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Sample records for technology zurich switzerland

  1. Concentrations in ambient air and emissions of cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes in Zurich, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buser, Andreas M; Kierkegaard, Amelie; Bogdal, Christian; MacLeod, Matthew; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2013-07-02

    Tens of thousands of tonnes of cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMS) are used each year globally, which leads to high and continuous cVMS emissions to air. However, field measurements of cVMS in air and empirical information about emission rates to air are still limited. Here we present measurements of decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) in air for Zurich, Switzerland. The measurements were performed in January and February 2011 over a period of eight days and at two sites (city center and background) with a temporal resolution of 6-12 h. Concentrations of D5 and D6 are higher in the center of Zurich and range from 100 to 650 ng m(-3) and from 10 to 79 ng m(-3), respectively. These values are among the highest levels of D5 and D6 reported in the literature. In a second step, we used a multimedia environmental fate model parametrized for the region of Zurich to interpret the levels and time trends in the cVMS concentrations and to back-calculate the emission rates of D5 and D6 from the city of Zurich. The average emission rates obtained for D5 and D6 are 120 kg d(-1) and 14 kg d(-1), respectively, which corresponds to per-capita emissions of 310 mg capita(-1) d(-1) for D5 and 36 mg capita(-1) d(-1) for D6.

  2. Acrylamide in a fried potato dish (rösti) from restaurants in Zurich, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCombie, Gregor; Biedermann, Maurus; Biedermann-Brem, Sandra; Suter, Gaby; Eicher, Angela; Pfefferle, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Rösti, a fried potato product, is a large contributor to acrylamide exposure locally in Switzerland. A survey of 55 dishes prepared by 51 restaurants in the city of Zurich showed that the average rösti contained 702 µg/kg acrylamide. By analysing the content of reducing sugars in the potatoes used for frying, it is shown that with simple measures, the exposure to acrylamide could easily be reduced by factor 2 or more, while even improving the culinary experience. Though rösti is a typical dish in the German-speaking areas in Switzerland, the result may be of general interest for fried potato products which are popular in large areas of Central Europe.

  3. Short-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins in Zurich, Switzerland--Atmospheric Concentrations and Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbacher, Pascal S; Bogdal, Christian; Gerecke, Andreas C; Glüge, Juliane; Schmid, Peter; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2015-08-18

    Short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are of concern due to their potential for adverse health effects, bioaccumulation, persistence, and long-range transport. Data on concentrations of SCCPs in urban areas and underlying emissions are still scarce. In this study, we investigated the levels and spatial distribution of SCCPs in air, based on two separate, spatially resolved sampling campaigns in the city of Zurich, Switzerland. SCCP concentrations in air ranged from 1.8 to 17 ng·m(-3) (spring 2011) and 1.1 to 42 ng·m(-3) (spring 2013) with medians of 4.3 and 2.7 ng·m(-3), respectively. Both data sets show that atmospheric SCCP levels in Zurich can vary substantially and may be influenced by a number of localized sources within this urban area. Additionally, continuous measurements of atmospheric concentrations performed at one representative sampling site in the city center from 2011 to 2013 showed strong seasonal variations with high SCCP concentrations in summer and lower levels in winter. A long-term dynamic multimedia environmental fate model was parametrized to simulate the seasonal trends of SCCP concentrations in air and to back-calculate urban emissions. Resulting annual SCCP emissions in the city of Zurich accounted for 218-321 kg, which indicates that large SCCP stocks are present in urban areas of industrialized countries.

  4. Mobile measurements of ammonia: Sources and spatial variations in the Wallis region and Zurich (Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elser, Miriam; El Haddad, Imad; Bruns, Emily; Pieber, Simone; Wolf, Robert; Krishna Kumar, Nivedita; Prévôt, André; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-05-01

    Ammonia (NH3) has negative impacts on human health, climate, ecosystems and materials. Moreover, it is also an important precursor for the formation of secondary aerosols in the form of ammonium salts (ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate and ammonium chloride). Previous studies have shown that the vast majority of the ammonia emissions come from the agricultural sector (mostly from livestock farming and fertilizing activities). Other sources such as road transport, waste deposit, energy use and supply can also contribute to the ammonia levels in the urban areas. High concentrations of ammonia are commonly measured at the National Air Pollution Monitoring Network (NABEL) stations in Switzerland. Mobile measurements of ammonia and other pollutants (including BC, CO2, NOx and NR-PM) were conducted in the Wallis region and in Zurich in 2013 to study the spatial distribution of ammonia in Switzerland and identify its major emission sources in these regions. A new heated inlet setup was developed to improve the response time of the ammonia measurements, so that even very local sources could be identified. For both, the Wallis region and Zurich, it was observed that the background values of ammonia have a regional origin, as other pollutants affected by regional changes show similar background trends. These regional background values varied between 5 to 10 ppb during the different days of measurements. Moreover, no big differences were observed in the background values between the city center, the surrounding areas, the highway and the rural areas. The major local source of ammonia observed during these measurements was road transport, producing increases on the NH3 levels up to 4 times the background values. Based on emission factors estimated from tunnel measurements, the traffic was estimated to contribute between 20 -30% of the measured ammonia levels on a daily average in Zurich. Other sources of ammonia that can also contribute significantly to the levels of ammonia

  5. Probabilistic stability evaluation and seismic triggering scenarios of submerged slopes in Lake Zurich (Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strupler, M.; Hilbe, M.; Anselmetti, F. S.; Kopf, A. J.; Fleischmann, T.; Strasser, M.

    2017-01-01

    Subaqueous landslides and their consequences, such as tsunamis, can cause serious damage to offshore infrastructure and coastal communities. Stability analyses of submerged slopes are therefore crucial, yet complex steps for hazard assessment, as many geotechnical and morphological factors need to be considered. Typically, deterministic models with data from a few sampling locations are used for the evaluation of slope stabilities, as high efforts are required to ensure high spatial data coverage. This study presents a simple but flexible approach for the probabilistic stability assessment of subaqueous slopes that takes into account the spatial variability of geotechnical data. The study area ( 2 km2) in Lake Zurich (northern Switzerland) shows three distinct subaquatic landslides with well-defined headscarps, translation areas (i.e. the zone where translational sliding occurred) and mass transport deposits. The ages of the landslides are known ( 2,210 and 640 cal. yr BP, and 1918 AD), and their triggers have been assigned to different mechanisms by previous studies. A combination of geophysical, geotechnical, and sedimentological methods served to analyse the subaquatic slope in great spatial detail: 3.5 kHz pinger seismic reflection data and a 300 kHz multibeam bathymetric dataset (1 m grid) were used for the detection of landslide features and for the layout of a coring and an in situ cone penetration testing campaign. The assignment of geotechnical data to lithological units enabled the construction of a sediment-mechanical stratigraphy that consists of four units, each with characteristic profiles of bulk density and shear strength. The thickness of each mechanical unit can be flexibly adapted to the local lithological unit thicknesses identified from sediment cores and seismic reflection profiles correlated to sediment cores. The sediment-mechanical stratigraphy was used as input for a Monte Carlo simulated limit-equilibrium model on an infinite slope for

  6. Probabilistic stability evaluation and seismic triggering scenarios of submerged slopes in Lake Zurich (Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strupler, M.; Hilbe, M.; Anselmetti, F. S.; Kopf, A. J.; Fleischmann, T.; Strasser, M.

    2017-06-01

    Subaqueous landslides and their consequences, such as tsunamis, can cause serious damage to offshore infrastructure and coastal communities. Stability analyses of submerged slopes are therefore crucial, yet complex steps for hazard assessment, as many geotechnical and morphological factors need to be considered. Typically, deterministic models with data from a few sampling locations are used for the evaluation of slope stabilities, as high efforts are required to ensure high spatial data coverage. This study presents a simple but flexible approach for the probabilistic stability assessment of subaqueous slopes that takes into account the spatial variability of geotechnical data. The study area ( 2 km2) in Lake Zurich (northern Switzerland) shows three distinct subaquatic landslides with well-defined headscarps, translation areas (i.e. the zone where translational sliding occurred) and mass transport deposits. The ages of the landslides are known ( 2,210 and 640 cal. yr BP, and 1918 AD), and their triggers have been assigned to different mechanisms by previous studies. A combination of geophysical, geotechnical, and sedimentological methods served to analyse the subaquatic slope in great spatial detail: 3.5 kHz pinger seismic reflection data and a 300 kHz multibeam bathymetric dataset (1 m grid) were used for the detection of landslide features and for the layout of a coring and an in situ cone penetration testing campaign. The assignment of geotechnical data to lithological units enabled the construction of a sediment-mechanical stratigraphy that consists of four units, each with characteristic profiles of bulk density and shear strength. The thickness of each mechanical unit can be flexibly adapted to the local lithological unit thicknesses identified from sediment cores and seismic reflection profiles correlated to sediment cores. The sediment-mechanical stratigraphy was used as input for a Monte Carlo simulated limit-equilibrium model on an infinite slope for

  7. Emissions of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in Zurich, Switzerland, determined by a combination of measurements and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdal, Christian; Wang, Zhanyun; Buser, Andreas M; Scheringer, Martin; Gerecke, Andreas C; Schmid, Peter; Müller, Claudia E; MacLeod, Matthew; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2014-12-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been widely used as flame retardants but they are of concern and are currently being phased-out because of their environmentally hazardous properties and their potential to cause adverse health effects. We analyzed PBDEs in Zurich, Switzerland, and applied a multi-media environmental fate model to back-calculate the rate of PBDE emission to air. PBDE concentrations in ambient air were measured in summer 2010 and winter 2011 in the city center of Zurich. Concentrations were higher in summer (sum PBDEs 118-591 pg m(-3)) than in winter (sum PBDEs 17-151 pg m(-3)), and are on the upper end of concentrations reported in literature for urban sites with no point sources of PBDEs. The emissions derived from our measurements (summer: 53-165 μg capita(-1) d(-1), winter: 25-112 μg capita(-1) d(-1)) and extrapolated to annual emissions for Switzerland (114-406 kg a(-1)) lie in the middle of ranges reported on the basis of substance flow analyses and emission inventories. The difference between summer and winter emissions is small compared to the difference that would be expected from the temperature dependence of PBDE vapor pressure, which would be consistent with emissions occurring to a large extent from flame-proofed materials located indoors under nearly constant temperature conditions and/or emissions to air occurring by suspension of particles containing PBDEs. Compared to previous studies in Switzerland, concentrations and emissions of PBDEs appear to have increased during the last five years with an increasing contribution of decabromodiphenyl ether, despite the addition of PBDEs to national and international regulations.

  8. Systems Thinking as a Major Skill of Business Students – A New Teaching Concept at the University of Zurich, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Adam

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In our world of growing complexity, linear thinking and the belief that the whole is only the sum of its parts are evidently obsolete. Systems thinking, which promotes a holistic view of reality, is a situation-adequate handling of complex systems, and is therefore one of the most important skills of future executives in the business world. A new teaching concept was introduced one year ago by the Faculty of Business Administration at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. This concept was designed to help the students to develop abilities in thinking in models, operating complex systems and handling dynamic, non-linear situations. By use of a computer-simulated game the business students should gain knowledge about systemic realities and improve their complex-problem-solving skills. In the semester when the newly designed lecture started, the highly motivated class became aware of the problems in dealing with complexity. Documenting any significant improvements in our students' performance in playing the game was not possible, but we observed a change in their behaviour and ways of thinking in situations of complex problem-solving. Some necessary changes and adjustments in the teaching concept were made and the next class will be investigated in autumn 2003.

  9. Variability in SCCmecN1 spreading among injection drug users in Zurich, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCallum Nadine

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An extremely low level methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA belonging to ST45, circulates among intravenous drug users in the Zurich area. This clone can be misinterpreted as an MSSA by phenotypic oxacillin resistance tests, although it carries a staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec element encoding a functional mecA gene and it produces PBP2a. Results This clone carried a new 45.7-kb element, termed SCCmecN1, containing a class B mec complex (mecA-ΔmecR1::IS1272, a truncated Tn4003 harbouring the dfrA gene, and a fusB1 gene, conferring methicillin, trimethoprim and low level fusidic acid resistance, respectively. In addition to the two insertion site sequences (ISS framing the SCCmec, a third ISS (ISS* was identified within the element. SCCmecN1 also harboured two distinct ccrAB complexes belonging to the class 4 subtype, both of which were shown to be active and to be able to excise the SCCmecN1 or parts thereof. Slight variations in the SmaI-PFGE pattern of the clinical MRSA isolates belonging to this clone were traced back to differences in the sizes of the SCCmec J2 regions and/or to a 6.4-kb deletion extending from ISS* to the right end ISS. This latter deletion led to a variant right SCCmec-chromosomal junction site. MRSA clones carrying the shorter SCCmec with the 6.4-kb deletion were usually ciprofloxacin resistant, while strains with the complete SCCmecN1 were co-trimoxazole resistant or had no additional resistances. This suggested that the genetic backbone of the host S. aureus, although identical by PFGE pattern, had at some stage diverged with one branch acquiring a sulfonomide resistance mutation and the other ciprofloxacin resistance. Conclusion This description of the structure and variations of SCCmecN1 will allow for quicker and easier molecular detection of this clone and monitoring of its spread.

  10. Motivation in medical education and patient communication. The EGPRN meeting in Zurich, Switzerland, October 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rethans, Jan-Joost; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert

    2011-06-01

    The European General Practice Research Network held an international research meeting on 'Motivation in medical education and patient communication' in Zürich, Switzerland, in October 2010. The two authors were keynote speakers, who introduced the theme from different angles and summarized and reflected on individual papers presented at the conference. The theme of the conference underlined the importance of communication in general practice and of motivation in medical education in particular. There were a variety of papers each addressing in its own way the topic of this meeting. We conclude that it is still uncommon to use psychological theories on motivation in research on motivation and patient communication in general practice/family medicine. Motivation and readiness to change are essential concepts in experimental health services research. Research designs increasingly follow the Framework for the Evaluation of Complex Interventions in Health Care as suggested by the British Medical Research Council. However, there are also difficulties related to classical experimental designs that have to be critically discussed.

  11. An operational hydrological ensemble prediction system for the city of Zurich (Switzerland: skill, case studies and scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Addor

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Sihl River flows through Zurich, Switzerland's most populated city, for which it represents the largest flood threat. To anticipate extreme discharge events and provide decision support in case of flood risk, a hydrometeorological ensemble prediction system (HEPS was launched operationally in 2008. This model chain relies on limited-area atmospheric forecasts provided by the deterministic model COSMO-7 and the probabilistic model COSMO-LEPS. These atmospheric forecasts are used to force a semi-distributed hydrological model (PREVAH, coupled to a hydraulic model (FLORIS. The resulting hydrological forecasts are eventually communicated to the stakeholders involved in the Sihl discharge management. This fully operational setting provides a real framework with which to compare the potential of deterministic and probabilistic discharge forecasts for flood mitigation.

    To study the suitability of HEPS for small-scale basins and to quantify the added-value conveyed by the probability information, a reforecast was made for the period June 2007 to December 2009 for the Sihl catchment (336 km2. Several metrics support the conclusion that the performance gain can be of up to 2 days lead time for the catchment considered. Brier skill scores show that overall COSMO-LEPS-based hydrological forecasts outperforms their COSMO-7-based counterparts for all the lead times and event intensities considered. The small size of the Sihl catchment does not prevent skillful discharge forecasts, but makes them particularly dependent on correct precipitation forecasts, as shown by comparisons with a reference run driven by observed meteorological parameters. Our evaluation stresses that the capacity of the model to provide confident and reliable mid-term probability forecasts for high discharges is limited. The two most intense events of the study period are investigated utilising a novel graphical representation of probability forecasts, and are used

  12. 6 March 2012 - CERN Director-General R. HEUER holding the keynote speech at NIDays 2012, Zurich, Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    Balle, Ch

    2012-01-01

    15e congrès des technologies et des experts pour la technique de la mesure et de l’automatisation par ordinateur.Pour la 15ème fois, le congrès des technologies et des experts « NIDays » qui eut lieu le 6 mars 2012 au Swissôtel à Zurich, a enthousiasmé près de 400 visiteurs.Prof. Heuer. lors du discours d'ouveture, a présente le centre de recherche CERN et décrit le potentiel de découverte du LHC pour la physique tout en mentionnant les résultats les plus importants de la première collecte de données. Le LHC fonctionne avec l'aide de plusieurs centaines de systèmes PXI. Ceux-ci font en sorte que les particules qui sortent du cœur de rayonnement soient absorbées. Grâce à LabVIEW Real-Time et LabVIEW FPGA, environ 600 moteurs sont synchronisés à la milliseconde le long des 27 km de l'accélérateur.

  13. Changing School Architecture in Zurich

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Mark; Kurz, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Changes in the way education is delivered has contributed to the evolution of school architecture in Zurich, Switzerland. The City of Zurich has revised its guidelines for designing school buildings, both new and old. Adapting older buildings to today's needs presents a particular challenge. The authors explain what makes up a good school building…

  14. Energy strategy for ETH Zurich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulouchos, K.; Casciaro, C.; Froehlich, K.; Hellweg, S.; Leibundgut, J.; Spreng, D. (eds.)

    2008-04-15

    This report published by the Energy Science Center (ESC) at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich, Switzerland, reports on how the Energy Science Center of the ETH Zurich embarked on the task of adjusting its plans for future energy-related teaching and research to match the magnitude of the challenges in the national and global arena. Strategic considerations for a future sustainable energy system as well as an assessment of the ETH's strengths and its prospects for continuing research in areas highly relevant for the future are dealt with. It is noted that the Energy Science Center has contributed significantly to the integration of specialists and disciplines and has already become indispensable for the co-ordination of energy-relevant activities in research and teaching at the ETH in Zurich. Strategic goals are discussed, as are the challenges placed on the centre. Research done in the areas of energy supply and its use are discussed, as are interactions with society and the environment. Energy education at the ETH is examined and visions for a transformation path are discussed, as are the implications for the ETH itself.

  15. Receptor modeling of C2─C7 hydrocarbon sources at an urban background site in Zurich, Switzerland: changes between 1993─1994 and 2005─2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Reimann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Hourly measurements of 13 volatile hydrocarbons (C2–C7 were performed at an urban background site in Zurich (Switzerland in the years 1993–1994 and again in 2005–2006. For the separation of the volatile organic compounds by gas-chromatography (GC, an identical chromatographic column was used in both campaigns. Changes in hydrocarbon profiles and source strengths were recovered by positive matrix factorization (PMF. Eight and six factors could be related to hydrocarbon sources in 1993–1994 and in 2005–2006, respectively. The modeled source profiles were verified by hydrocarbon profiles reported in the literature. The source strengths were validated by independent measurements, such as inorganic trace gases (NOx, CO, SO2, methane (CH4, oxidized hydrocarbons (OVOCs and meteorological data (temperature, wind speed etc.. Our analysis suggests that the contribution of most hydrocarbon sources (i.e. road traffic, solvents use and wood burning decreased by a factor of about two to three between the early 1990s and 2005–2006. On the other hand, hydrocarbon losses from natural gas leakage remained at relatively constant levels (−20%. The estimated emission trends are in line with the results from different receptor-based approaches reported for other European cities. Their differences to national emission inventories are discussed.

  16. Renewal strategies for old industrial areas in the post-industrial age——Take "Zurich-West" in Switzerland as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Hong; ZHANG SiWei

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces and analyses the renewal planning of "Zurich-West", an old industrial area. It points out that systematic and comprehensive target orientation, extensive collaboration in argumen-tation and decision-making, and the design ideas of coexistence and integration are the key to its success. Considering the status quo of China's old industrial district remodeling, the paper offers some suggestions.

  17. Renewal strategies for old industrial areas in the post-industrial age——Take "Zurich-West" in Switzerland as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces and analyses the renewal planning of "Zurich-West" ,an old industrial area. It points out that systematic and comprehensive target orientation,extensive collaboration in argumentation and decision-making,and the design ideas of coexistence and integration are the key to its success. Considering the status quo of China’s old industrial district remodeling,the paper offers some suggestions.

  18. Switzerland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleri Jørgensen, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    The book answers ten delay-related questions when the FIDIC Red Book (internationally recognized standard construction contract) is subjected to the law of twelve different countries. Sylvie Cavaleri wrote the chapter concerning Switzerland.......The book answers ten delay-related questions when the FIDIC Red Book (internationally recognized standard construction contract) is subjected to the law of twelve different countries. Sylvie Cavaleri wrote the chapter concerning Switzerland....

  19. Switzerland Committed to Innovation. The Swiss Network of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrade von Bremen

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Switzerland showed its commitment to innovation in health care since the early 80th, implementing agencies and government units with the mission to promote and to appropriately govern innovation. The Swiss Network of Technology Assessment (SNHTA was founded in 1998.

    The aim is the promotion and implementation of Health Technology Assessment projects in Switzerland by providing a neutral forum for the identification and the pursuit of common interests. This includes the coordination, exchange and dissemination of experiences of HTA projects and the implementation of the results. The collaboration in international projects is a priority. Ultimately SNHTA has the goal to improve efficacy, cost effectiveness and social accountability. An inventory survey amongst the members confirmed a high level of diverse specialised competencies, mainly employed within the institution. Only 20% of the HTA specific competencies are used for external activities.

    The need for integration of all partners in the field of innovation in a network has been recognised by the Swiss government. This lead to the creation of a webplatform in which all players involved in the business of medical technologies are involved.

    This platform (swiss medtech, includes patients, insurers, industry, universities and professional organisations. The joined activities include agreements on intellectual property and the integrated patient care chain. New ways to connect players in innovation are needed to face the challenge of increasing costs and diminishing resources.

  20. ZAP: Zurich Atmosphere Purge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Kurt T.; Lilly, Simon J.; Bacon, Roland; Richard, Johan; Conseil, Simon

    2016-02-01

    ZAP (Zurich Atmosphere Purge) provides sky subtraction for integral field spectroscopy; its approach is based on principal component analysis (PCA) developed for the Multi Unit Spectrographic Explorer (MUSE) integral field spectrograph. ZAP employs filtering and data segmentation to enhance the inherent capabilities of PCA for sky subtraction. ZAP reduces sky emission residuals while robustly preserving the flux and line shapes of astronomical sources; this method works in a variety of observational situations from sparse fields with a low density of sources to filled fields in which the target source fills the field of view. With the inclusion of both of these situations the method is generally applicable to many different science cases and should also be useful for other instrumentation.

  1. A Decade of a Freeze on Appointments: The Case of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), Zurich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursprung, H.

    1986-01-01

    Factors promoting excellence in a technical university and requirements for obtaining or maintaining it are examined, and the problems encountered by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in achieving excellence in a decade of retrenchment are discussed. (MSE)

  2. ETH Zurich tour at CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Right to left: Thomas Wobmann and Markus Zemp visit the LHC tunnel at CERN with G nther Dissertori and Marcel Wyler of ETH Zurich. Their visit was part of the top prize for a competition organised by the ETH department of physics to coincide with its open day in June. Residents of Zurich and surrounding Swiss cantons were invited to answer five physics questions broadcast on local radio and the Internet the week before the open day. The two winners' reward for knowing who did not believe that God plays dice, among other things, was a flight offered by Swiss International Air Lines to Geneva and a VIP tour of CERN. One highlight was a trip to the underground site of the future CMS experiment, where the scale of the enormous cavern makes construction machines look like children's toys.

