston-Smith, Elise; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Beuning, Penny J

    2018-02-20

    The process of DNA replication is carried out with high efficiency and accuracy by DNA polymerases. The replicative polymerase in E. coli is DNA Pol III, which is a complex of 10 different subunits that coordinates simultaneous replication on the leading and lagging strands. The 1160-residue Pol III alpha subunit is responsible for the polymerase activity and copies DNA accurately, making one error per 10 5 nucleotide incorporations. The goal of this research is to determine the residues that contribute to the activity of the polymerase subunit. Homology modeling and the computational methods of THEMATICS and POOL were used to predict functionally important amino acid residues through their computed chemical properties. Site-directed mutagenesis and biochemical assays were used to validate these predictions. Primer extension, steady-state single-nucleotide incorporation kinetics, and thermal denaturation assays were performed to understand the contribution of these residues to the function of the polymerase. This work shows that the top 15 residues predicted by POOL, a set that includes the three previously known catalytic aspartate residues, seven remote residues, plus five previously unexplored first-layer residues, are important for function. Six previously unidentified residues, R362, D405, K553, Y686, E688, and H760, are each essential to Pol III activity; three additional residues, Y340, R390, and K758, play important roles in activity.

  3. Inhibiting DNA Polymerases as a Therapeutic Intervention against Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Berdis

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Inhibiting DNA synthesis is an important therapeutic strategy that is widely used to treat a number of hyperproliferative diseases including viral infections, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. This chapter describes two major categories of therapeutic agents used to inhibit DNA synthesis. The first category includes purine and pyrmidine nucleoside analogs that directly inhibit DNA polymerase activity. The second category includes DNA damaging agents including cisplatin and chlorambucil that modify the composition and structure of the nucleic acid substrate to indirectly inhibit DNA synthesis. Special emphasis is placed on describing the molecular mechanisms of these inhibitory effects against chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA polymerases. Discussions are also provided on the mechanisms associated with resistance to these therapeutic agents. A primary focus is toward understanding the roles of specialized DNA polymerases that by-pass DNA lesions produced by DNA damaging agents. Finally, a section is provided that describes emerging areas in developing new therapeutic strategies targeting specialized DNA polymerases.

  4. [The contamination under polymerase chain reaction studies: problems and solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V N; Ameliushkina, V A; Rozhkova, T A

    2015-01-01

    The study was carried out to determine risk factors of false positive and false negative results under polymerase chain reaction-analysis of clinical material. The samples with high viral load can be the source of false positive results. The contamination with nucleic acids can occur at any section of polymerase chain reaction analysis. The study data permitted to establish that the most sensitive stage is isolation and purification of nucleic acids especially under manual mode of operation. The detection of positive signal in most samples of one setting indicates total contamination. The cases when only several samples are polluted are special challenge. The presence of sample with high concentration of viral nucleic acid and several samples with low concentration in one setting means necessity of repeated analysis beginning with stage of isolation of nucleic acid. The analysis of curves of accumulation of products of amplification, their forms and positioning on chart is the obligatory stage of polymerase chain reaction study in real time regimen. These actions permit to exclude the readouts of false negative testing results to departments. The study conclusions are equipotent for polymerase chain reaction testing of any nucleic acid targets.

  5. QUANTITATION OF DNA TOPOISOMERASE-II-ALPHA MESSENGER-RIBONUCLEIC-ACID LEVELS IN A SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER CELL-LINE AND 2 DRUG-RESISTANT SUBLINES USING A POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION-AIDED TRANSCRIPT TITRATION ASSAY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WITHOFF, S; SMIT, EF; MEERSMA, GJ; van den Berg, Anke; TIMMERBOSSCHA, H; KOK, K; POSTMUS, PE; MULDER, NH; DEVRIES, EGE; BUYS, CHCM

    BACKGROUND: We have modified a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-aided transcript titration assay (1) in order to allow quantitation of low amounts of DNA topoisomerase II alpha mRNA in small RNA samples. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The titration assay was used to quantitate the amount of DNA topoisomerase

  6. A thermostable d-polymerase for mirror-image PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, Andreas; Achenbach, John; Jahnz, Michael; Schülzchen, Simone; Jarosch, Florian; Bordusa, Frank; Klussmann, Sven

    2017-04-20

    Biological evolution resulted in a homochiral world in which nucleic acids consist exclusively of d-nucleotides and proteins made by ribosomal translation of l-amino acids. From the perspective of synthetic biology, however, particularly anabolic enzymes that could build the mirror-image counterparts of biological macromolecules such as l-DNA or l-RNA are lacking. Based on a convergent synthesis strategy, we have chemically produced and characterized a thermostable mirror-image polymerase that efficiently replicates and amplifies mirror-image (l)-DNA. This artificial enzyme, dubbed d-Dpo4-3C, is a mutant of Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA polymerase IV consisting of 352 d-amino acids. d-Dpo4-3C was reliably deployed in classical polymerase chain reactions (PCR) and it was used to assemble a first mirror-image gene coding for the protein Sso7d. We believe that this d-polymerase provides a valuable tool to further investigate the mysteries of biological (homo)chirality and to pave the way for potential novel life forms running on a mirror-image genome. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Niacin, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and genomic stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, G.J.; Stierum, R.H.

    2001-01-01

    Nicotinic acid (NA) and nicotinamide (NAM), commonly called niacin, are the dietary precursors for NAD+ (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), which is required for DNA synthesis, as well as for the activity of the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1; EC 2.4.2.30) for which NAD+ is the sole

  8. PCR performance of a thermostable heterodimeric archaeal DNA polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killelea, Tom; Ralec, Céline; Bossé, Audrey; Henneke, Ghislaine

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerases are versatile tools used in numerous important molecular biological core technologies like the ubiquitous polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cDNA cloning, genome sequencing, and nucleic acid based diagnostics. Taking into account the multiple DNA amplification techniques in use, different DNA polymerases must be optimized for each type of application. One of the current tendencies is to reengineer or to discover new DNA polymerases with increased performance and broadened substrate spectra. At present, there is a great demand for such enzymes in applications, e.g., forensics or paleogenomics. Current major limitations hinge on the inability of conventional PCR enzymes, such as Taq, to amplify degraded or low amounts of template DNA. Besides, a wide range of PCR inhibitors can also impede reactions of nucleic acid amplification. Here we looked at the PCR performances of the proof-reading D-type DNA polymerase from P. abyssi, Pab-polD. Fragments, 3 kilobases in length, were specifically PCR-amplified in its optimized reaction buffer. Pab-polD showed not only a greater resistance to high denaturation temperatures than Taq during cycling, but also a superior tolerance to the presence of potential inhibitors. Proficient proof-reading Pab-polD enzyme could also extend a primer containing up to two mismatches at the 3' primer termini. Overall, we found valuable biochemical properties in Pab-polD compared to the conventional Taq, which makes the enzyme ideally suited for cutting-edge PCR-applications. PMID:24847315

  9. PCR performance of a thermostable heterodimeric archaeal DNA polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom eKillelea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are versatile tools used in numerous important molecular biological core technologies like the ubiquitous polymerase chain reaction (PCR, cDNA cloning, genome sequencing and nucleic acid based diagnostics. Taking into account the multiple DNA amplification techniques in use, different DNA polymerases must be optimized for each type of application. One of the current tendencies is to reengineer or to discover new DNA polymerases with increased performance and broadened substrate spectra. At present, there is a great demand for such enzymes in applications, e.g., forensics or paleogenomics. Current major limitations hinge on the inability of conventional PCR enzymes, such as Taq, to amplify degraded or low amounts of template DNA. Besides, a wide range of PCR inhibitors can also impede reactions of nucleic acid amplification. Here we looked at the PCR performances of the proof-reading D-type DNA polymerase from P. abyssi, Pab-polD. Fragments, 3 kilobases in length, were specifically PCR-amplified in its optimized reaction buffer. Pab-polD showed not only a greater resistance to high denaturation temperatures than Taq during cycling, but also a superior tolerance to the presence of potential inhibitors. Proficient proof-reading Pab-polD enzyme could also extend a primer containing up to two mismatches at the 3’ primer termini. Overall, we found valuable biochemical properties in Pab-polD compared to the conventional Taq, which makes the enzyme ideally suited for cutting-edge PCR-applications.

  10. PCR performance of a thermostable heterodimeric archaeal DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killelea, Tom; Ralec, Céline; Bossé, Audrey; Henneke, Ghislaine

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerases are versatile tools used in numerous important molecular biological core technologies like the ubiquitous polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cDNA cloning, genome sequencing, and nucleic acid based diagnostics. Taking into account the multiple DNA amplification techniques in use, different DNA polymerases must be optimized for each type of application. One of the current tendencies is to reengineer or to discover new DNA polymerases with increased performance and broadened substrate spectra. At present, there is a great demand for such enzymes in applications, e.g., forensics or paleogenomics. Current major limitations hinge on the inability of conventional PCR enzymes, such as Taq, to amplify degraded or low amounts of template DNA. Besides, a wide range of PCR inhibitors can also impede reactions of nucleic acid amplification. Here we looked at the PCR performances of the proof-reading D-type DNA polymerase from P. abyssi, Pab-polD. Fragments, 3 kilobases in length, were specifically PCR-amplified in its optimized reaction buffer. Pab-polD showed not only a greater resistance to high denaturation temperatures than Taq during cycling, but also a superior tolerance to the presence of potential inhibitors. Proficient proof-reading Pab-polD enzyme could also extend a primer containing up to two mismatches at the 3' primer termini. Overall, we found valuable biochemical properties in Pab-polD compared to the conventional Taq, which makes the enzyme ideally suited for cutting-edge PCR-applications.

  11. Comparison of histopathology, acid fast bacillus smear and real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in anal fistula in 161 patients: A prospective controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Pankaj; Garg, Mohinder K; Agarwal, Narinder

    2016-12-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a known cause of refractory and recurrent fistula-in-ano. Histopathology of fistula tract and acid fast bacillus (AFB) smear of the pus are the standard procedures employed to diagnose MTB. However, they have some drawbacks. Nontubercular mycobacteria (NTM) has also been detected to cause fistula-in-ano and these methods cannot differentiate between MTB and NTM. Secondly, as these methods have low sensitivity, they could possibly be missing out MTB patients. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has high sensitivity in detecting mycobacteria. The aim of the study was to compare the sensitivity of RT-PCR, histopathology, and AFB smear in detecting MTB in fistula-in-ano. The histopathology and RT-PCR of tissue (fistula tract) was done along with AFB smear and RT-PCR of the pus was done in all the cases as per the availability of the specimen. The histopathology, AFB smear and RT-PCR was done by same pathologists in all the cases and all the patients were operated by a single surgeon. A total of 286 samples were tested in 161 patients of fistula-in-ano who were operated over a period of 1year. The mean age was 38.6±10.5 and male/female ratio was 153/8. Histopathology and RT-PCR of tissue (fistula tract) was done in 131 patients and 141 patients respectively. AFB smear and RT-PCR of pus (fistula) was done in 14 patients. Overall, MTB was detected in total of 17/161 (10.63%) patients. Out of these, MTB was detected in tissue (fistula tract) in 1/131 (0.76%) by histopathology and 14/141 (10%) by RT-PCR tissue. In pus samples, AFB smear was negative in all cases (0/14), whereas RT-PCR detected MTB in four of 14 (28.6%) patients. In 17 patients detected to have MTB, four-drug antitubercular therapy (ATT) was recommended. ATT was started in 15 patients. Nine of 17 patients completed 6months ATT and were cured. Six of 17 patients are currently taking ATT. Two patients did not take ATT; both of these have persistent symptoms of pus

  12. Translesion DNA polymerases Pol ζ, Pol η, Pol ι, Pol κ and Rev1 are ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MADU

    Kozmin S G, Pavlov Y I, Kunkel T A and Sage E 2003 Roles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerases Pol η and. Pol ζ in response to simulated sunlight; Nucleic Acids Res. 31. 4541–4552. Lawrence C W 2002 Cellular roles of DNA polymerase ζ and Rev. 1 protein; DNA Repair 1 425–435. Lemontt J F 1971 Mutants ...

  13. Accurate Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction Quantification of Challenging Samples Applying Inhibitor-Tolerant DNA Polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidstedt, Maja; Romsos, Erica L; Hedell, Ronny; Ansell, Ricky; Steffen, Carolyn R; Vallone, Peter M; Rådström, Peter; Hedman, Johannes

    2017-02-07

    Digital PCR (dPCR) enables absolute quantification of nucleic acids by partitioning of the sample into hundreds or thousands of minute reactions. By assuming a Poisson distribution for the number of DNA fragments present in each chamber, the DNA concentration is determined without the need for a standard curve. However, when analyzing nucleic acids from complex matrixes such as soil and blood, the dPCR quantification can be biased due to the presence of inhibitory compounds. In this study, we evaluated the impact of varying the DNA polymerase in chamber-based dPCR for both pure and impure samples using the common PCR inhibitor humic acid (HA) as a model. We compared the TaqMan Universal PCR Master Mix with two alternative DNA polymerases: ExTaq HS and Immolase. By using Bayesian modeling, we show that there is no difference among the tested DNA polymerases in terms of accuracy of absolute quantification for pure template samples, i.e., without HA present. For samples containing HA, there were great differences in performance: the TaqMan Universal PCR Master Mix failed to correctly quantify DNA with more than 13 pg/nL HA, whereas Immolase (1 U) could handle up to 375 pg/nL HA. Furthermore, we found that BSA had a moderate positive effect for the TaqMan Universal PCR Master Mix, enabling accurate quantification for 25 pg/nL HA. Increasing the amount of DNA polymerase from 1 to 5 U had a strong effect for ExTaq HS, elevating HA-tolerance four times. We also show that the average Cq values of positive reactions may be used as a measure of inhibition effects, e.g., to determine whether or not a dPCR quantification result is reliable. The statistical models developed to objectively analyze the data may also be applied in quality control. We conclude that the choice of DNA polymerase in dPCR is crucial for the accuracy of quantification when analyzing challenging samples.

  14. Capacity of rTth polymerase to detect RNA in the presence of various inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Dongyang; Behrmann, Ole; Hufert, Frank; Dame, Gregory; Urban, Gerald

    2018-01-01

    The full potential of the real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) as a rapid and accurate diagnostic method is limited by DNA polymerase inhibitors as well as reverse transcriptase inhibitors which are ubiquitous in clinical samples. rTth polymerase has proven to be more resistant to DNA polymerase inhibitors present in clinical samples for DNA detection and also exhibits reverse transcriptase activity in the presence of Mn2+ ions. However, the capacity of rTth polymerase, which acts as DNA polymerase and reverse transcriptase, to detect RNA in the presence of various inhibitors has not been investigated in detail. Herein, the inhibitors originating from various clinical samples such as blood, urine, feces, bodily fluids, tissues and reagents used during nucleic acid extraction were employed to evaluate the capacity of rTth polymerase to detect RNA. The results show that the inhibitors have different inhibitory effects on the real-time RT-PCR reactions by rTth polymerase, and the inhibitory effects are concentration dependent. Additionally, the capacity of rTth polymerase to detect RNA in the presence of various inhibitors is better or at least comparable with its capacity to detect DNA in the presence of various inhibitors. As a consequence, RNA may be directly detected in the presence of co-purified inhibitors or even directly from crude clinical samples by rTth polymerase.

  15. Poliovirus Polymerase Residue 5 Plays a Critical Role in Elongation Complex Stability ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hobdey, Sarah E.; Kempf, Brian J.; Steil, Benjamin P.; Barton, David J.; Peersen, Olve B.

    2010-01-01

    The structures of polio-, coxsackie-, and rhinovirus polymerases have revealed a conserved yet unusual protein conformation surrounding their buried N termini where a β-strand distortion results in a solvent-exposed hydrophobic amino acid at residue 5. In a previous study, we found that coxsackievirus polymerase activity increased or decreased depending on the size of the amino acid at residue 5 and proposed that this residue becomes buried during the catalytic cycle. In this work, we extend ...

  16. Dual phase multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemov, Alexander [Charlottesville, VA; Bavykin, Sergei [Darien, IL

    2008-10-07

    Highly specific and sensitive methods were developed for multiplex amplification of nucleic acids on supports such as microarrays. Based on a specific primer design, methods include five types of amplification that proceed in a reaction chamber simultaneously. These relate to four types of multiplex amplification of a target DNA on a solid support, directed by forward and reverse complex primers immobilized to the support and a fifth type--pseudo-monoplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of multiple targets in solution, directed by a single pair of unbound universal primers. The addition of the universal primers in the reaction mixture increases the yield over the traditional "bridge" amplification on a solid support by approximately ten times. Methods that provide multitarget amplification and detection of as little as 0.45-4.5.times.10.sup.-12 g (equivalent to 10.sup.2-10.sup.3 genomes) of a bacterial genomic DNA are disclosed.

  17. A model for the evolution of nucleotide polymerase directionality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Ballanco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In all known living organisms, every enzyme that synthesizes nucleic acid polymers does so by adding nucleotide 5′-triphosphates to the 3′-hydroxyl group of the growing chain. This results in the well known 5'→3' directionality of all DNA and RNA Polymerases. The lack of any alternative mechanism, e.g. addition in a 3'→5' direction, may indicate a very early founder effect in the evolution of life, or it may be the result of a selective pressure against such an alternative. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In an attempt to determine whether the lack of an alternative polymerase directionality is the result of a founder effect or evolutionary selection, we have constructed a basic model of early polymerase evolution. This model is informed by the essential chemical properties of the nucleotide polymerization reaction. With this model, we are able to simulate the growth of organisms with polymerases that synthesize either 5'→3' or 3'→5' in isolation or in competition with each other. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have found that a competition between organisms with 5'→3' polymerases and 3'→5' polymerases only results in a evolutionarily stable strategy under certain conditions. Furthermore, we have found that mutations lead to a much clearer delineation between conditions that lead to a stable coexistence of these populations and conditions which ultimately lead to success for the 5'→3' form. In addition to presenting a plausible explanation for the uniqueness of enzymatic polymerization reactions, we hope these results also provide an example of how whole organism evolution can be understood based on molecular details.

  18. In Silico Screening Hepatitis B Virus DNA Polymerase Inhibitors from Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhtar Nosrati

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Hepatitis B virus infection (HBV is a significant global health problem and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Therefore, currently, introducing novel anti Hepatitis B drugs is taken into consideration. This study was planned to in silico screening novel Hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase inhibitors from two medicinal plants Terminalis chebula and Caesalpinia sappan. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive-analytic study. In the study, three-dimensional structure of the Hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase was predicted using homology modeling method. A set of phytochemicals from mentioned plants were retrieved from Pubchem database in SDF format. In silico screening was carried out using molecular docking between mentioned phytochemicals and modeled polymerase by iGemdock 2.1 software. Results: Results of the study confirmed that all evaluated ligands have appropriate interactions to the polymerase with least toxicity and without genotoxicity potential. Results also showed that most interactions occur in reverse transcriptase domain which located in 354-694 area in the amino acid sequence of tested polymerase. Analysis of energy and amino acids involved in ligand-polymerase interaction revealed that Terchebin, Chebulinic Acid and Terflavin A have more effective interaction with the polymerase in compared to other ligands. Conclusion: Based on the results it can be concluded that evaluated compounds could be good candidates for in vitro and in vivo research in order to develop novel anti- Hepatitis B drugs.

  19. Genetic and codon usage bias analyses of polymerase genes of equine influenza virus and its relation to evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Bidhan Ch; Virmani, Nitin; Kumar, Naveen; Anand, Taruna; Pavulraj, S; Rash, Adam; Elton, Debra; Rash, Nicola; Bhatia, Sandeep; Sood, Richa; Singh, Raj Kumar; Tripathi, Bhupendra Nath

    2017-08-23

    Equine influenza is a major health problem of equines worldwide. The polymerase genes of influenza virus have key roles in virus replication, transcription, transmission between hosts and pathogenesis. Hence, the comprehensive genetic and codon usage bias of polymerase genes of equine influenza virus (EIV) were analyzed to elucidate the genetic and evolutionary relationships in a novel perspective. The group - specific consensus amino acid substitutions were identified in all polymerase genes of EIVs that led to divergence of EIVs into various clades. The consistent amino acid changes were also detected in the Florida clade 2 EIVs circulating in Europe and Asia since 2007. To study the codon usage patterns, a total of 281,324 codons of polymerase genes of EIV H3N8 isolates from 1963 to 2015 were systemically analyzed. The polymerase genes of EIVs exhibit a weak codon usage bias. The ENc-GC3s and Neutrality plots indicated that natural selection is the major influencing factor of codon usage bias, and that the impact of mutation pressure is comparatively minor. The methods for estimating host imposed translation pressure suggested that the polymerase acidic (PA) gene seems to be under less translational pressure compared to polymerase basic 1 (PB1) and polymerase basic 2 (PB2) genes. The multivariate statistical analysis of polymerase genes divided EIVs into four evolutionary diverged clusters - Pre-divergent, Eurasian, Florida sub-lineage 1 and 2. Various lineage specific amino acid substitutions observed in all polymerase genes of EIVs and especially, clade 2 EIVs underwent major variations which led to the emergence of a phylogenetically distinct group of EIVs originating from Richmond/1/07. The codon usage bias was low in all the polymerase genes of EIVs that was influenced by the multiple factors such as the nucleotide compositions, mutation pressure, aromaticity and hydropathicity. However, natural selection was the major influencing factor in defining the

  20. A specific subdomain in φ29 DNA polymerase confers both processivity and strand-displacement capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Irene; Lázaro, José M.; Blanco, Luis; Kamtekar, Satwik; Berman, Andrea J.; Wang, Jimin; Steitz, Thomas A.; Salas, Margarita; de Vega, Miguel

    2005-01-01

    Recent crystallographic studies of φ29 DNA polymerase have provided structural insights into its strand displacement and processivity. A specific insertion named terminal protein region 2 (TPR2), present only in protein-primed DNA polymerases, together with the exonuclease, thumb, and palm subdomains, forms two tori capable of interacting with DNA. To analyze the functional role of this insertion, we constructed a φ29 DNA polymerase deletion mutant lacking TPR2 amino acid residues Asp-398 to Glu-420. Biochemical analysis of the mutant DNA polymerase indicates that its DNA-binding capacity is diminished, drastically decreasing its processivity. In addition, removal of the TPR2 insertion abolishes the intrinsic capacity of φ29 DNA polymerase to perform strand displacement coupled to DNA synthesis. Therefore, the biochemical results described here directly demonstrate that TPR2 plays a critical role in strand displacement and processivity. PMID:15845765

  1. Application and Comparative Evaluation of Fluorescent Antibody, Immunohistochemistry and Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Tests for the Detection of Rabies Virus Antigen or Nucleic Acid in Brain Samples of Animals Suspected of Rabies in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, K Nithin; Isloor, Shrikrishna; Veeresh, B Hanchinal; Rathnamma, Doddamane; Sharada, R; Das, Lekshmi J; Satyanarayana, M L; Hegde, Nagendra R; Rahman, Sira Abdul

    2018-02-28

    Accurate and early diagnosis of animal rabies is critical for undertaking public health measures. Whereas the direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) technique is the recommended test, the more convenient, direct rapid immunochemistry test (dRIT), as well as the more sensitive, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), have recently been employed for the laboratory diagnosis of rabies. We compared the three methods on brain samples from domestic (dog, cat, cattle, buffalo, horse, pig and goat) and wild (leopard, wolf and jackal) animals from various parts of India. Of the 257 samples tested, 167 were positive by all the three tests; in addition, 35 of the 36 decomposed samples were positive by RT-PCR. This is the first study in which such large number of animal samples have been subjected to the three tests simultaneously. The results confirm 100% corroboration between DFA and dRIT, buttress the applicability of dRIT in the simple and rapid diagnosis of rabies in animals, and reaffirm the suitability of RT-PCR for samples unfit for testing either by DFA or dRIT.

  2. Chimeric thermostable DNA polymerases with reverse transcriptase and attenuated 3'-5' exonuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönbrunner, Nancy J; Fiss, Ellen H; Budker, Olga; Stoffel, Susanne; Sigua, Christopher L; Gelfand, David H; Myers, Thomas W

    2006-10-24

    The synthesis of accurate, full-length cDNA from low-abundance RNA and the subsequent PCR amplification under conditions which provide amplicon that contains minimal mutations remain a difficult molecular biological process. Many of the challenges associated with performing sensitive, long RT/PCR have been alleviated by using a mixture of DNA polymerases. These mixtures have typically contained a DNA polymerase devoid of 3'-5' exonuclease, or "proofreading", activity blended with a small amount of an Archaea DNA polymerase possessing 3'-5' exonuclease activity, since reverse transcriptases lack 3'-5' exonuclease activity and generally have low fidelity. To create a DNA polymerase with efficient reverse transcriptase and 3'-5' exonuclease activity, a family of mutant DNA polymerases with a range of attenuated 3'-5' exonuclease activities was constructed from a chimeric DNA polymerase derived from Thermus species Z05 and Thermotoga maritima DNA polymerases. These "designer" DNA polymerases were fashioned using structure-based tools to identify amino acid residues involved in the substrate-binding site of the exonuclease domain of a thermostable DNA polymerase. Mutation of some of these residues resulted in proteins in which DNA polymerase activity was unaffected, while proofreading activity ranged from 60% of the wild-type level to undetectable levels. Kinetic characterization of the exonuclease activity indicated that the mutations affected catalysis much more than binding. On the basis of their specificity constants (kcat/KM), the mutant enzymes have a 5-15-fold stronger preference for a double-stranded mismatched substrate over a single-stranded substrate than the wild-type DNA polymerase, a desirable attribute for RT/PCR. The utility of these enzymes was evaluated in a RT/PCR assay to generate a 1.7 kb amplicon from HIV-1 RNA.

  3. RNA polymerase II collision interrupts convergent transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobson, David J; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2012-01-01

    and genetic approaches in yeast to show that polymerases transcribing opposite DNA strands cannot bypass each other. RNAPII stops but does not dissociate upon head-to-head collision in vitro, suggesting that opposing polymerases represent insurmountable obstacles for each other. Head-to-head collision in vivo...... genes. These results provide insight into fundamental mechanisms of gene traffic control and point to an unexplored effect of antisense transcription on gene regulation via polymerase collision....

  4. Crystal structure of Deep Vent DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikida, Yasushi; Kimoto, Michiko; Hirao, Ichiro; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2017-01-29

    DNA polymerases are useful tools in various biochemical experiments. We have focused on the DNA polymerases involved in DNA replication including the unnatural base pair between 7-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ds) and 2-nitro-4-propynylpyrrole (Px). Many reports have described the different combinations between unnatural base pairs and DNA polymerases. As an example, for the replication of the Ds-Px pair, Deep Vent DNA polymerase exhibits high efficiency and fidelity, but Taq DNA polymerase shows much lower efficiency and fidelity. In the present study, we determined the crystal structure of Deep Vent DNA polymerase in the apo form at 2.5 Å resolution. Using this structure, we constructed structural models of Deep Vent DNA polymerase complexes with DNA containing an unnatural or natural base in the replication position. The models revealed that the unnatural Ds base in the template-strand DNA clashes with the side-chain oxygen of Thr664 in Taq DNA polymerase, but not in Deep Vent DNA polymerase. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bacterial lipoteichoic acid enhances cryosurvival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Charles V; Middaugh, Amy; Wickham, Jason R; Friedline, Anthony; Thomas, Kieth J; Scull, Erin; Johnson, Karen; Zachariah, Malcolm; Garimella, Ravindranth

    2015-03-01

    Antifreeze proteins in fish, plants, and insects provide protection to a few degrees below freezing. Microbes have been found to survive at even lower temperatures, and with a few exceptions, antifreeze proteins are missing. We show that lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a biopolymer in the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria, can be added to B. subtilis cultures and increase freeze tolerance. At 1 % w/v, LTA enables a 50 % survival rate, similar to the results obtained with 1 % w/v glycerol as measured with the resazurin cell viability assay. In the absence of added LTA or glycerol, a very small number of B. subtilis cells survive freezing. This suggests that an innate freeze tolerance mechanism exists. While cryoprotection can be provided by extracellular polymeric substances, our data demonstrate a role for LTA in cryoprotection. Currently, the exact mode of action for LTA cryoprotection is unknown. With a molecular weight of 3-5 kDa, it is unlikely to enter the cell cytoplasm. However, low temperature microscopy data show small ice crystals aligned along channels of liquid water. Our observations suggest that teichoic acids could protect liquid water within biofilms and planktonic bacteria, augmenting the role of brine while also raising the possibility for survival without brine present.

  6. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with Pfu DNA polymerase and effect on polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L-P; Wang, S; Zhang, Z-W; Ma, Y-Y; Lai, Y-Q; Weng, J; Zhang, Q-Q

    2011-03-01

    The interaction of gold nanoparticles with Pfu DNA polymerase has been investigated by a number of biological, optical and electronic spectroscopic techniques. Polymerase chain reaction was performed to show gold nanoparticles' biological effect. Ultraviolet-visible and circular dichroism spectra analysis were applied to character the structure of Pfu DNA polymerase after conjugation with gold nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to investigate the bond properties of the polymerase-gold nanoparticles complex. The authors demonstrate that gold nanoparticles do not affect the amplification efficiency of polymerase chain reaction using Pfu DNA polymerase, and Pfu DNA polymerase displays no significant changes of the secondary structure upon interaction with gold nanoparticles. The adsorption of Pfu DNA polymerase to gold nanoparticles is mainly through Au-NH(2) bond and electrostatic interaction. These findings may have important implications regarding the safety issue as gold nanoparticles are widely used in biomedical applications.

