WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology-based student activities

  1. Designing a Technology-Based Science Lesson: Student Teachers Grapple with an Authentic Problem of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Susan McAleenan; Wiebe, Eric N.

    2003-01-01

    This project used techniques from problem-based learning to aid students in developing a technology-based science lesson. In this case, the "problem" students were asked to solve, was that of combining curriculum knowledge and pedagogical skills to incorporate computer graphics animation technology within a science lesson and then teach the lesson…

  2. Bringing Technology to Students' Proximity: A Sociocultural Account of Technology-Based Learning Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukama, Evode

    2014-01-01

    This paper depicts a study carried out in Rwanda concerning university students who participated in a contest to produce short documentary films. The purpose of this research is to conceptualize these kinds of technology-based learning projects (TBLPs) through a sociocultural perspective. The methodology included focus group discussions and field…

  3. Introductory Statistics, College Student Attitudes and Knowledge--A Qualitative Analysis of the Impact of Technology-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meletiou-Mavrotheris, M.; Lee, C.; Fouladi, R. T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a qualitative study that compared the learning experiences of a group of students from a technology-based college-level introductory statistics course with the learning experiences of a group of students with non-technology-based instruction. Findings from the study indicate differences with regards to classroom…

  4. Networking activities in technology-based entrepreneurial teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Helle

    2005-01-01

    Based on social network theoy, this article investigates the distribution of networking roles and responsibilities in entrepreneurial founding teams. Its focus is on the team as a collection of individuals, thus allowing the research to address differences in networking patterns. It identifies six...... central networking activities and shows that not all founding team members are equally active 'networkers'. The analyses show that team members prioritize different networking activities and that one member in particular has extensive networking activities whereas other memebrs of the team are more...

  5. Rethinking the Role of Information Technology-Based Research Tools in Students' Development of Scientific Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijck, Michiel; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2007-06-01

    Given the central place IT-based research tools take in scientific research, the marginal role such tools currently play in science curricula is dissatisfying from the perspective of making students scientifically literate. To appropriately frame the role of IT-based research tools in science curricula, we propose a framework that is developed to understand the use of tools in human activity, namely cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT). Accordingly, IT-based research tools constitute central moments of scientific research activity and neither can be seen apart from its objectives, nor can it be considered apart from the cultural-historical determined forms of activity (praxis) in which human subjects participate. Based on empirical data involving students participating in research activity, we point out how an appropriate account of IT-based research tools involves subjects' use of tools with respect to the objectives of research activity and the contribution to the praxis of research. We propose to reconceptualize the role of IT-based research tools as contributing to scientific literacy if students apply these tools with respect to the objectives of the research activity and contribute to praxis of research by evaluating and modifying the application of these tools. We conclude this paper by sketching the educational implications of this reconceptualized role of IT-based research tools.

  6. Constraints experienced by female students pursuing science and technology-based university programmes in their learning of science in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwaku Darko Amponsah

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is part of a larger study to investigate female students in science and technology-based university (STU programs in their motivation, perception and constraint in learning science at senior high school and consequently science and technology-based programs at the university level. The conceptual framework is rooted in Steele’s concept of stereotype threat, which is the experience of anxiety or concern in a situation where a person has the potential to confirm a negative stereotype about their social group. The investigation was conducted among 328 final year female students pursuing engineering, medicine, pharmacy and computer science/ICT at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST, Kumasi, Ghana. The study utilized cross-sectional descriptive survey design. 328 final year female students in the 2008/2009 academic year pursuing engineering, medicine, pharmacy and computer science/ICT formed the sample. A Self-Report Survey Questionnaire on constraints female students experience in their learning of science was designed and administered. This study indicated that female students have to grapple with some challenges such as lack of funding, and the unavailability or expensive nature of some textbooks. One-way between group analysis of variance (ANOVA and Hotchberg GT2 Post hoc analyses indicated that there were significant differences in constraints among some of the four groups of students. It was concluded that Government and other stakeholders should provide funding, scholarships or bursaries to female students in order to enhance their full participation. These challenges may account in part to the low participation of females in science and technology-based programs.

  7. The Development of Technology-Based Counseling Strategies to Enhance Outreach to Parents and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Marie L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a program for counseling students enrolled in an online charter school located in Las Vegas, Nevada. The author presents a review of the process to establish an online school in Nevada and a unique model for delivery of services that combines face-to-face instruction and online education. The author describes the development of…

  8. Technology-Based Literature Plans for Elementary Students (Technology Links to Literacy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wepner, Shelley B.

    1991-01-01

    Presents ideas for incorporating software into each guided reading phase for two realistic fiction books: Lois Lowry's "Anastasia on Her Own" and Barthe DeClements's "The Fourth Grade Wizards." Discusses how each skeletal plan uses three pieces of software to enliven students' oral and written thoughts about the books'…

  9. Mobile Learning Technology Based on iOS Devices to Support Students with Special Education Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Lopez, Alvaro; Rodriguez-Fortiz, Maria Jose; Rodriguez-Almendros, Maria Luisa; Martinez-Segura, Maria Jose

    2013-01-01

    Students with special education have difficulties to develop cognitive abilities and acquire new knowledge. They could also need to improve their behavior, communication and relationships with their environment. The development of customizable and adaptable applications tailored to them provides many benefits as it helps mold the learning process…

  10. Towards a Socio-Cultural Framework for the Analysis of Joint Student-Teacher Development over Technology-Based Mathematics Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper offers a framework, an extension of Valsiner's "zone theory", for the analysis of joint student-teacher development over a series of technology-based mathematics lessons. The framework is suitable for developing research studies over a moderately long period of time and considers interrelated student-teacher development as…

  11. Analyzing the Effect of Technology-Based Intervention in Language Laboratory to Improve Listening Skills of First Year Engineering Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasupathi Madhumathi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available First year students pursuing engineering education face problems with their listening skills. Most of the Indian schools use a bilingual method for teaching subjects from primary school through high school. Nonetheless, students entering university education develop anxiety in listening to classroomlectures in English. This article reports an exploratory study that aimed to find out whether the listening competences of students improved when technology was deployed in language laboratory. It also investigated the opinions of the students about using teacher-suggested websites for acquiring listening skills. The results of the study indicated that the use of technology in a language laboratory for training students in listening competences had reduced the anxiety of the students when listening to English. Further, there was a significant improvement on the part of students in acquiring listening skills through technology-based intervention.Muchos estudiantes de ingeniería de primer año en India tienen problemas con sus habilidades de escucha en inglés; experimentan ansiedad al momento de escuchar conferencias en inglés, pese a que provienen de colegios donde se sigue un modelo bilingüe para enseñar materias desde la primariahasta la secundaria. Con el objetivo de averiguar si las competencias de escucha de los estudiantes mejoran cuando se introduce la tecnología en el laboratorio de idiomas, se realizó un estudio exploratorio en el que se tuvieron en cuenta las opiniones de los estudiantes acerca del uso de sitios web sugeridos por el docente para adquirir habilidades de escucha. Los resultados indican que el uso de la tecnología en el laboratorio de idiomas reduce la ansiedad de los estudiantes al momento de escuchar conferencias en inglés y que progresan significativamente en sus habilidades de escucha.

  12. Development of Glutathione Production Technology Based on Constructed Active Yeast Overproducers

    OpenAIRE

    Yurkiv M.T.; Kurylenko O.O.; Vasylyshyn R.V.; Dmytruk K.V.; Martynyuk N.B.; Skorohod V.V.; Sybirny A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant Hansenula polymorpha strain overexpressing both GSH2 gene, encoding γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, and MET4 gene, coding for transcription activator of genes involved in cysteine biosynthesis (precursor of glutathione) was obtained applying metabolic engineering approaches. Obtained recombinant strain was characterized by significantly increased glutathione production as compared to the wild type strain in laboratory conditions. Conditions for efficient glutathione production by r...

  13. Basic Study for New Assistive Technology Based on Brain Activity during Car Driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Inoue

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it is necessary to develop a new system which assists driving car and wheelchair as aged society. The final our purpose in this research is to contribute to developing of assistive robot and related-apparatus. In terms of developing a new system, we thought that it is important to examine behaviors as well as spatial recognition. Therefore, experiments have been performed for an examination of human spatial perceptions, especially right and left recognition, during car driving by using NIRS. In previous research, it has been documented that there were significant differences at dorsolateral prefrontal cortex at left hemisphere during virtual driving task and actual driving. In this paper, we performed measuring the brain activity during car driving by using NIRS. And we performed statistical analysis of the brain activity. The purpose of this paper is discovering the brain region which was involved in decision making when human drive a car and considering between human movement and brain activity during car driving.

  14. Development of Glutathione Production Technology Based on Constructed Active Yeast Overproducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurkiv M.T.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant Hansenula polymorpha strain overexpressing both GSH2 gene, encoding γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, and MET4 gene, coding for transcription activator of genes involved in cysteine biosynthesis (precursor of glutathione was obtained applying metabolic engineering approaches. Obtained recombinant strain was characterized by significantly increased glutathione production as compared to the wild type strain in laboratory conditions. Conditions for efficient glutathione production by recombinant H. polymorpha strain were optimized. A semi-industrial model for glutathione production using constructed H. polymorpha overproducer was developed.

  15. Technology based interventions to promote Healthy and Active Ageing: the role of positive emotions and physical activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabrita, M.; Tabak, Monique; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé

    2016-01-01

    An active lifestyle is of utmost importance for the quality of life of the older adults. With active lifestyle is meant not only physically active, but also engaged with the social environment. Although some individuals can achieve a desired level of physical activity and engagement by themselves,

  16. Technology based interventions to promote Healthy and Active Ageing: the role of positive emotions and physical activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabrita, Miriam; Tabak, Monique; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    An active lifestyle is of utmost importance for the quality of life of the older adults. With active lifestyle is meant not only physically active, but also engaged with the social environment. Although some individuals can achieve a desired level of physical activity and engagement by themselves, o

  17. Implementation of 7e learning cycle model using technology based constructivist teaching (TBCT) approach to improve students' understanding achievment in mechanical wave material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warliani, Resti; Muslim, Setiawan, Wawan

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to determine the increase in the understanding achievement in senior high school students through the Learning Cycle 7E with technology based constructivist teaching approach (TBCT). This study uses a pretest-posttest control group design. The participants were 67 high school students of eleventh grade in Garut city with two class in control and experiment class. Experiment class applying the Learning Cycle 7E through TBCT approach and control class applying the 7E Learning Cycle through Constructivist Teaching approach (CT). Data collection tools from mechanical wave concept test with totally 22 questions with reability coefficient was found 0,86. The findings show the increase of the understanding achievement of the experiment class is in the amount of 0.51 was higher than the control class that is in the amount of 0.33.

  18. Contribution of the analytic hierarchy process (AHP method for supporting the decision to outsource or internalize activities in the context of technology-based company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Paula Reis

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The definition of business model requires, among other decisions, the structure of the value chain of an emerging new organization. This structure depends on the decision to outsource or internalize sets of processes and their activities. This decision fundamentally strategic, demand a correct definition of the activities that actually add value to the business, and therefore desirable a methodology able to assist the manager in the process of decision making. This paper aims to propose a process to aid decision to outsource or internalize activities in the context of a technology-based company, using the strategy of action research methods associated with the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP and focus group technique. The study has resulted in the structuring of the decision process and criteria relevant to the identification of activities to be internalized by the technology-based company.

  19. Psycho-physical perfection of economic specialties’ girl students under influence of sport-oriented technology, based on prevalence of volleyball practicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salatenko I.O.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to work out content of sport-oriented technology of physical education, based on prevalence of volleyball practicing. Material: in the research two experimental (n=25, n=25 and one control (n=25 groups of girl students participated. The content of sport-oriented technology, based on prevalence of volleyball practicing included additionally elements of fitness. студенток. Quickness of mental processes and efficiency of mind operations were assessed with the help of special cards, on which 9 dials with pointers were depicted. The sense of test was: addition of dials’ readings in mind; simultaneous calculation of value of scale one division; keeping in memory the previous sum of readings. This task was to be fulfilled for 6 minutes. Results: it was found that quickness of mental processes and mind operations as well as operative memory were at level below average. The most expressed positive factor was registered in group in which circle sport trainings were conducted. It was also found that over-fatigue at the end of academic year influences on testing indicators. Conclusions: the offered by us sport-oriented technology, based on prevalence of volleyball practicing can be recommended as effective mean of economic specialties girl students’ psycho-physical qualities’ strengthening.

  20. Technology based Education System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kant Hiran, Kamal; Doshi, Ruchi; Henten, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Abstract - Education plays a very important role for the development of the country. Education has multiple dimensions from schooling to higher education and research. In all these domains, there is invariably a need for technology based teaching and learning tools are highly demanded in the acad...

  1. Physical activity assessment in patients with axial spondyloarthritis compared to healthy controls: a technology-based approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thijs Willem Swinnen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Traditionally, assessment in axial Spondyloarthritis (aSpA includes the evaluation of the capacity to execute tasks, conceptualized as physical function. The role of physical activity, defined as movement-related energy expenditure, is largely unknown and almost exclusively studied using patient-reported outcome measures. The aims of this observational cross-sectional study are to compare physical activity between patients with aSpA and healthy controls (HC and to evaluate the contribution of disease activity to physical activity differences between groups. METHODS: Forty patients with aSpA were matched by age, gender, period of data acquisition in terms of days and season to 40 HC. Physical activity was measured during five consecutive days (three weekdays and two weekend days using ambulatory monitoring (SenseWear Armband. Self-reported disease activity was measured by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI. Differences in physical activity between patients with aSpA and HC were examined with Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and a mixed linear model. Difference scores between patients and HC were correlated with disease activity. RESULTS: Average weekly physical activity level (Med(IQR; HC:1.54(1.41-1.73; aSpA:1.45(1.31-1.67,MET and energy expenditure (HC:36.40(33.43-41.01; aSpA:34.55(31.08-39.41,MET.hrs/day were significantly lower in patients with aSpA. Analyses across intensity levels revealed no significant differences between groups for inactivity and time spent at light or moderate physical activities. In contrast, weekly averages of vigorous (HC:4.02(1.20-12.60; aSpA:0.00(0.00-1.20,min/d, very vigorous physical activities (HC0.00(0.00-1.08; aSpA:0.00(0.00-0.00,mind/d and moderate/(veryvigorous combined (HC2.41(1.62-3.48; aSpA:1.63(1.20-2.82,hrs/d were significantly lower in patients with aSpA. Disease activity did not interact with differences in physical activity between patients with aSpA and HC

  2. Student-Centered Reading Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, James; Wagner, Betty Jane

    1991-01-01

    Offers student-centered reading activities designed to bring students to reading maturity and involvement in literature. Discusses partner reading, dramatizing and performing texts, transforming texts, journal writing, discussion, and writing. (PRA)

  3. SOCIAL ACTIVITY OF STUDENT YOUTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzhela I. BALOG

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to disclosure of features of social activity of modern student's youth. At the beginning of the article different classifications of social activity forms are described, that proves their great diversity. To identify specifics of social activity of modern student's youth we used the results of the survey conducted among university students in Kirov. We analyzed the readiness of students to participate in social activities; the popularity of various social organizations in the student environment; the expectations related to social activity and subjective self-determination of the level of social activity of student's youth. It should be noted that to date, indeed public youth organizations are well represented in our country. As for the student youth, then, of course, the most common of the non-governmental organizations in this environment are the bodies of the student government. They are represented by student councils, trade unions, student scientific society, student centers and personnel agencies, councils of dormitories and other organizations. The majority of respondents to impose requirements youth organizations develop their leadership and managerial qualities as well as promote selforganization of young people. This proves the need for the development of youth public organizations of competent state youth policy. 

  4. Enhancing Learning with the Social Media: Student Teachers' Perceptions on Twitter in a Debate Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tur, Gemma; Marín, Victoria I.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents research focused on the educational experience of students using the microblogging platform Twitter for debate activities in three groups in different teacher education programmes at the University of the Balearic Islands, Spain. The implementation of this technology-based task in a face-to-face class was introduced as an…

  5. Student active teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    will give a brief introduction to meta-analyses and syntheses of educational research related to student achievement (Hattie, 2009, 2011). And then point to teaching methods that are manageable in classes of any size, are engaging to students, and qualified for increasing and developing students’ abilities......It seems unsatisfactory that much teaching practice is based on ideas with only weak or sometimes even no documentation for their effect. Many resources in terms of money and time have been lost on implementing ideas that after a short while must be dropped because they did not function well...... in practice, or had no relevant importance for student outcomes. In education we have quite often witnessed introduction of strategies and methods based on personal beliefs, habits, fancy and fads; not research findings and evidence. Fields like education that frequently are occupied with ill defined problems...

  6. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  7. Student active teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    It seems unsatisfactory that much teaching practice is based on ideas with only weak or sometimes even no documentation for their effect. Many resources in terms of money and time have been lost on implementing ideas that after a short while must be dropped because they did not function well...... to the surface (Best, 2006). In order to avoid fads, fancy and personal bias in education the science of teaching has gained ground over the last decades. Today we have from research and especially from syntheses of research results quite much evidence on what works and to what degree it works. This presentation...... will give a brief introduction to meta-analyses and syntheses of educational research related to student achievement (Hattie, 2009, 2011). And then point to teaching methods that are manageable in classes of any size, are engaging to students, and qualified for increasing and developing students’ abilities...

  8. Coal Activities for Secondary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Coal Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This collection of lesson plans designed for teachers of 4th- through 12th-grade students utilizes an assortment of teaching strategies for topics related to coal and the coal industry. Activities cover the following topics: coal formation; coal identification; "the geologist's dilemma" (a supply and demand activity); geologic time and the…

  9. Technology base for microgravity horticulture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, R. L.; Magnuson, J. W.; Scruby, R. R.; Scheld, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced microgravity plant biology research and life support system development for the spacecraft environment are critically hampered by the lack of a technology base. This inadequacy stems primarily from the fact that microgravity results in a lack of convective currents and phase separation as compared to the one gravity environment. A program plan is being initiated to develop this technology base. This program will provide an iterative flight development effort that will be closely integrated with both basic science investigations and advanced life support system development efforts incorporating biological processes. The critical considerations include optimum illumination methods, root aeration, root and shoot support, and heat rejection and gas exchange in the plant canopy.

  10. Make Your Students Active Learners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冬云

    2009-01-01

    Think back to when you were in school.? Did you like to sit at a desk and listen to your teacher drone on and on? Or suppose that you're standing in the front of a class of glassy-eyed children, or, even worse, a class of students who are just plain ignoringyou. Active learning doesn't mean the children need to sit still throughout the class period - it just means that you design your class period around having them actively participate in the learning process.?How can you get them back "into" your class and make them active learners? There are lots of things you can do. During my 20-year teaching career as a junior English teacher, I have got plenty of experience. This paper suggests the importance and ways of making your students active learners based on the theory of intrinsic motivation and extrinsic motivation. With regard to achieving intrinsic motivation, it is concluded that TPR, playing games, using stories, sing songs and saying rhymes are good strategies for children. As to extrinsic motivation, outward praise, proper mistake correction and portfolios are suggested.

  11. Horticulture Therapy Activities for Exceptional Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airhart, Douglas L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The Tennessee Technological University's Program of Special Education sponsors a "Super Saturday" of enrichment activities for gifted and talented students as well as students with learning disabilities. A session on horticulture was planned and arranged by students in a class on horticultural therapy who designed learning activities of…

  12. Physical active rest in education of active personality of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaycev V.P.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Meaningfulness of physical recreation is rotined in education of active personality of students. Research material is literary sources on this issue. Factors which influence on an educate function of personality of students are considered. Application of physical recreation is grounded for education of active personality of students. It is marked that physical recreation in pedagogical process decides educate, educational, health and social tasks. It positively influences on education of active personality of students. It is rotined that in education of active personality of students an important role is played by their research activity.

  13. A Student Activity That Simulates Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nichole L.; Lang-Walker, Rosalyn; Fail, Joseph L., Jr.; Champion, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    We describe an activity that uses cards to simulate evolution. The mechanism of the evolutionary pressure in the simulation is clearly indicated for the students. This simulation is useful for allowing student experimentation by varying conditions.

  14. A Technology-based Model for Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Williams

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Math Emporium, opened in 1997, is an open 7000-squaremeter facility with 550+ workstations arranged in an array of widely spaced hexagonal "pods", designed to support group work at the same time maintaining an academic air. We operate it 24/7 with math support personnel in attendance 12 hours per day. Students have access to online course resources at all times, from anywhere. We have used this unique asset to transform traditional classroom-based courses into technology based learning programs that have no class meetings at all. The structure of the program is very different from the conventional one, having a new set of expectations and motivations. The results include: more effective students, substantial cost savings, economies of scale and scope and a stream-lined process for creating new on-line courses.

  15. Activation of Students with Various Teaching Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma

    2011-01-01

    A group of teaching methodes to active engineer students have been tried out. The methodes are developed based on the Pedagogical Cyclic Workflow (PCW). Comparing with earlier evaluation, positive feedback is achieved among the students.......A group of teaching methodes to active engineer students have been tried out. The methodes are developed based on the Pedagogical Cyclic Workflow (PCW). Comparing with earlier evaluation, positive feedback is achieved among the students....

  16. Making Meaning of Student Activism: Student Activist and Administrator Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Laura M.; Mather, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    College campuses have experienced a recent resurgence of student activism, particularly in response to some of President Donald Trump's executive orders as well as controversial speakers like Ann Coulter and Milo Yiannopoulous. Student activism presents both challenges and opportunities for higher education leaders seeking to engage productively…

  17. Active Learning via Student Karaoke Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Gary D.; Richards, Travis

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated students' perceptions and reactions to an active learning Karaoke Video project in both a large (104 student) undergraduate class in Natural History of Georgia and a small graduate seminar in Fish Ecology. Undergraduate responses were evaluated with both questionnaires and triangulation interviews and graduate student responses…

  18. An Investigation of the Linkage between Technology-Based Activities and STEM Major Selection in 4-Year Postsecondary Institutions in the United States: Multilevel Structural Equation Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ahlam

    2015-01-01

    Among the disciplines of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), much attention has been paid to the influences of math- and science-related learning contexts on students' STEM major selection. However, the technology and engineering learning contexts that are linked to STEM major selection have been overlooked. In response, a…

  19. Problem of shortage of motor activity students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futornyі S.M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The approaches to the problem of a rational organization of motor activity of students. Elucidate the relation of motor activity of health conditions. Shows the contradictions between the growing need to enhance students' mental labor in the modern educational environment and the lack of physical activity of young people in the learning process at the university. The level of physical activity of students and to assess its compliance with the appropriate regulations. An expert survey of physical education teachers. The necessity of changing approaches to the process of physical education and the development of recommendations and actions to improve the quality of education in physical education. It is proved that the deficit of motor activity by the students it is advisable to include educational and daily activities of this category of students of various forms of physical education classes of various kinds.

  20. Promoting Business Education through Student Organization Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelverton, Sandra

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the promotion of business education through the activities of student organizations. Describes specific programs, projects, and leadership development activities and their effectiveness in publicizing business education programs. (JOW)

  1. FY04 Engineering Technology Reports Technology Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, R M

    2005-01-27

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate has two primary discretionary avenues for its investment in technologies: the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program and the ''Tech Base'' program. This volume summarizes progress on the projects funded for technology-base efforts in FY2004. The Engineering Technical Reports exemplify Engineering's more than 50-year history of researching and developing (LDRD), and reducing to practice (technology-base) the engineering technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence, and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and technical resources. This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow''. LDRD is the vehicle for creating those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge. These require a significant level of research or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply those technologies, or adapt them to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice''. Tech Base projects effect the natural transition to reduction-to-practice of scientific or engineering methods that are well understood and established. They represent discipline-oriented, core competency activities that are multi-programmatic in application, nature, and scope. The objectives of technology-base funding include: (1) the development and enhancement of tools and processes to provide Engineering support capability, such as code maintenance and improved fabrication methods; (2) support of Engineering science and technology infrastructure, such as the installation or integration of a new capability; (3) support for technical and

  2. Team Building Activities for Young Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    Team building activities are an excellent way to challenge students and teach them the critical communication and problem solving skills that encourage trust, empathy, and ability to work together. They create an atmosphere that enhances the ability to meet fitness and skill goals because students, regardless of skill level, will possess increased…

  3. Enhancing learning with the social media: student teachers’ perceptions on Twitter in a debate activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Tur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents research focused on the educational experience of students using the microblogging platform Twitter for debate activities in three groups in different teacher education programmes at the University of the Balearic Islands, Spain. The implementation of this technology-based task in a face-to-face class was introduced as an innovative experience as a way of enhancing student learning and fostering participation in the context of formal learning. The educational objectives of these activities, besides working on the topics of the debate, were to empower student teachers’ Personal Learning Environments, engage student participation and enhance their use of social media and mobile devices for learning. Student perceptions were assessed by means of a questionnaire completed by them at the end of the courses. Tweets related to the debate were also collected in order to obtain some statistical data on student participation. Data collected allowed the researchers to observe student teacher engagement with the use of Twitter for the debate activity and its impact on their learning and understanding of the debate topic. Results also showed positive perceptions towards the use of social media in education and students’ willingness for future use, learning opportunities from Twitter and the use of mobile technology were also envisioned. Finally, conclusions argue the implications for practice of the current study and highlight some issues for further research, such as the exploration of new and innovative uses for teachers’ professional development and the empowerment of new activities and habits in learning on the move.

  4. A systematic review of information and communication technology-based interventions for promoting physical activity behavior change in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Patrick W C; Lau, Erica Y; Wong, Del P; Ransdell, Lynda

    2011-07-13

    A growing body of research has employed information and communication technologies (ICTs) such as the Internet and mobile phones for disseminating physical activity (PA) interventions with young populations. Although several systematic reviews have documented the effects of ICT-based interventions on PA behavior, very few have focused on children and adolescents specifically. The present review aimed to systematically evaluate the efficacy and methodological quality of ICT-based PA interventions for children and adolescents based on evidence from randomized controlled trials. Electronic databases Medline, PsycInfo, CINAHL, and Web of Science were searched to retrieve English language articles published in international academic peer-reviewed journals from January 1, 1997, through December 31, 2009. Included were articles that provided descriptions of interventions designed to improve PA-related cognitive, psychosocial, and behavioral outcomes and that used randomized controlled trial design, included only children (6-12 years old) and adolescents (13-18 years old) in both intervention and control groups, and employed Internet, email, and/or short message services (SMS, also known as text messaging) as one or more major or assistive modes to deliver the intervention. In total, 9 studies were analyzed in the present review. All studies were published after 2000 and conducted in Western countries. Of the 9 studies, 7 demonstrated positive and significant within-group differences in at least one psychosocial or behavioral PA outcome. In all, 3 studies reported positive and significant between-group differences favoring the ICT group. When between-group differences were compared across studies, effect sizes were small in 6 studies and large in 3 studies. With respect to methodological quality, 7 of the 9 studies had good methodological quality. Failure to report allocation concealment, blinding to outcome assessment, and lack of long-term follow-up were the criteria met

  5. Development of student self-study activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvols, Anja Madsen; Kim, Won-Chung; Christensen, Dorthe Ansine

    2015-01-01

    of the teacher education and will aim at strengthening students' motivation for choosing self-initiated activities. The motivation should for example be based on students´ perception of relevance and quality of their own initiatives and the possibility of guidance in self-selected activities. This paper......This paper is based on research that both identifies student teachers' understanding of selfinitiated study activities and intervenes through testing a design based prototype for teacher education practices. The prototype produced will be put simultaneously into play in several context...... will describe the production process and results of the intervention and will also refer to the paper “Student teachers’ interpretation of their independent learning activities”, which the design of the prototype is based on. The interpretation of data from the prototype study will aim to evaluate...

  6. Comparison of technology-based cooperative learning with technology-based individual learning in enhancing fundamental nursing proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zu-Chun

    2013-05-01

    The aim of nursing education is to prepare students with critical thinking, high interests in profession and high proficiency in patient care. Cooperative learning promotes team work and encourages knowledge building upon discussion. It has been viewed as one of the most powerful learning methods. Technology has been considered an influential tool in teaching and learning. It assists students in gathering more information to solve the problems and master skills better. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of technology-based cooperative learning with technology-based individual learning in nursing students' critical thinking in catheterization knowledge gaining, error discovering, skill acquisitions, and overall scores. This study used a pretest-posttest experimental design. Ninety-eight students were assigned randomly to one of two groups. Questionnaires and tests were collected at baseline and after completion of intervention. The results of this study showed that there was no significant difference in related catheterization skill performance. However, the remaining variables differed greatly between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS AND APPLICATIONS: This study's findings guide the researchers and instructors to use technology-based cooperative learning more appropriately. Future research should address the design of the course module and the availability of mobile devices to reach student-centered and learn on the move goals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Traditionally taught students learn; actively engaged students remember

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Scott V.; Sayre, Eleanor C.; Clark, Jessica W.

    2014-08-01

    A common narrative in physics education research is that students taught in lecture-based classes learn less than those taught with activity-based reformed methods. We show this narrative is simplistic and misses important dynamics of student learning. In particular, we find students of both methods show equal short-term learning gains on a conceptual question dealing with electric potential. For traditionally taught students, this learning rapidly decays on a time scale of weeks, vanishing by the time of the typical end-of-term post-test. For students in reform-based classes, however, the knowledge is retained and may even be enhanced by subsequent instruction. This difference explains the many previous pre- and post-test studies that have found minimal learning gains in lecture-based courses. Our findings suggest a more nuanced model of student learning, one that is sensitive to time-dependent effects such as forgetting and interference. In addition, the findings suggest that lecture-based courses, by incorporating aspects designed to reinforce student understanding of previously covered topics, might approach the long-term learning found in research-based pedagogies.

  8. Physical Activity among Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sarah J.; Sturts, Jill R.; Ross, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study provides insight into the perceived physical activity levels of students attending a Midwestern 2-year community college. Over 60% of respondents were classified as overweight or obese based on a BMI measurement. The majority of respondents were not participating regularly in physical activity to gain any health benefits,…

  9. Physical Activity among Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sarah J.; Sturts, Jill R.; Ross, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study provides insight into the perceived physical activity levels of students attending a Midwestern 2-year community college. Over 60% of respondents were classified as overweight or obese based on a BMI measurement. The majority of respondents were not participating regularly in physical activity to gain any health benefits,…

  10. Engaging Students' Learning Through Active Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Fitzsimons

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a project carried out with thirty six final year undergraduate students, studying the Bachelor of Science in Business and Management and taking the module Small Business Management during the academic year 2012 and 2013 in Dublin Institute of Technology. The research had two separate objectives, 1 to engage in active learning by having students work on a consulting project in groups for a real life business and 2 to improve student learning. The Small Business Management previously had a group assignment that was to choose an article related to entrepreneurship and critic it and present it to the class. Anecdotally, from student feedback, it was felt that this process did not engage students and also did not contribute to the key competencies necessary in order to be an entrepreneur. The desire was for students on successful completion of this module to have better understood how business is conducted and equip them with core skills such as innovation, critical thinking, problem solving and decision making .Student buy in was achieved by getting the students to select their own groups and also work out between each group from a one page brief provided by the businesses which business they would like to work with. It was important for the businesses to also feel their time spent with students was worthwhile so they were presented with a report from the students at the end of the twelve weeks and invited into the College to hear the presentations from students. Students were asked to provide a reflection on their three key learning points from the assignment and to answer specific questions designed to understand what they learnt and how and their strengths and weaknesses. A survey was sent to the businesses that took part to understand their experiences. The results were positive with student engagement and learning rating very highly and feedback from the businesses demonstrated an appreciation of having a different

  11. Student-Student Online Coaching: Conceptualizing an Emerging Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrastinski, Stefan; Stenbom, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe student-student online coaching, defined as "an online service where a student gets support on a specific subject matter from a more experienced student". Student-student online coaching emphasizes learning a subject matter by giving a student the opportunity to get coached by a coach, i.e. a more experienced…

  12. Student activation: Considerations and successful examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjerbæk Søtoft, Lene

    My development project focuses on student activitation. I incorporated various types of activation into two courses, which I have been teaching in the autumn 2012. Three practical examples are presented below, which I found has been very successfull in my courses. Additionally, I present some of my...

  13. Incorporating Student Activities into Climate Change Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, H.; Kelly, K.; Klein, D.; Cadavid, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    atmospheric circulation with applications of the Lorenz model, explored the land-sea breeze problem with the Dynamics and Thermodynamics Circulation Model (DTDM), and developed simple radiative transfer models. Class projects explored the effects of varying the content of CO2 and CH4 in the atmosphere, as well as the properties of paleoclimates in atmospheric simulations using EdGCM. Initial assessment of student knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors associated with these activities, particularly about climate change, was measured. Pre- and post-course surveys provided student perspectives about the courses and their learning about remote sensing and climate change concepts. Student performance on the tutorials and course projects evaluated students' ability to learn and apply their knowledge about climate change and skills with remote sensing to assigned problems or proposed projects of their choice. Survey and performance data illustrated that the exercises were successful in meeting their intended learning objectives as well as opportunities for further refinement and expansion.

  14. FY02 Engineering Technology Reports Volume 1: Technology Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minichino, C; Meeker, D

    2003-01-28

    Engineering has touched on every challenge, every accomplishment, and every endeavor of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during its fifty-year history. In this time of transition to new leadership, Engineering continues to be central to the mission of the Laboratory, returning to the tradition and core values of E. O. Lawrence: science-based engineering--turning scientific concepts into reality. This volume of Engineering Technical Reports summarizes progress on the projects funded for technology-base efforts. Technology-base projects effect the natural transition to reduction-to-practice of scientific or engineering methods that are well understood and established. They represent discipline-oriented, core competency activities that are multi-programmatic in application, nature, and scope. Objectives of technology-base funding include: (1) the development and enhancement of tools and processes to provide Engineering support capability, such as code maintenance and improved fabrication methods; (2) the support of Engineering science and technology infrastructure, such as the installation or integration of a new capability; (3) support for technical and administrative leadership through our technology Centers; and (4) the initial scoping and exploration of selected technology areas with high strategic potential, such as assessment of university, laboratory, and industrial partnerships. Five Centers focus and guide longer-term investments within Engineering. The Centers attract and retain top staff, develop and maintain critical core technologies, and enable programs. Through their technology-base projects, they oversee the application of known engineering approaches and techniques to scientific and technical problems.

  15. College Student Environmental Activism: How Experiences and Identities Influence Environmental Activism Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Laura A. H.

    2016-01-01

    College student environmental activism is one way students civically engage in addressing social issues. This study explores the environmental activism of twelve college students and how their experiences outside of college and in college influenced their activism. In addition, how students' identities influenced their approach to activism was…

  16. Student Perceptions of Social Justice and Social Justice Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Harding, Susan R.; Steele, Cheronda; Schulz, Erica; Taha, Farah; Pico, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Encouraging students to engage in activities that actively seek to promote social justice is a goal of many educators. This study analyzed college student perceptions around social justice and related activities in a medium-sized, urban university in the United States. Students' open-ended responses to questions assessing their perceptions of…

  17. Student Perceptions of Social Justice and Social Justice Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Harding, Susan R.; Steele, Cheronda; Schulz, Erica; Taha, Farah; Pico, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Encouraging students to engage in activities that actively seek to promote social justice is a goal of many educators. This study analyzed college student perceptions around social justice and related activities in a medium-sized, urban university in the United States. Students' open-ended responses to questions assessing their perceptions of…

  18. Technology-based Mergers and Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan; Moini, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an updated review of what is known about the performance of technology-based mergers and acquisitions (TBM&As) and their determinants. This review brings together papers published from 1990 to 2012 in top-rated academic journals within nearly all fields...

  19. Technology-based Mergers and Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan; Moini, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an updated review of what is known about the performance of technology-based mergers and acquisitions (TBM&As) and their determinants. This review brings together papers published from 1990 to 2012 in top-rated academic journals within nearly all fields...

  20. Comrades' power: Student representation and activism in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the last decade, student politics and governance of universities in Kenya and ... of teacher training colleges, institutes of science and technology, ... admitting state-funded students to private universities – currently, state-funded students can.

  1. Students' Attitudes toward an After-School Physical Activity Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbuga, Bulent; Xiang, Ping; McBride, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Though considerable research on student attitudes has been conducted in physical education, little information exists concerning student attitudes toward after-school physical activity programmes. This study assessed students' attitudes toward their after-school physical activity programme located in southwest Texas, USA. Participants included 158…

  2. Active and emotional student engagement: a nationwide, prospective, longitudinal study of Swedish nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Malin; Omne-Pontã N, Marianne; Gustavsson, Petter J

    2010-01-01

    The researchers surveyed nursing students yearly during their three-year education, and examined active and emotional engagement. We examined the association of these properties with seven independent variables: higher educational institution, class size, age, gender, prior assistant nurse education, study experience and self-rated health. This longitudinal study included 1,334 students from 24 universities and university colleges in Sweden. Active engagement increased and emotional engagement decreased during the study years. Male students, older students and those with prior assistant nurse education had higher active engagement than other students. Older students, females, students with good self-rated health and those attending universities had higher emotional engagement. Study results suggest that higher educational institutions should pay more attention to students' active and emotional engagement in learning situations, since this may increase the ability of the students to cope with stressful events during their education, giving them an extra resource on which they can draw.

  3. Transfer Student Success: Educationally Purposeful Activities Predictive of Undergraduate GPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauria, Renee M.; Fuller, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers evaluated the effects of Educationally Purposeful Activities (EPAs) on transfer and nontransfer students' cumulative GPAs. Hierarchical, linear, and multiple regression models yielded seven statistically significant educationally purposeful items that influenced undergraduate student GPAs. Statistically significant positive EPAs for…

  4. Engineering Technology Reports, Volume 2: Technology Base FY01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minichino, C; Meeker, D

    2002-07-01

    Engineering has touched on every challenge, every accomplishment, and every endeavor of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during its fifty-year history. In this time of transition to new leadership, Engineering continues to be central to the mission of the Laboratory, returning to the tradition and core values of E.O. Lawrence: science-based engineering--turning scientific concepts into reality. This volume of Engineering Technical Reports summarizes progress on the projects funded for technology-base efforts. Technology-base projects effect the natural transition to reduction-to-practice of scientific or engineering methods that are well understood and established. They represent discipline-oriented, core competency activities that are multi-programmatic in application, nature, and scope. Objectives of technology-base funding include: (1) the development and enhancement of tools and processes to provide Engineering support capability, such as code maintenance and improved fabrication methods; (2) the support of Engineering science and technology infrastructure, such as the installation or integration of a new capability; (3) support for technical and administrative leadership through our technology Centers; (4) the initial scoping and exploration of selected technology areas with high strategic potential, such as assessment of university, laboratory, and industrial partnerships.