  3. Solar heating system with seasonal storage for the 'Heumatt' housing development in Zurich; Solare Waermeversorgung mit saisonalem Speicher fuer die Wohnsiedlung Heumatt, Zuerich Seebach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, P.; Juzi, H.

    2003-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy describes a project proposal for the seasonal storage of heat produced by solar collectors to provide a fifty-percent coverage of the space heating and hot water demands of a housing scheme with 140 dwellings in Zurich, Switzerland. The report describes the project, including the collection of solar energy and the storage of heat in an underground storage area. Figures are given on the estimates of energy requirements and energy production. The investments needed for the realisation of the project are quoted. The report also includes a detailed report on the concept and reviews of the project made by the University of Applied Technology in Winterthur and that of Southern Switzerland.

  4. Procedures for Preventing Juvenile Violence in Switzerland: The Zurich Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endrass, Jerome; Rossegger, Astrid; Urbaniok, Frank; Laubacher, Arja; Pierce, Christine Schnyder; Moskvitin, Konstantin

    2011-01-01

    The Swiss legal system places strong emphasis on risk assessment and treatment of potentially violent offenders. Especially after the 2001 Zug massacre, there is close cooperation between the judicial and mental health systems to prevent violence through early detection and intervention. A case study of a risk management program for a dangerous…

  5. Evidence as Source of Power in School Reforms: The Quest for the Extension of Compulsory Education in Zurich

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imlig, Flavian; Ruoss, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the use of evidence in educational policy and politics, and how this use has changed over time. Using an analytical framework that combines research approaches from both political and educational science, evidence-related arguments in two major school reforms in the canton of Zurich, Switzerland are described. In…

  6. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-29

    Accelerated The discovery of perovskite -based superconductivity substances by Müller of IBM Zurich Research Institute in Switzerland created the...intensity of 10 roentgens per hour. For this effort, the Institute is earmarking 69 million yen from this year’s budget. Nuclear power plants have a...development of a basic technology toward the construction of a harsh environment sensor system capable of withstanding a radiation rate of 10 roentgens

  7. [SUVA (Swiss Accident Insurance Fund) and silicosis. Silicosis in Switzerland. Development of technological dust control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachofen, G

    1983-01-01

    In Switzerland the technical measures against quartz dust started in 1948 when wet drilling was compulsoryly introduced, initially in underground mining. The miners using the first wet drilling machines had serious problems with water, and only with the introduction of carriage drilling machines in 1963 did the method fully break through. Dust caused by blasting operations and by loading of the resultant material was limited by ventilation and sprinkling of water. In 1966 the first full-face cutting machines were used, and it was necessary to install a dust chamber behind the drill from which dust could be taken to a dust arrester. The problem of dust limitation when using boom cutters at sectional areas of more than 20 sq. meters without a pilot tunnel has not been resolved. Since 1970, dust in quarries and stone-cutter workshops has been successfully combated by the use of exhaust pumps in combination with filters. The use of quartz sand to clean metal pieces (sandblast) was forbidden in 1960. Today, materials of the same value, but quartz-free, are available. In foundries, dust production can be limited by continuous automation and installation of exhaust pumps in moulding units. For more than 30 years now the technical equipment has been available for successful prevention of quartz dust emissions. However, at some plants it is still difficult to persuade the personnel to use the protective equipment.

  8. Transforming Critical Spreadsheets into Web Applications at Zurich Financial

    CERN Document Server

    Dewhurst, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    In the insurance industry, spreadsheets have emerged as an invaluable tool to for product pricing, because it is relatively straightforward to create and maintain complex pricing models using Excel. In fact, Excel is often preferred to "hard-code" whenever there are frequent changes to the calculations and business logic which under-pin the pricing of an insurance product. However, problems arise as soon as spreadsheets are deployed to end-users: version control, security of intellectual property, and ensuring correct usage are obvious issues; frequently, integration with other systems is also a requirement. Zurich Financial Services Group is a leading financial services provider; several possible solutions to these problems have been evaluated, and EASA has been selected as the preferred technology. Other spreadsheet collaboration approaches which were considered include Excel Services, and/or custom-built software; however, EASA has provided clear benefits over these strategies.

  9. Biotech 2011 conference Zurich University of applied sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuth, Caspar

    2011-01-01

    More than 160 experts from industry and academia came together this September for the Biotech 2011 at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW) in Wädenswil. As one of the main topics, the conference addressed innovations in sensor technology, where new measurement principles and methods have helped to enhance robustness and user friendliness. Another main emphasis of Biotech 2011 was the application of sensors and related analytical techniques in bioprocesses. In this area, the sensor industry needs to meet the challenges introduced by the increasing use of single-use bioreactors. With its strong focus on sensor applications, Biotech 2011 successfully promoted interaction between professionals in academic and industrial research as well as with experts who apply sensors in biopharmaceutical production.

  10. Creation and development of energy technologies and energy-policy support in Switzerland; Generierung und Uebernahme von Energietechnologien und energiepolitische Foerderung in der Schweiz - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvanitis, S.; Ley, M.

    2010-08-15

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents and discusses the results of the 2009 Energy Technology Survey and the factors determining the adoption of energy-saving technologies in Swiss companies. Also, innovations in the area of energy efficiency and public support for energy efficiency technologies in Switzerland are discussed. This research project relies on a unique survey of Swiss enterprises in order to provide empirical insights on some relevant issues concerning the generation and use of energy-efficient technology. One of the questions addressed is: What are the determinants for the widespread adoption and application of such new technologies, once they have reached maturity?.

  11. An LCA model for waste incineration enhanced with new technologies for metal recovery and application to the case of Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, Michael E; Vadenbo, Carl; Saner, Dominik; Huter, Christoph; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2014-02-01

    A process model of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) and new technologies for metal recovery from combustion residues was developed. The environmental impact is modeled as a function of waste composition as well as waste treatment and material recovery technologies. The model includes combustion with a grate incinerator, several flue gas treatment technologies, electricity and steam production from waste heat recovery, metal recovery from slag and fly ash, and landfilling of residues and can be tailored to specific plants and sites (software tools can be downloaded free of charge). Application of the model to Switzerland shows that the treatment of one tonne of municipal solid waste results on average in 425 kg CO2-eq. generated in the incineration process, and 54 kg CO2-eq. accrue in upstream processes such as waste transport and the production of operating materials. Downstream processes, i.e. residue disposal, generates 5 kg CO2-eq. Savings from energy recovery are in the range of 67 to 752 kg CO2-eq. depending on the assumptions regarding the substituted energy production, while the recovery of metals from slag and fly ash currently results in a net saving of approximately 35 kg CO2-eq. A similar impact pattern is observed when assessing the MSWI model for aggregated environmental impacts (ReCiPe) and for non-renewable resource consumption (cumulative exergy demand), except that direct emissions have less and no relevance, respectively, on the total score. The study illustrates that MSWI plants can be an important element of industrial ecology as they provide waste disposal services and can help to close material and energetic cycles.

  12. The 2015 Annual Meeting of SETAC German Language Branch in Zurich (7–10 September, 2015): Ecotoxicology and environmental chemistry—from research to application

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Inge; Aldrich, Annette; Becker, Benjamin; Becker, Dennis; Brinkmann, Markus; Burkhardt, Michael; Caspers, Norbert; Campiche, Sophie; Chèvre, Nathalie; Düring, Rolf‑Alexander; Escher, Beate I.; Fischer, Fabian; Giebner, Sabrina; Heye, Katharina; Hollert, Henner [Hrsg.

    2016-01-01

    This report provides a brief review of the 20th annual meeting of the German Language Branch of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC GLB) held from September 7th to 10th 2015 at ETH (Swiss Technical University) in Zurich, Switzerland. The event was chaired by Inge Werner, Director of the Swiss Centre for Applied Ecotoxicology (Ecotox Centre) Eawag-EPFL, and organized by a team from Ecotox Centre, Eawag, Federal Office of the Environment, Federal Office of Agriculture, ...

  13. Writing on Pigments in Natural History and Art Technology in Sixteenth-Century Germany and Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltrogge, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Renaissance painters used a number of inorganic color materials. The development of mineralogy as a discipline opened a new discourse on mineral pigments. Agricola and other naturalists were familiar with the contemporary writings on art technology, but their focus was different. Therefore, the exchange of knowledge between these two color worlds remained selective. One possible meeting point was the Kunstkammer where the study of natural objects and materials was combined with an interest in the manual execution of a painting.

  14. An LCA model for waste incineration enhanced with new technologies for metal recovery and application to the case of Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boesch, Michael E. [Aveny GmbH, Schwandenholzstr. 212, CH-8046 Zürich (Switzerland); Vadenbo, Carl, E-mail: vadenbo@ifu.baug.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Schafmattstrasse 6, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Saner, Dominik [Swiss Post, Communications, Politics and Social Responsibility, Viktoriastrasse 21, P.O. Box, CH-3030 Berne (Switzerland); Huter, Christoph [City of Zürich, ERZ Entsorgung - Recycling Zürich, Hagenholzstrasse 110, P.O. Box, CH-8050 Zürich (Switzerland); Hellweg, Stefanie [ETH Zurich, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Schafmattstrasse 6, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • An enhanced process-based LCA model for MSWI is featured and applied in case study. • LCA modeling of recent technological developments for metal recovery from fly ash. • Net release from Swiss MSWI 133 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne waste from attributional LCA perspective. • Net savings from a consequential LCA perspective reach up to 303 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne waste. • Impacts according to ReCiPe and CExD show similar pattern to climate change. - Abstract: A process model of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) and new technologies for metal recovery from combustion residues was developed. The environmental impact is modeled as a function of waste composition as well as waste treatment and material recovery technologies. The model includes combustion with a grate incinerator, several flue gas treatment technologies, electricity and steam production from waste heat recovery, metal recovery from slag and fly ash, and landfilling of residues and can be tailored to specific plants and sites (software tools can be downloaded free of charge). Application of the model to Switzerland shows that the treatment of one tonne of municipal solid waste results on average in 425 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. generated in the incineration process, and 54 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. accrue in upstream processes such as waste transport and the production of operating materials. Downstream processes, i.e. residue disposal, generates 5 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Savings from energy recovery are in the range of 67 to 752 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. depending on the assumptions regarding the substituted energy production, while the recovery of metals from slag and fly ash currently results in a net saving of approximately 35 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. A similar impact pattern is observed when assessing the MSWI model for aggregated environmental impacts (ReCiPe) and for non-renewable resource consumption (cumulative exergy demand), except that direct emissions have less and no relevance, respectively, on the total

  15. CO{sub 2} emissions of newly homologated private cars in Switzerland: EU orientation; CO{sub 2}-Emissionen der PW-Neuzulassungen der Schweiz: Orientierung an der EU - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haan, P. de

    2009-05-15

    In this final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE), the Institute for Environmental Decisions at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH in Zurich reports on the carbon dioxide emissions of newly homologated vehicles in Switzerland. The report examines if, how, until when and with which pricing-signals Switzerland can adopt the EU's strategy for attaining an average CO{sub 2} emission rate of 130 g/km for newly homologated vehicles. It is noted that the Swiss car market is completely integrated into the EU market. The models used are looked at and demand-side tools such as models on the basis of sanctions and certificates are considered. Further points examined include measures for attaining a further 10 g/km saving, as well as rebound effects and economic feasibility aspects. Finally, monitoring using annual data for result-checking and Swiss joint CO{sub 2} monitoring reporting are discussed.

  16. The practice of analytical psychotherapy, counselling and examination. Institute for legal psychology, Uster (Zurich, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinfried H.-W.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Psychotherapy is often regarded as a technique by which convicts can be changed in accordance with the wishes of society. Independent client activity is paid too little attention to. However, it is the one on which it depends whether the therapeutic work will begin, as well as the extent to which the client will be able to transfer the acquired in the course of the therapy awareness so that it can last after his release from a prison. In order to check how deep the mental changes are, you can use some analytical therapeutic approaches that help the therapist to control the process. Therapeutic interventions of different psychological schools make it possible to enhance a customer and to stimulate his activity

  17. Age and gender as independent predictors of violence under the influence of alcohol in Zurich, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mica, Ladislav; Oesterle, Linda; Werner, Clément M L; Simmen, Hans-Peter

    2015-04-08

    Violent behaviour associated with alcohol consumption is frequently reported by different media. Clinical data analysing the correlation between alcohol intoxication, age, gender and violence are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of age, gender and blood alcohol content on violent behaviour under the influence of alcohol under central European conditions. Three hundred patients admitted to the emergency department were included into this study in the time period from January 01. to December 31. 2009. The inclusion criteria were a blood alcohol content (BAC) of ≥10 mmol/l, any traumatic injury and an age ≥16 years. Violence was defined as an evitable act committed by others leading to patient's hospitalisation. The data were compared with Wilcoxon and χ2-test for proportions. The data were considered as significant if pviolence with no correlation to blood alcohol content found. Logistic regression analysis revealed male gender and young age as an independent predictor for violence. These results clarify the relationship between alcohol, age, gender and violence and have important implications for municipal-level alcohol policies.

  18. Einstein and Besso: from Z\\"urich to Milano

    OpenAIRE

    Bracco, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The 1896-1901 Milanese period is a key one to understand Einstein's training background. When he was a student at the ETH in Z\\"urich (the Swiss Federal Polytechnic in Z\\"urich) from 1896 to 1900, he would make regular trips back to Milan to stay with his family who was involved in the development of the electricity industry in northern Italy. Between 1899 and 1901, he would meet his faithful friend and collaborator, Michele Besso in Milan on a regular basis. Given their relationship, the 189...

  19. [First cases of besnoitiosis in cattle in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, M; Braun, U; Deplazes, P; Gottstein, B; Hilbe, M; Basso, W

    2012-11-01

    Bovine besnoitiosis has been diagnosed in neighboring countries but not in Switzerland so far. This disease occurs endemically in France and focal outbreaks have been reported in Germany and Italy. To determine if Besnoitia besnoiti is introduced into Switzerland through the import of breeding cattle from France, a systematic serological survey was performed. A total of 412 breeding cattle (from 114 farms) imported from France into Switzerland between 2005 and 2011, were serologically examined for antibodies against B. besnoiti using a commercial ELISA kit (PrioCHECK© Besnoitia Ab 2.0, Prionics AG, Zurich, Switzerland). Sixty-four (15.5 %) animals reacted positive in ELISA. The serologic diagnosis was confirmed by an indirect immunfluorescence test (IFAT) and a Western blot (WB) in only 2 Limousin cows imported from France on a farm in Eastern Switzerland. Subsequently, this whole herd (n = 16) was examined clinically and serologically and 2 additional Limousin cows imported from Germany also reacted positive in the three serological tests. One of these cows presented B. besnoiti tissue cysts in the scleral conjunctiva and typical skin lesions in the head region. The infection was further confirmed cytologically, histopathologically and by PCR. It can be concluded that the parasite is most likely being introduced into Switzerland through the import of infected animals.

  20. Sustainable development in city districts: BaLaLuZ project - Gruenau Zurich; Schlussbericht Quartier Gruenau/Siedlung Bernerstrasse/Werdwies, Zuerich - Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, W.; Kaufmann, Y.; Arend, M.

    2004-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) is one of a series of reports concerning municipal development in various cities in Switzerland. The four city districts involved include Basel (Gundeldinger Feld), Lausanne (Bellevaux), Lucerne (Basel-/Bernstrasse) and Zurich (Werdwies). This final report summarises the results of the first phase of the project concerning the Bernerstrasse/Werdwies estate in western Zurich. The results of an analysis of the present situation are presented that cover social aspects, residential buildings and their heating using waste heat from sewage, economical factors and, also, mobility and urban planning aspects. The replacement of a residential estate with new buildings is looked at from the energy and ecological viewpoints. Measures to be taken are suggested and recommendations for projects are made.

  1. Sustainable development in city districts: BaLaLuZ project - Gruenau Zurich; Schlussbericht Quartier Gruenau/Siedlung Bernerstrasse/Werdwies, Zuerich - Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, W.; Kaufmann, Y.; Arend, M.

    2004-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) is one of a series of reports concerning municipal development in various cities in Switzerland. The four city districts involved include Basel (Gundeldinger Feld), Lausanne (Bellevaux), Lucerne (Basel-/Bernstrasse) and Zurich (Werdwies). This final report summarises the results of the first phase of the project concerning the Bernerstrasse/Werdwies estate in western Zurich. The results of an analysis of the present situation are presented that cover social aspects, residential buildings and their heating using waste heat from sewage, economical factors and, also, mobility and urban planning aspects. The replacement of a residential estate with new buildings is looked at from the energy and ecological viewpoints. Measures to be taken are suggested and recommendations for projects are made.

  2. Switzerland: the pragmatics of business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestetti, Gilberto

    2008-01-01

    Switzerland has a population of seven million and approximately 600 medical technology companies are located there. This equates to one company per 12 thousand people and arguably the highest density in the world. The factors that make the country a successful place to do business are outlined in this interview with Professor Bestetti, Head of the CTI Medtech initiative.

  3. Simulating the dispersion of NOx and CO2 in the city of Zurich at building resolving scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Dominik; Berchet, Antoine; Emmenegger, Lukas; Henne, Stephan; Müller, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Cities are emission hotspots for both greenhouse gases and air pollutants. They contribute about 70% of global greenhouse gas emissions and are home to a growing number of people potentially suffering from poor air quality in the urban environment. High-resolution atmospheric transport modelling of greenhouse gases and air pollutants at the city scale has, therefore, several important applications such as air pollutant exposure assessment, air quality forecasting, or urban planning and management. When combined with observations, it also has the potential to quantify emissions and monitor their long-term trends, which is the main motivation for the deployment of urban greenhouse gas monitoring networks. We have developed a comprehensive atmospheric modeling model system for the city of Zurich, Switzerland ( 600,000 inhabitants including suburbs), which is composed of the mesoscale model GRAMM simulating the flow in a larger domain around Zurich at 100 m resolution, and the nested high-resolution model GRAL simulating the flow and air pollutant dispersion in the city at building resolving (5-10 m) scale. Based on an extremely detailed emission inventory provided by the municipality of Zurich, we have simulated two years of hourly NOx and CO2 concentration fields across the entire city. Here, we present a detailed evaluation of the simulations against a comprehensive network of continuous monitoring sites and passive samplers for NOx and analyze the sensitivity of the results to the temporal variability of the emissions. Furthermore, we present first simulations of CO2 and investigate the challenges associated with CO2 sources not covered by the inventory such as human respiration and exchange fluxes with urban vegetation.

  4. Sustainable development in the Gruenau-Werdwies quarter, Zurich; Nachhaltige Quartierentwicklung Gruenau-Werdwies Zuerich; Auswirkungen der Ersatzneubauten Bernerstrasse Werdwies - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenny, A.; Ott, W.

    2009-12-15

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) examines the effects of new, replacement residential buildings in the Bernerstrasse in Zurich, Switzerland. The authors state that this replacement development project is exemplary for sustainable residential development, incorporating ecological solutions for building and mobility, addressing financial and social aspects and allowing resident participation. The report includes the results of surveys made among the residents of the area and compares the Werdwies quarter with the whole area's social structures and mobility aspects. The quarter's energy consumption is discussed on the basis of a result checking survey. Finally, the findings of the project are discussed.

  5. Herd level antimicrobial resistance in beef calves in Switzerland 1986 through 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Hässig, Michael; Eugster, Sabine; Lewis, Fraser I.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing emergence of antimicrobial resistance in food animals is a growing global concern and is closely linked to animal husbandry practices. In this study we describe the changement of antimicrobial resistance in beef calf production in Switzerland from 1986 through 2011. Data were collected from farms with known calf herd problems, such as diarrhoea or pneumonia, along with antimicrobial resistance from those herds. The Herd Health section of the University of Zurich visited each...

  6. Herd level antimicrobial resistance in beef calves in Switzerland 1986 through 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Hässig, Michael; Eugster, Sarina; Lewis, Frazer Iain

    2014-01-01

    The increasing emergence of antimicrobial resistance in food animals is a growing global concern and is closely linked to animal husbandry practices. In this study we describe the changement of antimicrobial resistance in beef calf production in Switzerland from 1986 through 2011. Data were collected from farms with known calf herd problems, such as diarrhoea or pneumonia, along with antimicrobial resistance from those herds. The Herd Health Section of the University of Zu-rich visited each f...

  7. Einstein and Besso: from Z\\"urich to Milano

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The 1896-1901 Milanese period is a key one to understand Einstein's training background. When he was a student at the ETH in Z\\"urich (the Swiss Federal Polytechnic in Z\\"urich) from 1896 to 1900, he would make regular trips back to Milan to stay with his family who was involved in the development of the electricity industry in northern Italy. Between 1899 and 1901, he would meet his faithful friend and collaborator, Michele Besso in Milan on a regular basis. Given their relationship, the 1899-1901 Milanese period therefore foreshadowed the Bern period later in 1904. In order to specify the circumstances under which Einstein and Besso got the chance to meet, we will show that their respective families did have interconnected social networks, especially through the electricity sector and the polytechnic engineering Universities of Z\\"urich and Milan. The branch of the Cantoni family, on Michele's mother's side, rather ignored by now, played a crucial role: with Vittorio Cantoni, a renowned electrical engineer ...

  8. The New Law Library of the University of Zurich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Strehler

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the new Law Library that was opened to the public in 2004. It was integrated in the courtyard of an existing building; its creator was the engineer and architect Santiago Calatrava. The article touches first on the historical background of the building, then gives an outline of the project development. It goes on to explain some of the ecological and energy-saving measures and finally demonstrates the building itself; as the building cannot be 'explained' the demonstration comes in the form of a running commentary on the slides that were shown at the presentation during the LIBER Architecture seminar in Utrecht. The presentation itself is on the web: href="http://www.zhbluzern.ch/LIBER-LAG/PP_LAG_06/Thursday/Strehler_ZH-RWI-oA.pdf" René Strehler was project manager for the Building Department of the Canton of Zurich, during the construction activities. The Building Department of the Canton of Zurich acted on behalf of the Law Faculty of the University of Zurich.

  9. Two speeches that changed the world: from Fulton to Zurich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan John Watson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this extract from his new book Churchill’s Legacy: Two Speeches to Save the World (Watson, 2016, Lord Watson of Richmond draws on his own experience of post war British politics, as a television presenter and media commentator and then as a Liberal Peer and Chairman of the English-Speaking Union, to analyse the significance of Churchill’s Zurich speech of 19 September 1946. He argues that, building on Churchill’s earlier speech at Fulton, Missouri, it helped change the perceptions of the West and alter their response to the emerging Cold War and the future of Europe.