  7. The vaccinia virus DNA polymerase and its processivity factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Maciej W; Traktman, Paula

    2017-04-15

    Vaccinia virus is the prototypic poxvirus. The 192 kilobase double-stranded DNA viral genome encodes most if not all of the viral replication machinery. The vaccinia virus DNA polymerase is encoded by the E9L gene. Sequence analysis indicates that E9 is a member of the B family of replicative polymerases. The enzyme has both polymerase and 3'-5' exonuclease activities, both of which are essential to support viral replication. Genetic analysis of E9 has identified residues and motifs whose alteration can confer temperature-sensitivity, drug resistance (phosphonoacetic acid, aphidicolin, cytosine arabinsode, cidofovir) or altered fidelity. The polymerase is involved both in DNA replication and in recombination. Although inherently distributive, E9 gains processivity by interacting in a 1:1 stoichiometry with a heterodimer of the A20 and D4 proteins. A20 binds to both E9 and D4 and serves as a bridge within the holoenzyme. The A20/D4 heterodimer has been purified and can confer processivity on purified E9. The interaction of A20 with D4 is mediated by the N'-terminus of A20. The D4 protein is an enzymatically active uracil DNA glycosylase. The DNA-scanning activity of D4 is proposed to keep the holoenzyme tethered to the DNA template but allow polymerase translocation. The crystal structure of D4, alone and in complex with A20 1-50 and/or DNA has been solved. Screens for low molecular weight compounds that interrupt the A20 1-50 /D4 interface have yielded hits that disrupt processive DNA synthesis in vitro and/or inhibit plaque formation. The observation that an active DNA repair enzyme is an integral part of the holoenzyme suggests that DNA replication and repair may be coupled. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Targeting of the Influenza A Virus Polymerase PB1-PB2 Interface Indicates Strain-Specific Assembly Differences ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, Peter; Mänz, Benjamin; Brunotte, Linda; Schwemmle, Martin; Wunderlich, Kerstin

    2011-01-01

    Assembly of the heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase complex from the individual subunits PB1, PA, and PB2 is a prerequisite for viral replication. The conserved protein-protein interaction sites have been suggested as potential drug targets. To characterize the PB1-PB2 interface, we fused the PB1-binding domain of PB2 to green fluorescent protein (PB21-37-GFP) and determined its competitive inhibitory effect on the polymerase activity of influenza A virus strains. Coexpression of PB21-37-GFP in a polymerase reconstitution system led to substantial inhibition of the polymerase of A/WSN/33 (H1N1). Surprisingly, polymerases of other strains, including A/SC35M (H7N7), A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1), A/Hamburg/4/2009 (H1N1), and A/Thailand/1(KAN-1)/2004 (H5N1), showed various degrees of resistance. Individual exchange of polymerase subunits and the nucleoprotein between the sensitive WSN polymerase and the insensitive SC35M polymerase mapped the resistance to both PB1 and PA of SC35M polymerase. While PB21-37-GFP bound equally well to the PB1 subunits of both virus strains, PB1-PA dimers of SC35M polymerase showed impaired binding compared to PB1-PA dimers of WSN polymerase. The use of PASC35M/WSN chimeras revealed that the reduced affinity of the SC35M PB1-PA dimer was mediated by the N-terminal 277 amino acids of PA. Based on these observations, we speculate that the PB1-PA dimer formation of resistant polymerases shields the PB21-37 binding site, whereas sensitive polymerases allow this interaction, suggesting different assembly strategies of the trimeric polymerase complex between different influenza A virus strains. PMID:21957294

  9. DNA Polymerase Fidelity: Beyond Right and Wrong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, M Todd

    2016-11-01

    Accurate DNA replication depends on the ability of DNA polymerases to discriminate between correctly and incorrectly paired nucleotides. In this issue of Structure, Batra et al. (2016) show the structural basis for why DNA polymerases do not efficiently add correctly paired nucleotides immediately after incorporating incorrectly paired ones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Polymerase Gamma Disease through the Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saneto, Russell P.; Naviaux, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    The most common group of mitochondrial disease is due to mutations within the mitochondrial DNA polymerase, polymerase gamma 1 ("POLG"). This gene product is responsible for replication and repair of the small mitochondrial DNA genome. The structure-function relationship of this gene product produces a wide variety of diseases that at times, seems…

  11. Distinct Mechanism Evolved for Mycobacterial RNA Polymerase and Topoisomerase I Protein-Protein Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Srikanth; Cao, Nan; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2017-09-15

    We report here a distinct mechanism of interaction between topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis that has evolved independently from the previously characterized interaction between bacterial topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase. Bacterial DNA topoisomerase I is responsible for preventing the hyper-negative supercoiling of genomic DNA. The association of topoisomerase I with RNA polymerase during transcription elongation could efficiently relieve transcription-driven negative supercoiling. Our results demonstrate a direct physical interaction between the C-terminal domains of topoisomerase I (TopoI-CTDs) and the β' subunit of RNA polymerase of M. smegmatis in the absence of DNA. The TopoI-CTDs in mycobacteria are evolutionarily unrelated in amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure to the TopoI-CTD found in the majority of bacterial species outside Actinobacteria, including Escherichia coli. The functional interaction between topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase has evolved independently in mycobacteria and E. coli, with distinctively different structural elements of TopoI-CTD utilized for this protein-protein interaction. Zinc ribbon motifs in E. coli TopoI-CTD are involved in the interaction with RNA polymerase. For M. smegmatis TopoI-CTD, a 27-amino-acid tail that is rich in basic residues at the C-terminal end is responsible for the interaction with RNA polymerase. Overexpression of recombinant TopoI-CTD in M. smegmatis competed with the endogenous topoisomerase I for protein-protein interactions with RNA polymerase. The TopoI-CTD overexpression resulted in decreased survival following treatment with antibiotics and hydrogen peroxide, supporting the importance of the protein-protein interaction between topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase during stress response of mycobacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. DNA polymerase ι: The long and the short of it!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Ekaterina G; McLenigan, Mary P; McDonald, John P; Huston, Donald; Mead, Samantha; Woodgate, Roger

    2017-10-01

    The cDNA encoding human DNA polymerase ι (POLI) was cloned in 1999. At that time, it was believed that the POLI gene encoded a protein of 715 amino acids. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies led to the realization that there is an upstream, in-frame initiation codon that would encode a DNA polymerase ι (polι) protein of 740 amino acids. The extra 25 amino acid region is rich in acidic residues (11/25) and is reasonably conserved in eukaryotes ranging from fish to humans. As a consequence, the curated Reference Sequence (RefSeq) database identified polι as a 740 amino acid protein. However, the existence of the 740 amino acid polι has never been shown experimentally. Using highly specific antibodies to the 25 N-terminal amino acids of polι, we were unable to detect the longer 740 amino acid (ι-long) isoform in western blots. However, trace amounts of the ι-long isoform were detected after enrichment by immunoprecipitation. One might argue that the longer isoform may have a distinct biological function, if it exhibits significant differences in its enzymatic properties from the shorter, well-characterized 715 amino acid polι. We therefore purified and characterized recombinant full-length (740 amino acid) polι-long and compared it to full-length (715 amino acid) polι-short in vitro. The metal ion requirements for optimal catalytic activity differ slightly between ι-long and ι-short, but under optimal conditions, both isoforms exhibit indistinguishable enzymatic properties in vitro. We also report that like ι-short, the ι-long isoform can be monoubiquitinated and polyubiuquitinated in vivo, as well as form damage induced foci in vivo. We conclude that the predominant isoform of DNA polι in human cells is the shorter 715 amino acid protein and that if, or when, expressed, the longer 740 amino acid isoform has identical properties to the considerably more abundant shorter isoform. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. The mechanism of pyrophosphorolysis of RNA by RNA polymerase. Endowment of RNA polymerase with artificial exonuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozovskaya, T A; Rechinsky, V O; Bibilashvili, R S; Karpeisky MYa; Tarusova, N B; Khomutov, R M; Dixon, H B

    1984-01-01

    DNA-directed RNA polymerase from Escherichia coli can break down RNA by catalysing the reverse of the reaction: NTP + (RNA)n = (RNA)n+1 + PPi where n indicates the number of nucleotide residues in the RNA molecule, to yield nucleoside triphosphates. This reaction requires the ternary complex of the polymerase with template DNA and the RNA that it has synthesized. It is now shown that methylenebis(arsonic acid) [CH2(AsO3H2)2], arsonomethylphosphonic acid (H2O3As-CH2-PO3H2) and arsonoacetic acid (H2O3As-CH2-CO2H) can replace pyrophosphate in this reaction. When they do so, the low-Mr products of the reaction prove to be nucleoside 5'-phosphates, so that the arsenical compounds endow the polymerase with an artificial exonuclease activity, an effect previously found by Rozovskaya, Chenchik, Tarusova, Bibilashvili & Khomutov [(1981) Mol. Biol. (Moscow) 15, 636-652] for phosphonoacetic acid (H2O3P-CH2-CO2H). This is explained by instability of the analogues of nucleoside triphosphates believed to be the initial products. Specificity of recognition of pyrophosphate is discussed in terms of the sites, beta and gamma, for the -PO3H2 groups of pyrophosphate that will yield P-beta and P-gamma of the nascent nucleoside triphosphate. Site gamma can accept -AsO3H2 in place of -PO3H2, but less well; site beta can accept both, and also -CO2H. We suggest that partial transfer of an Mg2+ ion from the attacking pyrophosphate to the phosphate of the internucleotide bond of the RNA may increase the nucleophilic reactivity of the pyrophosphate and the electrophilicity of the diester, so that the reaction is assisted. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6083781

  14. Characterization of a coupled DNA replication and translesion synthesis polymerase supraholoenzyme from archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, Matthew T; Chu, Aurea M; Baguley, Joshua K; Bauer, Robert J; Trakselis, Michael A

    2017-08-21

    The ability of the replisome to seamlessly coordinate both high fidelity and translesion DNA synthesis requires a means to regulate recruitment and binding of enzymes from solution. Co-occupancy of multiple DNA polymerases within the replisome has been observed primarily in bacteria and is regulated by posttranslational modifications in eukaryotes, and both cases are coordinated by the processivity clamp. Because of the heterotrimeric nature of the PCNA clamp in some archaea, there is potential to occupy and regulate specific polymerases at defined subunits. In addition to specific PCNA and polymerase interactions (PIP site), we have now identified and characterized a novel protein contact between the Y-family DNA polymerase and the B-family replication polymerase (YB site) bound to PCNA and DNA from Sulfolobus solfataricus. These YB contacts are essential in forming and stabilizing a supraholoenzyme (SHE) complex on DNA, effectively increasing processivity of DNA synthesis. The SHE complex can not only coordinate polymerase exchange within the complex but also provides a mechanism for recruitment of polymerases from solution based on multiequilibrium processes. Our results provide evidence for an archaeal PCNA 'tool-belt' recruitment model of multienzyme function that can facilitate both high fidelity and translesion synthesis within the replisome during DNA replication. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. DNA polymerase III of Escherichia coli is required for UV and ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagensee, M.E.; Timme, T.L.; Bryan, S.K.; Moses, R.E.

    1987-06-01

    Strains of Escherichia coli possessing the pcbA1 mutation, a functional DNA polymerase I, and a temperature-sensitive mutation in DNA polymerase III can survive at the restrictive temperature (43 degrees C) for DNA polymerase III. The mutation rate of the bacterial genome of such strains after exposure to either UV light or ethyl methanesulfonate was measured by its rifampicin resistance or amino acid requirements. In addition, Weigle mutagenesis of preirradiated lambda phage was also measured. In all cases, no increase in mutagenesis was noted at the restrictive temperature for DNA polymerase III. Introduction of a cloned DNA polymerase III gene returned the mutation rate of the bacterial genome as well as the Weigle mutagenesis to normal at 43 degrees C. Using a recA-lacZ fusion, the SOS response after UV irradiation was measured and found to be normal at the restrictive and permissive temperature for DNA polymerase III, as was induction of lambda prophage. Recombination was also normal at either temperature. Our studies demonstrate that a functional DNA polymerase III is strictly required for mutagenesis at a step other than SOS induction.

  16. Variants of sequence family B Thermococcus kodakaraensis DNA polymerase with increased mismatch extension selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Huber

    Full Text Available Fidelity and selectivity of DNA polymerases are critical determinants for the biology of life, as well as important tools for biotechnological applications. DNA polymerases catalyze the formation of DNA strands by adding deoxynucleotides to a primer, which is complementarily bound to a template. To ensure the integrity of the genome, DNA polymerases select the correct nucleotide and further extend the nascent DNA strand. Thus, DNA polymerase fidelity is pivotal for ensuring that cells can replicate their genome with minimal error. DNA polymerases are, however, further optimized for more specific biotechnological or diagnostic applications. Here we report on the semi-rational design of mutant libraries derived by saturation mutagenesis at single sites of a 3'-5'-exonuclease deficient variant of Thermococcus kodakaraensis DNA polymerase (KOD pol and the discovery for variants with enhanced mismatch extension selectivity by screening. Sites of potential interest for saturation mutagenesis were selected by their proximity to primer or template strands. The resulting libraries were screened via quantitative real-time PCR. We identified three variants with single amino acid exchanges-R501C, R606Q, and R606W-which exhibited increased mismatch extension selectivity. These variants were further characterized towards their potential in mismatch discrimination. Additionally, the identified enzymes were also able to differentiate between cytosine and 5-methylcytosine. Our results demonstrate the potential in characterizing and developing DNA polymerases for specific PCR based applications in DNA biotechnology and diagnostics.

  17. Poliovirus polymerase residue 5 plays a critical role in elongation complex stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobdey, Sarah E; Kempf, Brian J; Steil, Benjamin P; Barton, David J; Peersen, Olve B

    2010-08-01

    The structures of polio-, coxsackie-, and rhinovirus polymerases have revealed a conserved yet unusual protein conformation surrounding their buried N termini where a beta-strand distortion results in a solvent-exposed hydrophobic amino acid at residue 5. In a previous study, we found that coxsackievirus polymerase activity increased or decreased depending on the size of the amino acid at residue 5 and proposed that this residue becomes buried during the catalytic cycle. In this work, we extend our studies to show that poliovirus polymerase activity is also dependent on the nature of residue 5 and further elucidate which aspects of polymerase function are affected. Poliovirus polymerases with mutations of tryptophan 5 retain wild-type elongation rates, RNA binding affinities, and elongation complex formation rates but form unstable elongation complexes. A large hydrophobic residue is required to maintain the polymerase in an elongation-competent conformation, and smaller hydrophobic residues at position 5 progressively decrease the stability of elongation complexes and their processivity on genome-length templates. Consistent with this, the mutations also reduced viral RNA production in a cell-free replication system. In vivo, viruses containing residue 5 mutants produce viable virus, and an aromatic phenylalanine was maintained with only a slightly decreased virus growth rate. However, nonaromatic amino acids resulted in slow-growing viruses that reverted to wild type. The structural basis for this polymerase phenotype is yet to be determined, and we speculate that amino acid residue 5 interacts directly with template RNA or is involved in a protein structural interaction that stabilizes the elongation complex.

  18. A point mutation in a herpesvirus polymerase determines neuropathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B Goodman

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection with equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1 leads to respiratory disease, abortion, and neurologic disorders in horses. Molecular epidemiology studies have demonstrated that a single nucleotide polymorphism resulting in an amino acid variation of the EHV-1 DNA polymerase (N752/D752 is significantly associated with the neuropathogenic potential of naturally occurring strains. To test the hypothesis that this single amino acid exchange by itself influences neuropathogenicity, we generated recombinant viruses with differing polymerase sequences. Here we show that the N752 mutant virus caused no neurologic signs in the natural host, while the D752 virus was able to cause inflammation of the central nervous system and ataxia. Neurologic disease induced by the D752 virus was concomitant with significantly increased levels of viremia (p = 0.01, but the magnitude of virus shedding from the nasal mucosa was similar between the N752 and D752 viruses. Both viruses replicated with similar kinetics in fibroblasts and epithelial cells, but exhibited differences in leukocyte tropism. Last, we observed a significant increase (p < 0.001 in sensitivity of the N752 mutant to aphidicolin, a drug targeting the viral polymerase. Our results demonstrate that a single amino acid variation in a herpesvirus enzyme can influence neuropathogenic potential without having a major effect on virus shedding from infected animals, which is important for horizontal spread in a population. This observation is very interesting from an evolutionary standpoint and is consistent with data indicating that the N752 DNA pol genotype is predominant in the EHV-1 population, suggesting that decreased viral pathogenicity in the natural host might not be at the expense of less efficient inter-individual transmission.

  19. Translation of a laboratory-validated equine herpesvirus-1 specific real-time PCR assay into an insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (iiPCR) assay for point-of-need diagnosis using POCKIT™ nucleic acid analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasuriya, Udeni B R; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison; Tsai, Yun-Long; Tsai, Chuan-Fu; Shen, Yu-Han; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace; Skillman, Ashley; Wang, Hwa-Tang Thomas; Pronost, Stéphane; Zhang, Yan

    2017-03-01

    Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM), a major problem for the equine industry in the United States, is caused by equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1). In addition, EHV-1 is associated with upper respiratory disease, abortion, and chorioretinal lesions in horses. Here we describe the development and evaluation of an inexpensive, user-friendly insulated isothermal PCR (iiPCR) method targeting open reading 30 (ORF30) to detect both neuropathogenic and non-neuropathogenic strains on the field-deployable POCKIT™ device for point-of-need detection of EHV-1. The analytical sensitivity of the EHV-1 iiPCR assay was 13 genome equivalents per reaction. The assay did not cross react with ten non-target equine viral pathogens. Performance of the EHV-1 iiPCR assay was compared to two previously described real-time PCR (qPCR) assays in two laboratories by using 104 archived clinical samples. All 53 qPCR-positive and 46 of the 51 qPCR-negative samples tested positive and negative, respectively, by the iiPCR. The agreement between the two assays was 95.19% (confidence interval 90.48-99.90%) with a kappa value of 0.90. In conclusion, the newly developed EHV-1 iiPCR assay is robust to provide specificity and sensitivity comparable to qPCR assays for the detection of EHV-1 nucleic acid in clinical specimens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The α subunit of E. coli RNA polymerase activates RNA binding by NusA

    OpenAIRE

    Mah, Thien-Fah; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Mushegian, Arcady; Severinov, Konstantin; Greenblatt, Jack

    2000-01-01

    The Escherichia coli NusA protein modulates pausing, termination, and antitermination by associating with the transcribing RNA polymerase core enzyme. NusA can be covalently cross-linked to nascent RNA within a transcription complex, but does not bind RNA on its own. We have found that deletion of the 79 carboxy-terminal amino acids of the 495-amino-acid NusA protein allows NusA to bind RNA in gel mobility shift assays. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the α subunit of RNA polymerase, as ...

  1. Escherichia coli DnaE Polymerase Couples Pyrophosphatase Activity to DNA Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Lapenta

    Full Text Available DNA Polymerases generate pyrophosphate every time they catalyze a step of DNA elongation. This elongation reaction is generally believed as thermodynamically favoured by the hydrolysis of pyrophosphate, catalyzed by inorganic pyrophosphatases. However, the specific action of inorganic pyrophosphatases coupled to DNA replication in vivo was never demonstrated. Here we show that the Polymerase-Histidinol-Phosphatase (PHP domain of Escherichia coli DNA Polymerase III α subunit features pyrophosphatase activity. We also show that this activity is inhibited by fluoride, as commonly observed for inorganic pyrophosphatases, and we identified 3 amino acids of the PHP active site. Remarkably, E. coli cells expressing variants of these catalytic residues of α subunit feature aberrant phenotypes, poor viability, and are subject to high mutation frequencies. Our findings indicate that DNA Polymerases can couple DNA elongation and pyrophosphate hydrolysis, providing a mechanism for the control of DNA extension rate, and suggest a promising target for novel antibiotics.

  2. Use of polymerase chain reaction for laboratory diagnosis of herpes simplex virus encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanzadeh, J; Garner, J G; Feder, H M; Ryan, R W

    1993-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect herpes simplex virus (HSV) specific deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences in acute and convalescent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain tissue of a 78-year-old man and in CSF of a neonate who died of complications owing to herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out for 35 cycles with a set of primers that bracketed a 92 base pair segment unique to the HSV DNA polymerase gene. Amplified DNA was electrophoresed on 3 percent agarose gel, blotted onto a nylon membrane, and probed with 32p-labeled oligonucleotide internal to the primers. The HSV specific DNA sequences were detected in the specimens from both patients. No HSV specific DNA was detected in CSFs from 20 patients with suspected Lyme disease or neurosyphilis. Polymerase chain reaction is a rapid and noninvasive technique for the diagnosis of HSVE.

  3. Total chemical synthesis of a thermostable enzyme capable of polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weiliang; Jiang, Wenjun; Wang, Jiaxing; Yu, Linping; Chen, Ji; Liu, Xianyu; Liu, Lei; Zhu, Ting F

    2017-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been a defining tool in modern biology. Towards realizing mirror-image PCR, we have designed and chemically synthesized a mutant version of the 352-residue thermostable Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 DNA polymerase IV with l-amino acids and tested its PCR activity biochemically. To the best of our knowledge, this enzyme is the largest chemically synthesized protein reported to date. We show that with optimization of PCR conditions, the fully synthetic polymerase is capable of amplifying template sequences of up to 1.5 kb. The establishment of this synthetic route for chemically synthesizing DNA polymerase IV is a stepping stone towards building a d-enzyme system for mirror-image PCR, which may open up an avenue for the creation of many mirror-image molecular tools such as mirror-image systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment.

  4. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase wherein the modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase.

  5. Polymerase and Exonuclease Activities in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 DNA Polymerase Are Not Highly Coordinated

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The herpes polymerase–processivity factor complex consists of the catalytic UL30 subunit containing both polymerase and proofreading exonuclease activities and the UL42 subunit that acts as a processivity factor. Curiously, the highly active exonuclease has minimal impact on the accumulation of mismatches generated by the polymerase activity. We utilized a series of oligonucleotides of defined sequence to define the interactions between the polymerase and exonuclease active sites. Exonuclease activity requires unwinding of two nucleotides of the duplex primer–template. Surprisingly, even though the exonuclease rate is much higher than the rate of DNA dissociation, the exonuclease degrades both single- and double-stranded DNA in a nonprocessive manner. Efficient proofreading of incorrect nucleotides incorporated by the polymerase would seem to require efficient translocation of DNA between the exonuclease and polymerase active sites. However, we found that translocation of DNA from the exonuclease to polymerase active site is remarkably inefficient. Consistent with inefficient translocation, the DNA binding sites for the exonuclease and polymerase active sites appear to be largely independent, such that the two activities appear noncoordinated. Finally, the presence or absence of UL42 did not impact the coordination of the polymerase and exonuclease activities. In addition to providing fundamental insights into how the polymerase and exonuclease function together, these activities provide a rationale for understanding why the exonuclease minimally impacts accumulation of mismatches by the purified polymerase and raise the question of how these two activities function together in vivo. PMID:25517265

  6. Polymerase chain reaction identification of Trypanosoma brucei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymerase chain reaction identification of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in wild tsetse flies from Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve, Malawi. Janelisa Musaya, John Chisi, Edward Senga, Peter Nambala, Emmanuel Maganga, Enock Matovu, John Enyaru ...

  7. Replicative DNA polymerase defects in human cancers: Consequences, mechanisms, and implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbari, Stephanie R; Shcherbakova, Polina V

    2017-08-01

    The fidelity of DNA replication relies on three error avoidance mechanisms acting in series: nucleotide selectivity of replicative DNA polymerases, exonucleolytic proofreading, and post-replicative DNA mismatch repair (MMR). MMR defects are well known to be associated with increased cancer incidence. Due to advances in DNA sequencing technologies, the past several years have witnessed a long-predicted discovery of replicative DNA polymerase defects in sporadic and hereditary human cancers. The polymerase mutations preferentially affect conserved amino acid residues in the exonuclease domain and occur in tumors with an extremely high mutation load. Thus, a concept has formed that defective proofreading of replication errors triggers the development of these tumors. Recent studies of the most common DNA polymerase variants, however, suggested that their pathogenicity may be determined by functional alterations other than loss of proofreading. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the consequences of DNA polymerase mutations in cancers and the mechanisms of their mutator effects. We also discuss likely explanations for a high recurrence of some but not other polymerase variants and new ideas for therapeutic interventions emerging from the mechanistic studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Structure and function of DNA polymerase μ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takuro; Maezawa, So

    2013-01-01

    DNA polymerases are enzymes playing the central role in DNA metabolism, including DNA replication, DNA repair and recombination. DNA polymerase μ (pol μ DNA polymerase λ (pol λ) and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase (TdT) in X family DNA polymerases function in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is the predonmiant repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). NHEJ involves enzymes that capture both ends of the broken DNA strand, bring them together in a synaptic DNA-protein complex, and repair the DSB. Pol μ and pol λ fill in the gaps at the junction to maintain the genomic integrity. TdT synthesizes N region at the junction during V(D)J recombination and promotes diversity of immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor gene. Among these three polymerases, the regulatory mechanisms of pol μ remain rather unclear. We have approached the mechanism of pol μ from both sides of structure and cellular dynamics. Here, we propose some new insights into pol μ and the probable NHEJ model including our findings. (author)

  9. Detection of adenovirus hexon sequence in a cat by polymerase chain reaction(short communication)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Lakatos, B.; Farkas, J.; Egberink, H.F.; Vennema, H.; Benko, M.

    1999-01-01

    Adenoviral nucleic acid was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in pharyngeal and rectal swab samples of a cat seropositive for adenovirus and suffering from transient hepatic failure. The samples were taken at a one-year interval, and both faecal samples as well as the second pharyngeal

  10. Genotyping of RHD by multiplex polymerase chain reaction analysis of six RHD-specific exons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaskant-van Wijk, P. A.; Faas, B. H.; de Ruijter, J. A.; Overbeeke, M. A.; von dem Borne, A. E.; van Rhenen, D. J.; van der Schoot, C. E.

    1998-01-01

    Qualitative RHD variants are the result of the replacement of RHD exons by their RHCE counterparts or of point mutations in RHD causing amino acid substitutions. For RHD typing, the use of at least two RHD typing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays directed at different regions of RHD is advised

  11. False-negative HIV-1 polymerase chain reaction in a 15-month-old ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corresponding author: S Korsman (stephen.korsman@nhls.ac.za). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing is the gold standard for determining the HIV status in children <18 months of age. ... mismatches relative to the consensus are shown as coloured blocks. Nucleic acid numbering relative to consensus C gag p24 is ...

  12. Cloning the Horse RNA Polymerase I Promoter and Its Application to Studying Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Lu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An influenza virus polymerase reconstitution assay based on the human, dog, or chicken RNA polymerase I (PolI promoter has been developed and widely used to study the polymerase activity of the influenza virus in corresponding cell types. Although it is an important member of the influenza virus family and has been known for sixty years, no studies have been performed to clone the horse PolI promoter or to study the polymerase activity of equine influenza virus (EIV in horse cells. In our study, the horse RNA PolI promoter was cloned from fetal equine lung cells. Using the luciferase assay, it was found that a 500 bp horse RNA PolI promoter sequence was required for efficient transcription. Then, using the developed polymerase reconstitution assay based on the horse RNA PolI promoter, the polymerase activity of two EIV strains was compared, and equine myxovirus resistance A protein was identified as having the inhibiting EIV polymerase activity function in horse cells. Our study enriches our knowledge of the RNA PolI promoter of eukaryotic species and provides a useful tool for the study of influenza virus polymerase activity in horse cells.

  13. Sequence and transcription analysis of the human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouzarides, T.; Bankier, A.T.; Satchwell, S.C.; Weston, K.; Tomlinson, P.; Barrell, B.G.

    1987-01-01

    DNA sequence analysis has revealed that the gene coding for the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA polymerase is present within the long unique region of the virus genome. Identification is based on extensive amino acid homology between the predicted HCMV open reading frame HFLF2 and the DNA polymerase of herpes simplex virus type 1. The authors present here a 5280 base-pair DNA sequence containing the HCMV pol gene, along with the analysis of transcripts encoded within this region. Since HCMV pol also shows homology to the predicted Epstein-Barr virus pol, they were able to analyze the extent of homology between the DNA polymerases of three distantly related herpes viruses, HCMV, Epstein-Barr virus, and herpes simplex virus. The comparison shows that these DNA polymerases exhibit considerable amino acid homology and highlights a number of highly conserved regions; two such regions show homology to sequences within the adenovirus type 2 DNA polymerase. The HCMV pol gene is flanked by open reading frames with homology to those of other herpes viruses; upstream, there is a reading frame homologous to the glycoprotein B gene of herpes simplex virus type I and Epstein-Barr virus, and downstream there is a reading frame homologous to BFLF2 of Epstein-Barr virus

  14. RNA polymerase II mediated transcription from the polymerase III promoters in short hairpin RNA expression vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumi, Mohammad; Ishihara, Shunji; Aziz, Monowar; Kazumori, Hideaki; Ishimura, Norihisa; Yuki, Takafumi; Kadota, Chikara; Kadowaki, Yasunori; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    RNA polymerase III promoters of human ribonuclease P RNA component H1, human U6, and mouse U6 small nuclear RNA genes are commonly used in short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vectors due their precise initiation and termination sites. During transient transfection of shRNA vectors, we observed that H1 or U6 promoters also express longer transcripts enough to express several reporter genes including firefly luciferase, green fluorescent protein EGFP, and red fluorescent protein JRed. Expression of such longer transcripts was augmented by upstream RNA polymerase II enhancers and completely inhibited by downstream polyA signal sequences. Moreover, the transcription of firefly luciferase from human H1 promoter was sensitive to RNA polymerase II inhibitor α-amanitin. Our findings suggest that commonly used polymerase III promoters in shRNA vectors are also prone to RNA polymerase II mediated transcription, which may have negative impacts on their targeted use

  15. Towards the molecular bases of polymerase dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela Flores, J.

    1991-03-01

    One aspect of the strong relationship that is known to exist between the processes of DNA replication and transcription is manifest in the coupling of the rates of movement of the replication fork (r f ) and RNA polymerase (r t ). We address two issues concerning the largely unexplored area of polymerase dynamics: (i) The validity of an approximate kinematic formula linking r f and r t suggested by experiments in which transcription is initiated in some prokaryotes with the antibiotic streptolydigin, and (ii) What are the molecular bases of the kinematic formula? An analysis of the available data suggests possible molecular bases for polymerase dynamics. In particular, we are led to a hypothesis: In active chromatin r t may depend on the length (λ t ) of the transcript of the primary messenger RNA (pre-mRNA). This new effect is subject to experimental verification. We discuss possible experiments that may be performed in order to test this prediction. (author). Refs, 6 tabs

  16. Evolution of DNA polymerases: an inactivated polymerase-exonuclease module in Pol epsilon and a chimeric origin of eukaryotic polymerases from two classes of archaeal ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahirov, Tahir H; Makarova, Kira S; Rogozin, Igor B; Pavlov, Youri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2009-03-18

    Evolution of DNA polymerases, the key enzymes of DNA replication and repair, is central to any reconstruction of the history of cellular life. However, the details of the evolutionary relationships between DNA polymerases of archaea and eukaryotes remain unresolved. We performed a comparative analysis of archaeal, eukaryotic, and bacterial B-family DNA polymerases, which are the main replicative polymerases in archaea and eukaryotes, combined with an analysis of domain architectures. Surprisingly, we found that eukaryotic Polymerase epsilon consists of two tandem exonuclease-polymerase modules, the active N-terminal module and a C-terminal module in which both enzymatic domains are inactivated. The two modules are only distantly related to each other, an observation that suggests the possibility that Pol epsilon evolved as a result of insertion and subsequent inactivation of a distinct polymerase, possibly, of bacterial descent, upstream of the C-terminal Zn-fingers, rather than by tandem duplication. The presence of an inactivated exonuclease-polymerase module in Pol epsilon parallels a similar inactivation of both enzymatic domains in a distinct family of archaeal B-family polymerases. The results of phylogenetic analysis indicate that eukaryotic B-family polymerases, most likely, originate from two distantly related archaeal B-family polymerases, one form giving rise to Pol epsilon, and the other one to the common ancestor of Pol alpha, Pol delta, and Pol zeta. The C-terminal Zn-fingers that are present in all eukaryotic B-family polymerases, unexpectedly, are homologous to the Zn-finger of archaeal D-family DNA polymerases that are otherwise unrelated to the B family. The Zn-finger of Polepsilon shows a markedly greater similarity to the counterpart in archaeal PolD than the Zn-fingers of other eukaryotic B-family polymerases. Evolution of eukaryotic DNA polymerases seems to have involved previously unnoticed complex events. We hypothesize that the archaeal

  17. Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 4. Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction - A Revolution in Diagnostics. Simarjot Singh Pabla Sarabjot Singh Pabla. General Article Volume 13 Issue 4 April 2008 pp 369-377 ...