  5. Relevance of Student Teaching Skills and Activities from the Perspective of the Student Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Scott W.; Retallick, Michael S.; Paulsen, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive survey study was to determine the extent to which student teachers deem traditional student teaching skills and activities relevant as part of the capstone student teaching experience. The study population consisted of all (N = 140) fall 2012 and spring 2013 agricultural education student teachers in the North…

  6. Activity Preferences of Middle School Physical Education Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Michael; Stillwell, Jim; Byars, Allyn

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the physical education activity preferences of middle school students who completed a checklist featuring a variety of activities. Overall, middle school boys and girls both differed and agreed on their interests for specific activities. Most students liked basketball, bicycling, roller skating, soccer, swimming, and volleyball but…

  7. Self-Organization Activities of College Students: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmurygina, Natalia; Bazhenova, Natalia; Bazhenov, Ruslan; Nikolaeva, Natalia; Tcytcarev, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    The article provides the analysis of self-organization activities of college students related to their participation in youth associations activities. The purpose of research is to disclose a degree of students' activities demonstration based on self-organization processes, assessment of existing self-organization practices of the youth,…

  8. GUIDING STUDENTS TO READ ACTIVELY THROUGH INTENSIVE READING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi; Guangming

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the background and problems in theteaching of intensive reading (IR) to the students with non-English majors and proposes some activities for improving theteaching and learning process of the IR classroom. It is expectedthat with some applicable and effective activities, the teachercan help students read actively and grow into effective andindependent readers.

  9. Creating Student Engagement: The Kickstarter Active Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzon, Elliott

    2017-01-01

    Students can become disengaged from marketing material if they cannot see the direct application. Marketing material needs to be applied to a meaningful business task to engage and motivate students. This article introduces the Kickstarter Active Learning Project--an innovative semester-long project in which students create a Kickstarter…

  10. Cybernated Storytelling: Revitalising Storytelling Activities for Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Roziana M.; Idrus, Faizah

    2017-01-01

    Storytelling is one of the most common activities used in teaching English proficiency to language students. It is widely accepted as a teaching technique by many educators because it engages students in learning. This study seeks to examine students' readiness in using technology-aided applications in telling their stories. It also investigates…

  11. Examining Participation of University Students in Recreational Entertainment Marketing Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Adem

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine participation of university students in recreational entertainment marketing activities. The survey population consisted of university student in Marmara University Province of Istanbul. The sample constituted a total of 272 students (150 male and 122 female), determined by circumstantial method. The survey…

  12. Race and Sex Differences in College Student Physical Activity Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Laura H.; Raedeke, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To assess sex/race differences on psychosocial correlates of physical activity among college students. Methods: Survey research protocol. Results: Students (n = 636) exercised an average of 3.5 days per week, with black females being the least active. Across subgroups, health/fitness was rated as the most important motive for exercise,…

  13. PETE Students' Perceptions of a Healthy and Active Lifestyle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Carol; Pennington, Todd; Barney, David; Lockhart, Barbara; Hager, Ron; Prusak, Keven

    2014-01-01

    Participants were male and female students (n = 12) in a physical education teacher education (PETE) program with a healthy and active lifestyle management (HALM) focus, at a university in the Intermountain West. The purpose of the study was to examine PETE students' perceptions of a healthy and active lifestyle (HAL). Following inductive content…

  14. Engaging Students in Large Health Classes with Active Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Steven; Combs, Sue; Huelskamp, Amelia; Hritz, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Creative K-12 health teachers can engage students in large classes by utilizing active learning strategies. Active learning involves engaging students in higher-order tasks, such as analysis and synthesis, which is a crucial element of the movement toward what is commonly called "learner-centered" teaching. Health education teachers who…

  15. Speaking Activities for the Advanced College-Bound Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Don

    Three activities for developing speaking skills of advanced English as second language students are presented. Impromptu speaking, extemporaneous speaking, and debate activities are designed to train students to organize concepts, develop spontaneous oral skills, and enhance confidence and clarity of thought. Impromptu speaking develops…

  16. American College Student Activism in the Mid-1980s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, Kent D.

    1985-01-01

    Examines related aspects of American college student activism and advocacy in the mid-1980s. Provides a profile of today's undergraduates and their current campus activism. Lists demographic factors that will affect continued campus tranquility. Discusses selected pressure points affecting students, including academic consumerism. Describes major…

  17. Staff and Student Experiences of Dialogue Days, a Student Engagement Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Mandy

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the findings from a descriptive phenomenological exploration of the lived experience of dialogue days, a student engagement activity, from the perspectives of staff and students. I suggest that dialogue days enhance the relational and emotional aspects of learning with the potential to impact on future student engagement and…

  18. How do students from Student Incubators (SI) use networks and how can SI support the activity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik Mariendal

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines Student Entrepreneur’s (SE) use of networks as part of their activities in a Student Incubator (SI). Recommendations are made as to how SI can create activities to support students' use of internal and external relationships and discusses the paradox between running a learning...... is on SEs because students are likely to have a smaller (in size), less well-founded and limited professional network. In addition, an SI is assumed to be characterized by “limitations” related to their student status. So far none has paid any attention to how SEs "compensate for" and/or develop relevant...... and "performance" (revenues, survival rate, growth) of the SE....

  19. Motivations of Women Participating in a Technology-Based Social Entrepreneurship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzombak, Rachel; Mouakkad, Sally; Mehta, Khanjan

    2016-01-01

    Academic programs focused on engineering entrepreneurship are growing in number and popularity at American universities. However, the fields of engineering, entrepreneurship and technology-based entrepreneurship struggle to recruit and retain female students: a historic and endemic failure at obtaining gender-balanced participation. Understanding…

  20. An Educational and Entrepreneurial Ecosystem to Actualize Technology-Based Social Ventures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Khanjan; Zappe, Sarah; Brannon, Mary Lynn; Zhao, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The Humanitarian Engineering and Social Entrepreneurship (HESE) Program engages students and faculty across Penn State in the rigorous research, design, field-testing, and launch of technology-based social enterprises that address global development challenges. HESE ventures are embedded in a series of five courses that integrate learning,…

  1. Transition Strategies to Ensure Active Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbel, Donna M.; McGuire, Joan M.; Banerjee, Manju; Saunders, Sue A.

    2011-01-01

    Transition into college for students with disabilities has been written about extensively over the past decade, due in part to legislative mandates implemented at the secondary level. With significant increases in the number of these students in the college population, a focus on their transition through college is imperative to improve retention…

  2. Transition Strategies to Ensure Active Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbel, Donna M.; McGuire, Joan M.; Banerjee, Manju; Saunders, Sue A.

    2011-01-01

    Transition into college for students with disabilities has been written about extensively over the past decade, due in part to legislative mandates implemented at the secondary level. With significant increases in the number of these students in the college population, a focus on their transition through college is imperative to improve retention…

  3. Energy conservation technologies based on thermodynamic principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Masaru [Shibaura Institute of Technology of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emission to prevent global warming, the most promising way for electric generation in the Northeast Asia is to introduce cogeneration and {open_quotes}repowering{close_quotes} technologies based on high temperature gas turbines fueled by natural gas. Especially the old type coal burning boiler-steam turbine plants should be retrofit by introducing gas turbines to become highly efficient combined cycle. Same technologies should be applied to the old garbage incineration plants and/or even to the nuclear power plants. The exhaust heat or steam should become much increased and it should be utilized as the process heat for industries or heat supply as the distinct heating or cooling for residential area. This paper introduces a brief survey of these new technologies.

  4. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVEL AMONG UNIVERSITY STUDENTS: A CROSS SECTIONAL SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshini Rajappan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Physical inactivity is the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality. Physical inactivity levels are rising in developing countries and Malaysia is of no exception. Malaysian Adult Nutrition Survey 2003 reported that the prevalence of physical inactivity was 39.7% and the prevalence was higher for women (42.6% than men (36.7%. In Malaysia, the National Health and Morbidity Survey 2006 reported that 43.7% (5.5 million of Malaysian adults were physically inactive. These statistics show that physically inactive is an important public health concern in Malaysia. College students have been found to have poor physical activity habits. The objective of this study was to identify the physical activity level among students of Asia Metropolitan University (AMU in Malaysia. Materials and Methods: The study design was a cross sectional survey. A total of 100 participants comprising of 50 male and 50 female students were selected for the study by means of convenience sampling. International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ short form was used to identify the physical activity level. Results: A greater percentage of males (56% showed high physical activity level than females (24%. In contrast, females showed high percentage of low physical activity level. Students in the age range of 22-25 years depicted more percentage (43.5% of high physical activity level. When comparison of physical activity levels were done among different races, Indian students showed greater percentage (61.8% of high physical activity level. Furthermore, students who were underweight and overweight had 50% and 46.7% of high physical activity levels respectively which are greater than the values observed in normal body weight students. Conclusion: The physical activity level among students was found satisfactory although the percentage of low level of physical activity was found higher in female students.

  5. Mature students learning statistics: The activity theory perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Sue

    1993-09-01

    The concept of approach "stresses relationships between intention, process and outcome within a specified context as described by an individual" (Schmeck, 1988, p. 10). This paper explores the approaches to learning of a group of mature students from the theoretical perspective of activity theory in order to gain an insight into some of the ways statistics is learned. In this framework, learning, regarded as goal-directed behaviour, is analysed by exploring the socio-historical factors relating to students' self regulation of their cognitive activities. The material is derived from questionnaires and interviews with five students, and focuses on the students' own interpretations of the contexts affecting their approaches.

  6. Physical Activity, Exercise, and Sedentary Behavior in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckworth, Janet; Nigg, Claudio

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviors in 493 college students who were enrolled in 10 conditioning activity classes and had completed questionnaires at the beginning of the course. They analyzed sedentary activities and indicators of participation in exercise and physical activity by…

  7. Technology-based strategies for promoting clinical reasoning skills in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellenbarger, Teresa; Robb, Meigan

    2015-01-01

    Faculty face the demand of preparing nursing students for the constantly changing health care environment. Effective use of online, classroom, and clinical conferencing opportunities helps to enhance nursing students' clinical reasoning capabilities needed for practice. The growth of technology creates an avenue for faculty to develop engaging learning opportunities. This article presents technology-based strategies such as electronic concept mapping, electronic case histories, and digital storytelling that can be used to facilitate clinical reasoning skills.

  8. Participation Motivation and Student's Physical Activity among Sport Students in Three Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondric, Miran; Sindik, Joško; Furjan-Mandic, Gordana; Schiefler, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine the differences in motivation to participate in sport activities among sports students from three different countries. On a sample of 390 sports students from Slovenia, Croatia and Germany we studied what motivates an interest in being sports active. The sample was stratified across the choice to attend table tennis lessons at all three institutions and all students have completed the Participation Motivation Questionnaire (PMQ). The results revealed that the latent structure of the types of sports students' motives consisted of six factors (sport action with friend, popularity, fitness & health, social status, sports events, relaxation through sports). We also found significant sex differences in motivation to participate in sport activities for all sports students from the three different countries. We did not find relevant age-based differences among the students, and this is the only initial hypothesis that we can reject. Key pointsThe potential implications of the result can be in better understanding the relationship between different motivational orientations - in particular, extrinsic motivation - and sport motivation among school-aged individuals.In the context of Self Determination Theory, students can be encouraged in developing more autonomous orientations for sport activity, rather than controlled and impersonal, especially in certain countries.Significant factors of differences have been found in motivation to participate in sport activities among sports students from three different countries and also some significant sex differences have been found in motivation to participate in sport activities for all sports students.

  9. Monitoring Student Activity in Collaborative Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietsch, Daniel; Podelski, Andreas; Nam, Jaechang

    2013-01-01

    by weekly meetings with teaching assistants and instructors regarding group progress, code quality, and management issues. Through these meetings and their interactions with the software tools, students leave a detailed trace of data related to their individual engagement and their collaboration behavior......This paper presents data analysis from a course on Software Engineering in an effort to identify metrics and techniques that would allow instructor to act proactively and identify patterns of low engagement and inefficient peer collaboration. Over the last two terms, 106 students in their second...... year of studies formed 20 groups and worked collaboratively to develop video games. Throughout the lab, students have to use a variety of tools for managing and developing their projects, such as software version control, static analysis tools, wikis, mailing lists, etc. The students are also supported...

  10. The perception and constraints towards recreational activity among female students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azlan Ahmad Kamal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available More often than not, male students are seen to be more active in recreation activity than female students. To investigate this matter, a study was done on the female recreational activity participation. This study investigated the perception and constraints towards recreation activity among female students in a university in Malaysia. This study used a questionnaire regarding the recreation activity to collect the findings. Sixty respondents have been selected randomly as the subject for this study. All the information that is obtained from the questionnaire has been collected and analyzed using SPSS. It was found recreation is most often perceived as ‘extreme sports’ by female students. Moreover, most of the female students perceived themselves as participating regularly in recreational activity. The reasons for not participating in recreational activity are of lack of time, low energy level, lack of participants, lack of facilities and money. It was also found female students prefer outdoor activities such as camping, abseiling and wall climbing. Future studies should compare the perception of male and female students’ on recreational activity.

  11. PARTICIPATION MOTIVATION AND STUDENT'S PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AMONG SPORT STUDENTS IN THREE COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Kondric

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was to examine the differences in motivation to participate in sport activities among sports students from three different countries. On a sample of 390 sports students from Slovenia, Croatia and Germany we studied what motivates an interest in being sports active. The sample was stratified across the choice to attend table tennis lessons at all three institutions and all students have completed the Participation Motivation Questionnaire (PMQ. The results revealed that the latent structure of the types of sports students' motives consisted of six factors (sport action with friend, popularity, fitness & health, social status, sports events, relaxation through sports. We also found significant sex differences in motivation to participate in sport activities for all sports students from the three different countries. We did not find relevant age-based differences among the students, and this is the only initial hypothesis that we can reject.

  12. Attachment relationships and physical activity motivation of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich-French, Sarah; Smith, Alan L; Cox, Anne E

    2011-08-01

    This study was designed to assess the link of attachment relationships with physical activity motivation. Potential mediators of this link were examined in a cross-sectional study targeting college student physical activity motivation and behaviour. Participants completed self-reports of attachment relationships (with mother, father and best friend), self-determined motivation for physical activity, physical activity behaviour and the hypothesised mediator variables of perceived competence, autonomy and relatedness. The results provide support for the mediating role of these variables in the association of father attachment with self-determined motivation. Meaningful variance in self-determined motivation for physical activity and physical activity behaviour was explained. Overall, attachment relationships appear to be relevant, albeit modestly, to physical activity motivation of college students. The findings support continued efforts to integrate attachment and motivational perspectives in the study of college student health behaviour.

  13. Monitoring Student Activity in Collaborative Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietsch, Daniel; Podelski, Andreas; Nam, Jaechang

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents data analysis from a course on Software Engineering in an effort to identify metrics and techniques that would allow instructor to act proactively and identify patterns of low engagement and inefficient peer collaboration. Over the last two terms, 106 students in their second...... by weekly meetings with teaching assistants and instructors regarding group progress, code quality, and management issues. Through these meetings and their interactions with the software tools, students leave a detailed trace of data related to their individual engagement and their collaboration behavior...

  14. Perceiving the General: The Multisemiotic Dimension of Students' Algebraic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Luis; Bardino, Caroline; Sabena, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we deal with students' algebraic generalizations set in the context of elementary geometric-numeric patterns. Drawing from Vygotsky's psychology, Leont'ev's Activity Theory, and Husserl's phenomenology, we focus on the various semiotic resources mobilized by students in their passage from the particular to the general. Two small…

  15. Do Active-Learning Strategies Improve Students' Critical Thinking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Larry P.; Crow, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    Improving students' ability to recognize work-related problems and apply effective strategies and solutions to fundamental challenges in the field is at the crux of a good college preparation. This paper attempts to investigate if active-learning strategies improve students' critical thinking ability in this regard. Participants were pre-service…

  16. Perceiving the General: The Multisemiotic Dimension of Students' Algebraic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Luis; Bardino, Caroline; Sabena, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we deal with students' algebraic generalizations set in the context of elementary geometric-numeric patterns. Drawing from Vygotsky's psychology, Leont'ev's Activity Theory, and Husserl's phenomenology, we focus on the various semiotic resources mobilized by students in their passage from the particular to the general. Two small…

  17. Using the Web to Increase Physical Activity in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magoc, Dejan; Tomaka, Joe; Bridges-Arzaga, Amber

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of a theoretically based and Web-delivered intervention using common course technology for increasing physical activity in a college student sample. Methods: One hundred four students randomly participated in either a Web-based intervention involving 7 theory-based learning lessons or a control group that…

  18. An Evolving Framework for Describing Student Engagement in Classroom Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Flavio S.; diSessa, Andrea A.; Sherin, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    Student engagement in classroom activities is usually described as a function of factors such as human needs, affect, intention, motivation, interests, identity, and others. We take a different approach and develop a framework that models classroom engagement as a function of students' "conceptual competence" in the "specific content" (e.g., the…

  19. Monitoring Social Media: Students Satisfaction with University Administration Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshkin, Andrey Petrovich; Rassolov, Ilya Mihajlovich; Novikov, Andrey Vadimovich

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents an original method of identifying satisfaction of students with the activities of their university administration based on studying the content of comments on the social networks. The analysis of student opinions revealed areas of concern and priority areas in the work of the university administration. The paper characterizes…

  20. Student Use of Facebook for Organizing Collaborative Classroom Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Cliff; Wohn, Donghee Yvette; Vitak, Jessica; Ellison, Nicole B.; Wash, Rick

    2011-01-01

    Social network sites such as Facebook are often conceived of as purely social spaces; however, as these sites have evolved, so have the ways in which students are using them. In this study, we examine how undergraduate students use the social network site Facebook to engage in classroom-related collaborative activities (e.g., arranging study…

  1. Economics and Entrepreneurship: Student Activities. Master Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council on Economic Education, New York, NY.

    Correlated to the Economics and Entrepreneurship Teaching Strategies Master Curriculum Guide, this book features 66 student activities, case studies, comprehension quizzes, and lessons related to economic concepts. Designed for high school students of economics, social studies, and business education, this curriculum guide combines study of basic…

  2. Impact of Smartphone Based Activities on EFL Students' Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarhandi, Pir Suhail Ahmed; Bajnaid, Ayman; Elyas, Tariq

    2017-01-01

    Teachers all over the world strive to keep their students engaged, and research has shown that task engagement can be elevated by utilising technology to complete classroom activities. Reasons suggested for this is that technology's alignment with students' interests, as well as the stimulatingly transformative effect that technology can have on…

  3. Magnetism and Electricity Activity "Attracts" Student Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Electricity and magnetism are intimately linked, this relationship forming the basis of the modern electric utility system and the generation of bulk electrical energy. There is rich literature from which to teach students the basics, but nothing drives the point home like having them learn from firsthand experience--and that is what this…

  4. Magnetism and Electricity Activity "Attracts" Student Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Electricity and magnetism are intimately linked, this relationship forming the basis of the modern electric utility system and the generation of bulk electrical energy. There is rich literature from which to teach students the basics, but nothing drives the point home like having them learn from firsthand experience--and that is what this…

  5. 25 CFR 36.43 - Standard XVI-Student activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... The activity program shall be an integral part of the overall educational program. (a) All student... with other schools in setting up a schedule of sports and games. Schools that participate in state...

  6. Factors determining physical activity of Ukrainian students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Bergier

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available [b]Objective[/b]. Scientific reports provide information concerning an insufficient level of physical activity of societies. The objective of the study is recognition of the level of physical activity among Ukrainian students, and factors which condition this activity: gender, place of residence, self-reported physical fitness, and the BMI. [b]Methods[/b]. The study was conducted in 2013 among 2,125 Ukrainian students using a long version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ, supplemented with data concerning the respondents’ physical development. [b]Results[/b]. The results of the study showed that the mean total physical activity of students was 3.560 MET, and its highest percentage pertained to the area of activity in sports – 1.124 MET. Significantly higher statistically physical activity was observed among males than females. In males, the highest activity was related to participation in sports classes, while in females – engagement in household chores. It was found that males, compared to females, were significantly more physically active in such areas as occupational activity (education and sports activity, whereas females showed higher activity performing household chores. According to the place of residence, inhabitants of medium-size towns and rural areas obtained the most favourable results in activity, while the inhabitants of large cities the poorest. Self-reported physical fitness was significantly correlated with the results in physical activity obtained by the students. No relationship was found between the BMI and the level of student’s physical activity. [b]Conclusion[/b]. Considering the very large population of respondents, the results obtained may be considered as an up-to-date pattern of physical activity among Ukrainian students.

  7. Students' Performance in Investigative Activity and Their Understanding of Activity Aims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Alessandro Damasio Trani; Borges, A. Tarciso; Justi, Rosaria

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the students' understanding of the aims of an investigative activity and their performance when conducting it. One hundred and eighty-one year nine students from a public middle school in Brazil took part in the study. Students working in pairs were asked to investigate two problems using a…

  8. Student Behavior and Epistemological Framing: Examples from Collaborative Active-Learning Activities in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Hammer, David

    2009-01-01

    The concept of framing from anthropology and sociolinguistics is useful for understanding student reasoning. For example, a student may frame a learning activity as an opportunity for sensemaking or as an assignment to fill out a worksheet. The student's framing affects what she notices, what knowledge she accesses, and how she thinks to act. We…

  9. Student Behavior and Epistemological Framing: Examples from Collaborative Active-Learning Activities in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Hammer, David

    2009-01-01

    The concept of framing from anthropology and sociolinguistics is useful for understanding student reasoning. For example, a student may frame a learning activity as an opportunity for sensemaking or as an assignment to fill out a worksheet. The student's framing affects what she notices, what knowledge she accesses, and how she thinks to act. We…

  10. Medical students' preparedness for professional activities in early clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Josefin; Maaz, Asja; Hitzblech, Tanja; Holzhausen, Ylva; Peters, Harm

    2017-08-22

    Sufficient preparedness is important for transitions to workplace participation and learning in clinical settings. This study aims to analyse medical students' preparedness for early clerkships using a three-dimensional, socio-cognitive, theory-based model of preparedness anchored in specific professional activities and their supervision level. Medical students from a competency-based undergraduate curriculum were surveyed about preparedness for 21 professional activities and level of perceived supervision during their early clerkships via an online questionnaire. Preparedness was operationalized by the three dimensions of confidence to carry out clerkship activities, being prepared through university teaching and coping with failure by seeking support. Factors influencing preparedness and perceived stress as outcomes were analysed through step-wise regression. Professional activities carried out by the students (n = 147; 19.0%) and their supervision levels varied. While most students reported high confidence to perform the tasks, the activity-specific analysis revealed important gaps in preparation through university teaching. Students regularly searched for support in case of difficulty. One quarter of the variance of each preparedness dimension was explained by self-efficacy, supervision quality, amount of prior clerkship experience and nature of professional activities. Preparedness contributed to predicting perceived stress. The applied three-dimensional concept of preparedness and the task-specific approach provided a detailed and meaningful view on medical students' workplace participation and experiences in early clerkships.

  11. Seeing around a Ball: Complex, Technology-Based Problems in Calculus with Applications in Science and Engineering-Redux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    A complex technology-based problem in visualization and computation for students in calculus is presented. Strategies are shown for its solution and the opportunities for students to put together sequences of concepts and skills to build for success are highlighted. The problem itself involves placing an object under water in order to actually see…

  12. Motivational activities based on previous knowledge of students

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, J. A.; Gómez-Robledo, L.; Huertas, R.; Perales, F. J.

    2014-07-01

    Academic results depend strongly on the individual circumstances of students: background, motivation and aptitude. We think that academic activities conducted to increase motivation must be tuned to the special situation of the students. Main goal of this work is analyze the students in the first year of the Degree in Optics and Optometry in the University of Granada and the suitability of an activity designed for those students. Initial data were obtained from a survey inquiring about the reasons to choose this degree, their knowledge of it, and previous academic backgrounds. Results show that: 1) the group is quite heterogeneous, since students have very different background. 2) Reasons to choose the Degree in Optics and Optometry are also very different, and in many cases were selected as a second option. 3) Knowledge and motivations about the Degree are in general quite low. Trying to increase the motivation of the students we designed an academic activity in which we show different topics studied in the Degree. Results show that students that have been involved in this activity are the most motivated and most satisfied with their election of the degree.

  13. Curvature of spacetime: A simple student activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Monika; Smith, Warren; Jackson, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    The following is a description of an inexpensive and simple student experiment for measuring the differences between the three types of spacetime topology—Euclidean (flat), Riemann (spherical), and Lobachevskian (saddle) curvatures. It makes use of commonly available tools and materials, and requires only a small amount of construction. The experiment applies to astronomical topics such as gravity, spacetime, general relativity, as well as geometry and mathematics.

  14. Using Sales Management Students to Manage Professional Selling Students in an Innovative Active Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Joyce A.; Hawes, Jon M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an application of active learning within two different courses: professional selling and sales management. Students assumed the roles of sales representatives and sales managers for an actual fund-raiser--a golf outing--sponsored by a student chapter of the American Marketing Association. The sales project encompassed an…

  15. Can nursing students' confidence levels increase with repeated simulation activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Cynthia L; Connelly, Linda K

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, nursing faculty conducted a study with undergraduate nursing students on their satisfaction, confidence, and educational practice levels, as it related to simulation activities throughout the curriculum. The study was a voluntary survey conducted on junior and senior year nursing students. It consisted of 30 items based on the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning and the Educational Practices Questionnaire (Jeffries, 2012). Mean averages were obtained for each of the 30 items from both groups and were compared using T scores for unpaired means. The results showed that 8 of the items had a 95% confidence level and when combined the items were significant for p confidence and active learning. Based on these findings, it can be assumed that repeated simulation experiences can lead to an increase in student confidence and active learning.

  16. Activities of the Student Forum of the Geoinformation Forum Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, A.; Miyazaki, H.

    2012-07-01

    This reports a history and future prospects of the activities by the Student Forum of the Geoinformation Forum Japan. For growths of academic fields, active communications among students and young scientists are indispensable. Several academic communities in geoinformation fields are established by youths and play important roles of building networks over schools and institutes. The networks are expected to be innovative cooperation after the youths achieve their professions. Although academic communities are getting fixed growth particularly in Japan, youths had gotten little opportunities to make contacts with youths themselves. To promote gotten youth activities among geoinformation fields, in 1998, we started a series of programs that named the Student Forum of the Geoinformation Forum Japan involving students and young scientists within the annual conferences, Geoinformation Forum Japan. The programs have provided opportunities to do presentation their studies by posters, some events, and motivations to create networks among students and young scientists. From 2009, some members of our activities set additional conference in west area of Japan. Thus our activities are spread within Japan. As a result of these achievements, the number of youth dedicating to the programs keeps growing. From 2009, it's getting international gradually, however, almost all the participants are still Japanese. To keep and expand the network, we are planning to make some nodes with some Asian youth organizations in the field of geoinformation. This paper is concluded with proposals and future prospects on the Student Forum of the Geoinformation Forum Japan.

  17. Determinants of physical activity in university students: a literary review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Caro-Freile

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity refers to the body movement that generates energy expenditure, its frequent practice improves physical and mental functions; Active transportation, daily activities and recreation correspond to the most common form of physical activity. In Colombia the majority of the population is inactive, children are more active, but this condition decreases with age, the percentage of college students who engage in physical activity is low, this practice is conditioned by internal motivation, physical condition, Availability of time and social support. The taste for sports, the competitive spirit, the improvement of the corporal image, the management of the stress and the benefits for the health are motivating factors for the practice of the physical activity in university students; On the other hand, laziness, fear of injury, lack of sports scenarios and insecurity of the environment are the most frequent barriers to physical activity in this population

  18. Effects of Hall Residence on Leisure Activities and Student Activism in the 70's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Yee-wang

    1990-01-01

    Reports of a 1974 study that examined the influence of dormitory residency on student leisure activities, especially student activism. Using questionnaires from 760 University of Hong Kong resident and nonresident undergraduates, demonstrates that living in dormitories increased likelihood of becoming activist through increasing social interaction…

  19. Groundwater: A Vital Resource. Student Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Carla, Ed.

    Twenty-three activities dealing with various aspects of groundwater are provided in this manual. The activities are arranged under four headings: (1) the water cycle; (2) water distribution in soils (considering such topics as calculating water table depth and purifying water by filtering); (3) water quality (considering such topics as acid rain,…

  20. Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer: Student Awareness Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, James H., Comp.

    Awareness activities pertaining to cancer and cardiovascular disease are presented as a supplement for high school science classes. The exercises can be used to enrich units of study dealing with the circulatory system, the cell, or human diseases. Eight activities deal with the following topics: (1) cardiovascular disease risk factors; (2)…

  1. Student Activities Can Generate Positive PR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armistead, Lew

    1985-01-01

    To counter negative news about education it is important to make sure that positive school activities receive their fair share of exposure in the news media. Presents tips on how to generate positive public relations. Includes a list of newsworthy activities ideas. (MD)

  2. Using complexity theory to develop a student-directed interprofessional learning activity for 1220 healthcare students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorm, Christine; Nisbet, Gillian; Roberts, Chris; Gordon, Christopher; Gentilcore, Stacey; Chen, Timothy F

    2016-08-08

    More and better interprofessional practice is predicated to be necessary to deliver good care to the patients of the future. However, universities struggle to create authentic learning activities that enable students to experience the dynamic interprofessional interactions common in healthcare and that can accommodate large interprofessional student cohorts. We investigated a large-scale mandatory interprofessional learning (IPL) activity for health professional students designed to promote social learning. A mixed methods research approach determined feasibility, acceptability and the extent to which student IPL outcomes were met. We developed an IPL activity founded in complexity theory to prepare students for future practice by engaging them in a self-directed (self-organised) learning activity with a diverse team, whose assessable products would be emergent creations. Complicated but authentic clinical cases (n = 12) were developed to challenge student teams (n = 5 or 6). Assessment consisted of a written management plan (academically marked) and a five-minute video (peer marked) designed to assess creative collaboration as well as provide evidence of integrated collective knowledge; the cohesive patient-centred management plan. All students (including the disciplines of diagnostic radiology, exercise physiology, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physiotherapy and speech pathology), completed all tasks successfully. Of the 26 % of students who completed the evaluation survey, 70 % agreed or strongly agreed that the IPL activity was worthwhile, and 87 % agreed or strongly agreed that their case study was relevant. Thematic analysis found overarching themes of engagement and collaboration-in-action suggesting that the IPL activity enabled students to achieve the intended learning objectives. Students recognised the contribution of others and described negotiation, collaboration and creation of new collective knowledge after working

  3. 78 FR 6852 - Agency Information Collection (Student Verification of Enrollment) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Student Verification of Enrollment) Activity Under OMB Review....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Student Verification of Enrollment, VA Form 22-8979. OMB Control Number: 2900... a student's certification of actual attendance and verification of the student's...

  4. Physical activity in physiotherapy and physical education high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailova A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A term of health-related physical fitness became topical with four its components: aerobic and/or cardiovascular fitness, body composition, abdominal muscle strength and endurance, and lower back and hamstring flexibility. Complex evaluation of health-related physical fitness and physical activity (PA may show a wider insight in health promotion and disease prevention. The aim of this study was to evaluate physical activity relation to health-related physical fitness in Physiotherapy (PT and Physical Education (PE students. Final study sample consisted of 67 students (46 women and 21 men (aged 21.61 ± 0.71. All participants filled in International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Health-related physical testing included: 1 body composition evaluation, 2 abdominal muscles strength tests, 3 dynamometry, 4 hamstring muscles and m. quadratus lumborum elasticity evaluation tests, 5 bicycle ergometer test (anaerobic threshold, maximal oxygen consumption. Results showed that most students had normal body composition parameters (BMI, body fat, muscle mass, body water in both genders and study programs. Women were less physically active that men, and PA duration was higher in PE students. PT students had higher body composition values, lower cardiorespiratory fitness parameters and lower handgrip strength in both hands than PE students. Greater PA generally implies a higher level of health-related physical fitness. PA significantly positively affects body composition, upper m. rectus abdominisstrength, grip strength and aerobic capacity.

  5. Technology-Based Classroom Assessments: Alternatives to Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salend, Spencer J.

    2009-01-01

    Although many teachers are using new technologies to differentiate instruction and administer tests, educators are also employing a range of technology-based resources and strategies to implement a variety of classroom assessments as alternatives to standardized and teacher-made testing. Technology-based classroom assessments focus on the use of…

  6. Technology-Based Classroom Assessments: Alternatives to Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salend, Spencer J.

    2009-01-01

    Although many teachers are using new technologies to differentiate instruction and administer tests, educators are also employing a range of technology-based resources and strategies to implement a variety of classroom assessments as alternatives to standardized and teacher-made testing. Technology-based classroom assessments focus on the use of…

  7. Health status, physical activity, and orthorexia nervosa: A comparison between exercise science students and business students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmborg, Julia; Bremander, Ann; Olsson, M Charlotte; Bergman, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Orthorexia nervosa is described as an exaggerated fixation on healthy food. It is unclear whether students in health-oriented academic programs, highly focused on physical exercise, are more prone to develop orthorexia nervosa than students in other educational areas. The aim was to compare health status, physical activity, and frequency of orthorexia nervosa between university students enrolled in an exercise science program (n = 118) or a business program (n = 89). The students completed the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), and ORTO-15, which defines orthorexia nervosa as a sensitive and obsessive behavior towards healthy nutrition. The SF-36 showed that exercise science students scored worse than business students regarding bodily pain (72.8 vs. 82.5; p = 0.001), but better regarding general health (83.1 vs. 77.1; p = 0.006). Of 188 students, 144 (76.6%) had an ORTO-15 score indicating orthorexia nervosa, with a higher proportion in exercise science students than in business students (84.5% vs. 65.4%; p = 0.002). Orthorexia nervosa in combination with a high level of physical activity was most often seen in men in exercise science studies and less often in women in business studies (45.1% vs. 8.3%; p orthorexia nervosa in exercise science students may cause problems in the future, since they are expected to coach others in healthy living. Our findings may be valuable in the development of health-oriented academic programs and within student healthcare services. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Correlates of School-Day Physical Activity in Preschool Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Leah E.; Wadsworth, Danielle D.; Peoples, Christina M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship among sex, body mass index, motor skill competence (MSC), perceived physical competence (PPC), and school-day physical activity in preschool students (N = 34). Physical activity was assessed by steps accumulated during the school day, while MSC and PPC were assessed with the Test of Gross Motor Development--2nd…

  9. Breaking the Ice: Career Development Activities for Accounting Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Bob G.; Wilburn, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes two co-curricular career development activities, mock interviews and speed networking that we provide for accounting majors at our university. The driving force behind both activities was to increase comfort levels for students when interacting with professionals and to enhance their job interview and networking skills.…

  10. Drinking Water Activities for Students, Teachers, and Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This guide provides teachers with materials, information, and classroom activities to enhance any drinking water curriculum. Students can use the activity sheets to further lessons and stimulate thought. Parents can use the guide to develop science projects that will provoke thought, encourage research, and provide a scientific approach to…

  11. Spelling for Writing: Student Activity Book. Level 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Reid

    This Student Activity Book is designed to be used with the "Guidebook for Parents and Teachers" of the same series. The Level 3 activity book consists of worksheets intended to help children discover and practice the most important patterns and principles that govern English spelling and writing. It includes short and long vowels, punctuation,…

  12. Graduate Nursing Students' Attitudes Toward Sexually Active Older Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damrosch, Shirley Petchel

    1984-01-01

    Reviewed empirical evidence relevant to taboos for aged sexuality and measured the attitudes of 114 graduate nursing students toward a 68-year-old woman. Nurses read a vignette which either contained or excluded information about the woman's sexual activity and exhibited a statistically significant bias favoring the sexually active version. (JAC)

  13. The analysis and reconciliation of students' rebuttals in argumentation activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ren; Hung, Jeng-Fung

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the guidance provided by science teachers to resolve conflicts during socioscientific issue-based argumentation activities. A graphical representation (GR) was developed as a tool to code and analyze the dialogue interaction process. Through the GR and qualitative analysis, we identified three types of dialogue reconciling strategies. The first one consists of teacher management, in which the teacher temporarily maintains the right to speak when students get mired in an emotional rebuttal situation. The second strategy involves the use of qualifiers to identify the strengths and weaknesses of an opposing argument. The third strategy consists of providing students with guidance to keep both parties (i.e. the students taking, respectively, the affirmative and negative positions) on the same discussion topic and can be used to assist teachers with forming broad questions that prompt students to conduct deeper discussions. These reconciling strategies were beneficial in that they helped students to argue in a more reflective way.

  14. MOTIVATING STUDENTS TO BE ACTIVE PARTICIPANTS IN CLASS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    Introduction In China, it is not uncommon for students to be treated as passive recipients in class. They are trained in this way from primary school. So by the time they enter college, not only are they accustomed to the role of submissive student following the lead of a dominant teacher, but they also quite welcome it, for they don’t have to take any initiative in class, they just wait to be filled with knowledge. Students’ hesitancy to participate actively in class comes not just from students themselves but also from some teachers, who stick to the force-feeding method because it is an easy way for them to conduct a class. So I started to try and change this situation. I designed a teaching plan in which I used different techniques to provide the students with lots of opportunities to be active participants in class. Some of the techniques used are described below.

  15. Bringing technology to students’ proximity: a sociocultural account of technology-based learning projects

    OpenAIRE

    Evode Mukama

    2014-01-01

    This paper depicts a study carried out in Rwanda concerning university students who participated in a contest to produce short documentary films. The purpose of this research is to conceptualize these kinds of technology-based learning projects (TBLPs) through a sociocultural perspective. The methodology included focus-group discussions and field notes to collect empirical data. The findings reveal that the more educational technologies capture objects of learning positioned in the students’ ...

  16. laboratory activities and students practical performance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unesco

    data were questionnaires and content analysis of the course material. Observation was .... To evaluate the types of objectives of the selected activities. 2. To assess ... The major research design employed was descriptive research. Descriptive ... laboratory instructors (n = 11) in the Department were included in this survey.

  17. Employer Branding; influencing student perception by campus management activities

    OpenAIRE

    Strnad, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The target of this thesis was to define the concept of employer branding and its relation to campus management, the activities companies do in order to attract students and promote themselves as quality employers. The theoretical research captures the marketing essence of branding and further develops it into the employer branding framework. Further research focussed on possible campus management activities. In the practical part the popularity and effectiveness of the activities were tested ...