  10. Groundwater Temperature in the Limmat Valley Aquifer, Zurich

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Martin; Rivera, Jaime; Blum, Philipp; Bayer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    In metropolitan areas, the thermal environment is strongly influenced by the effects of urbanization. Urban climate is often described by Urban Heat Islands (UHIs), which are also observed in the shallow subsurface. On the one hand, these temperature anomalies may put sustainable development of urban ground at a risk, but on the other hand, enhanced ground temperatures represent potential energy reservoirs. In this contribution, we focus on the role of hydrogeological conditions for the development subsurface UHIs. As a study case, the Limmat valley forming the city center of Zurich is chosen. The Limmat valley is filled with widely heterogeneous, high-conductive moraine deposits, which host groundwater reaching close to the urban surface. By rigorous temperature-depth metering of the Limmat valley aquifer since the summer of 2013, and by compiling previously measured data, the intensity of Zurich's subsurface UHI is examined. This is done with respect to its special hydrogeology, which is dominated by large-scale infiltrations from the rivers Limmat and Sihl. These generate seasonal temperature variations in the groundwater, with increasing amplitudes in the vicinity of the rivers. The seasonal groundwater temperature changes in the Limmat valley are assessed by complementing measurements from summer and winter. The measurements reveal that groundwater temperatures in Zurich are generally high. Across the Limmat valley, values of beyond 13°C are regionally observed, which is around 4 K higher than annual surface air temperature and around 3 K higher than groundwater temperature in the rural surrounding. Though, urbanization is interpreted as a secondary factor (1-1.5K), as the river infiltration naturally causes high groundwater temperatures in the Limmat valley. In the permeable gravel, the temperature-depth-profiles measured in city wells often show little fluctuation. This may be due to horizontal and vertical mixing of the groundwater, and reflects the

  11. Transition of the Sunspot Number from Zurich to Brussels in 1980: A Personal Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenflo, J. O.

    2016-11-01

    The Swiss Federal Observatory, which had been founded in 1863 by Rudolf Wolf, was dissolved in connection with the retirement of Max Waldmeier in 1979. The determination of the Zurich sunpot number, which had been a cornerstone activity of the observatory, was then discontinued by ETH Zurich. A smooth transition of the responsibility for the sunspot number from Zurich to Brussels was achieved in 1980, however, through which it was possible to avoid a discontinuity in this important time series. Here we describe the circumstances that led to the termination in Zurich, how Brussels was chosen for the succession, and how the transfer was accomplished.

  12. Research councils facing new science and technology : the case of nanotechnology in Finland, the Netherlands, Norway and Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Most, F.V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis investigates how research funding organizations (RFOs) respond to a new emerging field of science and technology. It takes nanoscience and nanotechnology (nanotechnology for short) as its case and compares the responses of RFOs in Finland, the Netherlands, Norway and Finland.

  13. 1 November 2012 - Signature of the Co-operation Agreement between the Administrative Department of Science, Technology and Innovation (COLCIENCIAS) of Colombia and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics and related technologies by CERN Director-General R. Heuer, witnessed by Ambassador of Colombia to Switzerland C. Turbay Quintero.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    1 November 2012 - Signature of the Co-operation Agreement between the Administrative Department of Science, Technology and Innovation (COLCIENCIAS) of Colombia and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics and related technologies by CERN Director-General R. Heuer, witnessed by Ambassador of Colombia to Switzerland C. Turbay Quintero.

  14. Implementation of early intensive behavioural intervention for children with autism in Switzerland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studer, Nadja; Gundelfinger, Ronnie; Schenker, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a major gap between the US and most European countries regarding the implementation of early intensive behavioural intervention (EIBI) for children with autism. The present paper reports on the current status of EIBI in Switzerland and on the effectiveness of EIBI under...... clinical conditions in a Swiss pilot project. METHODS: The paper combines a narrative report of the care system for children with autism in Switzerland and an initial evaluation of EIBI as implemented in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Zurich. RESULTS: The current situation...... of the implementation of EIBI for children with autism in Switzerland is characterized by marked deficits in its acceptance. Major reasons include insufficient governmental approval and lacking legal and financial support. In addition, ignorance among health care providers and educational professionals has contributed...

  15. GEM-E3: A computable general equilibrium model applied for Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahn, O. [Paul Scherrer Inst., CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Frei, C. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) and Paul Scherrer Inst. (Switzerland)

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of the European Research Project GEM-E3-ELITE, funded by the European Commission and coordinated by the Centre for European Economic Research (Germany), were to further develop the general equilibrium model GEM-E3 (Capros et al., 1995, 1997) and to conduct policy analysis through case studies. GEM-E3 is an applied general equilibrium model that analyses the macro-economy and its interaction with the energy system and the environment through the balancing of energy supply and demand, atmospheric emissions and pollution control, together with the fulfillment of overall equilibrium conditions. PSI's research objectives within GEM-E3-ELITE were to implement and apply GEM-E3 for Switzerland. The first objective required in particular the development of a Swiss database for each of GEM-E3 modules (economic module and environmental module). For the second objective, strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions were evaluated for Switzerland. In order to develop the economic, PSI collaborated with the Laboratory of Applied Economics (LEA) of the University of Geneva and the Laboratory of Energy Systems (LASEN) of the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL). The Swiss Federal Statistical Office (SFSO) and the Institute for Business Cycle Research (KOF) of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich) contributed also data. The Swiss environmental database consists mainly of an Energy Balance Table and of an Emission Coefficients Table. Both were designed using national and international official statistics. The Emission Coefficients Table is furthermore based on know-how of the PSI GaBE Project. Using GEM-E3 Switzerland, two strategies to reduce the Swiss CO{sub 2} emissions were evaluated: a carbon tax ('tax only' strategy), and the combination of a carbon tax with the buying of CO{sub 2} emission permits ('permits and tax' strategy). In the first strategy, Switzerland would impose the necessary carbon tax to achieve

  16. The KULTURisk Regional Risk Assessment methodology for water-related natural hazards - Part 2: Application to the Zurich case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, P.; Bullo, M.; Torresan, S.; Critto, A.; Olschewski, R.; Zappa, M.; Marcomini, A.

    2014-07-01

    The main objective of the paper is the application of the KULTURisk Regional Risk Assessment (KR-RRA) methodology, presented in the companion paper (Part 1, Ronco et al., 2014), to the Sihl River valley, in Switzerland. Through a tuning process of the methodology to the site-specific context and features, flood related risks have been assessed for different receptors lying on the Sihl River valley including the city of Zurich, which represents a typical case of river flooding in urban area. After characterizing the peculiarities of the specific case study, risk maps have been developed under a 300 years return period scenario (selected as baseline) for six identified relevant targets, exposed to flood risk in the Sihl valley, namely: people, economic activities (including buildings, infrastructures and agriculture), natural and semi-natural systems and cultural heritage. Finally, the total risk index map, which allows to identify and rank areas and hotspots at risk by means of Multi Criteria Decision Analysis tools, has been produced to visualize the spatial pattern of flood risk within the area of study. By means of a tailored participative approach, the total risk maps supplement the consideration of technical experts with the (essential) point of view of the relevant stakeholders for the appraisal of the specific scores and weights related to the receptor-relative risks. The total risk maps obtained for the Sihl River case study are associated with the lower classes of risk. In general, higher relative risks are concentrated in the deeply urbanized area within and around the Zurich city centre and areas that rely just behind to the Sihl River course. Here, forecasted injuries and potential fatalities are mainly due to high population density and high presence of old (vulnerable) people; inundated buildings are mainly classified as continuous and discontinuous urban fabric; flooded roads, pathways and railways, the majority of them referring to the Zurich main

  17. Spatial variation of chemical composition and sources of submicron aerosol in Zurich: factor analysis of mobile aerosol mass spectrometer data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mohr

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile measurements of PM1 (PM with an aerodynamic diameter D<1 μm chemical composition using a quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer and a multi-angle absorption photometer were performed using the PSI mobile laboratory during winter 2007/2008 and December 2008 in the metropolitan area of Zurich, Switzerland. Positive matrix factorization (PMF applied to the organic fraction of PM1 yielded 3 factors: Hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA related to traffic emissions; organic aerosol from wood burning for domestic heating purposes (WBOA; and oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA, assigned to secondary organic aerosol formed by oxidation of volatile precursors. The spatial variation of the chemical composition of PM1 shows a uniform distribution throughout the city: for primary emissions, road traffic is important along major roads (varying between 7 and 14% of PM1 for different sites within the city, but overall, domestic wood burning is more important for the organic aerosol concentrations in Zurich during winter time (varying between 8–15% of PM1 for different sites within the city. OOA makes up the largest fraction of organic aerosol (44% on average. A new method, based on simultaneous on-road mobile and stationary background measurements and using the ratio of on-road sulfate to stationary sulfate to correct for small-scale dynamic effects, allows for the separation of PM1 emitted or produced locally and the PM1 from the regional background. It could be shown that especially during thermal inversions over the Swiss plateau, regional background concentrations contribute substantially to particulate number concentrations (60% on average as well as to the concentrations of PM1 components (on average 60% for black carbon and HOA, over 97% for WBOA and OOA, and more than 94% for the measured inorganic components in downtown Zurich. The results emphasize, on

  18. Diffusion of green power products in Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuestenhagen, Rolf E-mail: rolf.wuestenhagen@unisg.ch; Markard, Jochen E-mail: markard@eawag.ch; Truffer, Bernhard E-mail: truffer@eawag.ch

    2003-06-01

    As in many other European countries, green electricity is an emerging product in Switzerland as well. Although the market is yet to be liberalised, more than 100 of the 1200 Swiss electric utilities offer some sort of green electricity product to their customers. Successful companies like the municipal utilities of the cities of Zurich and Berne have reached customer response rates of up to 4%, while still maintaining cost-based pricing, i.e. charging their customers price premiums of 400-700% per kWh. While most of the products still rely on mainly photovoltaics, some utilities have started to introduce mixed green electricity products also including wind power. With a share of 60% in the Swiss generation mix, hydropower's role in the green electricity mix was also an issue to emerge causing controversial debate. While being renewable, hydropower is not considered environmentally benign by all the stakeholders, and unlike new renewables (solar, wind, biomass), there is little room for new hydropower generation facilities in Switzerland. The green electricity labelling scheme 'Naturemade' tackles that issue. The labelling organisation has evolved from a process with broad stakeholder involvement, which included environmental NGOs, scientific institutions, green electricity providers, renewable energy advocates, government bodies and consumer organisations. The analysis in this paper is based on a diffusion theory framework. It identifies and characterises different phases of (past and future) market development, and stresses the importance of eco-labelling as a tool to facilitate the transition from niche to mass market. Finally, we also discuss conclusions that can be drawn from the Swiss case towards market development and labelling on a European level.

  19. Cybersecurity in Switzerland

    CERN Document Server

    Dunn Cavelty, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Gives the reader a detailed account of how cyber-security in Switzerland has evolved over the years, using official documents and a considerable amount of inside knowledge. It focuses on key ideas, institutional arrangements, on the publication of strategy papers, and importantly, on processes leading up to these strategy documents. The peculiarities of the Swiss political system, which influence the way cyber-security can be designed and practiced in Switzerland are considered, as well as the bigger, global influences and driving factors that shaped the Swiss approach to cyber-security. It

  20. The Societal Costs of Schizophrenia in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletscher, Mark; Mattli, Renato; von Wyl, Agnes; Reich, Oliver; Wieser, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder that typically develops in early adulthood and becomes chronic in most cases. The disease is associated with elevated health care utilization, impaired functionality and the loss of life years and quality of life. The prevalence and costs of schizophrenia are not yet known for Switzerland. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of schizophrenia in Switzerland and to assess its burden on patients, caregivers and society as a whole. A hospital registry was combined with an outpatient physician survey and health insurance claims data to capture all patients living in the northern part of the canton of Zurich. Structured interviews with outpatient physicians were held to obtain information on outpatient care in private practices. Total costs included direct medical and nonmedical costs and lost production. All costs were calculated for the year 2012 from a societal perspective using a prevalence-based bottom-up approach. Intangible costs were expressed as quality-adjusted life years (QALY). Uncertainty and its sources were addressed in univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. The point prevalence of schizophrenia in Switzerland was estimated at 0.39% of the population. The average costs of schizophrenia in 2012 were EUR 39,408 per patient. Lost production accounted for 64% (EUR 25,108) of the total cost of illness, direct medical costs for 24% (EUR 9,507) and care by relatives or in residential homes for the mentally ill for 12% (EUR 4,793). Inpatient hospital care amounted to EUR 6,242 per year or 66% of direct medical costs. The results show the high burden of schizophrenia on patients, caregivers and society. The prevalence estimate can be considered a lower bound because undiagnosed cases were not identified by our empirical strategy. The estimated costs are conservative because the costs of comorbidities were not considered. The strengths of this study are the full coverage of the sample region by a

  1. The KULTURisk Regional Risk Assessment methodology for flood risk: the case of Sihl river in Zurich

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, Paolo; Bullo, Martina; Gallina, Valentina; Torresan, Silvia; Critto, Andrea; Zabeo, Alex; Semenzin, Elena; Buchecker, Matthias; Marcomini, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    -spot areas and targets at risk (i.e. people, buildings, infrastructures, agriculture, natural and semi-natural systems, cultural heritages) in the considered region by comparing the baseline scenario with alternative scenarios, where different structural and/or non-structural mitigation measures are planned. Risk maps, along with related statistics, provide crucial information about flood risk pattern, and allow the development of relevant and strategic mitigation and prevention measures to minimizing flood risk in urban areas. The present study applied and validated the KULTURisk RRA methodology to the Sihl river case study in Zurich (Switzerland). Through a tuning process of the methodology to the site-specific context and features, flood related risks have been assessed for different receptors lying on the Sihl river valley, which represents a typical case of river flooding in urban area. The total risk maps obtained under a 300 years return period scenario (selected as the reference one) have highlighted that the area is associated with the lower class of risk. Moreover, the relative risk is higher in Zurich city centre, in the few residential areas around the city centre and within the districts that rely just beside to the Sihl river course.

  2. No gender difference in peak performance in ultra-endurance swimming performance - analysis of the 'Zurich 12-h Swim' from 1996 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberger, Evelyn; Knechtle, Beat; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Christoph, Alexander Rüst; Knechtle, Patrizia; Lepers, Romuald; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-10-31

    The aims of the study were to [1] investigate the performance trends at the 'Zurich 12-h Swim' in Switzerland from 1996 to 2010; and [2] determine the gender difference in peak performance in ultraendurance swimming. In total, 113 male and 53 female swimmers competed in this indoor ultraendurance event while swimming in a heated pool. The number of male participants significantly increased (r² = 0.36, P = 0.04) over time while the participation of females remained unchanged (r² = 0.12, P = 0.26). In the age group swimming performances (P swim performances remained unchanged across the years. Females are able to achieve a similar swim performance in an indoor ultra-endurance swim event of ~40 km. Further studies are needed to investigate whether females are able to achieve similar or even better performances than males in openwater ultra-swimming events such as 'Channel Swimming'.

  3. Switzerland country report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aegerter, Irene [Cogito Foundation, Saeumerstrasse 26, 08832 Wollerau (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    - Nuclear in Switzerland: Percent of Electricity from Nuclear: 40%. Nuclear facilities: 2 Nuclear Research reactors at the University of Basle (Swimming pool Type) and EPF Lausanne; 5 Nuclear Power Plants: KKB I / II: Westinghouse; PWR; each 365 MWe (1969,1971), KKM: General Electric; BWR 355 MWe (1972), KKG: Siemens / KWU; PWR; 970 MWe (1979), KKL: General Electric; BWR; 1165 MWe (1984). Interim Storage for nuclear waste: ZWILAG. - Public acceptance: Acceptance of existing NPP: 70.3%; Acceptance of replacing old NPP by new NPP: 52%; Therefore: Only talk about replacing the 3 old ones by one or more new NPP at an existing site. Women: Only 45% accept replacing NPP. New and additional NPP do not get a majority (43,5%). - Energy policy: Referendum for the project of a new NPP (about 2011); DOE study about the security of supply shows Nuclear is needed; Reorganization of Nuclear Inspectorate Nuclear waste management policy; Positive decision of Federal Council on deep geological repository for spent fuel / high and low level waste 2007. - Nuclear research: Paul Scherrer Institute, Wuerenlingen, New Master study in Nuclear Engineering Fall 2008, Generation IV and ITER research. - Nuclear competences challenge in Switzerland: Nuclear Revival is coming in Switzerland only if we win the referendum. Therefore we need: Personal information and dialogue with the public, especially women about the necessity to replace the older NPP by new ones at the existing sites, because we need CO{sub 2}-free base load capacity; Sun and wind cannot replace nuclear because it is not base load. The sun sets every night. Nuclear plants cannot be replaced by fossil plants because of CO{sub 2}- emissions. Switzerland could not meet the Kyoto-targets if the now CO{sub 2}- free electricity production (40% Nuclear, 60% Hydro) would be given up with the construction of a gas fired power plant. - WIN - Switzerland Main achievements: Activities of 2007 WIN Switzerland: Visit of the special waste

  4. Seasonal and diurnal characteristics of water soluble inorganic compounds in the gas and aerosol phase in the Zurich area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fisseha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas and aerosol samples were taken using a wet effluent diffusion denuder/aerosol collector (WEDD/AC coupled to ion chromatography (IC in the city of Zurich, Switzerland from August to September 2002 and in March 2003. Major water soluble inorganic ions; nitrate, sulfate, and nitrite were analyzed online with a time resolution of two hours for the gas and aerosol phase. The fraction of water soluble inorganic anions in PM10 varied from 15% in August to about 38% in March. Seasonal and diurnal variations of nitrate in the gas and aerosol phase were observed with more than 50% of the total nitrate in the gas phase during August and more than 80% of nitrate in the aerosol phase during March exceeding the concentration of sulfate by a factor of 2. Aerosol sulfate, on the other hand, did not show significant variability with season. However, in the gas phase, the SO2 concentration was 6.5 times higher in winter than in summer. Nitrous acid (HONO also showed a diurnal variation in both the gas and aerosol phase with the lowest concentration (0.2–0.6 µg/m3 in the afternoon. The primary pollutants, NO, CO and SO2 mixing ratios were often at their highest between 04:00–10:00 local time due to the build up of fresh vehicle emission under a nocturnal inversion.

  5. Diffusion of the biogas technology into Switzerland: a GIS-based multiagent simulation; Diffusion der Biogastechnologie in der Schweiz: eine GIS-basierte Multiagenten-Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Christian [Campana und Schott Realisierungsmanagement Schweiz AG, Zuerich (Switzerland); Madlener, Reinhard [Lehrstuhl fuer Wirtschaftswissenschaften insb. Energieoekonomik, Inst. for Future Energy Consumer Needs and Behavior (FCN), Fakultaet fuer Wirtschaftswissenschaften/E.ON Energy Research Center, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    In this article we introduce a GIS-based multi-agent simulation model. It is used to study the spatial diffusion dynamics of agricultural biogas plants in Switzerland, which lags markedly behind those in the neighboring countries Austria and Germany. The investigation concentrates in particular on the impacts of economic factors and of locally available resources on the diffusion process. The model considers three different types of plants (100 kW{sub el}, 200 kW{sub el}, 1 MW{sub el}). The results show that feed-in tariffs, cosubstrate prices and the revenues from heat sales are critical parameters. They indicate further that the present promotion policy fosters smaller plants, whereas larger plants are preferred only in few areas with high substrate densities. Finally, we find evidence that increased heat sales can significantly raise diffusion dynamics, and that the higher feed-in tariffs planned in Switzerland could actually overcompensate deteriorating cosubstrate prices. (orig.)

  6. 5th Annual Pan-European Science and Big Physics Symposium on March 5th, 2012, Zurich, Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    Balle, Ch

    2012-01-01

    The 5th Annual Pan-European Science and Big Physics Symposium on March 5th is a technical workshop that covers topics in the areas of control, measurement and diagnostics for accelerators, cyclotrons, tokamaks and telescopes. The symposium brings together over 60 scientists and engineers from major research labs around the world such as CERN, PSI, INFN, NPL, ESRF and other research institutions. Attend this event to share ideas and results and to learn from the presentations of your peers from different labs and experiments worldwide.

  7. HIV testing in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeannin, A; Dubois-Arber, F; Paccaud, F

    1994-11-01

    To obtain information about the prevalence of, reasons for, and adequacy of HIV testing in the general population in Switzerland in 1992. Telephone survey (n = 2800). Some 47% of the sample underwent one HIV test performed through blood donation (24%), voluntary testing (17%) or both (6%). Of the sample, 46% considered themselves well or very well informed about the HIV test. Patients reported unsystematic pre-test screening by doctors for the main HIV risks. People having been in situations of potential exposure to risk were more likely to have had the test than others. Overall, 85% of those HIV-tested had a relevant, generally risk-related reason for having it performed. HIV testing is widespread in Switzerland. Testing is mostly performed for relevant reasons. Pre-test counselling is poor and an opportunity for prevention is thus lost.

  8. VEHICLES LICENSED IN SWITZERLAND

    CERN Multimedia

    Service des Relations avec les Pays-Hôtes

    2000-01-01

    1.\tVehicle licensinga)\tTime limitsVehicles must have a Swiss registration document and Swiss number plates: -\tif the owner has been residing in Switzerland for more than one year without a break of more than three consecutive months and has been using it for more than one month on Swiss territory, or -\tif the vehicle itself has been on Swiss territory for more than one year without a break of more than three consecutive months. b)\tTechnical details Vehicles belonging to non-Swiss members of the personnel who hold a carte de légitimation issued by the Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (hereinafter referred to as 'DFAE') and who were not permanently resident in Switzerland before taking up their appointment may be licensed in Switzerland with virtually no restrictions provided that their owner produces: -\tthe vehicle registration document and number plates of the country in which the car was previously registered, or -\ta manufacturer's certi...

  9. KULTURisk regional risk assessment methodology for water-related natural hazards - Part 2: Application to the Zurich case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, P.; Bullo, M.; Torresan, S.; Critto, A.; Olschewski, R.; Zappa, M.; Marcomini, A.

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this paper is the application of the KULTURisk regional risk assessment (KR-RRA) methodology, presented in the companion paper (Part 1, Ronco et al., 2014), to the Sihl River basin, in northern Switzerland. Flood-related risks have been assessed for different receptors lying on the Sihl River valley including Zurich, which represents a typical case of river flooding in an urban area, by calibrating the methodology to the site-specific context and features. Risk maps and statistics have been developed using a 300-year return period scenario for six relevant targets exposed to flood risk: people; economic activities: buildings, infrastructure and agriculture; natural and semi-natural systems; and cultural heritage. Finally, the total risk index map has been produced to visualize the spatial pattern of flood risk within the target area and, therefore, to identify and rank areas and hotspots at risk by means of multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) tools. Through a tailored participatory approach, risk maps supplement the consideration of technical experts with the (essential) point of view of relevant stakeholders for the appraisal of the specific scores weighting for the different receptor-relative risks. The total risk maps obtained for the Sihl River case study are associated with the lower classes of risk. In general, higher (relative) risk scores are spatially concentrated in the deeply urbanized city centre and areas that lie just above to river course. Here, predicted injuries and potential fatalities are mainly due to high population density and to the presence of vulnerable people; flooded buildings are mainly classified as continuous and discontinuous urban fabric; flooded roads, pathways and railways, most of them in regards to the Zurich central station (Hauptbahnhof) are at high risk of inundation, causing severe indirect damage. Moreover, the risk pattern for agriculture, natural and semi-natural systems and cultural heritage is relatively

  10. The 2015 Annual Meeting of SETAC German Language Branch in Zurich (7-10 September, 2015): Ecotoxicology and environmental chemistry-from research to application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Inge; Aldrich, Annette; Becker, Benjamin; Becker, Dennis; Brinkmann, Markus; Burkhardt, Michael; Caspers, Norbert; Campiche, Sophie; Chèvre, Nathalie; Düring, Rolf-Alexander; Escher, Beate I; Fischer, Fabian; Giebner, Sabrina; Heye, Katharina; Hollert, Henner; Junghans, Marion; Kienle, Cornelia; Knauer, Katja; Korkaric, Muris; Märkl, Veronika; Muncke, Jane; Oehlmann, Jörg; Reifferscheid, Georg; Rensch, Daniel; Schäffer, Andreas; Schiwy, Sabrina; Schwarz, Simon; Segner, Helmut; Simon, Eszter; Triebskorn, Rita; Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Wintgens, Thomas; Zennegg, Markus

    2016-01-01

    This report provides a brief review of the 20th annual meeting of the German Language Branch of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC GLB) held from September 7th to 10th 2015 at ETH (Swiss Technical University) in Zurich, Switzerland. The event was chaired by Inge Werner, Director of the Swiss Centre for Applied Ecotoxicology (Ecotox Centre) Eawag-EPFL, and organized by a team from Ecotox Centre, Eawag, Federal Office of the Environment, Federal Office of Agriculture, and Mesocosm GmbH (Germany). Over 200 delegates from academia, public agencies and private industry of Germany, Switzerland and Austria attended and discussed the current state of science and its application presented in 75 talks and 83 posters. In addition, three invited keynote speakers provided new insights into scientific knowledge 'brokering', and-as it was the International Year of Soil-the important role of healthy soil ecosystems. Awards were presented to young scientists for best oral and poster presentations, and for best 2014 master and doctoral theses. Program and abstracts of the meeting (mostly in German) are provided as Additional file 1.