  18. Determining Annealing Temperatures for Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Angela R.; Enners, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common technique used in high school and undergraduate science teaching. Students often do not fully comprehend the underlying principles of the technique and how optimization of the protocol affects the outcome and analysis. In this molecular biology laboratory, students learn the steps of PCR with an…

  19. RNA Polymerase II–The Transcription Machine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 3. RNA Polymerase II – The Transcription Machine - Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2006. Jiyoti Verma Aruna Naorem Anand Kumar Manimala Sen Parag Sadhale. General Article Volume 12 Issue 3 March 2007 pp 47-53 ...

  20. The bacterial enhancer-dependent RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Darbari, Vidya C; Glyde, Robert; Zhang, Xiaodong; Buck, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Transcription initiation is highly regulated in bacterial cells, allowing adaptive gene regulation in response to environment cues. One class of promoter specificity factor called sigma54 enables such adaptive gene expression through its ability to lock the RNA polymerase down into a state unable to melt out promoter DNA for transcription initiation. Promoter DNA opening then occurs through the action of specialized transcription control proteins called bacterial enhancer-binding proteins (bEBPs) that remodel the sigma54 factor within the closed promoter complexes. The remodelling of sigma54 occurs through an ATP-binding and hydrolysis reaction carried out by the bEBPs. The regulation of bEBP self-assembly into typically homomeric hexamers allows regulated gene expression since the self-assembly is required for bEBP ATPase activity and its direct engagement with the sigma54 factor during the remodelling reaction. Crystallographic studies have now established that in the closed promoter complex, the sigma54 factor occupies the bacterial RNA polymerase in ways that will physically impede promoter DNA opening and the loading of melted out promoter DNA into the DNA-binding clefts of the RNA polymerase. Large-scale structural re-organizations of sigma54 require contact of the bEBP with an amino-terminal glutamine and leucine-rich sequence of sigma54, and lead to domain movements within the core RNA polymerase necessary for making open promoter complexes and synthesizing the nascent RNA transcript. © 2016 The Author(s).

  1. Immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction techniques for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To compare the Reverse Passive Latex Agglutination (RPLA) and Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) techniques with a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) for detection of enterotoxigenic Bacillus cereus. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: The Department of Public Health, Pharmacology and ...

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex identification by polymerase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex identification by polymerase chain reaction from positive culture in patients from Jamot and Mbalmayo district hospitals. ... On the same way, MTBC were differentiated from other mycobacreia using the PNP inhibition test. DNA extracted from positive cultures was subjected to PCR ...

  3. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based molecular characterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based molecular characterization of popular wheat varieties of Khyber Pukhtunkhwa (KPK) region of Pakistan. ... Molecular markers used in this study show high rate of genetic diversity that can be used to assist a breeding program for the improvement of wheat in KPK-Pakistan. Key words: ...

  4. Bordetella pertussis diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkebaek, N H; Heron, I; Skjødt, K

    1994-01-01

    The object of this work was to test the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for demonstration of Bordetella pertussis (BP) in nasopharyngeal secretions. The method was applied to patients with recently diagnosed pertussis, as verified by BP culture. In order to test the sensitivity and specificity...

  5. RNA Polymerase II–The Transcription Machine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/03/0047-0053. Keywords. RNA polymerase II; Mediator; Roger Kornberg. Author Affiliations. Jiyoti Verma Aruna Naorem Anand Kumar Manimala Sen Parag Sadhale1. Department of Microbiology and Cell biology, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  6. Structural basis of RNA polymerase II backtracking, arrest and reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Alan C M; Cramer, Patrick

    2011-03-10

    During gene transcription, RNA polymerase (Pol) II moves forwards along DNA and synthesizes messenger RNA. However, at certain DNA sequences, Pol II moves backwards, and such backtracking can arrest transcription. Arrested Pol II is reactivated by transcription factor IIS (TFIIS), which induces RNA cleavage that is required for cell viability. Pol II arrest and reactivation are involved in transcription through nucleosomes and in promoter-proximal gene regulation. Here we present X-ray structures at 3.3 Å resolution of an arrested Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol II complex with DNA and RNA, and of a reactivation intermediate that additionally contains TFIIS. In the arrested complex, eight nucleotides of backtracked RNA bind a conserved 'backtrack site' in the Pol II pore and funnel, trapping the active centre trigger loop and inhibiting mRNA elongation. In the reactivation intermediate, TFIIS locks the trigger loop away from backtracked RNA, displaces RNA from the backtrack site, and complements the polymerase active site with a basic and two acidic residues that may catalyse proton transfers during RNA cleavage. The active site is demarcated from the backtrack site by a 'gating tyrosine' residue that probably delimits backtracking. These results establish the structural basis of Pol II backtracking, arrest and reactivation, and provide a framework for analysing gene regulation during transcription elongation.

  7. Structures of two cell wall-associated polysaccharides of a Streptococcus mitis biovar 1 strain. A unique teichoic acid-like polysaccharide and the group O antigen which is a C-polysaccharide in common with pneumococci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, N; Jansson, P.-E.; Kilian, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    -polysaccharide constitutes the Lancefield group O antigen. Studies using mAbs directed against the backbone and against the phosphocholine moiety of the C-polysaccharide revealed several different patterns of these epitopes among 95 S. mitis and Streptococcus oralis strains tested and the exclusive presence of the group O...

  8. Conserved Features of the PB2 627 Domain Impact Influenza Virus Polymerase Function and Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirui, James; Bucci, Michael D.; Poole, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Successful replication of influenza virus requires the coordinated expression of viral genes and replication of the genome by the viral polymerase, composed of the subunits PA, PB1, and PB2. Polymerase activity is regulated by both viral and host factors, yet the mechanisms of regulation and how they contribute to viral pathogenicity and tropism are poorly understood. To characterize these processes, we created a series of mutants in the 627 domain of the PB2 subunit. This domain contains a conserved “P[F/P]AAAPP” sequence motif and the well-described amino acid 627, whose identity regulates host range. A lysine present at position 627 in most mammalian viral isolates creates a basic face on the domain surface and confers high-level activity in humans compared to the glutamic acid found at this position in avian isolates. Mutation of the basic face or the P[F/P]AAAPP motif impaired polymerase activity, assembly of replication complexes, and viral replication. Most of these residues are required for general polymerase activity, whereas PB2 K586 and R589 were preferentially required for function in human versus avian cells. Thus, these data identify residues in the 627 domain and other viral proteins that regulate polymerase activity, highlighting the importance of the surface charge and structure of this domain for virus replication and host adaptation. IMPORTANCE Influenza virus faces barriers to transmission across species as it emerges from its natural reservoir in birds to infect mammals. The viral polymerase is an important regulator of this process and undergoes discrete changes to adapt to replication in mammals. Many of these changes occur in the polymerase subunit PB2. Here we describe the systematic analysis of a key region in PB2 that controls species-specific polymerase activity. We report the importance of conserved residues that contribute to the overall charge of the protein as well as those that likely affect protein structure. These

  9. Recombinase polymerase amplification: Emergence as a critical molecular technology for rapid, low-resource diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Ameh; Macdonald, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Isothermal molecular diagnostics are bridging the technology gap between traditional diagnostics and polymerase chain reaction-based methods. These new techniques enable timely and accurate testing, especially in settings where there is a lack of infrastructure to support polymerase chain reaction facilities. Despite this, there is a significant lack of uptake of these technologies in developing countries where they are highly needed. Among these novel isothermal technologies, recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) holds particular potential for use in developing countries. This rapid nucleic acid amplification approach is fast, highly sensitive and specific, and amenable to countries with a high burden of infectious diseases. Implementation of RPA technology in developing countries is critically required to assess limitations and potentials of the diagnosis of infectious disease, and may help identify impediments that prevent adoption of new molecular technologies in low resource- and low skill settings. This review focuses on approaching diagnosis of infectious disease with RPA.

  10. PCR fidelity of pfu DNA polymerase and other thermostable DNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, J; Braman, J C; Hogrefe, H H

    1996-09-15

    The replication fidelities of Pfu, Taq, Vent, Deep Vent and UlTma DNA polymerases were compared using a PCR-based forward mutation assay. Average error rates (mutation frequency/bp/duplication) increased as follows: Pfu (1.3 x 10(-6)) Pfu and UlTma (approximately 5 x 10(-5)). Buffer optimization experiments indicated that Pfu fidelity was highest in the presence of 2-3 mM MgSO4 and 100-300 microM each dNTP and at pH 8.5-9.1. Under these conditions, the error rate of exo- Pfu was approximately 40-fold higher (5 x 10(-5)) than the error rate of Pfu. As the reaction pH was raised from pH 8 to 9, the error rate of Pfu decreased approximately 2-fold, while the error rate of exo- Pfu increased approximately 9-fold. An increase in error rate with pH has also been noted for the exonuclease-deficient DNA polymerases Taq and exo- Klenow, suggesting that the parameters which influence replication error rates may be similar in pol l- and alpha-like polymerases. Finally, the fidelity of 'long PCR' DNA polymerase mixtures was examined. The error rates of a Taq/Pfu DNA polymerase mixture and a Klentaq/Pfu DNA polymerase mixture were found to be less than the error rate of Taq DNA polymerase, but approximately 3-4-fold higher than the error rate of Pfu DNA polymerase.

  11. Structure of the family B DNA polymerase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum calidifontis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingxu; Zhang, Wenling; Coker, Alun R; Wood, Steve P; Cooper, Jonathan B; Ahmad, Shazeel; Ali, Syed; Rashid, Naeem; Akhtar, Muhummad

    2017-05-01

    The family B DNA polymerase from Pyrobaculum calidifontis (Pc-polymerase) consists of 783 amino acids and is magnesium-ion dependent. It has an optimal pH of 8.5, an optimal temperature of 75°C and a half-life of 4.5 h at 95°C, giving it greater thermostability than the widely used Taq DNA polymerase. The enzyme is also capable of PCR-amplifying larger DNA fragments of up to 7.5 kb in length. It was shown to have functional, error-correcting 3'-5' exonuclease activity, as do the related high-fidelity DNA polymerases from Pyrococcus furiosus, Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1 and Thermococcus gorgonarius, which have extensive commercial applications. Pc-polymerase has a quite low sequence identity of approximately 37% to these enzymes, which, in contrast, have very high sequence identity to each other, suggesting that the P. calidifontis enzyme is distinct. Here, the structure determination of Pc-polymerase is reported, which has been refined to an R factor of 24.47% and an R free of 28.81% at 2.80 Å resolution. The domains of the enzyme are arranged in a circular fashion to form a disc with a narrow central channel. One face of the disc has a number of connected crevices in it, which allow the protein to bind duplex and single-stranded DNA. The central channel is thought to allow incoming nucleoside triphosphates to access the active site. The enzyme has a number of unique structural features which distinguish it from other archaeal DNA polymerases and may account for its high processivity. A model of the complex with the primer-template duplex of DNA indicates that the largest conformational change that occurs upon DNA binding is the movement of the thumb domain, which rotates by 7.6° and moves by 10.0 Å. The surface potential of the enzyme is dominated by acidic groups in the central region of the molecule, where catalytic magnesium ions bind at the polymerase and exonuclease active sites. The outer regions are richer in basic amino acids that

  12. Electrochemiluminescence polymerase chain reaction detection of genetically modified organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinfeng; Xing Da; Shen Xingyan; Zhu Debin

    2005-01-01

    With the development of biotechnology, more and more genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have entered commercial market. Because of the safety concerns, detection and characterization of GMOs have attracted much attention recently. Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) method is a chemiluminescent (CL) reaction of species generated electrochemically on an electrode surface. It is a highly efficient and accurate detection method. In this paper, ECL polymerase chain reaction (PCR) combined with two types of nucleic acid probes hybridization was applied to detect GMOs for the first time. Whether the organisms contain GM components was discriminated by detecting the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S) promoter and nopaline synthase (NOS) terminator. The experiment results show that the detection limit is 100 fmol of PCR products. The promoter and the terminator can be clearly detected in GMOs. The method may provide a new means for the detection of GMOs due to its simplicity and high efficiency

  13. Rapid electrochemiluminescence assays of polymerase chain reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenten, J H; Casadei, J; Link, J; Lupold, S; Willey, J; Powell, M; Rees, A; Massey, R

    1991-09-01

    We demonstrate the first use of an electrochemiluminescent (ECL) label, [4-(N-succimidyloxycarbonylpropyl)-4'-methyl-2,2'- bipyridine]ruthenium(II) dihexafluorophosphate (Origen label; IGEN Inc.), in DNA probe assays. This label allows rapid (less than 25 min) quantification and detection of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified products from oncogenes, viruses, and cloned genes. For the PCR, we used labeled oligonucleotide primers complementary to human papiloma virus and the Ha-ras oncogene. These samples were followed by ECL analysis or hybridization with specific, Origen-labeled oligonucleotide probes. These studies demonstrate the speed, specificity, and effectiveness of the new ECL labels, compared with 32P, for nucleic acid probe applications. We describe formats involving conventional methodologies and a new format that requires no wash step, allowing simple and rapid sample analysis. These rapid assays also reduce PCR contamination, by requiring less sample handling. Improvements in ECL detectability are currently under investigation for use in DNA probe assays without amplification.

  14. Molecular typing of Lactobacillus brevis isolates from Korean food using repetitive element-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasmine; Sharma, Anshul; Lee, Sulhee; Park, Young-Seo

    2018-01-01

    Lactobacillus brevis is a part of a large family of lactic acid bacteria that are present in cheese, sauerkraut, sourdough, silage, cow manure, feces, and the intestinal tract of humans and rats. It finds its use in food fermentation, and so is considered a "generally regarded as safe" organism. L. brevis strains are extensively used as probiotics and hence, there is a need for identifying and characterizing these strains. For identification and discrimination of the bacterial species at the subspecific level, repetitive element-polymerase chain reaction method is a reliable genomic fingerprinting tool. The objective of the present study was to characterize 13 strains of L. brevis isolated from various fermented foods using repetitive element-polymerase chain reaction. Repetitive element-polymerase chain reaction was performed using three primer sets, REP, Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC), and (GTG) 5 , which produced different fingerprinting patterns that enable us to distinguish between the closely related strains. Fingerprinting patterns generated band range in between 150 and 5000 bp with REP, 200-7500 bp with ERIC, and 250-2000 bp with (GTG) 5 primers, respectively. The Jaccard's dissimilarity matrices were used to obtain dendrograms by the unweighted neighbor-joining method using genetic dissimilarities based on repetitive element-polymerase chain reaction fingerprinting data. Repetitive element-polymerase chain reaction proved to be a rapid and easy method that can produce reliable results in L. brevis species.

  15. An unusual polyanion from Physarum polycephalum that inhibits homologous DNA polymerase α in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, H.; Erdmann, S.; Holler, E.

    1989-01-01

    From extracts of microplasmodia of Physarum polycephalum and their culture medium, an unusual substance was isolated which inhibited homologous DNA polymerase α of this slime mold but not β-like DNA polymerase and not heterologous DNA polymerases. Analysis, especially NMR spectroscopy, revealed the major component to be an anionic polyester of L-malic acid and the inhibition to be due to poly(L-malate) in binding reversibly to DNA polymerase α. The mode of inhibition is competitive with substrate DNA and follows an inhibition constant K i = 10 ng/mL. Inhibition is reversed in the presence of spermine, spermidine, poly(ethylene imine), and calf thymus histone H1. According to its ester nature, the inhibitor is slightly labile at neutral and instable at acid and alkaline conditions. Its largest size corresponds to a molecular mass of 40-50 kDa, but the bulk of the material after purification has lower molecular masses. The inhibitory activity depends on the polymer size and has a minimal size requirement

  16. Molecular architecture and function of adenovirus DNA polymerase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenkman, A.B. (Arjan Bernard)

    2002-01-01

    Central to this thesis is the role of adenovirus DNA polymerase (Ad pol) in adenovirus DNA replication. Ad pol is a member of the family B DNA polymerases but belongs to a distinct subclass of polymerases that use a protein as primer. As Ad pol catalyses both the initiation and elongation phases and

  17. Structural and functional similarities between HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase beta' subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilvay, A M; Stern, B; Blichenberg, A; Helland, D E

    2000-10-27

    Four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) recognizing HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) were shown here to cross-react with the beta' subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP). The anti-RT MAbs bind to a peptide comprising residues 294-305 of the RT amino acid sequence. Computer analyses revealed sequence similarity between this peptide and two regions of the RNAP beta' subunit. MAb-binding studies using RT mutants suggested that the epitope is located to amino acids 652-663 of the beta' sequence. One of the MAbs which inhibited the polymerase activity of RT also mediated a dose dependent inhibition of the RNAP activity.

  18. Synthetic Nucleotides as Probes of DNA Polymerase Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Walsh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic code is continuously expanding with new nucleobases designed to suit specific research needs. These synthetic nucleotides are used to study DNA polymerase dynamics and specificity and may even inhibit DNA polymerase activity. The availability of an increasing chemical diversity of nucleotides allows questions of utilization by different DNA polymerases to be addressed. Much of the work in this area deals with the A family DNA polymerases, for example, Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I, which are DNA polymerases involved in replication and whose fidelity is relatively high, but more recent work includes other families of polymerases, including the Y family, whose members are known to be error prone. This paper focuses on the ability of DNA polymerases to utilize nonnatural nucleotides in DNA templates or as the incoming nucleoside triphosphates. Beyond the utility of nonnatural nucleotides as probes of DNA polymerase specificity, such entities can also provide insight into the functions of DNA polymerases when encountering DNA that is damaged by natural agents. Thus, synthetic nucleotides provide insight into how polymerases deal with nonnatural nucleotides as well as into the mutagenic potential of nonnatural nucleotides.

  19. Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction: principles and applications in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Santos,Carlos Ferreira dos; Sakai,Vivien Thiemy; Machado,Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; Schippers,Daniela Nicole; Greene,Andrew Seth

    2004-01-01

    Various molecular biology techniques have become available in the last few years. One of the most revolutionary of these techniques regarding nucleic acid analysis is the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which was first described in 1985. This method relies on the exponential amplification of specific DNA fragments, resulting in millions of copies that can serve as templates for different kinds of analyses. PCR can be preceded by a reverse transcription (RT) reaction in order to produce cDNA ...

  20. Structure and Function of Caliciviral RNA Polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hye Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Caliciviruses are a leading agent of human and animal gastroenteritis and respiratory tract infections, which are growing concerns in immunocompromised individuals. However, no vaccines or therapeutics are yet available. Since the rapid rate of genetic evolution of caliciviruses is mainly due to the error-prone nature of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, this article focuses on recent studies of the structures and functions of RdRp from caliciviruses. It also provides recent advances in the interactions of RdRp with virion protein genome-linked (VPg and RNA and the structural and functional features of its precursor.

  1. Chemical fidelity of an RNA polymerase ribozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attwater, J.; Tagami, S.; Kimoto, M.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of catalytically active RNA enzymes (ribozymes) is widely believed to have been an important transition in the origin of life. In the context of a likely heterogeneous chemical environment, substrate specificity and selectivity of these primordial enzymes would have been critical...... for function. Here we have explored the chemical fidelity, i.e. substrate selectivity and specificity for both single and multiple catalytic steps of the Z RNA polymerase ribozyme-a modern day analogue of the primordial RNA replicase. Using a wide range of nucleotide analogues and ionic conditions, we observe...

  2. Evolution of DNA polymerases: an inactivated polymerase-exonuclease module in Pol ε and a chimeric origin of eukaryotic polymerases from two classes of archaeal ancestors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahirov, Tahir H; Makarova, Kira S; Rogozin, Igor B; Pavlov, Youri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2009-01-01

    Background Evolution of DNA polymerases, the key enzymes of DNA replication and repair, is central to any reconstruction of the history of cellular life. However, the details of the evolutionary relationships between DNA polymerases of archaea and eukaryotes remain unresolved. Results We performed a comparative analysis of archaeal, eukaryotic, and bacterial B-family DNA polymerases, which are the main replicative polymerases in archaea and eukaryotes, combined with an analysis of domain architectures. Surprisingly, we found that eukaryotic Polymerase ε consists of two tandem exonuclease-polymerase modules, the active N-terminal module and a C-terminal module in which both enzymatic domains are inactivated. The two modules are only distantly related to each other, an observation that suggests the possibility that Pol ε evolved as a result of insertion and subsequent inactivation of a distinct polymerase, possibly, of bacterial descent, upstream of the C-terminal Zn-fingers, rather than by tandem duplication. The presence of an inactivated exonuclease-polymerase module in Pol ε parallels a similar inactivation of both enzymatic domains in a distinct family of archaeal B-family polymerases. The results of phylogenetic analysis indicate that eukaryotic B-family polymerases, most likely, originate from two distantly related archaeal B-family polymerases, one form giving rise to Pol ε, and the other one to the common ancestor of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ζ. The C-terminal Zn-fingers that are present in all eukaryotic B-family polymerases, unexpectedly, are homologous to the Zn-finger of archaeal D-family DNA polymerases that are otherwise unrelated to the B family. The Zn-finger of Polε shows a markedly greater similarity to the counterpart in archaeal PolD than the Zn-fingers of other eukaryotic B-family polymerases. Conclusion Evolution of eukaryotic DNA polymerases seems to have involved previously unnoticed complex events. We hypothesize that the archaeal

  3. Evolution of DNA polymerases: an inactivated polymerase-exonuclease module in Pol ε and a chimeric origin of eukaryotic polymerases from two classes of archaeal ancestors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlov Youri I

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution of DNA polymerases, the key enzymes of DNA replication and repair, is central to any reconstruction of the history of cellular life. However, the details of the evolutionary relationships between DNA polymerases of archaea and eukaryotes remain unresolved. Results We performed a comparative analysis of archaeal, eukaryotic, and bacterial B-family DNA polymerases, which are the main replicative polymerases in archaea and eukaryotes, combined with an analysis of domain architectures. Surprisingly, we found that eukaryotic Polymerase ε consists of two tandem exonuclease-polymerase modules, the active N-terminal module and a C-terminal module in which both enzymatic domains are inactivated. The two modules are only distantly related to each other, an observation that suggests the possibility that Pol ε evolved as a result of insertion and subsequent inactivation of a distinct polymerase, possibly, of bacterial descent, upstream of the C-terminal Zn-fingers, rather than by tandem duplication. The presence of an inactivated exonuclease-polymerase module in Pol ε parallels a similar inactivation of both enzymatic domains in a distinct family of archaeal B-family polymerases. The results of phylogenetic analysis indicate that eukaryotic B-family polymerases, most likely, originate from two distantly related archaeal B-family polymerases, one form giving rise to Pol ε, and the other one to the common ancestor of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ζ. The C-terminal Zn-fingers that are present in all eukaryotic B-family polymerases, unexpectedly, are homologous to the Zn-finger of archaeal D-family DNA polymerases that are otherwise unrelated to the B family. The Zn-finger of Polε shows a markedly greater similarity to the counterpart in archaeal PolD than the Zn-fingers of other eukaryotic B-family polymerases. Conclusion Evolution of eukaryotic DNA polymerases seems to have involved previously unnoticed complex events. We

  4. RNA polymerase activity of Ustilago maydis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yie, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    Ustilago maydis virus has an RNA polymerase enzyme which is associated with virion capsids. In the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/ ion and ribonucleotide triphosphate, the enzyme catalyzes the in vitro synthesis of mRNA by using dsRNA as a template. The products of the UmV RNA polymerase were both ssRNA and dsRNA. The dsRNA was determined by characteristic mobilities in gel electrophoresis, lack of sensitivity to RNase, and specific hybridization tests. The ssRNAs were identified by elution from a CF-11 column and by their RNase sensitivity. On the basis of the size of ssRNAs, it was concluded that partial transcripts were produced from H dsRNA segments, and full length transcripts were produced from M and L dsRNA segments. The following observations indicates that transcription occurs by strand displacement; (1) Only the positive strand of M2 dsRNA was labeled by the in vitro reaction. (2) The M2 dsRNA which had been labeled with /sup 32/''P-UTP in vitro could be chased from dsRNA with unlabeled UTP. The transcription products of three UmV strains were compared, and the overall pattern of transcription was very similar among them.

  5. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Three DNA polymerases — Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ — are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson–Crick base pairing and 3′exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to ‘polymerase proofreading associated polyposis’ (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an ‘ultramutator’ phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions. PMID:24583393

  6. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-02-01

    Three DNA polymerases - Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ - are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson-Crick base pairing and 3'exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to 'polymerase proofreading associated polyposis' (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an 'ultramutator' phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA repair synthesis in human fibroblasts requires DNA polymerase delta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, C.; Reinhard, P.; Linn, S.

    1988-01-01

    When UV-irradiated cultured diploid human fibroblasts were permeabilized with Brij-58 then separated from soluble material by centrifugation, conservative DNA repair synthesis could be restored by a soluble factor obtained from the supernatant of similarly treated HeLa cells. Extensive purification of this factor yielded a 10.2 S, 220,000-dalton polypeptide with the DNA polymerase and 3'- to 5'-exonuclease activities reported for DNA polymerase delta II. Monoclonal antibody to KB cell DNA polymerase alpha, while binding to HeLa DNA polymerase alpha, did not bind to the HeLa DNA polymerase delta. Moreover, at micromolar concentrations N2-(p-n-butylphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate (BuPdGTP) and 2-(p-n-butylanilino)-2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate (BuAdATP) were potent inhibitors of DNA polymerase alpha, but did not inhibit the DNA polymerase delta. Neither purified DNA polymerase alpha nor beta could promote repair DNA synthesis in the permeabilized cells. Furthermore, under conditions which inhibited purified DNA polymerase alpha by greater than 90%, neither monoclonal antibodies to DNA polymerase alpha, BuPdGTP, nor BuAdATP was able to inhibit significantly the DNA repair synthesis mediated by the DNA polymerase delta. Thus, it appears that a major portion of DNA repair synthesis induced by UV irradiation might be catalyzed by DNA polymerase delta. When xeroderma pigmentosum human diploid fibroblasts were utilized, DNA repair synthesis dependent upon ultraviolet light could be restored by addition of both T4 endonuclease V and DNA polymerase delta, but not by addition of either one alone

  8. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus DNA in cultured human glial cells by means of the polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teglbjærg, Lars Stubbe; Hansen, J-ES; Dalbøge, H

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of viral genomic sequences in latently infected cells. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus in cultures of human glial cells was demonstrated, using nucleic acid amplification followed by dot blot hybrid...

  9. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus DNA in cultured human glial cells by means of the polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teglbjaerg, L L; Hansen, J E; Dalbøge, H

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of viral genomic sequences in latently infected cells. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus in cultures of human glial cells was demonstrated, using nucleic acid amplification followed by dot blot...

  10. The DnaE polymerase from Deinococcus radiodurans features RecA-dependent DNA polymerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randi, Lorenzo; Perrone, Alessandro; Maturi, Mirko; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Camerani, Michela; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro

    2016-12-01

    We report in the present study on the catalytic properties of the Deinococcus radiodurans DNA polymerase III α subunit (αDr). The αDr enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, both in soluble form and as inclusion bodies. When purified from soluble protein extracts, αDr was found to be tightly associated with E. coli RNA polymerase, from which αDr could not be dissociated. On the contrary, when refolded from inclusion bodies, αDr was devoid of E. coli RNA polymerase and was purified to homogeneity. When assayed with different DNA substrates, αDr featured slower DNA extension rates when compared with the corresponding enzyme from E. coli (E. coli DNA Pol III, αEc), unless under high ionic strength conditions or in the presence of manganese. Further assays were performed using a ssDNA and a dsDNA, whose recombination yields a DNA substrate. Surprisingly, αDr was found to be incapable of recombination-dependent DNA polymerase activity, whereas αEc was competent in this action. However, in the presence of the RecA recombinase, αDr was able to efficiently extend the DNA substrate produced by recombination. Upon comparing the rates of RecA-dependent and RecA-independent DNA polymerase activities, we detected a significant activation of αDr by the recombinase. Conversely, the activity of αEc was found maximal under non-recombination conditions. Overall, our observations indicate a sharp contrast between the catalytic actions of αDr and αEc, with αDr more performing under recombination conditions, and αEc preferring DNA substrates whose extension does not require recombination events. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. Nascent Transcription Affected by RNA Polymerase IV in Zea mays

    OpenAIRE

    Erhard, Karl F.; Talbot, Joy-El R. B.; Deans, Natalie C.; McClish, Allison E.; Hollick, Jay B.

    2015-01-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define th...