  18. Synthesis of Collaborative Learning Processes with Technology Based Education to Enhance Classroom Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sumit

    2016-07-01

    A major hurdle in school education in India is the presence of large number of teachers who are inexperienced and have merely taken up the profession of teaching only after exhausting all avenues or getting rejected from all quarters. Empowering and training such teachers with information is a herculean task. Students tend to pay attention and show enthusiasm in learning when they view the class as relevant to themselves and connected to their interests. The current teaching-learning methods for teaching science and astronomy have become obsolete and require a major overhaul. A teaching-learning process which concentrates on an explorative-collaborative-comprehending methodology with simultaneous combination of technology has been developed with the objective to reignite the scientific temper among the future budding scientists. Attaining this goal will be possible when instructors adopt a bottom-up approach, which involves understanding the student's needs, designing flexible course content and synchronizing teaching techniques that focus on increasing student engagement by making the learning experience meaningful and purposeful. The International Year of Light (IYL 2015) is a global initiative that highlights to the citizens of the world the importance of light and optical technologies in their lives, for their futures, and for the development of society. One of the strong legacies left by the 2009 International Year of Astronomy was to use Astronomy in making the world a better place. On the eve of IYL 2015, an Optical Society funded outreach program, 'Spark of Light' was organised for under-privileged school children by using the explorative-collaborative-technology based mechanism and make them understand the nature and properties of light with emphasis on how Astronomy has been crucial for the evolution of sophisticated technology. A major paradigm shift from our previous program was the engagement of such untrained teachers in each and every aspect of

  19. Understanding and Facilitating Student Bloggers: Towards a Blogging Activity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derntl, Michael

    Since instructors have started recognizing the potential of Web 2.0 integration in web-based courses, blogs have been used to provide students with means of virtual communication, contribution, collaboration and community building. In this paper we aim to take another step forward by presenting and analyzing the integration of student blogs in an undergraduate computer science course on software architecture and web technologies: we implemented an LMS extension that acted as a course blog portal by collecting and displaying feeds of externally hosted blogs and logging usage data. Data analysis reveals that students who perform better academically also tend to participate more actively in the course blogosphere. Subsequently, we propose a blogging activity model, which aims to reveal and explain relationships between blogging activity variables—including peer visits, commenting and posting—to achieve a better understanding of lively blog communities in courses.

  20. Medical Student Perspectives of Active Learning: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Anne; Istas, Kathryn; Bonaminio, Giulia A; Paolo, Anthony M; Fontes, Joseph D; Davis, Nancy; Berardo, Benito A

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: Medical student perspectives were sought about active learning, including concerns, challenges, perceived advantages and disadvantages, and appropriate role in the educational process. Focus groups were conducted with students from all years and campuses of a large U.S. state medical school. Students had considerable experience with active learning prior to medical school and conveyed accurate understanding of the concept and its major strategies. They appreciated the potential of active learning to deepen and broaden learning and its value for long-term professional development but had significant concerns about the efficiency of the process, the clarity of expectations provided, and the importance of receiving preparatory materials. Most significantly, active learning experiences were perceived as disconnected from grading and even as impeding preparation for school and national examinations. Insights: Medical students understand the concepts of active learning and have considerable experience in several formats prior to medical school. They are generally supportive of active learning concepts but frustrated by perceived inefficiencies and lack of contribution to the urgencies of achieving optimal grades and passing United States Medical Licensing Examinations, especially Step 1.

  1. Preparing Students for (Inter-)Action with Activity Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we explore recent developments in activity theoretical HCI with the purpose of preparing designers for action. The paper discusses two projects where students engaged in iterative design applying fundamental principles from Activity Theory. They had been introduced to these principles....... Through these tools, we suggest, designers are equipped to act skeptically and systematically, supported by theory. Obviously, a design process with students cannot in every respect be compared to a real design process, yet this paper will discuss whether, through the model and framework, designers may...

  2. Student Behavior and Epistemological Framing: Examples from Collaborative Active-Learning Activities in Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Scherr, Rachel E

    2007-01-01

    Questions of participant understanding of the nature of an activity have been addressed in anthropology and sociolinguistics with the concepts of frames and framing. For example, a student may frame a learning activity as an opportunity for sensemaking or as an assignment to fill out a worksheet. The student's understanding of the nature of the activity affects what she notices, what knowledge she accesses, and how she thinks to act. Previous analyses have found evidence of framing primarily in linguistic markers associated with speech acts. In this paper, we show that there is useful evidence of framing in easily observed features of students' behavior. We apply this observational methodology to explore dynamics among behavior, framing, and the conceptual substance of student reasoning in the context of collaborative active-learning activities in an introductory university physics course.

  3. 基于驾驶行为及意图的汽车主动安全技术研究%Study on automotive active safety technology based on driving behavior and intention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    储颖; 肖献强; 朱家诚

    2011-01-01

    针对国内汽车主动安全技术研究的现状,提出了基于驾驶员行为及意图判断的汽车主动安全研究方法,在此汽车主动安全系统中利用采集到的驾驶员各种操作信号及环境信息,进行驾驶员的驾驶行为及意图分析.根据驾驶员的各种操作信息对常见驾驶行为及意图判断的权重的不同,建立了用于判别典型驾驶行为及意图的权重矩阵.通过MATLAB软件编程仿真,建立了八种典型驾驶状态下权重判断矩阵,仿真表明,该权重矩阵设计合理,可以准确地判断和识别出典型的驾驶行为及意图,为未来汽车主动安全技术的研究提供了一种有效的方法.%To the status of domestic automotive safety technology research,the vehicle active safety research method that was based on the identifying of driver behavior and intention was proposed.it safety system,the analysis of driving behavior and intention was made by collecting a variety of driver's operating signal and environmental information.The weight matrix for identifying the typical driving behavior and intention was built according to the different proportion of variety operating information on identifying cornmon intention of driving behavior and intention. Through programming emulation with MATLAB, the weight matrix under the eight typical given state of driving was established. The emulation indicates that the weight matrix was designed reasonably. The matrix can identify the driving behavior and intention exactly. It offers an effective method for researching automotive active safety technology.

  4. Kinematics Card Sort Activity: Insight into Students' Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryhill, Erin; Herrington, Deborah; Oliver, Keith

    2016-12-01

    Kinematics is a topic students are unknowingly aware of well before entering the physics classroom. Students observe motion on a daily basis. They are constantly interpreting and making sense of their observations, unintentionally building their own understanding of kinematics before receiving any formal instruction. Unfortunately, when students take their prior conceptions to understand a new situation, they often do so in a way that inaccurately connects their learning. We were motivated to identify strategies to help our students make accurate connections to their prior knowledge and understand kinematics at a deeper level. To do this, we integrated a formative assessment card sort into a kinematic graphing unit within an introductory high school physics course. Throughout the activities, we required students to document and reflect upon their thinking. This allowed their learning to build upon their own previously held conceptual understanding, which provided an avenue for cognitive growth. By taking a more direct approach to eliciting student reasoning, we hoped to improve student learning and guide our assessment of their learning.

  5. Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Scott; Eddy, Sarah L; McDonough, Miles; Smith, Michelle K; Okoroafor, Nnadozie; Jordt, Hannah; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2014-06-10

    To test the hypothesis that lecturing maximizes learning and course performance, we metaanalyzed 225 studies that reported data on examination scores or failure rates when comparing student performance in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses under traditional lecturing versus active learning. The effect sizes indicate that on average, student performance on examinations and concept inventories increased by 0.47 SDs under active learning (n = 158 studies), and that the odds ratio for failing was 1.95 under traditional lecturing (n = 67 studies). These results indicate that average examination scores improved by about 6% in active learning sections, and that students in classes with traditional lecturing were 1.5 times more likely to fail than were students in classes with active learning. Heterogeneity analyses indicated that both results hold across the STEM disciplines, that active learning increases scores on concept inventories more than on course examinations, and that active learning appears effective across all class sizes--although the greatest effects are in small (n ≤ 50) classes. Trim and fill analyses and fail-safe n calculations suggest that the results are not due to publication bias. The results also appear robust to variation in the methodological rigor of the included studies, based on the quality of controls over student quality and instructor identity. This is the largest and most comprehensive metaanalysis of undergraduate STEM education published to date. The results raise questions about the continued use of traditional lecturing as a control in research studies, and support active learning as the preferred, empirically validated teaching practice in regular classrooms.

  6. Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Scott; Eddy, Sarah L.; McDonough, Miles; Smith, Michelle K.; Okoroafor, Nnadozie; Jordt, Hannah; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2014-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that lecturing maximizes learning and course performance, we metaanalyzed 225 studies that reported data on examination scores or failure rates when comparing student performance in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses under traditional lecturing versus active learning. The effect sizes indicate that on average, student performance on examinations and concept inventories increased by 0.47 SDs under active learning (n = 158 studies), and that the odds ratio for failing was 1.95 under traditional lecturing (n = 67 studies). These results indicate that average examination scores improved by about 6% in active learning sections, and that students in classes with traditional lecturing were 1.5 times more likely to fail than were students in classes with active learning. Heterogeneity analyses indicated that both results hold across the STEM disciplines, that active learning increases scores on concept inventories more than on course examinations, and that active learning appears effective across all class sizes—although the greatest effects are in small (n ≤ 50) classes. Trim and fill analyses and fail-safe n calculations suggest that the results are not due to publication bias. The results also appear robust to variation in the methodological rigor of the included studies, based on the quality of controls over student quality and instructor identity. This is the largest and most comprehensive metaanalysis of undergraduate STEM education published to date. The results raise questions about the continued use of traditional lecturing as a control in research studies, and support active learning as the preferred, empirically validated teaching practice in regular classrooms. PMID:24821756

  7. Gender differences in relation of students to sports activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchenko O.Y.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The problem of gender approach in the modern physical education in schools is considered. The experiment was conducted with students of 5-11 grades of secondary schools in the city of Poltava in the amount of 419 people. By the experiment, the students were involved in I-year students (35 girls and 16 boys. It is noted that for the normal socialization are important sex and gender roles. They are associated with the awareness itself as the representative of a particular sex with the norms of behavior, characteristic of members of this sex. Show the direction of consideration for the interests, motivations, values in the process of physical education. Found that to attract students to the sports activity requires consideration of the physiological and morphological and functional characteristics of the individual through the process of gender mainstreaming in the school system.

  8. Research of Electrical Pitch Servo Control Technology Based on the Active Disturbance Rejection Controller%基于自抗扰控制器的电动变桨伺服控制技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪常明; 张雷; 胡书举; 赵斌

    2013-01-01

    电动变桨伺服系统中的电机参数变动以及外部扰动等因素都会降低PID闭环控制系统的性能.简要介绍了串励直流电机的数学模型,提出了一种基于自抗扰控制器的变桨电机伺服控制方法,并将二阶自抗扰控制器应用到变桨伺服控制中.基于Matlab/Simulink仿真平台验证了该方法的有效性.仿真结果表明,基于自抗扰控制器的电动变桨伺服系统具有较好的动态和稳态性能,对系统内部参数变动和外部扰动都具有较强的鲁棒性.%In the electrical pitch control servo system, the variation of the motor parameters and external disturbance will reduce the performance of the closed - loop PID control system. First, the mathematics model of series-excited DC motor was briefly introduced and a novel control method of the pitch motor servo control based on active disturbances rejection controller (ADRC) was proposed. A second order ADRC was applied to the pitch servo control, and its validity was verified by Matlab/Simulink simulation. Simulation results show electrical pitch servo system based on proposed method has good dynamic and static performance and strong robustness to the variation of system internal parameters and external disturbance.

  9. Factors Related to Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines in Active College Students: A Social Cognitive Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farren, G. L.; Zhang, T.; Martin, S. B.; Thomas, K. T.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relations of sex, exercise self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and social support with meeting physical activity guidelines (PAGs). Participants: Three hundred ninety-six college students participated in this study in the summer 2013. Methods: Students completed online questionnaires that assessed physical activity…

  10. Factors Related to Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines in Active College Students: A Social Cognitive Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farren, G. L.; Zhang, T.; Martin, S. B.; Thomas, K. T.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relations of sex, exercise self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and social support with meeting physical activity guidelines (PAGs). Participants: Three hundred ninety-six college students participated in this study in the summer 2013. Methods: Students completed online questionnaires that assessed physical activity…

  11. Moving (Literally) to Engage Students: Putting the (Physically) Active in Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strean, William B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores a variety of practices and classroom activities that engage the whole student. Grounded in a somatic perspective (from "soma" meaning the body in its wholeness--the integration of thinking, feeling, and acting), the discussion shows how students can be brought fully into learning through movement, music, and…

  12. Perceived barriers to physical activity in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzu, Daskapan; Tuzun, Emine Handan; Eker, Levent

    2006-01-01

    Many studies which were published in other countries identified certain benefits and barriers to physical activity among young people. But there is no data about the subject pertaining to Turkish adolescents. This study tries to rectify this with a study of Turkish university students. Undergraduate university students (n = 303) were recruited to the study. Current exercise habits and perceived barriers to physical activity were assessed in the sample. Using a Likert Type scale, participants responded an instrument with 12 items representing barriers to physical activity. Mean scores were computed. External barriers were more important than internal barriers. "Lack of time due to busy lesson schedule", "My parents give academic success priority over exercise. "and "lack of time due to responsibilities related to the family and social environment "were most cited items for physical activity barriers. There is a need for future research, which will be carried out with larger sample groups to develop national standardized instrument. It will be helpful for accurately identify perceived barriers and then recommend changes to enhance physical activity among young people. Key PointsThe purpose of this study was to analyze perceived barriers to physical activity in the university students.The results showed that not having enough time was the most important barrier for not participating in physical activity among our samples.This study with relatively small sample must be considered as pilot study for related studies in the future.

  13. Physical recreation in a structure of active rest of students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaytzev V.P.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Experience of authors is generalized on issue «Physical recreation»: concept, facilities, forms and methods of physical culture that is used in physical recreation and offered for the students some recommendation on their realization. In the process of forming motive activity it is necessary to take into account both favourable and unfavorable social factors, and during practical work - such directions: hygienic, health-improving recreation, general preparatory and medical. It is presented bases of physical recreation of students: construction of the complex program, development of valeological and recreation measures; joint creative activity of teachers and students and at the same time use of modern methods of health forming technologies.

  14. Create Effective Activities for Students to Learn English Literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩建萍; 谷婷婷; 田颖慧

    2013-01-01

    Rather than only learning English grammar and some other language knowledge about English, learning English litera⁃ture is another effective way for students to learn English since they can not only learn the native English by reading some English literature but also get familiar with different cultures and background knowledge of English countries. As an English teacher, the main job in the literature class is to design effective activities for students in order to let them comprehend texts that they read and improve their critical thinking. This paper is tend to discuss some activities, including pre-reading, reading and post-reading ac⁃tivities, which was used in my literature class and how they help the students learn English and improve their critical thinking.

  15. Physical activity and mental well-being in student nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawker, Clare L

    2012-04-01

    There is strong evidence that suggests physical activity can enhance mental well-being. However, this relationship has not been widely investigated in student nurses. A cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the relationship between physical activity and mental well-being in undergraduate student nurses (n=215). Physical activity was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Other outcomes included self-esteem, anxiety, depression, life satisfaction, outcome expectations and self-efficacy. Almost, a quarter (23.8%) of the total sample, were meeting the Department of Health's physical activity guideline. Mean body mass index (BMI) was 25.0 with 40% being in the overweight to morbidly obese category. Self-esteem was significantly positively correlated with total physical activity (r=0.16, p=0.038) and moderate intensity activity (r=0.17, p=0.021). No other significant relationships were found between anxiety, depression and satisfaction with life and physical activity. Outcome expectations for exercise and self-efficacy were significantly positively correlated with moderate (r=0.17, p=0.019) and vigorous (r=0.28, p=0.000) intensity activity and total physical activity (r=0.29, p=0.000). BMI was significantly positively correlated with age (r=0.242, p=0.001), significantly negatively correlated with self-efficacy for exercise (r=0.257, p=0.000) and satisfaction with life (r=-0.144, p=0.041). Regression analysis showed that low self efficacy for exercise and increasing age were significant predictors of BMI with a small effect size r(2)=0.126, adjusted r(2)=0.112. BMI and physical activity variables collectively explained only 2% of the variance for anxiety, 4% for depression, 5% for self esteem and 6% for satisfaction with life. BMI was a significant predictor of satisfaction with life (Beta=-0.171, p=0.027). Participation in physical activity may be influential in improving mental well-being in student nurses. Promoting physical

  16. Physical activity in normal weight and obese university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhan Soyuer

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The specific objective of this study was to examine the physical activity patterns among normal weight and obese university students. This cross-sectional research study was carried out on the 176 university students. As a data-collecting device, the Physical activity assessment questionnaire (FADA was used. An additional questionnaire was administered to obtain Body Mass Index (BKİ and demographic data. 8.5% (15 of students were obese (Body Mass Index ≥ 25. The mean age, gender, where the student lived , family type, social guarantee and income were not statistically different between subjects who were normal weight and subjects who were obese (p>0.05. There was difference between normal weight and obese groups from the perspective of FADA stair, FADA sport, FADA travel and FADA total variables, in physical activity measurement (p<0.05. When the obese groups were categorized according to their total physical activity score which was obtained from FADA, 83.5 % (15 of them found as sedentary. A negatively significant correlation was found between BKİ and FADA stair, sport, travel, total scores (r= -0.223- 0.285, p<0.05. According to Binary logistic regression analysis, it was found that the FADA sport and total decreased, as the value of BKİ increased (p<0.02. Proper weight and higher physical activity levels should be promoted among university students. Additionally, schools should provide opportunities for young people to participate in a wider range of physical activities that address their individual needs while promoting the health benefits of engaging in regular exercise.

  17. TEACHERS, STUDENTS AND EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES IN PRIMARY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankica Antovska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the scientific public, since long ago, there has been an interest in studying leisure time. Leisure time is a central issue of modern civilization, integral part of the structure of modern society and a significant factor for a person’s development. The goal of this research is to study the modern concept of and the benefits from the introduction of leisure (extracurricular activities in the primary education process. Certain investigations show that teachers, through extracurricular activities, can have a significant role in building and improving the talents of students. From the answers received in the enquiry it can be seen that both teachers and students have different attitudes and interests regarding extracurricular activities. The school has still the best position and the hope for developing students’ skills for the wide world of extracurricular activities.

  18. DESIGNING INSTRUCTION FOR THE TRADITIONAL, ADULT, AND DISTANCE LEARNER: A New Engine for Technology-Based Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence A. Tomei

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Adult students demand a wider variety of instructional strategies that encompass real-world, interactive, cooperative, and discovery learning experiences.Designing Instruction for the Traditional, Adult, and Distance Learner: A New Engine for Technology-Based Teaching explores how technology impacts the process of devising instructional plans as well as learning itself in adult students. Containing research from leading international experts, this publication proposes realistic and accurate archetypes to assist educators in incorporating state-of-the-art technologies into online instruction.This text proposes a new paradigm for designing, developing, implementing, and assessed technology-based instruction. It addresses three target populations of today's learner: traditional, adult, and distance education. The text proposes a new model of instructional system design (ISD for developing effective technology-based education that involves a five-step process focusing on the learner, learning theories, resources, delivery modalities, and outcomes.

  19. Pedagogical Distance: Explaining Misalignment in Student-Driven Online Learning Activities Using Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberry, Nicola; Franken, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an Activity Theory analysis of two online student-driven interactive learning activities to interrogate assumptions that such groups can effectively learn in the absence of the teacher. Such an analysis conceptualises learning tasks as constructed objects that drive pedagogical activity. The analysis shows a disconnect between…

  20. Behavioral Activation for Moderately Depressed University Students: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawrysiak, Michael; Nicholas, Christopher; Hopko, Derek R.

    2009-01-01

    Although depression is prevalent among university students, limited and dated research has examined the efficacy of behavioral interventions in treating this population (C. Lee, 2005). On the basis of a modified version of the Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD; D. R. Hopko & C. W. Lejuez, 2007; C. W. Lejuez, D. R. Hopko, & S. D.…

  1. Satisfaction from Academic Activities among Medical Students in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Naggar, Redhwan A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2013-01-01

    There is a lack of data about the levels of satisfaction among medical students in regards to their academic activities in Malaysia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to fill the gap in the existing knowledge. A cross sectional study was carried out at the International medical school, the Management and Science University of Malaysia,…

  2. Shaping Student Activists: Discursive Sensemaking of Activism and Participation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Diane E.; Hastings, Sally O.; Minei, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    As social media becomes a more potent force in society, particularly for younger generations, the role in activism has been contested. This qualitative study examines 35 interviews with students regarding their perceptions of the use of social media in social change, their perceptions of activists, and their level of self-identification as an…

  3. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-02-01

    In this teaching manual several activities are presented to introduce students to information on solar energy through classroom instruction. Wind power is also included. Instructions for constructing demonstration models for passive solar systems, photovoltaic cells, solar collectors and water heaters, and a bicycle wheel wind turbine are provided. (BCS)

  4. Another Way to Develop Chinese Students' Creativity: Extracurricular Innovation Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao-jiang, Zhao; Xue-ting, Zhao

    2012-01-01

    In China, improving students' creativity is becoming an important goal of modern colleges and universities, especially in the domain of science and technology. The efforts made for this goal can be observed not only in classroom, but also in activities and competitions which were held out-of-school. This paper will firstly give a brief description…

  5. Student Activity Guide for "Business in an Information Economy."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, David; And Others

    The 20 chapters of this student activity guide provide study guides (key terms and concepts reviews), projects, cases for analyses, and self-assessment exercises for business and career education classes. Topics covered include the following: business winners (entrepreneurship); growth of the U.S. economy, the basics of economics, comparing…

  6. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student activities. Field test edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-01

    A view of solar energy from the standpoint of home economics is taken in this book of activities. Students are provided information on solar energy resources while performing these classroom activities. Instructions for the construction of a solar food dryer and a solar cooker are provided. Topics for study include window treatments, clothing, the history of solar energy, vitamins from the sun, and how to choose the correct solar home. (BCS)

  7. Technology-based suicide prevention: current applications and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxton, David D; June, Jennifer D; Kinn, Julie T

    2011-01-01

    This review reports on current and emerging technologies for suicide prevention. Technology-based programs discussed include interactive educational and social networking Web sites, e-mail outreach, and programs that use mobile devices and texting. We describe innovative applications such as virtual worlds, gaming, and text analysis that are currently being developed and applied to suicide prevention and outreach programs. We also discuss the benefits and limitations of technology-based applications and discuss future directions for their use.

  8. Teaching English Activities for the Gifted And Talented Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem CELIK-SAHIN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the literature and recommends activities that can be used to teach English to gifted and talented students. It includes the responsibilities that teachers of the gifted and talented have in teaching the English language. Strategies for teaching the language in a natural and flowing way to increase intake and usage are also presented. Also discussed are the pressures on gifted and talented students when they are learning a new subject such as the English language and how these pressures occur because of beliefs about giftedness and how gifted learners learn. Teachers need to also be aware of the linguistic and cultural backgrounds of their students. This information can be used to help students speak English more naturally during informal talks/discussions in class about their different lifestyles and/or cultural features. The special and different learning characteristics of gifted students are important for their teachers to know. Teachers of gifted students should then use that knowledge when they differentiate curriculum. To be a teacher of these special children means being open to ongoing professional development and always focusing on the learner rather than the learning. Finally, the teachers of the gifted need to shift their approaches in order to become counsellors and guides more than instructors and directors of learning.

  9. An Inquiry "Warm-Up" Activity: Preparing Students for an Active Classroom Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagroves, S.

    2010-12-01

    An active learning community that engages in inquiry activities will employ strategies and structures that students from traditional classrooms may find unfamiliar or uncomfortable. These include group work, voicing questions, shifting from one part of an activity to another (and sometimes shifting groups at the same time), presenting informally to the group, and many others. In addition, the role of the instructor as facilitator rather than teacher may not be familiar to students. As inquiry activities become incorporated into the regular classroom curriculum at Maui Community College (through collaboration with the Professional Development Program as part of the Akamai Workforce Initiative), a need emerged to give students a "warm-up" early in the semester to help them practice these participation structures. This activity was designed to be used on the very first day of class, to be easy and accessible to students, and to give them practice with these features of inquiry activities that they would see again throughout the semester. In addition, the activity introduces the engineering technology concepts of requirements, trade-offs, and limitations. It is important to note that this activity is not in and of itself an inquiry activity; in fact the content and processes featured in the activity are not particularly challenging nor are they the main focus. Instead, this is a "warm-up" for inquiry, so that students gain some comfort with the unconventional features of inquiry activities. The particular activity presented is for 20-30 students in a ˜90 minute lab period, and highlights different imaging technologies of cameras; however, it is easily adaptable to other requirements, to different technology, or other needs.

  10. Physical activity participation and constraints among athletic training students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, Justin; Rogers, Katherine; Anderson, Jordan

    2015-02-01

    Researchers have examined the physical activity (PA) habits of certified athletic trainers; however, none have looked specifically at athletic training students. To assess PA participation and constraints to participation among athletic training students. Cross-sectional study. Entry-level athletic training education programs (undergraduate and graduate) across the United States. Participants were 1125 entry-level athletic training students. Self-reported PA participation, including a calculated PA index based on a typical week. Leisure constraints and demographic data were also collected. Only 22.8% (252/1105) of athletic training students were meeting the American College of Sports Medicine recommendations for PA through moderate-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise. Although 52.3% (580/1105) were meeting the recommendations through vigorous-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise, 60.5% (681/1125) were meeting the recommendations based on the combined total of moderate or vigorous cardiorespiratory exercise. In addition, 57.2% (643/1125) of respondents met the recommendations for resistance exercise. Exercise habits of athletic training students appear to be better than the national average and similar to those of practicing athletic trainers. Students reported structural constraints such as lack of time due to work or studies as the most significant barrier to exercise participation. Athletic training students experienced similar constraints to PA participation as practicing athletic trainers, and these constraints appeared to influence their exercise participation during their entry-level education. Athletic training students may benefit from a greater emphasis on work-life balance during their entry-level education to promote better health and fitness habits.

  11. Teachers' Activities in Technology-Based Mathematics Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, John

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on high school mathematics teachers and what they do when they use digital technology in their lessons. It is essentially a discursive paper but it uses data from a project on teachers using technology to illustrate points. The main aim of the paper is to present an holistic account of factors influencing teachers' practice. A…

  12. Information-Technology Based Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. S.; Lee, K. H.

    2001-04-01

    Developing countries emphasize expansion of the educated population but demand for quality improvement follows later. Current science education reform is driven in part by post cold war restructuring of the global economy and associated focus on the education of a more scientifically literate society, due to the industrial change from labor-intensive to high-technology type, and the societal change inherent in the present information era. Industry needs employees of broad and flexible background with inter disciplinary training, engineers with better physics training, and well trained physicists. Education researches have proved that active-learning based methods are superior to the traditional methods and the information technology (IT) has lot to offer in this. Use of IT for improving physics education is briefly discussed with prospects for collaboration in the Asia-Pacific region via Asian Physics Education Network (ASPEN), UNESCO University Foundation Course in Physics (UUFCP), etc.

  13. An investigation of the impact of selected prereading activities on student content learning through laboratory activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Jesse (Shaya)

    This study investigated whether two prereading activities impacted student learning from hands-on science activities. The study was based on constructivist learning theory. Based on the work of Piaget, it was hypothesized that students who activated prior knowledge would learn more from the activities. Based on the work of Vygotsky it was hypothesized that students who talk more and write more would learn more from the activity. The K-W-L chart and anticipation guide strategies were used with eighth grade students at Graves Middle School in Whittier, California before learning about levers and convection currents. D. M. Ogle (1986) created the three-column K-W-L chart to have students activate prior knowledge. In the first column, the students write what they already know about a subject, in the second column, the students write what they want to know about the subject, and the students complete the third column after learning about a subject by writing answers to the questions that they asked in the second column. Duffelmeyer (1994) created the anticipation guide based on Herber's (1978) reasoning guide. In the anticipation guide, the teacher creates three or four sentences that convey the major ideas of the topic and the students either agree or disagree with the statements. After learning about the topic, students revisit their answers and decide if they were correct or incorrect and they must defend their choices. This research used the Solomon (1947) four-square design and compared both the experimental groups to a control group that simply discussed the concepts before completing the activity. The research showed no significant difference between the control group and either of the treatment groups. The reasons for the lack of significant differences are considered. It was hypothesized that since the students were unfamiliar with the prereading activities and did not have much experience with using either writing-to-learn or talking-to-learn strategies, the

  14. Assisting in Radiology/Imaging. Instructor's Guide, Student's Manual, and Student Learning Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Helena J.

    The instructor's guide, the first of three documents in this package, is designed for a course to help students who are investigating the activities within a radiology department or considering any of the imaging technologies as a career. The material is designed to relate training experience to information studied in the classroom. This…

  15. Assisting in Radiology/Imaging. Instructor's Guide, Student's Manual, and Student Learning Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Helena J.

    The instructor's guide, the first of three documents in this package, is designed for a course to help students who are investigating the activities within a radiology department or considering any of the imaging technologies as a career. The material is designed to relate training experience to information studied in the classroom. This…

  16. 78 FR 42761 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Program for International Student...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Program for International Student Assessments... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Program for International Student.... Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 2,240. Abstract: PISA (Program for International Student...

  17. 78 FR 22530 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Program for International Student...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Program for International Student Assessment... of Collection: Program for International Student Assessment (PISA 2015) Recruitment and Field Test.... Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 6,313. Abstract: The Program for International Student...

  18. Activities and interactions of baccalaureate nursing students in clinical practica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polifroni, E C; Packard, S A; Shah, H S; MacAvoy, S

    1995-01-01

    Basic nursing education is governed by individual state rules and regulations lacking in uniformity across the United States and based on unstated and perhaps mistaken assumptions. At the same time, there is increasing evidence of problems and difficulties with the current traditional model of nursing education. Before proposing changes in said model, the authors chose to examine what it is that a nursing student does in a clinical area. The perspective of activities and interactions was chosen to illustrate, through a nonparticipant observation study, the patterns and utilization of time during a scheduled clinical experience for baccalaureate nursing students. The goal of the study was to determine who, other than the client/patient, influences the student learning at the clinical site and how learning time is spent. Two schools (one private and one public) and nine clinical sites with 37 observations were used to collect the data for this study. Findings are best summarized in four (overlapping) categories of school time, registered nurse (RN) staff time, hospital staff time, and supervised time. School time, or time spent interacting with the instructor, another student, and/or the student on his/her own in the practice setting (time exclusive of staff input) constituted 84 per cent of all time. RN staff time that was time spent with either the primary nurse or other RNs on the unit used 10 per cent of the student time, Fourteen per cent of student time was spent in hospital staff time, which includes interactions with any nursing staff or other hospital personnel.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. A Standards-Based Meteorological Activities for All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Barry; Harding, Ian

    2000-11-01

    Canarsie High School is a typical urban high school in Brooklyn, New York. We have been involved in a District Initiative in collaboration with the City College of New York (CCNY) to initiate and incorporate relevant technologies into the science content areas and classrooms. Through changes in teaching strategies consistent with science education reform movements for mainstream, gifted and special education students; we have been able to effectively motivate student interest and to enhance and enrich the learning potential of all students. Our lessons involve extensive computer and Internet applications, concentrating our efforts in developing high-ordered reasoning skills to address the required concepts covered in Earth Science and Environmental Science curricula. This is a crucial aspect of applied learning approaches as related science concepts are integrated and clearly demonstrated in our daily lives. Our task was to infuse 'live' weather data into Earth Science and Environmental Science classrooms. Student-centered learning activities, laboratory experiences and long-term investigations were designed, written and included into classroom lessons and laboratory sections. This component is aligned with the New Learning and Performance Standards, and makes use of investigative and inquiry-based studies through technological resources. These were accomplished through data readings taken from our school weather station and various World Wide Web sites. Weather data from area "cluster" schools were also used to compare micro-climates within our local region. This fostered peer communication skills among students and staff throughout the Brooklyn High School District.

  20. Physical activity and health promotion in Italian university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Anna Teleman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Physical activity, diet plans, the mantainment of a certain Body Mass Index (BMI and the use of various types of supplementation are common elements in the search for disease prevention, health promotion and well-being. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed the data regarding Italian university students' BMI, dieting behaviour, personal body perception, exercise habits, and use of dietary supplements and of doping substances. RESULTS: 13.7% resulted being underweight, 75.1% was in the normal range, 9.8% was overweight, and 1.4% was obese. 11.0% were on a diet. 25.8% of the students reported never doing any type of physical activity. 0.9% admitted consuming doping substances. The percentage of overweight/obese students increases from 8.8% of the 18-21 year olds to 18.1% of the 25-30 year olds. Similarly, the prevalence of overweight/obesity was 18.5% among male population and 7.5% among the female one. DISCUSSION: The data deriving from this questionnaire showed that while the majority of university students has a BMI in the normal range, 11.2% of the study population is overweight/obese. Males present a higher risk of being overweight or obese. An important part of the population showed to be sedentary even though data coming from our study are aligned to further evidence. CONCLUSION: The most important concern arising from the questionnaire is represented by physical inactivity. Indeed, it is necessary to encourage and plan initiatives aimed at promoting physical activity in university students.

  1. Social capital and physical activity among Croatian high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, D; Doubova, S V; Kawachi, I

    2016-06-01

    To examine factors associated with regular physical activity in Croatian adolescents. A cross-sectional survey among high school students was carried out in the 2013/14 school year. A survey was conducted among 33 high schools in Zagreb City, Croatia. Participants were students aged 17-18 years. The dependent variables were regular moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and overall physical activity measured by the short version of International Physical Activity Questionnaire and defined as 60 min or more of daily physical activity. The independent variables included family, neighborhood, and high school social capital. Other study covariates included: socio-economic status, self-rated health, psychological distress and nutritional status. The associations between physical activity and social capital variables were assessed separately for boys and girls through multiple logistic regression and inverse probability weighting in order to correct for missing data bias. A total of 1689 boys and 1739 girls responded to the survey. A higher percentage of boys reported performing regular vigorous and moderate physical activity (59.4%) and overall physical activity (83.4%), comparing with the girls (35.4% and 70%, respectively). For boys, high family social capital and high informal social control were associated with increased odds of regular MVPA (1.49, 95%CI: 1.18 - 1.90 and 1.26, 95%CI: 1.02 - 1.56, respectively), compared to those with low social capital. For girls, high informal social control was associated with regular overall physical activity (OR 1.38, 95% CI: 1.09 - 1.76). High social capital is associated with regular MVPA in boys and regular overall activity in girls. Intervention and policies that leverage community social capital might serve as an avenue for promotion of physical activity in youth. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Curricular Activity on Students' Situational Motivation and Physical Activity Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zan; Hannon, James C.; Newton, Maria; Huang, Chaoqun

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine (a) the effects of three curricular activities on students' situational motivation (intrinsic motivation [IM], identified regulation [IR], external regulation, and amotivation [AM]) and physical activity (PA) levels, and (b) the predictive strength of situational motivation to PA levels. Four hundred twelve…

  3. Embodied Semiotic Activities and Their Role in the Construction of Mathematical Meaning of Motion Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botzer, Galit; Yerushalmy, Michal

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the relation between bodily actions, artifact-mediated activities, and semiotic processes that students experience while producing and interpreting graphs of two-dimensional motion in the plane. We designed a technology-based setting that enabled students to engage in embodied semiotic activities and experience two modes of…

  4. Connecting with Teachers and Students through K-12 Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Susan; Lindbo, David; Robinson, Clay

    2014-05-01

    The Soil Science Society of America has invested heavily in a significant outreach effort to reach teachers and students in the primary/secondary grades (K-12 grades in US/Canada) to raise awareness of soil as a critical resource. The SSSA K-12 committee has been charged with increasing interest and awareness of soil science as a scientific pursuit and career choice, and providing resources that integrate more information on soil science into biology, chemistry, physics, and earth science areas taught at multiple grade levels. Activities center around five main areas: assessment and standards, learning modules/lesson plans, website development, and books and materials, and partnership activities. Members (professionals and students) of SSSA are involved through committee participation, local events, materials review, and project development.

  5. Periodic Properties and Inquiry: Student Mental Models Observed during a Periodic Table Puzzle Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kathleen G.; Long, George R.; Briggs, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The mental models of both novice and advanced chemistry students were observed while the students performed a periodic table activity. The mental model framework seems to be an effective way of analyzing student behavior during learning activities. The analysis suggests that students do not recognize periodic trends through the examination of…

  6. Periodic Properties and Inquiry: Student Mental Models Observed during a Periodic Table Puzzle Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kathleen G.; Long, George R.; Briggs, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The mental models of both novice and advanced chemistry students were observed while the students performed a periodic table activity. The mental model framework seems to be an effective way of analyzing student behavior during learning activities. The analysis suggests that students do not recognize periodic trends through the examination of…

  7. Incorporating Active Learning and Student Inquiry into an Introductory Merchandising Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Hwa; Hines, Jean D.

    2012-01-01

    Many educators believe that student learning is enhanced when they are actively involved in classroom activities that require student inquiry. The purpose of this paper is to report on three student inquiry projects that were incorporated into a merchandising class with the focus on making students responsible for their learning, rather than the…

  8. THE EFFECTS OF THE ACTIVE LEARNING MODEL ON STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müge TAÇMAN

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research was to determine the effects of the active learning model onstudents. The subjects were 40 teacher candidates from computer and teaching technology department who were enrolled inthe course of “New Instructional Methods” at Near East University in TRNC. A queationnaires were used to collect the data.The data was analyzed by using frequencies and percentile techniques. The finding revealed that there was a positive effect ofavtive learning atmosphere on students.

  9. Gender difference in academic planning activity among medical students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huy Van Nguyen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Vietnam, as doctor of medicine is socially considered a special career, both men and women who are enrolled in medical universities often study topics of medicine seriously. However, as culturally expected, women often perform better than men. Because of this, teaching leadership and management skill (LMS to develop academic planning activity (APA for female medical students would also be expected to be more effective than male counterparts. This research aimed to compare by gender the effect of teaching LMS on increasing APA, using propensity score matching (PSM. METHODS: In a cross-sectional survey utilizing a self-reported structured questionnaire on a systematic random sample of 421 male and female medical students in Hanoi Medical University, this study adopted first regression techniques to construct a fit model, then PSM to create a matched control group in order to allow for evaluating the effect of LMS education. RESULTS: There were several interesting gender differences. First, while for females LMS education had both direct and indirect effects on APA, it had only direct effect on males' APA. Second, after PSM to adjust for the possible confounders to balance statistically two groups - with and without LMS education, there is statistically a significant difference in APA between male and female students, making a net difference of 11% (p<.01, equivalent to 173 students. The difference in APA between exposed and matched control group in males and females was 9% and 20%, respectively. These estimates of 9.0 and 20.0 percentage point increase can be translated into the practice of APA by 142 males and 315 females, respectively, in the population. These numbers of APA among male and female students can be explained by LMS education. CONCLUSIONS: Gender appears to be a factor explaining in part academic planning activity.