  11. Science channel: addressing evolutionary questions using whole genome sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Kentaro K. Shimizu; Akiyama, Reiko; Hatakeyama, Masaomi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, technical advance in gene analysis opened a new perspective in research on evolution. At the University of Zurich in Switzerland, we visited the Evolutionary Ecological Genomics group and Functional Genomics Center Zurich addressing evolutionary questions using latest technologies.

  12. Tinnitus functional index: validation of the German version for Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Nicole; Kleinjung, Tobias; Jeker, Raphael; Meyer, Martin; Klaghofer, Richard; Weidt, Steffi

    2017-05-05

    Different standardized questionnaires are used to assess tinnitus severity, making comparisons across studies difficult. These questionnaires are also used to measure treatment-related changes in tinnitus although they were not designed for this purpose. To solve these problems, a new questionnaire - the Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI) - has been established. The TFI is highly responsive to treatment-related change and promises to be the new gold standard in tinnitus evaluation. The aim of the current study was to validate a German version of the TFI for a German-speaking population in Switzerland. At the ENT department of the University Hospital Zurich, 264 subjects completed an online survey including the German version for Switzerland of TFI, Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and sociodemographic variables. Internal consistency of the TFI was calculated with Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Pearson correlation coefficients were used for the test-retest reliability of the TFI and to investigate convergent and discriminant validity between the THI and the BDI and BAI, respectively. Factor analysis was assessed using a principal component analysis with oblique rotation. The different factors extracted were then compared with the original questionnaire. The German version of the TFI for Switzerland showed an excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha of 0.97) and an excellent test-retest reliability of 0.91. The convergent validity with THI was high (r = 0.86). The discriminant validity with BAI and BDI showed moderate results (BAI: r = 0.60 and BDI: r = 0.65). In the factor analysis only five factors with one main factor could be extracted instead of eight factors as described in the original version. Nevertheless, relations to the original eight subscales could be demonstrated. The German version of the TFI for Switzerland is a suitable instrument for measuring the impact of tinnitus

  13. 5 June 2013 - European Union Ambassador to Switzerland and the Principality of Liechtenstein R. Jones in the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler, in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer. Head of the EU Projects Office S. Stavrev present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    5 June 2013 - European Union Ambassador to Switzerland and the Principality of Liechtenstein R. Jones in the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler, in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer. Head of the EU Projects Office S. Stavrev present.

  14. CHANGE OF NUMBERING IN SWITZERLAND

    CERN Multimedia

    Telephone Service

    2002-01-01

    Swiss telephone numbers are changing to ten-digit numbers. This means that the 0-022 area code will have to be used for calls to the Geneva region. From 29 March it will no longer be possible to make local calls without the 022 code. There will be no change in the procedure for dialling other destinations from CERN, including Zurich. Don't forget to change the numbers stored in your various memories (fax, telephone, modem, etc.). Please contact the switchboard (111) for any further information. Telephone Service IT/CS/TEL

  15. Large decrease of VOC emissions of Switzerland's car fleet during the past decade: results from a highway tunnel study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemmler, Konrad; Bugmann, Stefan; Buchmann, Brigitte; Reimann, Stefan; Staehelin, Johannes

    The emissions of 14 C 4-C 8 VOC species from road traffic have been measured in a highway tunnel (Gubristtunnel) near Zurich, Switzerland in 2002. The investigated traffic situation corresponds to highway driving with an average speed of 90 km h -1 and hot engine conditions. The comparison with measurements in the same tunnel performed in 1993 indicates that the emission factors of the individual hydrocarbons decreased on average by 80% in the 9 years between both investigations. This improvement can mainly be explained by the nearly complete elimination of non-catalyst gasoline-fuelled cars from the Swiss car fleet in the past decade. The relative emission strengths of the quantified individual VOCs were similar in 1993 and 2002. The emission factors reported in this study are the lowest reported from on-road vehicle emission measurements so far, indicating the efficient technology of modern car fleets with respect to VOC emissions. The emission factors derived from the tunnel study are compared to modelled emission factors based on dynamometric test measurements on Swiss passenger cars. The employed model is the Handbuch für Emissionsfaktoren des Strassenverkehrs; version 1.2 (Umweltbundesamt Berlin and INFRAS AG Bern, 1999). A good agreement between the modelled and measured emissions was found for the investigated traffic situation, indicating that the development of the VOC emissions during the last decade is well understood on the basis of the fleet composition and the dynamometric test measurements. The observed VOC emission reduction corresponds to a traffic situation, where an optimal exhaust gas catalyst performance can be expected. Factors leading to a somewhat less beneficial influence of the catalytic converter technique in other relevant driving situations are therefore additionally discussed.

  16. Barriers to the adoption and diffusion of technological innovations for climate-smart agriculture in Europe: evidence from the Netherlands, France, Switzerland and Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, T.B.; Blok, V.; Coninx, I.

    2016-01-01

    Climate-smart agriculture (CSA) is one response to the challenges faced by agriculture due to climate change. As with other sustainability transitions, technological innovation is highlighted as playing a critical role, however, the adoption and diffusion of technological innovations in OECD countri

  17. Regional differences in self-reported screening, prevalence and management of cardiovascular risk factors in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Paccaud, Fred

    2012-03-28

    In Switzerland, health policies are decided at the local level, but little is known regarding their impact on the screening and management of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs). We thus aimed at assessing geographical levels of CVRFs in Switzerland. Swiss Health Survey for 2007 (N = 17,879). Seven administrative regions were defined: West (Leman), West-Central (Mittelland), Zurich, South (Ticino), North-West, East and Central Switzerland. Obesity, smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes prevalence, treatment and screening within the last 12 months were assessed by interview. After multivariate adjustment for age, gender, educational level, marital status and Swiss citizenship, no significant differences were found between regions regarding prevalence of obesity or current smoking. Similarly, no differences were found regarding hypertension screening and prevalence. Two thirds of subjects who had been told they had high blood pressure were treated, the lowest treatment rates being found in East Switzerland: odds-ratio and [95% confidence interval] 0.65 [0.50-0.85]. Screening for hypercholesterolemia was more frequently reported in French (Leman) and Italian (Ticino) speaking regions. Four out of ten participants who had been told they had high cholesterol levels were treated and the lowest treatment rates were found in German-speaking regions. Screening for diabetes was higher in Ticino (1.24 [1.09 - 1.42]). Six out of ten participants who had been told they had diabetes were treated, the lowest treatment rates were found for German-speaking regions. In Switzerland, cardiovascular risk factor screening and management differ between regions and these differences cannot be accounted for by differences in populations' characteristics. Management of most cardiovascular risk factors could be improved.

  18. Regional differences in self-reported screening, prevalence and management of cardiovascular risk factors in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marques-Vidal Pedro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Switzerland, health policies are decided at the local level, but little is known regarding their impact on the screening and management of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs. We thus aimed at assessing geographical levels of CVRFs in Switzerland. Methods Swiss Health Survey for 2007 (N = 17,879. Seven administrative regions were defined: West (Leman, West-Central (Mittelland, Zurich, South (Ticino, North-West, East and Central Switzerland. Obesity, smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes prevalence, treatment and screening within the last 12 months were assessed by interview. Results After multivariate adjustment for age, gender, educational level, marital status and Swiss citizenship, no significant differences were found between regions regarding prevalence of obesity or current smoking. Similarly, no differences were found regarding hypertension screening and prevalence. Two thirds of subjects who had been told they had high blood pressure were treated, the lowest treatment rates being found in East Switzerland: odds-ratio and [95% confidence interval] 0.65 [0.50-0.85]. Screening for hypercholesterolemia was more frequently reported in French (Leman and Italian (Ticino speaking regions. Four out of ten participants who had been told they had high cholesterol levels were treated and the lowest treatment rates were found in German-speaking regions. Screening for diabetes was higher in Ticino (1.24 [1.09 - 1.42]. Six out of ten participants who had been told they had diabetes were treated, the lowest treatment rates were found for German-speaking regions. Conclusions In Switzerland, cardiovascular risk factor screening and management differ between regions and these differences cannot be accounted for by differences in populations' characteristics. Management of most cardiovascular risk factors could be improved.

  19. Mobile measurements of particle composition in the Rhine Valley and Zurich. Winter 2007/2008; Mobile Messungen der Partikelzusammensetzung im Rheintal und in der Stadt Zuerich. Winter 2007/2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, C.; Weimer, S.; Good, C.; Richter, R.; Prevot, A.; Baltensperger, U.

    2009-07-15

    This report issued by the General Energy Research Department and its Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) reports on the results obtained from the measurement of fine-dust quantities and composition in the cantons of eastern Switzerland and the upper Rhine valley during the winter. The PSI analysed the samples on behalf of the Swiss cantons, Vorarlberg (Austria) and the Principality of Liechtenstein. The mobile equipment used and the measurements made in the Rhine Valley between Lake Constance and Chur as well as in the City of Zurich are presented and discussed. The results of the measurements are presented in graphical form and the chemical composition of the pollutants at the different locations are discussed. Details of the instruments used and the routes taken are noted in an appendix.

  20. An innovation for Switzerland - the CO{sub 2} heat-pump; Eine Innovation fuer die Schweiz - die CO{sub 2}-Waermepumpe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ, H.-P.

    2006-07-01

    This article describes one of the first heat-pump installations in Switzerland that uses carbon dioxide as its working fluid. The installation, operated in contracting-modus by the Zurich electricity utility EWZ, provides the heating energy required to supply the training centre of a Zurich football club. The heat sources used in the system are mentioned, which include ambient air and 23 geothermal probes. The various uses of the heat are discussed, which include the heating of changing rooms, offices and restaurant and hot-water for the showers. The functioning of the CO{sub 2} heat-pump is described and its advantages are discussed. These include the use of a cheap, natural refrigerant, high temperature-lifts and high energy-efficiency. The possible application areas of such CO{sub 2} heat-pumps is discussed.

  1. Switzerland: Health System Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pietro, Carlo; Camenzind, Paul; Sturny, Isabelle; Crivelli, Luca; Edwards-Garavoglia, Suzanne; Spranger, Anne; Wittenbecher, Friedrich; Quentin, Wilm

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of the Swiss health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. The Swiss health system is highly complex, combining aspects of managed competition and corporatism (the integration of interest groups in the policy process) in a decentralized regulatory framework shaped by the influences of direct democracy. The health system performs very well with regard to a broad range of indicators. Life expectancy in Switzerland (82.8 years) is the highest in Europe after Iceland, and healthy life expectancy is several years above the European Union (EU) average. Coverage is ensured through mandatory health insurance (MHI), with subsidies for people on low incomes. The system offers a high degree of choice and direct access to all levels of care with virtually no waiting times, though managed care type insurance plans that include gatekeeping restrictions are becoming increasingly important. Public satisfaction with the system is high and quality is generally viewed to be good or very good. Reforms since the year 2000 have improved the MHI system, changed the financing of hospitals, strengthened regulations in the area of pharmaceuticals and the control of epidemics, and harmonized regulation of human resources across the country. In addition, there has been a slow (and not always linear) process towards more centralization of national health policy-making. Nevertheless, a number of challenges remain. The costs of the health care system are well above the EU average, in particular in absolute terms but also as a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP) (11.5%). MHI premiums have increased more quickly than incomes since 2003. By European standards, the share of out-of-pocket payments is exceptionally high at 26% of total health expenditure (compared to the EU average of 16%). Low and middle-income households contribute a greater share of their income to

  2. 27 kWp photovoltaic plant at the Stadelhofen High School in Zurich; 27 kWp Photovoltaik Anlage Kantonschule Zuerich-Stadelhofen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clavadetscher, L.; Nordmann, T.

    2002-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) describes the results obtained from the monitoring of a photovoltaic (PV) installation that was installed on the roof and facade of a gym at the Stadelhofen High School in the city of Zurich, Switzerland. This prize-winning installation features multi-functional PV modules, whose solar cells are mounted on double-glazed roof windows as well as further laminated facade modules that provide both power and shading. The report gives details of the results obtained from measurements made on the PV installations and includes the results of laboratory measurements made on selected modules. The performance of the installation, which started operation in 1999, was monitored until 2001. The report presents the results of the monitoring campaign, that not only monitored power output and energy production but also cell temperatures. These can rise up to 85 {sup o}C in summer and lead to power losses of around 7%. The self-cleaning properties of roof, which is only lightly sloped, are also commented on by the report.

  3. Application of the analytic hierarchy process to the analysis of wastewater nutrient recycling options: a case based on a group study of residents in the city of Zurich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Francisco; Hanaki, Keisuke; Aramaki, Toshiya; Binder, Claudia R

    2013-01-01

    The recycling of anthropogenic nutrients derived from the wastewater management systems is often characterized by a complex and uncertain scenario, due not only to the nature of the process but also to the involvement of different stakeholder groups. Over the past 10 years in Switzerland, policies regarding the use of sewage sludge as fertilizer have gradually shifted to a ban on use in agriculture. As a result, alternative methods for the recycling of anthropogenic nutrients may play a relevant role in the near future. This paper uses the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) to examine more closely the nutrient-recycling dilemma by analysing the preferences of a group of German-speaking residents in the city of Zurich for various management scenarios. Nutrient recycling by the use of urine separation toilets and the BioCon treatment process are presented as possible management alternatives in addition to current practice. The study shows that AHP can incorporate the respondents' preferences and multiple objectives when evaluating alternatives with different attributes.

  4. [The first steps of an ANP-team - challenges and chances of ANP-teams at the Children's University Hospital Zurich].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann-Bremi, Andrea; Schlüer, Anna-Barbara; Finkbeiner, Gabriela; Huber, Yvonne

    2011-02-01

    In the past, various individual ANP-roles such as Clinical Nurse Specialist and Nurse Practitioner were developed in the USA and in several countries of Northern Europe. In Switzerland, the number of university-educated nurse specialists is still very limited. In order to promote sustainable progress in nursing practice despite of this background, Advanced Nursing Practice teams (ANP-teams) have continuously been established at Kinderspital Zurich for the last eight years. This approach has proven to be an excellent option especially in highly complex situations where targeted and adequate solutions for patients are a major issue. In this article, the structure of the ANP-teams is discussed, with the personnel mix as a key factor. Important supportive elements are a clear definition of tasks as well as an allocation of individual tasks to either clinical or conceptual groups. The ANP teams are highly motivated and goal-oriented, they integrate nurses with various backgrounds of experience or training whereby mutual learning is being encouraged.

  5. Emission scenarios 1985-2010: Their influence on ozone in Switzerland - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, J.; Andreani-Aksoyoglu, S.; Tinguely, M.; Prevot, A

    2005-07-15

    most regions. In the Zurich area even a difference of 15% was found. These values are in accordance with no significant ozone trends north of the Alps in the 90s except in the region of Zurich if we take into account hat during the same period, background ozone as found at Jungfraujoch increased since 1985 by a similar magnitude as the predicted decreases due to the emission changes. Scenario calculations suggest that peak zone levels would have been 10-20 % higher in 2000 if no emission reduction measures were applied. In the future, applying the Gothenburg protocol peak ozone concentrations could go down by 5-6 % in Switzerland. Reducing the Gothenburg target emissions by half may improve the air quality with respect to ozone further. However, measures taken in Switzerland alone would not be very effective. Even removing all anthropogenic emissions in Switzerland in a hypothetical case, would not prevent exceedances of legal thresholds as long as emissions abroad remain the same. The question if halving of the Gothenburg target emissions would be enough to meet the legal threshold for ozone in Switzerland should be answered by investigating air quality for longer time scales and not only for an episode as in this case. The further development of the background ozone will in any case be very important or the ozone levels in Switzerland. (author)

  6. FameLab International Final: a triumph for Switzerland and CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    Oskari Vinko, from ETH Zurich, who won the Swiss finals organised at CERN last May, is the winner of the 2015 FameLab competition. The CERN winner Lillian Smestad, member of the AEgIS collaboration from the Norwegian Research Council, shared second place with François-Xavier Joly from France, who also was among the trainees at the FameLab Master Classes organised by CERN in April.     CERN's Lillian Smestad (left) and Oskari Vinko from ETH Zurich, during the Swiss and CERN joint final, organised at CERN in May 2015. The 2015 FameLab International Final, which took place on 4 June in Cheltenham, UK, was a triumph for Switzerland and CERN! The competition was very hard this year, with 27 countries participating in the international semifinals and only nine making it through to the finals. This was also the first year that CERN took part as a “country”.  Congratulations to all the winners! To experience the international Famelab ...

  7. First light from student Pascal Keller, Eschenbach/Switzerland on 6-8 June 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monstein, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Pascal Keller, a student during his exams for general qualification for university entrance, recently set up a Long Wavelength Array (LWA) antenna and a Callisto system to observe solar radio burst activity in his back yard (figure 1) in Eschenbach, Switzerland. The antenna, spectrometer and software were provided on loan by Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich. On the first observation day he observed his 1st light, a type II solar radio burst and some type III bursts. His aim is now to compare this LWA observation with others from the e-Callisto network, which is composed of different antenna types and different antenna sizes as well different locations worldwide. His first four observations on 6 and 8 June 2014 are presented in figures 2 to 5 and associated tables 1 to 4.

  8. CPAFFC Cultural Exchange Working Group Visits Switzerland,Germany and Greece

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Swiss-Chinese Association (SCA) of Switzerland, the Villa Musica Foundation of Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany, and the Euro-Chinese Centre for Research and Development of Greece, a Cultural Exchange Working Group led by Wang Xiuyun, director general of the Department of Cultural Exchanges of the CPAFFC, paid a visit to the three countries from February 16 to March 5. The working group met with Pascal Couchepin, president of the Swiss Confederation, Dr. Thomas Wagner, president of the Swiss-Chinese Association, Dr. Elmar Ledergerber, mayor of Zurich, Marc Wehrlin, acting deputy director of Swiss Federal Office of Culture, Olivier Francais, vice mayor of Lausanne, Hofmann Gottig, state secretary of Rheinland-Pfalz and George Patoulis, mayor of Maroussi, and had wide contact with cultural institutions and local governments, during which the two sides had in-depth discussion on issues of common interest.

  9. Venture Capital Investment in the Life Sciences in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosang, Markus

    2014-12-01

    Innovation is one of the main driving factors for continuous and healthy economic growth and welfare. Switzerland as a resource-poor country is particularly dependent on innovation, and the life sciences, which comprise biotechnologies, (bio)pharmaceuticals, medical technologies and diagnostics, are one of the key areas of innovative strength of Switzerland. Venture capital financing and venture capitalists (frequently called 'VCs') and investors in public equities have played and still play a pivotal role in financing the Swiss biotechnology industry. In the following some general features of venture capital investment in life sciences as well as some opportunities and challenges which venture capital investors in Switzerland are facing are highlighted. In addition certain means to counteract these challenges including the 'Zukunftsfonds Schweiz' are discussed.

  10. Energy Perspectives In Switzerland: The Potential Of Nuclear Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foskolos, K.; Hardegger, P

    2005-03-01

    In 2004, discussions were started in Switzerland concerning future of energy supply, including domestic electricity generation. On behalf of the Federal Office of Energy, PSI undertook a study to evaluate the potential of future nuclear technologies, covering electricity demand, with a time horizon up to 2050. It has been shown that nuclear power plants (NPPs) of the Third Generation, similar to the ones currently under construction in several other countries, built on the existing nuclear sites in Switzerland, have the potential to replace, at competitive costs, the existing nuclear plants, and even to cover (postulated) increases in electricity demand. Because of their late maturity (expected at the earliest around 2030), NPPs of the Fourth Generation, which are currently under development, cannot play a major role in Switzerland, since, with the exception of the Leibstadt NPP, all decisions regarding replacement of the current Swiss NPPs have to be taken before 2030. (author)

  11. Interannual and decadal-scale variability in winter storms over Switzerland since end of the 19th century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, Christoph; Martius, Olivia

    2013-04-01

    In Switzerland, damaging and potentially life-threatening high-wind events can often be attributed to mid-latitude winter storms. The scarce availability of long-term atmospheric data series has so far limited the analysis of interannual and in particular decadal-scale changes in hazardous winter storms over Switzerland. In our study, we evaluate this variability on the basis of the Twentieth Century Reanalysis (20CR), a novel global atmospheric reanalysis which extends back to 1871, with 56 realisations for each 6-hourly time step. In the 20CR, only observations of synoptic surface pressure were assimilated and monthly sea surface temperature and sea ice distributions served as boundary conditions. We apply an objective cyclone identification and tracking scheme to the global sea level pressure data of the 20CR ensemble, i.e. to each of the 56 ensemble members. For Switzerland and during almost the whole period available, the 20CR shows relatively small values of the ensemble range (uncertainty), compared to other regions of the world. We use historic wind speed measurements taken at Zurich climate station to evaluate the quality of 20CR wind data over Switzerland, in particular during the first half of the 20th century and earlier when surface pressure observations were sparser. On both interannual and decadal time scales, we find a good agreement between the 20CR and observations, concerning the winter storm variability over Switzerland. One of the main conclusions of our study is that the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), regarded as the major anomaly pattern of the North Atlantic/European sector, alone does not necessarily provide a good description of the interannual variability in winter storms over Switzerland. In the 20CR, the year-to-year variability in winter storms over Switzerland is rather associated with a large-scale atmospheric pattern similar to a southeastward displaced NAO-like pattern. Also on shorter (i.e. synoptic) time scales, similar large

  12. Early Child Care in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luscher, Kurt K.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    This monograph provides a comprehensive description of the multiple, diverse, and complex systems of child care in Switzerland today. The following topics are discussed: prevailing conceptions of the child-rearing process, the relationship between family and society, socialization, training of personnel, information dissemination, mass media and…

  13. Switzerland advances payments to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    In the picture, Charles Kleiber (third from left) visits the TI8 tunnel with (left to right) Jean-Luc Baldy, Head of the LHC civil engineering group, Luciano Maiani, CERN Director-General, Jean-Pierre Ruder, Swiss Delegate to CERN Council, Guy Hentsch, Personal adviser to the Director-General, Michel Buchs and Frédéric Chavan, representatives of the firm Prader Losinger. The State Secretary for Science and Research in Switzerland, Charles Kleiber, signed an agreement with CERN last week for an advancement of contributions from his country. The Confédération Helvétique will make an advanced payment of 90 million CHF. There will be no interest involved in this payment and the amount of money will be deducted from Switzerland's ordinary contributions to CERN in later years.