  12. A pseudaminic acid or a legionaminic acid derivative transferase is strain-specifically implicated in the general protein O-glycosylation system of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomek, Markus B; Janesch, Bettina; Maresch, Daniel; Windwarder, Markus; Altmann, Friedrich; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina

    2017-06-01

    The occurrence of nonulosonic acids in bacteria is wide-spread and linked to pathogenicity. However, the knowledge of cognate nonulosonic acid transferases is scarce. In the periodontopathogen Tannerella forsythia, several proposed virulence factors carry strain-specifically either a pseudaminic or a legionaminic acid derivative as terminal sugar on an otherwise structurally identical, protein-bound oligosaccharide. This study aims to shed light on the transfer of either nonulosonic acid derivative on a proximal N-acetylmannosaminuronic acid residue within the O-glycan structure, exemplified with the bacterium's abundant S-layer glycoproteins. Bioinformatic analyses provided the candidate genes Tanf_01245 (strain ATCC 43037) and TFUB4_00887 (strain UB4), encoding a putative pseudaminic and a legionaminic acid derivative transferase, respectively. These transferases have identical C-termini and contain motifs typical of glycosyltransferases (DXD) and bacterial sialyltransferases (D/E-D/E-G and HP). They share homology to type B glycosyltransferases and TagB, an enzyme catalyzing glycerol transfer to an N-acetylmannosamine residue in teichoic acid biosynthesis. Analysis of a cellular pool of nucleotide-activated sugars confirmed the presence of the CMP-activated nonulosonic acid derivatives, which are most likely serving as substrates for the corresponding transferase. Single gene knock-out mutants targeted at either transferase were analyzed for S-layer O-glycan composition by ESI-MS, confirming the loss of the nonulosonic acid derivative. Cross-complementation of the mutants with the nonnative nonulosonic acid transferase was not successful indicating high stringency of the enzymes. This study identified plausible candidates for a pseudaminic and a legionaminic acid derivative transferase; these may serve as valuable tools for engineering of novel sialoglycoconjugates. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Polymerase chain reaction methods (PCR in agrobiotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taški-Ajduković Ksenija

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The agricultural biotechnology applies polymerase chain reaction (PCR technology at numerous steps throughout product development. The major uses of PCR technology during product development include gene discovery and cloning, vector construction, transformant identification, screening and characterization as well as seed quality control. Commodity and food companies as well as testing laboratories rely on PCR technology to verify the presence or absence of genetically modification (GM in a product or to quantify the amount of GM material present in the product. This article describes the fundamental elements of PCR analysis and its application to the testing of grains and highlights some of areas to which attention must be paid in order to produce reliable test results. The article also discuses issues related to the analysis of different matrixes and the effect they may have on the accuracy of the PCR analytical results.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of DNA Polymerase Clamp Loaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelch, Brian; Makino, Debora; Simonetta, Kyle; O'Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John

    Clamp loaders are ATP-driven multiprotein machines that couple ATP hydrolysis to the opening and closing of a circular protein ring around DNA. This ring-shaped clamp slides along DNA, and interacts with numerous proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair and cell cycle control. Recently determined structures of clamp loader complexes from prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases have revealed exciting new details of how these complex AAA+ machines perform this essential clamp loading function. This review serves as background to John Kuriyan's lecture at the 2010 Erice School, and is not meant as a comprehensive review of the contributions of the many scientists who have advanced this field. These lecture notes are derived from recent reviews and research papers from our groups.

  15. Mutations in the PA Protein of Avian H5N1 Influenza Viruses Affect Polymerase Activity and Mouse Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Gongxun; Le, Mai Quynh; Lopes, Tiago J S; Halfmann, Peter; Hatta, Masato; Fan, Shufang; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2018-02-15

    To study the influenza virus determinants of pathogenicity, we characterized two highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza viruses isolated in Vietnam in 2012 (A/duck/Vietnam/QT1480/2012 [QT1480]) and 2013 (A/duck/Vietnam/QT1728/2013 [QT1728]) and found that the activity of their polymerase complexes differed significantly, even though both viruses were highly pathogenic in mice. Further studies revealed that the PA-S343A/E347D (PA with the S-to-A change at position 343 and the E-to-D change at position 347) mutations reduced viral polymerase activity and mouse virulence when tested in the genetic background of QT1728 virus. In contrast, the PA-343S/347E mutations increased the polymerase activity of QT1480 and the virulence of a low-pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus. The PA-343S residue (which alone increased viral polymerase activity and mouse virulence significantly relative to viral replication complexes encoding PA-343A) is frequently found in H5N1 influenza viruses of several subclades; infection with a virus possessing this amino acid may pose an increased risk to humans. IMPORTANCE H5N1 influenza viruses cause severe infections in humans with a case fatality rate that exceeds 50%. The factors that determine the high virulence of these viruses in humans are not fully understood. Here, we identified two amino acid changes in the viral polymerase PA protein that affect the activity of the viral polymerase complex and virulence in mice. Infection with viruses possessing these amino acid changes may pose an increased risk to humans. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Exploring the Chemistry of Genetic Information Storage and Propagation through Polymerase Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlihan, Gillian; Arangundy-Franklin, Sebastian; Holliger, Philipp

    2017-04-18

    Nucleic acids are a distinct form of sequence-defined biopolymer. What sets them apart from other biopolymers such as polypeptides or polysaccharides is their unique capacity to encode, store, and propagate genetic information (molecular heredity). In nature, just two closely related nucleic acids, DNA and RNA, function as repositories and carriers of genetic information. They therefore are the molecular embodiment of biological information. This naturally leads to questions regarding the degree of variation from this seemingly ideal "Goldilocks" chemistry that would still be compatible with the fundamental property of molecular heredity. To address this question, chemists have created a panoply of synthetic nucleic acids comprising unnatural sugar ring congeners, backbone linkages, and nucleobases in order to establish the molecular parameters for encoding genetic information and its emergence at the origin of life. A deeper analysis of the potential of these synthetic genetic polymers for molecular heredity requires a means of replication and a determination of the fidelity of information transfer. While non-enzymatic synthesis is an increasingly powerful method, it currently remains restricted to short polymers. Here we discuss efforts toward establishing enzymatic synthesis, replication, and evolution of synthetic genetic polymers through the engineering of polymerase enzymes found in nature. To endow natural polymerases with the ability to efficiently utilize non-cognate nucleotide substrates, novel strategies for the screening and directed evolution of polymerase function have been realized. High throughput plate-based screens, phage display, and water-in-oil emulsion technology based methods have yielded a number of engineered polymerases, some of which can synthesize and reverse transcribe synthetic genetic polymers with good efficiency and fidelity. The inception of such polymerases demonstrates that, at a basic level at least, molecular heredity is not

  17. Directed evolution of DNA polymerases: construction and screening of DNA polymerase mutant libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloeckner, Christian; Kranaster, Ramon; Marx, Andreas

    2010-06-01

    The protocols in this article describe the construction of a mutant DNA polymerase library using error-prone PCR (epPCR) as a method for gene randomization, followed by screening of the library using two different approaches. The examples described use an N-terminally truncated form of the thermostable DNA polymerase I of Thermus aquaticus (Taq DNA polymerase), namely Klentaq (KTQ), and protocols are included for the identification of variants with (1) increased DNA lesion-bypass ability and (2) enhanced selectivity for DNA match/mismatch recognition. The screening assays are based on double-stranded DNA detection (using SYBR Green I) which can be carried out using standard laboratory equipment. The described assays are designed for use in a 384-well plate format to increase screening throughput and reduce material costs. For improved accuracy and ease of liquid handling, the use of an automated liquid handling device is recommended. Curr. Protoc. Chem Biol. 2:89-109. © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Mutagenesis of the bacterial RNA polymerase alpha subunit for improvement of complex phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Marcuschamer, Daniel; Santos, Christine Nicole S; Yu, Huimin; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2009-05-01

    Combinatorial or random methods for strain engineering have been extensively used for the improvement of multigenic phenotypes and other traits for which the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Although the preferred method has traditionally been mutagenesis and selection, our laboratory has successfully used mutant transcription factors, which direct the RNA polymerase (RNAP) during transcription, to engineer complex phenotypes in microbial cells. Here, we show that it is also possible to impart new phenotypes by altering the RNAP core enzyme itself, in particular through mutagenesis of the alpha subunit of the bacterial polymerase. We present the use of this tool for improving tolerance of Escherichia coli to butanol and other solvents and for increasing the titers of two commercially relevant products, L-tyrosine and hyaluronic acid. In addition, we explore the underlying physiological changes that give rise to the solvent-tolerant mutant.

  19. New lupane triterpenoids from Solidago canadensis that inhibit the lyase activity of DNA polymerase beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedula, V S Prakash; Zhou, Bing-Nan; Gao, Zhijie; Thomas, Shannon J; Hecht, Sidney M; Kingston, David G I

    2004-12-01

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of a methyl ethyl ketone extract of Solidago canadensis L. (Asteraceae), using an assay to detect the lyase activity of DNA polymerase beta, resulted in the isolation of the four new lupane triterpenoids 1-4 and the seven known compounds lupeol, lupeyl acetate, ursolic acid, cycloartenol, cycloartenyl palmitate, alpha-amyrin acetate, and stigmasterol. The structures of the new compounds were established as 3beta-(3R-acetoxyhexadecanoyloxy)-lup-20(29)-ene (1), 3beta-(3-ketohexadecanoyloxy)-lup-20(29)-ene (2), 3beta-(3R-acetoxyhexadecanoyloxy)-29-nor-lupan-20-one (3), and 3beta-(3-hetohexadecanoyloxy)-29-nor-lupan-20-one (4), respectively, on the basis of extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic interpretation and chemical modification studies. All 11 compounds were inhibitory to the lyase activity of DNA polymerase beta.

  20. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2001-07-03

    The present invention relates to purine analogs that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such purine analogs to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  1. Problem-Solving Test: Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: polymerase chain reaction, DNA amplification, electrophoresis, breast cancer, "HER2" gene, genomic DNA, "in vitro" DNA synthesis, template, primer, Taq polymerase, 5[prime][right arrow]3[prime] elongation activity, 5[prime][right arrow]3[prime] exonuclease activity, deoxyribonucleoside…

  2. Polymerase chain reaction for the detection of Mycobacterium leprae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartskeerl, R. A.; de Wit, M. Y.; Klatser, P. R.

    1989-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using heat-stable Taq polymerase is described for the specific detection of Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy. A set of primers was selected on the basis of the nucleotide sequence of a gene encoding the 36 kDa antigen of M. leprae. With this set

  3. Role for DNA polymerase beta in response to ionizing radiation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, C.; Verwijs-Janssen, M.; Cramers, P.; Begg, A.C.; Vens, C.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence for a role of DNA polymerase beta in determining radiosensitivity is conflicting. In vitro assays show an involvement of DNA polymerase beta in single strand break repair and base excision repair of oxidative damages, both products of ionizing radiation. Nevertheless the lack of DNA

  4. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase γ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Euro, Liliya; Haapanen, Outi; Róg, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    DNA polymerase γ (Pol γ) is a key component of the mitochondrial DNA replisome and an important cause of neurological diseases. Despite the availability of its crystal structures, the molecular mechanism of DNA replication, the switch between polymerase and exonuclease activities, the site...

  5. Reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a highly specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method that allows one to detect very low transcription levels of functional gene(s) in soil. RT-qPCR helps us to know the active members of the microbial community, and their activities can be ...

  6. Rapid purification of high activity Taq DNA polymerase expressed in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simplified method is described here for the preparation of a thermostable Taq DNA polymerase enzyme from Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain DH5a carrying the pTTQ18 expression vector transformed with the Taq polymerase gene. Standard purifications were done with 1 litre batch cultures of E. coli cells and produced ...

  7. The cap-snatching endonuclease of influenza virus polymerase resides in the PA subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Alexandre; Bouvier, Denis; Crépin, Thibaut; McCarthy, Andrew A; Hart, Darren J; Baudin, Florence; Cusack, Stephen; Ruigrok, Rob W H

    2009-04-16

    The influenza virus polymerase, a heterotrimer composed of three subunits, PA, PB1 and PB2, is responsible for replication and transcription of the eight separate segments of the viral RNA genome in the nuclei of infected cells. The polymerase synthesizes viral messenger RNAs using short capped primers derived from cellular transcripts by a unique 'cap-snatching' mechanism. The PB2 subunit binds the 5' cap of host pre-mRNAs, which are subsequently cleaved after 10-13 nucleotides by the viral endonuclease, hitherto thought to reside in the PB2 (ref. 5) or PB1 (ref. 2) subunits. Here we describe biochemical and structural studies showing that the amino-terminal 209 residues of the PA subunit contain the endonuclease active site. We show that this domain has intrinsic RNA and DNA endonuclease activity that is strongly activated by manganese ions, matching observations reported for the endonuclease activity of the intact trimeric polymerase. Furthermore, this activity is inhibited by 2,4-dioxo-4-phenylbutanoic acid, a known inhibitor of the influenza endonuclease. The crystal structure of the domain reveals a structural core closely resembling resolvases and type II restriction endonucleases. The active site comprises a histidine and a cluster of three acidic residues, conserved in all influenza viruses, which bind two manganese ions in a configuration similar to other two-metal-dependent endonucleases. Two active site residues have previously been shown to specifically eliminate the polymerase endonuclease activity when mutated. These results will facilitate the optimisation of endonuclease inhibitors as potential new anti-influenza drugs.

  8. Inhibition of Taq DNA polymerase by iridoid aglycone derivates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pungitore, C R; García, C; Sotero Martín, V; Tonn, C E

    2012-11-08

    Faithful replication of DNA molecules by DNA polymerases is essential for genome integrity and correct transmission of genetic information in all living organisms. DNA polymerases have recently emerged as important cellular targets for chemical intervention in the development of anti--cancer agents. Herein we report additional synthesis of simplified bicyclic aglycones of iridoids and their biological activity against Taq DNA polymerase with the object to find out some of the likely molecular targets implicated in the biological activity showed for this kind of compounds. The compounds 14, 33 and 34 showed inhibitory activity against Taq DNA polymerase with IC(50) values of 13.47, 17.65 and 18.31 μM, respectively. These results would allow proposing to DNA polymerases as the molecular targets implicated in this bioactivity and enhance the iridoid aglycones as leader molecule to develop new drugs for cancer therapy.

  9. [Localization of lysine residues in the site of initiating substrate binding of E. coli RNA-polymerase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, M A; Lukhtanov, E A; Mustaev, A A; Rikhter, V A; Rabinov, I V

    1987-04-01

    Superselective affinity labelling of E. coli RNA polymerase in a complex with the promoter-containing fragment of T7 DNA by treatment with orto-formylphenyl ester of GMP followed by addition of [alpha-33P]UTP resulted in covalent binding of the residue--pGpU (p-radioactive phosphate) with one of lysine residues of the beta-subunit, Lys1048, Lys1051, Lys1057, Lys1065. The amino acid sequence of this region of the beta-subunit of E. coli RNA polymerase has a high extent of homology with that deduced for a region of tobacco chloroplast RNA polymerase on the basis of the nucleotide sequence of the chloroplast rpoB-like gene.

  10. Kinetic mechanism of DNA polymerase I (Klenow)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchta, R.D.; Mizrahi, V.; Benkovic, P.A.; Johnson, K.A.; Benkovic, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    The minimal kinetic scheme for DNA polymerization catalyzed by the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I (KF) from Escherichia coli has been determined with short DNA oligomers of defined sequence, labeled with [ 32 P]-nucleotides. A key feature of this scheme is a minimal two-step sequence that interconverts the ternary KF-DNA/sub n/-dNTP and KF-DNA/sub n+1/-PP/sub i/ complexes. The rate is not limited by the actual polymerization but by a separate step, possibly important in ensuring fidelity. Evidence for this sequence is supplied by the observation of biphasic kinetics in single-turnover pyrophosphorolysis experiments (the microscopic reverse of polymerization). Data analysis then provides an estimate of the internal equilibrium constant. The dissociations of DNA, dNTP, and PP/sub i/ from the various binary and ternary complexes were measured by partitioning (isotope-trapping) experiments. The rate constant for DNA dissociation from KF is sequence dependent and is rate limiting during nonprocessive DNA synthesis. The combination of single-turnover (both directions) and isotope-trapping experiments provides sufficient information to permit a quantitative evaluation of the kinetic scheme for specific DNA sequences

  11. Actinobaculum suis Detection Using Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Román Amigo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinobaculum suis is an important agent related to urinary infection in swine females. Due to its fastidious growth characteristics, the isolation of this anaerobic bacterium is difficult, thus impairing the estimation of its prevalence. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a polymerase chain reaction (PCR for the detection and identification of A. suis and then compare these results with traditional isolation methods. Bacterial isolation and PCR were performed on one hundred and ninety-two urine samples from sows and forty-five preputial swabs from boars. The results indicate that this PCR was specific for A. suis, presenting a detection limit between 1.0×101 CFU/mL and 1.0×102 CFU/mL. A. suis frequencies, as measured by PCR, were 8.9% (17/192 in sow urine samples and 82.2% (37/45 in preputial swabs. Assessed using conventional culturing techniques, none of the urine samples were positive for A. suis; however, A. suis was detected in 31.1% (14/45 of the swabs. This PCR technique was shown to be an efficient method for the detection of A. suis in urine and preputial swabs.

  12. Discovery of cyanophage genomes which contain mitochondrial DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yi-Wah; Mohr, Remus; Millard, Andrew D; Holmes, Antony B; Larkum, Anthony W; Whitworth, Anna L; Mann, Nicholas H; Scanlan, David J; Hess, Wolfgang R; Clokie, Martha R J

    2011-08-01

    DNA polymerase γ is a family A DNA polymerase responsible for the replication of mitochondrial DNA in eukaryotes. The origins of DNA polymerase γ have remained elusive because it is not present in any known bacterium, though it has been hypothesized that mitochondria may have inherited the enzyme by phage-mediated nonorthologous displacement. Here, we present an analysis of two full-length homologues of this gene, which were found in the genomes of two bacteriophages, which infect the chlorophyll-d containing cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina. Phylogenetic analyses of these phage DNA polymerase γ proteins show that they branch deeply within the DNA polymerase γ clade and therefore share a common origin with their eukaryotic homologues. We also found homologues of these phage polymerases in the environmental Community Cyberinfrastructure for Advanced Microbial Ecology Research and Analysis (CAMERA) database, which fell in the same clade. An analysis of the CAMERA assemblies containing the environmental homologues together with the filter fraction metadata indicated some of these assemblies may be of bacterial origin. We also show that the phage-encoded DNA polymerase γ is highly transcribed as the phage genomes are replicated. These findings provide data that may assist in reconstructing the evolution of mitochondria.

  13. Human DNA polymerase η accommodates RNA for strand extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yan; Egli, Martin; Guengerich, F Peter

    2017-11-03

    Ribonucleotides are the natural analogs of deoxyribonucleotides, which can be misinserted by DNA polymerases, leading to the most abundant DNA lesions in genomes. During replication, DNA polymerases tolerate patches of ribonucleotides on the parental strands to different extents. The majority of human DNA polymerases have been reported to misinsert ribonucleotides into genomes. However, only PrimPol, DNA polymerase α, telomerase, and the mitochondrial human DNA polymerase (hpol) γ have been shown to tolerate an entire RNA strand. Y-family hpol η is known for translesion synthesis opposite the UV-induced DNA lesion cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer and was recently found to incorporate ribonucleotides into DNA. Here, we report that hpol η is able to bind DNA/DNA, RNA/DNA, and DNA/RNA duplexes with similar affinities. In addition, hpol η, as well as another Y-family DNA polymerase, hpol κ, accommodates RNA as one of the two strands during primer extension, mainly by inserting dNMPs opposite unmodified templates or DNA lesions, such as 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine or cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, even in the presence of an equal amount of the DNA/DNA substrate. The discovery of this RNA-accommodating ability of hpol η redefines the traditional concept of human DNA polymerases and indicates potential new functions of hpol η in vivo . © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Theoretical analysis of transcription process with polymerase stalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingwei; Zhang, Yunxin

    2015-05-01

    Experimental evidence shows that in gene transcription RNA polymerase has the possibility to be stalled at a certain position of the transcription template. This may be due to the template damage or protein barriers. Once stalled, polymerase may backtrack along the template to the previous nucleotide to wait for the repair of the damaged site, simply bypass the barrier or damaged site and consequently synthesize an incorrect messenger RNA, or degrade and detach from the template. Thus, the effective transcription rate (the rate to synthesize correct product mRNA) and the transcription effectiveness (the ratio of the effective transcription rate to the effective transcription initiation rate) are both influenced by polymerase stalling events. So far, no theoretical model has been given to discuss the gene transcription process including polymerase stalling. In this study, based on the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process, the transcription process including polymerase stalling is analyzed theoretically. The dependence of the effective transcription rate, effective transcription initiation rate, and transcription effectiveness on the transcription initiation rate, termination rate, as well as the backtracking rate, bypass rate, and detachment (degradation) rate when stalling, are discussed in detail. The results showed that backtracking restart after polymerase stalling is an ideal mechanism to increase both the effective transcription rate and the transcription effectiveness. Without backtracking, detachment of stalled polymerase can also help to increase the effective transcription rate and transcription effectiveness. Generally, the increase of the bypass rate of the stalled polymerase will lead to the decrease of the effective transcription rate and transcription effectiveness. However, when both detachment rate and backtracking rate of the stalled polymerase vanish, the effective transcription rate may also be increased by the bypass mechanism.

  15. Mutation of the little finger domain in human DNA polymerase η alters fidelity when copying undamaged DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardslee, Renee A; Suarez, Samuel C; Toffton, Shannon M; McCulloch, Scott D

    2013-10-01

    DNA polymerase η (pol η) synthesizes past cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer and possibly 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) lesions during DNA replication. Loss of pol η is associated with an increase in mutation rate, demonstrating its indispensable role in mutation suppression. It has been recently reported that β-strand 12 (amino acids 316-324) of the little finger region correctly positions the template strand with the catalytic core of the enzyme. The authors hypothesized that modification of β-strand 12 residues would disrupt correct enzyme-DNA alignment and alter pol η's activity and fidelity. To investigate this, the authors purified proteins containing the catalytic core of the polymerase, incorporated single amino acid changes to select β-strand 12 residues, and evaluated DNA synthesis activity for each pol η. Lesion bypass efficiencies and replication fidelities when copying DNA-containing cis-syn cyclobutane thymine-thymine dimer and 8-oxoG lesions were determined and compared with the corresponding values for the wild-type polymerase. The results confirm the importance of the β-strand in polymerase function and show that fidelity is most often altered when undamaged DNA is copied. Additionally, it is shown that DNA-protein contacts distal to the active site can significantly affect the fidelity of synthesis. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Revealing the role of the product metal in DNA polymerase β catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Lalith; Freudenthal, Bret D; Beard, William A; Pedersen, Lee G; Wilson, Samuel H

    2017-03-17

    DNA polymerases catalyze a metal-dependent nucleotidyl transferase reaction during extension of a DNA strand using the complementary strand as a template. The reaction has long been considered to require two magnesium ions. Recently, a third active site magnesium ion was identified in some DNA polymerase product crystallographic structures, but its role is not known. Using quantum mechanical/ molecular mechanical calculations of polymerase β, we find that a third magnesium ion positioned near the newly identified product metal site does not alter the activation barrier for the chemical reaction indicating that it does not have a role in the forward reaction. This is consistent with time-lapse crystallographic structures following insertion of Sp-dCTPαS. Although sulfur substitution deters product metal binding, this has only a minimal effect on the rate of the forward reaction. Surprisingly, monovalent sodium or ammonium ions, positioned in the product metal site, lowered the activation barrier. These calculations highlight the impact that an active site water network can have on the energetics of the forward reaction and how metals or enzyme side chains may interact with the network to modulate the reaction barrier. These results also are discussed in the context of earlier findings indicating that magnesium at the product metal position blocks the reverse pyrophosphorolysis reaction. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2017.

  17. Pathogenicity in POLG syndromes: DNA polymerase gamma pathogenicity prediction server and database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurminen, Anssi; Farnum, Gregory A; Kaguni, Laurie S

    2017-06-01

    DNA polymerase gamma (POLG) is the replicative polymerase responsible for maintaining mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Disorders related to its functionality are a major cause of mitochondrial disease. The clinical spectrum of POLG syndromes includes Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS), myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA), the ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) and progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO). We have collected all publicly available POLG-related patient data and analyzed it using our pathogenic clustering model to provide a new research and clinical tool in the form of an online server. The server evaluates the pathogenicity of both previously reported and novel mutations. There are currently 176 unique point mutations reported and found in mitochondrial patients in the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of POLG, POLG . The mutations are distributed nearly uniformly along the length of the primary amino acid sequence of the gene. Our analysis shows that most of the mutations are recessive, and that the reported dominant mutations cluster within the polymerase active site in the tertiary structure of the POLG enzyme. The POLG Pathogenicity Prediction Server (http://polg.bmb.msu.edu) is targeted at clinicians and scientists studying POLG disorders, and aims to provide the most current available information regarding the pathogenicity of POLG mutations.

  18. Use of an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction assay to genotype pyrethroid resistant strains of Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, F D; Davey, R B; Miller, R J

    2001-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction-based assay was developed to detect the presence of a pyrethroid resistance-associated amino acid substitution in Boophilus microplus (Canestrini). The assay uses a simple method for the extraction of genomic DNA from individual larvae and genotypes individuals for the presence of a Phe-->Ile amino acid substitution in the S6 transmembrane segment of domain III of the para-like sodium channel, clearly distinguishing heterozygotes from homozygotes. High frequencies for this amino acid substitution were found in the Corrales and San Felipe strains, which have target site insensitivity mechanisms for pyrethroid resistance. The Caporal resistant strain contained lower yet substantial numbers of amino acid-substituted alleles. Low amino acid substitution frequencies were found in the susceptible reference Gonzales strain and the Coatzacoalcos strain, which has metabolic esterase-mediated pyrethroid resistance. The amino acid substitution was not found in six other strains that were susceptible to pyrethroids.

  19. Improvement of specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improvement of specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the identification of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae. H Ying, Z Nian-zhang, Z Ping, C Yue-feng, G Peng-cheng, Z Jian-jun, L Zhong-xin ...

  20. Simplex and triplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Simplex and triplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for identification of three medically important Candida species. Nabil S Harmal, Alireza Khodavandi, Mohammed A Alshawsh, Farida Jamal, Zamberi Sekawi, Ng Kee Peng, Pei Pei Chong ...

  1. Tetrahydrobenzothiophene inhibitors of hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporte, M G; Lessen, T A; Leister, L; Cebzanov, D; Amparo, E; Faust, C; Ortlip, D; Bailey, T R; Nitz, T J; Chunduru, S K; Young, D C; Burns, C J

    2006-01-01

    A novel series of selective HCV NS5B RNA dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors has been disclosed. These compounds contain an appropriately substituted tetrahydrobenzothiophene scaffold. This communication will detail the SAR and activities of this series.

  2. Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Capability in Space

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is enabling the real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) technology in space. In space, the real-time PCR technology can be used...

  3. Interstitial contacts in an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Andres B.; Wang, Jing; Tanner, Elizabeth J.; Spagnolo, Jeannie F.; Kirkegaard, Karla; Bullitt, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic activities can be facilitated by ordered enzymatic arrays that co-localize and orient enzymes and their substrates. The purified RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from poliovirus self-assembles to form two-dimensional lattices, possibly facilitating the assembly of viral RNA replication complexes on the cytoplasmic face of intracellular membranes. Creation of a two-dimensional lattice requires at least two different molecular contacts between polymerase molecules. One set of polymerase contacts, between the ‘thumb’ domain of one polymerase and the back of the ‘palm’ domain of another, has been previously defined. To identify the second interface needed for lattice formation and to test its function in viral RNA synthesis, a hybrid approach of both electron microscopic and biochemical evaluation of wild-type and mutant viral polymerases was used to evaluate computationally generated models of this second interface. A unique solution satisfied all constraints and predicted a two-dimensional structure formed from antiparallel arrays of polymerase fibers that use contacts from the flexible amino-terminal region of the protein. Enzymes that contained mutations in this newly defined interface did not form lattices and altered the structure of wild-type lattices. When reconstructed into virus, mutations that disrupt lattice assembly exhibited growth defects, synthetic lethality, or both, supporting the function of the oligomeric lattice in infected cells. Understanding the structure of polymerase lattices within the multimeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex should faciliate antiviral drug design and provide a precedent for other positive-strand RNA viruses. PMID:21839092

  4. Norovirus Polymerase Fidelity Contributes to Viral Transmission In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arias Esteban, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Ghurburrun, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    viral pathogenesis using the murine norovirus model, as increasing viral mutation frequency using a mutagenic nucleoside resulted in clearance of a persistent infection in mice. Given the role of replication fidelity and genetic diversity in pathogenesis, we have now investigated whether polymerase...... and that maintaining diversity is important for the establishment of infection. This work supports the hypothesis that the reduced polymerase fidelity of the pandemic GII.4 human norovirus isolates may contribute to their global dominance....

  5. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus DNA polymerase C terminus is required for nuclear localization and viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guozhong; Krell, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    The DNA polymerase (DNApol) of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is essential for viral DNA replication. The DNApol exonuclease and polymerase domains are highly conserved and are considered functional in DNA replication. However, the role of the DNApol C terminus has not yet been characterized. To identify whether only the exonuclease and polymerase domains are sufficient for viral DNA replication, several DNApol C-terminal truncations were cloned into a dnapol-null AcMNPV bacmid with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. Surprisingly, most of the truncation constructs, despite containing both exonuclease and polymerase domains, could not rescue viral DNA replication and viral production in bacmid-transfected Sf21 cells. Moreover, GFP fusions of these same truncations failed to localize to the nucleus. Truncation of the C-terminal amino acids 950 to 984 showed nuclear localization but allowed for only limited and delayed viral spread. The C terminus contains a typical bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) motif at residues 804 to 827 and a monopartite NLS motif at residues 939 to 948. Each NLS, as a GFP fusion peptide, localized to the nucleus, but both NLSs were required for nuclear localization of DNApol. Alanine substitutions in a highly conserved baculovirus DNApol sequence at AcMNPV DNApol amino acids 972 to 981 demonstrated its importance for virus production and DNA replication. Collectively, the data indicated that the C terminus of AcMNPV DNApol contains two NLSs and a conserved motif, all of which are required for nuclear localization of DNApol, viral DNA synthesis, and virus production. The baculovirus DNA polymerase (DNApol) is a highly specific polymerase that allows viral DNA synthesis and hence virus replication in infected insect cells. We demonstrated that the exonuclease and polymerase domains of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) alone are insufficient for viral

  6. Enhancement of DNA polymerase activity in potato tuber slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Akira; Imaseki, Hidemasa

    1977-01-01

    DNA polymerase was extracted from potato (Soleum tuberosum L.) tuber discs and the temporal correlation of its activity change to DNA synthesis in vivo was examined during aging of the discs. Most of the DNA polymerase was recovered as a bound form in the 18,000 x g precipitate. Reaction with the bound-form enzyme was dependent on the presence of four deoxynucleoside triphosphates, Mg 2+ , and a template. ''Activated'' DNA and heat-denatured DNA, but not native DNA, were utilized as templates. The polymerase activity was sensitive to SH reagents. Fresh discs, which do not synthesize DNA in vivo, contained a significant amount of DNA polymerase and its activity increased linearly with time until 48 hr after slicing and became four times that of fresh discs after 72 hr, whereas the activity of DNA synthesis in vivo increased with time and decreased after reaching a maximum at 30 hr. Cycloheximide inhibited the enhancement of polymerase activity. DNA polymerase from aged and fresh discs had identical requirements for deoxynucleotides and a template in their reactions, sensitivity to SH reagent, and affinity to thymidine triphosphate. (auth.)