  10. PERCEIVED BARRIERS TO PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Daskapan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Many studies which were published in other countries identified certain benefits and barriers to physical activity among young people. But there is no data about the subject pertaining to Turkish adolescents. This study tries to rectify this with a study of Turkish university students. Undergraduate university students (n = 303 were recruited to the study. Current exercise habits and perceived barriers to physical activity were assessed in the sample. Using a Likert Type scale, participants responded an instrument with 12 items representing barriers to physical activity. Mean scores were computed. External barriers were more important than internal barriers. "Lack of time due to busy lesson schedule", "My parents give academic success priority over exercise." and "lack of time due to responsibilities related to the family and social environment" were most cited items for physical activity barriers. There is a need for future research, which will be carried out with larger sample groups to develop national standardized instrument. It will be helpful for accurately identify perceived barriers and then recommend changes to enhance physical activity among young people.

  11. Physical activity and associated factors among students attending evening classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Luis Ceschini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the physical activity level and associated factors among students attending evening classes in public and private schools in a region of the city of São Paulo. The sample was composed of 1,844 adolescents of both sexes aged 15-20 years. Three public and private schools in the city of São Paulo were visited. Daily physical activity level was assessed through International Physical Activity Questionnaire that classifies physical activity level. Physical activity level was divided into insufficiently active (when subject reported less than 300 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activities per week and physically active (when subject reported more than 300 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activities per week. Information related to risk behavior such as smoking and alcohol consumption was collected. Data were analyzed using logistic regression with three levels of data input and p<.05 as significance level. The prevalence of physically active adolescents was 36.1%. Most active subjects were: A younger boys with low socioeconomic levels; B adolescents from private schools; C adolescents that do not smoke or drink alcoholic beverages; D those who do not attend formal exercise program; E those who go to school to perform physical activities on weekends. Adolescents attending evening classes tended to be insufficiently active. We believe that school structure, working hours, and distance from home and workplace to school and risk factor should explain these data. Intervention programs could significantly contribute to increase the physical activity level among adolescents.

  12. U.S. College Student Activism during an Era of Neoliberalism: A Qualitative Study of Students Against Sweatshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Rachel Fix

    2009-01-01

    This article sets out to examine the experiences of college student activists involved in Students Against Sweatshops on the Beautiful River University campus. Based on observation and interview fieldwork, the paper explores how students negotiate and understand their activism against the backdrop of neoliberalism. The paper concludes that being a…

  13. The Effectiveness of Student Extracurricular Activities in Evaluating Violent Behavior among Students in the Preparatory Year at Hail University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleid, Alkhamsah Saleh

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of student extracurricular activities in evaluating violent behavior among students in the preparatory year at Hail University. The researcher used the descriptive analytical method, and used two tools for the purpose of the study, the study sample consisted of 104 (violent) female students from the…

  14. University Student Agency, Representation, and Activism: A Case Study of Students Studying English at Universite Cheikh Anta Diop (Dakar, Senegal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Casey

    2012-01-01

    This study explores and interrogates dominant representations of African university students by examining how students conceptualize and act upon their own agency. Using a qualitative case-study approach, the author examines how students actively confront the ideological and material conditions presented by schooling. [The dissertation citations…

  15. The Ideal Science Student: Exploring the Relationship of Students' Perceptions to Their Problem Solving Activity in a Robotics Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Florence; Lin, Xiadong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship of middle school students' perceptions of the ideal science student to their problem solving activity and conceptual understanding in the applied science area of robotics. Twenty-six 11 and 12 year-olds (22 boys) attending a summer camp for academically advanced students participated in the…

  16. Effects of Active Learning Classrooms on Student Learning: A Two-Year Empirical Investigation on Student Perceptions and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Pit Ho Patrio; Cheng, Shuk Han

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies on active learning classrooms (ACLs) have demonstrated their positive influence on student learning. However, most of the research evidence is derived from a few subject-specific courses or limited student enrolment. Empirical studies on this topic involving large student populations are rare. The present work involved a large-scale…

  17. University Student Agency, Representation, and Activism: A Case Study of Students Studying English at Universite Cheikh Anta Diop (Dakar, Senegal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Casey

    2012-01-01

    This study explores and interrogates dominant representations of African university students by examining how students conceptualize and act upon their own agency. Using a qualitative case-study approach, the author examines how students actively confront the ideological and material conditions presented by schooling. [The dissertation citations…

  18. DIAGNOSING THE READINES OF TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY STUDENTS FOR RESEARCH ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Fedorova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the technique designed for diagnosing the technical university student’s readiness for research activities that is closely related to the research competence structure. Based on the survey results and literature analysis, the authors considered ten primary components of the readiness in question, and analyzed each component along with the corresponding weight value, mean value, and probability density. Consequently, the high level of academic knowledge and motivation for research activity were singled out as the priority components. The paper describes the linear mathematical model, developed for diagnosing student’s readiness for research activities, and presents the minimum, maximum and threshold values of diagnostic assessments, and the relating indicators. The given model can be used as the basic one for developing a test software product for students and research supervisors diagnosing the readiness for research activity

  19. Hypothetical biotechnology companies: A role-playing student centered activity for undergraduate science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuck, Jo-Anne

    2011-01-01

    Science students leaving undergraduate programs are entering the biotechnology industry where they are presented with issues which require integration of science content. Students find this difficult as through-out their studies, most content is limited to a single subdiscipline (e.g., biochemistry, immunology). In addition, students need knowledge of the ethical, economic, and legal frame work in which the industry operates. This article presents an approach to deliver these outcomes in a collaborative and active learning modality which promotes deep learning. In the model, groups of final year undergraduate students form hypothetical biotechnology companies and identify real issues of interest to industry, make integrative team decisions, use professional level technology, and develop appropriate communication skills. The final successful teaching paradigm was based on self reflection, observation, and student feedback to ensure appropriate attainment of content, group work skills and increased confidence in professional decision-making. It is these outcomes which will facilitate life long learning skills, a major outcome applicable for all tertiary education.

  20. Active learning and student-centered pedagogy improve student attitudes and performance in introductory biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Peter; Patel, Maya; Johnson, Erika; Weiss, Martha

    2009-01-01

    We describe the development and implementation of an instructional design that focused on bringing multiple forms of active learning and student-centered pedagogies to a one-semester, undergraduate introductory biology course for both majors and nonmajors. Our course redesign consisted of three major elements: 1) reordering the presentation of the course content in an attempt to teach specific content within the context of broad conceptual themes, 2) incorporating active and problem-based learning into every lecture, and 3) adopting strategies to create a more student-centered learning environment. Assessment of our instructional design consisted of a student survey and comparison of final exam performance across 3 years-1 year before our course redesign was implemented (2006) and during two successive years of implementation (2007 and 2008). The course restructuring led to significant improvement of self-reported student engagement and satisfaction and increased academic performance. We discuss the successes and ongoing challenges of our course restructuring and consider issues relevant to institutional change.

  1. Chaotic....!! Active and Engaged. Effects of an active learning classroom on student retention and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsole, S.; Serpa, L. F.

    2014-12-01

    Scientific literacy has been defined as the foremost challenge of this decade (AAAS, 2012). The Geological Society of American in its position statement postis that due to the systemic nature of the discipline of earth science, it is the most effective way to engage students in STEM disciplines. Given that the most common place for exposure to earth sciences is at the freshman level for non majors, we decided to transform a freshman introductory geology course to an active, student centered course, using an inquiry based approach. Our focus was to ensure the students saw the earth sciences as broadly applicative field, and not an esoteric science. To achieve this goal, we developed a series of problems that required the students to apply the concepts acquired through their self guided learning into the different topics of the course. This self guided learning took the form of didactic content uploaded into the learning management system (the various elements used to deliver the content were designed video clips, short text based lectures, short formative assessments, discussion boards and other web based discovery exercises) with the class time devoted to problem solving. A comparison of student performance in the active learning classroom vs. a traditional classroom as measured on a geoscience concept inventory (the questions were chosen by a third party who was not teaching either courses) showed that the the students in the active learning classroom scored 10% higher on the average in comparison to the traditional class. In addition to this heightened performance, the students in the active classroom also showed a higher degree of content retention 8 weeks after the semester had ended. This session will share the design process, some exercises and efficacy data collected.

  2. Shyness, Physical Activity, and Sports Team Participation among Philippine High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Randy M.; Zarco, Emilia Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Examined relationship between shyness and physical activity among Philippine high schoolers. Found that Philippine students reported less physical activity than U.S. students on the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Highly shy Filipino students participated in vigorous physical activity significantly less often than those with average or low shyness and…

  3. Using Technology to Increase Physical Activity in Health Profession Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ann Stark

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Health profession students may need help establishing and maintaining positive health behaviors when they are in college. This study explored the effectiveness of text messaging as an innovative method for promoting an increase in daily physical activity. A convenience sample (N = 134 was recruited from students at a college of Health and Human Services in Michigan. The participants were randomized into an intervention or control group (n = 67 each. The intervention group received daily affective text messages encouraging more physical activity by taking more steps. The control group received only messages reminding them to report their number of steps. All of the participants received a pedometer, completed a demographics and daily habits questionnaire, and completed the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS. There was no significant difference between the intervention and control groups in their number of daily steps. However, the most inactive participants had a significant increase in steps during the study period. Health profession students’ lifestyle behaviors have consequences, as they become caregivers in our dynamic, demanding health-care system. For those with the greatest need for physical activity, encouraging such activity via text messaging may improve their ability to care for themselves and their clients.

  4. Framework, process and tool for managing technology-based assets

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kfir, R

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available ) and the intellectual property (IP) of the organisation, The study describes a framework linking the core processes supporting the management of technology-based assets and offerings with other organisational elements such as leadership, strategy, and culture. Specific...

  5. Using Activity Theory to Model the Taiwan Atayal Students' Classroom Mathematical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Fou-Lai

    2013-01-01

    From the sociocultural perspective, this research utilized activity theory as the theoretical framework to analyze the influences of cultural factors for Taiwanese Atayal junior high school students' study in mathematics. The research methodology adopted grounded theory, theoretical and methodological approaches which are illustrated through…

  6. On Cleaning: Student Activism in the Corporate and Imperial University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi Carey

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the past year, over 100 university campuses in the United States and elsewhere have witnessed student protest, specifically against institutionalized racism and in response to symptoms of the university’s neoliberal, capitalist and imperial culture. This article outlines the emergence and confluence of the corporate and imperial university, producing and reproducing the violence of consumer culture, academic containment, and institutional control. This case study of a small, elite, liberal arts college in the United States will unravel the messiness of the contact zone where university administration and student protest meet, and its meanings for those of us who find ourselves ever-contained within spaces of higher education. Through critical discourse analysis and participant observation, I provide some preliminary mapping of how the university sanitizes—how it keeps itself ‘clean’—and the different ways this is interpreted, confirmed, and resisted by its campus community. Queer and feminist readings of pollution, dirt, and bacteria contextualize the university’s response to student activism, and daily operation, in the politics of containment and cleanliness.

  7. 78 FR 57371 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG) Enrollment... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG...: Enrollment in the Federal Student Aid (FSA) Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG) allows eligible entities...

  8. Gender, eating behavior, and personality characteristics in physically active students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjelsås, Einar; Augestad, Liv Berit

    2004-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine associations between personality traits, eating disorder (ED) behavior, exercise, and gender. The participants (n=1482: 905 women and 577 men) were students from four universities in Norway. The subjects filled out a compound questionnaire including demographics, weekly hours of exercise, type of sport, Karolinska Scales of Personality (KSP), and the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI). Because of the data collection procedure, it is difficult to provide a clear-cut response rate in this study. The results showed that the risk ratio for women who scored 40 or higher on the EDI was three times higher compared with men. ED behavior did not seem to be associated with high weekly hours of physical activity in general. There were significant gender differences in personality traits. However, women and men with high scores on the EDI showed no differences on the KSP scales, except on "detachment" and "indirect aggression". The most important predictors for weekly hours of physical activity were the EDI scales "drive for thinness" and "body dissatisfaction", and the personality variables "extraversion" and "neuroticism". The factors that contributed most to the differences between students who scored 40 or higher on the EDI and those who scored below 40 on the EDI were neuroticism, BMI, gender, and age.

  9. Enhancing Student Motivation in College and University Physical Activity Courses Using Instructional Alignment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, MooSong; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Yun, Joonkoo

    2015-01-01

    Motivation is a key factor in promoting students' active engagement in regular physical activity. According to self-determination theory -- one of the prominent motivational theories -- for this to occur, students' basic psychological needs must be met (i.e., their need for autonomy, competence and relatedness). Students' self-determined…

  10. Relationships among Physical Activity Levels, Psychomotor, Psychosocial, and Cognitive Development of Primary Education Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isler, Ayse Kin; Asci, F. Hulya; Kosar, S. Nazan

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the relationships of physical activity levels and psychomotor, psychosocial, and cognitive development among Turkish elementary school students. Student evaluations indicated that physical activity level was an important factor in determining student psychomotor development, but it was not important in determining psychosocial and…

  11. A Study of Lipscomb University Students' Internet Use and Involvement in Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Samuel Aarron

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze Lipscomb University students' Internet use and involvement in extracurricular activities. A survey of students at Lipscomb University was conducted. As confirmed by the data the research was able to determine that the type of extracurricular activity a student participates in most often is related to the…

  12. Relation between Academic Performance and Students' Engagement in Digital Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertheussen, Bernt Arne; Myrland, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the effect of student engagement in digital learning activities on academic performance for 120 students enrolled in an undergraduate finance course. Interactive practice and exam problem files were available to each student, and individual download activity was automatically recorded during the first 50 days of the course.…

  13. Enhancing Student Motivation in College and University Physical Activity Courses Using Instructional Alignment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, MooSong; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Yun, Joonkoo

    2015-01-01

    Motivation is a key factor in promoting students' active engagement in regular physical activity. According to self-determination theory -- one of the prominent motivational theories -- for this to occur, students' basic psychological needs must be met (i.e., their need for autonomy, competence and relatedness). Students' self-determined…

  14. Correlation between the Physical Activity Level and Grade Point Averages of Faculty of Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imdat, Yarim

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to find the correlation that exists between physical activity level and grade point averages of faculty of education students. The subjects consist of 359 (172 females and 187 males) under graduate students To determine the physical activity levels of the students in this research, International Physical Activity…

  15. Correlation between the Physical Activity Level and Grade Point Averages of Faculty of Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imdat, Yarim

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to find the correlation that exists between physical activity level and grade point averages of faculty of education students. The subjects consist of 359 (172 females and 187 males) under graduate students To determine the physical activity levels of the students in this research, International Physical Activity…

  16. Dynamic managerial capability of technology-based international new ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altshuler, Liliya

    2014-01-01

    case study of a technology-based INV conducted over the period of 3.5 years, starting 8 years into the firm’s history. This unique design has enabled close observation of the specific events and challenges the firm has been facing after its initial success, and of the aspects in the firm’s management......The article focuses on long-term development of technology-based international new ventures (INVs) and discusses aspects of managing such ventures once they are past the initial success and rapid internationalization and enter the stable development phase. The study builds on an in-depth process...... to resource availability. The study takes the dynamic capability perspective and focuses on INVs’ management, which are seen as founders and builders of the processes, rules and structures that lay the basis for long-term competitive advantage for such firms. Based on the findings, specific aspects...

  17. Promoting Physical Activity for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Barriers, Benefits, and Strategies for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menear, Kristi S.; Neumeier, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Many students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) fall short of the recommended physical activity levels and experience challenges in physical activity and physical education settings. This article reviews factors that can improve the physical activity statistics of students with ASD, outlines the researched benefits of physical activity for…

  18. Promoting Physical Activity for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Barriers, Benefits, and Strategies for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menear, Kristi S.; Neumeier, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Many students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) fall short of the recommended physical activity levels and experience challenges in physical activity and physical education settings. This article reviews factors that can improve the physical activity statistics of students with ASD, outlines the researched benefits of physical activity for…

  19. Assistive Technology Based on Robotics and Rise in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaoyu; WANG Kaixuan

    2013-01-01

    The concept of assistive technology based on robotics,rehabilitation robot and intelligent assistive devices.Domestic intelligence assistive devices include intelligent prosthetics,intelligent orthotics,intelligent walker,assistive devices for smart home environment control,intelligent life assistive devices; Domestic intelligent rehabilitation robot include upper limb rehabilitation robot,hand rehabilitation robot,lower limb rehabilitation robot,robotic smart wheelchair,intelligent nursing bed,daily care robot,the development trend of intelligent assistive devices and rehabilitation robot.

  20. Assessment of weight status, dietary habits and beliefs, physical activity, and nutritional knowledge among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahia, Najat; Wang, Daniel; Rapley, Melyssa; Dey, Rajarshi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess weight status, dietary habits, physical activity, dietary beliefs, and nutrition knowledge among a sample of students from Central Michigan University. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among a sample of undergraduate students in Fall 2011 and Spring 2012 at Central Michigan University. Participating students completed an online questionnaire that included questions related to their eating habits, physical activity and lifestyle, dietary beliefs, and nutritional knowledge. Weight, height, and waist circumference were measured. Percentage body fat and visceral fat score were determined using a Tanita body composition analyser (SC-331S). Outcomes of this study indicated that 78% of female students were within the healthy weight range compared to 52% of male students. Visceral body fat and waist circumference scores were higher in males than in females. Most students showed 'satisfactory' dietary habits. Almost half of the students reported drinking two glasses of milk and consuming two cups of fruits and vegetables daily. Physical activity and lifestyle score indicated that most of the students were not physically active. Only 7% of students reported having a very active lifestyle, and 4% had quite good nutritional knowledge. The majority of students, particularly females, were within the healthy body weight range. Students' dietary habits were satisfactory. However, physical activity, students' knowledge of healthy and unhealthy diet habits, and nutritional knowledge needed improvement. Developing gender-specific programmes for promoting healthy lifestyle behaviours among students is recommended. © Royal Society for Public Health 2015.

  1. Technology-based self-care methods of improving antiretroviral adherence: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parya Saberi

    Full Text Available As HIV infection has shifted to a chronic condition, self-care practices have emerged as an important topic for HIV-positive individuals in maintaining an optimal level of health. Self-care refers to activities that patients undertake to maintain and improve health, such as strategies to achieve and maintain high levels of antiretroviral adherence.Technology-based methods are increasingly used to enhance antiretroviral adherence; therefore, we systematically reviewed the literature to examine technology-based self-care methods that HIV-positive individuals utilize to improve adherence. Seven electronic databases were searched from 1/1/1980 through 12/31/2010. We included quantitative and qualitative studies. Among quantitative studies, the primary outcomes included ARV adherence, viral load, and CD4+ cell count and secondary outcomes consisted of quality of life, adverse effects, and feasibility/acceptability data. For qualitative/descriptive studies, interview themes, reports of use, and perceptions of use were summarized. Thirty-six publications were included (24 quantitative and 12 qualitative/descriptive. Studies with exclusive utilization of medication reminder devices demonstrated less evidence of enhancing adherence in comparison to multi-component methods.This systematic review offers support for self-care technology-based approaches that may result in improved antiretroviral adherence. There was a clear pattern of results that favored individually-tailored, multi-function technologies, which allowed for periodic communication with health care providers rather than sole reliance on electronic reminder devices.

  2. Instilling positive beliefs about disabilities: pilot testing a novel experiential learning activity for rehabilitation students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Arielle M; Pitonyak, Jennifer S; Nelson, Ian K; Matsuda, Patricia N; Kartin, Deborah; Molton, Ivan R

    2017-02-25

    To develop and test a novel impairment simulation activity to teach beginning rehabilitation students how people adapt to physical impairments. Masters of Occupational Therapy students (n = 14) and Doctor of Physical Therapy students (n = 18) completed the study during the first month of their program. Students were randomized to the experimental or control learning activity. Experimental students learned to perform simple tasks while simulating paraplegia and hemiplegia. Control students viewed videos of others completing tasks with these impairments. Before and after the learning activities, all students estimated average self-perceived health, life satisfaction, and depression ratings among people with paraplegia and hemiplegia. Experimental students increased their estimates of self-perceived health, and decreased their estimates of depression rates, among people with paraplegia and hemiplegia after the learning activity. The control activity had no effect on these estimates. Impairment simulation can be an effective way to teach rehabilitation students about the adaptations that people make to physical impairments. Positive impairment simulations should allow students to experience success in completing activities of daily living with impairments. Impairment simulation is complementary to other pedagogical methods, such as simulated clinical encounters using standardized patients. Implication of Rehabilitation It is important for rehabilitation students to learn how people live well with disabilities. Impairment simulations can improve students' assessments of quality of life with disabilities. To be beneficial, impairment simulations must include guided exposure to effective methods for completing daily tasks with disabilities.

  3. Measuring teacher regulating activities concerning student learning in secondary education classrooms : Reliability and validity of student perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, J. A.; de Jong, F. P. C. M.; Wubbels, Th.; Minnaert, A. E. M. G.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the use and validation of the Pedagogical Practices Inventory, which uses student perceptions arranged into five subscales to measure teacher activities concerning the regulation of student learning in secondary education. To determine the reliability and validity of the instr

  4. Effective Teachers for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: Active Ingredients Leading to Positive Teacher and Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Maureen A.; Sutherland, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    Teachers of students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) have varied skills and abilities. Within the field there are some teachers, who teach students with E/BD by actively engaging them in learning tasks and who have few behavior problems in comparison to other teachers, who struggle with classroom management. Many researchers have found…

  5. Business oriented educational experiments enhance active learning by engineering students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Nynne Mia; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans; Simon, Jens

    2012-01-01

    and the European Social Fund. The project is carried out with other major educational institutions in the Copenhagen area and organized in five themes: 1) world class competences, 2) new interactions between education and business, 3) the experimenting organization, 4) education on demand, and 5) new career paths...... the CIE concept is put into shape as an innovation and information hub for SMEs and start-ups where students, professors and companies can meet, share information, and embark on innovative projects creating practical solutions that are immediately applied in business. Obviously, all parties should harvest...... of major regional players in the innovation and entrepreneurship value chain including close cooperation with major players in the area of technological research, development, and service. Thus, the scale, scope, and quality of the IHK study programs as well as the active learning part is significantly...

  6. Student Active Participation in the Study of the Light Bulbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre Ogrutan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an initiative approach to the study of light bulbs, involving active participation of the students engaged in interactive problem-/project-based learning of electromagnetic compatibility and energetic efficiency belonging to the environmental issues. The paper includes preliminary and complementary simulations of the hardware firmware-software-net ware development of a laboratory test bench for the study of conducted perturbations generated during the bulb firing sequence. This laboratory sub-system is useful both in association with traditional methods of learning as well as with e-Learning platforms. Finally, the paper presents the results of a concise survey of opinions on the outcomes of this research.

  7. Activities for education at work for Medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna León Acebo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: the growing demands of a health professional that combines study and work, school with life and teaching-learning in primary and secondary health care constitute a current social problem for the country.Objective: to design a set of activities for education at work for first year medical students, from the family doctor's office, to contribute to health promotion and disease prevention in the community, favoring the integral formation of future doctors.Methods: the program was designed in work areas for the integrated teaching of biomedical disciplines for contributing to health promotion and disease prevention in "Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima” polyclinic in Las Tunas. It carried out the historic and graphical analysis of the problem; students’,  professors’ and community members’ behaviors were observed; interviews and surveys were applied to explore knowledge and experiences of students and health professionals on the promotion of health education at work; workshops on critical opinion and collective elaboration were carried out and permitted to  socialize with other teachers and health professionals the proposed program for its redesign based on collective criticism.Results: the shortcomings caused by the fragmentation of subject contents and biomedical disciplines in education at work were characterized and the plan to help to eliminate the inadequacies that occur in education at work was designed by work areas and determined by the general guidelines for its implementation, without specific indications.Conclusions: the clinical method was applied its pedagogical dimension, allowing the coordination between the traditional methods of teaching-learning and for diagnosing, to contribute to eliminate the spontaneous character in the development of education in the workplace. The program of activities was designed by work areas.

  8. When Students Take the Lead: Enhancing Quality and Relevance of Higher Education through Innovation in Student-Centred Problem-Based Active Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Student-centred problem-based active learning contributes substantially to the enhancement of students’ competitiveness and employability. It also contributes to research, allowing academic staff to engage in research-based teaching, bringing the latest business and scientific developments directly...... to the students. Student-centred problem-based active learning encourages students to work independently and constructively using academic staff as mentors and supervisors. It is a learning philosophy according to which the learning process is organized in such a way that the students actively engage in finding...... problems and answers to these problems; student-centred active learning also encourages students to pursue their own learning objectives and paths....

  9. THE CORRELATION BETWEEN PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES AND DEPRESSION STATUS AMONG THE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İrfan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at examining the correlation between physical activity levels and depression status among the university students. The study was a correlational research and was conducted with cross-sectional method. The sample of the study was composed of 906 students who studied at the Afyon Kocatepe University. The data of the study were collected using a questionnaire form consisted of items about personal information and physical activities and depression status. The data were evaluated with SPSS statistical software. First; descriptive statistical data were gathered. The correlational status among the variables was analyzed with Pearson Correlation Coefficients. The differences of depression status in terms of physical activity levels of the students were analyzed with ANOVA test. As a result of the study; it was found out that there was a statistically significant difference between physical activity levels and depression status of the students in terms of gender variable. It was identified that there was a significant difference in depression status of the students in terms of their physical activity levels (p<0.01. It was seen that there was a negative correlation between physical activity levels and depression status of the students (p<0.001. In conclusion; it was found out that physical activity MET scores of the female students were lower than male students while their depression levels were higher than male students and depression levels of the students decreased as their physical activity levels increased.

  10. Good Mental Health Status of Medical Students: Is There A Role for Physical Activity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepthi R

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental health problems are more commonly seen in youth, more so in medical students. Physical activity though known to improve mental health is difficult to follow among medical students. Aims & Objectives: This study aimed to investigate self-reported levels of anxiety and depression and compare these with self-reported physical activity among medical students in an institution of India. Material & Methods: A Cross sectional study was done among 430 medical students and interns of a medical college of rural Karnataka, India. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ were administered to assess mental health status and physical activity levels respectively. Results: The prevalence of anxiety (65.1%, depression (39.5% and anxiety with depression (34.4% was high among medical students. Only 18.1% of students were highly active while 35.9% were inactive when physical activity levels were measured. Students who were highly active and minimally active in physical activity showed lower levels of depression and anxiety compared to low physical activity group. Conclusion: Mental health problems are high and physical activity levels are low among medical undergraduate students. Engagement in physical activity can be an important contributory factor in positive mental health of future doctors.

  11. Reading and Internet Use Activities of Undergraduate Students of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science ... Students' learning in the digital age depends on both adequate search for learning materials through ... Keywords: Reading, Internet use, learning, universities, students, Nigeria ...

  12. Innovative cold joining technologies based on tube forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on innovative cold joining technologies for connecting tubes and fixing tubes to sheets. The proposed technologies are based on the utilization of plastic instability waves in thin-walled tubes subjected to axial compression and may be seen as an alternative to conventional joining technologies based on mechanical fixing with fasteners, welding and structural adhesive bonding. Besides allowing connecting dissimilar materials and being successfully employed in fixture conditions that are difficult and costly to achieve by means of conventional joining the new proposed technologies also cope with the growing concerns on the demand, lifecycle and recycling of materials.

  13. FUNCTIONALITY OF STUDENTS WITH PHYSICAL DEFICIENCY IN WRITING AND COMPUTER USE ACTIVITIES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fernanda Matrigani Mercado Gutierres de Queiroz; Lígia Maria Presumido Braccialli

    2017-01-01

    ... in: Describe the functionality of students with physical disabilities, in the Multifunctional Resource Rooms, for activities of writing and computer use, according to the perception of the teachers...

  14. Student Activism in the High Schools of New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haake, Bernard F.; Langworthy, Philip B.

    The purpose of nine regional meetings between New York State Education Department personnel, educators and students from selected secondary school districts was to obtain information about unrest and the changing expectations of high school students. The following conclusions were made: (1) rising expectations of students are part of the "times,"…

  15. Active Listening Strategies of Academically Successful University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canpolat, Murat; Kuzu, Sekvan; Yildirim, Bilal; Canpolat, Sevilay

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: In formal educational environments, the quality of student listening affects learning considerably. Students who are uninterested in a lesson listen reluctantly, wanting time to pass quickly and the class to end as soon as possible. In such situations, students become passive and, though appearing to be listening, will not use…

  16. Learning Activities Utilized and Readiness for the Student Teaching Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripling, Christopher T.; Thoron, Andrew C.; Estepp, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural education has traditionally provided rich learning experiences for secondary school students; however, less attention has been paid to the learning experiences preservice agricultural education teachers utilize and provide secondary school students during the student teaching internship. This study sought to describe the learning…

  17. 77 FR 67737 - Proposed Information Collection (Student Verification of Enrollment) Activity: Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Student Verification of Enrollment) Activity: Comment Request...: Student Verification of Enrollment, VA Form 22-8979. OMB Control Number: 2900-0465. Type of Review... of actual attendance and verification of the student's continued enrollment in courses leading to...

  18. Nobody Says No: Student Self-Censorship in a Collaborative Knowledge Building Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Alan; Nason, Rod

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores student self-censorship within an online learning environment. Self-censorship in group activity can be seen as a two-edged sword. While it can be advantageous that a student censor personal frustration and angst when working with others, if the self-censorship impacts on the cognitive contribution a student makes then this may…

  19. A Comparison of Motivational Factors and Barriers to Physical Activity among Traditional versus Nontraditional College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulavic, Kimberly; Hultquist, Cherilyn N.; McLester, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the motivational factors and the barriers to physical activity (PA) in traditional college students (TS) and nontraditional college students (NTS) and determine if differences exist between these 2 groups. Participants: A total of 746 college students; 628 were TS (19.1 [plus-minus] 1.2 years), and 118 were NTS (31.2…

  20. Effects of Active Learning on Enhancing Student Critical Thinking in an Undergraduate General Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoungna; Sharma, Priya; Land, Susan M.; Furlong, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    To enhance students' critical thinking in an undergraduate general science course, we designed and implemented active learning modules by incorporating group-based learning with authentic tasks, scaffolding, and individual reports. This study examined the levels of critical thinking students exhibited in individual reports and the students'…

  1. Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities in Electrochemistry: High School Students' Achievements and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesen, Burcin Acar; Tarhan, Leman

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of inquiry-based laboratory activities on high school students' understanding of electrochemistry and attitudes towards chemistry and laboratory work. The participants were 62 high school students (average age 17 years) in an urban public high school in Turkey. Students were assigned to experimental (N =…

  2. Scholarly Networking among Business Students: Structured Discussion Board Activity and Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kristen; Curren, Mary T.; Kiesler, Tina; Lammers, H. Bruce; Goldenson, Jamie

    2013-01-01

    The authors' intent was to show the effect of student discussion board activity on academic outcomes, after accounting for past academic performance. Data were collected from 516 students enrolled in a junior-level required business course. Controlling for students' grade point average, stepwise regression showed a significant…

  3. Time spent on clerkship activities by students in relation to their perceptions of learning environment quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hell, Elisabeth A.; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2009-01-01

    Context Students' perceptions of their learning environment are of great importance to their learning process. In this study we assessed the time allocated by students to clerkship activities and the relationship between students' allocations of time and their perceptions of the quality of their cli

  4. Beyond the Classroom: Involving Students with Disabilities in Extracurricular Activities at Levy Middle School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Pam; And Others

    Six students in a special education classroom at Levy Middle School (Syracuse, New York) became involved in a variety of after-school activities with nondisabled students. The students participated in the school computer club, cross-country skiing, volleyball, stage crew, intramural basketball, the Spanish Club, and after-school programs at two…

  5. 78 FR 24393 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Promoting Student Success in Algebra I...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-25

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Promoting Student Success in Algebra I Project... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Promoting Student Success in Algebra I... Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 208. Abstract: The Promoting Student Success in Algebra I (PSSA...

  6. Validation of psychosocial scales for physical activity in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Miranda Tassitano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Translate the Patient-centered Assessment and Counseling for Exercise questionnaire, adapt it cross-culturally and identify the psychometric properties of the psychosocial scales for physical activity in young university students.METHODS The Patient-centered Assessment and Counseling for Exercise questionnaire is made up of 39 items divided into constructs based on the social cognitive theory and the transtheoretical model. The analyzed constructs were, as follows: behavior change strategy (15 items, decision-making process (10, self-efficacy (6, support from family (4, and support from friends (4. The validation procedures were conceptual, semantic, operational, and functional equivalences, in addition to the equivalence of the items and of measurements. The conceptual, of items and semantic equivalences were performed by a specialized committee. During measurement equivalence, the instrument was applied to 717 university students. Exploratory factor analysis was used to verify the loading of each item, explained variance and internal consistency of the constructs. Reproducibility was measured by means of intraclass correlation coefficient.RESULTS The two translations were equivalent and back-translation was similar to the original version, with few adaptations. The layout, presentation order of the constructs and items from the original version were kept in the same form as the original instrument. The sample size was adequate and was evaluated by the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin test, with values between 0.72 and 0.91. The correlation matrix of the items presented r 0.40, varying between 0.43 and 0.80, which explained between 45.4% and 59.0% of the variance. Internal consistency was satisfactory (α ≥ 0.70, with support from friends being 0.70 and 0.92 for self-efficacy. Most items (74.3% presented values above 0.70 for the reproducibility test.CONCLUSIONS The validation process steps were considered satisfactory and adequate for applying

  7. Validation of psychosocial scales for physical activity in university students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassitano, Rafael Miranda; de Farias, José Cazuza; Rech, Cassiano Ricardo; Tenório, Maria Cecília Marinho; Cabral, Poliana Coelho; da Silva, Giselia Alves Pontes

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Translate the Patient-centered Assessment and Counseling for Exercise questionnaire, adapt it cross-culturally and identify the psychometric properties of the psychosocial scales for physical activity in young university students. METHODS The Patient-centered Assessment and Counseling for Exercise questionnaire is made up of 39 items divided into constructs based on the social cognitive theory and the transtheoretical model. The analyzed constructs were, as follows: behavior change strategy (15 items), decision-making process (10), self-efficacy (6), support from family (4), and support from friends (4). The validation procedures were conceptual, semantic, operational, and functional equivalences, in addition to the equivalence of the items and of measurements. The conceptual, of items and semantic equivalences were performed by a specialized committee. During measurement equivalence, the instrument was applied to 717 university students. Exploratory factor analysis was used to verify the loading of each item, explained variance and internal consistency of the constructs. Reproducibility was measured by means of intraclass correlation coefficient. RESULTS The two translations were equivalent and back-translation was similar to the original version, with few adaptations. The layout, presentation order of the constructs and items from the original version were kept in the same form as the original instrument. The sample size was adequate and was evaluated by the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin test, with values between 0.72 and 0.91. The correlation matrix of the items presented r 0.40), varying between 0.43 and 0.80, which explained between 45.4% and 59.0% of the variance. Internal consistency was satisfactory (α ≥ 0.70), with support from friends being 0.70 and 0.92 for self-efficacy. Most items (74.3%) presented values above 0.70 for the reproducibility test. CONCLUSIONS The validation process steps were considered satisfactory and adequate for applying to the

  8. Evaluation of a pilot school-based physical activity challenge for primary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, E; Donato-Hunt, C; Maher, L; Havrlant, R; Hennessey, K; Milat, A; Farrell, L

    2016-12-02

    Issue addressed: Physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour among children are growing public health concerns. The Culture Health Communities Activity Challenge (hereafter known as the Challenge) is a school-based pedometer program in which classes compete to achieve the highest class average daily steps in an 8-week period. The Challenge aims to encourage physical activity in primary school students, with a focus on engaging Aboriginal students. The program was piloted in 15 classes in New South Wales in 2014.Methods: The evaluation aimed to explore students' and teachers' experiences of the Challenge, and assess its impact on the students' physical activity levels. Data sources were a pre- and post-intervention survey of students' physical activity levels and sedentary time (n=209), qualitative interviews with teachers (n=11) and discussions with 10 classes.Results: Fifteen Year 5 and 6 classes comprising 318 students participated. Fifty percent of participants were girls, the average age was 11 years and the majority (57%) were Aboriginal students. Participation in the Challenge was associated with a slight but statistically significant increase in students' physical activity levels (Pimpacts, including increased motivation to be physically active, and improved student attendance and engagement in class activities and teamwork.Conclusions: Participation in the Challenge was associated with increased physical activity and decreased screen time for some students. Students and teachers also reported a range of positive social and educational outcomes.So what?: The findings highlight the importance of primary schools as a setting for health promotion activities, and demonstrate that school-based physical activity programs can be engaging and appropriate for classes with high proportions of Aboriginal students.

  9. Faculty and second-year medical student perceptions of active learning in an integrated curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Alexander; Harris, David M

    2016-12-01

    Patients expect physicians to be lifelong learners who are able to interpret and evaluate diagnostic tests, and most medical schools list the development of lifelong learning in their program objectives. However, lecture is the most often utilized form of teaching in the first two years and is considered passive learning. The current generation of medical students has many characteristics that should support active learning pedagogies. The purpose of this study was to analyze student and faculty perceptions of active learning in an integrated medical curriculum at the second-year mark, where students have been exposed to multiple educational pedagogies. The first hypothesis of the study was that faculty would favor active learning methods. The second hypothesis was that Millennial medical students would favor active learning due to their characteristics. Primary faculty for years 1 and 2 and second-year medical students were recruited for an e-mail survey consisting of 12 questions about active learning and lecture. Students perceived that lecture and passive pedagogies were more effective for learning, whereas faculty felt active and collaborative learning was more effective. Students believed that more content should be covered by lecture than faculty. There were also significant differences in perceptions of what makes a good teacher. Students and faculty both felt that lack of time in the curriculum and preparation time were barriers for faculty. The data suggest that students are not familiar with the process of learning and that more time may be needed to help students develop lifelong learning skills.

  10. Classroom Activities: Simple Strategies to Incorporate Student-Centered Activities within Undergraduate Science Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lom, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The traditional science lecture, where an instructor delivers a carefully crafted monolog to a large audience of students who passively receive the information, has been a popular mode of instruction for centuries. Recent evidence on the science of teaching and learning indicates that learner-centered, active teaching strategies can be more effective learning tools than traditional lectures. Yet most colleges and universities retain lectures as their central instructional method. This article highlights several simple collaborative teaching techniques that can be readily deployed within traditional lecture frameworks to promote active learning. Specifically, this article briefly introduces the techniques of: reader's theatre, think-pair-share, roundtable, jigsaw, in-class quizzes, and minute papers. Each technique is broadly applicable well beyond neuroscience courses and easily modifiable to serve an instructor's specific pedagogical goals. The benefits of each technique are described along with specific examples of how each technique might be deployed within a traditional lecture to create more active learning experiences.