  14. Foreign driving licences in Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2009-01-01

    1. Persons residing in Switzerland 1.1 Holders of a B, C, D, E or P-type "carte de légitimation" For holders of a B, C, D, E or P-type "carte de légitimation" issued by the Swiss Federal Department for Foreign Affairs (DFAE), current non-Swiss national driving licences are valid in Switzerland. If they so wish, holders of such driving licences may apply to the relevant road licensing authority in the canton where they live (Service des Automobiles et de la Navigation; for Geneva call + 41 22 388 30 30, website http://www.geneve.ch/san; for Vaud call + 41 21 316 82 10, website http://www.san.vd.ch/index.html) to exchange their driving licence for an equivalent Swiss licence (they must pass a test if they are not citizens of countries with which Switzerland has concluded an agreement on this matter, e.g. Member States of the European Union, the United States and Japan). However, such an exchange is not possible if the driving licence was issued in a foreign country during a...

  15. Foreign driving licences in Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    1. Persons residing in Switzerland 1.1 Holders of a B, C, D, E or P-type "carte de légitimation" For holders of a B, C, D, E or P-type "carte de légitimation" issued by the Swiss Federal Department for Foreign Affairs (DFAE), current non-Swiss national driving licences are valid in Switzerland. (see the official news about the new "Carte de légitimation P") If they so wish, holders of such driving licences may apply to the relevant road licensing authority in the canton where they live (Service des Automobiles et de la Navigation; for Geneva call + 41 22 388 30 30, website http://www.geneve.ch/san; for Vaud call + 41 21 316 82 10, website http://www.san.vd.ch/index.html) to exchange their driving licence for an equivalent Swiss licence (they must pass a test if they are not citizens of countries with which Switzerland has concluded an agreement on this matter, e.g. Member States of the European Union, the United States and Japan). However, such an exchange is not possible...

  16. Albert Einstein at the Z\\"urich Polytechnic: a rare mastery of Maxwell's electromagnetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, Galina

    2012-01-01

    Einstein at the Z\\"urich Polytechnic: he skipped classes, did not attend all the lectures of his Professors, and before going to the examinations he studied instead from the notebooks of his good friend from class, Marcel Grossmann. Einstein the free-thinker did not respect the two major professors in the Polytechnic - Heinrich Friedrich Weber and Jean Pernet - who eventually turned on him. He felt that his beloved science had lost its appeal because Weber's lectures did not include Maxwell's electromagnetic theory. Einstein seldom showed up to Pernet's practical physics course. By his fourth-rightness and his distrust of authority he had alienated his professors, especially Weber, who apparently conceived a particular dislike of him. At the Z\\"urich Polytechnic, Einstein could not easily bring himself to study what did not interest him. Most of his time he spent on his own studying Maxwell's theory and learning at first hand the works of great pioneers in science and philosophy: Boltzmann, Helmholtz, Kirchho...

  17. Feeding live prey to zoo animals: response of zoo visitors in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottle, Lauren; Tamir, Dan; Hyseni, Mimoza; Bühler, Dominique; Lindemann-Matthies, Petra

    2010-01-01

    In summer 2007, with the help of a written questionnaire, the attitudes of more than 400 visitors to the zoological garden of Zurich, Switzerland, toward the idea of feeding live insects to lizards, live fish to otters, and live rabbits to tigers were investigated. The majority of Swiss zoo visitors agreed with the idea of feeding live prey (invertebrates and vertebrates) to zoo animals, both off- and on-exhibit, except in the case of feeding live rabbits to tigers on-exhibit. Women and frequent visitors of the zoo disagreed more often with the on-exhibit feeding of live rabbits to tigers. Study participants with a higher level of education were more likely to agree with the idea of feeding live invertebrates and vertebrates to zoo animals off-exhibit. In comparison to an earlier study undertaken in Scotland, zoo visitors in Switzerland were more often in favor of the live feeding of vertebrates. Feeding live prey can counter the loss of hunting skills of carnivores and improve the animals' well-being. However, feeding enrichments have to strike a balance between optimal living conditions of animals and the quality of visitor experience. Our results show that such a balance can be found, especially when live feeding of mammals is carried out off-exhibit. A good interpretation of food enrichment might help zoos to win more support for the issue, and for re-introduction programs and conservation.

  18. Assessment and evaluation of geothermal potential in Switzerland; Atlas des ressources geothermiques suisses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andenmatten-Berthoud, N. [Geowatt AG, Zuerich (Switzerland); Kohl, T. [Eidgenossische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Institut de Geophysique, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2003-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy presents the first part of a project that aims at assessing the geothermal energy potential of Switzerland's underground. Due to the presence of the Alps the Swiss underground is highly heterogeneous with numerous geologic faults. Geothermal energy assessment has to be carried out region after region. The first steps consisted in collecting existing geological and hydrogeological data and finding out the best appropriate methodology. Analysis was restricted to the Northwest of Switzerland (Basle-Zurich area), which has a dense population - an important factor for future applications - and is better known than others, thanks to previous studies performed in conjunction with site pre-selection for future radioactive waste disposal facilities. In this area, sandstones and limestones are found on the crystalline bottom rock. Mathematical models and computer codes were developed for interpolation and extrapolation of local and regional data. Three dimensional finite-element techniques were used. The results are presented in diagrams and maps.

  19. Kagi steel warehouse, Winterthur, Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guetermann, A.

    1999-07-01

    The steel warehouse of the Kagi company in Winterthur near Zurich is a two-hall complex. The older (left) hall (3,000 m{sup 2}, 30,000 m{sup 3}) was completely uninsulated and has an open basement (6,500 m{sup 3}) to store infrequently used items. To prevent condensation on the cold steel surfaces in spring and early summer and to provide a smaller temperature difference between the hall and the basement for workers in the summer, (and avoid productivity loss due to illness), as well as to raise temperatures in the winter, the following measures were taken in a step-by-step approach: A ventilation system was installed (1986) to circulate sun-warmed air from under the roof to the basement. It was shown that, under the given circumstances, such a system worked well and was cost-effective in comparison with a conventional heating system. Complete external insulation was added to the hall (1994) and a roof-integrated 350 m{sup 2} air collector installed so that the circulating air could be warmed. Construction of a separate adjoining new hall (1996) profited from all the above experience. The air collector is integrated in the facade facing south-east. The first stage (1986) was monitored in detail, while only rough measurements were made for the modified system (1994). The 1996 system for the new hall was analysed by computer simulation. (author)

  20. [Neonatal hearing screening program and school education for deaf children in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao-Nguyen, M-H; Guyot, J-P

    2009-09-30

    A national hearing screening in newborns was introduced in Switzerland in the early 2000s. Since then, the number of maternities which applies has considerably increased. Test results are collected in a national database, giving a good overview of the quality of screening and incidence of deafness in Switzerland. The diagnosis and rehabilitation of deafness is earlier than before. This, combined to modem technologies allows mainstream integration of almost every deaf child.

  1. FOREIGN DRIVING LICENCES IN SWITZERLAND

    CERN Multimedia

    Relatiopns with the Host States Service

    2001-01-01

    1. PERSONS RESIDING IN SWITZERLAND 1.1 Holders of a B, C, D or E-type carte de légitimation For holders of B, C, D or E-type cartes de légitimation issued by the Swiss Federal Department for Foreign Affairs (Département fédéral suisse des Affaires étrangères, hereinafter called DFAE), current non-Swiss national driving licences are valid in Switzerland. Should they so wish, holders of such driving licences may apply to the relevant roads authority in the canton where they live (Service des Automobiles et de la Navigation ; for Geneva call 022/343 02 00, website: http://www.geneve.ch/san/welcome.html, for Vaud call 021/316 82 10, website: http://www.dse.vd.ch/auto/index.html) in order to exchange their driving licence for an equivalent Swiss licence. However, exchanges are not permitted if the driving licence was issued in a foreign country during a stay there of less than six months' duration while the person concerned was officially...

  2. Effects of sewage on benthic invertebrates in the lake of Zurich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubini-Ferlin, V.

    1986-01-01

    In 1981-83 sublittoral macroinvertebrates were collected by means of SCUBA diving from artificial substrates submerged near the outfalls from eight sewage treatment plants in Lake Zurich. Pollution around the outfall resulted on the one hand in a reduction of pollution intolerant benthic invertebrates, on the other hand in a considerable increase in the relative abundance of pollution tolerant taxa such as leeches, flatworms and crustaceans. Changes in the faunal composition were related to nutrient enrichment and changes in the nature of the substratum due to sedimentation of sewage sludge. Species diversity (Simpson index) showed low values near the outfall from some plants, high values near the outfall from others. Low species diversity did not always mark the sites where greatest pollution has been observed.

  3. La sûreté à l’aéroport de Zurich

    OpenAIRE

    Leese, Matthias; Wildi, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Après les attentats de Bruxelles et d’Istanbul en 2016, les mesures de sûreté ont été temporairement renforcées dans les aéroports internationaux, y compris celui de Zurich. Les responsables se demandent aujourd’hui comment améliorer la protection des aéroports côté ville et si certains contrôles de sûreté ne devraient pas être placés en amont. Néanmoins, les événements n’ont pas entraîné de modification profonde du dispositif de sûreté. ISSN:2296-0228

  4. Cooperation and Intertrade between Community Currencies : From Fundamentals to Rule-Making and Clearing Systems, including a Case Study of the Zurich Area, Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Martignoni (Jens)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCooperation, interchange or intertrade of complementary currencies is not yet very common, perhaps of because the funding impulse of most complementary currencies does not cover the question of interchange and cooperation yet, or because theoretical aspects are not often studied. The art

  5. [Native or not? Isotope analysis of a female skeleton on the 9th century A.D. from Elsau, Canton Zurich, Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tütken, Thomas; Langenegger, Elisabeth; Wild, Werner

    2008-03-01

    At Elsau near Winterthur (CH), a 9th century AD grave with a female skeleton was found in 2003. This grave was reopened one to six years after burial. After manipulating the partially decayed skeleton, the grave was filled with a layer of rocks and a claw of a sea eagle as well as the paw of a fox was placed on top. At least from this time onwards, the grave was situated in the annex of a church. Because of this special burial site for the 42 year old woman, who suffered from different severe illnesses, it is thought that she belonged to the upper class. The postmortal changes at the grave are exceptional and even after thorough research, no equivalent burial procedures are known from this area. To investigate the possibility if the woman migrated to the region of Elsau, the oxygen and strontium isotope composition of several teeth and one long bone of her skeleton was analysed. The results indicate a certain but restricted mobility within the northern Alpine foreland and as a result changes of the isotope composition of the food and drinking water during her childhood. Immigration from regions in which similar burial customs to those used for the woman persisted into the 9th century AD can be largely excluded based on the isotope composition of her skeletal remains. The mobility in the pre-Alpine region supports the interpretation that the woman belonged to the upper class, whose properties where widely distributed.

  6. Recent Advanced in Rare Earth Chemistry: IREC (International Rare Earth Conference) 85 Held at Zurich (Switzerland) on 4-8 Mar 85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-04

    diketone mixed cence-monitored stopped-flow. ligands. Sugimoto, Osaka City Univer- Table 3 shows a selection of topics sity, Japan. from the poster...solar concentrator, which uses their es, France) gave a tutorial on color principles (Figure 1). Nonradiative de- synthesis in products containing the...stitute 84/71 meeting on the synthesis , commercial use is in the color TV indus- structure, and reactivity of honoleptic try for brightness, color

  7. Switzerland and the Holocaust: Teaching Contested History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schar, Bernhard C.; Sperisen, Vera

    2010-01-01

    This study is about a history textbook which introduces the new transnational master-narrative of Holocaust memory into the classrooms of the German-speaking part of Switzerland. The script of the book entails a replacement of the formerly dominant view of Switzerland as a neutral nation resisting evil in favour of an image that aligns Switzerland…

  8. Counseling in Switzerland: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Roslyn; Henning, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    The authors review counseling in Switzerland and compare it with counseling in the United States. They evaluate the role of professional associations and programs and argue that the evolution of counseling is situated within the history and economic, social, and political systems of Switzerland. Findings suggest that Swiss counselors are ready to…

  9. Solar Research Programs at IRSOL, Switzerland

    CERN Document Server

    Ramelli, R; Stenflo, J O; Jetzer, P

    2009-01-01

    The Zurich IMaging POLarimeter (ZIMPOL) developed at ETH Zurich and installed permanently at the Gregory Coude Telescope at Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno (IRSOL) allows a polarimetric precision down to 10^-5 to be reached. This makes it possible to perform several accurate spectro-polarimetric measurements of scattering polarization and to investigate solar magnetic fields through the signatures of the Hanle and Zeeman effects. The research programs are currently being extended to monochromatic imaging of the Stokes vector with a recently installed Fabry-Perot rapidly tunable filter system with a narrow pass band of about 30mA. The spatial resolution is being improved by the installation of an Adaptive Optics system.

  10. Integrated care organizations in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchtold, Peter; Peytremann-Bridevaux, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The Swiss health care system is characterized by its decentralized structure and high degree of local autonomy. Ambulatory care is provided by physicians working mainly independently in individual private practices. However, a growing part of primary care is provided by networks of physicians and health maintenance organizations (HMOs) acting on the principles of gatekeeping. The share of insured choosing an alternative (managed care) type of basic health insurance and therefore restrict their choice of doctors in return for lower premiums increased continuously since 1990. To date, an average of one out of eight insured person in Switzerland, and one out of three in the regions in north-eastern Switzerland, opted for the provision of care by general practitioners in one of the 86 physician networks or HMOs. About 50% of all general practitioners and more than 400 other specialists have joined a physician networks. Seventy-three of the 86 networks (84%) have contracts with the healthcare insurance companies in which they agree to assume budgetary co-responsibility, i.e., to adhere to set cost targets for particular groups of patients. Within and outside the physician networks, at regional and/or cantonal levels, several initiatives targeting chronic diseases have been developed, such as clinical pathways for heart failure and breast cancer patients or chronic disease management programs for patients with diabetes. Swiss physician networks and HMOs were all established solely by initiatives of physicians and health insurance companies on the sole basis of a healthcare legislation (Swiss Health Insurance Law, KVG) which allows for such initiatives and developments. The relevance of these developments towards more integration of healthcare as well as their implications for the future are discussed.

  11. Cost of dementia in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Eliane; Marti, Michael; Werner, Sarah; Sommer, Heini

    2010-09-10

    The aim of this study was (a) to estimate the cost of dementia in Switzerland, (b) to compare the average annual cost for people with dementia who live at home and those living in an institution and (c) to analyse how the average cost per person with dementia who lives at home increases with the severity of dementia. This prevalence-based cost-of-illness study from a societal perspective combined top-down and bottom-up approaches and included both direct and indirect costs of dementia. Cost estimations were based on Swiss national statistics and surveys, as well as international reviews and expert interviews. The total annual cost of dementia amounted up to CHF 6.3 billion for the year 2007. Together, institutional and informal care accounted for over 90% of the cost. The average annual cost was estimated at CHF 55'300 per person with dementia who lives at home and at CHF 68'900 per person who lives in an institution. The cost per person living at home with severe dementia was nearly five times the cost per person with mild dementia. The present study indicates that dementia imposes a considerable economic burden on Swiss society. The cost of dementia is dominated by the costs of care. Diagnosis and treatment related costs are minor. These findings are consistent with contemporary international studies on the subject. The contribution of informal caregivers is substantial since they account for 44% of the total cost of dementia (based on market cost valuation). Given demographic developments in Switzerland, healthcare decision making should have an interest in securing this potential for the future.

  12. Risks associated with the use of morphine for analgesia: attitudes and perceptions amongst nursing students in French-speaking Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verloo H

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Henk Verloo,1 Christine Cohen,1 Corinne Borloz,1 Emmanuel K Mpinga,2,3 Philippe Chastonay3,41University of Applied Sciences, Nursing, La Source, Lausanne, Switzerland; 2Swiss School of Public Health Plus, Zurich, Switzerland; 3Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, 4Unit of Development and Research in Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, SwitzerlandAims: This paper reports on the attitudes and perceptions of risks associated with the use of morphine for analgesia among nursing students and explores the relationship between those attitudes and perceptions and sociodemographic data.Background: Attitudes and perception of risks regarding the use of morphine for analgesia amongst nurses remain problematic, thus potentially leading to important consequences regarding the quality of pain management.Methods: A cross-sectional survey among 557 nursing-students enrolled in the 3-year bachelor program was conducted in the French-speaking part of Switzerland from May to December 2010. The instrument's validity and internal reliability were tested before use. Twenty-two items evaluated attitudes and perception of risks when using morphine.Results: Attitudes and perception of risks regarding the use of morphine for analgesia are evolving significantly during the 3 years of education. Sociodemographic data have little influence, if any, on attitudes and perception of risks.Conclusion: The positive evolution of attitudes over the years of training pleads for the crucial role played by education regarding development of competency in pain management and nursing care.Keywords: morphinophobia, attitudes, risk perception, nursing students, myths of morphine, theory of reasoned action

  13. First water vortex power plant in Switzerland. An association uses innovative technology. Pilot plant is out into operation; Erstes Wasserwirbelkraftwerk in der Schweiz. Eine Genossenschaft setzt innovative Technologie ein. Pilotanlage in Betrieb genommen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Styger, Daniel

    2011-07-01

    A water vortex power plant is a small hydroelectric power plant which is suitable for power production in a drop of 0.7 meters and at water volumes above 1 m{sup 3}/s. The pilot plant of the Genossenschaft Wasserwirbelkraftwerk Schweiz (Schftland, Canton of Aargau) is operated with a basin diameter of 6.5 meter and a height of 1.7 meters. Thus, an annual electric power 80-130 MWh is generated. The company WWK Energie GmbH (Schoeftland, Switzerland) operates a test facility in the Technopark Aargau in Windisch. Performance and manufacturing costs should be optimized further under consideration of ecologic aspects.

  14. The ‘Indianisation of Switzerland'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyimóthy, Szilvia

    This paper demonstrates how Indian popular cultural expressions (Bollywood films) are transforming sociospatial textures in central Switzerland. Empirical illustrations are derived from various data sources from an ongoing fieldwork conducted in multiple Swiss locations (Interlaken, Luzern...... as promotional material (printed and online). Following a short historical account of Bollywood tourism in Switzerland, an analysis of the recent place promotion and branding campaigns is presented, revealing the interplay between established and emerging (Occidental) imageries of the Alps. Second, Bollywood...

  15. VISAS FOR SWITZERLAND AND FRANCE

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2001-01-01

    Henceforth only the undermentioned persons shall be authorized by the Advisor for Relations with the Member States and the Advisor for Relations with the non-Member States to sign official letters of invitation and other related documents : James V. ALLABY Lyndon EVANS Cecilia JARLSKOG Nicolas KOULBERG Hélène MAUGER Michelle MAZERAND Steve MYERS Chris ONIONS Monica PEPE-ALTARELLI Agnita QUERROU Karl-Heinz SCHINDL. As a precautionary measure, all persons coming to CERN should obtain all the requisite information in good time on entry requirements applying to him or her in Switzerland and France, particularly with regard to visas. The practice is for visas to be issued by the consulate competent for the place of residence, and in some cases a special procedure must be followed. Any further information required may be obtained from the Swiss and French consulates. You may also consult the Web pages of the Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (at http://www.eda.admin.ch/eda/e/home/e...

  16. VISAS FOR SWITZERLAND AND FRANCE

    CERN Document Server

    Service des Relations avec les Pays Hôtes

    2000-01-01

    ReminderAs a precautionary measure, everyone coming to CERN should obtain all the requisite information in good time on entry requirements applying to him or her in Switzerland and France, particularly with regard to visas. The practice is for visas to be issued by the consulate competent for the place of residence, and in some cases a special procedure must be followed.Swiss and French consulates are available for any information required. You may also consult the Web pages of the Swiss Department of Foreign Affairs (at http://194.6.168.115/site/hand/eda/botschaften-text.html) or those of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs (at http://www.diplomatie.fr/venir/visas/index.html). Information is also provided on the Relations with the Host States Service Web pages (at http://www.cern.ch/relations/). The authorities of the Host States have informed the Organisation on several occasions that they require scrupulous observance of the legislation in this field.Relations with the Host States Servicehttp://www.cern...

  17. VISAS FOR SWITZERLAND AND FRANCE

    CERN Document Server

    Service des Relations avec les Pays Hôtes

    1999-01-01

    As a precautionary measure, everyone coming to CERN should obtain all the requisite information in good time on entry requirements applying to him or her in Switzerland and France, particularly with regard to visas. The practice is for visas to be issued by the consulate competent for the place of residence, and in some cases a special procedure must be followed.Swiss and French consulates are available for any information required. You may also consult the Web pages of the Swiss Department of Foreign Affairs (at http://194.6.168.115/site/hand/eda/botschaften-text.html) or those of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs (at http://www.diplomatie.fr/venir/visas/index.html). Information is also provided on the Relations with the Host States Service Web pages (at http://www.cern.ch/relations/). The authorities of the Host States have informed the Organization on several occasions that they require scrupulous observance of the legislation in this field.Relations with the Host StatesServicehttp://www.cern.ch/relat...

  18. Evaluation of a sun safety education programme for primary school students in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinau, Daphne; Meier, Christoph R; Gerber, Nathalie; Surber, Christian

    2014-07-01

    The incidence of skin cancer has increased worldwide, with rates being especially high in Switzerland compared with other European countries. Extensive sun exposure during childhood is considered a key factor for skin carcinogenesis. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of a school-based sun safety education programme developed by the Swiss Cancer Leagues on primary school students' sun-related knowledge, protective behaviours and sunburn rates. In summer 2011, 1-h sun safety education sessions were held at 33 primary schools throughout the Canton of Zurich (North-Eastern Switzerland). Children in the participating school classes (first, second and third graders) answered a questionnaire on their sun-related knowledge, behaviours and sunburn experience shortly before and 1 year after the intervention. Overall, 3110 completed pretest and 1738 post-test questionnaires were eligible for analysis. The evaluation of pretest data showed considerable room for improvement in terms of sun-related knowledge, considering that merely a good half of the children were conscious that the sun may present a hazard to health. Overall, more than 95% of students benefited from the protection of sunscreen (application by parents: 73%; application by child: 66%), but only 36% stated that they generally sought shade on sunny days. After the intervention, knowledge increased considerably and significantly (P<0.0001), but there was no change in sun-protective behaviours (use of sunscreen, seeking shade). However, we observed a nonsignificant trend towards decreased sunburn rates. The brief one-time sun safety education sessions were effective in sustainably improving children's sun-related knowledge and possibly to some extent in decreasing their sunburn rates.