  7. PCR fidelity of pfu DNA polymerase and other thermostable DNA polymerases.

    OpenAIRE

    Cline, J; Braman, J C; Hogrefe, H H

    1996-01-01

    The replication fidelities of Pfu, Taq, Vent, Deep Vent and UlTma DNA polymerases were compared using a PCR-based forward mutation assay. Average error rates (mutation frequency/bp/duplication) increased as follows: Pfu (1.3 x 10(-6)) < Deep Vent (2.7 x 10(-6)) < Vent (2.8 x 10(-6)) < Taq (8.0 x 10(-6)) < < exo- Pfu and UlTma (approximately 5 x 10(-5)). Buffer optimization experiments indicated that Pfu fidelity was highest in the presence of 2-3 mM MgSO4 and 100-300 microM each dNTP and at p...

  8. Norovirus Polymerase Fidelity Contributes to Viral TransmissionIn Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Ghurburrun, Elsa; Bailey, Dalan; Goodfellow, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Intrahost genetic diversity and replication error rates are intricately linked to RNA virus pathogenesis, with alterations in viral polymerase fidelity typically leading to attenuation during infections in vivo . We have previously shown that norovirus intrahost genetic diversity also influences viral pathogenesis using the murine norovirus model, as increasing viral mutation frequency using a mutagenic nucleoside resulted in clearance of a persistent infection in mice. Given the role of replication fidelity and genetic diversity in pathogenesis, we have now investigated whether polymerase fidelity can also impact virus transmission between susceptible hosts. We have identified a high-fidelity norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase mutant (I391L) which displays delayed replication kinetics in vivo but not in cell culture. The I391L polymerase mutant also exhibited lower transmission rates between susceptible hosts than the wild-type virus and, most notably, another replication defective mutant that has wild-type levels of polymerase fidelity. These results provide the first experimental evidence that norovirus polymerase fidelity contributes to virus transmission between hosts and that maintaining diversity is important for the establishment of infection. This work supports the hypothesis that the reduced polymerase fidelity of the pandemic GII.4 human norovirus isolates may contribute to their global dominance. IMPORTANCE Virus replication fidelity and hence the intrahost genetic diversity of viral populations are known to be intricately linked to viral pathogenesis and tropism as well as to immune and antiviral escape during infection. In this study, we investigated whether changes in replication fidelity can impact the ability of a virus to transmit between susceptible hosts by the use of a mouse model for norovirus. We show that a variant encoding a high-fidelity polymerase is transmitted less efficiently between mice than the wild-type strain. This constitutes

  9. Investigation of Nascent Base Pair and Polymerase Behavior in the Presence of Mismatches in DNA Polymerase I Using Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Andrew; Humphries, Kathryn; Farmer, Ellen; Cline, Gene; Miller, Bill R

    2018-02-26

    Optimizing DNA polymerases for a broad range of tasks requires an understanding of the factors influencing polymerase fidelity, but many details of polymerase behavior remain unknown, especially in the presence of mismatched nascent base pairs. Using molecular dynamics, the large fragment of Bacillus stearothermophilus DNA polymerase I is simulated in the presence of all 16 possible standard nucleoside triphosphate-template (dNTP-dN) pairs, including four Watson-Crick pairs and 12 mismatches. The precatalytic steps of nucleotide addition from nucleotide insertion to immediately preceding catalysis are explored using three starting structures representing different stages of nucleotide addition. From these simulations, interactions between dNTPs and the DNA-protein complex formed by the polymerase are elucidated. Patterns of large-scale conformational shifts, classification of nucleotide pairs based on composition, and investigation of the roles of residues interacting with dNTPs are completed on 50+ μs of simulation. The role of molecular dynamics in studies of polymerase behavior is discussed.

  10. Nucleotide-mimetic synthetic ligands for DNA-recognizing enzymes One-step purification of Pfu DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissis, S; Labrou, N E; Clonis, Y D

    2006-07-28

    The commercial availability of DNA polymerases has revolutionized molecular biotechnology and certain sectors of the bio-industry. Therefore, the development of affinity adsorbents for purification of DNA polymerases is of academic interest and practical importance. In the present study we describe the design, synthesis and evaluation of a combinatorial library of novel affinity ligands for the purification of DNA polymerases (Pols). Pyrococcus furiosus DNA polymerase (Pfu Pol) was employed as a proof-of-principle example. Affinity ligand design was based on mimicking the natural interactions between deoxynucleoside-triphosphates (dNTPs) and the B-motif, a conserved structural moiety found in Pol-I and Pol-II family of enzymes. Solid-phase 'structure-guided' combinatorial chemistry was used to construct a library of 26 variants of the B-motif-binding 'lead' ligand X-Trz-Y (X is a purine derivative and Y is an aliphatic/aromatic sulphonate or phosphonate derivative) using 1,3,5-triazine (Trz) as the scaffold for assembly. The 'lead' ligand showed complementarity against a Lys and a Tyr residue of the polymerase B-motif. The ligand library was screened for its ability to bind and purify Pfu Pol from Escherichia coli extract. One immobilized ligand (oABSAd), bearing 9-aminoethyladenine (AEAd) and sulfanilic acid (oABS) linked on the triazine scaffold, displayed the highest purifying ability and binding capacity (0,55 mg Pfu Pol/g wet gel). Adsorption equilibrium studies with this affinity ligand and Pfu Pol determined a dissociation constant (K(D)) of 83 nM for the respective complex. The oABSAd affinity adsorbent was exploited in the development of a facile Pfu Pol purification protocol, affording homogeneous enzyme (>99% purity) in a single chromatography step. Quality control tests showed that Pfu Pol purified on the B-motif-complementing ligand is free of nucleic acids and contaminating nuclease activities, therefore, suitable for experimental use.

  11. A Point Mutation in the RNA-Binding Domain of Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 2 Nucleoprotein Elicits Abnormally Enhanced Polymerase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yusuke; Ohta, Keisuke; Kolakofsky, Daniel; Nishio, Machiko

    2017-05-01

    The genome RNA of human parainfluenza virus type 2 (hPIV2) that acts as the template for the polymerase complex is entirely encapsidated by the nucleoprotein (NP). Recently, the crystal structure of NP of PIV5, a virus closely related to hPIV2, was resolved in association with RNA. Ten amino acids that contact the bound RNA were identified and are strictly conserved between PIV5 and hPIV2 NP. Mutation of hPIV2 NP Q202 (which contacts a base rather than the RNA backbone) to various amino acids resulted in an over 30-fold increase of polymerase activity as evidenced by a minireplicon assay, even though the RNA-binding affinity was unaltered. Using various modified minireplicons, we found that the enhanced reporter gene expression could be accounted for by increased minigenome replication, whereas mRNA synthesis itself was not affected by Q202 mutation. Moreover, the enhanced activities were still observed in minigenomes partially lacking the leader sequence and which were not of hexamer genome length. Unexpectedly, recombinant hPIV2 possessing the NP Q202A mutation could not be recovered from cDNA. IMPORTANCE We examined the importance of amino acids in the putative RNA-binding domain of hPIV2 NP for polymerase activity using minireplicons. Abnormally enhanced genome replication was observed upon substitution mutation of the NP Q202 position to various amino acids. Surprisingly, this mutation enabled polymerase to use minigenomes that were partially lacking the leader sequence and not of hexamer genome length. This mutation does not affect fundamental properties of NP, e.g., recognition of gene junctional and editing signals. However, the strongly enhanced polymerase activity may not be viable for the infectious life cycle. This report highlights the potential of the polymerase complex with point mutations in NP and helps our detailed understanding of the molecular basis of gene expression. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. DNA polymerase-α regulates type I interferon activation through cytosolic RNA:DNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starokadomskyy, Petro; Gemelli, Terry; Rios, Jonathan J.; Xing, Chao; Wang, Richard C.; Li, Haiying; Pokatayev, Vladislav; Dozmorov, Igor; Khan, Shaheen; Miyata, Naoteru; Fraile, Guadalupe; Raj, Prithvi; Xu, Zhe; Xu, Zigang; Ma, Lin; Lin, Zhimiao; Wang, Huijun; Yang, Yong; Ben-Amitai, Dan; Orenstein, Naama; Mussaffi, Huda; Baselga, Eulalia; Tadini, Gianluca; Grunebaum, Eyal; Sarajlija, Adrijan; Krzewski, Konrad; Wakeland, Edward K.; Yan, Nan; de la Morena, Maria Teresa; Zinn, Andrew R.; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant nucleic acids generated during viral replication are the main trigger for antiviral immunity, and mutations disrupting nucleic acid metabolism can lead to autoinflammatory disorders. Here we investigated the etiology of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR), a primary immunodeficiency with autoinflammatory features. We discovered that XLPDR is caused by an intronic mutation that disrupts expression of POLA1, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-α. Unexpectedly, POLA1 deficiency results in increased type I interferon production. This enzyme is necessary for RNA:DNA primer synthesis during DNA replication and strikingly, POLA1 is also required for the synthesis of cytosolic RNA:DNA, which directly modulates interferon activation. Altogether, this work identified POLA1 as a critical regulator of the type I interferon response. PMID:27019227

  13. A novel role for D-alanylation of lipoteichoic acid of enterococcus faecalis in urinary tract infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Wobser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterococci are the third most common cause of healthcare-associated infections, which include urinary tract infections, bacteremia and endocarditis. Cell-surface structures such as lipoteichoic acid (LTA have been poorly examined in E. faecalis, especially with respect to urinary tract infections (UTIs. The dlt operon is responsible for the D-alanylation of LTA and includes the gene dltA, which encodes the D-alanyl carrier protein ligase (Dcl. The involvement of LTA in UTI infection by E. faecalis has not been studied so far. Here, we examined the role of teichoic acid alanylation in the adhesion of enterococci to uroepithelial cells. RESULTS: In a mouse model of urinary tract infection, we showed that E. faecalis 12030ΔdltA mutant colonizes uroepithelial surfaces more efficiently than wild type bacteria. We also demonstrated that this mutant adhered four fold better to human bladder carcinoma cell line T24 compared to the wild type strain. Bacterial adherence could be significantly inhibited by purified lipoteichoic acid (LTA and inhibition was specific. CONCLUSION: In contrast to bacteraemia model and adherence to colon surfaces, E. faecalis 12030ΔdltA mutant colonized uroepithelial surfaces more efficiently than wild-type bacteria. In the case of the uroepithelial surface the adherence to specific host cells could be prevented by purified LTA. Our results therefore suggest a novel function of alanylation of LTA in E. faecalis.

  14. File list: Pol.Kid.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Kidney S...X1206068,SRX1206073,SRX1206074,SRX1206072,SRX1206071,SRX003882,SRX367323 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Kid.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Neu.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Neural S...6,SRX743838,SRX743832,SRX743834,SRX743840 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Neu.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Myo.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Myo.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Adp.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Adipoc...yte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Embryo SR...7582,SRX050604,SRX050605,SRX013077 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Prosta...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Prs.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Myo.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Myo.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Bon.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bon.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Bone SRX...,SRX351408 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bon.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.ALL.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All c...ell types http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.ALL.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Neu.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Neural S...1,SRX099887,SRX099886,SRX743834,SRX743832 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Neu.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.CDV.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Cardio...vascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Lar.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lar.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Larvae... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Lar.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Kid.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Kidney... SRX016996 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Kid.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Pan.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Pancre...as http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Pan.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III All ce...ll types SRX395531,SRX331268,SRX331270,SRX395532 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Lng.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Lung S...RX016555,SRX150101,SRX150102 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Lng.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Oth.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Others S...RX1027435,SRX668218,SRX1027436,SRX1027434,SRX1027433,SRX099879,SRX099880 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Oth.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Gonad ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Lng.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Lung S...RX016555,SRX150101,SRX150102 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Lng.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Kid.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Kidney S...SRX1206072,SRX1206066,SRX326423,SRX1206067,SRX003883,SRX003882,SRX367323 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Kid.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Emb.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Embryo... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Utr.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Utr.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Uterus... SRX018606,SRX017002,SRX017001 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Utr.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Epider...mis SRX016997 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Bon.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bon.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Bone SRX...,SRX351408 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bon.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Embryo SR...7582,SRX013077,SRX050604,SRX050605 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Plc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Placenta... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Kid.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Kidney S...SRX128201,SRX128200,SRX003882,SRX1206065,SRX1206066,SRX1206067,SRX367323 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Kid.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Kid.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Kidney... SRX016996 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Kid.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Gon.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Gonad ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Gon.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Plc.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Placen...ta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Emb.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Embryo S...,SRX043869 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Adp.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Adipocyt...e SRX682084,SRX682086,SRX682085,SRX682083 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Epd.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Epidermi...245,SRX663247,SRX807622 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Utr.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Utr.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Uterus S...SRX573070,SRX027921,SRX1048949,SRX1136641,SRX1136638,SRX099217 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Utr.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Cardiova...,SRX080152,SRX080153,SRX367018,SRX367016 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Embryo S...,SRX043867 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Gon.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Gonad ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Gon.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Unclassi...fied http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III All ce...,SRX150396,SRX015144,SRX150101,SRX150102 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Pan.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Pancre...as http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Pan.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Adl.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adl.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Adult ...SRX395531,SRX331268,SRX331270,SRX395532 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Adl.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.YSt.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.YSt.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Yeast... strain http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.YSt.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Embryo S...,SRX043867 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Utr.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Utr.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Uterus... SRX017001,SRX018606,SRX017002 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Utr.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Embryo S...,SRX043866 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.ALL.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All c...ell types http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.ALL.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Myo.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Muscle h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Myo.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Plc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Placen...ta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Adl.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adl.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Adult ...SRX395531,SRX331268,SRX331270,SRX395532 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Adl.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Plc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Placen...ta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Myo.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Myo.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Unclassi...fied http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Plc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Placen...ta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Gon.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Gonad ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Gon.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Myo.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Muscle h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Myo.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Epd.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Epider...mis SRX016997 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All cell...,SRX1013886,SRX1013900 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Adp.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Adipoc...yte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Embryo... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Embryo... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Liv.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Liv.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Liver SR...1013886 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Liv.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Bon.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bon.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Bone h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bon.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Liv.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Liv.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Liv.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Pup.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pup.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Pupae SRX...013069 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Pup.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Oth.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Oth.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Dig.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Dig.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Digestiv...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Dig.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Bld.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Blood ...SRX150560,SRX018610,SRX015143,SRX017006,SRX150396,SRX015144 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Oth.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Oth.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Embryo... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Dig.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Dig.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Digest...ive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Dig.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Bon.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bon.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Bone h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bon.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Lar.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lar.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Larvae... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Lar.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Cardio...vascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Epidermi...247,SRX080162,SRX807622 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Epd.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Epider...mis SRX016997 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Bld.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Blood SR...,SRX153079,SRX017717,SRX103447,SRX386121,SRX038919,SRX038920,SRX080132 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Bon.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bon.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Bone h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bon.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.PSC.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Plurip...otent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Pup.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pup.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Pupae SRX...013069 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Pup.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Dig.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Dig.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Digestiv...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Dig.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Kid.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Kidney S...SRX1206066,SRX1206067,SRX003882,SRX003883,SRX1206065,SRX367323,SRX326416 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Kid.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Pan.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Pancreas... SRX190244 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Pan.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All c...ell types http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Epd.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Epidermi...246,SRX663247,SRX807622 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Dig.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Dig.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Digest...ive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Dig.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Gonad ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Gon.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Neu.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Neural... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Neu.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.CDV.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Cardiova...,SRX346933,SRX346936,SRX367018,SRX367016 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Bld.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Blood ...SRX017006,SRX015143,SRX150560,SRX018610,SRX150396,SRX015144 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Oth.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Others S...RX1027436,SRX1027435,SRX1027434,SRX1027433,SRX668218,SRX099880,SRX099879 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Oth.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Brs.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Breast... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Brs.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Plc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Placenta... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.YSt.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.YSt.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Yeast... strain http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.YSt.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All cell ...013077,SRX050604,SRX050605 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.ALL.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Epd.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Epidermi...248,SRX663247,SRX807622 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Embryo SR...7582,SRX050604,SRX050605,SRX013073 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.ALL.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All cell...0,SRX1013886,SRX016705 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.ALL.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Adl.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adl.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Adult SR...SRX554718,SRX043965,SRX043963,SRX043964 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Adl.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Lar.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lar.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Larvae SR...SRX151962,SRX182775,SRX661503,SRX013070,SRX013072,SRX013113,SRX013082,SRX151961 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Lar.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Unclassif...ied SRX110774 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Lng.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Lung SRX... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Lng.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Unc.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Kid.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Kidney... SRX016996 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Kid.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.ALL.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III All ce...,SRX017001,SRX018606,SRX150396,SRX015144 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.ALL.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Plc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Placenta... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Plc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.ALL.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All cell...3874,SRX003817,SRX043845,SRX043964,SRX043967,SRX043881,SRX043879 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.ALL.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Brs.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Breast... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Brs.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Lar.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lar.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Larvae... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Lar.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Pan.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Pancre...as http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Pan.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II All c...ell types http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Utr.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Utr.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Uterus S...,SRX245742,SRX811393,SRX1136641,SRX099216,SRX1048949,SRX099217 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Utr.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.PSC.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Plurip...otent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Neu.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Neural... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Neu.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Oth.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Others ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Oth.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Adl.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adl.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Adult SR...SRX1388757,SRX1388756 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Adl.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.ALL.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III All cel...l types ERX204069 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.ALL.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.ALL.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II All cell ...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.ALL.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Bld.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Blood ...SRX017006,SRX150560,SRX015143,SRX018610,SRX150396,SRX015144 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Liv.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Liv.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Liver SRX...1,SRX020172,SRX020181,SRX020178,SRX193438,SRX193437,SRX020174,ERX204060,ERX204064 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Liv.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.ALL.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III All cel...l types ERX204069 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.ALL.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Lar.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lar.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Larvae SR...SRX661503,SRX026743,SRX013070,SRX013072,SRX182775,SRX013113,SRX013082,SRX151961 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Lar.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Myo.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Muscle SR.../dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Myo.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Adp.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Adipocyt...e SRX682084,SRX682086,SRX682083,SRX682085 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Bld.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Blood SRX...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bld.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III All ce...,SRX018606,SRX150396,SRX015144,SRX017002 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Brs.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Breast ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Neu.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Neural... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Neu.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Oth.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Others SR...X736457,SRX736456,SRX112963,SRX143827,SRX335666,SRX112981,SRX143834,SRX957689 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Oth.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Spl.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Spl.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Spleen ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Spl.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Unc.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Unclass...ified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Unc.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Bld.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Blood h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bld.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Neu.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Neural ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.YSt.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.YSt.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Yeast... strain SRX092435,SRX360917,SRX360914,SRX497380,SRX497382,SRX497381,SRX360915 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.YSt.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Pan.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Pancre...as http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Pan.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Neu.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Neural SR...,SRX685285,SRX217736 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Prs.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Prosta...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Prs.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.CDV.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Cardiov...ascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.CDV.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Unclass...ified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Kid.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Kidney SR...X661587,SRX062964,SRX143850,SRX236087,SRX020250 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Kid.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.ALL.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III All ce...ll types SRX331268,SRX331270,SRX395531 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.ALL.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Emb.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Embryo SR...0604,SRX013077,SRX050605,SRX197581 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Pan.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Pancrea...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Pan.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Myo.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Muscle ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Myo.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Plc.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Plc.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Placent...a http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Plc.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.ALL.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II All cell ...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.ALL.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Adp.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Adipoc...yte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Adp.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Embryo ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Prs.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Prostat...e http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Prs.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Bon.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bon.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Bone ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bon.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Unclassi...fied http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Unc.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.CDV.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Cardiovas...X320034,SRX346170,SRX346169,SRX373605,SRX680476 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.CDV.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Adl.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adl.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Adult SR...SRX005635,SRX554718,SRX043963,SRX043965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Adl.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Myo.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Muscle SR.../dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Myo.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Oth.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Others ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Oth.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Utr.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Utr.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Uterus SR...X508008,SRX129063,SRX314629,SRX508009,SRX129064,SRX314630 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Utr.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Neu.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Neural ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Gon.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Gonad ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Gon.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Epd.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Epidermis... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Epd.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Lng.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Lung SRX1...43816,SRX062976,SRX020252 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Lng.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Myo.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Muscle ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Myo.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Unc.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Lng.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Lung S...RX016555,SRX150102,SRX150101 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Lng.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Bld.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Blood ...SRX017006,SRX015143,SRX150560,SRX018610,SRX150396,SRX015144 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Oth.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Others SR...X143827,SRX112963,SRX736456,SRX736457,SRX112981,SRX143834,SRX335666,SRX957689 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Oth.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Spl.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Spl.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Spleen SR...X062981,SRX143838,SRX020253 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Spl.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.CDV.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Cardiova...,SRX367018,SRX367016,SRX112014,SRX112013 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Embryo h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Utr.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Utr.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Uterus SR...X508008,SRX508009,SRX129063,SRX129064,SRX314629,SRX314630 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Utr.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Dig.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Dig.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Digesti...ve tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Dig.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Unc.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Unclassif...ied SRX254629 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Unc.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Adp.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Adp.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Adipocyte... SRX800011,SRX800010,SRX341031,SRX341032,SRX341029,SRX800016,SRX800017,SRX341030 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Adp.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Embryo SR...SRX099707 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.YSt.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.YSt.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Yeast... strain http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.YSt.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Lar.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Lar.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell ce10 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Larvae h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Pol.Lar.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Bon.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bon.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Bone ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bon.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Emb.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Embryo ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  14. The structure and function of an RNA polymerase interaction domain in the PcrA/UvrD helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kelly; Lin, Chia-Liang; Smith, Abigail J; Cronin, Nora; Fisher, Gemma; Eftychidis, Vasileios; McGlynn, Peter; Savery, Nigel J; Wigley, Dale B; Dillingham, Mark S

    2017-04-20

    The PcrA/UvrD helicase functions in multiple pathways that promote bacterial genome stability including the suppression of conflicts between replication and transcription and facilitating the repair of transcribed DNA. The reported ability of PcrA/UvrD to bind and backtrack RNA polymerase (1,2) might be relevant to these functions, but the structural basis for this activity is poorly understood. In this work, we define a minimal RNA polymerase interaction domain in PcrA, and report its crystal structure at 1.5 Å resolution. The domain adopts a Tudor-like fold that is similar to other RNA polymerase interaction domains, including that of the prototype transcription-repair coupling factor Mfd. Removal or mutation of the interaction domain reduces the ability of PcrA/UvrD to interact with and to remodel RNA polymerase complexes in vitro. The implications of this work for our understanding of the role of PcrA/UvrD at the interface of DNA replication, transcription and repair are discussed. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. A small-RNA enhancer of viral polymerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jasmine T; Zlatev, Ivan; Aggarwal, Shilpa; Subramanian, Sailakshmi; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Kim, Baek; Manoharan, Muthiah; tenOever, Benjamin R

    2012-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is an unremitting virus that results in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Key to the viral life cycle is the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), a heterotrimeric complex responsible for both transcription and replication of the segmented genome. Here, we demonstrate that the viral polymerase utilizes a small RNA enhancer to regulate enzymatic activity and maintain stoichiometric balance of the viral genome. We demonstrate that IAV synthesizes small viral RNAs (svRNAs) that interact with the viral RdRp in order to promote genome replication in a segment-specific manner. svRNAs localize to the nucleus, the site of IAV replication, are synthesized from the positive-sense genomic intermediate, and interact within a novel RNA binding channel of the polymerase PA subunit. Synthetic svRNAs promote polymerase activity in vitro, while loss of svRNA inhibits viral RNA synthesis in a segment-specific manner. Taking these observations together, we mechanistically define svRNA as a small regulatory enhancer RNA, which functions to promote genome replication and maintain segment balance through allosteric modulation of polymerase activity.

  16. Optimal conditions to use Pfu exo(-) DNA polymerase for highly efficient ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angers, M; Cloutier, J F; Castonguay, A; Drouin, R

    2001-08-15

    Ligation-Mediated Polymerase Chain Reaction (LMPCR) is the most sensitive sequencing technique available to map single-stranded DNA breaks at the nucleotide level of resolution using genomic DNA. LMPCR has been adapted to map DNA damage and reveal DNA-protein interactions inside living cells. However, the sequence context (GC content), the global break frequency and the current combination of DNA polymerases used in LMPCR affect the quality of the results. In this study, we developed and optimized an LMPCR protocol adapted for Pyrococcus furiosus exo(-) DNA polymerase (Pfu exo(-)). The relative efficiency of Pfu exo(-) was compared to T7-modified DNA polymerase (Sequenase 2.0) at the primer extension step and to Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase (Taq) at the PCR amplification step of LMPCR. At all break frequencies tested, Pfu exo(-) proved to be more efficient than Sequenase 2.0. During both primer extension and PCR amplification steps, the ratio of DNA molecules per unit of DNA polymerase was the main determinant of the efficiency of Pfu exo(-), while the efficiency of Taq was less affected by this ratio. Substitution of NaCl for KCl in the PCR reaction buffer of Taq strikingly improved the efficiency of the DNA polymerase. Pfu exo(-) was clearly more efficient than Taq to specifically amplify extremely GC-rich genomic DNA sequences. Our results show that a combination of Pfu exo(-) at the primer extension step and Taq at the PCR amplification step is ideal for in vivo DNA analysis and DNA damage mapping using LMPCR.

  17. Antiviral activity of double-stranded RNA-binding protein PACT against influenza A virus mediated via suppression of viral RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chi-Ping; Yuen, Chun-Kit; Cheung, Pak-Hin Hinson; Fung, Sin-Yee; Lui, Pak-Yin; Chen, Honglin; Kok, Kin-Hang; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2018-03-07

    PACT is a double-stranded RNA-binding protein that has been implicated in host-influenza A virus (IAV) interaction. PACT facilitates the action of RIG-I in the activation of the type I IFN response, which is suppressed by the viral nonstructural protein NS1. PACT is also known to interact with the IAV RNA polymerase subunit PA. Exactly how PACT exerts its antiviral activity during IAV infection remains to be elucidated. In the current study, we demonstrated the interplay between PACT and IAV polymerase. Induction of IFN-β by the IAV RNP complex was most robust when both RIG-I and PACT were expressed. PACT-dependent activation of IFN-β production was suppressed by the IAV polymerase subunits, polymerase acidic protein, polymerase basic protein 1 (PB1), and PB2. PACT associated with PA, PB1, and PB2. Compromising PACT in IAV-infected A549 cells resulted in the augmentation of viral RNA (vRNA) transcription and replication and IFN-β production. Furthermore, vRNA replication was boosted by knockdown of PACT in both A549 cells and IFN-deficient Vero cells. Thus, the antiviral activity of PACT is mediated primarily via its interaction with and inhibition of IAV polymerase. Taken together, our findings reveal a new facet of the host-IAV interaction in which the interplay between PACT and IAV polymerase affects the outcome of viral infection and antiviral response.-Chan, C.-P., Yuen, C.-K., Cheung, P.-H. H., Fung, S.-Y., Lui, P.-Y., Chen, H., Kok, K.-H., Jin, D.-Y. Antiviral activity of double-stranded RNA-binding protein PACT against influenza A virus mediated via suppression of viral RNA polymerase.

  18. Two modes of interaction of the single-stranded DNA-binding protein of bacteriophage T7 with the DNA polymerase-thioredoxin complex

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Sharmistha

    2010-04-06

    The DNA polymerase encoded by bacteriophage T7 has low processivity. Escherichia coli thioredoxin binds to a segment of 76 residues in the thumb subdomain of the polymerase and increases the processivity. The binding of thioredoxin leads to the formation of two basic loops, loops A and B, located within the thioredoxin-binding domain (TBD). Both loops interact with the acidic C terminus of the T7 helicase. A relatively weak electrostatic mode involves the C-terminal tail of the helicase and the TBD, whereas a high affinity interaction that does not involve the C-terminal tail occurs when the polymerase is in a polymerization mode. T7 gene 2.5 single-stranded DNA-binding protein (gp2.5) also has an acidic C-terminal tail. gp2.5 also has two modes of interaction with the polymerase, but both involve the C-terminal tail of gp2.5. An electrostatic interaction requires the basic residues in loops A and B, and gp2.5 binds to both loops with similar affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance. When the polymerase is in a polymerization mode, the C terminus of gene 2.5 protein interacts with the polymerase in regions outside the TBD.gp2.5 increases the processivity of the polymerase-helicase complex during leading strand synthesis. When loop B of the TBD is altered, abortive DNA products are observed during leading strand synthesis. Loop B appears to play an important role in communication with the helicase and gp2.5, whereas loop A plays a stabilizing role in these interactions. © 2010 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Ubiquitylation and degradation of elongating RNA polymerase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Marcus D; Harreman, Michelle; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2013-01-01

    During its journey across a gene, RNA polymerase II has to contend with a number of obstacles to its progression, including nucleosomes, DNA-binding proteins, DNA damage, and sequences that are intrinsically difficult to transcribe. Not surprisingly, a large number of elongation factors have...... evolved to ensure that transcription stalling or arrest does not occur. If, however, the polymerase cannot be restarted, it becomes poly-ubiquitylated and degraded by the proteasome. This process is highly regulated, ensuring that only RNAPII molecules that cannot otherwise be salvaged are degraded....... In this review, we describe the mechanisms and factors responsible for the last resort mechanism of transcriptional elongation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA polymerase II Transcript Elongation....