  11. Analyzing the Effect of Technology-Based Intervention in Language Laboratory to Improve Listening Skills of First Year Engineering Students (El uso de la tecnología en el laboratorio de idiomas para el mejoramiento de las habilidades de escucha de estudiantes de ingeniería de primer año)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasupathi, Madhumathi

    2013-01-01

    First year students pursuing engineering education face problems with their listening skills. Most of the Indian schools use a bilingual method for teaching subjects from primary school through high school. Nonetheless, students entering university education develop anxiety in listening to classroom lectures in English. This article reports an…

  12. Participation in School Food and Nutrition Activities among Grade 6-8 Students in Vancouver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Teya A; Black, Jennifer L; Chapman, Gwen E; Velazquez, Cayley E; Rojas, Alejandro

    2016-09-01

    This study examined student-reported participation in school food and nutrition activities in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC), and whether engagement differed by gender and between elementary and secondary school students. A cross-sectional survey of grade 6-8 public school students (n = 937) from 20 elementary and 6 secondary schools assessed student-reported participation in a range of food and nutrition activities. Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics and multilevel logistic regression to examine associations between participation with gender and school type. Overall, students reported engaging in most of the food and nutrition activities examined in the 2011-2012 school year, including: food preparation (36%), choosing/tasting healthy foods (27%), learning about Canada's Food Guide (CFG) (45%), learning about foods grown in BC (35%), gardening (21%), composting (32%), and recycling (51%). Females were more likely to report recycling and learning about CFG and BC-grown foods (P students were more likely to report activities focused on working with or learning about food/nutrition (P students in food and nutrition experiences, participation in most activities remains relatively low, with few students exposed to multiple activities. Continued advocacy is needed from the dietetics community to improve student engagement in food and nutrition activities.

  13. Technology Activities for Life Skills Support Students. [and] CNC for Lower-Achieving Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressel, Michael J.; Smith, Clayton

    1995-01-01

    Ressel shows how providing technology education to special needs students can reaffirm belief in technology education and revitalize desire to teach. Smith suggests that breaking down processes into special steps allows these students to be successful. (JOW)

  14. Technology Activities for Life Skills Support Students. [and] CNC for Lower-Achieving Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressel, Michael J.; Smith, Clayton

    1995-01-01

    Ressel shows how providing technology education to special needs students can reaffirm belief in technology education and revitalize desire to teach. Smith suggests that breaking down processes into special steps allows these students to be successful. (JOW)

  15. Networking in Sport Management: Ideas and Activities to Enhance Student Engagement and Career Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan S. Kornspan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of this paper is to present information regarding the development of networking skills to enhance the career development of sport management students. Specifically, literature is reviewed which supports the importance of networking in the attainment of employment and career advancement in the sport industry. This is followed by an overview of emerging networking activities that allow opportunities for sport management students to expand their network. Sport industry career fairs and career conferences that students can attend are discussed. Additionally, sport industry professional associations that students can become involved with are presented. This is then followed with information related to the development of sport management clubs and various events that can be promoted to enhance the networking process. Specifically, activities provided by university faculty to enhance the educational experience of sport management students are detailed. Finally, a sample schedule of semester activities focused on student engagement and networking activities is provided.

  16. STUDENT CLUBS AS A FORM OF EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES IN HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Vasilievna Tolstoukhova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The students as a specific stratum of young people actively involved in various associations, movements. Today, more than ever need the support of positive student associations from universities. This paper considers the extracurricular activities of students, and in particular the creation and development of a student club that promotes self-learning, self-education and self-development of students.Purpose: to develop the author a mechanism for the development of activities of the student club «Studio».Methodology: a theoretical analysis of the pedagogical literature on the problems of students ‘ extracurricular activities.Results: the experience of the Tyumen oil and gas University on the organization and management of extracurricular educational work with students. The basis of this system became the tradition and the experience of the music club «Studio». Lists the sessions conducted with students for career mobility, career advancement. In conclusion traces the development of motivation of students, who are members of a student club. The paper presents information from the personal experience of the authors.

  17. Bringing Technology to Students’ Proximity: A Sociocultural Account of Technology-Based Learning Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evode Mukama

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper depicts a study carried out in Rwanda concerning university students who participated in a contest to produce short documentary films. The purpose of this research is to conceptualize these kinds of technology-based learning projects (TBLPs through a sociocultural perspective. The methodology included focus-group discussions and field notes to collect empirical data. The findings reveal that the more educational technologies capture objects of learning positioned in the students’ sociocultural proximity, the more focused the learners’ attention is on these objects. The study shows also that a change in learning projects may depend to a large extent on whether the technology relates to the students’ sociocultural proximity, that is, taking into consideration students’ physical, cultural, and contextual real world. The study recommends a community of learning/inquiry embedded in a collaborative, problem-solving dynamic involving cognitive support from peers, teachers, external specialists, and the wider community.

  18. Integrative Student Learning: An Effective Team Learning Activity in a Learner-Centered Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Karimi, RPh, PhD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: An Integrative Student Learning (ISL activity was developed with the intent to enhance the dynamic of student teamwork and enhance student learning by fostering critical-thinking skills, self-directed learning skills, and active learning. Case Study: The ISL activity consists of three portions: teambuilding, teamwork, and a facilitator driven “closing the loop” feedback discussion. For teambuilding, a set of clue sheets or manufacturer‘s drug containers were distributed among student pairs who applied their pharmaceutical knowledge to identify two more student pairs with similar clues or drugs, thus building a team of six. For teamwork, each team completed online exams, composed of integrated pharmaceutical science questions with clinical correlates, using only selected online library resources. For the feedback discussion, facilitators evaluated student impressions, opened a discussion about the ISL activity, and provided feedback to teams’ impressions and questions. This study describes three different ISL activities developed and implemented over three days with first year pharmacy students. Facilitators’ interactions with students and three surveys indicated a majority of students preferred ISL over traditional team activities and over 90% agreed ISL activities promoted active learning, critical-thinking, self-directed learning, teamwork, and student confidence in online library searches. Conclusions: The ISL activity has proven to be an effective learning activity that promotes teamwork and integration of didactic pharmaceutical sciences to enhance student learning of didactic materials and confidence in searching online library resources. It was found that all of this can be accomplished in a short amount of class time with a very reasonable amount of preparation.

  19. Analysis of the low motor activity of students of the specialized educational department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gryban G.P.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper highlights the results of investigations into the reasons for the low motor activity of students who belong to a special medical group due to their state of health. Deals with the gap between huge amount of mental activity and insufficient motor activity. The absence of dosed motor activity has it's negative impact on students' health, reduces their labor activity and the quality of educational process. The combination of physical exercises provide healthy and training effect on the students who have health condition aberrations.

  20. Toolbox of activities to support students in a physics gateway course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin S. Kalman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a set of activities, which scaffolds students to succeed in the standard Physics gateway course. The set of instructional activities that were designed included four distinct components: reflective writing, collaborative groups, critiques, and an essay question on the examination. Each activity was designed to lead into and connect with the other activities, with the intention that students would establish links between different parts of the course. Implementation was studied at three postsecondary institutions. The results demonstrate that the combination of instructional activities were successful in scaffolding the students and getting them to view the course in a holistic manner.

  1. Hypothetical Biotechnology Companies: A Role-Playing Student Centered Activity for Undergraduate Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuck, Jo-Anne

    2011-01-01

    Science students leaving undergraduate programs are entering the biotechnology industry where they are presented with issues which require integration of science content. Students find this difficult as through-out their studies, most content is limited to a single subdiscipline (e.g., biochemistry, immunology). In addition, students need…

  2. What Are Students Doing during Lecture? Evidence from New Technologies to Capture Student Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltese, Adam V.; Danish, Joshua A.; Bouldin, Ryan M.; Harsh, Joseph A.; Bryan, Branden

    2016-01-01

    Engaging students in class is paramount if they are to gain a deep understanding of class content. Student engagement is manifested by attention to the various components of instruction. However, there is little research at the tertiary level focusing on what aspects of instruction are related to changes in student attention during class. To…

  3. STAFF ACTIVE AND REFLECTIVE LEARNING (ARL TO ENHANCE STUDENT MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tay Sing Leong

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Staff Active Reflective Learning (ARL is a new scheme designed to enhance student management though regular get-togethers of a group of teaching staff. It provides a platform for staff to share issues related to teaching, and seek solutions. This addresses current and future challenges faced in classroom management. The implementation of the Staff ARL is one of the recent initiatives taken under a new approach to shared learning within the School of Electronic and Info-Comm Technology. It provides a platform for mentors to facilitate in developing fellow staff members through the provision of professional support, helping existing staff to learn and grow professionally. Insights into classroom management techniques are provided for new staff to apply while waiting to attend the formal Pedagogic Certification in Technical Education (a compulsory component for all staff. The Staff ARL fosters good working relationships, as staff can ‘chill out’ and be rewarded through the enrichment of knowledge, sharpening of capabilities, building of confidence, and growth of mutual support. The scheme received good feedback as it resulted in the creation of a range of purposeful learning tools and strategies for thedevelopment of problem solving skills, reflective thinking skills and awareness of upto-date classroom situations.

  4. Medical student stories of participation in patient care-related activities: the construction of relational identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmington, Sally; McColl, Geoffrey

    2017-03-01

    Professional identity formation is acknowledged as one of the fundamental tasks of contemporary medical education. Identity is a social phenomenon, constructed through participation in everyday activities and an integral part of every learning interaction. In this paper we report from an Australian ethnographic study into how medical students and patients use narrative to construct their identities. The dialogic narrative analysis employed focused on the production of meaning through the use of language devices in a given context, and the juxtaposition of multiple perspectives. Two stories told by students about their participation in patient care-related activities reveal how identities are constructed in this context through depictions of the relationships between medical students, patients and clinical teachers. These students use the rhetorical functions of stories to characterise doctors and patients in certain ways, and position themselves in relation to them. They defend common practices that circumvent valid consent processes, justified by the imperative to maximise students' participation in patient care-related activities. In doing so, they identify patients as their adversaries, and doctors as allies. Both students are influenced by others' expectations but one reveals the active nature of identity work, describing subtle acts of resistance. These stories illustrate how practices for securing students' access to patients can influence students' emerging identities, with implications for their future disclosure and consent practices. We argue that more collaborative ways of involving medical students in patient care-related activities will be facilitated if students and clinical teachers develop insight into the relational nature of identity work.

  5. Comrades’ power: Student representation and activism in universities in Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Mwangi J. Macharia

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, student politics and governance of universities in Kenya and in otherAfrican countries have undergone a tremendous transformation. The unprecedentedexpansion and massification of public universities, the introduction of ‘Module 2’programmes, the admission of private, ‘parallel’ and ‘school-based’ students, and thesubstantial increase in private universities have impacted on the governance of theinstitutions and student politics in different ways. In this context, this arti...

  6. A Curriculum Activities Guide to Environment Studies with Students with Special Education Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Randolph R., Jr., Ed.

    Developed by teachers, the curriculum guide provides information on environmental studies activities for use with handicapped students. Activities are divided into three areas: awareness level activities (aesthetics, cemeteries, water, soil, air, noise, and miscellaneous activities); transition level activities (playgrounds, cemeteries, wildlife,…

  7. Examination of the Effect of High School Students Physical Activity Levels on Their Problem Solving Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Nimet Korkmaz; Serkan Pancar; Tuncay Alparslan; Ayça Ayan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to be knowledgeable with demographic characteristics, Body mass index, physical activity levels, problem solving skills and sub-dimensions of the students receiving education at Anatolia High Schools and examine the effect of the physical activity levels of these students on their problem solving skills. The population of the study was included a total of 451 students (female=264; male=187) receiving education at the Anatolia High Schools in the Osmangazi district...

  8. Effect of Gender and Physical Activity on Internet Addiction in Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Muhammad Alamgir; Shabbir, Faizania; Rajput, Tausif Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of gender and physical activity on internet addiction in medical students. Methods: In this cross sectional, analytical study Young?s internet addiction test questionnaire was distributed to 350 MBBS students of Army Medical College, Rawalpindi. The study was conducted from January to May 2015. A dichotomous response from students regarding physical activity was obtained which was verified from the sports department of the institution. Based upon total score...

  9. Comrades’ power: Student representation and activism in universities in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwangi J. Macharia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, student politics and governance of universities in Kenya and in otherAfrican countries have undergone a tremendous transformation. The unprecedentedexpansion and massification of public universities, the introduction of ‘Module 2’programmes, the admission of private, ‘parallel’ and ‘school-based’ students, and thesubstantial increase in private universities have impacted on the governance of theinstitutions and student politics in different ways. In this context, this article exploresstudent involvement in university governance and describes the structure of students’unions in Kenyan universities in comparison with students exercising ‘comrades’ power’ inuniversities in Kenya.

  10. Student Engagement with Artefacts and Scientific Ideas in a Laboratory and a Concept-Mapping Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikael Hamza, Karim; Wickman, Per-Olof

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to use a comparative approach to scrutinize the common assumption that certain school science activities are theoretical and therefore particularly suited for engaging students with scientific ideas, whereas others are practical and, thus, not equally conducive to engagement with scientific ideas. We compared two school science activities, one (laboratory work) that is commonly regarded as focusing attention on artefacts that may distract students from central science concepts and the other (concept mapping) that is thought to make students focus directly on these concepts. We observed students in either a laboratory activity about real galvanic cells or a concept-mapping activity about idealized galvanic cells. We used a practical epistemology analysis to compare the two activities regarding students' actions towards scientific ideas and artefacts. The comparison revealed that the two activities, despite their alleged differences along the theory-practice scale, primarily resulted in similar student actions. For instance, in both activities, students interacted extensively with artefacts and, to a lesser extent, with scientific ideas. However, only occasionally did students establish any explicit continuity between artefacts and scientific ideas. The findings indicate that some of the problems commonly considered to be unique for school science practical work may indeed be a feature of school science activities more generally.

  11. Undergraduate Student Construction and Interpretation of Graphs in Physics Lab Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Ryan S.; Godfrey, T. J.; Mayhew, Nicholas T.; Wiegert, Craig C.

    2016-01-01

    Lab activities are an important element of an undergraduate physics course. In these lab activities, students construct and interpret graphs in order to connect the procedures of the lab with an understanding of the related physics concepts. This study investigated undergraduate students' construction and interpretation of graphs with best-fit…

  12. Analyses of Activity Design in Geometry in the Light of Student Actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadas, Nurit; Hershkowitz, Rina; Schwarz, Baruch B.

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the effects of inquiry activities on a dynamic geometry environment designed to confront students with contradictions and uncertainties. Characterizes epistemological, didactic, and cognitive aspects of the activities. Analyzes the interplay among these three aspects, students' investigations, and their explanations. (Author/KHR)

  13. Student Perception of Metacognitive Activities in Entry-Level Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandall, Leah; Mamo, Martha; Speth, Carol; Lee, Don; Kettler, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    A research study investigated student perception of the use of metacognitive activities in the classroom. The courses were large enrollment (n greater than 100) introductory Plant and Soil Sciences courses taught in the fall semester. The courses implemented activities such as concept sketches or conceptual modeling to help students develop their…

  14. Middle-Class Parental Involvement in the Summer Activities of Four Elementary Students: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Iva B.; Chappell, Manya; Johnson, Susan; Ngassam, Marlise DePaul

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we explore middle-class parental involvement in summer activities of four elementary students. Many researchers discuss summer programs initiated by institutions, but fail to explain how parents' availability, experiences, and related criteria affect student summer activities. From our interviews, observations, and artifacts, we…

  15. Undergraduate Student Construction and Interpretation of Graphs in Physics Lab Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Ryan S.; Godfrey, T. J.; Mayhew, Nicholas T.; Wiegert, Craig C.

    2016-01-01

    Lab activities are an important element of an undergraduate physics course. In these lab activities, students construct and interpret graphs in order to connect the procedures of the lab with an understanding of the related physics concepts. This study investigated undergraduate students' construction and interpretation of graphs with best-fit…

  16. Self-Regulated Learning and Perceived Health among University Students Participating in Physical Activity Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Ron E.; Altunsöz, Irmak Hürmeriç; Su, Xiaoxia; Xiang, Ping; Demirhan, Giyasettin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore motivational indicators of self-regulated learning (SRL) and the relationship between self-regulation (SR) and perceived health among university students enrolled in physical activity (PA) classes. One hundred thirty-one Turkish students participating in physical education activity classes at two…

  17. A Literature Review of the Impact of Extracurricular Activities Participation on Students' Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Poh-Sun; Pan, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Extracurricular activities (ECA) have become an important component of students' school life and many schools have invested significant resources on extracurricular activities. The authors suggest three major theoretical frameworks (zero-sum, developmental, and threshold) to explain the impact of ECA participation on students' academic…

  18. Student Perception of Metacognitive Activities in Entry-Level Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandall, Leah; Mamo, Martha; Speth, Carol; Lee, Don; Kettler, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    A research study investigated student perception of the use of metacognitive activities in the classroom. The courses were large enrollment (n greater than 100) introductory Plant and Soil Sciences courses taught in the fall semester. The courses implemented activities such as concept sketches or conceptual modeling to help students develop their…

  19. Using an Exploratory Internet Activity & Trivia Game to Teach Students about Biomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Matthew L.

    2009-01-01

    Students in life science classes need an introduction to biomes, including an introduction to the concept, key biotic and abiotic features of biomes, and geographic locations of biomes. In this activity, students in seventh- and eighth-grade science classes used a directed exploratory Internet activity to learn about biomes. The author tested…

  20. Changes in Short-Term Attitudes Toward Physical Activity and Exercise of University Personal Wellness Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Mick G.; Shaddox, Lea Ann

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the attitudes toward physical activity and exercise of university students enrolled in Personal Wellness classes. 1,625 undergraduate students completed the Attitudes Toward Exercise and Physical Activity (ATEPA) inventory on the first and last day of the class. Paired-samples t test results comparing the mean pretest ATEPA…

  1. Using an Exploratory Internet Activity & Trivia Game to Teach Students about Biomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Matthew L.

    2009-01-01

    Students in life science classes need an introduction to biomes, including an introduction to the concept, key biotic and abiotic features of biomes, and geographic locations of biomes. In this activity, students in seventh- and eighth-grade science classes used a directed exploratory Internet activity to learn about biomes. The author tested…

  2. Effect of Different Types of Small-Group Activities on Students' Conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Krista K.; Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Teaching reform efforts in chemistry education often involve engaging students in small-group activities of different types. This study focused on the analysis of how activity type affected the nature of group conversations. In particular, we analyzed the small-group conversations of students enrolled in a chemistry course for nonscience majors.…

  3. "Activities of Older Adults" Survey: Tapping into Student Views of the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtele, Sandy K.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an exercise used in a life span developmental psychology course to tap into undergraduates' perceptions of activities of the elderly. Students were asked to generate items to be included in a hypothetical Activities of Older Adults survey (to be administered to people 65 years and older). Responses from 1,340 students over a…

  4. A Meta-Analysis Method to Advance Design of Technology-Based Learning Tool: Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Research to Understand Learning in Relation to Different Technology Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Educators design and create various technology tools to scaffold students' learning. As more and more technology designs are incorporated into learning, growing attention has been paid to the study of technology-based learning tool. This paper discusses the emerging issues, such as how can learning effectiveness be understood in relation to…

  5. The Role of Blogs and Web Resources in Students' Autonomous Learning Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballén, Diana

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the way in which technology-based activities may shape and characterize students' awareness of their own learning processes and their understanding of autonomy. The study was carried out at a public university in Colombia. Data collection was done through the implementation of class observations, a survey, and some focus…

  6. Career Guidance, Participation of Students and Its Implication for Kano, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, Isa Ado

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine students' participation in career guidance activities as mechanism through which young adults are developed into productive, responsible personalities well equipped for life and work in today's technology based society. The study focused on career information search, career exploration and assessment aspects…

  7. Facilitating Active Engagement of the University Student in a Large-Group Setting Using Group Work Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Gemma K.; Mahon, Catherine; Lillis, Seamus

    2017-01-01

    It is envisaged that small-group exercises as part of a large-group session would facilitate not only group work exercises (a valuable employability skill), but also peer learning. In this article, such a strategy to facilitate the active engagement of the student in a large-group setting was explored. The production of student-led resources was…

  8. Old but sexy: Value creation of old technology-based businesses models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oke Christian Beckmann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to contribute to a better understanding of the strategic and organisational con gurations that companies can use to generate value with product-market systems and their busi- ness models that have been dominant in the past but forced back into niche positions by innovation. The former dominant music format vinyl was rapidly substituted after the introduction of digital music. However, still nowadays some customers use and buy old technology-based products – vinyl sales boom again since 2007. Due to the two-sided nature of the market, customers have to get access to complementary goods. We are thus interested in technologies which have been outdated by the emergence of new technologies. The originality lies in the combination of the two areas: business models and old technologies. Furthermore, vinyl is an example not analysed in depth by scholars so far. We approached this by undertaking an in-depth literature review to generate hypotheses regarding the value-adding activities of old-technology based businesses as a basis for further research in this area. In addition the paper gives insights into the constellations to be expected over time for old technology-based businesses models in platform markets. We here focus on a neglected topic in the strategy literature which, however, bears relevance for many businesses locked into product-market systems which make it hard for them to (completely switch to a new technology emerging in the market. It is especially valuable to describe the consequences in a systematic fashion.

  9. A Conceptual Framework Based on Activity Theory for Mobile CSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita, Gustavo; Nussbaum, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    There is a need for collaborative group activities that promote student social interaction in the classroom. Handheld computers interconnected by a wireless network allow people who work on a common task to interact face to face while maintaining the mediation afforded by a technology-based system. Wirelessly interconnected handhelds open up new…

  10. Promoting Technology-Assisted Active Learning in Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinzhu; Hargis, Jace

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes specific active learning strategies for teaching computer science, integrating both instructional technologies and non-technology-based strategies shown to be effective in the literature. The theoretical learning components addressed include an intentional method to help students build metacognitive abilities, as well as…

  11. The Alliance Capability of Technology-Based Born Globals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxtorp, Liliya Altshuler; Elg, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the aspects comprising the alliance capability of technology-based born globals. Alliance capability is regarded as a set of organizational skills necessary from the decision to search for a partner for a technology collaboration, which may also involve a marketing...... organisational skills that enable the firms to successfully initiate, manage and finish their R&D alliances with MNEs. The in-depth longitudinal methodology adds insight and value to the study. It is discussed how the specific aspects of the alliance capability can help born globals to counteract the challenges...... and risks of collaborating with MNEs.Methodology: A longitudinal process study of a Danish technology born global with three embedded cases of its R&D and marketing alliances with Asian MNEs.Findings: The organisational skills comprising the alliance capability are defined to be internal and external...

  12. The Alliance Capability of Technology-Based Born Globals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxtorp, Liliya Altshuler; Elg, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the aspects comprising the alliance capability of technology-based born globals. Alliance capability is regarded as a set of organizational skills necessary from the decision to search for a partner for a technology collaboration, which may also involve a marketing...... aspect, through initiation and management of the alliance, up until its objectives are achieved, or otherwise. Originality/value of paper: While earlier research discussed networking and alliance strategies of born globals on a strategic level, this paper investigates and analyses the specific...... and risks of collaborating with MNEs.Methodology: A longitudinal process study of a Danish technology born global with three embedded cases of its R&D and marketing alliances with Asian MNEs.Findings: The organisational skills comprising the alliance capability are defined to be internal and external...

  13. Image Restoration Technology Based on Discrete Neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Duoying

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of computer science and technology, the development of artificial intelligence advances rapidly in the field of image restoration. Based on the MATLAB platform, this paper constructs a kind of image restoration technology of artificial intelligence based on the discrete neural network and feedforward network, and carries out simulation and contrast of the restoration process by the use of the bionic algorithm. Through the application of simulation restoration technology, this paper verifies that the discrete neural network has a good convergence and identification capability in the image restoration technology with a better effect than that of the feedforward network. The restoration technology based on the discrete neural network can provide a reliable mathematical model for this field.

  14. Blended Learning with Everyday Technologies to Activate Students' Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesisenaho, Mikko; Valtonen, Teemu; Kukkonen, Jari; Havu-Nuutinen, Sari; Hartikainen, Anu; Karkkainen, Sirpa

    2010-01-01

    Schools are facing challenges to meet the demands of the information society and the student generation of today. Not only are students carrying their mobile phones everywhere, they are also familiar with different online environments, especially social software. This situation can be seen both a challenge and a chance for schools, as mobile…

  15. Simple Activities to Improve Students' Understanding of Microscopic Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpuz, Edgar de Guzman; Rebello, N. Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    We are currently on the verge of several breakthroughs in nanoscience and technology, and we need to prepare our citizenry to be scientifically literate about the microscopic world. Previous research shows that students' mental models of friction at the atomic level are significantly influenced by their macroscopic ideas. Most students see…

  16. Communicating Wave Energy: An Active Learning Experience for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Trongnghia; Hou, Gene; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted an education project to communicate the wave energy concept to high school students. A virtual reality system that combines both hardware and software is developed in this project to simulate the buoy-wave interaction. This first-of-its-kind wave energy unit is portable and physics-based, allowing students to conduct a number of…

  17. How to Motivate Students to be Active in Class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jie

    2001-01-01

    Good teaching method is the first step to successful teaching. Till now. some teachers still follow the traditional teaching method. so the students are sometimes tired of learning. To improve our teaching techniques and meet the needs of mordern students. it is urgent for us to find a variety of ways to achieve effective teaching.

  18. Adapting Creative and Relaxation Activities to Students with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenko, Nika; Stopar, Mojca Lipec

    2015-01-01

    The team which forms a comprehensive treatment plan for students with cancer includes, among other experts, special educators. In cooperation with other team members, their role is to enable students to integrate in the educational process, having regard to their individual needs. In the present paper we introduce the study of specific methodical…

  19. Physical Activity Preferences of Overweight Fourth and Fifth Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Anne; Galvan, Christine; Hsu, Yun; Giron, Kim

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to contribute to the childhood obesity mitigation literature by determining the PA preferences of obese/overweight (o/o) elementary students who participated in Club Fit!, a school-based PA program designed to engage the students in developmentally appropriate, moderate-vigorous PA and enhance their regard for PA…

  20. Teaching Students the Persuasive Message through Small Group Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creelman, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    Teaching students to write persuasive messages is a critical feature of any undergraduate business communications course. For the persuasive writing module in the author's course, students write a persuasive message on the basis of the four-part indirect pattern often used for sales or fund-raising messages. The course text she uses identifies…

  1. Teachers' Attitudes toward the Implementation of Student Active Learning Approach in Teaching Learning Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mas'ud Yusuf

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to obtain an empirical evidence concerning the attitudes of teachers of elementary schools in Pekalongan Sub District, East Lampung District toward the implementation of the student active learning (CBSA approach in teaching-learning activities. The data were collected through questionnaire and observation, and were analyzed by t-test. The results indicated that there were significant differences in attitudes between young teachers and old ones, between teachers with a bachelor's degree and those without the degree, and between teachers with less teaching experience and those with more teaching experience. Additionally, there were no significant differences in teachers' attitudes in terms of sex and training experience

  2. Intention-behavior gap is wider for walking and moderate physical activity than for vigorous physical activity in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebar, Amanda L; Maher, Jaclyn P; Doerksen, Shawna E; Elavsky, Steriani; Conroy, David E

    2016-02-01

    The theory of planned behavior proposes that physical activity is the result of intentions; however little is known about whether the relation between intentions and behavior differs between vigorous, moderate physical activity, and walking. For university students, vigorous physical activity is oftentimes enacted as a goal-directed behavior; whereas walking is oftentimes a means to achieving a goal other than physical activity (e.g., transportation). The study was a one-week prospective study. Undergraduate students (N=164) reported intentions for walking, moderate physical activity, and vigorous physical activity and self-reported these behaviors one week later. Hierarchical linear modeling revealed that intentions were more strongly related to vigorous physical activity than to moderate physical activity or walking. Intention-enhancing interventions may effectively promote vigorous physical activity, but other motivational processes may be more appropriate to target in interventions of walking and moderate physical activity. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Developing pharmacy student communication skills through role-playing and active learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiz Adrian, Julie Ann; Zeszotarski, Paula; Ma, Carolyn

    2015-04-25

    To evaluate the impact on pharmacy students of a communication course, which used role-playing to develop active-learning skills. Students role-playing pharmacists in patient care scenarios were critiqued by students and pharmacist faculty members. Grading was performed using the rubric inspired by Bruce Berger's Communication Skills for Pharmacists. Written skills were evaluated using student written critique questionnaires. Students completed precourse and postcourse self-assessment surveys. Preceptor evaluations were analyzed for course impact. Students demonstrated improvement in oral skills based on role-play scores (45.87/50) after practice sessions. The average score based on the student questionnaire was 9.31/10. Gain was demonstrated in all defined course objectives. Impact on introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) communication objectives was insignificant. Student evaluations for course and teaching strategy reflected a high average. Study results demonstrated improvement in oral and written communication skills that may help improve interprofessional teamwork between pharmacists and other health care providers.

  4. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PHYSICAL EDUCATION STUDENTS' MOTIVATIONAL PROFILES, ENJOYMENT, STATE ANXIETY, AND SELF-REPORTED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Yli-Piipari

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze motivational profiles based on the self-determination theory (Deci and Ryan, 2000 and how these profiles are related to physical education students' enjoyment, state anxiety, and physical activity. The participants, 429 sixth grade students (girls = 216; boys = 213 completed SMS, Sport Enjoyment Scale, PESAS, and Physical Activity Scale. Cluster analyses identified two motivational profiles: 1 the "High motivation profile", in which the students had high intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and low levels of amotivation, and 2 the "Low motivation profile", in which the students had low intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and low levels of amotivation. The students in the first cluster enjoyed physical education more and were physically more active. The results revealed that students may be motivated towards physical education lessons both intrinsically and extrinsically, and still experience enjoyment in physical education.

  5. Geoscience Outreach Activity Using Art to Understand Imprint Fossils Engaging K-5 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    In order to engage students in grades 3 through 5 in the geosciences, a hands on science activity was developed and implemented using art as a mechanism to gain knowledge of imprint fossils. The desired learning outcomes of this activity were for students to understand imprint fossils formation and how these fossils can be used to learn about past organisms. For more advanced students, an additional learning outcome was to understand how fossils provide information about depositional environments. Five graduate and undergraduate student volunteers presented imprint fossils and used a game to connect the fossils with the corresponding organisms. Students then made their own imprint fossils using modeling clay, plants, and plastic dinosaur skeletons. Of the 212 participating students, 95% (201) of students completed the hands on activity successfully and reported a knowledge gain in the formation and significance of imprint fossils. The activity was adapted to accommodate a diverse student population across grade and ability levels. Classroom teachers reported incorporating students' art into further classroom learning and requested this activity to be repeated the following year by the outreach group.

  6. Successful Geoscience Pipeline Activities for High School and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, T.; Fail, C. F.; Adewumi, M.; Bralower, T.; Guertin, L.

    2004-12-01

    The proportion of African-American students in the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (EMS) at Penn State is 3.3 percent, only slightly lower than the overall University Park campus proportion of 4 percent. Retention rates within EMS are excellent; a recent survey found that EMS ranks highest in student satisfaction overall at the University Park campus. Our goal to increase diversity in EMS disciplines requires us to attract new students to Penn State rather than recruiting from other areas within the institution. We have implemented three programs that appear successful in this regard, and are thus likely to form a viable pipeline from high school through graduate school. These programs operate at a college-wide level and are co-sponsored by AESEDA (Alliance for Earth Science, Engineering and Development in Africa). SEEMS (Summer Experience in EMS) is a partnership with Upward Bound Math and Science, adding 30 hours of directed research to their existing enrichment program. Students identified in 9th grade spend 6 weeks each summer in residence at PSU, where they receive classroom instruction in core academic areas in addition to a group research project led by faculty and graduate students. SEEMS students are likely PSU recruits: all are accepted to college, 85 percent plan to attend college within PA, and all have strong family support for education as well as for careers in EMS. Pre- and post-experience surveys indicate strong positive changes in perception of EMS careers, particularly with regard to levels of intellectual challenge and starting salary. We maintain personal contact with these students and encourage them to attend PSU when they graduate. SROP (Summer Research Opportunity Program) is administered by the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, the academic arm of the Big 10, and provides residential research internships for students from HBCU and MSI campuses. EMS participates in SROP by funding research interns and providing strong individual

  7. School time physical activity of students with and without autism spectrum disorders during PE and recess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chien-Yu

    2008-10-01

    This study compared moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) of students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and students without disabilities during inclusive physical education and recess. Students (7-12 years) wore a uniaxial accelerometer in school for 5 consecutive school days. Results indicated a significant difference between settings, F(1,46) = 15.94, p Students with and without ASD spent a higher proportion of time in MVPA during physical education than during recess, relative to the amount of time spent in those settings. In addition, structured physical education offers opportunities to increase students' MVPA engagement.

  8. Motivational priorities to successful activity of students of faculty of physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezverkhnya G.V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The questions of motivation of students to educational activity are examined. 164 students of 1-4 courses of faculty of physical education took part in research. Limiting factors, impedimental forming of positive motivation of students to teaching, are exposed (weak personal interest by the executable types of works; weak demand to itself; absence of self-control; low level of ambition. It is set that motivational situations of students in a greater degree as negative are estimated. These motivational situations testify to the low personal interest in executable work and about effective stimuli. It is developed organizationally-pedagogical terms of process of teaching and physical education of students.

  9. Does doctors’ workload impact supervision and ward activities of final-year students? A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celebi Nora

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital doctors face constantly increasing workloads. Besides caring for patients, their duties also comprise the education of future colleagues. The aim of this study was to objectively investigate whether the workload arising from increased patient care interferes with student supervision and is associated with more non-medical activities of final-year medical students. Methods A total of 54 final-year students were asked to keep a diary of their daily activities over a three-week period at the beginning of their internship in Internal Medicine. Students categorized their activities – both medical and non-medical - according to whether they had: (1 only watched, (2 assisted the ward resident, (3 performed the activity themselves under supervision of the ward resident, or (4 performed the activity without supervision. The activities reported on a particular day were matched with a ward specific workload-index derived from the hospital information system, including the number of patients treated on the corresponding ward on that day, a correction factor according to the patient comorbidity complexity level (PCCL, and the number of admissions and discharges. Both students and ward residents were blinded to the study question. Results A total of 32 diaries (59 %, 442 recorded working days were handed back. Overall, the students reported 1.2 ± 1.3 supervised, 1.8 ±1.6 medical and 3.6 ± 1.7 non-medical activities per day. The more supervised activities were reported, the more the number of reported medical activities increased (p  Conclusions There was a significant association between ward doctors’ supervision of students and the number of medical activities performed by medical students. The workload had no significant effect on supervision or the number of medical or non-medical activities of final-year students.

  10. ASPECT: A Survey to Assess Student Perspective of Engagement in an Active-Learning Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Benjamin L; Eddy, Sarah L; Wener-Fligner, Leah; Freisem, Karen; Grunspan, Daniel Z; Theobald, Elli J; Timbrook, Jerry; Crowe, Alison J

    2017-01-01

    The primary measure used to determine relative effectiveness of in-class activities has been student performance on pre/posttests. However, in today's active-learning classrooms, learning is a social activity, requiring students to interact and learn from their peers. To develop effective active-learning exercises that engage students, it is important to gain a more holistic view of the student experience in an active-learning classroom. We have taken a mixed-methods approach to iteratively develop and validate a 16-item survey to measure multiple facets of the student experience during active-learning exercises. The instrument, which we call Assessing Student Perspective of Engagement in Class Tool (ASPECT), was administered to a large introductory biology class, and student responses were subjected to exploratory factor analysis. The 16 items loaded onto three factors that cumulatively explained 52% of the variation in student response: 1) value of activity, 2) personal effort, and 3) instructor contribution. ASPECT provides a rapid, easily administered means to measure student perception of engagement in an active-learning classroom. Gaining a better understanding of students' level of engagement will help inform instructor best practices and provide an additional measure for comprehensively assessing the impact of different active-learning strategies. © 2017 B. L. Wiggins, S. L. Eddy, et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. Speeding up development activities in student projects with time boxing and scrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovesen, Nis; Eriksen, Kaare; Tollestrup, Christian

    2011-01-01

    This research project investigates how procedures from agile software development can be of benefit to development activities in projects of design engineering students. The agile methods Scrum and Time boxing are evaluated through a student workshop focusing on near-future concepts for design...... competitions. Scrum meetings within the student design teams are conducted and video documented each hour throughout the workshop activities as a structured process evaluation tool. Based on a subsequent student survey it is argued that scrum and time boxing are strengthening the focus, communication...

  12. Participation Motivation and Student’s Physical Activity among Sport Students in Three Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondric, Miran; Sindik, Joško; Furjan-Mandic, Gordana; Schiefler, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine the differences in motivation to participate in sport activities among sports students from three different countries. On a sample of 390 sports students from Slovenia, Croatia and Germany we studied what motivates an interest in being sports active. The sample was stratified across the choice to attend table tennis lessons at all three institutions and all students have completed the Participation Motivation Questionnaire (PMQ). The results revealed that the latent structure of the types of sports students’ motives consisted of six factors (sport action with friend, popularity, fitness & health, social status, sports events, relaxation through sports). We also found significant sex differences in motivation to participate in sport activities for all sports students from the three different countries. We did not find relevant age-based differences among the students, and this is the only initial hypothesis that we can reject. Key points The potential implications of the result can be in better understanding the relationship between different motivational orientations - in particular, extrinsic motivation - and sport motivation among school-aged individuals. In the context of Self Determination Theory, students can be encouraged in developing more autonomous orientations for sport activity, rather than controlled and impersonal, especially in certain countries. Significant factors of differences have been found in motivation to participate in sport activities among sports students from three different countries and also some significant sex differences have been found in motivation to participate in sport activities for all sports students. PMID:24149720

  13. Improving Post-graduate Students Learning Activities through Lesson Study in Learning Forest-Prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhfahroyin Muhfahroyin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Improving learning quality in 21st can not be separated from contextual learning and student-centered learning paradigm. The contextual lesson study program conducted in learning-forest prototype to build a learning community. The objectives of this research were to improve learning activities of postgraduate students in Biology Education department and to build a learning community. The implementation of lesson study was conducted in the Biology Learning Innovation subject for postgraduate students while practicing to observe open lesson in the undergraduate students which used learning forest-prototype. The postgraduate students took roles as planner, observer, and reflector in the plan, do (open lesson, and see (reflection activities. The implementation was done in three cycles in even semester of academic year 2015/2016. Students learned collaboratively and contextually. The postgraduate students’ learning activities were observed by six observers from lecturer colleagues. The research results showed that the students were able to implement planning, open lesson, and reflection properly. The average of student’s learning activity grade was 91.11% from all of students, with the grade averages for planning, open lesson, and reflection activities were 88.89%, 93.33%, and 91.11% respectively. The implementation of this lesson study in the learning forest-prototype can be done in other relevant subjects to strengthen learning activities.