  19. Scientific basis to assess the potential for geological sequestration of CO{sub 2} in Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, L. W.; Chevalier, G. [Institut fuer Geologie, Universitaet Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Leu, W. [Geoform AG, Geologische Beratungen und Studien, Villeneuve (former Minusio) (Switzerland)

    2010-07-01

    Possibilities to sequester anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in deep geological formations are being investigated worldwide, but the potential within Switzerland has not yet been evaluated. This study presents a first-order appraisal based solely on geological criteria collated from the literature. The Swiss Molasse Basin (SMB) and the adjacent Folded Jura are the only realms of the country where CO{sub 2} could conceivably be stored in saline aquifers. Evaluation of geological criteria at the basin-wide scale shows that the SMB-Jura has moderate potential (score of 0.6 on a scale from 0 to 1) when compared to basins elsewhere. At the intrabasinal scale, inspection of the stratigraphy reveals four regional candidate aquifers that are sealed by suitable caprocks: top Basement plus basal Mesozoic sandstones, all sealed by the Anhydrite Group; Upper Muschelkalk sealed by the Gipskeuper; Hauptrogenstein sealed by the Effinger Member, and Upper Malm plus Lower Cretaceous sealed by the Lower Freshwater Molasse. Nine geological criteria are defined to evaluate the storage potential of these and other smaller-scale candidates. A numerical scoring and weighting scheme allows the criteria to be assessed simultaneously, permitting the storage potential to be depicted using the 0-1 scale in contoured maps. Approximately 5000 km{sup 2} of the central SMB exhibits potentials between 0.6 and 0.96. The Fribourg-Olten-Lucerne area is the most favoured owing to the presence of several sealed aquifers within the preferred 800-2500 m depth interval, and to its low seismicity, low geothermal gradient, low fault density, and long groundwater residence times. Smaller areas with good potential lie between Zurich and St. Gall. In contrast, western Switzerland, the Jura and the southern SMB have markedly poorer potential. Considering only the portions of the aquifers with potential above 0.6, the theoretical, effective storage capacity of the basin is estimated to be 2680 million tonnes of CO{sub 2

  20. The University Hospital Zurich Offers a Medical Online Consultation Service for Men With Intimate Health Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Weitmann, Sabine; Schulz, Urs; Schmid, Daniel Max; Brockes, Christiane

    2017-05-01

    The University Hospital of Zurich offers a text-based, Medical Online Consultation Service to the public since 1999. Users asked health questions anonymously to tele-doctors. This study focused on the characteristics of male enquirers with intimate health problems, the content of their questions, the medical advice given by tele-doctors and the rating of the service to prove the benefit of an online service for medical laymen. This retrospective study included 5.1% of 3,305 enquiries from 2008 to 2010 using the International Classification of Diseases-10 and International Classification of Primary Care codes relevant for intimate and sexual health problems in men. A professional text analysis program (MAXQDA) supported the content analysis, which is based on the procedure of inductive category development described by Mayring. The average age was 40 years, 63.1% enquirers had no comorbidity, in 62.5% it was the first time they consulted a doctor, and 70.2% asked for a specific, single, intimate health issue. In 64.3%, the most important organ of concern was the penis. Overall, 30.4% asked about sexually transmitted diseases. In 74.4% a doctor visit was recommended to clarify the health issue. The rating of the problem solving was very good. The service was mainly used by younger men without comorbidity and no previous contact with a doctor with regard to an intimate health problem. The anonymous setting of the teleconsultation provided men individual, professional medical advice and decision support. Teleconsultation is suggested to empower patients by developing more health literacy.

  1. Field evaluation of baited traps for surveillance of Aedes japonicus japonicus in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrino, F; Schaffner, F; Forgia, D L; Paslaru, A I; Torgerson, P R; Mathis, A; Veronesi, E

    2016-03-01

    The efficacy of Centers for Disease Control (CDC) miniature light traps and ovitraps was tested in the outskirts of the city of Zurich in Switzerland for their use in the surveillance of Aedes (Hulecoeteomyia) japonicus japonicus (Theobald) (Diptera: Culicidae), the invasive Asian bush mosquito. Sets of single CDC traps were run overnight (n = 18) in three different environments (forest, suburban and urban) in 3 × 3 Latin square experimental designs. Traps were baited with: (a) carbon dioxide (CO2 ); (b) CO2 plus light, or (c) CO2 plus lure blend [Combi FRC 3003 (iGu® )]. At the same locations, mosquito eggs were collected weekly using standard ovitraps baited with different infusions (oak, hay or tap water) and equipped with different oviposition substrates (a block of extruded polystyrene, a germination paper strip or a wooden stick). Data were analysed using Poisson and negative binomial general linear models. The use of light (P ovitraps compared with standing tap water (P > 0.05), and extruded polystyrene blocks were preferred as an oviposition substrate over wooden sticks (P ovitraps containing standing tap water and polystyrene oviposition blocks can be considered as efficient and simple tools for use in Ae. j. japonicus surveillance programmes. © 2015 The Royal Entomological Society.

  2. The role of government in supporting the emergence of clean energy venture capital investing in Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerer, M.J.; Wuestenhagen, R.

    2005-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at the role of the Swiss government in supporting the provision of venture capital for clean energy projects. Topics examined include the lack of sufficient venture capital investment in clean energy technology, the situation encountered in Switzerland today as far as energy entrepreneurship is concerned, key challenges and cultural, legal and fiscal aspects. Present government support in these areas, the relevance of current Swiss programmes and improvements that are to be made are also discussed. Also, activities in other countries are examined and suggestions are made concerning new activities to improve the situation in Switzerland.

  3. [Remedy for shortage or risk for national security? The search for oil in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Lea; Gisler, Monika

    2014-03-01

    Over several decades, geologists, entrepreneurs, politicians, and public authorities dealt with a potential petroleum occurrence in Switzerland. They provided scientific expertise, granted concessions, invested capital and sank bore holes. Although the endeavour was never successful economically, it reveals how closely related geopolitical situations and the exploitation of natural resources were. This article investigates the search for crude oil in Switzerland from the 1930s until the 1960s, combining a history of science and technology perspective with a history of the political regulations and economic considerations concerning the extractive industry. It traces the changing fears and hopes about potential oil occurrences in Switzerland: From an investment to overcome future shortages, to the risk of imperial desires if oil would be found in abundance.

  4. Imperial College Alumni Association in Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Are you a graduate of Imperial College London? If so, you might be interested in its new Swiss alumni association for graduate engineers and scientists. The aim of the founder members is to create a network of the several hundred graduates of Imperial College working at CERN, in Geneva, Lausanne and Zurich with a view to organising social and scientific events, informing members of the studies and research done by Imperial College, setting up a link between the College and Swiss academic institutes and, of course, building up an alumni directory. Membership applications and requests for further information should be sent to: Imperial College Alumni (ICA) - Swiss chapter Case Postale CH-1015 Lausanne Tel. : + 41 22 794 57 94 Fax : + 41 22 794 28 14 Email : imperialcollegeswissalumni@epfl.ch

  5. Age and gender differences in half-Ironman triathlon performances – the Ironman 70.3 Switzerland from 2007 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knechtle B

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Beat Knechtle,1,2 Christoph Alexander Rüst,2 Thomas Rosemann,2 Romuald Lepers31Gesundheitszentrum St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland; 2Institute of General Practice and Health Services Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 3INSERM U1093, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Burgundy, Dijon, FranceBackground: To date, the age-related decline and gender differences in performance have been investigated for both Olympic and Ironman distance triathlons, but not for the intermediate distance (ie, the half-Ironman distance triathlon covering 1.9 km swimming, 90 km cycling and 21.1 km running, Ironman 70.3®. We determined the age-related differences in performance and the gender differences for female and male half-Ironman triathletes of 6303 finishers (1115 women and 5188 men at the Ironman 70.3 Switzerland in Rapperswil, Switzerland, from 2007 to 2010.Methods: Analyses of variance were used to examine performance trends and differences between the genders.Results: Gender differences in total event time were affected by age (F = 4.2; P < 0.001. Women achieved their best performance between 25 and 39 years whereas men attained their fastest race times between 18 and 39 years. The gender difference for ages 18–24 years was significantly (P < 0.01 greater compared to older age groups (25–29 years and 40–44 years, and the gender difference for age groups 45–49 years and 50–54 years was significantly (P < 0.01 greater than for those between the ages of 35–39 years.Conclusion: The present data suggest that the fastest race time in a half-Ironman triathlon was achieved between the age of 25 and 39 years for women and between 18 and 39 years for men. Further studies considering the influences on endurance performance are required to better understand the age and gender interactions in half-Ironman triathlon performances, and these studies may provide valuable information to delineate the difference in performance between female

  6. Antihypertensive combination therapy in primary care offices: results of a cross-sectional survey in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roas S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Susanne Roas,1 Felix Bernhart,2 Michael Schwarz,3 Walter Kaiser,4 Georg Noll5 1Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital, Zurich, 2Private Practice, Biberist, 3Ambulatorium Wiesendamm, Basel, 4Healthworld (Schweiz AG, Steinhausen, 5HerzKlinik Hirslanden, Zurich, Switzerland Background: Most hypertensive patients need more than one substance to reach their target blood pressure (BP. Several clinical studies indicate the high efficacy of antihypertensive combinations, and recent guidelines recommend them in some situations even as initial therapies. In general practice they seem widespread, but only limited data are available on their effectiveness under the conditions of everyday life. The objectives of this survey among Swiss primary care physicians treating hypertensive patients were: to know the frequency of application of different treatment modalities (monotherapies, free individual combinations, single-pill combinations; to see whether there are relationships between prescribed treatment modalities and patient characteristics, especially age, treatment duration, and comorbidities; and to determine the response rate (percentage of patients reaching target BP of different treatment modalities under the conditions of daily practice. Methods: This cross-sectional, observational survey among 228 randomly chosen Swiss primary care physicians analyzed data for 3,888 consecutive hypertensive patients collected at one single consultation. Results: In this survey, 31.9% of patients received monotherapy, 41.2% two substances, 20.9% three substances, and 4.7% more than three substances. By combination mode, 34.9% took free individual combinations and 30.0% took fixed-dose single-pill combinations. Combinations were more frequently given to older patients with a long history of hypertension and/or comorbidities. In total, 67.8% of patients achieved their BP target according to their physician's judgment. When compared, single

  7. Madagascar rich and in- transparent

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    esis 2 requires a deeper understanding of the financial, legal, and institutional mechanisms ... Promoting African Publishing and Education www.ioeink.com .... and Development. Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich, Switzerland.

  8. [Bites of venomous snakes in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plate, Andreas; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Schneemann, Markus

    2016-06-08

    Although snake bites are rare in Europe, there are a constant number of snake bites in Switzerland. There are two domestic venomous snakes in Switzerland: the aspic viper (Vipera aspis) and the common European adder (Vipera berus). Bites from venomous snakes are caused either by one of the two domestic venomous snakes or by an exotic venomous snake kept in a terrarium. Snake- bites can cause both a local and/or a systemic envenoming. Potentially fatal systemic complications are related to disturbances of the hemostatic- and cardiovascular system as well as the central or peripheral nervous system. Beside a symptomatic therapy the administration of antivenom is the only causal therapy to neutralize the venomous toxins.

  9. OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE TO EXTERNAL RADIATION IN SWITZERLAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, S; Baechler, S; Damet, J; Elmiger, R; Frei, D; Giannini, S; Leupin, A; Sarott, F; Schuh, R

    2016-09-01

    Individual monitoring for both external and internal exposures is well regulated in Switzerland. The article gives an overview on the occupational exposure to external radiation of workers based on the data collected in the Swiss national dose registry (NDR) in 2013. The NDR records the monthly doses of radiation workers since the introduction of ICRP 60 recommendations and is manifested in the Swiss ordinance since 1994. Annual dose limits for effective dose are typically exceeded once a year in Switzerland, mostly in medicine. The NDR is a useful optimisation tool to identify and characterise areas with the highest exposures. While exceeded dose limits were often related to accidental acute exposure in the past, they are now more related to continuous exposure during normal work, especially in medicine.

  10. Federal census of the population in Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2011-01-01

    A federal census of the 2010 population has been underway since January 2011. The objective is to provide important insights into the composition of the resident population, households and families in Switzerland and identify trends. The census methods have been modernised so that it covers only information that is not already contained in Federal, Cantonal and municipal registries of persons; the information will be gathered via questionnaires issued to approximately 3% of the population residing in Switzerland. In order to obtain representative information about the local population, the Canton of Geneva has requested that questionnaires be issued to international civil servants and members of their families aged 15 and over who live in the Canton. They will be invited to respond to the questionnaire on a strictly voluntary basis. If they choose not to respond to the questionnaire, they will not be contacted again. The Permanent Swiss Mission to the International Organizations in Geneva wishes in advance t...

  11. An integrated model of care to counter high incidence of HIV and sexually transmitted diseases in men who have sex with men – initial analysis of service utilizers in Zurich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwappach David LB

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As other countries, Switzerland experiences a high or even rising incidence of HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI among men who have sex with men (MSM. An outpatient clinic for gay men ("Checkpoint" was opened in 2006 in Zurich (Switzerland in order to provide sexual health services. The clinic provides counselling, testing, medical treatment and follow-up at one location under an "open-door-policy" and with a high level of personal continuity. We describe first experiences with the new service and report the characteristics of the population that utilized it. Methods During the 6-month evaluation period, individuals who requested counselling, testing or treatment were asked to participate in a survey at their first visit prior to the consultation. The instrument includes questions regarding personal data, reasons for presenting, sexual behaviour, and risk situations. Number and results of HIV/STI tests and treatments for STI were also recorded. Results During the evaluation period, 632 consultations were conducted and 247 patients were seen by the physician. 406 HIV tests were performed (3.4% positive. 402 men completed the entry survey (64% of all consultations. The majority of respondents had 4 and more partners during the last 12 months and engaged in either receptive, insertive or both forms of anal intercourse. More than half of the responders used drugs or alcohol to get to know other men or in conjunction with sexual activity (42% infrequently, 10% frequently and 0.5% used drugs always. The main reasons for requesting testing were a prior risk situation (46.3%, followed by routine screening without a prior risk situation (24.1% and clarification of HIV/STI status due to a new relationship (29.6%. A fifth of men that consulted the service had no history of prior tests for HIV or other STIs. Conclusion Since its first months of activity, the service achieved high levels of recognition, acceptance and demand in

  12. Biocrystallography in Switzerland: achievements and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grütter, Markus G

    2014-01-01

    The first protein crystallography group in Switzerland was installed at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel approximately 40 years ago. Since then protein crystallography has grown and matured remarkably and is now established in the molecular biology, biochemistry or biological medicine departments of most major Swiss Universities as well as in the pharmaceutical industry and in biotech startup companies. Swiss X-ray biocrystallography groups have made remarkable contributions from the beginning and have brought Switzerland to the forefront in biostructural research during the last 5 to 10 years. Switzerland has now a leading position in the areas of supramolecular complexes, membrane proteins and structure-based drug design in pharmaceutical and biotech industries. Protein crystallography on the outer membrane protein ompF as well as the development of the lipidic cubic phase crystallization methodology has been pioneered at the Biozentrum. The latter found its somewhat late recognition through the recent explosion in structure determinations of the seven transmembrane helix G-coupled receptors. Highlights from Swiss structural biology groups in the field of supramolecular complexes include the structures of ribosomal particles, of the nucleosome and the pilus assembly complex of uropathogenic E. coli. On the membrane protein side advances in the field of ABC transporters and ion channels are world-recognized achievements of Swiss structural biology. Dedicated laboratories at many academic and industrial institutions, their current research programs, the availability of excellent infrastructure and the continuing efforts to build new facilities such as the SwissFEL indicate an even brighter future for structural biology in Switzerland.

  13. Inter-Industry Wage Differentials in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Ferro-Luzzi

    1994-01-01

    This paper analyzes the Swiss inter-industry wage structure in the light of the current debate on the efficiency wage hypothesis. Results clearly indicate the presence of an industry component in the determinants of earnings in Switzerland. No definite conclusion emerges though as to the source of wage variation. The stability of the wage structure and the role of tenure point to the existence of "wage rents". However, these results may be severely biased if unobserved ability is used by firm...

  14. CPAFFC Delegation Visits Switzerland and Poland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang; Qing

    2013-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Swiss-Chinese Association(SCA) and the Adam Michiewicz Institute (AMI) of Poland,a CPAFFC delegation led by Vice President Jing Dunquan visited Switzerland and Poland from October 15 to 24, 2012,and met leading members of the relevant organizations. They discussed the international situation,cultural cooperation and exchanges between local governments and pledged further coopera-

  15. Ten years of integrated care in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Berchtold

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In Switzerland, a growing part of primary care is provided by networks of physicians and health maintenance organizations (HMOs acting on the principles of gatekeeping. To date, an average of one out of eight insured person in Switzerland, and one out of three in the regions in north-eastern Switzerland, opted for the provision of care by general practitioners in one of the 86 physician networks or HMOs. About 50% of all general practitioners and more than 400 other specialists have joined a physician networks. Seventy-three of the 86 networks (84% have contracts with the healthcare insurance companies in which they agree to assume budgetary co-responsibility, i.e. to adhere to set cost targets for particular groups of patients. Within and outside the physician networks, at regional and/or cantonal levels, several initiatives targeting chronic diseases have been developed, such as clinical pathways for heart failure and breast cancer patients or chronic disease management programs for patients with diabetes. The relevance of these developments towards more integration of healthcare as well as their implications for the future are discussed.

  16. Debates about assisted suicide in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Sandra; La Harpe, Romano

    2012-12-01

    Assisted suicide is allowed in 3 states of the United States (Oregon, Washington, Montana) but only if performed by a physician.On the opposite, in Switzerland, at the beginning of the 20th century, the Swiss Penal Code referred to assisted suicide in the context of honor or an unhappy love affair. It was only in 1985 that Exit Deutsche Schweiz (Exit for German-speaking Switzerland) "medically" assisted the first patient to end his life.Even if authorized by the Swiss law upon certain conditions, assisted suicide is subject to debates for ethical reasons. The Swiss Academy of Medical Sciences described directives to guide physicians on this difficult subject.Different studies showed an increase in the number of medical-assisted suicide in Switzerland since the 1990s. Now, this number seems to be quite stable. Assisted suicide is authorized in a few hospitals under strict conditions (especially when returning home is impossible).Thus, according to the Swiss law, any person could perform assisted suicide; this is essentially performed by 3 main associations, using pentobarbital on medical prescription as lethal substance.Generally speaking, the Swiss population is rather in favor of assisted suicide. Among politics, the debate has been tough until 2010, when the Federal Council decided not to modify the Swiss Penal Code concerning assisted suicide.

  17. Status of Court Management in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lienhard

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available At an international level, and in particular in the Anglo-American region, there is a long tradition of scientific study of court management. Thus in Australia there has for quite some time been the Australasian Institution of Judicial Administration (AIJA, which concerns itself with every aspect of court administration. In the USA too, research and education in the field of court management has been institutionalized for a long time, in particular by the National Center for State Courts (NCSC and the related Institute for Court Management (ICM. In Europe, a working group known as the European Commission for the Efficiency of Justice (CEPEJ deals with issues of court management as part of the activities of the Council of Europe. The fact that court management is also increasingly becoming an important topic in the European area was demonstrated by the establishment, in 2008, of a new professional journal that focuses on court management, the International Journal for Court Administration (IJCA. In Switzerland, the issue of court management was discussed for the first time in the course of the New Public Management (NPM projects in the cantons, but was often limited to the question of whether to include the courts in the relevant cantonal NPM model. Generally speaking, court management was a matter that was only sporadically raised, such as at a symposium of the Swiss Society of Administrative Sciences (SSAS in 2003 or more recently in an article in which theses on good court management are formulated. In Switzerland even today there is a general dearth of empirical and other theoretical findings on the mode of operation of the justice system and its interaction with society, or with specific social target groups. For example, it was only in 2009 that the first indications were obtained of how cases in various categories were handled by the highest administrative and social insurance courts in Switzerland. In the fields of criminal and civil

  18. Similarities and dissimilarities between the movement ABC-2 and the Zurich neuromotor assessment in children with suspected developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakebeeke, Tanja H; Egloff, Kristin; Caflisch, Jon; Chaouch, Aziz; Rousson, Valentin; Largo, Remo H; Jenni, Oskar G

    2014-11-01

    An established tool for the assessment of motor performance in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) is the Movement-ABC-2 (M-ABC-2). The Zurich Neuromotor Assessment (ZNA) is also widely used for the evaluation of children's motor performance, but has not been compared with the M-ABC-2. Fifty-one children (39 males) between 5 and 7 years of age with suspected DCD were assessed using the M-ABC-2 and the ZNA. Rank correlations between scores of different test components were calculated. The structure of the tests was explored using canonical-correlation analysis. The correlation between total scores of the two motor tests was reasonable (0.66; pdisorder.

  19. [The attitude of children of divorce to child custody, court hearings and visiting rights--a survey in Zurich].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, W

    1989-06-01

    In a study conducted in Zurich, 1877 apprentices were asked to fill out one of two questionnaires on child custody, court hearings and visiting rights. The results reported in the present paper are based on the responses of the 338 youths (18%) whose parents were divorced. Of the youths included, 46.4% said the child's wishes should be the main criterion in custody decisions; 25.7% were in favor of joint custody and 39.1% opposed to it. The majority of the apprentices thought the child should be heard in court (lowest age recommended: 11 +/- 3.18 years). How often the subjects visited the parent who did not have custody depended on their age at the time of the divorce and whether their parents had remarried.

  20. Sequence heterogeneity in the 18S rRNA gene in Theileria equi from horses presented in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin; Meli, Marina L; Zhang, Yi; Meili, Theres; Stirn, Martina; Riond, Barbara; Weibel, Beatrice; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2016-05-15

    A reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was adapted and applied for equine blood samples collected at the animal hospital of the University of Zurich to determine the presence of piroplasms in horses in Switzerland. A total of 100 equine blood samples were included in the study. The V4 hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and analyzed using the RLB assay. Samples from seven horses hybridized to a Theileria/Babesia genus-specific and a Theileria genus-specific probe. Of these, two hybridized also to the Theileria equi-specific probe. The other five positive samples did not hybridize to any of the species-specific probes, suggesting the presence of unrecognized Theileria variants or genotypes. The 18S rRNA gene of the latter five samples were sequenced and found to be closely related to T. equi isolated from horses in Spain (AY534822) and China (KF559357) (≥98.4% identity). Four of the seven horses that tested positive had a documented travel history (France, Italy, and Spain) or lived abroad (Hungary). The present study adds new insight into the presence and sequence heterogeneity of T. equi in Switzerland. The results prompt that species-specific probes must be designed in regions of the gene unique to T. equi. Of note, none of the seven positive horses were suspected of having Theileria infection at the time of presentation to the clinic. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of equine piroplasma infections outside of endemic areas and in horses without signs of piroplasmosis.

  1. Physics technologies in medicine

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit; Kreis, Roland; Wildermuth, Simon; Buck, Alfred; Von Schulthess, Gustav K

    2002-01-01

    Modern medicine is a large consumer of physics technologies. The series of lectures covers medical imaging starting with an overview and the history of medical imaging. Then follows four lectures covering x-ray imaging positron emission tomography imaging blood flow by ultrasound magnetic resonance 10 June 2002 100 Years of Medical Imaging Pr. Gustav K. von Schulthess MD, PhD, University of Zurich History and overview of Medical Imaging 11 June 2002 X-rays: still going strong Dr. Simon Wildermuth, MD, University Hospital Zurich Multidetector computed tomography: New developments and applications Since its introduction in 1992, spiral computed tomography (CT) scanners constructed with a single row of detectors have revolutionized imaging of thoracic and abdominal diseases. Current state-of-the-art models use up to 16 detectors and are capable of acquiring 16 contiguous slices of data with each gantry rotation; systems with 32 data acquisition units (and more) are currently in development. The principal advan...