  20. Control of Transcriptional Elongation by RNA Polymerase II: A Retrospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Brannan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The origins of our current understanding of control of transcription elongation lie in pioneering experiments that mapped RNA polymerase II on viral and cellular genes. These studies first uncovered the surprising excess of polymerase molecules that we now know to be situated at the at the 5′ ends of most genes in multicellular organisms. The pileup of pol II near transcription start sites reflects a ubiquitous bottle-neck that limits elongation right at the start of the transcription elongation. Subsequent seminal work identified conserved protein factors that positively and negatively control the flux of polymerase through this bottle-neck, and make a major contribution to control of gene expression.

  1. Active RNA polymerases: mobile or immobile molecular machines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argyris Papantonis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It is widely assumed that active RNA polymerases track along their templates to produce a transcript. We test this using chromosome conformation capture and human genes switched on rapidly and synchronously by tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha; one is 221 kbp SAMD4A, which a polymerase takes more than 1 h to transcribe. Ten minutes after stimulation, the SAMD4A promoter comes together with other TNFalpha-responsive promoters. Subsequently, these contacts are lost as new downstream ones appear; contacts are invariably between sequences being transcribed. Super-resolution microscopy confirms that nascent transcripts (detected by RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization co-localize at relevant times. Results are consistent with an alternative view of transcription: polymerases fixed in factories reel in their respective templates, so different parts of the templates transiently lie together.

  2. 3D-QSAR and molecular docking studies on designing inhibitors of the hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlian; Si, Hongzong; Li, Yang; Ge, Cuizhu; Song, Fucheng; Ma, Xiuting; Duan, Yunbo; Zhai, Honglin

    2016-08-01

    Viral hepatitis C infection is one of the main causes of the hepatitis after blood transfusion and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a global health threat. The HCV NS5B polymerase, an RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and an essential role in the replication of the virus, has no functional equivalent in mammalian cells. So the research and development of efficient NS5B polymerase inhibitors provides a great strategy for antiviral therapy against HCV. A combined three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling was accomplished to profoundly understand the structure-activity correlation of a train of indole-based inhibitors of the HCV NS5B polymerase to against HCV. A comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (COMSIA) model as the foundation of the maximum common substructure alignment was developed. The optimum model exhibited statistically significant results: the cross-validated correlation coefficient q2 was 0.627 and non-cross-validated r2 value was 0.943. In addition, the results of internal validations of bootstrapping and Y-randomization confirmed the rationality and good predictive ability of the model, as well as external validation (the external predictive correlation coefficient rext2 = 0.629). The information obtained from the COMSIA contour maps enables the interpretation of their structure-activity relationship. Furthermore, the molecular docking study of the compounds for 3TYV as the protein target revealed important interactions between active compounds and amino acids, and several new potential inhibitors with higher activity predicted were designed basis on our analyses and supported by the simulation of molecular docking. Meanwhile, the OSIRIS Property Explorer was introduced to help select more satisfactory compounds. The satisfactory results from this study may lay a reliable theoretical base for drug development of hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase inhibitors.

  3. Diversity of structure and function of DNA polymerase (gp43) of T4-related bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, V M; Karam, J D

    2004-11-01

    The replication DNA polymerase (gp43) of the bacteriophage T4 is a member of the pol B family of DNA polymerases, which are found in all divisions of life in the biosphere. The enzyme is a modularly organized protein that has several activities in one polypeptide chain (approximately 900 amino acid residues). These include two catalytic functions, POL (polymerase) and EXO (3 -exonuclease), and specific binding activities to DNA, the mRNA for gp43, deoxyribonucleotides (dNTPs), and other T4 replication proteins. The gene for this multifunctional enzyme (gene 43) has been preserved in evolution of the diverse group of T4-like phages in nature, but has diverged in sequence, organization, and specificity of the binding functions of the gene product. We describe here examples of T4-like phages where DNA rearrangements have created split forms of gene 43 consisting of two cistrons instead of one. These gene 43 variants specify separate gp43A (N-terminal) and gp43B (C-terminal) subunits of a split form of gp43. Compared to the monocistronic form, the interruption in contiguity of the gene 43 reading frame maps in a highly diverged sequence separating the code for essential components of two major modules of this pol B enzyme, the FINGERS and PALM domains, which contain the dNTP binding pocket and POL catalytic residues of the enzyme. We discuss the biological implications of these gp43 splits and compare them to other types of pol B splits in nature. Our studies suggest that DNA mobile elements may allow genetic information for pol B modules to be exchanged between organisms.

  4. Activation of dormant bacterial genes by Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727 mutant-type RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talà, Adelfia; Wang, Guojun; Zemanova, Martina; Okamoto, Susumu; Ochi, Kozo; Alifano, Pietro

    2009-02-01

    There is accumulating evidence that the ability of actinomycetes to produce antibiotics and other bioactive secondary metabolites has been underestimated due to the presence of cryptic gene clusters. The activation of dormant genes is therefore one of the most important areas of experimental research for the discovery of drugs in these organisms. The recent observation that several actinomycetes possess two RNA polymerase beta-chain genes (rpoB) has opened up the possibility, explored in this study, of developing a new strategy to activate dormant gene expression in bacteria. Two rpoB paralogs, rpoB(S) and rpoB(R), provide Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727 with two functionally distinct and developmentally regulated RNA polymerases. The product of rpoB(R), the expression of which increases after transition to stationary phase, is characterized by five amino acid substitutions located within or close to the so-called rifampin resistance clusters that play a key role in fundamental activities of RNA polymerase. Here, we report that rpoB(R) markedly activated antibiotic biosynthesis in the wild-type Streptomyces lividans strain 1326 and also in strain KO-421, a relaxed (rel) mutant unable to produce ppGpp. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the rpoB(R)-specific missense H426N mutation was essential for the activation of secondary metabolism. Our observations also indicated that mutant-type or duplicated, rpoB often exists in nature among rare actinomycetes and will thus provide a basis for further basic and applied research.

  5. C25, an essential RNA polymerase III subunit related to the RNA polymerase II subunit RPB7.

    OpenAIRE

    Sadhale, P P; Woychik, N A

    1994-01-01

    We identified a partially sequenced Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene which encodes a protein related to the S. cerevisiae RNA polymerase II subunit, RPB7. Several lines of evidence suggest that this related gene, YKL1, encodes the RNA polymerase III subunit C25. C25, like RPB7, is present in submolar ratios, easily dissociates from the enzyme, is essential for cell growth and viability, but is not required in certain transcription assays in vitro. YKL1 has ABF-1 and PAC upstream sequences often ...

  6. Evaluation of nested Polymerase Chain Reaction targeting hup B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this study are to evaluate the role of nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) targeting hup B gene as a rapid diagnostic modality of tubercular ascites and also to detect the infecting species (Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis). 100 suspected tubercular ascites patients were enrolled ...

  7. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescence-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescence-based capillary electrophoresis (CE) of blood and tissue samples have been used to distinguish between deer species such as red deer, sika deer, wapiti and reindeer. We constructed 4 species-specific primers by using the D-loop of mitochondrial DNA and ...

  8. Uneven Braking Spins RNA Polymerase into a Pause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artsimovitch, Irina; Belogurov, Georgiy A

    2018-03-01

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Guo et al. (2018) and Kang et al. (2018) report structures of paused transcription complexes in which asynchronous translocation inhibits nucleotide addition, allowing for global rearrangements in RNA polymerase stabilized by RNA hairpin and NusA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in the detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus is mainly acquired from hospital infections and demonstrated the ability of developing resistance to many antibiotics. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was used to identify antibiotic-resistant isolates. This study was conducted in Al-Mujtahed, Al-Mouwasat and the Children Hospitals in ...

  10. A Double Polymerase Chain Reaction Method for Detecting African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Double Polymerase Chain Reaction Method for Detecting African Swine Fever and Swine Vesicular Disease Virus. ... specificity as only the recombinant plasmids of ASFV and SVDV were amplified and control plasmids for three other diseases - porcine circovirus (PCV), pseudorabies virus (PRV), and porcine parvovirus ...

  11. Stochastic resetting in backtrack recovery by RNA polymerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, Édgar; Lisica, Ana; Sánchez-Taltavull, Daniel; Grill, Stephan W.

    2016-06-01

    Transcription is a key process in gene expression, in which RNA polymerases produce a complementary RNA copy from a DNA template. RNA polymerization is frequently interrupted by backtracking, a process in which polymerases perform a random walk along the DNA template. Recovery of polymerases from the transcriptionally inactive backtracked state is determined by a kinetic competition between one-dimensional diffusion and RNA cleavage. Here we describe backtrack recovery as a continuous-time random walk, where the time for a polymerase to recover from a backtrack of a given depth is described as a first-passage time of a random walker to reach an absorbing state. We represent RNA cleavage as a stochastic resetting process and derive exact expressions for the recovery time distributions and mean recovery times from a given initial backtrack depth for both continuous and discrete-lattice descriptions of the random walk. We show that recovery time statistics do not depend on the discreteness of the DNA lattice when the rate of one-dimensional diffusion is large compared to the rate of cleavage.

  12. Rat1p maintains RNA polymerase II CTD phosphorylation balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimeno-González, Silvia; Schmid, Manfred; Malagon, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    In S. cerevisiae, the 5'-3' exonuclease Rat1p partakes in transcription termination. Although Rat1p-mediated RNA degradation has been suggested to play a role for this activity, the exact mechanisms by which Rat1p helps release RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) from the DNA template are poorly understoo...

  13. (DNA) fragment using two-step polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), an essential tool in many fields such as molecular biology, normally comprises three steps: denaturation at a high temperature, annealing at a low temperature and elongation at a moderate temperature. Here, we report a two-step PCR method which incorporates annealing and elongation ...

  14. original article evaluation of usefulness of polymerase chain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    Ogbolu*, D. O., Terry Alli, O. A., Nassar, A. S., and Ajagbe, O.O.. Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, (Osogbo Campus), Ladoke Akintola University ..... Zalis MG, Ferreira-da-Cruz MF,. Balthazar-Guedes HC et al. (1996):. Malaria diagnosis: standardization of a polymerase chain reaction for the.

  15. Polymerase chain reaction: Theory, practice and application: A review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a rapid procedure for in vitro enzymatic amplification of specific DNA sequences using two oligonucleotide primers that hybridize to opposite strands and flank the region of interest in the target DNA. Repetitive cycles involving template denaturation, primer annealing and the extension ...

  16. Genotypic frequency of calpastatin gene in lori sheep by polymerase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calpastatin is a natural occurring inhibitor of calpastatin (CAST) and consequently the balance of calpain-calpastatin activity in muscles is believed to dictate the rate of tenderization in post-mortem meat. Genomic DNA was extracted from 100 sheep blood sample. Polymerase chain reaction was performed to amplify a 622 ...

  17. DNA structure in human RNA polymerase II promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Baldi, Pierre; Chauvin, Yves

    1998-01-01

    The fact that DNA three-dimensional structure is important for transcriptional regulation begs the question of whether eukaryotic promoters contain general structural features independently of what genes they control. We present an analysis of a large set of human RNA polymerase II promoters...

  18. Evaluation of Usefulness of Polymerase Chain Reaction in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods used included Giemsa staining procedure for estimation of parasite densities and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect the presence of malaria parasite in the whole blood. Using microscopy as reference gold standard, patients comprising 120 males and 330 females with age ranging between less than 1 ...

  19. Robust and inexpensive equipment design for polymerase chain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Robust and inexpensive equipment design for polymerase chain reaction detection of sequence mutations Cystic fibrosis in a mother and 2 children analysed. ... temperature cycler for about 3 hours. Since there are many diagnostic tests using this technology, it is important that robust but inexpensive machinery is available.

  20. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of the predominant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the present study was to assess the presence of microcystins (MCs) and identify the genotypes of MC-producing cyanobacteria in Mozambique. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based detection methods were used to analyze samples from three study freshwater bodies which are used as sources of drinking ...

  1. SAGA Is a General Cofactor for RNA Polymerase II Transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baptista, Tiago; Grünberg, Sebastian; Minoungou, Nadège; Koster, Maria J.E.; Timmers, H. T.Marc|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074858432; Hahn, Steve; Devys, Didier; Tora, László

    2017-01-01

    Prior studies suggested that SAGA and TFIID are alternative factors that promote RNA polymerase II transcription, with about 10% of genes in S. cerevisiae dependent on SAGA. We reassessed the role of SAGA by mapping its genome-wide location and role in global transcription in budding yeast. We find

  2. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic similarity and diversity of cultured catfish Silurus asotus populations collected from two areas in western Korea were examined using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR). Out of 20 random primers tested, 5 produced 1344 RAPD bands ranging from 8.2 to 13.6 polymorphic ...

  3. Species specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A highly specific single step polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is described for the detection of pig (Sus domesticus) meat. A PCR assay was successfully optimized for amplification of 629 and 322-bp DNA fragment extracted from pig meat using designed species-specific primer pairs based on mitochondrial D-loop and 12S ...

  4. Development of a sensitive nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for rapid and accurate detection of Ustilago scitaminea, the causal agent of sugarcane smut disease. Based on nucleotide differences in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of U. scitaminea, a pair of species-specific primers, SL1 ...

  5. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) provides a superior tool for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) provides a superior tool for the diagnosis of Pneumococcal Infection in Burkina Faso. Y Chaibou, M Congo/Ouedraogo, I Sanou, H Somlare, K Ouattara, CM Kienou, H Belem, E Sampo, SA Traore, R Traore/Ouedraogo, C Hatcher, L Mayer, X Wang, L Sangare ...

  6. Comparison of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and loop-mediated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparison of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for diagnosis of Fusarium solani in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients. ... The test was carried out in 1 h reaction at 65°C in a heater block. The specificity of the test was 100% and its sensitivity was a ...

  7. Polymerase chain reaction to search for Herpes viruses in uveitic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymerase chain reaction to search for Herpes viruses in uveitic and healthy eyes: a South African perspective. Debbie Laaks1, Derrick P Smit1, Justin Harvey2. 1. Division of Ophthalmology, Department of Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences,. University of Stellenbosch, South Africa. 2. Center for Statistical ...

  8. TaqMan Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TaqMan Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and Pyrosequencing using Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Protocol for Rapid Determination of ALDH2 *2 in a Chinese Population. J Li, J Wu, Y Zhang, X Wang, J Jin, Y Wang ...

  9. Polymerase chain reaction for detection of herpes simplex virus encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanzadeh, J; Skiest, D J

    1994-06-01

    A patient with herpes simplex virus encephalitis is described. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to confirm the diagnosis in cerebrospinal fluid. PCR allows the rapid diagnosis of many infectious organisms, such as HSV, in which prompt diagnosis is essential.

  10. Polymerase chain reaction for detection of herpes simplex virus encephalitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Aslanzadeh, J; Skiest, D J

    1994-01-01

    A patient with herpes simplex virus encephalitis is described. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to confirm the diagnosis in cerebrospinal fluid. PCR allows the rapid diagnosis of many infectious organisms, such as HSV, in which prompt diagnosis is essential.

  11. Application of polymerase chain reaction to differentiate between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to identify and differentiate between strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. Nine Campylobacter reference strains; C. jejuni NCTC 11168, C. jejuni NCTC 11322, C. jejuni NCTC 11828, Campylobacter coli NCTC 12110, C. coli NCTC 11437, C. coli ...

  12. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of the predominant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-21

    Dec 21, 2011 ... genotypes of MC-producing cyanobacteria in Mozambique. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based detection methods were used to analyze samples from three study freshwater bodies which are used as sources of drinking water. The occurrence of cyanobacterial toxic genes in Nhambavale lake and.

  13. Prevalence and detection of cytomegalovirus by polymerase chain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 327 women were screened, amongst them, 7 (2.14%) were cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA positive by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Antibodies against toxoplasma were also detected in 106 (32.41%) women, while 54 (16.51%) were anti CMV positive. Eleven (3.36%) and thirteen (3.97%) women were anti HSV ...

  14. The application of polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-05-23

    May 23, 2011 ... paper proposed the application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-DGGE method in reducing the complicated work in microorganism ... for it takes time to examine these precisely. To improve the efficiency in ..... Explorative screening of complex microbial communities by real-time 16S rDNA restriction.

  15. Reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    zino

    2014-02-05

    Feb 5, 2014 ... and subsequent downstream applications (England et al.,. 2001; England and Trevors, 2003; Sayler et al., 2001; ... Real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The cDNA produced can be used for real-time ... phoresis after completion of the reaction, real-time qPCR technology allows quantification of PCR ...

  16. A Double Polymerase Chain Reaction Method for Detecting African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To establish a double polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for the simultaneous detection of African swine fever virus (ASFV) and swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV). Methods: By using reference sequences of ASFV and SVDV, this study synthesized parts of the genes connected to the 19-T vector which ...

  17. Competition between replicative and translesion polymerases during homologous recombination repair in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Kane

    Full Text Available In metazoans, the mechanism by which DNA is synthesized during homologous recombination repair of double-strand breaks is poorly understood. Specifically, the identities of the polymerase(s that carry out repair synthesis and how they are recruited to repair sites are unclear. Here, we have investigated the roles of several different polymerases during homologous recombination repair in Drosophila melanogaster. Using a gap repair assay, we found that homologous recombination is impaired in Drosophila lacking DNA polymerase zeta and, to a lesser extent, polymerase eta. In addition, the Pol32 protein, part of the polymerase delta complex, is needed for repair requiring extensive synthesis. Loss of Rev1, which interacts with multiple translesion polymerases, results in increased synthesis during gap repair. Together, our findings support a model in which translesion polymerases and the polymerase delta complex compete during homologous recombination repair. In addition, they establish Rev1 as a crucial factor that regulates the extent of repair synthesis.

  18. Perturbation in the Conserved Methyltransferase-Polymerase Interface of Flavivirus NS5 Differentially Affects Polymerase Initiation and Elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiqin; Lu, Guoliang; Zhang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The flavivirus NS5 is a natural fusion of a methyltransferase (MTase) and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP). Analogous to DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, the NS5 polymerase initiates RNA synthesis through a de novo mechanism and then makes a transition to a processive elongation phase. However, whether and how the MTase affects polymerase activities through intramolecular interactions remain elusive. By solving the crystal structure of the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) NS5, we recently identified an MTase-RdRP interface containing a set of six hydrophobic residues highly conserved among flaviviruses. To dissect the functional relevance of this interface, we made a series of JEV NS5 constructs with mutations of these hydrophobic residues and/or with the N-terminal first 261 residues and other residues up to the first 303 residues deleted. Compared to the wild-type (WT) NS5, full-length NS5 variants exhibited consistent up- or downregulation of the initiation activities in two types of polymerase assays. Five representative full-length NS5 constructs were then tested in an elongation assay, from which the apparent single-nucleotide incorporation rate constant was estimated. Interestingly, two constructs exhibited different elongation kinetics from the WT NS5, with an effect rather opposite to what was observed at initiation. Moreover, constructs with MTase and/or the linker region (residues 266 to 275) removed still retained polymerase activities, albeit at overall lower levels. However, further removal of the N-terminal extension (residues 276 to 303) abolished regular template-directed synthesis. Together, our data showed that the MTase-RdRP interface is relevant in both polymerase initiation and elongation, likely with different regulation mechanisms in these two major phases of RNA synthesis. IMPORTANCE The flavivirus NS5 is very unique in having a methyltransferase (MTase) placed on the immediate N terminus of its RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

  19. Heat Shock Protein 70 Modulates Influenza A Virus Polymerase Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, Rashid; Kuroda, Kazumichi; Yoshida, Reiko; Tsuda, Yoshimi; Fujikura, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Kajihara, Masahiro; Kida, Hiroshi; Takada, Ayato

    2014-01-01

    The role of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in virus replication has been discussed for many viruses. The known suppressive role of Hsp70 in influenza virus replication is based on studies conducted in cells with various Hsp70 expression levels. In this study, we determined the role of Hsp70 in influenza virus replication in HeLa and HEK293T cells, which express Hsp70 constitutively. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence studies revealed that Hsp70 interacted with PB2 or PB1 monomers and PB2/PB1 heterodimer but not with the PB1/PA heterodimer or PB2/PB1/PA heterotrimer and translocated into the nucleus with PB2 monomers or PB2/PB1 heterodimers. Knocking down Hsp70 resulted in reduced virus transcription and replication activities. Reporter gene assay, immunofluorescence assay, and Western blot analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions from infected cells demonstrated that the increase in viral polymerase activity during the heat shock phase was accompanied with an increase in Hsp70 and viral polymerases levels in the nuclei, where influenza virus replication takes place, whereas a reduction in viral polymerase activity was accompanied with an increase in cytoplasmic relocation of Hsp70 along with viral polymerases. Moreover, significantly higher levels of viral genomic RNA (vRNA) were observed during the heat shock phase than during the recovery phase. Overall, for the first time, these findings suggest that Hsp70 may act as a chaperone for influenza virus polymerase, and the modulatory effect of Hsp70 appears to be a sequel of shuttling of Hsp70 between nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. PMID:24474693

  20. DksA guards elongating RNA polymerase against ribosome-stalling-induced arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Mooney, Rachel A; Grass, Jeffrey A; Sivaramakrishnan, Priya; Herman, Christophe; Landick, Robert; Wang, Jue D

    2014-03-06

    In bacteria, translation-transcription coupling inhibits RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalling. We present evidence suggesting that, upon amino acid starvation, inactive ribosomes promote rather than inhibit RNAP stalling. We developed an algorithm to evaluate genome-wide polymerase progression independently of local noise and used it to reveal that the transcription factor DksA inhibits promoter-proximal pausing and increases RNAP elongation when uncoupled from translation by depletion of charged tRNAs. DksA has minimal effect on RNAP elongation in vitro and on untranslated RNAs in vivo. In these cases, transcripts can form RNA structures that prevent backtracking. Thus, the effect of DksA on transcript elongation may occur primarily upon ribosome slowing/stalling or at promoter-proximal locations that limit the potential for RNA structure. We propose that inactive ribosomes prevent formation of backtrack-blocking mRNA structures and that, in this circumstance, DksA acts as a transcription elongation factor in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Dichotomy of the Poly(ADP-Ribose Polymerase-Like Thermozyme from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosaria Faraone Mennella

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The first evidence of an ADP-ribosylating activity in Archaea was obtained in Sulfolobus solfataricus(strain MT-4 where a poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP-like thermoprotein, defined with the acronymous PARPSso, was found. Similarly to the eukaryotic counterparts PARPSso cleaves beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide to synthesize oligomers of ADP-ribose; cross-reacts with polyclonal anti-PARP-1 catalytic site antibodies; binds DNA. The main differences rely on the molecular mass (46.5 kDa and the thermophily of PARPSso which works at 80 °C. Despite the biochemical properties that allow correlating it to PARP enzymes, the N-terminal and partial amino acid sequences available suggest that PARPSso belongs to a different group of enzymes, the DING proteins, an item discussed in detail in this review.This finding makes PARPSso the first example of a DING protein in Archaea and extends the existence of DING proteins into all the biological kingdoms. PARPSsohas a cell peripheral localization, along with the edge of the cell membrane. The ADP-ribosylation reaction is reverted by a poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase-like activity, able to use the eukaryotic poly(ADP-ribose as a substrate too. Here we overview the research of (ADP-ribosylation in Sulfolobus solfataricus in the past thirty years and discuss the features of PARPSso common with the canonical poly(ADP-ribose polymerases, and the structure fitting with that of DING proteins.

  2. Purification and characterization of a common soil component which inhibits the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, R J; Blackwell, B

    2000-07-01

    DNA prepared from soil usually contains a brown-tinted inhibitor of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) which limits the sensitivity of this technique for specific detection of microorganisms. To localize the inhibitor, soil fractions were tested for their inhibitory effect on the PCR reaction. A highly inhibitory activity, sufficient to account for the inhibition typically exhibited by soil DNA, was found to be tightly associated with the soil microorganism fraction. After cell breakage, the inhibitory material became soluble, and was not separable from DNA by standard purification procedures. A method was derived by which most of the inhibitory material could be selectively solubilized from the microorganism fraction without cell breakage, using successive washes with buffers differing in EDTA concentration. This technique was used to isolate a substance with characteristics suggesting that it is the major PCR inhibitor contaminating DNA purified from soil. It was found to be an organic, water-soluble compound of high molecular weight, and was present in a variety of soil types from different locations. It was found to be distinctly different in its solubility properties from humic and fulvic acids, and also in its FT-IR and NMR spectra. It forms a complex with protein and may inhibit the PCR reaction by an interaction with Taq DNA polymerase.

  3. Quantum dots for a high-throughput Pfu polymerase based multi-round polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Fuming; Zhang, Zhizhou; Yuan, Lin; Liu, Deli

    2018-02-26

    Multi-round PCR is an important technique for obtaining enough target DNA from rare DNA resources, and is commonly used in many fields including forensic science, ancient DNA analysis and cancer research. However, multi-round PCR is often aborted, largely due to the accumulation of non-specific amplification during repeated amplifications. Here, we developed a Pfu polymerase based multi-round PCR technique assisted by quantum dots (QDs). Different PCR assays, DNA polymerases (Pfu and Taq), DNA sizes and GC amounts were compared in this study. In the presence of QDs, PCR specificity could be retained even in the ninth-round amplification. Moreover, the longer and more complex the targets were, the earlier the abortion happened in multi-round PCR. However, no obvious enhancement of specificity was found in multi-round PCR using Taq DNA polymerase. Significantly, the fidelity of Pfu polymerase based multi-round PCR was not sacrificed in the presence of QDs. Besides, pre-incubation at 50 °C for an hour had no impact on multi-round PCR performance, which further authenticated the hot start effect of QDs modulated in multi-round PCR. The findings of this study demonstrated that a cost-effective and promising multi-round PCR technique for large-scale and high-throughput sample analysis could be established with high specificity, sensibility and accuracy.

  4. DNA polymerases eta and kappa exchange with the polymerase delta holoenzyme to complete common fragile site synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ryan P; Hile, Suzanne E; Lee, Marietta Y; Eckert, Kristin A

    2017-09-01

    Common fragile sites (CFSs) are inherently unstable genomic loci that are recurrently altered in human tumor cells. Despite their instability, CFS are ubiquitous throughout the human genome and associated with large tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. CFSs are enriched with repetitive DNA sequences, one feature postulated to explain why these loci are inherently difficult to replicate, and sensitive to replication stress. We have shown that specialized DNA polymerases (Pols) η and κ replicate CFS-derived sequences more efficiently than the replicative Pol δ. However, we lacked an understanding of how these enzymes cooperate to ensure efficient CFS replication. Here, we designed a model of lagging strand replication with RFC loaded PCNA that allows for maximal activity of the four-subunit human Pol δ holoenzyme, Pol η, and Pol κ in polymerase mixing assays. We discovered that Pol η and κ are both able to exchange with Pol δ stalled at repetitive CFS sequences, enhancing Normalized Replication Efficiency. We used this model to test the impact of PCNA mono-ubiquitination on polymerase exchange, and found no change in polymerase cooperativity in CFS replication compared with unmodified PCNA. Finally, we modeled replication stress in vitro using aphidicolin and found that Pol δ holoenzyme synthesis was significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner, preventing any replication past the CFS. Importantly, Pol η and κ were still proficient in rescuing this stalled Pol δ synthesis, which may explain, in part, the CFS instability phenotype of aphidicolin-treated Pol η and Pol κ-deficient cells. In total, our data support a model wherein Pol δ stalling at CFSs allows for free exchange with a specialized polymerase that is not driven by PCNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of aquatic animal pathogens in a diagnostic laboratory setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Getchell, Rodman G.; McClure, Carol A.; Weber, S.E.; Garver, Kyle A.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time, or quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is quickly supplanting other molecular methods for detecting the nucleic acids of human and other animal pathogens owing to the speed and robustness of the technology. As the aquatic animal health community moves toward implementing national diagnostic testing schemes, it will need to evaluate how qPCR technology should be employed. This review outlines the basic principles of qPCR technology, considerations for assay development, standards and controls, assay performance, diagnostic validation, implementation in the diagnostic laboratory, and quality assurance and control measures. These factors are fundamental for ensuring the validity of qPCR assay results obtained in the diagnostic laboratory setting.

  6. Bookmarking promoters in mitotic chromatin: poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 as an epigenetic mark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, Niraj; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Tulin, Alexei V

    2014-06-01

    Epigenetics are the heritable changes in gene expression or cellular phenotype caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequence. After mitosis, it is thought that bookmarking transcription factors remain at promoters, regulating which genes become active and which remain silent. Herein, we demonstrate that poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a genome-wide epigenetic memory mark in mitotic chromatin, and we further show that the presence of PARP-1 is absolutely crucial for reactivation of transcription after mitosis. Based on these findings, a novel molecular model of epigenetic memory transmission through the cell cycle is proposed. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Domain topology of the DNA polymerase D complex from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao-Feng; Shen, Yulong; Matsui, Eriko; Matsui, Ikuo

    2004-09-21

    Family D DNA polymerase (PolD) is a recently found DNA polymerase extensively existing in Euryarchaeota of Archaea. Here, we report the domain function of PolD in oligomerization and interaction with other proteins, which were characterized with the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assays. A proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PhoPCNA, interacted with the N-terminus of the small subunit, DP1(1-200). Specific interaction between the remaining part of the small subunit, DP1(201-622), and the N-terminus of the large subunit, DP2(1-300), was detected by the Y2H assay. The SPR assay also indicated the intrasubunit interaction within the N-terminus, DP2(1-100), and the C-terminus, DP2(792-1163), of the large subunit. A synthetic 21 amino acid peptide corresponding to the sequence from cysteine cluster II, DP2(1290-1310), tightly interacted (a dissociation constant K(D) = 4.3 nM) with the N-terminus of the small subunit, DP1(1-200). Since the peptide could increase the 3'-5' exonuclease activity of DP1 [Shen et al. (2004) Nucleic Acids Res. 32, 158], the short region DP2(1290-1310) seems to play dual roles to form the PhoPolD complex and to regulate the 3'-5' exonuclease activity of DP1 through interaction with DP1(1-200). Furthermore, DP2(792-1163) containing the catalytic residues for DNA polymerization, Asp1122 and Asp1124, interacted with the intrasubunit domain, DP2(1-100), and the intersubunit domain, DP1(1-200). DP2(792-1163) probably forms the most important domain deeply involved in both the catalysis of DNA polymerization and stabilization of the PhoPolD complex through these multiple interactions.