  14. Evaluation of Classroom Active Engagement in Elementary Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparapani, Nicole; Morgan, Lindee; Reinhardt, Vanessa P; Schatschneider, Christopher; Wetherby, Amy M

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the classroom measure of active engagement (CMAE), an observational tool designed to measure active engagement in students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants included 196 students with ASD and their educators (n = 126) who were video-recorded at the beginning of the school year. Findings documented limited active engagement overall, with students spending less than half of the observation well-regulated, productive, or independent and infrequently directing eye gaze and communicating. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the structure of the CMAE was represented by a 5-factor model. These findings underscore the need for improved active engagement in students with ASD and show promise for a tool to measure behaviors associated with positive educational outcomes in students with ASD.

  15. Promoting Female Students' Learning Motivation towards Science by Exercising Hands-On Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-jin, Kuo; Chia-ju, Liu; Shi-an, Leou

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design different hands-on science activities and investigate which activities could better promote female students' learning motivation towards science. This study conducted three types of science activities which contains nine hands-on activities, an experience scale and a learning motivation scale for data…

  16. Dissent by Design: Fostering Student Activism in Higher Education through a Case Study of Student Affairs in a Public University in the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Maria Aurora Correa; Baranovich, Diana-Lea

    2016-01-01

    Student activism is a ubiquitous component in most democratic societies. Despite its disconcerting implications to the university's operations, it remains an important agenda to student development in higher education. This study presents the case of a university in the Philippines where student activism is a predominant ethos. The findings expose…

  17. Cardiovascular risk factors and physical activity among university students in Somaliland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mahdi; Yusuf, Hassan Ismail; Stahmer, Jens; Rahlenbeck, Sibylle I

    2015-04-01

    Physical inactivity is a well-known risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases and counts as fourth leading cause of death worldwide. The study aimed to elucidate to what extent cardiovascular risk factors exist in university students in Somaliland. In a cross-sectional survey, self-administered questionnaires were used to elucidate existence of cardiovascular risk factors in 173 university students (117 male, 56 female) in Hargeisa, Somaliland. Information elucidated included socio-economic and demographic data in addition to questions on coffee intake, on physical activity behavior, type of sport/activity and intensity and duration. Height and weight were taken, as was blood pressure (BP). Median age was 23 years in male and 20 years in female students. Mean BMI was 19.7 in male and 21.8 in female students. The prevalence rates of elevated BP and overweight (BMI ≥ 25) in female and male students were, 0 versus 9 and 14 versus 7 %, respectively. Coffee consumption was reported by 39 % of students. None of the female students reported smoking cigarettes, while 5.1 % of the male students did. Physical inactivity was reported by 52 % of the female students and 27 % of the male students (p = 0.01). Overall, male students reported a higher degree and intensity of physical activity. The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors is low in female and male university students in Somaliland. However, the results demonstrate a high degree of physical inactivity and overweight might become a problem in the future. This issue should be addressed by increasing the motivation and opportunities for physical activity in students.

  18. Student anxiety in introductory biology classrooms: Perceptions about active learning and persistence in the major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Benjamin J; Brigati, Jennifer R; Schussler, Elisabeth E

    2017-01-01

    Many researchers have called for implementation of active learning practices in undergraduate science classrooms as one method to increase retention and persistence in STEM, yet there has been little research on the potential increases in student anxiety that may accompany these practices. This is of concern because excessive anxiety can decrease student performance. Levels and sources of student anxiety in three introductory biology lecture classes were investigated via an online survey and student interviews. The survey (n = 327) data revealed that 16% of students had moderately high classroom anxiety, which differed among the three classes. All five active learning classroom practices that were investigated caused student anxiety, with students voluntarily answering a question or being called on to answer a question causing higher anxiety than working in groups, completing worksheets, or answering clicker questions. Interviews revealed that student anxiety seemed to align with communication apprehension, social anxiety, and test anxiety. Additionally, students with higher general anxiety were more likely to self-report lower course grade and the intention to leave the major. These data suggest that a subset of students in introductory biology experience anxiety in response to active learning, and its potential impacts should be investigated.

  19. Summary of Student Assistant Activities June 11 September 8 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Student Assistant Program is designed to acquaint the incumbent with all phases of Refuge work. Simultaneously the Bureau will have an opportunity to evaluate...

  20. The Influence of Toy Design Activities on Middle School Students' Understanding of the Engineering Design Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ninger; Pereira, Nielsen L.; George, Tarun Thomas; Alperovich, Jeffrey; Booth, Joran; Chandrasegaran, Senthil; Tew, Jeffrey David; Kulkarni, Devadatta M.; Ramani, Karthik

    2017-10-01

    The societal demand for inspiring and engaging science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students and preparing our workforce for the emerging creative economy has necessitated developing students' self-efficacy and understanding of engineering design processes from as early as elementary school levels. Hands-on engineering design activities have shown the potential to promote middle school students' self-efficacy and understanding of engineering design processes. However, traditional classrooms often lack hands-on engineering design experiences, leaving students unprepared to solve real-world design problems. In this study, we introduce the framework of a toy design workshop and investigate the influence of the workshop activities on students' understanding of and self-efficacy beliefs in engineering design. Using a mixed method approach, we conducted quantitative analyses to show changes in students' engineering design self-efficacy and qualitative analyses to identify students' understanding of the engineering design processes. Findings show that among the 24 participants, there is a significant increase in students' self-efficacy beliefs after attending the workshop. We also identified major themes such as design goals and prototyping in students' understanding of engineering design processes. This research provides insights into the key elements of middle school students' engineering design learning and the benefits of engaging middle school students in hands-on toy design workshops.

  1. The Influence of Toy Design Activities on Middle School Students' Understanding of the Engineering Design Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ninger; Pereira, Nielsen L.; George, Tarun Thomas; Alperovich, Jeffrey; Booth, Joran; Chandrasegaran, Senthil; Tew, Jeffrey David; Kulkarni, Devadatta M.; Ramani, Karthik

    2017-05-01

    The societal demand for inspiring and engaging science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students and preparing our workforce for the emerging creative economy has necessitated developing students' self-efficacy and understanding of engineering design processes from as early as elementary school levels. Hands-on engineering design activities have shown the potential to promote middle school students' self-efficacy and understanding of engineering design processes. However, traditional classrooms often lack hands-on engineering design experiences, leaving students unprepared to solve real-world design problems. In this study, we introduce the framework of a toy design workshop and investigate the influence of the workshop activities on students' understanding of and self-efficacy beliefs in engineering design. Using a mixed method approach, we conducted quantitative analyses to show changes in students' engineering design self-efficacy and qualitative analyses to identify students' understanding of the engineering design processes. Findings show that among the 24 participants, there is a significant increase in students' self-efficacy beliefs after attending the workshop. We also identified major themes such as design goals and prototyping in students' understanding of engineering design processes. This research provides insights into the key elements of middle school students' engineering design learning and the benefits of engaging middle school students in hands-on toy design workshops.

  2. Promoting social skills of mexican high school students through virtual activities in the Moodle platform

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Yolanda RODRÍGUEZ MATAMOROS; Cacheiro González, María Luz; Gil Pascual, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    With the intention of promoting social skills of Mexican high school students based on the graduate profile of this level, virtual activities were implemented in the Moodle platform to 169 students of second year, adopting the proposed Goldstein social skills. In order to establish the impact of these activities to a pretest-postest a one group design was used. The results show that the activities had a positive and significant impact in beginning social skills, advanced social skills, skills...

  3. Predictors of physical activity and barriers to exercise in nursing and medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, Holly; Stanulewicz, Natalia; McGill, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Aims\\ud \\ud To investigate physical activity levels of nursing and medicine students; examine predictors of physical activity level; and examine the most influential benefits and barriers to exercise.\\ud Background\\ud \\ud Healthcare professionals have low levels of physical activity, which increases their health risk and may influence their health promotion practices with patients.\\ud Design\\ud \\ud We surveyed 361 nursing (n=193) and medicine (n=168) students studying at a UK medical school.\\...

  4. Predictors of physical activity and barriers to exercise in nursing and medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, Holly; Stanulewicz, Natalia; McGill, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Aims To investigate physical activity levels of nursing and medicine students; examine predictors of physical activity level; and examine the most influential benefits and barriers to exercise. Background Healthcare professionals have low levels of physical activity, which increases their health risk and may influence their health promotion practices with patients. Design We surveyed 361 nursing (n=193) and medicine (n=168) students studying at a UK medical school. Method...

  5. Efficacy of technology-based interventions to increase the use of hearing protections among adolescent farmworkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Khalid M; Evans, Sydney S; Bielko, Sylvanna L; Rohlman, Diane S

    2017-09-18

    Adolescent farmworkers are exposed to loud noise during farm activities. We present a prospective study that evaluated the efficacy of low-cost, technology-based intervention approaches in high schools to enhance the use of hearing protection among adolescent farmworkers. Six high schools in Iowa that agreed to participate in the study were divided into three equal groups through cluster-randomisation with each group receiving one of the three formats of hearing protection intervention: (a) classroom training, (b) classroom training coupled with smartphone app training and (c) computer training. Participants completed baseline (pre-training) and six-week post-intervention surveys for assessing hearing protection knowledge, attitudes and behaviour. Seventy participants from six schools were initially enrolled but 50 completed both pre- and post-intervention surveys. In most cases, all three groups showed significant improvement in hearing protection knowledge, attitude and frequency of use from pre- to post-intervention. However, changes between groups were statistically non-significant. Although all three formats led to improvements on hearing protection knowledge, attitude and behaviour, the findings of the study, perhaps due to the small sample size, did not allow us to detect whether technology-based hearing protection interventions were more effective than the traditional face-to-face training for adolescent farmworkers.

  6. Psychological and pedagogical support of the information and computer activities of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Нина Львовна Сунгурова

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the theoretical foundations of psychological researches of the process of informatization in education, is denoted the problem information and computer activity of students. Information-computer activity of students means a qualitatively special kind of activity. In the interaction of with the modern technologies there are changes and development the indicative and operational and technical components of the activity, the spatial and temporal boundaries are transformed, the motivation of applications is formed. Information-computer environment as the context activity of the subject becomes the new source of the psychic neoplasms. The article discusses the psychological effects of using of information technologies, the conditions for ensuring the success of information and computer activity of students are allocated. The author offers a program of psycho-pedagogical support of training of students in the information and educational environment. The technology includes the following areas: the diagnostic, consultative work of the teacher and students' own activity. The organization of student support enhances knowledge about the socio-psychological aspects of the of information technology, social valuable motivation is formed, skills of the avoidance negative consequences of informatization are developed. In the process of work monitoring is conducted, individual-typological features of personality of students in interaction with technology are studied, correction of deviations is held, the psychological readiness of the subject to a productive application of information and computer technology is formed, information competence develops.

  7. University students' emotions, interest and activities in a web-based learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummenmaa, Minna; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2008-03-01

    Within academic settings, students experience varied emotions and interest towards learning. Although both emotions and interest can increase students' likelihood to engage in traditional learning, little is known about the influence of emotions and interest in learning activities in a web-based learning environment (WBLE). This study examined how emotions experienced while using a WBLE, students' interest towards the course topic and interest towards web-based learning are associated with collaborative visible and non-collaborative invisible activities and 'lurking' in the WBLE. Participants were 99 Finnish university students from five web-based courses. All the students enrolled in the courses filled out pre- and post-test questionnaires of interest, and repeatedly completed an on-line questionnaire on emotions experienced while using the WBLE during the courses. The fluctuation of emotional reactions was positively associated with both visible collaborative and invisible non-collaborative activities in the WBLE. Further, interest towards the web-based learning was positively associated with invisible activity. The results also demonstrated that students not actively participating in the collaborative activities (i.e. lurkers) had more negative emotional experiences during the courses than other students. The results highlight the distinct impacts that emotions and interest have on different web-based learning activities and that they should be considered when designing web-based courses.

  8. [Leisure-time physical activity of first-year students in 3 health science departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora i Ripoll, R; Fuentes i Almendras, M; Sentis i Vilalta, J

    1997-12-01

    Physical inactivity is a well-known risk factor for many chronic diseases which have high prevalence in developed countries. The aims of this study are to describe leisure-time physical activity levels and to identify preferences for its practice among first grade students in three Health Sciences Faculties at the University of Barcelona. During the year 1994-95, a total of 887 first grade students of three Faculties, Pharmacy (n = 573), Medicine (n = 222) and Dentistry (n = 92), were interviewed using a recall of their leisure time physical activity over last 8 months. Physical activity level was classified into four categories: non-active, low, medium and high, based on the number of hours per week. Statistical methods consisted in the estimation of rates, comparisons using the chi-square test, and computing the odds ratio. Women were 75% of students. Fifty per cent of men and 71.5% of women referred to be non-active or having low physical activity level (chi 2 = 36.8; DF = 3; p or = 25). Among the rest of students, men's most frequently reported activities were football, swimming and tennis, and those of women's were swimming, aerobic and tennis. Physical activity level among first grade health sciences university students is poorly exemplary. More physical activity promotion is needed, particularly to female students, as an important primary preventive measure among this group.

  9. Practice of walking, moderate and vigorous physical activity and associated factors in first year undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Salvador Claumann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The changes that occur with the beginning of university life may interfere with the practice of physical activities by students. The aim was to investigate the association between the practice of walking, moderate and vigorous physical activities with sociodemographic factors and weight status in freshman students in the first semester of the first year of a public university in Florianopolis/SC. This study assessed198 students (86 men and 112 women. The practice of physical activities was collected with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire – IPAQ, short version. Students of human and educational sciences reported higher amounts of moderate physical activity when compared to health and exact science counterparts (p< 0.05. It was verified that male students, from higher economic status, from the health sciences, and full-time students showed higher time of practice of vigorous physical activity (p< 0.05. Significant associations were also observed between study period and walking, and between gender, scientific field and vigorous physical activity. It was concluded that the variables associated with the practice of physical activity differ according to the type and intensity of physical activity.

  10. Empowering Students in Science through Active Learning: Voices From Inside the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Sabrina Ann

    Preparing students for success in the 21st century has shifted the focus of science education from acquiring information and knowledge to mastery of critical thinking and problem-solving skills. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine teacher and student perspectives of the relationship between (a) active learning, problem solving, and achievement in science and (b) the conditions that help facilitate this environment. Adapting a social constructivist theoretical framework, high school science teachers and students were interviewed, school records analyzed, curriculum documents studied, and classes observed. The findings revealed that students were engaged with the material in an active learning environment, which led to a sense of involvement, interest, and meaningful learning. Students felt empowered to take ownership of their learning, developed the critical thinking skills necessary to solve problems independently and became aware of how they learn best, which students reported as interactive learning. Moreover, student reflections revealed that an active environment contributed to deeper understanding and higher skills through interaction and discussion, including questioning, explaining, arguing, and contemplating scientific concepts with their peers. Recommendations are for science teachers to provide opportunities for students to work actively, collaborate in groups, and discuss their ideas to develop the necessary skills for achievement and for administrators to facilitate the conditions needed for active learning to occur.

  11. Open-ended versus guided laboratory activities:Impact on students' beliefs about experimental physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2016-12-01

    Improving students' understanding of the nature of experimental physics is often an explicit or implicit goal of undergraduate laboratory physics courses. However, lab activities in traditional lab courses are typically characterized by highly structured, guided labs that often do not require or encourage students to engage authentically in the process of experimental physics. Alternatively, open-ended laboratory activities can provide a more authentic learning environment by, for example, allowing students to exercise greater autonomy in what and how physical phenomena are investigated. Engaging in authentic practices may be a critical part of improving students' beliefs around the nature of experimental physics. Here, we investigate the impact of open-ended activities in undergraduate lab courses on students' epistemologies and expectations about the nature of experimental physics, as well as their confidence and affect, as measured by the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS). Using a national data set of student responses to the E-CLASS, we find that the inclusion of some open-ended lab activities in a lab course correlates with more expertlike postinstruction responses relative to courses that include only traditional guided lab activities. This finding holds when examining postinstruction E-CLASS scores while controlling for the variance associated with preinstruction scores, course level, student major, and student gender.

  12. Burnout and its association with extracurricular activities among medical students in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almalki, Sami A; Almojali, Abdullah I; Alothman, Ali S; Masuadi, Emad M; Alaqeel, Meshal K

    2017-04-26

    To assess levels of burnout in medical students, and to explore the influence of extracurricular activities on burnout at a medical school in Saudi Arabia. This cross-sectional study was conducted with first to fourth year medical students at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences (KSAU-HS) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Socio-demographic, burnout level (the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey, MBI-SS) and participation in extracurricular activities data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Statistical analyses were performed using the Pearson's chi-square test and binary logistic regression. From the 306 medical students approached, 249 (81.4%) completed the questionnaire. The level of high burnout was 67.1% (n=167). The study revealed that the majority (62.3%, n=155) of students had high levels of cynicism, 58.6% (n=146) had high levels of emotional exhaustion, and 60.2% (n=150) had low levels of professional efficacy. Most of the students (73.5%, n=183) participated in extracurricular activities, and 112 (45%) students were organizers of extracurricular activities. No significant association was found between burnout levels and the frequency of involvement in extracurricular activities (χ(2)=2.2, df=2, p=0.333). However, students who were organizing extracurricular activities were less likely to have low professional efficacy (OR=0.51, 95% CI: 0.27- 0.96). High levels of burnout were reported at this medical school. Although the burnout level is not significantly associated with the frequency of involvement in extracurricular activities, leading and organizing extracurricular activities might result in lower levels of burnout. Therefore, improving the students' leadership skills should be considered in curriculum planning, and greater emphasis should be placed on the quality of involvement in extracurricular activities rather than the quantity.

  13. TECHNOLOGIES OF INITIATING STUDENTS INTO INDEPENDENT (SELF-GUIDED ACTIVITY IN SUPPLEMENTARY DISTANCE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Abakumova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The research in question investigates the technologies of initiating independent activity within the framework of distance learning and their psychological aspects. The authors’ classification of educational technologies of initiating students into independent cognitive activity is presented. Such technologies utilize various psychological mechanisms of exciting students’ cognitive interest, intensifying cognitive processes, developing independent activity skills, and, as a result, increase motivation for independent activity and learning on the whole. These include such types of technologies as developmental technologies, interactive technologies, technologies of information transfer, technologies of meaning-making initiation. The research of the attitude of distance learning educators to independent activity of students and the content of the academic courses were done at Moodle-based education programs. The findings show the differences in retention rate among distance learning educators whose competence in terms of initiating students into independent (self-guided activity varies. It’s emphasized that interactive lectures, videoconferences, audio-visual aids, interactive seminars, glossaries, interactive tests are considered the most efficient technologies in initiating students into independent (self-guided activity. The obtained results have made it possible to stress the developmental effect of distance learning technologies and the technologies of initiating students into independent (self-guided activity in various psychic spheres of students: cognitive, individual, emotional. We mention the changes in motivational sphere of students and their meaning-making activity. In the course of correct development of distance learning we notice the development of voluntary and nonvoluntary cognitive activity. A student starts actively participating in educational process, he becomes the creator of his own world.

  14. Teaching physical activities to students with significant disabilities using video modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannella-Malone, Helen I; Mizrachi, Sharona V; Sabielny, Linsey M; Jimenez, Eliseo D

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of video modeling on teaching physical activities to three adolescents with significant disabilities. The study implemented a multiple baseline across six physical activities (three per student): jumping rope, scooter board with cones, ladder drill (i.e., feet going in and out), ladder design (i.e., multiple steps), shuttle run, and disc ride. Additional prompt procedures (i.e., verbal, gestural, visual cues, and modeling) were implemented within the study. After the students mastered the physical activities, we tested to see if they would link the skills together (i.e., complete an obstacle course). All three students made progress learning the physical activities, but only one learned them with video modeling alone (i.e., without error correction). Video modeling can be an effective tool for teaching students with significant disabilities various physical activities, though additional prompting procedures may be needed.

  15. Relation between physical activity and academic performance in 3rd-year secondary education students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, José; Pellicer-Chenoll, Maite; García-Masso, Xavier; Gomis, Manuel; González, Luis-Millán

    2011-10-01

    The main aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between the amount of physical activity and academic performance in 3rd-year secondary education students. The sample was taken from three secondary schools in the area of Barcelona. 284 students (158 girls, 126 boys) with an average age of 14.7 yr. participated. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used by students to self-report their amount of physical activity. Students' academic records were obtained for comparisons. Results showed that there was a linear relationship between academic performance and physical activity; nevertheless, there was a trend to stronger correlation when modeling the relationship between these variables with a quadratic equation. Further research should focus on whether academic performance and physical activity might be better explained with a second-order equation.

  16. Social competence and collaborative guided inquiry science activities: Experiences of students with learning disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jennifer Anne

    This thesis presents a qualitative investigation of the effects of social competence on the participation of students with learning disabilities (LD) in the science learning processes associated with collaborative, guided inquiry learning. An inclusive Grade 2 classroom provided the setting for the study. Detailed classroom observations were the primary source of data. In addition, the researcher conducted two interviews with the teacher, and collected samples of students' written work. The purpose of the research was to investigate: (a) How do teachers and peers mediate the participation of students with LD in collaborative, guided inquiry science activities, (b) What learning processes do students with LD participate in during collaborative, guided inquiry science activities, and (c) What components of social competence support and constrain the participation of students with LD during collaborative, guided inquiry science activities? The findings of the study suggest five key ideas for research and teaching in collaborative, guided inquiry science in inclusive classrooms. First, using a variety of collaborative learning formats (whole-class, small-group, and pairs) creates more opportunities for the successful participation of diverse students with LD. Second, creating an inclusive community where students feel accepted and valued may enhance the academic and social success of students with LD. Third, careful selection of partners for students with LD is important for a positive learning experience. Students with LD should be partnered with academically successful, socially competent peers; also, this study suggested that students with LD experience more success working collaboratively in pairs rather than in small groups. Fourth, a variety of strategies are needed to promote active participation and positive social interactions for students with and without LD during collaborative, guided inquiry learning. Fifth, adopting a general approach to teaching

  17. Association between physical activity and academic performance in Korean adolescent students

    OpenAIRE

    So Wi-Young

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Recently, physical activity (PA) was found to improve cognitive and memory functions in the brain; however, no epidemiological studies have specifically investigated this phenomenon in the Korean adolescent student population. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of various types of PA undertaken at various frequencies, on the academic performance of Korean adolescent students. Methods A total of 75,066 adolescent students (39,612 males and 35,454 femal...

  18. Relationships between physical education students' motivational profiles, enjoyment, state anxiety, and self-reported physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yli-Piipari, Sami; Watt, Anthony; Jaakkola, Timo; Liukkonen, Jarmo; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze motivational profiles based on the self-determination theory (Deci and Ryan, 2000) and how these profiles are related to physical education students' enjoyment, state anxiety, and physical activity. The participants, 429 sixth grade students (girls = 216; boys = 213) completed SMS, Sport Enjoyment Scale, PESAS, and Physical Activity Scale. Cluster analyses identified two motivational profiles: 1) the "High motivation profile", in which the students had high intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and low levels of amotivation, and 2) the "Low motivation profile", in which the students had low intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and low levels of amotivation. The students in the first cluster enjoyed physical education more and were physically more active. The results revealed that students may be motivated towards physical education lessons both intrinsically and extrinsically, and still experience enjoyment in physical education. Key pointsTWO MOTIVATIONAL PROFILES WERE REVEALED: 1) the "High motivation profile", in which the students had high intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and low levels of amotivation, and 2) the "Low motivation profile", in which the students had low intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and low levels of amotivation.The students in the first profile enjoyed physical education more and were physically more active than the students in the second profile.Moreover, the representatives of the "High motivation profile "experienced greater anxiety toward physical education than the representatives of the "Low motivation profile"These findings raised an interesting question whether students engaging in physical education benefit more from the presence of both self-determined and non-self-determined forms of motivation, or are the benefits higher if students are primarily self-determined?

  19. Open-ended versus guided laboratory activities: Impact on students' beliefs about experimental physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilcox, Bethany R

    2016-01-01

    Improving students' understanding of the nature of experimental physics is often an explicit or implicit goal of undergraduate laboratory physics courses. However, lab activities in traditional lab courses are typically characterized by highly structured, guided labs that often do not require or encourage students to engage authentically in the process of experimental physics. Alternatively, open-ended laboratory activities can provide a more authentic learning environment by, for example, allowing students to exercise greater autonomy in what and how physical phenomena are investigated. Engaging in authentic practices may be a critical part of improving students' beliefs around the nature of experimental physics. Here, we investigate the impact of open-ended activities in undergraduate lab courses on students' epistemologies and expectations about the nature of experimental physics, as well as their confidence and affect, as measured by the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Ph...

  20. Influence of small forms of active rest on intellection of students of agrarian higher institutes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prysjazhnuk S.I.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Influence of facilities of active rest is considered on the increase of mental capacity of students. In research took part 105 students with the low level of physical preparedness. Progress of students is select the integral index of mental capacity. It is set that the most effective factors of diminishing of action of processes of fatigue and increase of mental capacity of students is the use of small forms of active rest during an educational day. It is suggested to utillize athletic pauses (minutes, micro pauses during the leadthrough of employments on theoretical disciplines. It is set that small forms of active rest in combination with a leadthrough independent health-improvement-trainings employments on physical self-perfection instrumental in the substantial improvement of the state of physical and mental capacity of student young people.

  1. Risk assessment and level of physical activity of students in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Grażyna Zuzda

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim . The aim of the study was to determine the risks of activity by using Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire (PAR-Q and describe the PA profile using the short-version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ-SF among selected groups of sport science students. Material and methods The study covered 99 students - 61 females aged 21.08 ± 1.43 and 38 males aged 21.24 ± 1.22 y. In order to asses and stratify the risk of PA the Polish short version of the IPAQ-SF was used. Results. The total level of physical activity of the male students was 3460.039±2502.207 MET- min/week and was higher than in the case of female students (3388,107±2204,290 MET- min/week. The dominant type physical activity of female and male students was intensive effort. Among 22 men and 39 women, risk factors for cardiac events, pulmonary and musculoskeletal injuries were reported. The relationship between PAR-Q results and the on the IPAQ-SF results was no statistically significant. Conclusions This study demonstrates that students achieve the level of physical activity recommended by experts for the prevention of chronic diseases. This research allows sports science students to understand their own health issues through self-assessments of personal risk factors for cardiac events, pulmonary and musculoskeletal injury.

  2. Physical activity, nutritional status, and dietary habits of students of a medical university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygiel-Górniak, Bogna; Tomczak, Andrzej; Krulikowska, Natalia; Przysławski, Juliusz; Seraszek-Jaros, Agnieszka; Kaczmarek, Elżbieta

    Nutritional habits and physical activity influence the health status of young adults. In this study, we engaged a group of 151 students from a medical university (90 female and 61 male subjects). Anthropometric parameters, dietary habits (a 7-day dietary recall), and level of physical activity were measured. It was found that the daily food rations of female (F) and male (M) students were improperly balanced and characterized by high amount of total and animal protein, phosphorus, vitamin A, cholesterol, and insufficient intake of carbohydrates, dietary fiber, and vitamin C. Female subjects consumed low amounts of total fat and calcium. The intake of protein (total and animal), fat, phosphorus, and cholesterol correlated with higher body mass. The physical activity of the students was found to be higher than the average physical activity of the European Union populations, and a general tendency of lowering level of physical activity with age was observed. Students with the highest level of physical activity (MET > 1500) consumed lower amounts of simple carbohydrates (galactose and saccharose) when compared to students with lower physical activity (MET students and they should be encouraged to participate in high level of physical activity so as to promote good health status.

  3. GUIDELESS SPATIAL COORDINATE MEASUREMENT TECHNOLOGY BASED ON CODING POLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Min; QIU Zongming; QU Jiamin; LIU Hongzhao

    2008-01-01

    A new method of guideless spatial coordinate measurement technology based on coding pole and vision measurement is proposed. Unequal spacing of bar code is adopted to pole, so that the code combination of pole image in measuring field is unique. Holographic characteristics of numeric coding pole are adopted to obtain pole pose and pole probe position by any section of bar code on the pole. Spatial coordinates of measuring points can be obtained by coordinate transform. The contradiction between high resolution and large visual field of image sensor is resolved, thereby providing a new concept for surface shape measurement of large objects with high precision. The measurement principles of the system are expounded and mathematic model is established. The measurement equation is evaluated by simulation experiments and the measurement precision is analyzed. Theoretical analysis and simulation experiments prove that this system is characterized by simple structure and wide measurement range. Therefore it can be used in the 3-dimentional coordinate measurement of large objects.

  4. Reliability analysis for new technology-based transmitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brissaud, Florent, E-mail: florent.brissaud.2007@utt.f [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Parc Technologique Alata, BP 2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), Institut Charles Delaunay (ICD) and STMR UMR CNRS 6279, 12 rue Marie Curie, BP 2060, 10010 Troyes cedex (France); Barros, Anne; Berenguer, Christophe [Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), Institut Charles Delaunay (ICD) and STMR UMR CNRS 6279, 12 rue Marie Curie, BP 2060, 10010 Troyes cedex (France); Charpentier, Dominique [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Parc Technologique Alata, BP 2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France)

    2011-02-15

    The reliability analysis of new technology-based transmitters has to deal with specific issues: various interactions between both material elements and functions, undefined behaviours under faulty conditions, several transmitted data, and little reliability feedback. To handle these particularities, a '3-step' model is proposed, based on goal tree-success tree (GTST) approaches to represent both the functional and material aspects, and includes the faults and failures as a third part for supporting reliability analyses. The behavioural aspects are provided by relationship matrices, also denoted master logic diagrams (MLD), with stochastic values which represent direct relationships between system elements. Relationship analyses are then proposed to assess the effect of any fault or failure on any material element or function. Taking these relationships into account, the probabilities of malfunction and failure modes are evaluated according to time. Furthermore, uncertainty analyses tend to show that even if the input data and system behaviour are not well known, these previous results can be obtained in a relatively precise way. An illustration is provided by a case study on an infrared gas transmitter. These properties make the proposed model and corresponding reliability analyses especially suitable for intelligent transmitters (or 'smart sensors').

  5. Student mathematical activity as a springboard to developing teacher didactisation practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Biccard

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is part of a larger study on teacher development. The main study investigated teacher development within primary school Mathematics teachers’ classrooms to determine if teaching practices could be enhanced through a didactisation-based programme. It sought to develop teachers within their own environments and classrooms. Design research (both designing the conditions for change and studying the results of those conditions enabled the researchers to design a programme that was congruent with teachers’ own needs and experiences. The programme ran for a period of a year with regular contact between the teachers and the researcher conducting the programme (the first author. The programme set out nine didactisation practices: active students, differentiation, mathematisation, vertically aligned lessons, accessing student thinking and ideas, probing student thinking and ideas, connecting student ideas, assessing students and reflecting on practice. One practice, student activity, is the focus of this article. It was found that by initiating discussion and cognitive conflict in teachers by using modelling problems, and further allowing teachers to observe pupils working in groups with modelling problems, teachers were starting to incorporate the didactisation practices within their own classrooms. This article documents specifically the fundamental role of student mathematical activity and the importance of improving student mathematical experiences, both for teacher development and for student mathematical learning. The study may be valuable in structuring and planning further effective teacher development programmes.

  6. A Sociocultural Account of Students' Collective Mathematical Understanding of Polynomial Inequalities in Instrumented Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Ferdinand; Becker, Joanne, Rossi

    2004-01-01

    In this report, we give a sociocultural account of the mediating functions handheld graphing calculators and social interaction play in students' mathematical understanding. We discuss the evolution of students' abilities to symbolize, model, and develop collective mathematical practices about polynomial inequalities in instrumented activity. In…

  7. Student Loan Lenders: Information on the Activities of the First Independent Trust Company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    Information is provided on the activities of the First Independent Trust Company (FITCO) of Carmichael, California, which made loans to students participating in the Stafford Student Loan Program until California's State Banking Department closed it in May 1989. During the 11 years FITCO was in the Stafford program, it made over $1 billion in…

  8. The Role of Entrepreneurship Program Models and Experiential Activities on Engineering Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval-Couetil, Nathalie; Shartrand, Angela; Reed, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Entrepreneurship education is being delivered to greater numbers of engineering students through a variety of courses, programs, and experiential learning activities. Some of these opportunities are designed primarily to serve engineering students in their departments and colleges, while others are cross-campus, university-wide efforts to serve…

  9. University Students' Emotions, Interest and Activities in a Web-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummenmaa, Minna; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2008-01-01

    Background: Within academic settings, students experience varied emotions and interest towards learning. Although both emotions and interest can increase students' likelihood to engage in traditional learning, little is known about the influence of emotions and interest in learning activities in a web-based learning environment (WBLE). Aims: This…

  10. Health-Related Fitness Knowledge and Physical Activity of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Angela; Hannon, James C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if health-related fitness (HRF) knowledge is related to self-reported physical activity (PA) of high school students. Students (N=165) enrolled in physical education from two schools in the Southwestern U.S participated. A 100-point HRF knowledge test was assembled, focusing on the HRF concepts of…

  11. Student Reciprocal Peer Teaching as a Method for Active Learning: An Experience in an Electrotechnical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-García, Miguel A.; Moreda, Guillermo P.; Hernández-Sánchez, Natalia; Valiño, Vanesa

    2013-01-01

    Active learning is one of the most efficient mechanisms for learning, according to the psychology of learning. When students act as teachers for other students, the communication is more fluent and knowledge is transferred easier than in a traditional classroom. This teaching method is referred to in the literature as reciprocal peer teaching. In…

  12. Influence of Age, Sex, and Race on College Students' Exercise Motivation of Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Trevor; Bland, Helen W.; Melton, Bridget F.; Czech, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined differences in exercise motivation between age, sex, and race for college students. Participants: Students from 156 sections of physical activity classes at a midsize university were recruited (n = 2,199; 1,081 men, 1,118 women) in 2005-2006 and volunteered to complete the Exercise Motivation Inventory. Methods:…

  13. Teacher regulation of cognitive activities during student collaboration : Effects of learning analytics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leeuwen, Anouschka|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357401670; Janssen, Jeroen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/242063667; Erkens, Gijsbert|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070901066; Brekelmans, Mieke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074625411

    2015-01-01

    By collaboratively solving a task, students are challenged to share ideas, express their thoughts, and engage in discussion. Collaborating groups of students may encounter problems concerning cognitive activities (such as a misunderstanding of the task material). If these problems are not addressed

  14. Living in a Global Age. A Simulation Activity for Upper Elementary and Secondary Level Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford Univ., CA. Stanford Program on International and Cross Cultural Education.

    Designed to introduce concepts in international trade and global economics to upper elementary and secondary level students, this simulation activity engages students in the group task of assembling flashlights. A variety of topics can be explored, such as energy shortages, international crises, relationships between rich and poor nations, foreign…

  15. Teacher regulation of cognitive activities during student collaboration : Effects of learning analytics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leeuwen, Anouschka; Janssen, Jeroen; Erkens, Gijsbert; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    By collaboratively solving a task, students are challenged to share ideas, express their thoughts, and engage in discussion. Collaborating groups of students may encounter problems concerning cognitive activities (such as a misunderstanding of the task material). If these problems are not addressed

  16. Open-Ended versus Guided Laboratory Activities: Impact on Students' Beliefs about Experimental Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Improving students' understanding of the nature of experimental physics is often an explicit or implicit goal of undergraduate laboratory physics courses. However, lab activities in traditional lab courses are typically characterized by highly structured, guided labs that often do not require or encourage students to engage authentically in the…

  17. Exploring Students' Perceptions about Learning in School: An Activity Theory Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnov-Neeman, Yelena; Barak, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, we used Activity Theory as the conceptual framework for exploring students' perceptions about how learning in school is affected by the following five elements: Object, Tools, Rules, Community and Division of Labor. Data were collected by administrating a semi-structured questionnaire among 70 junior high school students and…

  18. Using Haptic and Auditory Interaction Tools to Engage Students with Visual Impairments in Robot Programming Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, A. M.; Park, Chung Hyuk; Remy, S.

    2012-01-01

    The robotics field represents the integration of multiple facets of computer science and engineering. Robotics-based activities have been shown to encourage K-12 students to consider careers in computing and have even been adopted as part of core computer-science curriculum at a number of universities. Unfortunately, for students with visual…

  19. Associations between Physical Activity and Reduced Rates of Hopelessness, Depression, and Suicidal Behavior among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Rienzo, Barbara A.; Pigg, R. Morgan; Miller, M. David; Dodd, Virginia J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors explored associations among types of physical activity and hopelessness, depression, and suicidal behavior among college students. Participants: Participants included 43,499 college students aged 18 to 25 who completed the 2005 National College Health Assessment conducted by the American College Health Association. Methods:…

  20. Fostering Students' Creativity through Van Hiele's 5 Phase-Based Tangram Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew, Nyet Moi; Chong, Chin Lu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Van Hiele's 5 phase-based tangrams activities could help to foster creativity among Grade Three primary school students. Students' creativity was investigated in terms of Torrance's Figural Test of creative thinking: Fluency, Originality, Elaboration, Abstractness of title, and Resistance to a…

  1. The Relationship between Physical Activity Level and Healthy Life-Style Behaviors of Distance Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the relationship between physical activity levels and healthy life-style behaviors in distance education students in Hoca Ahmet Yesevi University. In total, 526 distance education students in Hoca Ahmet Yesevi University participated in this study voluntarily. The short form of International Physical…

  2. Using Art-Based Chemistry Activities to Improve Students' Conceptual Understanding in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danipog, Dennis L.; Ferido, Marlene B.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of art-based chemistry activities (ABCA) on high school students' conceptual understanding in chemistry. The study used the pretest-posttest control group design. A total of 64 third-year high school students from two different chemistry classes participated in the study. One class was exposed to art-based…

  3. Using Haptic and Auditory Interaction Tools to Engage Students with Visual Impairments in Robot Programming Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, A. M.; Park, Chung Hyuk; Remy, S.

    2012-01-01

    The robotics field represents the integration of multiple facets of computer science and engineering. Robotics-based activities have been shown to encourage K-12 students to consider careers in computing and have even been adopted as part of core computer-science curriculum at a number of universities. Unfortunately, for students with visual…

  4. Effects of Implementing STEM-I Project-Based Learning Activities for Female High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Shi-Jer; Tsai, Huei-Yin; Tseng, Kuo-Hung; Shih, Ru-Chu

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to explore the application of STEM-I (STEM-Imagination) project-based learning activities and its effects on the effectiveness, processes, and characteristics of STEM integrative knowledge learning and imagination development for female high school students. A total of 72 female high school students were divided into 18 teams.…

  5. Exploring Students' Intuitive Ideas of Randomness Using an iPod Shuffle Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Laura; Garfield, Joan

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an activity that engages students in considering characteristics of a random sequence, in this case, a randomly generated playlist of songs using the iPod shuffle feature. Students examine simulated sequences of randomly generated songs from a small music library in order to identify characteristics that are used to develop…

  6. An Activity Theory Analysis of Teaching Goals versus Student Epistemological Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Barbara; Robinson, Carol; Matthews, Janette; Croft, Tony

    2012-01-01

    A teaching innovation for first year engineering students' was designed to involve inquiry-based questions, an electronic graphical medium, small group activity and modifications to assessment. The use of an inquiry approach was intended to encourage students' deeper engagement with mathematics and more conceptual understanding. Data were…

  7. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. Lecture and Active Learning as a Dialectical Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallin, Irwin

    2017-01-01

    Lecture remains a valuable tool in the student learning toolbox--one that at its best helps students unpack what they read for class, place course material in context, and see how a subject matter expert solves problems. It may be useful to think of lecture and active learning as a dialectical tension satisfied by the interactive lecture. Just as…

  8. Scientific Skateboarding and Mathematical Music: Edutainment That Actively Engages Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, William; Lesser, Lawrence M.