  2. Convention on nuclear safety. Questions posted to Switzerland in 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Switzerland signed the Convention on Nuclear Safety (CNS) on 31 October 1995. It ratified the Convention on 12 September 1996, which came into force on 11 December 1996. In accordance with Article 5 of the Convention, Switzerland has prepared and submitted 4 country reports for Review Meetings of Contracting Parties organised in 1999, 2002, 2005 and 2006. These meetings at the IAEA headquarters in Vienna were attended by a Swiss delegation. Most of the requirements of the articles of the Convention were already standard practice in Switzerland. In the last years, all Swiss nuclear power plants (NPPs) as well as the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (HSK) built up documented quality management systems. The independence of HSK from licensing authorities is fulfilled on a technical level. In 2005, a new Nuclear Energy Act came into force requiring formal independence of the supervisory authorities from the licensing authorities. A separate act to legally settle the Inspectorate's fully independent status was adopted by Parliament. HSK participates in international co-operation and is represented in numerous nuclear safety working groups in order to ensure the exchange of scientific, technical and regulatory know-how. The regulatory processes applied to the licensing and safety surveillance of nuclear installations and their operation are up to date with the current state of science and technology. Deterministic and probabilistic safety evaluations guide and prioritise inspections and provide the basis for a graded approach to safety review and assessment. The surveillance of the NPPs' operating, control and safety systems, their component performance and integrity, their organisational and human aspects as well as the management, conditioning and interim storage of radioactive waste are permanent features of the supervisory authority's activities. Within the frame of a new integrated oversight process there is an annual systematic assessment of

  3. Energy supply and energy policy in Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiener, E. (Bundesamt fuer Energiewirtschaft, Bern (Switzerland))

    1985-04-01

    The article gives an outline of the problems of energy supply in Switzerland, with some emphasis upon the extent to which Federal and Cantonal constitutions and the functioning of Swiss democracy, notably the relatively frequent recourse to referendums and the strong public interest in conservation and ecology, affect the nature of decisions upon technical matters such as the authorisation and siting of generating plants and the construction of transmission lines. The dominating factor in the energy situation in Switzerland has been and will remain the need to import about 84% of the energy used, mainly in the form of oil, the cost of which is nearly 10% of the total value of all imports. Water power accounts for 13% of the total supply and is approaching the limit of its possible development. The use of energy constantly increases but the political difficulties in the way of providing the consequently necessary resources increase if anything still more rapidly. The resulting difficult situation is discussed in some detail. The author urges the energy industry to view its political difficulties in a positive manner, and to see them rather as a spur to effort than as merely an unwelcome obstacle to private enterprise.

  4. Modern Vaccines/Adjuvants Formulation--Session 2 (Plenary II): May 15-17, 2013--Lausanne, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Nicolas

    2013-09-01

    On the 15-17th May 2013, the Fourth International Conference on Modern Vaccines/Adjuvants Formulation was organized in Lausanne, Switzerland, and gathered stakeholders from academics and from the industry to discuss several challenges, advances and promises in the field of vaccine adjuvants. Plenary session 2 of the meeting was composed of four different presentations covering: (1) the recent set-up of an adjuvant technology transfer and training platform in Switzerland, (2) the proposition to revisit existing paradigms of modern vaccinology, (3) the properties of polyethyleneimine as potential new vaccine adjuvant, and (4) the progresses in the design of HIV vaccine candidates able to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

  5. On the Relevance of Bernstein for German-Speaking Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolander, Brook

    2009-01-01

    This article assesses the relevance of Basil Bernstein for German-speaking Switzerland. It argues that Bernstein is potentially relevant for German-speaking Switzerland in light of contemporary studies which highlight a connection between social background and differential school achievement. After contextualising Bernstein's theoretical outlook…

  6. On the Relevance of Bernstein for German-Speaking Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolander, Brook

    2009-01-01

    This article assesses the relevance of Basil Bernstein for German-speaking Switzerland. It argues that Bernstein is potentially relevant for German-speaking Switzerland in light of contemporary studies which highlight a connection between social background and differential school achievement. After contextualising Bernstein's theoretical outlook…

  7. Recent changes in distribution of dragonflies in Switzerland (Odonata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonseth, Y.; Monnerat, C.

    2003-01-01

    Recent changes in distribution of dragonflies in Switzerland (Odonata) In 1998 the Swiss Centre for the Cartography of Fauna (CSCF) initiated ‘Odonata 2000’. This project aimed at testing a method for periodical reassessment of Red Lists in Switzerland. The study was carried out on Odonata and consi

  8. A prediction model for assessing residential radon concentration in Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauri, D.D.; Huss, A.; Zimmermann, F.; Kuehni, C.E.; Roosli, M.

    2012-01-01

    Indoor radon is regularly measured in Switzerland. However, a nationwide model to predict residential radon levels has not been developed. The aim of this study was to develop a prediction model to assess indoor radon concentrations in Switzerland. The model was based on 44,631 measurements from the

  9. Recent changes in distribution of dragonflies in Switzerland (Odonata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonseth, Y.; Monnerat, C.

    2003-01-01

    Recent changes in distribution of dragonflies in Switzerland (Odonata) In 1998 the Swiss Centre for the Cartography of Fauna (CSCF) initiated ‘Odonata 2000’. This project aimed at testing a method for periodical reassessment of Red Lists in Switzerland. The study was carried out on Odonata and consi

  10. The Zurich Environmental Study (ZENS) of Galaxies in Groups along the Cosmic Web. I. Which Environment Affects Galaxy Evolution?

    CERN Document Server

    Carollo, C M; Lilly, S J; Miniati, F; Norberg, P; Silverman, J D; van Gorkom, J; Cameron, E; Finoguenov, A; Pipino, A; Rudick, C S; Lu, T; Peng, Y

    2012-01-01

    The Zurich Environmental Study (ZENS) is designed to compare the dependence of z=0 galaxy structural and stellar populations diagnostics at constant stellar mass on four measures of the environment: the mass of the host group halos; the projected distance from the center of the halo; the rank of galaxies as central or satellites; and the filamentary LSS density on which the groups reside. The complete ZENS sample contains 1630 galaxies in 141~10^{12.5-14}M_sun 2PIGG groups at z~0.06. We outline the survey motivation and describe novel approaches to quantify the environments of galaxies. We introduce a set of self-consistency checks to define the group centers and to rank galaxies as centrals or satellites, and describe an Nth-nearest-neighbor approach to determine the LSS density field using groups as tracers. We publish the ZENS catalogue of galaxy and group properties, which combines the environmental diagnostics presented here with structural and SED measurements described in subsequent papers. In a suite ...

  11. JOB CENTRE FOR DOMESTIC STAFF IN SWITZERLAND

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service; http://www.cern.ch/relations/

    2001-01-01

    The Permanent mission of Switzerland to the International Organisations in Geneva has informed CERN that the Geneva Welcome Centre has set up an employment registration desk for the domestic staff of international civil servants. The aim of this pilot project is, on the one hand, to help international civil servants find domestic staff and, on the other hand, to help domestic staff holding an 'F'-type carte de légitimation find employment within 30 days after the expiry of a contract. For more information, please contact the Geneva Welcome Centre, La Pastorale, 106, route de Ferney, Case postale 103, 1211 Genève 20, tel. (+41.22) 918 02 70, fax (+41.22) 918 02 79), http://geneva-international.org/Welcome.E.html.

  12. Information Centre Radioactivity Switzerland; Beratungsstelle Radioaktivitaet Schweiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosimann, N.; Balsiger, B.; Burger, M. [Bundesamt fuer Bevoelkerungsschutz (Switzerland). LABOR SPIEZ

    2016-07-01

    The Information Centre Radioactivity Switzerland is meant to assess the radiological condition and serves for psychological-medical care of affected members of the Swiss public following an event of increased radioactivity in the environment. The Centre is structured in a modular way consisting of the following modules: ''Entry Measurement'': The visitors are registered and measured for contamination, ''Decontamination'': Contaminated visitors are decontaminated, ''Additional Measurements'': If required, thyroid and whole body measurements are performed, ''Information'': The visitors are informed about radioactivity, radiation protection, the current situation and their individual next steps, ''Exit'': Administrative release from the Information Centre.

  13. PRIVILEGES AND IMMUNITIES IN SWITZERLAND - PRACTICAL GUIDE

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2002-01-01

    The Permanent Mission of Switzerland to the International Organisations in Geneva has just published a practical guide to the implementation of the system of privileges and immunities and other facilities on its Web site. The guide is currently available in French only but an English translation is in preparation. Comprising around ten chapters, each dealing with a different subject (insurance, real estate, customs, etc.), the guide is not exhaustive but will be regularly supplemented, expanded and updated. The Mission specifies that the information contained in the document is given only as guide and that it implies no legal commitment on the part of the Host State. Relations with the Host States Service Tel. 72848

  14. PRIVILEGES AND IMMUNITIES IN SWITZERLAND: PRACTICAL GUIDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Permanent Mission of Switzerland to the International Organisations in Geneva has informed CERN that the "Practical Manual of the regime of privileges and immunities and other facilities" is available on its Web site: - in English (http://www.dfae.admin.ch/geneva_miss/e/home/guide.html); - in French (http://www.dfae.admin.ch/geneva_miss/f/home/guide.html). Comprising around ten chapters, each dealing with a different subject (insurance, real estate, customs, etc.), the guide is not exhaustive but will be regularly supplemented, expanded and updated. The Mission specifies that the information contained in the document is given only as guide and that it implies no legal commitment on the part of the Host State. Relations with the Host States Service http://www.cern.ch/relations/ Tel. 72848

  15. A Cartography of Qualitative Research in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S. Eberle

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Our attempt to describe the state of qual­itative research in Switzerland starts out with an impressionist sketch which inevitably is selective, subjective and culturally biased. In order to reach a more objective stance, we gather some facts and figures and present them by means of de­scriptive statistics. Based on the database of the Swiss Information and Data Archive Service for the Social Sciences (SIDOS, we analyze a sample of qualitative, sociological research projects funded by national science foundations (Swiss, German and French between 1995-2004. We compare qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods pro­jects and try to find similarities, differences and trends: Has the ratio of qualitative research pro­jects in­creased over the last ten years? Can we find cul­tural differences, e.g. a preference of Ger­man or French Swiss researchers for either qualit­ative or quantitative or mixed methods designs? Do dif­ferent types of institutions, or do men and women have such different preferences? Which methods are prevailing in Swiss qualitative re­search? In a second data set collected by a survey of our own, we broaden the perspective to other disciplines and try to identify the most commonly used methods and theoretical approaches. But we have also obtained individual portraits of the qual­it­ative researchers in Switzerland with their prefer­ences of theoretical approaches and methods, their ex­pertise, their research and their teaching courses. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0503244

  16. Determinants of generic drug substitution in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lufkin Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since generic drugs have the same therapeutic effect as the original formulation but at generally lower costs, their use should be more heavily promoted. However, a considerable number of barriers to their wider use have been observed in many countries. The present study examines the influence of patients, physicians and certain characteristics of the generics' market on generic substitution in Switzerland. Methods We used reimbursement claims' data submitted to a large health insurer by insured individuals living in one of Switzerland's three linguistic regions during 2003. All dispensed drugs studied here were substitutable. The outcome (use of a generic or not was modelled by logistic regression, adjusted for patients' characteristics (gender, age, treatment complexity, substitution groups and with several variables describing reimbursement incentives (deductible, co-payments and the generics' market (prices, packaging, co-branded original, number of available generics, etc.. Results The overall generics' substitution rate for 173,212 dispensed prescriptions was 31%, though this varied considerably across cantons. Poor health status (older patients, complex treatments was associated with lower generic use. Higher rates were associated with higher out-of-pocket costs, greater price differences between the original and the generic, and with the number of generics on the market, while reformulation and repackaging were associated with lower rates. The substitution rate was 13% lower among hospital physicians. The adoption of the prescribing practices of the canton with the highest substitution rate would increase substitution in other cantons to as much as 26%. Conclusions Patient health status explained a part of the reluctance to substitute an original formulation by a generic. Economic incentives were efficient, but with a moderate global effect. The huge interregional differences indicated that prescribing behaviours and

  17. 23rd April 2008 - Nobel Prize in Physics 1987 J. G. Bednorz visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with IBM Zurich Research Laboratory colleagues guided by L. Bottura, N. Catalan Lasheras and Y. Papaphilippou.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien brice

    2008-01-01

    23rd April 2008 - Nobel Prize in Physics 1987 J. G. Bednorz visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with IBM Zurich Research Laboratory colleagues guided by L. Bottura, N. Catalan Lasheras and Y. Papaphilippou.

  18. Sino-Swiss center for cassava technology launched in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Under the joint sponsorship of the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences (SIBS) and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich), the Shanghai Center for Cassava Biotechnology (SCCB) has been established at the Shanghai Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology(SIPE), SIBS.

  19. [TCM/aciipuncture therapy and medical insurance support in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kaiyu; Yuan, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    Based on the expeienes in th acdemic exchanges in Switzerland and relevant data, the development of TCM/acupuncture in Switzerland, Swiss medical insurance system and the acceptance to TCM/acupuncture were introduced in the paper. The case analysis was applied to explain the reimbursement, proportion and additional conditions of Obligatory Basic Insurance and Supplementary Alternative Insurance on TCM/acupuncture; Additionally, in the paper, the certification and registration from EMR, ASCA and NVS for the TCM physician were introduced, which is required to the recognition by insurance companies. All of these provide the guarantee for the positive development of TCM/acupuncture in Switzerland.

  20. THE ZURICH ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY OF GALAXIES IN GROUPS ALONG THE COSMIC WEB. I. WHICH ENVIRONMENT AFFECTS GALAXY EVOLUTION?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carollo, C. Marcella; Cibinel, Anna; Lilly, Simon J.; Miniati, Francesco; Cameron, Ewan; Peng, Yingjie; Pipino, Antonio; Rudick, Craig S. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Norberg, Peder [Department of Physics, Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Silverman, John D. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Van Gorkom, Jacqueline [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Finoguenov, Alexis, E-mail: marcella@phys.ethz.ch [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, D-84571 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-20

    The Zurich Environmental Study (ZENS) is based on a sample of ∼1500 galaxy members of 141 groups in the mass range ∼10{sup 12.5-14.5} M{sub ☉} within the narrow redshift range 0.05 < z < 0.0585. ZENS adopts novel approaches, described here, to quantify four different galactic environments, namely: (1) the mass of the host group halo; (2) the projected halo-centric distance; (3) the rank of galaxies as central or satellites within their group halos; and (4) the filamentary large-scale structure density. No self-consistent identification of a central galaxy is found in ∼40% of <10{sup 13.5} M{sub ☉} groups, from which we estimate that ∼15% of groups at these masses are dynamically unrelaxed systems. Central galaxies in relaxed and unrelaxed groups generally have similar properties, suggesting that centrals are regulated by their mass and not by their environment. Centrals in relaxed groups have, however, ∼30% larger sizes than in unrelaxed groups, possibly due to accretion of small satellites in virialized group halos. At M > 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, satellite galaxies in relaxed and unrelaxed groups have similar size, color, and (specific) star formation rate distributions; at lower galaxy masses, satellites are marginally redder in relaxed relative to unrelaxed groups, suggesting quenching of star formation in low-mass satellites by physical processes active in relaxed halos. Overall, relaxed and unrelaxed groups show similar stellar mass populations, likely indicating similar stellar mass conversion efficiencies. In the enclosed ZENS catalog, we publish all environmental diagnostics as well as the galaxy structural and photometric measurements described in companion ZENS papers II and III.

  1. Assessing river health in Europe and Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Marianne; Chèvre, Nathalie; Reynard, Emmanuel

    2017-04-01

    River conditions and welfare of aquatic ecosystems are threatened by anthropogenic and climatic changes. The release of personal-care products, pharmaceuticals and crop protection products is increasing and climate change is likely to cause significant changes in hydrological regimes affecting water resources' capacity to dissolve pollutants. Assessing river health, i.e. the ability of a river to support and maintain a balanced ecosystem close to the natural habitat, is thus of major concern to ensure the development of ecosystems and to provide enough clean useable water to users. Such studies involve physical, chemical and biological processes and characteristics. In Europe and Switzerland, standardized procedures have been developed to assess the hydromorphological, ecological and toxicological status of rivers. The European Water Framework Directive sets ecological requirements and chemical guidelines while the Swiss Modular Stepwise Procedure suggests methods to apprehend ecological deficits and promote water management plans. In this study, both procedures were applied and compared in order (i) to address their capacity to follow-up the spatial and temporal variability of the river's water quality and (ii) to identify challenges that still need to be addressed to assess river's health. Applied on the Boiron River (canton of Vaud, Switzerland) for a 11-year period (2005-2015), both frameworks highlight that no section of the river currently meets a good environmental state. This river flows through a diversified agricultural area causing a progressive deterioration of its chemical and biological quality. The two methods also identify two periods of time with significant changes of the river's water quality. The 2009-2011 period is characterized by a significant deterioration of the river's ecological and toxicological state due to severe low flows and an increased use of pesticides. However, since 2013, an improvement in water quality is identified in

  2. Characterization of CO2 reservoir rock in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Stefano; Madonna, Claudio; Zappone, Alba

    2014-05-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) are one of the key drivers regarding global climate change (IPCC, 2007). Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) is one valuable technology to mitigate current climate change with an immediate impact. The IPCC special report on CCS predicted a potential capture range of 4.7 to 37.5 Gt of CO2 by 2050. Among several countries, Switzerland has started to investigate its potential for CO2 storage (Chevalier et al., 2010) and is currently performing research on the characterization of the most promising reservoir/seal rocks for CO2 sequestration. For Switzerland, the most feasible option is to store CO2 in saline aquifers, sealed by impermeable formations. One aquifer of regional scale in the Swiss Molasse Basin is a carbonate sequence consisting of reworked shallow marine limestones and accumulations of shell fragments. The upper part of the formation presents the most promising permeability values and storage properties. The storage potential has been estimated of 706 Mt of CO2, based on the specific ranking scheme proposed by Chevalier et al. 2010. In this study, key parameters such as porosity, permeability and acoustic velocities in compressional and shear mode have been measured in laboratory at pressures and temperatures simulating in situ conditions. Reservoir rock samples have been investigated. Permeability has been estimated before and after CO2 injection in supercritical state. The simulation of typical reservoir conditions allows us to go one step further towards a significant evaluation of the reservoir's true capacities for CO2 sequestration. It seems of major importance to notice that the permeability crucially depends on confining pressure, temperature and pore pressure conditions of the sample. Especially at in situ conditions with CO2 being at supercritical state, a substantial loss in permeability have to be taken into consideration when it comes to the calculation of potential injection rates. The

  3. [Uroliths of dogs in Switzerland from 2003 to 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenberger-Schenk, F; Rothenanger, E; Reusch, C E; Gerber, B

    2015-01-01

    Information on composition of uroliths collected between 2003 and 2009 from dogs in Switzerland and epidemiologic data of affected dogs are summarised in this paper. Of 490 stones analysed 44% were composed of calcium oxalate, 330% of struvite, 80% of silica, 7% of urate, 3% of cystine, 3% were mixed stones and 1% each were calcium phosphate and xanthine stones. Compared to other dogs, Norwich Terriers, Norfolk Terriers, Miniature Schnauzers, Miniature Pinscher and Yorkshire Terriers had a significantly increased risk to suffer from calcium oxalate stones, Dalmatians and Continental Bulldogs from urate stones and English Bulldogs from cystine stones. No breed had an increased risk of struvite or silica stones. Stones composed of silica were more prevalent in Switzerland compared to other countries and were more common in the eastern part than in the western part of Switzerland. This study shows that there are differences in occurrence and prevalence of uroliths between Switzerland and surveys of other countries.

  4. Switzerland Replaces United States at Top of Competitiveness Rankings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    On Sep. 8,2009,Switzerland tops the overall ranking in The Global Competitiveness Report 2009-2010, released by the World Economic Forum ahead of its Annual Meeting of the New Champions 2009 in Dalian.

  5. Switzerland and efforts to combat the financing of terrorism

    OpenAIRE

    de Watteville, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    Combating international terrorism has long been one of Switzerland's main concerns. Furthermore Switzerland has worked closely with other nations in combating terrorism and will continue to do so in future, both in the context of international treaties and on the basis of the law on mutual assistance in criminal matters. International co-operation to combat the financing of terrorism is taking place at several levels. The instruments for combating money laundering are also important for comba...

  6. Research on VHDL in France, Italy and Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Borrione, D.

    1996-01-01

    International audience; Research on VHDL in France, Italy and Switzerland This presentation is an overview of the research on and around VHDL in France, Italy and French speaking Switzerland. The teams covered by this survey are well known in Europe, for their participation in the VHDL User's Groups, and for their publications. The period covered is 1991-1995, although some groups have started their VHDL activities several years before.

  7. The fallacy of slimming products: a case analysis in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Droz, N.; Marques-Vidal, P M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Many people desire to lose weight. This favors the marketing of "miracle" products with overemphasized slimming capacities. To our knowledge, no study regarding the claimed performances of slimming products has ever been conducted in Switzerland. Objectives: To assess weight loss claims of slimming products available in Switzerland by analyzing their corresponding advertisements. Methods: Between May 2008 and February 2013, 31 advertisements for 13 different slimming products fr...

  8. Food control in Switzerland: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deflorin, Otmar

    2014-10-01

    Switzerland is a confederation consisting of 26 states, the so-called 'cantons'. In the field of food control, the Swiss federal state is in charge of issuing the regulations (Food law and associated texts), whereas enforcement is assigned to the cantons. The offices in charge of food control are the cantonal laboratories headed by a 'Cantonal chemist'. These offices pursue three main goals: to protect consumer health, to protect the consumer against frauds and to ensure food handling under good hygiene conditions. To that purpose, the Cantonal chemist heads both a laboratory and a staff of inspectors, who are responsible for the control of food products (including meat and drinking water), the control of hygiene and production at factories, stores, restaurants, etc. as well as the control of common goods and household items such as toys, clothing, make-up, dishes, cookware, jewelry and so on. All laboratories and inspection bodies are accredited according to ISO norms EN 17'020 and EN 17'025. The offices headed by the cantonal chemists analyze annually about 110'000 samples on sale or from factories, whereas the inspection bodies perform roughly 45'000 inspections (without primary producers and occasional importers).

  9. Increasing Incidence of Canine Leptospirosis in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Major

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A marked increase in canine leptospirosis was observed in Switzerland over 10 years with a peak incidence of 28.1 diagnosed cases/100,000 dogs/year in the most affected canton. With 95% affected dogs living at altitudes <800 m, the disease presented a seasonal pattern associated with temperature (r2 0.73 and rainfall (r2 0.39, >90% cases being diagnosed between May and October. The increasing yearly incidence however was only weakly correlated with climatic data including number of summer (r2 0.25 or rainy days (r2 0.38. Serovars Australis and Bratislava showed the highest seropositivity rates with 70.5% and 69.1%, respectively. Main clinical manifestations included renal (99.6%, pulmonary (76.7%, hepatic (26.0%, and hemorrhagic syndromes (18.2%, leading to a high mortality rate (43.3%. Similar to the human disease, liver involvement had the strongest association with negative outcome (OR 16.3. Based on these data, canine leptospirosis presents similar features and severity as the human infection for which it therefore can be considered a model. Its re-emergence in a temperate country with very high incidence rates in canines should thus be viewed as a warning and emphasize the need for increased awareness in other species.