  8. The α subunit of E. coli RNA polymerase activates RNA binding by NusA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Thien-Fah; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Mushegian, Arcady; Severinov, Konstantin; Greenblatt, Jack

    2000-01-01

    The Escherichia coli NusA protein modulates pausing, termination, and antitermination by associating with the transcribing RNA polymerase core enzyme. NusA can be covalently cross-linked to nascent RNA within a transcription complex, but does not bind RNA on its own. We have found that deletion of the 79 carboxy-terminal amino acids of the 495-amino-acid NusA protein allows NusA to bind RNA in gel mobility shift assays. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the α subunit of RNA polymerase, as well as the bacteriophage λ N gene antiterminator protein, bind to carboxy-terminal regions of NusA and enable full-length NusA to bind RNA. Binding of NusA to RNA in the presence of α or N involves an amino-terminal S1 homology region that is otherwise inactive in full-length NusA. The interaction of the α-CTD with full-length NusA stimulates termination. N may prevent termination by inducing NusA to interact with N utilization (nut) site RNA rather than RNA near the 3′ end of the nascent transcript. Sequence analysis showed that the α-CTD contains a modified helix–hairpin–helix motif (HhH), which is also conserved in the carboxy-terminal regions of some eubacterial NusA proteins. These HhH motifs may mediate protein–protein interactions in NusA and the α-CTD. PMID:11040219

  9. A novel thermostable polymerase for RNA and DNA Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh eChander

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Meeting the goal of providing point of care (POC tests for molecular detection of pathogens in low resource settings places stringent demands on all aspects of the technology. OmniAmp DNA polymerase (Pol is a thermostable viral enzyme that enables true POC use in clinics or in field by overcoming important barriers to isothermal amplification. In this paper, we describe the multiple advantages of OmniAmp Pol as an isothermal amplification enzyme and provide examples of its use in loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP for pathogen detection. The inherent reverse transcriptase activity of OmniAmp Pol allows single enzyme detection of RNA targets in RT-LAMP. Common methods of nucleic acid amplification are highly susceptible to sample contaminants, necessitating elaborate nucleic acid purification protocols that are incompatible with POC or field use. OmniAmp Pol was found to be less inhibited by whole blood components typical in certain crude sample preparations . Moreover, the thermostability of the enzyme compared to alternative DNA polymerases (Bst and reverse transcriptases allows pretreatment of complete reaction mixes immediately prior to amplification, which facilitates amplification of highly structured genome regions. Compared to Bst, OmniAmp Pol has a faster time to result, particularly with more dilute templates. Molecular diagnostics in field settings can be challenging due to the lack of refrigeration. The stability of OmniAmp Pol is compatible with a dry format that enables long term storage at ambient temperatures. A final requirement for field operability is compatibility with either commonly available instruments or, in other cases, a simple, inexpensive, portable detection mode requiring minimal training or power. Detection of amplification products is shown using lateral flow strips and analysis on a real-time PCR instrument. Results of this study show that OmniAmp Pol is ideally suited for low resource molecular

  10. DNA Polymerase Gamma in Mitochondrial DNA Replication and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Copeland

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA are associated with aging, and they can cause tissue degeneration and neuromuscular pathologies known as mitochondrial diseases. Because DNA polymerase γ (pol γ is the enzyme responsible for replication and repair of mitochondrial DNA, the burden of faithful duplication of mitochondrial DNA, both in preventing spontaneous errors and in DNA repair synthesis, falls on pol γ. Investigating the biological functions of pol γ and its inhibitors aids our understanding of the sources of mtDNA mutations. In animal cells, pol γ is composed of two subunits, a larger catalytic subunit of 125–140 kDa and second subunit of 35–55 kDa. The catalytic subunit contains DNA polymerase activity, 3’-5’ exonuclease activity, and a 5’-dRP lyase activity. The accessory subunit is required for highly processive DNA synthesis and increases the affinity of pol gamma to the DNA.

  11. Polymerase chain reaction: Theory, practice and application: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S E Atawodi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR is a rapid procedure for in vitro enzymatic amplification of specific DNA sequences using two oligonucleotide primers that hybridize to opposite strands and flank the region of interest in the target DNA. Repetitive cycles involving template denaturation, primer annealing and the extension of the annealed primers by DNA polymerase, result in the exponential accumulation of a specific fragment whose termini are defined by 5′ end of the primers. The primer extension products synthesized in one cycle can serve as a template in the next. Hence the number of target DNA copies approximately doubles at every cycle. Since its inception, PCR has had an enormous impact in both basic and diagnostic aspects of molecular biology. Like the PCR itself, the number of applications has been accumulating exponentially. It is therefore recommended that relevant scientists and laboratories in developing countries like Nigeria should acquire this simple and relatively inexpensive, but rather robust technology.

  12. Nucleosome Positioning and NDR Structure at RNA Polymerase III Promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Alexandra Søgaard; Lay, Fides D; Jones, Peter A

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin is structurally involved in the transcriptional regulation of all genes. While the nucleosome positioning at RNA polymerase II (pol II) promoters has been extensively studied, less is known about the chromatin structure at pol III promoters in human cells. We use a high-resolution analy......Chromatin is structurally involved in the transcriptional regulation of all genes. While the nucleosome positioning at RNA polymerase II (pol II) promoters has been extensively studied, less is known about the chromatin structure at pol III promoters in human cells. We use a high....... The +1 nucleosome is located further downstream than at pol II genes and furthermore displays weak positioning. The variable position of the +1 location is seen not only within individual cell populations and between cell types, but also between different pol III promoter subtypes, suggesting that the +1...... the first high-resolution map of nucleosome positioning and occupancy at human pol III promoters at specific loci and genome wide....

  13. Dye-ligand affinity chromatography of RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skripal, I G; Weeks, J R; Greenleaf, A L

    1986-01-01

    The binding of wheat germ RNA polymerase II to five different dye-ligand chromatography gels (Matrex gels, Amicon Corp.) was tested. A quantitative binding of the enzyme to four of the gels, namely Dyematrex gels Blue A, Blue B, Red A and Green A was observed. Only the Orange A gel column failed to bind the enzyme strongly. Nearly 100% of the activity could be recovered from the Green A column by elution with high salt concentration and high pH. Under these conditions only a part of the activity was eluted from the other three columns since the enzyme bound tightly. Enzyme activity could be removed from the columns by elution with nucleotide substrates, but the yield from the Blue A, Blue B and Red A columns was still low (7 to 42%). The Green A Matrex gel appeared to be useful for the purification and analysis of RNA polymerase.

  14. New Fpg probe chemistry for direct detection of recombinase polymerase amplification on lateral flow strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Michael L; Bowler, Frank R; Martinez, Aurore J; Greenwood, Catherine J; Armes, Niall; Piepenburg, Olaf

    2018-02-15

    Rapid, cost-effective and sensitive detection of nucleic acids has the ability to improve upon current practices employed for pathogen detection in diagnosis of infectious disease and food testing. Furthermore, if assay complexity can be reduced, nucleic acid amplification tests could be deployed in resource-limited and home use scenarios. In this study, we developed a novel Fpg (Formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase) probe chemistry, which allows lateral flow detection of amplification in undiluted recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) reactions. The prototype nucleic acid lateral flow chemistry was applied to a human genomic target (rs1207445), Campylobacter jejuni 16S rDNA and two genetic markers of the important food pathogen E. coli O157:H7. All four assays have an analytical sensitivity between 10 and 100 copies DNA per amplification. Furthermore, the assay is performed with fewer hands-on steps than using the current RPA Nfo lateral flow method as dilution of amplicon is not required for lateral flow analysis. Due to the simplicity of the workflow, we believe that the lateral flow chemistry for direct detection could be readily adapted to a cost-effective single-use consumable, ideal for use in non-laboratory settings. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. One-stop polymerase chain reaction (PCR): An improved PCR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2011-12-21

    Dec 21, 2011 ... improved PCR method with speedy operation and ... novel PCR method is desired to compatibilize Taq DNA .... as template. A 20 ul traditional PCR mixture included 10×PCR reaction buffer, 2 µl, 40 mM dNTP (10mM each), 0.5 µl; Taq DNA polymerase, 0.2 µl (1 unit), 0.5 µl forward and reverse primer mix ...

  16. Mechanism of Ribonucleotide Incorporation by Human DNA Polymerase η.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yan; Egli, Martin; Guengerich, F Peter

    2016-02-19

    Ribonucleotides and 2'-deoxyribonucleotides are the basic units for RNA and DNA, respectively, and the only difference is the extra 2'-OH group on the ribonucleotide sugar. Cellular rNTP concentrations are much higher than those of dNTP. When copying DNA, DNA polymerases not only select the base of the incoming dNTP to form a Watson-Crick pair with the template base but also distinguish the sugar moiety. Some DNA polymerases use a steric gate residue to prevent rNTP incorporation by creating a clash with the 2'-OH group. Y-family human DNA polymerase η (hpol η) is of interest because of its spacious active site (especially in the major groove) and tolerance of DNA lesions. Here, we show that hpol η maintains base selectivity when incorporating rNTPs opposite undamaged DNA and the DNA lesions 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer but with rates that are 10(3)-fold lower than for inserting the corresponding dNTPs. X-ray crystal structures show that the hpol η scaffolds the incoming rNTP to pair with the template base (dG) or 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine with a significant propeller twist. As a result, the 2'-OH group avoids a clash with the steric gate, Phe-18, but the distance between primer end and Pα of the incoming rNTP increases by 1 Å, elevating the energy barrier and slowing polymerization compared with dNTP. In addition, Tyr-92 was identified as a second line of defense to maintain the position of Phe-18. This is the first crystal structure of a DNA polymerase with an incoming rNTP opposite a DNA lesion. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Mechanism of Ribonucleotide Incorporation by Human DNA Polymerase η*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yan; Egli, Martin; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Ribonucleotides and 2′-deoxyribonucleotides are the basic units for RNA and DNA, respectively, and the only difference is the extra 2′-OH group on the ribonucleotide sugar. Cellular rNTP concentrations are much higher than those of dNTP. When copying DNA, DNA polymerases not only select the base of the incoming dNTP to form a Watson-Crick pair with the template base but also distinguish the sugar moiety. Some DNA polymerases use a steric gate residue to prevent rNTP incorporation by creating a clash with the 2′-OH group. Y-family human DNA polymerase η (hpol η) is of interest because of its spacious active site (especially in the major groove) and tolerance of DNA lesions. Here, we show that hpol η maintains base selectivity when incorporating rNTPs opposite undamaged DNA and the DNA lesions 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer but with rates that are 103-fold lower than for inserting the corresponding dNTPs. X-ray crystal structures show that the hpol η scaffolds the incoming rNTP to pair with the template base (dG) or 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine with a significant propeller twist. As a result, the 2′-OH group avoids a clash with the steric gate, Phe-18, but the distance between primer end and Pα of the incoming rNTP increases by 1 Å, elevating the energy barrier and slowing polymerization compared with dNTP. In addition, Tyr-92 was identified as a second line of defense to maintain the position of Phe-18. This is the first crystal structure of a DNA polymerase with an incoming rNTP opposite a DNA lesion. PMID:26740629

  18. Block copolymer nanoparticles as nanobeads for the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Siyan; Prud'homme, Robert K; Link, A James

    2011-04-13

    New sequencing technologies based on massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) have been developed to reduce the cost of genome sequencing. In some current MPSS platforms, DNA-modified micrometer-scale beads are used to template the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Reducing the size of the beads to nanoscale can lead to significant improvements in sequencing throughput. To this end, we have assembled polymeric nanobeads that efficiently template PCR, resulting in DNA-decorated "nanobeads" with a high extent of functionalization.

  19. Mechanisms of backtrack recovery by RNA polymerases I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisica, Ana; Engel, Christoph; Jahnel, Marcus; Roldán, Édgar; Galburt, Eric A; Cramer, Patrick; Grill, Stephan W

    2016-03-15

    During DNA transcription, RNA polymerases often adopt inactive backtracked states. Recovery from backtracks can occur by 1D diffusion or cleavage of backtracked RNA, but how polymerases make this choice is unknown. Here, we use single-molecule optical tweezers experiments and stochastic theory to show that the choice of a backtrack recovery mechanism is determined by a kinetic competition between 1D diffusion and RNA cleavage. Notably, RNA polymerase I (Pol I) and Pol II recover from shallow backtracks by 1D diffusion, use RNA cleavage to recover from intermediary depths, and are unable to recover from extensive backtracks. Furthermore, Pol I and Pol II use distinct mechanisms to avoid nonrecoverable backtracking. Pol I is protected by its subunit A12.2, which decreases the rate of 1D diffusion and enables transcript cleavage up to 20 nt. In contrast, Pol II is fully protected through association with the cleavage stimulatory factor TFIIS, which enables rapid recovery from any depth by RNA cleavage. Taken together, we identify distinct backtrack recovery strategies of Pol I and Pol II, shedding light on the evolution of cellular functions of these key enzymes.

  20. Nascent transcription affected by RNA polymerase IV in Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhard, Karl F; Talbot, Joy-El R B; Deans, Natalie C; McClish, Allison E; Hollick, Jay B

    2015-04-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3'-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  1. Effects of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticle Clusters on the Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Higashi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The polymerase chain reaction (PCR method is widely used for the reproduction and amplification of specific DNA segments, and a novel PCR method using nanomaterials such as gold nanoparticles has recently been reported. This paper reports on the effects of superparamagnetic nanoparticles on PCR amplification without an external magnetic field, and clarifies the mechanism behind the effects of superparamagnetic particle clusters on PCR efficiency by estimating the structures of such clusters in PCR. It was found that superparamagnetic nanoparticles tend to inhibit PCR amplification depending on the structure of the magnetic nanoparticle clusters. The paper also clarifies that Taq polymerase is captured in the spaces formed among magnetic nanoparticle clusters, and that it is captured more efficiently as a result of their motion from heat treatment in PCR thermal cycles. Consequently, Taq polymerase that should be used in PCR is reduced in the PCR solution. These outcomes will be applied to novel PCR techniques using magnetic particles in an external magnetic field.

  2. DNA polymerase delta is required for early mammalian embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arikuni Uchimura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In eukaryotic cells, DNA polymerase delta (Poldelta, whose catalytic subunit p125 is encoded in the Pold1 gene, plays a central role in chromosomal DNA replication, repair, and recombination. However, the physiological role of the Poldelta in mammalian development has not been thoroughly investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine this role, we used a gene targeting strategy to generate two kinds of Pold1 mutant mice: Poldelta-null (Pold1(-/- mice and D400A exchanged Poldelta (Pold1(exo/exo mice. The D400A exchange caused deficient 3'-5' exonuclease activity in the Poldelta protein. In Poldelta-null mice, heterozygous mice developed normally despite a reduction in Pold1 protein quantity. In contrast, homozygous Pold1(-/- mice suffered from peri-implantation lethality. Although Pold1(-/- blastocysts appeared normal, their in vitro culture showed defects in outgrowth proliferation and DNA synthesis and frequent spontaneous apoptosis, indicating Poldelta participates in DNA replication during mouse embryogenesis. In Pold1(exo/exo mice, although heterozygous Pold1(exo/+ mice were normal and healthy, Pold1(exo/exo and Pold1(exo/- mice suffered from tumorigenesis. CONCLUSIONS: These results clearly demonstrate that DNA polymerase delta is essential for mammalian early embryogenesis and that the 3'-5' exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase delta is dispensable for normal development but necessary to suppress tumorigenesis.

  3. Allosteric inhibitors of Coxsackie virus A24 RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Catherine H; Rowold, Diane; Choi, Kyung H

    2016-02-15

    Coxsackie virus A24 (CVA24), a causative agent of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, is a prototype of enterovirus (EV) species C. The RNA polymerase (3D(pol)) of CVA24 can uridylylate the viral peptide linked to the genome (VPg) from distantly related EV and is thus, a good model for studying this reaction. Once UMP is bound, VPgpU primes RNA elongation. Structural and mutation data have identified a conserved binding surface for VPg on the RNA polymerase (3D(pol)), located about 20Å from the active site. Here, computational docking of over 60,000 small compounds was used to select those with the lowest (best) specific binding energies (BE) for this allosteric site. Compounds with varying structures and low BE were assayed for their effect on formation of VPgU by CVA24-3D(pol). Two compounds with the lowest specific BE for the site inhibited both uridylylation and formation of VPgpolyU at 10-20μM. These small molecules can be used to probe the role of this allosteric site in polymerase function, and may be the basis for novel antiviral compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Thioredoxin suppresses microscopic hopping of T7 DNA polymerase on duplex DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etson, Candice M.; Hamdan, Samir M.; Richardson, Charles C.; Oijen, Antoine M. van; Richardson, Charles C.

    2010-01-01

    The DNA polymerases involved in DNA replication achieve high processivity of nucleotide incorporation by forming a complex with processivity factors. A model system for replicative DNA polymerases, the bacteriophage T7 DNA polymerase (gp5), encoded by gene 5, forms a tight, 1:1 complex with

  5. Production of DNA polymerase by recombinant pET-17b/Pfu-Pol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although this enzyme has been produced worldwide, there is no reported cloning or production of polymerases in Egypt. In the current work, plasmid coding Pfu polymerase enzyme (pET-17b/Pfu-Pol) was transformed into E. coli Top10. The plasmid coding Pfu- polymerase was confirmed by restriction analysis using HindIII ...

  6. COMPARISON OF SIX COMMERCIALLY-AVAILABLE DNA POLYMERASES FOR DIRECT PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Miura

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY The use of a “direct PCR” DNA polymerase enables PCR amplification without any prior DNA purification from blood samples due to the enzyme's resistance to inhibitors present in blood components. Such DNA polymerases are now commercially available. We compared the PCR performance of six direct PCR-type DNA polymerases (KOD FX, Mighty Amp, Hemo KlenTaq, Phusion Blood II, KAPA Blood, and BIOTAQ in dried blood eluted from a filter paper with TE buffer. GoTaq Flexi was used as a standard DNA polymerase. PCR performance was evaluated by a nested PCR technique for detecting Plasmodium falciparum genomic DNA in the presence of the blood components. Although all six DNA polymerases showed resistance to blood components compared to the standard Taq polymerase, the KOD FX and BIOTAQ DNA polymerases were resistant to inhibitory blood components at concentrations of 40%, and their PCR performance was superior to that of other DNA polymerases. When the reaction mixture contained a mild detergent, only KOD FX DNA polymerase retained the original amount of amplified product. These results indicate that KOD FX DNA polymerase is the most resistant to inhibitory blood components and/or detergents. Thus, KOD FX DNA polymerase could be useful in serological studies to simultaneously detect antibodies and DNA in eluents for antibodies. KOD FX DNA polymerase is thus not limited to use in detecting malaria parasites, but could also be employed to detect other blood-borne pathogens.

  7. Variants of a Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase with increased selectivity for applications in allele- and methylation-specific amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Drum

    Full Text Available The selectivity of DNA polymerases is crucial for many applications. For example, high discrimination between the extension of matched versus mismatched primer termini is desired for the detection of a single nucleotide variation at a particular locus within the genome. Here we describe the generation of thermostable mutants of the large fragment of Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase (KlenTaq with increased mismatch extension selectivity. In contrast to previously reported much less active KlenTaq mutants with mismatch discrimination abilities, many of the herein discovered mutants show conserved wild-type-like high activities. We demonstrate for one mutant containing the single amino acid exchange R660V the suitability for application in allele-specific amplifications directly from whole blood without prior sample purification. Also the suitability of the mutant for methylation specific amplification in the diagnostics of 5-methyl cytosines is demonstrated. Furthermore, the identified mutant supersedes other commercially available enzymes in human leukocyte antigen (HLA analysis by sequence-specific primed polymerase chain reactions (PCRs.

  8. The role of DNA polymerase {iota} in UV mutational spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jun-Hyuk [Division of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Besaratinia, Ahmad [Division of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Lee, Dong-Hyun [Division of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Lee, Chong-Soon [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Yeungnam University, Gyongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Pfeifer, Gerd P. [Division of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)]. E-mail: gpfeifer@coh.org

    2006-07-25

    UVB (280-320 nm) and UVC (200-280 nm) irradiation generate predominantly cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and (6-4) photoproducts in DNA. CPDs are thought to be responsible for most of the UV-induced mutations. Thymine-thymine CPDs, and probably also CPDs containing cytosine, are replicated in vivo in a largely accurate manner by a DNA polymerase {eta} (Pol {eta}) dependent process. Pol {eta} is a DNA damage-tolerant and error-prone DNA polymerase encoded by the POLH (XPV) gene in humans. Another member of the Y family of error-prone DNA polymerases is POLI encoding DNA polymerase iota (Pol {iota}). In order to clarify the specific role of Pol {iota} in UV mutagenesis, we have used an siRNA knockdown approach in combination with a supF shuttle vector which replicates in mammalian cells, similar as we have previously done for Pol {eta}. Synthetic RNA duplexes were used to efficiently inhibit Pol {iota} expression in 293T cells. The supF shuttle vector was irradiated with 254 nm UVC and replicated in 293T cells in presence of anti-Pol {iota} siRNA. Surprisingly, there was a consistent reduction of recovered plasmid from cells with Pol {iota} knockdown and this was independent of UV irradiation of the plasmid. The supF mutant frequency was unchanged in the siRNA knockdown cells relative to control cells confirming that Pol {iota} does not play an important role in UV mutagenesis. UV-induced supF mutants were sequenced from siRNA-treated cells and controls. Neither the type of mutations nor their distribution along the supF gene were significantly different between controls and siRNA knockdown cells and were predominantly C to T and CC to TT transitions at dipyrimidine sites. These results show that Pol {iota} has no significant role in UV lesion bypass and mutagenesis in vivo and provides some initial data suggesting that this polymerase may be involved in replication of extrachromosomal DNA.

  9. Poliovirus Polymerase Leu420 Facilitates RNA Recombination and Ribavirin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Brian J; Peersen, Olve B; Barton, David J

    2016-10-01

    RNA recombination is important in the formation of picornavirus species groups and the ongoing evolution of viruses within species groups. In this study, we examined the structure and function of poliovirus polymerase, 3D(pol), as it relates to RNA recombination. Recombination occurs when nascent RNA products exchange one viral RNA template for another during RNA replication. Because recombination is a natural aspect of picornavirus replication, we hypothesized that some features of 3D(pol) may exist, in part, to facilitate RNA recombination. Furthermore, we reasoned that alanine substitution mutations that disrupt 3D(pol)-RNA interactions within the polymerase elongation complex might increase and/or decrease the magnitudes of recombination. We found that an L420A mutation in 3D(pol) decreased the frequency of RNA recombination, whereas alanine substitutions at other sites in 3D(pol) increased the frequency of recombination. The 3D(pol) Leu420 side chain interacts with a ribose in the nascent RNA product 3 nucleotides from the active site of the polymerase. Notably, the L420A mutation that reduced recombination also rendered the virus more susceptible to inhibition by ribavirin, coincident with the accumulation of ribavirin-induced G→A and C→U mutations in viral RNA. We conclude that 3D(pol) Leu420 is critically important for RNA recombination and that RNA recombination contributes to ribavirin resistance. Recombination contributes to the formation of picornavirus species groups and the emergence of circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs). The recombinant viruses that arise in nature are occasionally more fit than either parental strain, especially when the two partners in recombination are closely related, i.e., members of characteristic species groups, such as enterovirus species groups A to H or rhinovirus species groups A to C. Our study shows that RNA recombination requires conserved features of the viral polymerase. Furthermore, a polymerase

  10. Biochemical characterization of recombinant influenza A polymerase heterotrimer complex: Polymerase activity and mechanisms of action of nucleotide analogs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barauskas, O.; Xing, W.; Aguayo, E.; Willkom, M.; Sapre, A.; Clarke, M.; Birkuš, Gabriel; Schultz, B. E.; Sakowicz, R.; Kwon, H. J.; Feng, J. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 10 (2017), č. článku e0185998. E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : virus RNA polymerase * T-705 Favipiravir * structural basis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0185998

  11. Plant organellar DNA primase-helicase synthesizes RNA primers for organellar DNA polymerases using a unique recognition sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta-Castro, Antolín; Baruch-Torres, Noe; Brieba, Luis G

    2017-10-13

    DNA primases recognize single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) sequences to synthesize RNA primers during lagging-strand replication. Arabidopsis thaliana encodes an ortholog of the DNA primase-helicase from bacteriophage T7, dubbed AtTwinkle, that localizes in chloroplasts and mitochondria. Herein, we report that AtTwinkle synthesizes RNA primers from a 5'-(G/C)GGA-3' template sequence. Within this sequence, the underlined nucleotides are cryptic, meaning that they are essential for template recognition but are not instructional during RNA synthesis. Thus, in contrast to all primases characterized to date, the sequence recognized by AtTwinkle requires two nucleotides (5'-GA-3') as a cryptic element. The divergent zinc finger binding domain (ZBD) of the primase module of AtTwinkle may be responsible for template sequence recognition. During oligoribonucleotide synthesis, AtTwinkle shows a strong preference for rCTP as its initial ribonucleotide and a moderate preference for rGMP or rCMP incorporation during elongation. RNA products synthetized by AtTwinkle are efficiently used as primers for plant organellar DNA polymerases. In sum, our data strongly suggest that AtTwinkle primes organellar DNA polymerases during lagging strand synthesis in plant mitochondria and chloroplast following a primase-mediated mechanism. This mechanism contrasts to lagging-strand DNA replication in metazoan mitochondria, in which transcripts synthesized by mitochondrial RNA polymerase prime mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Time related total lactic acid bacteria population diversity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-07

    Feb 7, 2011 ... type. Comparison of 16S rDNA sequences of pure culture isolates with those in Genbank database revealed that, the dominating lactic acid bacteria were L. plantarum and Pediococcus species. Key words: Lactic acid bacteria, communities' diversity, fortified weaning foods, polymerase chain reaction.

  13. A combined in vitro / in vivo selection for polymerases with novel promoter specificities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellington Andrew D

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from T7 bacteriophage (T7 RNAP has been extensively characterized, and like other phage RNA polymerases it is highly specific for its promoter. A combined in vitro / in vivo selection method has been developed for the evolution of T7 RNA polymerases with altered promoter specificities. Large (103 – 106 polymerase libraries were made and cloned downstream of variant promoters. Those polymerase variants that can recognize variant promoters self-amplify both themselves and their attendent mRNAs in vivo. Following RT / PCR amplification in vitro, the most numerous polymerase genes are preferentially cloned and carried into subsequent rounds of selection. Results and Conclusions A T7 RNA polymerase library that was randomized at three positions was cloned adjacent to a T3-like promoter sequence, and a 'specialist' T7 RNA polymerase was identified. A library that was randomized at a different set of positions was cloned adjacent to a promoter library in which four positions had been randomized, and 'generalist' polymerases that could utilize a variety of T7 promoters were identified, including at least one polymerase with an apparently novel promoter specificity. This method may have applications for evolving other polymerase variants with novel phenotypes, such as the ability to incorporate modified nucleotides.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis and evolutionary origins of DNA polymerase X-family members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienstock, Rachelle J.; Beard, William A.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian DNA polymerase (pol) β is the founding member of a large group of DNA polymerases now termed the X-family. DNA polymerase β has been kinetically, structurally, and biologically well characterized and can serve as a phylogenetic reference. Accordingly, we have performed a phylogenetic analysis to understand the relationship between pol β and other members of the X-family of DNA polymerases. The bacterial X-family DNA polymerases, Saccharomyces cerevisiae pol IV, and four mammalian X-family polymerases appear to be directly related. These enzymes originated from an ancient common ancestor characterized in two Bacillus species. Understanding distinct functions for each of the X-family polymerases, evolving from a common bacterial ancestor is of significant interest in light of the specialized roles of these enzymes in DNA metabolism. PMID:25112931

  15. Rapid detection of Plasmodium falciparum with isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification and lateral flow analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Nucleic acid amplification is the most sensitive and specific method to detect Plasmodium falciparum. However the polymerase chain reaction remains laboratory-based and has to be conducted by trained personnel. Furthermore, the power dependency for the thermocycling process and the costly equipment necessary for the read-out are difficult to cover in resource-limited settings. This study aims to develop and evaluate a combination of isothermal nucleic acid amplification and simple lateral flow dipstick detection of the malaria parasite for point-of-care testing. Methods A specific fragment of the 18S rRNA gene of P. falciparum was amplified in 10 min at a constant 38°C using the isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) method. With a unique probe system added to the reaction solution, the amplification product can be visualized on a simple lateral flow strip without further labelling. The combination of these methods was tested for sensitivity and specificity with various Plasmodium and other protozoa/bacterial strains, as well as with human DNA. Additional investigations were conducted to analyse the temperature optimum, reaction speed and robustness of this assay. Results The lateral flow RPA (LF-RPA) assay exhibited a high sensitivity and specificity. Experiments confirmed a detection limit as low as 100 fg of genomic P. falciparum DNA, corresponding to a sensitivity of approximately four parasites per reaction. All investigated P. falciparum strains (n = 77) were positively tested while all of the total 11 non-Plasmodium samples, showed a negative test result. The enzymatic reaction can be conducted under a broad range of conditions from 30-45°C with high inhibitory concentration of known PCR inhibitors. A time to result of 15 min from start of the reaction to read-out was determined. Conclusions Combining the isothermal RPA and the lateral flow detection is an approach to improve molecular diagnostic for P. falciparum in

  16. Rapid (ligase-free) subcloning of polymerase chain reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuldiner, A R; Tanner, K

    1993-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a versatile, widely used method for the production of a very large number of copies of a specific DNA molecule (1,2). For some applications, it is advantageous to subclone the PCR product into a plasmid vector for subsequent replication in bacteria (3-6). Subcloning the PCR product into a plasmid vector has several advantages: (1) the amplified fragment can be sequenced with greater reliability, (2) only one allele is sequenced per clone, and (3) the vector containing the PCR product may be used for other molecular biological experiments, e.g., in vitro transcription, radiolabeling, and further amplification in bacteria.

  17. Building block synthesis using the polymerase chain assembly method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Julie A; Peccoud, Jean

    2012-01-01

    De novo gene synthesis allows the creation of custom DNA molecules without the typical constraints of traditional cloning assembly: scars, restriction site incompatibility, and the quest to find all the desired parts to name a few. Moreover, with the help of computer-assisted design, the perfect DNA molecule can be created along with its matching sequence ready to download. The challenge is to build the physical DNA molecules that have been designed with the software. Although there are several DNA assembly methods, this section presents and describes a method using the polymerase chain assembly (PCA).