    2013-01-01

    Edutainment has recently been a major growing area of education, showing great promise to motivate students with relevant activities. The authors are among innovators who have developed cutting-edge fusions of popular culture and STEM concepts to engage and to motivate middle school students, using vehicles such as music/song and skateboarding.…

  9. Cooperative Activity as Mediation in the Social Adjustment of Chinese International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junqian

    2017-01-01

    Social adjustment is one of the most difficult and long-lasting challenges for international students who study in a new country. This paper uses a case study of cooperative painting activity conducted in Australian setting, in which two Chinese and three other students from different countries participated, in order to assess the efficiency of…

  10. Using Active Learning to Teach Culturally Relevant Personal Finance to Native American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboe, Lorna

    2014-01-01

    Active learning is a teaching approach that requires students to do something intellectually with course content. This involves examining, questioning, and relating knowledge gained from previous experiences to new knowledge and skills. Native American students have been found to have low financial literacy skills. Family and consumer sciences…

  11. Using Art-Based Chemistry Activities to Improve Students' Conceptual Understanding in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danipog, Dennis L.; Ferido, Marlene B.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of art-based chemistry activities (ABCA) on high school students' conceptual understanding in chemistry. The study used the pretest-posttest control group design. A total of 64 third-year high school students from two different chemistry classes participated in the study. One class was exposed to art-based…

  12. Student Perceptions of Information Literacy Instruction: The Importance of Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detlor, Brian; Booker, Lorne; Serenko, Alexander; Julien, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the merits of employing active learning strategies in the delivery of information literacy instruction (ILI). Traditional approaches to the teaching of information literacy skills--where students are passive recipients of the information they receive--are challenged. Rather, methods that encourage students to actively…

  13. Electronic Learning Courses as a Means to Activate Students' Independent Work in Studying Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurygin, Viktor Yurjevich; Krasnova, Lyubov Alekseevna

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there are special requirements to the system of higher education, focused not only on imparting knowledge to students, but also on the formation of the continuous need for independent self-education, self-creative approach to getting knowledge throughout their active life. In this regard, the role of students' independent work with its…

  14. Open-Ended versus Guided Laboratory Activities: Impact on Students' Beliefs about Experimental Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Improving students' understanding of the nature of experimental physics is often an explicit or implicit goal of undergraduate laboratory physics courses. However, lab activities in traditional lab courses are typically characterized by highly structured, guided labs that often do not require or encourage students to engage authentically in the…

  15. Initial Evaluation of Active Minds: A Student Organization Dedicated to Reducing the Stigma of Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Kathleen G.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether a new student organization, Active Minds, aimed at increasing awareness of "mental illness" and reducing stigma had an impact on students' stigma and willingness to seek psychological help. Three classes were recruited to become involved in the organization. In a pretest/posttest design, stigma and willingness to seek…

  16. Can We Have Fries with That, Please? Nutrition and Physical Activities among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Andreia C.; Jeremic, Miljana; Budden, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is a growing health and socioeconomic issue in the United States. College students are an important part of the alarming statistics involving weight gain. This study investigated how nutrition behaviors and physical activity modified students' perceptions of body weight and nutrition knowledge. Furthermore, the study assessed gender and…

  17. Initial Evaluation of Active Minds: A Student Organization Dedicated to Reducing the Stigma of Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Kathleen G.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether a new student organization, Active Minds, aimed at increasing awareness of "mental illness" and reducing stigma had an impact on students' stigma and willingness to seek psychological help. Three classes were recruited to become involved in the organization. In a pretest/posttest design, stigma and willingness to seek…

  18. P.S.: I Survived--An Activism Project to Increase Student and Community Trauma Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantas, Susanna; Miller, Sean A.; Kulkarni, Shanti J.

    2017-01-01

    Social work students created a community activism project to raise awareness about trauma prevalence and impact. Trauma theory describes silencing as the mechanism that hinders individual and community healing. Therefore, students sought to create an interactive opportunity to heighten trauma visibility on campus. They created a physical mailbox…

  19. Uncovering Students' Environmental Identity: An Exploration of Activities in an Environmental Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Erica

    2014-01-01

    This study at a public high school in the Northeastern United States explores how students' environmental identities are affected by various activities in an Environmental Science course. Data was collected as part of an ethnographic study involving an Environmental Science teacher and her tenth-twelfth grade students. The results focus on…

  20. Peers' Perceived Support, Student Engagement in Academic Activities and Life Satisfaction: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimzadeh, Rezvan; Besharat, Mohammad-Ali; Khaleghinezhad, Seyed Ali; Ghorban Jahromi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships among peers' perceived support, life satisfaction, and student engagement in academic activities. Three hundred and fifteen Iranian students (172 boys and 143 girls) who were studying in one suburb of Tehran participated in this study. All participants were asked to complete Peers' Perceived Support scale…

  1. University Students' Perceptions of an Activity-Based EFL Drama Course at a Korean University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Jennifer; Aguiar, Bryan; Seong, Myeong-Hee

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate university students' perceptions of drama activities in terms of providing suggestions for constructing an effective drama class. A total of ten students who participated in Interactive English, an elective English course during the second semester of 2013 at a Korean university, took part in this study. The…

  2. The Effects of the Directed Reading-Thinking Activity on EFL Students' Referential and Inferential Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Koumy, Abdel Salam Abdel Khalek

    2006-01-01

    A study investigated the effects of the Directed Reading Thinking Activity on Egyptian first-year secondary stage EFL students' referential and inferential reading comprehension. The study utilized a pretest-posttest control group experimental design. The subjects consisted of 72 first-year secondary students in Menouf Secondary School for Boys at…

  3. Elements of Design-Based Science Activities That Affect Students' Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brett D.; Chittum, Jessica R.; Akalin, Sehmuz; Schram, Asta B.; Fink, Jonathan; Schnittka, Christine; Evans, Michael A.; Brandt, Carol

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the ways in which a 12-week after-school science and engineering program affected middle school students' motivation to engage in science and engineering activities. We used current motivation research and theory as a conceptual framework to assess 14 students' motivation through questionnaires,…

  4. Roles and Relationships in Student Teaching: A Role-Play Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Jeewa R.

    This role-play activity is designed for use by teacher educators in a general or content area methods class to help education majors become knowledgeable of role expectations in the student teaching experience and build good interpersonal role relationships. Students conduct library research and interviews concerning role expectations, use the…

  5. The Effect of Activating Metacognitive Strategies on the Listening Performance and Metacognitive Awareness of EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimirad, Maryam; Shams, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of activating metacognitive strategies on the listening performance of English as a foreign language (EFL) university students and explores the impact of such strategies on their metacognitive awareness of the listening task. The participants were N = 50 students of English literature at the state university of…

  6. Uncovering Students' Environmental Identity: An Exploration of Activities in an Environmental Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Erica

    2014-01-01

    This study at a public high school in the Northeastern United States explores how students' environmental identities are affected by various activities in an Environmental Science course. Data was collected as part of an ethnographic study involving an Environmental Science teacher and her tenth-twelfth grade students. The results focus on…

  7. Associations between Physical Activity and Reduced Rates of Hopelessness, Depression, and Suicidal Behavior among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Rienzo, Barbara A.; Pigg, R. Morgan; Miller, M. David; Dodd, Virginia J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors explored associations among types of physical activity and hopelessness, depression, and suicidal behavior among college students. Participants: Participants included 43,499 college students aged 18 to 25 who completed the 2005 National College Health Assessment conducted by the American College Health Association. Methods:…

  8. Possibilities of Extracurricular Activities in the Student's Spiritual and Moral Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykova, Saule A.; Yergazina, Aliya A.; Yeshpanov, Vladimir S.; Korvyakov, Valeriy A.; Aitzhanova, Akmaral B.

    2016-01-01

    With the purpose of substantiating pedagogical terms of the student's spiritually-moral becoming it is necessary to expose possibilities of extracurricular activities during this process. Its intrinsic characteristics are described as a factor of the student's spiritually-moral becoming. The main idea of the article is to reveal possibilities of…

  9. Evaluating a Physical Activity App in the Classroom: A Mixed Methodological Approach among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Bridget; Bland, Helen; Harris, Brandonn; Kelly, Destiny; Chandler, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using an exercise-based app in increasing student motivation, social support, self-efficacy, and enjoyment in a university physical activity class. A convenience sample of 48 college-aged students (28 males, 20 females) from one university located in the Southeastern United States…

  10. The Influence of Physical Activity, Sport and Exercise Motives among UK-Based University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Simon; Reeves, Matthew; Ryrie, Angus

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the majority of the adult population fails to achieve the recommended target of 30-minutes moderate intensity exercise, days a week. This includes university students who often have the time to engage in physical activity. The aim of this study was to determine exercise motives for a UK-based student population. The…

  11. Influence of Age, Sex, and Race on College Students' Exercise Motivation of Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Trevor; Bland, Helen W.; Melton, Bridget F.; Czech, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined differences in exercise motivation between age, sex, and race for college students. Participants: Students from 156 sections of physical activity classes at a midsize university were recruited (n = 2,199; 1,081 men, 1,118 women) in 2005-2006 and volunteered to complete the Exercise Motivation Inventory. Methods:…

  12. The Influence of Physical Activity, Sport and Exercise Motives among UK-Based University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Simon; Reeves, Matthew; Ryrie, Angus

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the majority of the adult population fails to achieve the recommended target of 30-minutes moderate intensity exercise, days a week. This includes university students who often have the time to engage in physical activity. The aim of this study was to determine exercise motives for a UK-based student population. The…

  13. Elements of Design-Based Science Activities That Affect Students' Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brett D.; Chittum, Jessica R.; Akalin, Sehmuz; Schram, Asta B.; Fink, Jonathan; Schnittka, Christine; Evans, Michael A.; Brandt, Carol

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the ways in which a 12-week after-school science and engineering program affected middle school students' motivation to engage in science and engineering activities. We used current motivation research and theory as a conceptual framework to assess 14 students' motivation through questionnaires,…

  14. Promoting Physical Activity among International Students in Higher Education: A Peer-Education Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zi; Cardinal, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    International students have become an important and growing group in U.S. higher education. Although many universities offer various types of support to international students, little attention is given to preventive health services or health promotion efforts, such as the promotion of physical activity. This article outlines a theory-based…

  15. The Influence of the Sport Education Model on Amotivated Students' In-Class Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Dana

    2012-01-01

    The Sport Education Model (SEM) was designed by Siedentop to provide students with a holistic sport-based experience. As research on the SEM continues, an aspect that has gained interest is the influence on (a) students with low levels of motivation and (b) opportunities to engage in health-enhancing levels of physical activity. The purpose of…

  16. Students' Network Project Activities in the Context of the Information Educational Medium of Higher Education Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samerkhanova, Elvira K.; Krupoderova, Elena P.; Krupoderova, Klimentina R.; Bahtiyarova, Lyudmila N.; Ponachugin, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the research is justifying didactic possibilities of the use of network services for the organization of information for the learning environment of college, where students carry out their project activities, and where effective networking between students and teachers takes place. The authors consider didactic possibilities of…

  17. Uncovering Students' Environmental Identity: An Exploration of Activities in an Environmental Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Erica

    2014-01-01

    This study at a public high school in the Northeastern United States explores how students' environmental identities are affected by various activities in an Environmental Science course. Data was collected as part of an ethnographic study involving an Environmental Science teacher and her tenth-twelfth grade students. The results focus on…

  18. The Effectiveness of WhatsApp Mobile Learning Activities Guided by Activity Theory on Students' Knowledge Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhoumi, Chokri

    2015-01-01

    This research paper explores the effectiveness of using mobile technologies to support a blended learning course titled Scientific Research Methods in Information Science. Specifically, it discusses the effects of WhatsApp mobile learning activities guided by activity theory on students' knowledge Management (KM). During the 2014 academic year,…

  19. Exploring the Effects of Active Learning on High School Students' Outcomes and Teachers' Perceptions of Biotechnology and Genetics Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Ashley L.; Knobloch, Neil A.; Orvis, Kathryn S.

    2015-01-01

    Active learning can engage high school students to learn science, yet there is limited understanding if active learning can help students learn challenging science concepts such as genetics and biotechnology. This quasi-experimental study explored the effects of active learning compared to passive learning regarding high school students'…

  20. Factors that influence physicians' and medical students' confidence in counseling patients about physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Fatima Cody; Durkin, Martin W; Stallworth, James Rast; Powell, Caroline Keller; Poston, Mary Beth; Blair, Steven N

    2014-06-01

    Less than half of US adults and two-thirds of US high school students do not meet current US guidelines for physical activity. We examined which factors promoted physicians' and medical students' confidence in counseling patients about physical activity. We established an online exercise survey targeting attending physicians, resident and fellow physicians, and medical students to determine their current level of physical activity and confidence in counseling patients about physical activity. We compared their personal level of physical activity with the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines of the US Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). We administered a survey in 2009 and 2010 that used the short form of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. A total of 1,949 individuals responded to the survey, of whom 1,751 (i.e., 566 attending physicians, 138 fellow physicians, 806 resident physicians, and 215 medical students) were included in this analysis. After adjusting for their BMI, the odds that physicians and medical students who met USDHHS guidelines for vigorous activity would express confidence in their ability to provide exercise counseling were more than twice that of physicians who did not meet these guidelines. Individuals who were overweight were less likely to be confident than those with normal BMI, after adjusting for whether they met the vigorous exercise guidelines. Physicians with obesity were even less likely to express confidence in regards to exercise counseling. We conclude that physicians and medical students who had a normal BMI and met vigorous USDHHS guidelines were more likely to feel confident about counseling their patients about physical activity. Our findings suggest that graduate medical school education should focus on health promotion in their students, as this will likely lead to improved health behaviors in their students' patient populations.

  1. Using Expectancy Value Theory as a Framework to Reduce Student Resistance to Active Learning: A Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Katelyn M; Ashley, Michael; Brownell, Sara E

    2017-01-01

    There has been a national movement to transition college science courses from passive lectures to active learning environments. Active learning has been shown to be a more effective way for students to learn, yet there is concern that some students are resistant to active learning approaches. Although there is much discussion about student resistance to active learning, few studies have explored this topic. Furthermore, a limited number of studies have applied theoretical frameworks to student engagement in active learning. We propose using a theoretical lens of expectancy value theory to understand student resistance to active learning. In this study, we examined student perceptions of active learning after participating in 40 hours of active learning. We used the principal components of expectancy value theory to probe student experience in active learning: student perceived self-efficacy in active learning, value of active learning, and potential cost of participating in active learning. We found that students showed positive changes in the components of expectancy value theory and reported high levels of engagement in active learning, which provide proof of concept that expectancy value theory can be used to boost student perceptions of active learning and their engagement in active learning classrooms. From these findings, we have built a theoretical framework of expectancy value theory applied to active learning.

  2. Teaching the Civil Rights Era: A Student-Active Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Joe P.

    2005-01-01

    The civil rights movement is the most important historical event of the last fifty years, and it remains central to contemporary society. For all the purported attention at the elementary and secondary school levels, students and their teachers appear to know very little if anything beyond the names Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks. Student…

  3. Student Teachers' Participation in Learning Activities and Effective Teaching Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Siebrich; Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.; Helms-Lorenz, Michelle; van de Grift, Wim J. C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Teacher learning is essential to the teaching profession, because it has been strongly linked to improved teaching practices and teacher quality. The source for teacher learning is initial teacher education, a crucial phase in the learning-to-teach continuum. To gain insight into this influential period for student teachers' long-term professional…

  4. Comrades' Power: Student Representation and Activism in Universities in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macharia, Mwangi J.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, student politics and governance of universities in Kenya and in other African countries have undergone a tremendous transformation. The unprecedented expansion and massification of public universities, the introduction of "Module 2" programmes, the admission of private, "parallel" and…

  5. Understanding Unearned Privilege: An Experiential Activity for Counseling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Katrina; Lusk, Aisha; Miller, Laura Christina; Dodier, Oscar Esteban; Salazar, Ana M.

    2012-01-01

    The Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development stresses the importance of counselors to develop multicultural competencies that include attitudes, knowledge, and skills. Counselor educators face the challenge of helping their students develop multicultural counseling competence including an awareness of unearned privilege. This…

  6. Preparing Students for (Inter-)Action with Activity Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    . Through these tools, we suggest, designers are equipped to act skeptically and systematically, supported by theory. Obviously, a design process with students cannot in every respect be compared to a real design process, yet this paper will discuss whether, through the model and framework, designers may...

  7. Professional Identities of Vocational High School Students and Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan, Bilge Aslan; Altintas, Havva Ozge

    2017-01-01

    Vocational high schools are one of the controversial topics, and also the hardly touched fields in educational field. Students' profiles of vocational schools, their visions, and professional identity developments are not frequently reflected in the literature. Therefore, the main aim of the study is to research whether vocational high school…

  8. Understanding Chinese international college and university students' physical activity behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi Yan

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Understanding factors that influence PA among Chinese international students is an important step in the process of promoting their long-term health and wellbeing. Designing program that address the identified key factors may help colleges and universities achieve this goal.

  9. Students design unmanned drone to take action against terrorist activity

    OpenAIRE

    Nystrom, Lynn A.

    2010-01-01

    In less than two years, an unmanned aircraft search and rescue competition will be happening in a remote area in Australia. Kevin Kochersberger, director of the Unmanned System Lab at Virginia Tech, says he hopes to take a student design team and believes they have an excellent shot at winning the $50,000 prize money.

  10. Teaching Students to Read the Primary Literature Using POGIL Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Tracey Arnold

    2014-01-01

    The ability to read, interpret, and evaluate articles in the primary literature are important skills that science majors will use in graduate school and professional life. Because of this, it is important that students are not only exposed to the primary literature in undergraduate education, but also taught how to read and interpret these…

  11. Design Piracy: Student Perceptions of a Constructive Controversy Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcketti, Sara B.

    2007-01-01

    Optimal learning occurs when students are interested in the subject matter, are motivated with challenging and quality learning opportunities, and when immersed in atmospheres that make learning enjoyable. One technique to promote optimal learning is through the use of constructive controversies. The purpose of this study was to provide an example…

  12. Tablets in English Class: Students' Activities Surrounding Online Dictionary Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, Leona

    2015-01-01

    Tablets have become increasingly popular among young people in Sweden and this rapid increase also resonates in school, especially in classrooms for younger children. The aim of the present study is to analyze and describe how the students deal with the open instructions for a task of using online dictionaries on tablets. Specific focus is on how…

  13. Sexually Active Students Found Failing to Take Precautions Against AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Katherine S.

    1988-01-01

    College officials are finding that after three years of efforts to educate college students about acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), many still don't think they are vulnerable and are not protecting themselves against the disease. More creative and personal AIDS education strategies are needed. (MSE)

  14. 77 FR 54610 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed collection; Comments Requested: Student and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed collection; Comments Requested: Student and Supervisor Training Validation Surveys ACTION: 30-Day notice of information collection under review. The Department of Justice (DOJ), Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms...

  15. Teachers' and Students' Perceptions of Classroom Activities Commonly Used in English Speaking Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoyu; Hu, Xinyue

    2016-01-01

    Classroom activities, such as English dubs, role-play, brainstorming etc can be very useful for the teaching of oral English. In recent years, although considerable attention has been paid to the use of classroom activities in English speaking classes, the perceptions of teachers and students about such activities have been ignored. Therefore,…

  16. Educacion al Aire Libre: Libro de Actividades II = Outdoor Education: Student Activity Book II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ada, Alma Flor, Comp.; And Others

    Divided into four sections, the book includes activities for students to do before camp, on the way to camp, at camp, and after camp. Activities to do before camp include writing proverbs, tongue twisters, riddles, poems, and stories. Activities to do on the way to camp include singing songs and reading a map. The words to the following songs are…

  17. How Students' Everyday Situations Modify Classroom Mathematical Activity: The Case of Water Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaz, Vanessa Sena; David, Maria Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Our aim is to discuss how school mathematical activity is modified when students' everyday situations are brought into the classroom. One illustrative sequence--7th grade classes solving problems that required proportional reasoning--is characterized as a system of interconnected activities within the theoretical perspective of activity theory. We…

  18. Physical Activity Behaviors of Students of a Rural Historically Black College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Karen A.; Welsh, Ralph S.

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity can have a positive impact on health disparities among African Americans. Objective: In this study, we assessed physical activity behaviors and correlates of students of a Historically Black College. Methods: In September 2004, an online survey and pedometers were used to measure physical activity behavior and correlates.…

  19. The Influence of Daily Structured Physical Activity on Academic Progress of Elementary Students with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Brett; Dimon, Chelsea; Stone, Danielle; Desmond, Deborah; Casilio, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests regular physical activity can positively influence academic performance. Although, little has been published on physical activity's impact on academic performance of students with intellectual disabilities, research shows the impact on brain and cognitive function of movement and physical activity. In this study, seven…

  20. Active versus Passive Teaching Styles: An Empirical Study of Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Norbert; Cater, John James, III; Varela, Otmar

    2009-01-01

    This study compares the impact of an active teaching approach and a traditional (or passive) teaching style on student cognitive outcomes. Across two sections of an introductory business course, one class was taught in an active or nontraditional manner, with a variety of active learning exercises. The second class was taught in a passive or…

  1. Educacion al Aire Libre: Libro de Actividades II = Outdoor Education: Student Activity Book II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ada, Alma Flor, Comp.; And Others

    Divided into four sections, the book includes activities for students to do before camp, on the way to camp, at camp, and after camp. Activities to do before camp include writing proverbs, tongue twisters, riddles, poems, and stories. Activities to do on the way to camp include singing songs and reading a map. The words to the following songs are…

  2. How Students' Everyday Situations Modify Classroom Mathematical Activity: The Case of Water Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaz, Vanessa Sena; David, Maria Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Our aim is to discuss how school mathematical activity is modified when students' everyday situations are brought into the classroom. One illustrative sequence--7th grade classes solving problems that required proportional reasoning--is characterized as a system of interconnected activities within the theoretical perspective of activity theory. We…

  3. Providing Physical Activity for Students with Intellectual Disabilities: The Motivate, Adapt, and Play Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kathy; Hodson, Patricia; Zhang, Guili; Boswell, Boni; Decker, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that regular physical activity helps to prevent major health problems, such as heart disease, obesity, and diabetes. However, little research has been conducted on classroom-based physical activity programs for students with disabilities. In North Carolina, the Healthy Active Children Policy was implemented in 2006, requiring…

  4. A study of physical education activities in the university swimming classes for students with poor eyesight

    OpenAIRE

    小森, 康加; 河野, 一郎; 斉藤, まゆみ; 坂田, 勇夫

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the status of eyeglasses or contact lens wear in swimming classes among the students and to examine the safety of swimming classes. Results were summarized as follows; 1) The percentage of students wearing eyeglasses or contact lens in daily life was 75% of all. 2) The percentage of students who have under 0.1 vision was 43% of all. 3) There were 51% of students wearing eyeglasses or contact lens in physical education activities on ground, and 19% ...

  5. A study of the relation between sports activity and sports test in NNCT male Students

    OpenAIRE

    内山, 了治; 塚田, 修三; 加藤, 俊也

    1996-01-01

    Purposes of this study were to clarify the relation between sports activity and sports test (physical fitness and motor performance) in N National College of Technology (NNCT) male students. Their sports activity were gathered information by questionnaires developed by Taisyuukann-tairyokukagakukennkyukai. Physical fitness and motor performance were measured by a sports test developed by Ministry of Education. The main results were as follows: 1) All year students; Average of physical fitness...

  6. Physical Activity Patterns in University Students: Do They Follow the Public Health Guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Filipe Manuel; Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros; Martins, Fernando Manuel Lourenço; Mendes, Rui Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity is associated with health. The aim of this study was (a) to access if Portuguese university students meet the public health recommendations for physical activity and (b) the effect of gender and day of the week on daily PA levels of university students. This observational cross-sectional study involved 126 (73 women) healthy Portuguese university students aged 18-23 years old. Participants wore the ActiGraph wGT3X-BT accelerometer for seven consecutive days. Number of steps, time spent sedentary and in light, moderate and vigorous physical activity were recorded. The two-way MANOVA revealed that gender (p-value = 0.001; η2 = 0.038; minimum effect) and day of the week (p-value = 0.001; η2 = 0.174; minimum effect) had significant main effects on the physical activity variables. It was shown that during weekdays, male students walked more steps (65.14%), spent less time sedentary (6.77%) and in light activities (3.11%) and spent more time in moderate (136.67%) and vigorous activity (171.29%) in comparison with weekend days (p students walked more steps (51.18%) and spent more time in moderate (125.70%) and vigorous (124.16%) activities during weekdays than in weekend days (p students did not achieve the recommended 10,000 steps/day on average during weekdays and weekend days. Only male students achieved this recommendation during weekdays. In summary, this study showed a high incidence of sedentary time in university students, mainly on weekend days. New strategies must be adopted to promote physical activity in this population, focusing on the change of sedentary behaviour.

  7. Relationship Between Age, Experience, and Student Preference for Types of Learning Activities in Online Courses

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    Thomas A. Simonds

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two researchers explored student learning preferences in online courses. They used the scholarship of teaching and learning process as a research model, and embedded a web-based survey and online focus groups in the online courses they were teaching. After collecting data, the researchers conducted multiple logistic regression analyses to test their hypothesis that a relationship existed between some student factors and student preferences for types of online learning activities. The results of the data analysis revealed a statistically significant relationship between student age and student preference for certain types of online learning activities. Older students in the study indicated a much stronger preference for videos of the professor lecturing, while younger students tended to prefer more interactive learning strategies. Focus group comments from the older students provide insights into some of the reasons why they found watching video lectures to be helpful for their learning, and comments from younger students illustrate how they learn best in online courses. The researchers offer suggestions for online instructors based on the findings of this study, and they explain why online instructors may find the scholarship of teaching and learning research process especially helpful for both teaching and research efforts.

  8. Determination of Factors Affecting Physical Activity Status of University Students on a Health Sciences Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayi, Ayfer; Acikgoz, Ayla; Guvendi, Guven; Bayrak, Levent; Ersoy, Burcu; Gur, Cagri; Ozmen, Omer

    2017-01-19

    Upon graduation, students studying in departments related to health will work in the health sector and will guide and enlighten people with their knowledge and behavior. The purpose of this study was to determine the factors affecting the physical activity (PA) conditions of university students on a health sciences campus. A cross-sectional study was carried out on 706 students in a Turkish university. The data was obtained from a survey prepared by the researchers. The 26-question survey aimed to discover the students' socio-demographic characteristics and their awareness and practices concerning PA. We found that 30% of the students engage in some type of PA during their university education. A relationship was observed concerning their current PA and their family inactivity levels, as well as between inactivity before entering the university and inactivity during their education. The presence of a chronic disease in family members does not affect student PA. A majority of the students believe PA is beneficial (98.7%), 93.9% believe it relieves stress, and 94.5% believe it helps control body weight. Although students of medicine and related disciplines are aware of the importance of proper diet and adequate levels of PA in health, they did not implement theory into practice. Thus, it is questionable how young health professionals will promote the positive effects and necessity of regular physical activity if they do not apply these activities to their own lifestyle.

  9. Physical activity practice´s characteristics of students of Faculty of Education (University of Seville

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    Carolina Castañeda Vázquez

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to know about students´ physical activity from Faculty of Education of University of Seville, and its characteristics.The sample (N=409 is constituted for students from the different degrees of this Faculty (±4.8%; 95%CI. A specific questionnaire, built to that effect, was used to obtain dates. This instrument was validated by different experts on this area of studies, and statistic tests was done to check its reliability (Alpha Cronbach: .78 using SPSS V.15. The main results showed that 62.19% of students do physical activity regularly. Students prefer recreational activities or exercise aimed at being fit or watching health instead competitive games. Activities done by students inside University are very similar to activities done out of this. They also do exercise during all academic year, preferably along the all week or from Monday to Friday, and especially in the afternoon. This group usually practice with friends, classmates or workmates, but lonely too, and they prefer public areas and public or private sport facilities for their sport practice.Key Words: University students, physical activity practice, leisure time.

  10. Prevalence of sexual activity and outcome among female secondary school students in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anochie, I C; Ikpeme, E E

    2001-08-01

    Sexual activity among 534 Nigerian female secondary school students was studied using self-administered questionnaire. Prevalence of sexual intercourse was 25.7%. There was no significant difference between the junior (48.2%) and senior (51.8%) students (p > 0.05). Seventeen (12.4%) students had initiated sexual intercourse before 11 years. The frequency of sexual exposure was high, with 34.3% of the students having intercourse more than once in a week. Pregnancy rate among sexually active females was 27.0%, with 24.8% rate of induced abortion. Early sexual health education starting from primary school would be helpful in influencing the reproductive decisions and sexual behaviour of the students, including contraceptive acceptance and usage, to avoid teenage pregnancy. Education of parents is also recommended in order to overcome the cultural barriers that discourage parents from providing sex education to their children at home.

  11. A learning activity to introduce undergraduate students to bioethics in human clinical research: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segarra, Ignacio; Gomez, Manuel

    2014-12-01

    We developed a pharmacology practicum assignment to introduce students to the research ethics and steps involved in a clinical trial. The assignment included literature review, critical analysis of bioethical situations, writing a study protocol and presenting it before a simulated ethics committee, a practice interview with a faculty member to obtain informed consent, and a student reflective assessment and self-evaluation. Students were assessed at various steps in the practicum; the learning efficiency of the activity was evaluated using an independent survey as well as students' reflective feedback. Most of the domains of Bloom's and Fink's taxonomies of learning were itemized and covered in the practicum. Students highly valued the translatability of theoretical concepts into practice as well as the approach to mimic professional practice. This activity was within a pharmacy program, but may be easily transferable to other medical or health sciences courses.

  12. Influence of physical education on the level of adaptation of students to educational activity.

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    Korolinska S.V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Examined and summarized problems of adaptation of students to educational activity. 100 students took part in research. Found out a row socially psychological factors which determine efficiency of process of adaptation of students to the scientific process. Practical recommendations are developed on organization of educational process of students. It is recommended widely to utillize a physical culture as mean of reduction of adaptation period and increase of level of physical and mental capacity. It is marked that almost 90% students have rejections in a health. Also over 50% - unsatisfactory physical preparedness. It is set that for the students of the II course the indexes of low situation anxiety prevail as compared to the I course. It is set that the characteristic feature of the psychological state during an examination session is emotionally volitional instability.

  13. [Ethical Attitudes of Brazilian Medical Students and Graduates with Active Methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Maria Rita Carvalho Garbi; Novaes, Luiz Carlos Garcez; Guilhem, Dirce; Stepke, Fernando Lolas; Silveira, Carla Cristina Costa; Komatsu, Ricardo Shoiti; Trindade, Eliane Mendonça Vilar; Guiotti, Murilo Galvão

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a diagnosis of the comprehensive inclusion of ethics in Brazilian medical training with a problem-based learning methodology and to describe students' and graduates' perceptions of ethical attitudes. The methodological design was a descriptive and documental case study with a qualitative and quantitative approach. The sample consisted of 20 students per course year, totaling 120 students and 40 alumni from two graduating classes at the ESCS School of Medicine. The project was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the State Health Secretariat, Federal District, Brazil. ESCS students and graduates showed that they approach ethical conflicts and respect for patients. However, an analysis of ethical sensitivity revealed weak perceptions and inappropriate attitudes by medical students, especially in the early years of medical school, requiring more systematic discussions on ethical and bioethical aspects integrated with practical activities, in order to increase and strengthen ethical reflection by students.

  14. Changing University Students' Alternative Conceptions of Optics by Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadžibegovic, Zalkida; Sliško, Josip

    2013-01-01

    Active learning is individual and group participation in effective activities such as in-class observing, writing, experimenting, discussion, solving problems, and talking about to-be-learned topics. Some instructors believe that active learning is impossible, or at least extremely difficult to achieve in large lecture sessions. Nevertheless, the…

  15. Active Learning Improves Nursing Student Clinical Performance in an Academic Institution in Macao

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cindy Sin U Leong; Lynn B. Clutter

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the outcome of the application of active learning during practicum among nursing students using clinical assessment and evaluation scores as a measurement. Methods: Nursing students were instructed on the basics of active learning prior to the initiation of their clinical experience. The participants were divided into 5groups of nursing students ( n=56) across three levels ( years 2-4) in a public academic institute of a bachelor degree program in Macao. Final clinical evaluation was averaged and compared between groups with and without in-tervention. Results: These nursing students were given higher appraisals in verbal and written comments than previous students without interventian. The groups with the invention achieved higher clinical as-sessment and evaluation scores on average than comparable groups without the active learning in-tervention. One group of sophomore nursing students ( year 2) did not receive as high of evalua-tions as the other groups, receiving an average score of above 80. Conclusions: Nursing students must engage in active learning to demonstrate that they are will-ing to gain knowledge of theory, nursing skills and communication skills during the clinical practi-cum.

  16. Association of physical activity and health status with intelligence quotient of high school students in Jeddah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kholy, Thanaa; Elsayed, Enas

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated the relationships of physical activity and healthiness with the intelligence quotients of high school students in Jeddah. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 135 male and female students were randomly drawn from public and private secondary schools in Jeddah. A self-designed questionnaire was distributed to the students that included demographic, physical activity, and health status sections. Body mass index measurement and an intelligence quotient test were carried out for all students. In addition, samples of blood were collected to estimate hemoglobin and serum iron. [Results] The highest proportions of males and females (39.1% and 51% respectively) had an intelligence quotient score of more than 75%. Moreover, the findings revealed that about 35% of the students were categorized as overweight obesity, and there was aninverse correlation between body mass index and physical activity. Students who shared physical education classes and exercising at and outside school showed a positive correlation with high IQ scores. Regarding hemoglobin and iron levels, there were significant correlations between their levels in blood and IQ. [Conclusion] The intelligence quotient of adolescent students is positively associated with physical activity and health status.

  17. THE EFFECT OF VIOLENCE OF READING COMPREHENSION ACTIVITIES IN TURKISH TEXTBOOKS ON STUDENTS

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    Şükran DİLİDÜZGÜN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the effect of violence of reading comprehension activities in Turkish textbooks on the personal and social development of students. In this study adopting multi-method research, the sample has been selected via convenience sampling and consists of 60 students at Grade 7, who are at the late of preadolescence stage (between the ages of 6 and 12 and thought to be affected the most in this context. Firstly, the feeling and attitudes of the students have been determined using two questionnaires designed on the basis of the studies in the field and interviews with the authorities as a survey method in a quantitative manner and applied to the students during analysing a short story in the class. The research has been focused on finding main idea as a result of the fact that the researches have showed that students feel the most desperate during this activity. Then, the results of the activities done during reading process by the students have been evaluated using documentary analysis as a qualitive research method and compared to the results of questionnaires under the categories of stimulus, interest and participation. As result of the research it has been found that reading activities constitute a component of violence to the personal development rights as they are not efficient enough for students to improve their comprehension and interpretation skills of literary texts.

  18. Extracurricular activities associated with stress and burnout in preclinical medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Jawad; Saadeddin, Zein; Al Tabosh, Hayat; Aridi, Hussam; El Mouhayyar, Christopher; Koleilat, Mohamad Karim; Chaaya, Monique; El Asmar, Khalil

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to assess the prevalence of stress and burnout among preclinical medical students in a private university in Beirut, Lebanon, and evaluate the association between extracurricular involvement and stress and burnout relief in preclinical medical students. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on a random sample of 165 preclinical medical students. Distress level was measured using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) while that of burnout was measured through the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey (MBI-SS). The MBI-SS assesses three interrelated dimensions: emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and academic efficacy. Extracurricular activities were divided into four categories: physical exercise, music, reading, and social activities. All selected participants responded. A substantial proportion of preclinical medical students suffered from stress (62%) and burnout (75%). Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses revealed that being a female or a 1st year medical student correlated with higher stress and burnout. Music-related activities were correlated with lower burnout. Social activities or living with parents were associated with lower academic efficacy. The high stress and burnout levels call for action. Addressing the studying conditions and attending to the psychological wellbeing of preclinical medical students are recommendations made in the study.

  19. Sexual activity, knowledge and contraceptive usage by gender among university students in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Hatice Bal; Kavlak, Oya; Atan, Senay Unsal

    2010-12-01

    To assess sexual activity and contraceptive knowledge and practice by gender among university students. Descriptive and cross-sectional study conducted at Ege University, Turkey, with 1000 volunteering students. Data collection was stopped when 500 students of each gender had participated. Of the surveyed students, 50.3% (27.4% female, 73.2% male) reported having had sexual intercourse; the mean age at first sexual intercourse was 18.4 years for girls and 16.9 years for boys. We found that 44.5% of female and 30.6% of male students failed to use contraception at their first coitus, whereas 2.2% of female and 13.7% of male students failed to do so at their most recent intercourse. The rate of condom usage for students' first sexual encounter was 50.1% (35.8% female, 55.5% male) and was 67.8% (70.1% female, 66.9% male) at their most recent intercourse. Abortion was mentioned by 43.9% of female and 39.2% of male students as a method of preventing pregnancy after unprotected coitus. Male Turkish students had started sexual relations at a younger age but had less often unprotected first sex than female students.

  20. Physical Activity Performance of Focal Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfle, Stephen E.; Gelbaugh, Corey M.

    2013-01-01

    Histograms of push-ups and curl-ups from a sample of more than 9,000 students show periodic spikes at five and 10 unit intervals. This article argues that these spikes are related to focal points, a game theoretic concept popularized by Nobel Laureate Thomas Schelling. Being focal on one test makes one more likely to be focal on the other. Focal…

  1. Identification of critical timeconsuming student support activities in e-learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred J. de Vries

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Higher education staff involved in e-learning often struggle with organising their student support activities. To a large extent this is due to the high workload involved with such activities. We distinguish support related to learning content, learning processes and student products. At two different educational institutions, surveys were conducted to identify the most critical support activities, using the Nominal Group Method. The results are discussed and brought to bear on the distinction between content-related, process-related and product-related support activities.