  18. Use of polymerase chain reaction for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lars; Birkelund, Svend; Christiansen, Gunna

    1990-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis DNA. From the published sequence of the common C. trachomatis plasmid, two primer sets were selected. Detection of amplified sequences was done by agarose gel electrophoresis of cleaved or uncleaved...... developed a closed system in which airborne contamination was minimized. Analysis of 228 clinical samples tested by cell culture, IDEIA enzyme immunosorbent assay (Medico-Nobel, Boots-Celltech Ltd., Berkshire, United Kingdom), and PCR showed a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 93% when PCR was compared...

  19. Copy number ratios determined by two digital polymerase chain reaction systems in genetically modified grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Urquiza, M.; Acatzi Silva, A. I.

    2014-02-01

    Three certified reference materials produced from powdered seeds to measure the copy number ratio sequences of p35S/hmgA in maize containing MON 810 event, p35S/Le1 in soybeans containing GTS 40-3-2 event and DREB1A/acc1 in wheat were produced according to the ISO Guides 34 and 35. In this paper, we report digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) protocols, performance parameters and results of copy number ratio content of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in these materials using two new dPCR systems to detect and quantify molecular deoxyribonucleic acid: the BioMark® (Fluidigm) and the OpenArray® (Life Technologies) systems. These technologies were implemented at the National Institute of Metrology in Mexico (CENAM) and in the Reference Center for GMO Detection from the Ministry of Agriculture (CNRDOGM), respectively. The main advantage of this technique against the more-used quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is that it generates an absolute number of target molecules in the sample, without reference to standards or an endogenous control, which is very useful when not much information is available for new developments or there are no standard reference materials in the market as in the wheat case presented, or when it was not possible to test the purity of seeds as in the maize case presented here. Both systems reported enhanced productivity, increased reliability and reduced instrument footprint. In this paper, the performance parameters and uncertainty of measurement obtained with both systems are presented and compared.

  20. Initiation of RNA Polymerization and Polymerase Encapsidation by a Small dsRNA Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M Collier

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available During the replication cycle of double-stranded (ds RNA viruses, the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP replicates and transcribes the viral genome from within the viral capsid. How the RdRP molecules are packaged within the virion and how they function within the confines of an intact capsid are intriguing questions with answers that most likely vary across the different dsRNA virus families. In this study, we have determined a 2.4 Å resolution structure of an RdRP from the human picobirnavirus (hPBV. In addition to the conserved polymerase fold, the hPBV RdRP possesses a highly flexible 24 amino acid loop structure located near the C-terminus of the protein that is inserted into its active site. In vitro RNA polymerization assays and site-directed mutagenesis showed that: (1 the hPBV RdRP is fully active using both ssRNA and dsRNA templates; (2 the insertion loop likely functions as an assembly platform for the priming nucleotide to allow de novo initiation; (3 RNA transcription by the hPBV RdRP proceeds in a semi-conservative manner; and (4 the preference of virus-specific RNA during transcription is dictated by the lower melting temperature associated with the terminal sequences. Co-expression of the hPBV RdRP and the capsid protein (CP indicated that, under the conditions used, the RdRP could not be incorporated into the recombinant capsids in the absence of the viral genome. Additionally, the hPBV RdRP exhibited higher affinity towards the conserved 5'-terminal sequence of the viral RNA, suggesting that the RdRP molecules may be encapsidated through their specific binding to the viral RNAs during assembly.

  1. Establishment of recombinase polymerase amplification assay for five hemorrhagic fever-related viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-feng CAO

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish a one-step recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA method for pathogen screening and rapid detection in the field targeting for five hemorrhagic fever related viruses (Zaire ebola virus, Sudan ebola virus, Marburg virus, Lassa virus and Yellow fever virus. Methods The specific nucleic acid (NA fragments of each virus were selected as target genes by genome sequence analysis, and the primers and probes for RPA assays were designed according to the sequence. A series of diluted template genes were used for RPA detection to determine the sensitivity. The hemorrhagic fever-related viral nucleic acids were used for RPA detection to determine the specificity. The amplification experiments were carried out at different temperature ranging from 37℃ to 42℃ to validate the reaction temperature range. Results The RPA reaction systems of the five hemorrhagic fever viruses could effectively amplify the target genes, the sensitivities were between 1.5×102 and 1.5×103 copies. No cross reactions existed with the other hemorrhagic fever-related viral genes. Meanwhile, RPA assay could effectively amplify the target genes at 37-42℃. Conclusion The isothermal RPA assays of five hemorrhagic fever viruses are established, which may amply target genes fast and react at a wide temperature range, and be potentially useful for in field pathogens detection. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.06.09

  2. Nucleobase but not Sugar Fidelity is Maintained in the Sabin I RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinran; Musser, Derek M; Lee, Cheri A; Yang, Xiaorong; Arnold, Jamie J; Cameron, Craig E; Boehr, David D

    2015-10-26

    The Sabin I poliovirus live, attenuated vaccine strain encodes for four amino acid changes (i.e., D53N, Y73H, K250E, and T362I) in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). We have previously shown that the T362I substitution leads to a lower fidelity RdRp, and viruses encoding this variant are attenuated in a mouse model of poliovirus. Given these results, it was surprising that the nucleotide incorporation rate and nucleobase fidelity of the Sabin I RdRp is similar to that of wild-type enzyme, although the Sabin I RdRp is less selective against nucleotides with modified sugar groups. We suggest that the other Sabin amino acid changes (i.e., D53N, Y73H, K250E) help to re-establish nucleotide incorporation rates and nucleotide discrimination near wild-type levels, which may be a requirement for the propagation of the virus and its efficacy as a vaccine strain. These results also suggest that the nucleobase fidelity of the Sabin I RdRp likely does not contribute to viral attenuation.

  3. Simple peptides derived from the ribosomal core potentiate RNA polymerase ribozyme function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Shunsuke; Attwater, James; Holliger, Philipp

    2017-04-01

    The emergence of functional interactions between nucleic acids and polypeptides was a key transition in the origin of life and remains at the heart of all biology. However, how and why simple non-coded peptides could have become critical for RNA function is unclear. Here, we show that putative ancient peptide segments from the cores of both ribosomal subunits enhance RNA polymerase ribozyme (RPR) function, as do derived homopolymeric peptides comprising lysine or the non-proteinogenic lysine analogues ornithine or, to a lesser extent, diaminobutyric acid, irrespective of chirality or chiral purity. Lysine decapeptides enhance RPR function by promoting holoenzyme assembly through primer-template docking, accelerate RPR evolution, and allow RPR-catalysed RNA synthesis at near physiological (≥1 mM) Mg2+ concentrations, enabling templated RNA synthesis within membranous protocells. Our results outline how compositionally simple, mixed-chirality peptides may have augmented the functional potential of early RNAs and promoted the emergence of the first protocells.

  4. Optimizing polymerase chain reaction testing for the diagnosis of pertussis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbefeville S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sophie Arbefeville, Patricia Ferrieri Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USA Abstract: Nucleic acid testing has revolutionized the diagnosis of pertussis in the clinical microbiology laboratory and has become the main avenue of testing for pertussis infection. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR is an important tool for timely diagnosis of pertussis and is more sensitive than culture. The most commonly amplified targets are the insertion-sequence (IS genes, which are found in multiple copies in the genome of Bordetella species. Some strains of Bordetella pertussis have more than 200 copies of IS481 in their genome. This high number of repeats allows RT-PCR assays to be very sensitive and makes nucleic acid testing two to three times more sensitive than culture. Despite these advantages, RT-PCR can give inaccurate results due to contamination or lack of specificity. Contamination can easily happen during specimen collection, DNA extraction, or nucleic acid amplification steps. To avoid contamination, laboratories need to have quality controls and good workflows in place. The poor specificity of the nucleic acid assays amplifying the IS genes is because they are found in various Bordetella species and, thus, not unique to a specific species. Bordetella holmesii, a more recently described Bordetella species found to be responsible for respiratory symptoms similar to pertussis in adolescents and adults, can be misidentified as B. pertussis in RT-PCR assays that amplify only the IS481 target. Use of multiple targets may improve specificity of RT-PCR assays for pertussis. In the past few years, the US Food and Drug Administration has cleared three commercial assays for the detection of B. pertussis in respiratory specimens. Several commercial assays and analyte-specific reagents, which are not US Food and Drug Administration cleared, are available for the detection of one

  5. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, a potential target for drugs: Cellular regulatory role of the polymer and the polymerase protein mediated by catalytic and macromolecular colligative actions (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun

    1998-08-01

    The cellular coenzymatic role of NAD, being a pleiotropic cofactor for diverse cellular reactions, is extended to poly(ADP-ribose) and to the highly abundant nuclear protein, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, with special focus on the pharmacological action of ligands on the latter. The polymer is defined to possess a helical configuration. From direct analyses of the polymer under physiological conditions, it is concluded that the polymerase is dormant in normal tissues, but is activated under certain pathological conditions: malignancy, retroviral integrate containing cells, and in a variety of inflammatory states. The interaction of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase ligands with the DNA component of the active poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase - DNA complex is shown. A major cellular function of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase protein is its binding capacity to a large number of nuclear proteins and DNA sites, an effect which is induced by drugs that inhibit the polymerase activity. The malignancy-reverting effect of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase ligand drugs is illustrated in chemically and oncovirally transformed cancer cells. The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase ligand-induced cessation of HIV replication is analyzed. Peroxynitrite-induced DNA damage-initiated pathological responses are shown to be inhibited by a specific poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase ligand. The irreversibly acting C-NO drugs oxidize asymmetric zinc fingers [poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, HIV gag-precursor protein] and act as anti-cancer and anti-HIV agents, an effect that is regulated by cellular concentration of GSH.

  6. Characterization of soluble RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from dengue virus serotype 2: The polyhistidine tag compromises the polymerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamkaew, Maliwan; Chimnaronk, Sarin

    2015-08-01

    The viral RNA polymerase is an attractive target for inhibition in the treatment of viral infections. In the case of dengue virus (DENV), a member of the genus Flavivirus, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity resides in the C-terminal two-thirds of non-structural protein (NS) 5 responsible for the de novo synthesis of the viral RNA genome. Among four distinct, but closely related dengue serotypes, serotype 2 (DENV-2) produces more severe diseases than other serotypes. It has been reported that bacterial production of the recombinant DENV-2 RdRp was difficult due to its low expression and solubility levels. To facilitate functional and structural analyses, we here demonstrate complete protocols for overexpression and purification of soluble DENV-2 RdRp, increasing protein yields by a remarkable 10 times compared to earlier reports. Three different forms of DENV-2 RdRp as either N- or C-terminally His-tagged fusions, or without tag, were purified to homogeneity. We show here that the presence of both the N- and C-terminal His-tag had a deleterious effect on polymerase activity and, in contrast to earlier studies, our non-tagged RdRp did not require manganese ions to activate RNA polymerization. We also determined an apparent Kd value of 53nM for binding to the 5'-UTR RNA by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Our work provide a more suitable material for basic research of viral RdRp and for drug development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. RNA polymerase of the killer virus of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgopoulos, D.E.; Leibowitz, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The L/sub A/ and M double-stranded (ds) RNA segments of the cytoplasmically inherited killer virus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are encapsidated in virions that contain a DNA-independent transcriptase activity. This enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of full-length (+) stranded copies of the genomic dsRNA segments, denoted l/sub A/ and m. The L/sub A/ dsRNA segment appears to encode the major capsid protein in which both dsRNA molecules are encapsidated, while M dsRNA encodes products responsible for the two killer phenotypes of toxin production and resistance to toxin. Proteins extracted from transcriptionally active virions fail to cross-react with antibody to yeast DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, suggesting that none of the subunits of the host cell polymerases are active in viral transcription. Sequence analysis of the in vitro transcripts reveals neither to be 3'-terminally polyadenylated, although m contains an apparent internal polyA-like tract. In the presence of any three ribonucleoside triphosphates (0.5 mM), the fourth ribonucleoside triphosphate shows an optimal rate of incorporation into transcript at a concentration of 20 μM. However, in a 3-hour reaction, the yield of a product RNA increases with the concentration of the limiting ribonucleotide up to 0.5 mM. Gel electrophoresis of the reaction products reveals that increasing the substrate concentration accelerates the appearance of radioactivity in full-length l/sub A/ and m transcripts

  8. Defining the Status of RNA Polymerase at Promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Core, Leighton J.; Waterfall, Joshua J.; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Fargo, David C.; Kwak, Hojoong; Adelman, Karen; Lis, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Recent genome-wide studies in metazoans have shown that RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) accumulates to high densities on many promoters at a rate-limited step in transcription. However, the status of this Pol II remains an area of debate. Here, we compare quantitative outputs of GRO-seq and ChIP-seq assays and demonstrate the majority of the Pol II on Drosophila promoters is transcriptionally-engaged - very little exists in a preinitiation or arrested complex. These promoter-proximal polymerases are inhibited from further elongation by detergent sensitive factors, and knockdown of negative elongation factor, NELF, reduces their levels. These results not only solidify that pausing occurs at most promoters, but demonstrate that it is the major rate-limiting step in early transcription at these promoters. Finally, the divergent elongation complexes seen at mammalian promoters are far less prevalent in Drosophila, and this specificity in orientation correlates with directional core promoter elements, which are abundant in Drosophila. PMID:23062713

  9. DNA polymerase beta participates in mitochondrial DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sykora, P; Kanno, S; Akbari, M

    2017-01-01

    We have detected DNA polymerase beta (Polβ), known as a key nuclear base excision repair (BER) protein, in mitochondrial protein extracts derived from mammalian tissue and cells. Manipulation of the N-terminal sequence affected the amount of Polβ in the mitochondria. Using Polβ fragments, mitocho......We have detected DNA polymerase beta (Polβ), known as a key nuclear base excision repair (BER) protein, in mitochondrial protein extracts derived from mammalian tissue and cells. Manipulation of the N-terminal sequence affected the amount of Polβ in the mitochondria. Using Polβ fragments......, mitochondrial-specific protein partners were identified, with the interactors mainly functioning in DNA maintenance and mitochondrial import. Of particular interest was the identification of the proteins TWINKLE, SSBP1 and TFAM, all of which are mitochondria specific DNA effectors and are known to function...... in the nucleoid. Polβ directly interacted with, and influenced the activity of, the mitochondrial helicase TWINKLE. Human kidney cells with Polβ knock-out (KO) had higher endogenous mtDNA damage. Mitochondrial extracts derived from heterozygous Polβ mouse tissue and KO cells had lower nucleotide incorporation...

  10. Chromosomal location of the human gene for DNA polymerase β

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, O.W.; Zmudzka, B.Z.; Wilson, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    Inhibition studies indicate that DNA polymerase β has a synthetic role in DNA repair after exposure of mammalian cells to some types of DNA-damaging agents. The primary structure of the enzyme is highly conserved in vertebrates, and nearly full-length cDNAs for the enzyme were recently cloned from mammalian cDNA libraries. Southern blot analysis of DNA from a panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids, using portions of the cDNA as probe, indicates that the gene for human DNA polymerase β is single copy and located on the short arm or proximal long arm of chromosome 8 (8pter-8q22). A restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was detected in normal individuals by using a probe from the 5' end of the cDNA, and this RFLP probably is due to an insertion or duplication of DNA in 20-25% of the population. This restriction site can be used as one marker for chromosome 8 genetic linkage studies and for family studies of traits potentially involving this DNA repair gene

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF MYCOBACTERIUM GENAVENSE IN A DIANA MONKEY (CERCOPITHECUS DIANA) BY POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION AND HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kathleen M; Wack, Allison N; Bradway, Dan; Simons, Brian W; Bronson, Ellen; Osterhout, Gerard; Parrish, Nicole M; Montali, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    A 25-yr-old Diana monkey (Cercopithecus diana) with a 1.5-yr history of chronic colitis and diarrhea was found to have disseminated granulomatous disease with intralesional acid fast bacilli. Bacilli were identified as Mycobacterium genavense by polymerase chain reaction, sequencing of the 16S-23S ribosomal RNA intergenic spacer (ITS) gene, and mycolic acid analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography. Mycobacterium genavense is a common cause of mycobacteriosis in free-ranging and captive birds. In addition, recognition of opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients is increasing. Disease manifestations of M. genavense are similar to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and include fever, wasting, and diarrhea with disseminated disease. Similar clinical signs and lesions were observed in this monkey. Mycobacterium genavense should be considered as a differential for disseminated mycobacterial disease in nonhuman primates as this agent can mimic MAC and related mycobacteria.

  12. File list: Pol.NoD.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.NoD.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III No des...cription http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.NoD.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.NoD.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.NoD.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II No de...scription http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.NoD.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.NoD.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.NoD.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III No des...cription http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.NoD.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.NoD.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.NoD.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II No descr...iption http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.NoD.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.NoD.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.NoD.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II No de...scription http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.NoD.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.NoD.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.NoD.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III No des...cription http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.NoD.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.NoD.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.NoD.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II No descr...iption http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.NoD.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.CeL.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CeL.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Cell line...70,SRX749072,SRX749071,SRX749073,SRX017852,SRX529168 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.CeL.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.NoD.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.NoD.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II No de...scription http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.NoD.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.NoD.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.NoD.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell dm3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II No descri...ption http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.NoD.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.NoD.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.NoD.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III No des...cription http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.NoD.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.NoD.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.NoD.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II No descr...iption http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.NoD.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.NoD.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.NoD.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II No de...scription http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.NoD.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.EmF.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.EmF.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Embryon...ic fibroblast http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.EmF.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.NoD.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.NoD.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II No descri...ption http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.NoD.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.NoD.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.NoD.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II No de...scription http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.NoD.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.NoD.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.NoD.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II No de...scription http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.NoD.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  9. Structures of an apo and a binary complex of an evolved archeal B family DNA polymerase capable of synthesising highly cy-dye labelled DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha A Wynne

    Full Text Available Thermophilic DNA polymerases of the polB family are of great importance in biotechnological applications including high-fidelity PCR. Of particular interest is the relative promiscuity of engineered versions of the exo- form of polymerases from the Thermo- and Pyrococcales families towards non-canonical substrates, which enables key advances in Next-generation sequencing. Despite this there is a paucity of structural information to guide further engineering of this group of polymerases. Here we report two structures, of the apo form and of a binary complex of a previously described variant (E10 of Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu polymerase with an ability to fully replace dCTP with Cyanine dye-labeled dCTP (Cy3-dCTP or Cy5-dCTP in PCR and synthesise highly fluorescent "CyDNA" densely decorated with cyanine dye heterocycles. The apo form of Pfu-E10 closely matches reported apo form structures of wild-type Pfu. In contrast, the binary complex (in the replicative state with a duplex DNA oligonucleotide reveals a closing movement of the thumb domain, increasing the contact surface with the nascent DNA duplex strand. Modelling based on the binary complex suggests how bulky fluorophores may be accommodated during processive synthesis and has aided the identification of residues important for the synthesis of unnatural nucleic acid polymers.

  10. Structures of an Apo and a Binary Complex of an Evolved Archeal B Family DNA Polymerase Capable of Synthesising Highly Cy-Dye Labelled DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, Samantha A.; Pinheiro, Vitor B.; Holliger, Philipp; Leslie, Andrew G. W.

    2013-01-01

    Thermophilic DNA polymerases of the polB family are of great importance in biotechnological applications including high-fidelity PCR. Of particular interest is the relative promiscuity of engineered versions of the exo- form of polymerases from the Thermo- and Pyrococcales families towards non-canonical substrates, which enables key advances in Next-generation sequencing. Despite this there is a paucity of structural information to guide further engineering of this group of polymerases. Here we report two structures, of the apo form and of a binary complex of a previously described variant (E10) of Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) polymerase with an ability to fully replace dCTP with Cyanine dye-labeled dCTP (Cy3-dCTP or Cy5-dCTP) in PCR and synthesise highly fluorescent “CyDNA” densely decorated with cyanine dye heterocycles. The apo form of Pfu-E10 closely matches reported apo form structures of wild-type Pfu. In contrast, the binary complex (in the replicative state with a duplex DNA oligonucleotide) reveals a closing movement of the thumb domain, increasing the contact surface with the nascent DNA duplex strand. Modelling based on the binary complex suggests how bulky fluorophores may be accommodated during processive synthesis and has aided the identification of residues important for the synthesis of unnatural nucleic acid polymers. PMID:23940661

  11. Identifikasi Cendawan Endofit Menggunakan Teknik Polymerase Chain Reaction (Detection of Endophytic Fungi Using Polymerase Chain Reaction Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuti Susanti Legiastuti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Yellow leaf curl disease, caused by a member of Begomovirus (Geminiviridae, is one of important diseases of chilli pepper in Indonesia. Exploration of endophytic fungi was initiated in order to find biological control agents for an alternative control strategies of this disease. Isolates of endophytic fungi were collected from chilli pepper growing area in Sleman, Yogyakarta and further identification using molecular technique involving polymerase chain reaction (PCR and DNA sequencing was performed. DNA fragments of ±500 bp were successfully amplified from 10 fungal isolates by PCR using primer pair ITS1/ITS4, but only 8 DNA sequences was obtained for further genetic analysis. Based on BLASTN analysis the endophytic fungi were identified as having the highest similarity with Pleosporaceae sp. (98% for H1 isolate, Cercospora nicotianae (100% for H5 isolate, ercospora piaropi (98% for H11 isolate, Guignardia mangiferae (99% for H16 isolate, Geomyces pannorum 95% for H17 isolate, Diaporthe phaseoloru (99% for H18 isolate, Dothideomycete sp. (100% for K3 isolate, and Alternaria longissima (99% for K10 isolate. Key words: Begomovirus, chillipepper, DNA sequencing, polymerase chain reaction

  12. General misincorporation frequency: Re-evaluation of the fidelity of DNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Li, Bianbian; Liu, Xiaoying; Tang, Hong; Zhuang, Xiyao; Yang, Mingqi; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Huidong; Yang, Chun

    2018-02-19

    DNA replication in cells is performed in the presence of four dNTPs and four rNTPs. In this study, we re-evaluated the fidelity of DNA polymerases using the general misincorporation frequency consisting of three incorrect dNTPs and four rNTPs but not using the traditional special misincorporation frequency with only the three incorrect dNTPs. We analyzed both the general and special misincorporation frequencies of nucleotide incorporation opposite dG, rG, or 8-oxoG by Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage 1 (PaP1) DNA polymerase Gp90 or Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA polymerase Dpo4. Both misincorporation frequencies of other DNA polymerases published were also summarized and analyzed. The general misincorporation frequency is obviously higher than the special misincorporation frequency for many DNA polymerases, indicating the real fidelity of a DNA polymerase should be evaluated using the general misincorporation frequency. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Translesion Synthesis: Insights into the Selection and Switching of DNA Polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication is constantly challenged by DNA lesions, noncanonical DNA structures and difficult-to-replicate DNA sequences. Two major strategies to rescue a stalled replication fork and to ensure continuous DNA synthesis are: (1 template switching and recombination-dependent DNA synthesis; and (2 translesion synthesis (TLS using specialized DNA polymerases to perform nucleotide incorporation opposite DNA lesions. The former pathway is mainly error-free, and the latter is error-prone and a major source of mutagenesis. An accepted model of translesion synthesis involves DNA polymerase switching steps between a replicative DNA polymerase and one or more TLS DNA polymerases. The mechanisms that govern the selection and exchange of specialized DNA polymerases for a given DNA lesion are not well understood. In this review, recent studies concerning the mechanisms of selection and switching of DNA polymerases in eukaryotic systems are summarized.

  14. Polymerase chain reaction: basic protocol plus troubleshooting and optimization strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Todd C

    2012-05-22

    In the biological sciences there have been technological advances that catapult the discipline into golden ages of discovery. For example, the field of microbiology was transformed with the advent of Anton van Leeuwenhoek's microscope, which allowed scientists to visualize prokaryotes for the first time. The development of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is one of those innovations that changed the course of molecular science with its impact spanning countless subdisciplines in biology. The theoretical process was outlined by Keppe and coworkers in 1971; however, it was another 14 years until the complete PCR procedure was described and experimentally applied by Kary Mullis while at Cetus Corporation in 1985. Automation and refinement of this technique progressed with the introduction of a thermal stable DNA polymerase from the bacterium Thermus aquaticus, consequently the name Taq DNA polymerase. PCR is a powerful amplification technique that can generate an ample supply of a specific segment of DNA (i.e., an amplicon) from only a small amount of starting material (i.e., DNA template or target sequence). While straightforward and generally trouble-free, there are pitfalls that complicate the reaction producing spurious results. When PCR fails it can lead to many non-specific DNA products of varying sizes that appear as a ladder or smear of bands on agarose gels. Sometimes no products form at all. Another potential problem occurs when mutations are unintentionally introduced in the amplicons, resulting in a heterogeneous population of PCR products. PCR failures can become frustrating unless patience and careful troubleshooting are employed to sort out and solve the problem(s). This protocol outlines the basic principles of PCR, provides a methodology that will result in amplification of most target sequences, and presents strategies for optimizing a reaction. By following this PCR guide, students should be able to: • Set up reactions and thermal cycling

  15. Lesion Orientation of O4-Alkylthymidine Influences Replication by Human DNA Polymerase η

    OpenAIRE

    O’Flaherty, D. K.; Patra, A.; Su, Y.; Guengerich, F. P.; Egli, M.; Wilds, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA lesions that elude repair may undergo translesion synthesis catalyzed by Y-family DNA polymerases. O4-Alkylthymidines, persistent adducts that can result from carcinogenic agents, may be encountered by DNA polymerases. The influence of lesion orientation around the C4-O4 bond on processing by human DNA polymerase η (hPol η) was studied for oligonucleotides containing O4-methylthymidine, O4-ethylthymidine, and analogs restricting the O4-methylene group in an anti-orientation. Primer extens...

  16. Detection of Clostridium septicum hemolysin gene by polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, S; Hashizume, N; Kinoshita, T; Kaidoh, T; Tamura, Y

    1997-09-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed for the detection of the hemolysin (alpha toxin) gene of Clostridium septicum. The PCR primers were designed from the sequence of the hemolysin gene and synthesized. A DNA fragment of 270 bp was amplified from 10 strains of C. septicum, but was not from strains of C. chauvoei, C. perfringens, C. novyi, or C. haemolyticum. When the PCR product was digested with Sau3AI, two DNA fragments of the expected 148 bp and 122 bp were recognized. The lowest detectable threshold of PCR for the hemolysin gene was 3.8 x 10(3) cells/ml. The PCR technique may be useful for rapid detection or identification of C. septicum associated with malignant edema.

  17. Kinetic discrimination of a polymerase in the presence of obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogod, Ilana; Rahav, Saar

    2017-04-01

    One of the causes of high fidelity of copying in biological systems is kinetic discrimination. In this mechanism larger dissipation and copying velocity result in improved copying accuracy. We consider a model of a polymerase which simultaneously copies a single-stranded RNA and opens a single- to double-stranded junction serving as an obstacle. The presence of the obstacle slows down the motor, resulting in a change of its fidelity, which can be used to gain information about the motor and junction dynamics. We find that the motor's fidelity does not depend on details of the motor-junction interaction, such as whether the interaction is passive or active. Analysis of the copying fidelity can still be used as a tool for investigating the junction kinetics.

  18. FACT facilitates chromatin transcription by RNA polymerases I and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Joanna L; Tan, Bertrand C-M; Panov, Kostya I

    2009-01-01

    Efficient transcription elongation from a chromatin template requires RNA polymerases (Pols) to negotiate nucleosomes. Our biochemical analyses demonstrate that RNA Pol I can transcribe through nucleosome templates and that this requires structural rearrangement of the nucleosomal core particle....... The subunits of the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription), SSRP1 and Spt16, co-purify and co-immunoprecipitate with mammalian Pol I complexes. In cells, SSRP1 is detectable at the rRNA gene repeats. Crucially, siRNA-mediated repression of FACT subunit expression in cells results...... in a significant reduction in 47S pre-rRNA levels, whereas synthesis of the first 40 nt of the rRNA is not affected, implying that FACT is important for Pol I transcription elongation through chromatin. FACT also associates with RNA Pol III complexes, is present at the chromatin of genes transcribed by Pol III...

  19. DNA sequencing using polymerase substrate-binding kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previte, Michael John Robert; Zhou, Chunhong; Kellinger, Matthew; Pantoja, Rigo; Chen, Cheng-Yao; Shi, Jin; Wang, BeiBei; Kia, Amirali; Etchin, Sergey; Vieceli, John; Nikoomanzar, Ali; Bomati, Erin; Gloeckner, Christian; Ronaghi, Mostafa; He, Molly Min

    2015-01-23

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has transformed genomic research by decreasing the cost of sequencing. However, whole-genome sequencing is still costly and complex for diagnostics purposes. In the clinical space, targeted sequencing has the advantage of allowing researchers to focus on specific genes of interest. Routine clinical use of targeted NGS mandates inexpensive instruments, fast turnaround time and an integrated and robust workflow. Here we demonstrate a version of the Sequencing by Synthesis (SBS) chemistry that potentially can become a preferred targeted sequencing method in the clinical space. This sequencing chemistry uses natural nucleotides and is based on real-time recording of the differential polymerase/DNA-binding kinetics in the presence of correct or mismatch nucleotides. This ensemble SBS chemistry has been implemented on an existing Illumina sequencing platform with integrated cluster amplification. We discuss the advantages of this sequencing chemistry for targeted sequencing as well as its limitations for other applications.

  20. Iwr1 facilitates RNA polymerase II dynamics during transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Navarro, Natalia; Peiró-Chova, Lorena; Estruch, Francisco

    2017-07-01

    Iwr1 is an RNA polymerase II (RNPII) interacting protein that directs nuclear import of the enzyme which has been previously assembled in the cytoplasm. Here we present genetic and molecular evidence that links Iwr1 with transcription. Our results indicate that Iwr1 interacts with RNPII during elongation and is involved in the disassembly of the enzyme from chromatin. This function is especially important in resolving problems posed by damage-arrested RNPII, as shown by the sensitivity of iwr1 mutants to genotoxic drugs and the Iwr1's genetic interactions with RNPII degradation pathway mutants. Moreover, absence of Iwr1 causes genome instability that is enhanced by defects in the DNA repair machinery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.