  2. Predicting Factors Associated with Regular Physical Activity among College Students: Applying BASNEF Model

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    B. Moeini

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: One of the important problems in modern society is people's sedentary life style. The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with regular physical activity among college students based on BASNEF model.Materials & Methods: This study was a cross-sectional study carried out on 400 students in Hamadan University of Medical Sciences. Based on the assignment among different schools, classified sampling method was chosen for data gathering using a questionnaire in three parts including: demographic information, constructs of BASNEF model, and standard international physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ. Data were analyzed by SPSS-13, and using appropriate statistical tests (Chi-square, T-test and regression. Results: Based on the results, 271 students(67.8 % had low, 124 (31% moderate ,and 5 (1.2% vigorous physical activity. There was a significant relationship (c2=6.739, df= 1, P= 0.034 between their residence and physical activity and students living in dormitory were reported to have higher level of physical activity. Behavioral intention and enabling factors from the constructs of BASNEF model were the best predictors for having physical activity in students (OR=1.215, P = 0.000 and (OR=1.119, P= 0.000 respectively.Conclusion: With regard to the fact that majority of the students did not engage in enough physical activity and enabling factors were the most effective predictors for having regular physical activity in them, it seems that providing sports facilities can promote physical activity among the students.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2011;18(3:70-76

  3. Mpemba Effect, Shechtman's Quasicrystals and Students' Exploring Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Balazovic, Marek

    2012-01-01

    In the 1960s, Tanzanian student Erasto Mpemba and his teacher published an article with the title "Cool" in the journal Physics Education (Mpemba, E. B. - Osborne, D. G.: Cool?. In: Physics Education, vol.4, 1969, pp. 172-175.). In this article they claimed that hot water freezes faster than cold water. The article raised not only a wave of discussions, and other articles about this topic, but also a whole series of new experiments, which should verify this apparent thermodynamic absurdity and find an adequate explanation. Here we give a review with references to explanations and we bring some proposals for experimental student work in this area. We introduce Mpemba Effect not only as a paradoxical physics phenomenon, but we shall present a strong educational message that the Mpemba story brings to the teachers and their students. This message also creates a bridge between this phenomenon and the discovery for which the 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded. It leads to critical adoption of traditional kn...

  4. A Comparison of Students' Outcomes in Two Classes: Business Administration Students vs Communication Arts Students Based on Self-Directed Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orawiwatnakul, Wiwat; Wichadee, Saovapa

    2011-01-01

    With research showing the benefits of self-directed learning, more activities are needed to provide learners opportunities for self-directed practice (Khomson, 1997; Lee, 1998; Phongnapharuk, 2007). A 12-week experimental study was performed with 80 EFL learners; one group contained 40 Communication Arts students and the other one consisted of 40…

  5. Relations of perception of responsibility to intrinsic motivation and physical activity among Korean middle school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okseon; Kim, Younhee; Kim, Oung Jun

    2012-12-01

    To validate the Personal and Social Responsibility Questionnaire, the relations between perceived responsibility and intrinsic motivation were examined among Korean middle school students. The relations of change in stages of physical activity and students' perceived responsibility were also examined. Participants were 357 middle school students (160 boys, 197 girls) from three schools in the Seoul metropolitan area. Exploratory factor analysis supported a three-factor structure with effort and self-direction merged into one factor and the responsibilities of respect and caring for others constituted separate factors. Pearson correlations among factors showed perceptions of personal responsibility were associated with more intrinsic motivation toward physical education and a higher stage of physical activity. A moderate or low association between perceived social responsibility and intrinsic motivation implied a need to develop strategies for Korean students to use social responsibility for promoting physical activity.

  6. Development of Learning Activities Using STEM Education in Mathematics for Third Grade Students

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    Parichart Prasertsang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were: 1 to develop learning activities STEM Education with the effective Criter of 75/75 and 2 to compare achievement pretest posttest by using the learning activities STEM Education of third grade students. the Samples were 28 of third grade students in the Second semester of academic year 2015 of Roi Et Rajabhat University Demonstration School, Amphoe Selaphum, Roi Et. The experiments were conducted by using research tools which were the lesson plans though the STEM Education approach and achievement test. Data were analyzed to find out the Percentage, Mean, standard deviation, and t-test. The results of this research revealed that: 1 The learning activities using STEM Education in learning mathematics of third grade students were performed at 79.73/78.69. 2 Achievement of third grade students who learned using STEM Education were higher than pretest at the statistical significance level of .05 of Statistical significance.

  7. Student research activities in the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division, Summer 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chester, R.O.; Roberts, D.A.

    1981-08-01

    Reports summarizing activities of students assigned to the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division for the summer 1980 are presented. Unless indicated otherwise, each report was written by the student whose work is being described. For each student, the student's supervisor, the name of the program under which the student was brought to ORNL, the academic level of the student, and the name of the ORNL project to which the student was assigned are tabulated. The reports are presented in alphabetical order of the students' last names.

  8. Influence of motive activity on forming of proof skills of healthy way of life of students of higher educational establishments.

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    Trotsenko V.V.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The estimation and the analysis of impellent activity of students is considered. The importance of impellent activity in forming a healthy way of life of students is shown. In research the data of questionnaire of students are used. sports priorities of students are revealed should to undertake in attention by development of the program of physical training. The wide spectrum of the reasons which interfere with exercises is revealed. These reasons should be considered during individual work with each student. It is proved, that impellent activity influences forming of proof skills of a healthy way of life of students.

  9. Technological and Traditional Drawing Approaches Encourage Active Engagement in Histology Classes for Science Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdell, Barbara; Torsney, Ben; Stewart, Katherine; Smith, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    In order to promote more active engagement of science undergraduates in histology practical classes some technology-based innovations were introduced. First, an interactive pre-lab tutorial was set up using an electronic handset voting system, where guidance on tissue analysis was given. Second, a web-based resource where students could access…

  10. Pre-Service Teachers' Learning Styles and Preferences towards Instructional Technology Activities and Collaborative Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusop, Farrah Dina; Sumari, Melati

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate pre-service teachers' learning styles and their preferences with respect to 15 technology-based instructional activities and collaborative work tasks. Felder and Silverman's online Index of Learning Style (ILS) and a questionnaire were used to measure students' learning styles and…

  11. Technological and Traditional Drawing Approaches Encourage Active Engagement in Histology Classes for Science Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdell, Barbara; Torsney, Ben; Stewart, Katherine; Smith, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    In order to promote more active engagement of science undergraduates in histology practical classes some technology-based innovations were introduced. First, an interactive pre-lab tutorial was set up using an electronic handset voting system, where guidance on tissue analysis was given. Second, a web-based resource where students could access…

  12. Enhancing Student Self-Study Attitude and Activity with Motivational Techniques

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    Kent Rhoads

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Research has shown that students will exhibit a positive attitude towards self-study, but that they will often fail to complete self-study activities. The purpose of this paper is to investigate positive instructor interactions and motivation of students to complete self- study activities and students’ attitudes towards self-study. Six English instructors at the University of Shizuoka created a one-semester self-access study log for use in the university self-access language laboratory in order to find out how many students would complete the log. One of the six instructors applied motivational techniques in the classroom in an effort to engender greater student self-study. Later a questionnaire was administered to 465 student participants to determine their self-study attitudes and activities. The data collected from the questionnaire and the high participation in the self- study activities suggest the positive impact the motivational actions employed by the instructor had on his students' attitudes towards self-study activities.

  13. Alignment of Hands-on STEM Engagement Activities with Positive STEM Dispositions in Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2015-12-01

    This study examines positive dispositions reported by middle school and high school students participating in programs that feature STEM-related activities. Middle school students participating in school-to-home hands-on energy monitoring activities are compared to middle school and high school students in a different project taking part in activities such as an after-school robotics program. Both groups are compared and contrasted with a third group of high school students admitted at the eleventh grade to an academy of mathematics and science. All students were assessed using the same science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) dispositions instrument. Findings indicate that the after-school group whose participants self-selected STEM engagement activities, and the self-selected academy of mathematics and science group, each had highly positive STEM dispositions comparable to those of STEM professionals, while a subset of the middle school whole-classroom energy monitoring group that reported high interest in STEM as a career, also possessed highly positive STEM dispositions comparable to the STEM Professionals group. The authors conclude that several different kinds of hands-on STEM engagement activities are likely to foster or maintain positive STEM dispositions at the middle school and high school levels, and that these highly positive levels of dispositions can be viewed as a target toward which projects seeking to interest mainstream secondary students in STEM majors in college and STEM careers, can hope to aspire. Gender findings regarding STEM dispositions are also reported for these groups.

  14. Anthropometric profile and habits of physical activity of a scho ol students Mapuches rural Temuco, Chile

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    Pablo Antonio Valdés-Badilla

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The nutritional status of children can be a predictor of health in adulthood element, the Mapuche population has a non-Mapuche population that increased prevalence of obesity in Chile. The aim of this study was to determine the anthropometric profile and physical activity habits of Mapuche students of a particular charter school in the rural of Temuco city.Material and Methods: The design is not experimental, descriptive, transversal, with a quantitative approach. The sample included all students of the educational establishment Mapuches (n=23, in both sexes. He underwent anthropometric assessment ISAK and total time physical activity was estimated by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, short version in Spanish (IPAQ-A. To correlate the variables a partial correlation was used.Results: The students average about 35.4% of fat mass, muscle mass 34.1%, 11.4% of residual mass, 12% of bone mass, 7% of residual mass and somatotype 4.9–5.1–1.8 that meso-endomorph classified as balanced. Regarding the total time physical activity, students reach 2225.9 minutes/week, your energy expenditure is 9592.1 (METs/min/week and stay seated equals 228.6 minutes per week, finally negative correlation was found between BMI and total time of physical activity.Conclusions: The students have a mostly standard anthropometric profile, but with a troubling obesity rate. His activity level is high, placing them as active subjects according to normative tables.

  15. SOME INNOVATIVE FORMS OF ORGANIZATION OF INDEPENDENT ACTIVITY OF STUDENTS IN CONSTRUCTIVE LEARNING

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    Shatalova N. P.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Conducted in our country reforms require active participation in their realization of all citizens. The development of the economic components of the state, will allow not only to strengthen the defense potential of the country, but also to raise the quality of life of the population. To solve this problem the country needs competent specialists, real, educated professionals, masters of their craft. The most important task of each University is to prepare such graduates. Training at the University is done not only through training and education, but also in the process of independent activity of students. Independent work is the activity performed by the students of the University without direct contact with the teacher or teacher-driven mediated through specific training materials; it is an integral, compulsory element of the learning process, providing primarily individual work of students in accordance with the setting of teacher or textbook curricula. In the modern didactics, independent work of students is, on the one hand, a kind of educational work carried out without direct intervention, but under the guidance of a teacher, and as a means of engaging students in independent cognitive activity, the formation methods of the organization of such activities. The effect from independent work of students can be obtained only when it is organized and implemented in the educational process as a holistic system that runs through all the stages of learning of students in high school. In the article, on the basis of experience, analysis, research and publications of the Russian scientists, we considered the problems arising at the organization of independent activity of students as recommendations are offered innovative forms and methods of education based on the theory of constructive learning

  16. Can students adequately evaluate the activities of their peers in PBL?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Rachelle J A; Dolmans, Diana H J M; Van Berkel, Henk J M; Schmidt, Henk G

    2011-01-01

    In problem-based learning (PBL), high-quality discussions are crucial for student learning. The quality of the discussion is affected by the quality of the contributions students make during PBL tutorials. This study investigated whether students are able to evaluate the activities of their peers in PBL groups in a reliable and valid way. For this purpose, the Maastricht-Peer Activity Rating Scale (M-PARS) was developed. The M-PARS was well-founded on the literature about effective tutorial performance. With this scale, students (N = 196) were evaluated by their peers on three main aspects: their constructive, collaborative, and motivational contributions to the group. A confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated that the data fitted the three-factor model reasonably well. The generalizability studies demonstrated good internal consistency when students were evaluated by, at least, four of their peers. Furthermore, Hancock's coefficients indicated good construct reliability. The results prove that peers are able to provide reliable and valid information about a student's active participation in the tutorial group, if at least four peer ratings are attainable, out of a group of eight students. In conclusion, the M-PARS is a valid and reliable instrument.

  17. Thin-Layer Chromatography: Four Simple Activities for Undergraduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Jamil; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities that can be used to introduce thin-layer chromatography at the undergraduate level in relatively less developed countries and that can be performed with very simple and commonly available apparati in high schools and colleges. Activities include thin-layer chromatography with a test-tube, capillary feeder, burette, and rotating…

  18. Thin-Layer Chromatography: Four Simple Activities for Undergraduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Jamil; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities that can be used to introduce thin-layer chromatography at the undergraduate level in relatively less developed countries and that can be performed with very simple and commonly available apparati in high schools and colleges. Activities include thin-layer chromatography with a test-tube, capillary feeder, burette, and rotating…

  19. Variety, Enjoyment, and Physical Activity Participation Among High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Shannon L; Coffield, Edward; Lee, Sarah M; Fulton, Janet E

    2016-02-01

    Federal guidelines state that youth should participate in a variety of physical activity (PA) they find enjoyable. Little is known, however, about how variety and enjoyment are associated with PA participation among adolescents. Data came from the 2010 National Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey, a nationally representative survey of adolescents. Path analysis was used to examine the association of a variety of self-reported PA, defined as the number of activities and activity types (ie, team sports/weightlifting, individual activities, and other competitive/recreational sports), on self-reported PA enjoyment and participation. The analysis also examined whether enjoyment mediates the association between a variety of PA and participation. Separate models were estimated for boys and girls. Number of activities was associated with increased PA enjoyment and participation. For boys and girls, team sports/weightlifting was associated with increased participation, and individual activities were indirectly associated with increased participation through enjoyment. For boys, team sports/weightlifting was indirectly related with participation. These findings suggest that participation in a variety of PA is associated with increased PA enjoyment and participation. Providing opportunities for adolescents to engage in a variety of activities might help them identify PA they enjoy and facilitate lifelong PA habits.

  20. 20 CFR 670.965 - What procedures apply to disclosure of information about Job Corps students and program activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... information about Job Corps students and program activities? 670.965 Section 670.965 Employees' Benefits... information about Job Corps students and program activities? (a) The Secretary develops procedures to respond to requests for information or records or other necessary disclosures pertaining to students. (b)...

  1. From the Mouths of Canadian University Students: Web-Based Information-Seeking Activities for Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Martine; Weinberg, Alysse; Sarma, Nandini; Frankoff, Mary

    2011-01-01

    This article presents student perceptions about different types of web-based activities used to seek information for French language learning. Group interviews were conducted with 71 students in five Canadian universities to elicit data on their use of the Internet for information-seeking activities. These students use the Web for three main…

  2. Multiculturalism in Technology-Based Education: Case Studies on ICT-Supported Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Penalvo, Francicso Jose

    2013-01-01

    Our differences in language, cultures, and history around the world play a vital role in the way we learn. As technology-based education continues to be used worldwide, there is an ever growing interest in how multiculturalism comes into effect. Multiculturalism in Technology-Based Education: Case Studies on ICT-Supported Approaches explores the…

  3. Relation of constipation problem and physical activity level in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ilkim Citak Karakaya

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical activity is a rarely investigated issue in studies focusing on constipation problem in university students. Therefore, the aim of this cross-sectional study is to investigate the relation of constipation problem and physical activity level in university students, and to find out the strategies they use to cope with constipation. Methods: Socio-demographic characteristics of 194 collegians were recorded and presence of constipation was determined by Rome II Criteria for Constipation. Physical activity level was evaluated by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Coping methods with constipation were evaluated by a questionnaire prepared by the researchers. Results: The prevalence of constipation problem was 20.6% (57.5% females and 42.5% males in the sample according to the Rome II criteria. Mean physical activity total score of the students with constipation was lower than the others (p<0.05. Increasing liquid intake (80%, massaging the abdomen during defecation (60%, and increasing the intake of nutrients rich from fiber (50% were the most frequently used coping methods by the students with constipation. Fifteen percent of the subjects indicated no coping methods. Conclusions: The prevalence of constipation was quite high among university students, and physical activity scores of the students with constipation were lower than those without this problem. It is considered that informing and educating university students about the possible causes of and the coping methods for constipation and also referring them to physical activities/sports may be of benefit in prevention and managemen t of constipation. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(4.000: 329-332

  4. Knowledge, attitude, and level of physical activity among medical undergraduate students in Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Tanu; Tanwar, Sneh; Kumar, Rajesh; Meena, Gajendra Singh; Ingle, Gopal Krishna

    2011-04-01

    Physical inactivity has been implicated as a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The healthy lifestyle of medical students could facilitate the formation of healthy physicians who is more likely to give effective preventive counseling to their patients. Therefore, this study was undertaken to assess the knowledge, attitude, and pattern of the physical activity among the medical students. A cross-sectional study was conducted amongst 161 eligible sixth semester medical undergraduate students. A pretested questionnaire was used to collect the data. Anthropometric measurements were also taken. The data were fed and coded in Microsoft Excel 2007 and analyzed using SPSS 17.0 and Epi Info software of World Health Organization. Knowledge regarding different types of exercise and anthropometric variables was fairly low among the study participants. Only 9.3% of the students were aware of the recommended level of the physical activity but nearly all (96.27%) were aware of the benefits of it. The attitude of the participants toward the physical activity was favorable, yet only one-third (32.3%) subjects adhered to recommended guidelines. Boys (39.8%) were found to be significantly more active than girls (20.6%) (P = 0.01). The knowledge and practices regarding the physical activity was found to be low amongst the medical students. There is a need to provide an enabling environment for promoting the physical activity amongst them so that can inculcate the same in their patients.

  5. Knowledge, attitude, and level of physical activity among medical undergraduate students in Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanu Anand

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physical inactivity has been implicated as a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The healthy lifestyle of medical students could facilitate the formation of healthy physicians who is more likely to give effective preventive counseling to their patients. Therefore, this study was undertaken to assess the knowledge, attitude, and pattern of the physical activity among the medical students. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted amongst 161 eligible sixth semester medical undergraduate students. A pretested questionnaire was used to collect the data. Anthropometric measurements were also taken. The data were fed and coded in Microsoft Excel 2007 and analyzed using SPSS 17.0 and Epi Info software of World Health Organization. Results: Knowledge regarding different types of exercise and anthropometric variables was fairly low among the study participants. Only 9.3% of the students were aware of the recommended level of the physical activity but nearly all (96.27% were aware of the benefits of it. The attitude of the participants toward the physical activity was favorable, yet only one-third (32.3% subjects adhered to recommended guidelines. Boys (39.8% were found to be significantly more active than girls (20.6% (P = 0.01. Conclusion: The knowledge and practices regarding the physical activity was found to be low amongst the medical students. There is a need to provide an enabling environment for promoting the physical activity amongst them so that can inculcate the same in their patients.

  6. Working Together: Librarian and Student Collaboration for Active Learning in a Library Eclassroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcie Lynne Jacklin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Active learning strategies based on several learning theories were incorporated during instruction sessions for second year Biological Sciences students. The instructional strategies described in this paper are based primarily on sociocultural and collaborative learning theory, with the goal being to expand the relatively small body of literature currently available that discusses the application of these learning theories to library instruction. The learning strategies employed successfully involved students in the learning process ensuring that the experiences were appropriate and effective. The researchers found that, as a result of these strategies (e.g. teaching moments based on the emerging needs of students students’ interest in learning information literacy was increased and students interacted with information given to them as well as with their peers. Collaboration between the Librarians, Co-op Student and Senior Lab Instructor helped to enhance the learning experience for students and also revealed new aspects of the active learning experiences. The primary learning objective, which was to increase the students’ information skills in the Biological Sciences, was realized. The advantages of active learning were realized by both instructors and students. Advantages for students attained during these sessions include having their diverse learning styles addressed; increased interaction with and retention of information; increased responsibility for their own learning; the opportunity to value not only the instructors, but also themselves and their peers as sources of authority and knowledge; improved problem solving abilities; increased interest and opportunities for critical thinking, as a result of the actively exchanging information in a group. The primary advantage enjoyed by the instructors was the opportunity to collaborate with colleagues to reduce the preparation required to create effective library instruction sessions

  7. Constructing Media Artifacts in a Social Constructivist Environment to Enhance Students' Environmental Awareness and Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Engin; Roehrig, Gillian

    2015-02-01

    Current science education reforms and policy documents highlight the importance of environmental awareness and perceived need for activism. As "environmental problems are socially constructed in terms of their conceptualized effects on individuals, groups, other living things and systems research based on constructivist principles provides not only a coherent framework in which to theorize about learning, but also a context for understanding socially constructed issues" (Palmer and Suggate in Res Pap Educ 19(2), 2004, p. 208). This research study investigated the impacts of the learning processes structured based on the theories of constructionism and social constructivism on students' environmental awareness and perceived need for activism. Students constructed multimedia artifacts expressing their knowledge, attitudes, awareness, and activism about environmental issues through a constructionist design process. In addition, a social networking site was designed and used to promote social interaction among students. Twenty-two high school environmental science students participated in this study. A convergent mixed methods design was implemented to allow for the triangulation of methods by directly comparing and contrasting quantitative results with qualitative findings for corroboration and validation purposes. Using a mixed method approach, quantitative findings are supported with qualitative data (student video projects, writing prompts, blog entries, video projects of the students, observational field notes, and reflective journals) including spontaneous responses in both synchronous and asynchronous conversations on the social network to provide a better understanding of the change in students' environmental awareness and perceived need for activism. The findings of the study indicated that students' environmental awareness and perceived need for activism were improved at different scales (personal, community, global) throughout the constructionist and social

  8. Combining traditional anatomy lectures with e-learning activities: how do students perceive their learning experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Lukas; Wieser, Heike; Waldboth, Simone; Mischo-Kelling, Maria

    2016-02-21

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how students perceived their learning experience when combining traditional anatomy lectures with preparatory e-learning activities that consisted of fill-in-the-blank assignments, videos, and multiple-choice quizzes. A qualitative study was conducted to explore changes in study behaviour and perception of learning. Three group interviews with students were conducted and thematically analysed. Data was categorized into four themes: 1. Approaching the course material, 2. Understanding the material, 3. Consolidating the material, and 4. Perceived learning outcome. Students appreciated the clear structure of the course, and reported that online activities encouraged them towards a first engagement with the material. They felt that they were more active during in-class sessions, described self-study before the end-of-term exam as easier, and believed that contents would remain in their memories for a longer time. By adjusting already existing resources, lectures can be combined fairly easily and cost-effectively with preparatory e-learning activities. The creation of online components promote well-structured courses, can help minimize 'student passivity' as a characteristic element of lectures, and can support students in distributing their studies throughout the term, thus suggesting enhanced learning. Further research work should be designed to confirm the afore-mentioned findings through objective measurements of student learning outcomes.

  9. Math Games 180 Reproducible Activities to Motivate, Excite, and Challenge Students, Grades 6-12

    CERN Document Server

    Muschla, Judith A

    2011-01-01

    Math Games offers a dynamic collection of 180 reproducible activity sheets to stimulate and challenge your students in all areas of math - from whole numbers to data analysis - while emphasizing problem solving, critical thinking, and the use of technology for today's curriculum! Each of the book's activities can help you teach students in grades 6 through 12 how to think with numbers, recognize relationships, and make connections between mathematical concepts. You pick the activity appropriate for their needs . . . encourage the use of a calculator . . . or provide further challenges with act

  10. Promoting social skills of mexican high school students through virtual activities in the Moodle platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Yolanda RODRÍGUEZ MATAMOROS

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available With the intention of promoting social skills of Mexican high school students based on the graduate profile of this level, virtual activities were implemented in the Moodle platform to 169 students of second year, adopting the proposed Goldstein social skills. In order to establish the impact of these activities to a pretest-postest a one group design was used. The results show that the activities had a positive and significant impact in beginning social skills, advanced social skills, skills for dealing with feeling, social alternatives skills of the participants according to the results obtained by skills scale social Goldstein.

  11. Specifics of Information Basis of Educational Activity of a Bachelor Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepko, Yury N.; Baranova, Natalia A.; Fayurshina, Elena A.; Mitiukov, Nicholas W.

    2016-01-01

    The discussion of the results of an empirical research of the problem of forming the information basis of educational activity of students studying in pedagogical higher education institution is carried out in the article. The information basis of educational activity is considered by the authors as a subsystem of psychological system of…

  12. The Flipped Classroom: An Opportunity to Engage Millennial Students through Active Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehl, Amy; Reddy, Shweta Linga; Shannon, Gayla Jett

    2013-01-01

    "Flipping" the classroom employs easy-to-use, readily accessible technology in order to free class time from lecture. This allows for an expanded range of learning activities during class time. Using class time for active learning versus lecture provides opportunities for greater teacher-to-student mentoring, peer-to-peer collaboration…

  13. Basic Business and Economics: Vary Classroom Activities for Basic Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jerry R.

    1977-01-01

    Creativity is the key word for the teacher as the types of activities for students are limited only to the teacher's imagination and ability to create new learning strategies. Activities for basic business courses are suggested: Projects, committees/teams/groups, field trips and guest speakers, sociodrama, improvisation, problemsolving, and…

  14. Gender Differences Regarding Motivation for Physical Activity among College Students: A Self-Determination Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauderdale, Michael E.; Yli-Piipari, Sami; Irwin, Carol C.; Layne, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown a decline in physical activity (PA) across college years, females being less physically active compared with males. Scholars have suggested studies to understand gender differences in PA and to examine motivational processes to facilitate college students' PA. Grounded in self-determination theory, the purpose of this…

  15. Integrating the Use of Interdisciplinary Learning Activity Task in Creating Students' Mathematical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanin, Hajah Umisuzimah Haji; Shahrill, Masitah; Tan, Abby; Mahadi, Mar Aswandi

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the use of interdisciplinary learning activity task to construct students' knowledge in Mathematics, specifically on the topic of scale drawing application. The learning activity task involved more than one academic discipline, which is Mathematics, English Language, Art, Geography and integrating the Brunei Darussalam…

  16. The Prisoner's Dilemma and Economics 101: Do Active Learning Exercises Correlate with Student Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Chong Hyun Christie

    2014-01-01

    The importance of active learning in the classroom has been well established in the field of Economic education. This paper examines the connection between active learning and performance outcomes in an Economics 101 course. Students participated in single play simultaneous move game with a clear dominant strategy, modeled after the Prisoner's…

  17. Improving the Cultural Competency of Social Work Students with a Social Privilege Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Cynthia L.; Deck, Stacy M.; Miller, J. Jay; Borders, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the development and utilization of an instructional activity created by the authors for the purposes of preparing social work students for culturally competent practice with members of historically oppressed populations. Experiential activities in the classroom provide an alternative approach to traditional pedagogical…

  18. Comparing Primary Student Teachers' Attitudes, Subject Knowledge and Pedagogical Content Knowledge Needs in a Physics Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jane; Ahtee, Maija

    2006-01-01

    This research explores and compares primary student teachers' attitudes, subject knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) in physics in two institutions in England and Finland, using a practical physics activity and questionnaire. Teaching of physics activities was rated unpopular both in Finland and England, although English students…

  19. Educational Activities and the Role of the Parent in Homeschool Families with High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Dan; Gann, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Using a qualitative case study approach, this study looked at the educational activities that constitute a typical day in a homeschool family and the role that the parent has within those activities. Three homeschooling families with high school students in a single community in a southern state in the United States participated in the case study.…

  20. Agree-Disagree Activities for Stimulating Student Analysis of Science Related Issues and Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Gerald

    This document discusses the need for agree-disagree, consensus science activities for teaching students skills in resolving differences and arriving at positions acceptable to all members of a group. Three activity sets are included, each containing ten exercises. The sets deal with human problems, life style problems, and problems of scientific…

  1. Physical Activity, Body Mass Index, Alcohol Consumption and Cigarette Smoking among East Asian College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Chul; Torabi, Mohammad R.; Chin, Ming-Kai; Lee, Chung Gun; Kim, Nayoung; Huang, Sen-Fang; Chen, Chee Keong; Mok, Magdalena Mo Ching; Wong, Patricia; Chia, Michael; Park, Bock-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify levels of moderate-intensity physical activity (MPA) and vigorous-intensity physical activity (VPA) in a representative sample of college students in six East Asian economies and examine their relationship with weight, alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: College students…

  2. The Use of an Active Learning Approach to Teach Metabolism to Students of Nutrition and Dietetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Sancho, Jose Manuel; Sanchez-Pacheco, Aurora; Lasa, Marina; Molina, Susana; Vara, Francisco; del Peso, Luis

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the transition from a traditional instructor-centered course, based on lectures, to a student-centered course based on active learning methodologies as part of the reform of the Spanish higher education system within the European Higher Education Area (EHEA). Specifically, we describe the use of active learning methodologies…

  3. The Relationship between Life Satisfaction, Social Interest, and Frequency of Extracurricular Activities among Adolescent Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Rich

    2001-01-01

    Studied the relationship between life satisfaction, social interest, and participation in extracurricular activities in 321 high school students. Higher social interest was significantly related to higher levels of overall satisfaction, and adolescents who participated in more structured extracurricular activities reported higher school…

  4. Stages of change in physical activity, self efficacy and decisional balance among Saudi university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ensaf S.A. Gawwad

    2008-01-01

    Conclusion : Physical inactivity is common among KSU students. A considerable proportion of them was not ready to become more physically active. The study highlights the need to adapt PA promotion programs to states of readiness for PA. University and public policies as well as environmental changes are necessary to encourage active living within the context of Islamic rules and Saudi culture.

  5. The Effects of Service Learning and Volunteerism Activities on University Students in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boru, Nese

    2017-01-01

    The general purpose of this study is to determine the awareness and acquisitions obtained with service activities by the students studying on undergraduate level in Eskisehir Anadolu University in 2016-2017 education year and involve in service learning and volunteerism activities. The study was designed according to qualitative research method…

  6. A Comparison of Students' Choices of 9th Grade Physical Education Activities by Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Grant M.; Cleven, Brian

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine physical education activity preferences of 9th grade students in a southern California school district and to compare preferences by ethnicity. Results indicated that basketball, football, bowling, softball/baseball, swimming, and volleyball were the most preferred activities. These preferences may be…

  7. Comparing Primary Student Teachers' Attitudes, Subject Knowledge and Pedagogical Content Knowledge Needs in a Physics Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jane; Ahtee, Maija

    2006-01-01

    This research explores and compares primary student teachers' attitudes, subject knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) in physics in two institutions in England and Finland, using a practical physics activity and questionnaire. Teaching of physics activities was rated unpopular both in Finland and England, although English students…

  8. The Use of an Active Learning Approach to Teach Metabolism to Students of Nutrition and Dietetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Sancho, Jose Manuel; Sanchez-Pacheco, Aurora; Lasa, Marina; Molina, Susana; Vara, Francisco; del Peso, Luis

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the transition from a traditional instructor-centered course, based on lectures, to a student-centered course based on active learning methodologies as part of the reform of the Spanish higher education system within the European Higher Education Area (EHEA). Specifically, we describe the use of active learning methodologies…

  9. Effects of Extracurricular Activities on Postsecondary Completion for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Ashley N.; Elliott, William, III; Cheatham, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    The authors focused on participation in extracurricular activities as a way of improving the educational outcomes of children with disabilities. Regarding students in the general population, adolescent involvement in extracurricular activities has been shown to have a positive association with school involvement and adolescent self-esteem,…

  10. Investigating the Effectiveness of an Analogy Activity in Improving Students' Conceptual Change for Solution Chemistry Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Muammer; Ayas, Alipasa; Coll, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation on the use of an analogy activity and seeks to provide evidence of whether the activity enables students to change alternative conceptions towards views more in accord with scientific views for aspects of solution chemistry. We were also interested in how robust any change was and whether these changes in…

  11. Student Learning through Participation in Inquiry Activities: Two Case Studies in Teacher and Computer Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsa, Crina I.; Nerland, Monika

    2016-01-01

    The two case studies reported in this article contribute to a better understanding of how inquiry tasks and activities are employed as resourceful means for learning in higher professional education. An observation-based approach was used to explore characteristics of and challenges in students' participation in collaborative inquiry activities in…

  12. Students' Motivation, Physical Activity Levels, & Health-Related Physical Fitness in Middle School Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zan; Newton, Maria; Carson, Russell L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the predictive utility of students' motivation (self-efficacy and task values) to their physical activity levels and health-related physical fitness (cardiovascular fitness and muscular strength/endurance) in middle school fitness activity classes. Participants (N = 305) responded to questionnaires assessing their self-efficacy…

  13. Educating Students for a Lifetime of Physical Activity: Enhancing Mindfulness, Motivation, and Meaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Catherine D

    2017-09-01

    For many years, pedagogical scholars and physical education (PE) teachers have worked to enhance effective teaching and learning environments. Yet for some children, youth, and young adults, many of the benefits associated with a physically active lifestyle remain elusive. Enhancing programming and performance to meet physical activity goals may require moving programs beyond "effective." It will require teachers and program leaders to focus programmatic attention on strategies to actually increase students' out-of-class physical activity behavior. Transformative PE provides physical activity content within a nurturing and motivating environment that can change students' lives. It focuses on PE students' role in cognitive decision making, self-motivation, and their search for personal meaning that can add connection and relevance to physical activities. In this SHAPE America - Society of Health and Physical Educators Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport Lecture, I have synthesized the research on these topics to emphasize useful findings applicable to teachers' everyday planning and teaching. Using sport, physical activity, dance, and adventure activities as the means to an end for personal and social growth, we can meet our commitment to effective standards-based education while preparing students for a lifetime of physical activity.

  14. Physical Activity, Body Mass Index, Alcohol Consumption and Cigarette Smoking among East Asian College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Chul; Torabi, Mohammad R.; Chin, Ming-Kai; Lee, Chung Gun; Kim, Nayoung; Huang, Sen-Fang; Chen, Chee Keong; Mok, Magdalena Mo Ching; Wong, Patricia; Chia, Michael; Park, Bock-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify levels of moderate-intensity physical activity (MPA) and vigorous-intensity physical activity (VPA) in a representative sample of college students in six East Asian economies and examine their relationship with weight, alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: College students…

  15. Moderators of the Relationship between Physical Activity and Alcohol Consumption in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscemi, Joanna; Martens, Matthew P.; Murphy, James G.; Yurasek, Ali M.; Smith, Ashley E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Among college students, several studies have found a positive relationship between physical activity and alcohol use. The current study tested gender, Greek status, and ethnicity as potential moderators of the physical activity-alcohol use relationship. Participants: Participants were college freshmen (n = 310) endorsing alcohol/drug…

  16. Effects of Extracurricular Activities on Postsecondary Completion for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Ashley N.; Elliott, William, III; Cheatham, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    The authors focused on participation in extracurricular activities as a way of improving the educational outcomes of children with disabilities. Regarding students in the general population, adolescent involvement in extracurricular activities has been shown to have a positive association with school involvement and adolescent self-esteem,…

  17. Promoting active learning of graduate student by deep reading in biochemistry and microbiology pharmacy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ren

    2017-01-06

    To promote graduate students' active learning, deep reading of high quality papers was done by graduate students enrolled in biochemistry and microbiology pharmacy curriculum offered by college of life science, Jiangxi Normal University from 2013 to 2015. The number of graduate students, who participated in the course in 2013, 2014, and 2015 were eleven, thirteen and fifteen, respectively. Through deep reading of papers, presentation, and group discussion in the lecture, these graduate students have improved their academic performances effectively, such as literature search, PPT document production, presentation management, specialty document reading, academic inquiry, and analytical and comprehensive ability. The graduate students also have increased their understanding level of frontier research, scientific research methods, and experimental methods. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2017.

  18. Engaging Students in a Bioinformatics Activity to Introduce Gene Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara J. May

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Bioinformatics spans many fields of biological research and plays a vital role in mining and analyzing data. Therefore, there is an ever-increasing need for students to understand not only what can be learned from this data, but also how to use basic bioinformatics tools.  This activity is designed to provide secondary and undergraduate biology students to a hands-on activity meant to explore and understand gene structure with the use of basic bioinformatic tools.  Students are provided an “unknown” sequence from which they are asked to use a free online gene finder program to identify the gene. Students then predict the putative function of this gene with the use of additional online databases.

  19. Students interest in learning science through fieldwork activity encourage critical thinking and problem solving skills among UPSI pre-university students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Siti Zaheera Muhamad; Khairuddin, Raja Farhana Raja

    2017-05-01

    Graduates with good critical thinking and problem solving (CTPS) skills are likely to boost their employability to live in 21st century. The demands of graduates to be equipped with CTPS skills have shifted our education system in focusing on these elements in all levels of education, from primary, the secondary, and up to the tertiary education, by fostering interesting teaching and learning activities such as fieldwork activity in science classes. Despite the importance of the CTPS skills, little is known about whether students' interests in teaching and learning activities, such as fieldwork activity, have any influence on the students CTPS skills. Therefore, in this investigation, firstly to examine students interests in learning science through fieldwork activity. Secondly, this study examined whether the students' interest in learning science through fieldwork activity have affect on how the students employ CTPS skills. About 100 Diploma of Science students in Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI) were randomly chosen to participate in this study. All of the participants completed a survey on how they find the fieldwork activity implemented in their science classes and it relevents towards their CTPS skills development. From our findings, majority of the students (91%) find that fieldwork activity is interesting and helpful in increasing their interest in learning science (learning factor) and accommodate their learning process (utility). Results suggest that students' interest on the fieldwork activity in science classes does have some influence on the students development of CTPS skills. The findings could be used as an initial guideline by incorporating students' interest on other teaching and learning activities that being implemented in science classes in order to know the impacts of these learning activities in enhancing their CTPS skills.

  20. How does participation in inquiry-based activities influence gifted students' higher order thinking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reger, Barbara H.

    Inquiry-based learning is considered a useful technique to strengthen the critical thinking skills of students. The National Science Standards emphasize its use and the complexities and challenge it provides are well suited for meeting the needs of the gifted. While many studies have documented the effectiveness of this type of instruction, there is a lack of research on growth in higher-order thinking through participation in science inquiry. This study investigated such growth among a small group of gifted fifth-grade students. In this study a group of fifth-grade gifted science students completed a series of three forensics inquiry lessons, and documented questions, ideas and reflections as they constructed evidence to solve a crime. From this class of students, one small group was purposely selected to serve as the focus of the study. Using qualitative techniques, the questions and statements students made as they interacted in the activity were analyzed. Videotaped comments and student logs were coded for emerging patterns and also examined for evidence of increased levels of higher-order thinking based on a rubric that was designed using the six levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. Evidence from this study showed marked increase in and deeper levels of higher-order thinking for two of the students. The other boy and girl showed progress using the inquiry activities, but it was not as evident. The social dynamics of the group seemed to hinder one girl's participation during some of the activities. The social interactions played a role in strengthening the exchange of ideas and thinking skills for the others. The teacher had a tremendous influence over the production of higher-level statements by modeling that level of thinking as she questioned the students. Through her practice of answering a question with a question, she gradually solicited more analytical thinking from her students.