  10. National Sustainability Outreach Assessment Based on Human and Social Capital: The Case of Environmental Sciences in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M. Frischknecht

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a sustainability outreach study based on an assessment of human and social capital. The aim was to capture the national sustainability outreach of twenty years of Environmental Sciences education, centered at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH in Zurich. The study contained two lines of research, one being a human capital assessment with a survey among graduates from the years 1992 to 2005 (n = 542 and the other being a social capital analysis based on interviews with institutions that represent the Swiss social systems of economy, politics/public administration and civil society (20 institutions. Our analyses reveal several functional forms of both human capital (specialists, pioneers, leaders and social capital (qualification profile, internalization, networks, standardization, professionalization that trigger and channel sustainability outreach.

  11. 6th Annual European Antibody Congress 2010: November 29-December 1, 2010, Geneva, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Alain; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M

    2011-01-01

    The 6th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapinn Ltd., was held in Geneva, Switzerland, which was also the location of the 4th and 5th EAC. As was the case in 2008 and 2009, the EAC was again the largest antibody congress held in Europe, drawing nearly 250 delegates in 2010. Numerous pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies active in the field of therapeutic antibody development were represented, as were start-up and academic organizations and representatives from the US Food and Drug Administration FDA. The global trends in antibody research and development were discussed, including success stories of recent marketing authorizations of golimumab (Simponi®) and canakinumab (Ilaris®) by Johnson & Johnson and Novartis, respectively, updates on antibodies in late clinical development (obinutuzumab/GA101, farletuzumab/MORAb-003 and itolizumab/T1 h, by Glycart/Roche, Morphotek and Biocon, respectively) and success rates for this fast-expanding class of therapeutics (Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development). Case studies covering clinical progress of girentuximab (Wilex), evaluation of panobacumab (Kenta Biotech), characterization of therapeutic antibody candidates by protein microarrays (Protagen), antibody-drug conjugates (sanofi-aventis, ImmunoGen, Seattle Genetics, Wyeth/Pfizer), radio-immunoconjugates (Bayer Schering Pharma, Université de Nantes) and new scaffolds (Ablynx, AdAlta, Domantis/GlaxoSmithKline, Fresenius, Molecular Partners, Pieris, Scil Proteins, Pfizer, University of Zurich) were presented. Major antibody structural improvements were showcased, including the latest selection engineering of the best isotypes (Abbott, Pfizer, Pierre Fabre), hinge domain (Pierre Fabre), dual antibodies (Abbott), IgG-like bispecific antibodies (Biogen Idec), antibody epitope mapping case studies (Eli Lilly), insights in FcγRII receptor (University of Cambridge), as well as novel tools for antibody fragmentation (Genovis). Improvements of

  12. Effects of nitrogen and strain age embrittlement on toughness of MMA welds. A final report on the joint reserach project - GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht, Germany, and Oerlikon Welding Ltd., Zurich, Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocak, M. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung; Achar, D.R.G.; Evans, G.M. [OERLIKON Welding Ltd., Zurich (Switzerland)

    1998-12-31

    A detailed literature review has been carried out on the topic to identify the areas requiring further investigations. Based on this investigations have been carried out to evaluate the influence of dissolved nitrogen in weld metals on their toughness and strain aging behaviour through fracture mechanics as well as conventional impact testing approaches. MMA C-Mn steel weld metals bearing nitrogen between 80 to 210 ppm were investigated under four different post-weld conditions, namely: 1. as welded, 2. stress relieved, 3. artificially strain aged and 4. artificially strain aged and stress relieved. Quantitative metallography and low load microhardness studies of microphases were integral part of these investigations. The results demonstrate the highly detrimental effect of nitrogen on the toughness behaviour of C-Mn steel weld metal particularly under strain aging conditions. This is substantiated through decrease of acicular ferrite with the accompanying increase in primary ferrite and ferrite with second phases in the microstructures. Also, there is a distinctive increase in acicular ferrite microhardness. Post-weld stress relieving heat treatment under these conditions effects only marginal improvement in toughness and shifts the fracture behaviour from brittle to ductile or quasi-ductile only in the case of low nitrogen weld metals. Comparing the results of the CTOD and Charpy tests, it is observed that both methods measure the influence of nitrogen on toughness behaviour in the same trend but the magnitudes of the effect measured are different whereby the fracture mechanics method appears very conservative. (orig.) [Deutsch] Untersucht werden der Einfluss von Stickstoff im Bereich von 80-120 ppm auf die Zaehigkeit und Reckalterungsversproedungs-Verhaeltnisse des C-Mn-Strahlschweissgutes. Die Pruefungen erfolgen mit technologischen Kerbschlagbiege- und CTOD-Versuchen an Schweissguetern, die durch mehrlagiges Lichtbogenschweissen hergestellt wurden, unter vier Versuchsbedingungen. Die untersuchten Zustaende der Schweissgueter sind: 1. wie geschweisst (AW), 2. spannungsarmgeglueht (SR) - 580 C, 120 min., 3. reckgealtert (SA) - 10%-pre-Kompressionsdehnung und nachfolgende Alterung bei 250 C, 30 min, und 4. reckgealtert und nachfolgend spannungsarmgeglueht (SAS)-SA+SR. Die Beziehungen zwischen Stickstoffanteilen und Zaehigkeit bzw. Reckalterung sind durch mikrostrukturelle Aenderungen, Mikrohaerte der einzelnen Mikrophasen und bruchmechanische Parameter ausfuehrlich dargestellt. Die Untersuchungen zeigen die dominierende Rolle des Reckalterungsprozesses bei der Versproedung der Schweissgueter, besonders im Hinblick auf den Stickstoffgehalt und die ziemlich begrenzte Rolle des Spannungsarmgluehens bei solchen Faellen. (orig.)

  13. Performance and age of African and non-African runners in half- and full marathons held in Switzerland, 2000–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aschmann A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available André Aschmann,1 Beat Knechtle,2 Marco Cribari,1 Christoph Alexander Rüst,1 Vincent Onywera,3 Thomas Rosemann,1 Romuald Lepers4 1Institute of General Practice and for Health Services Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Gesundheitszentrum St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland; 3Department of Recreation Management and Exercise Science, Kenyatta University, Kenya; 4Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Burgundy, Dijon, France Background: Endurance running performance of African (AF and non-African (NAF athletes is investigated, with better performances seen for Africans. To date, no study has compared the age of peak performance between AF and NAF runners. The present research is an analysis of the age and running performance of top AF and NAF athletes, using the hypothesis that AF athletes were younger and faster than NAF athletes. Methods: Age and performance of male and female AF and NAF athletes in half-marathons and marathons held in Switzerland in 2000–2010 were investigated using single and multilevel hierarchical regression analyses. Results: For half-marathons, male NAF runners were older than male AF runners (P = 0.02; NAF, 31.1 years ± 6.4 years versus AF, 26.2 years ± 4.9 years, and their running time was longer (P = 0.02; NAF, 65.3 minutes ± 1.7 minutes versus AF, 64.1 minutes ± 0.9 minutes. In marathons, differences between NAF and AF male runners in age (NAF, 33.0 years ± 4.8 years versus AF, 28.6 years ± 3.8 years; P 0.05 or running time (NAF, 75.0 minutes ± 3.7 minutes versus AF, 75.6 minutes ± 5.3 minutes; P > 0.05 between NAF and AF female half-marathoners. For marathoners, NAF women were older than AF female runners (P = 0.03; NAF, 31.6 years ± 4.8 years versus AF, 27.8 years ± 5.3 years, but their running times were similar (NAF, 162.4 minutes ± 7.2 minutes versus AF, 163.0 minutes ± 7.0 minutes; P > 0.05. Conclusion: In Switzerland

  14. Switzerland's videotex computer sex education programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbey, M A

    1991-05-01

    Switzerland's videotex computer sex education program in French is a telematic service set up in youth centers, schools and post offices, or for a monthly home rental charge of 9 swiss francs. German and Italian versions will be available by the end of 1991. CIAO receives 100 calls a month, or 20,000 screen page consultations. Anonymity is assured for caller and specialist through identification by pseudonym. This article discusses the experience of 2 trained specialists, a social worker and a sex education teacher, who answer questions. 70% of callers are boys, perhaps due to greater familiarity with computers, and to public location and freer attitude talking about sex in a group. Girls may use family planning centers for their questions. The typical boys 13-15 years questions concern anatomy and the size of the penis, breast stimulation, masturbation. Guilt and fear of consequences are communicated. Adolescents tend to focus on relationships, with shyness a typical pattern. There is expressed concern for whether it's OK to sexually explore certain sex zones, and what tells me she's happy. Communication between partners about sex is the difficulty and specialists emphasize asking the girl herself how she feels. With increasing age, the focus is very specific; i.e., premature ejaculation, STD's, homosexuality, but also with concern for knowledge about normal love-making and worry about not wanting it enough. In general, questions tend to be bound by traditional roles and questions on contraception are rare. Condom questions are usually related to AIDs. Questions express self-doubt and honesty, which sometimes focuses on the tragedy of sexual abuse, rape, AIDS, and suicide. Specialists find the work rewarding and helpful in sex education discussions in the classroom; great respect for young people is generated.

  15. Mentoring in general surgery in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reto M. Kaderli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mentorship has been found as a key factor for a successful and satisfying career in academic medicine and surgery. The present study was conducted to describe the current situation of mentoring in the surgical community in Switzerland and to evaluate sex differences regarding the impact of mentoring on career success and professional satisfaction. Methods: The study was designed as an anonymous national survey to all members of the Swiss Surgical Society in 2011 (820 ordinary and 49 junior members. It was a 25-item questionnaire addressing mentor–mentee relationships and their impact on the professional front. Results: Of the 869 mailed surveys, 512 responses were received (response rate: 58.9%. Mentor–mentee relationships were reported by 344 respondents (68.1% and structured mentoring programs were noted in 23 respondents (6.7%. Compared to individuals without mentors, male mentees exhibited significantly higher subjective career advancement (5.4±1.2 vs. 5.0±1.3; p=0.03 and career development (3.3±1.9 vs. 2.5±1.7; p<0.01 scores, but the differences for female mentees were not statistically significant (4.7±1.1 vs. 4.3±1.2, p=0.16; 2.5±1.6 vs. 1.9±1.4, p=0.26; respectively. The pursuit of an academic career was not influenced by the presence of a mentor–mentee relationship for female (p=0.14 or male participants (p=0.22. Conclusions: Mentor–mentee relationships are important for the career advancement of male surgeons. The reason for the lack of an impact on the careers of female surgeons is difficult to ascertain. However, mentoring also provides lifelong learning and personal development. Thus, specific attention should be paid to the development of more structured mentoring programs for both sexes.

  16. Differences in age of peak marathon performance between mountain and city marathon running - The ‘Jungfrau Marathon’ in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros; Zingg, Matthias Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Rüst, Christoph Alexander

    2017-02-28

    The age of the best marathon performance has been well investigated for flat city marathon running, but not for mountain marathon running. The aim of this study was to determine the age of the best mountain marathon performance and to compare to results of a flat city marathon. Race times and ages of finishers of a mountain marathon with 1,830 m of altitude change (Jungfrau Marathon, Switzerland) and two flat city marathons (Lausanne Marathon and Zurich Marathon, Switzerland) were analysed using linear, non-linear and mixed-effects regression analyses. Race times were slower in the mountain compared to the city marathon. In both the mountain marathon and the city marathons, women and men improved performance and men were faster than women when the fastest per year and all per year were considered. When the fastest runners in 1-year age intervals were considered in the mountain marathon, the fastest man (3:01 h:min) was ~35.6 years and the fastest women (3:28 h:min) ~34.5 years old. When all finishers were considered in 1-year age intervals, the fastest men (4:59 h:min) were ~29.1 years old and the fastest women (5:16 h:min) were ~25.6 years old. In the city marathons in 1-year age intervals, the fastest man (2:10 h:min) was ~23.7 years old and the fastest woman (2:36 h:min) ~32.2 years old. When all finishers were considered in 1-year age intervals, the fastest men (3:41 h:min) were ~35.0 years old and the fastest women (4:00 h:min) ~33.8 years old. In summary, the age of the fastest women and men was higher in the mountain marathon compared to the city marathons when the fastest runners were considered. However, when all finishers were considered the age of the fastest women and men was lower in the mountain marathon compared to the city marathons.

  17. The Role of Satellite Data Within GCOS Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Meier

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Global Climate Observing System (GCOS was established in 1992 to ensure that the observations necessary to address climate-related issues are defined, obtained and made available, to all potential users. The Swiss GCOS Office at the Federal Office of Meteorology and Climatology MeteoSwiss has the task of coordinating all climate relevant measurements in Switzerland (GCOS Switzerland. As such, the Swiss GCOS Office also fosters the exploration of new measurement techniques and methods, in particular through the use of satellite-based data, to complement the long-term in situ observations in Switzerland. In this paper, the role of satellites is presented for climatological studies of atmospheric and terrestrial Essential Climate Variables in Switzerland. For the atmospheric domain, the 10-year climatology March 2000–February 2010 of cloud cover from MODIS is shown for Switzerland, in low (1° × 1° and high (0.05° × 0.05° resolution, and compared to ground-based synop observations. For the terrestrial domain, the satellite-derived Swiss glacier inventory from 1998/99 and the new Alpine-wide inventory from 2003 is presented along with area changes derived from a comparison with previous inventories.

  18. Environmental inventories for future electricity supply systems for Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dones, R.; Gantner, U.; Hirschberg, S. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Doka, G.; Knoepfel, I. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-02-01

    This report provides the analysis of environmental inventories for selected electricity supply systems considered as possible options to meet the expected electricity demand in Switzerland in year 2030. Two possible electricity demand level cases were postulated by VSE, both under the basic assumption of economic growth: a high-growth demand case corresponding to a yearly increase of 2% from year 1995 to year 2010 and 1% from year 2010 to year 2030, and a low-growth demand case corresponding to a yearly increase of 1% from year 1995 to year 2010 and 0.5% from year 2010 to year 2030. The base (i.e. secured) supply in year 2030 will be, according to VSE, totally dominated by hydro with rather minor contributions from combined heat-and-power plants, small gas turbines, incinerators and solar photovoltaic plants. Due to decommissioning of the currently operating nuclear power plants and expiration of long-term electricity import contracts there will eventually occur a gap between the postulated electricity demand and the base supply. VSE provided seven options to cover this gap, defined in terms of mixes with different contributions from gas, coal, nuclear and solar chains; in this context a distinction is also made with respect to shares of domestic and imported electricity. The systems considered represent advanced technologies, regarded as either typical or most suitable for the Swiss conditions. System-specific input to the present analysis has been partially generated based on direct contacts with the industry. Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) was used to establish environmental inventories for the systems analysed. The analysis has been performed on three levels:(1) individually for each system considered, (2) comparison of systems, (3) comparison of supply options. Results are also provided for these three levels.

  19. Bioindication in Urban Soils in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amossé, J.; Le Bayon, C.; Mitchell, E. A. D.; Gobat, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    Urban development leads to profound changes in ecosystem structure (e.g. biodiversity) and functioning (e.g. ecosystem services). While above-ground diversity is reasonably well studied much less is known about soil diversity, soil processes and more generally soil health in urban settings. Soil invertebrates are key actors of soil processes at different spatial and temporal scales and provide essential ecosystem services. These functions may be even more vital in stressed environments such as urban ecosystems. Despite the general recognition of the importance of soil organisms in ecosystems, soil trophic food webs are still poorly known and this is especially the case in urban settings. As urban soils are characterised by high fragmentation and stress (e.g. drought, pollution) the structure and functioning of soil communities is likely to be markedly different from that of natural soils. It is for example unclear if earthworms, whose roles in organic matter transformation and soil structuration is well documented in natural and semi-natural soils, are also widespread and active in urban soils. Bioindication is a powerful tool to assess the quality of the environment. It is complementary to classical physicochemical soil analysis or can be used as sole diagnostic tool in cases where these analyses cannot be performed. However little is known about the potential use of bioindicators in urban settings and especially it is unclear if methods developped in agriculture can be applied to urban soils. The development of reliable methods for assessing the quality of urban soils has been identified as a priority for policy making and urban management in Switzerland, a high-urbanized country. We therefore initiated a research project (Bioindication in Urban Soil - BUS). The project is organised around four parts: (i) typology of urban soils in a study Region (Neuchâtel), (ii) sampling of soil fauna and analysis of soil physicochemical properties, (iii) comparison of the

  20. Monthly forecasting of agricultural pests in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschi, M.; Dubrovsky, M.; Spirig, C.; Samietz, J.; Calanca, P.; Weigel, A. P.; Fischer, A. M.; Rotach, M. W.

    2012-04-01

    Given the repercussions of pests and diseases on agricultural production, detailed forecasting tools have been developed to simulate the degree of infestation depending on actual weather conditions. The life cycle of pests is most successfully predicted if the micro-climate of the immediate environment (habitat) of the causative organisms can be simulated. Sub-seasonal pest forecasts therefore require weather information for the relevant habitats and the appropriate time scale. The pest forecasting system SOPRA (www.sopra.info) currently in operation in Switzerland relies on such detailed weather information, using hourly weather observations up to the day the forecast is issued, but only a climatology for the forecasting period. Here, we aim at improving the skill of SOPRA forecasts by transforming the weekly information provided by ECMWF monthly forecasts (MOFCs) into hourly weather series as required for the prediction of upcoming life phases of the codling moth, the major insect pest in apple orchards worldwide. Due to the probabilistic nature of operational monthly forecasts and the limited spatial and temporal resolution, their information needs to be post-processed for use in a pest model. In this study, we developed a statistical downscaling approach for MOFCs that includes the following steps: (i) application of a stochastic weather generator to generate a large pool of daily weather series consistent with the climate at a specific location, (ii) a subsequent re-sampling of weather series from this pool to optimally represent the evolution of the weekly MOFC anomalies, and (iii) a final extension to hourly weather series suitable for the pest forecasting model. Results show a clear improvement in the forecast skill of occurrences of upcoming codling moth life phases when incorporating MOFCs as compared to the operational pest forecasting system. This is true both in terms of root mean squared errors and of the continuous rank probability scores of the

  1. Modelling the energy future of Switzerland after the phase out of nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Paula; Van Vliet, Oscar

    2015-04-01

    HES [Pfenninger, 2015]. It has been specifically design to represent high shares of renewable energy, allowing for the estimation of the Swiss energy transition with high level of detail. Calliope includes topology characteristics of the electricity system, and variability of radiation and wind, which enables the analysis of intermittency in renewable electricity sources, in order to fulfil the electricity demand at all hours. Three energy scenarios are modelled; first, the higher energy production of renewables in Switzerland and the import of natural gas to supply the demand; second, imports of wind power from North Sea with high level of intermittency; and third, imports of solar power from North Africa, with less intermittency but with higher risk of internal turmoil. To summarise, we analyse in detail the energy scenarios of Switzerland when the nuclear power plants will be ceased. A gap currently present in academia, such as the future energy security in Switzerland, is covered by our Calliope modelling. References: Abt, M.; E. Bernhard, A. Kolliker, T. Roth, M. Spicher, L. Stieger, Volkswirtschaftliche Massnahmenanalyse zur Energiestrategie 2050: Tiel I: Gesamtergebnisse und Empfehlungen, Staatssekretariat fur Wirtschaft SECO, Bern, CH, 2012. Busser, M; T. Kaiser, E. Wassermann, K. Ammon, S. Reichen, A. Gunzinger, et al., Energiestrategie 2050 aus Sicht des Energie Trialogs, Energie Trialog Schweiz, 2013. Mathiesen, B. V. and Lund, H. Comparative analyses of seven technologies to facilitate the integration of fluctuating renewable energy sources. IET Renew. Power Gen. 3, 190-204 (2009). Mathys, N. 2012. Modelling contributions to the Swiss energy and environmental challenge. Special issue on energy modelling_introductory article.Swiss journal of economics and statistics. Pfenninger, Stefan. 2015. Calliope: a multi-scale energy systems (MUSES) modeling framework. Available at: http://www.callio.pe/ Piot, M. Energiestrategie 2050 der Schweiz, in: 13. Symp

  2. Gun utopias? Firearm access and ownership in Israel and Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Janet E

    2012-02-01

    The 2011 attempted assassination of a US representative renewed the national gun control debate. Gun advocates claim mass-casualty events are mitigated and deterred with three policies: (a) permissive gun laws, (b) widespread gun ownership, (c) and encouragement of armed civilians who can intercept shooters. They cite Switzerland and Israel as exemplars. We evaluate these claims with analysis of International Crime Victimization Survey (ICVS) data and translation of laws and original source material. Swiss and Israeli laws limit firearm ownership and require permit renewal one to four times annually. ICVS analysis finds the United States has more firearms per capita and per household than either country. Switzerland and Israel curtail off-duty soldiers' firearm access to prevent firearm deaths. Suicide among soldiers decreased by 40 per cent after the Israeli army's 2006 reforms. Compared with the United States, Switzerland and Israel have lower gun ownership and stricter gun laws, and their policies discourage personal gun ownership.

  3. CENSUS OF THE POPULATION, BUILDINGS AND HOUSING IN SWITZERLAND

    CERN Multimedia

    Relation with the Host States Service; Tel. 72848

    2000-01-01

    A census of the population, buildings and housing is to be conducted on the whole territory of the Swiss Confederation on 5 December 2000. For this purpose, those residing in Switzerland will receive a personal questionnaire at their place of residence plus a questionnaire on buildings and housing if they own real estate in Switzerland. The Swiss Permanent Mission to the International Organizations in Geneva has requested CERN to invite members of its personnel to complete these questionnaires and either to hand them to the census agents when they call at their places of residence on 5 December 2000 or to post them to the address indicated on the questionnaire.

  4. E-bike injuries: experience from an urban emergency department-a retrospective study from Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoutsi, Sylvana; Martinolli, Luca; Braun, Christian Tasso; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K

    2014-01-01

    Background. Between 2005 and 2012, annual sales of E-bikes in Switzerland increased from 1,792 to 52,941. This continuous and rapid transition from human-powered bicycles to an electric bicycle technology may indicate the increasing demand for low-cost transportation technology in combination with a healthy lifestyle. Material and Methods. In the present study, from April 2012 to September 2013, we retrospectively analysed E-bike accidents treated in the Emergency Department of our hospital by focusing on the following parameters: age, gender, time, period, and cause of the accident, as well as injury and outcome. Results. Patients were predominantly male. The mean age of injured E-cyclists was 47.5 years. The main causes of injury were self-accident. Most injuries were to the head/neck. The mean ISS was 8.48. The outcome showed that 9 patients were treated as outpatients, 9 were inpatients, and 5 patients were kept in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Only six patients underwent surgery (S). Discussion. This is the first attempt to evaluate E-bike injuries in Switzerland in an acute hospital setting. Since there is increasing popular preference for E-bikes as means of transportation and injuries to the head or neck are prevalent among E-cyclists, the hazard should not to be underestimated.

  5. E-Bike Injuries: Experience from an Urban Emergency Department—A Retrospective Study from Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoutsi, Sylvana; Martinolli, Luca; Braun, Christian Tasso; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Between 2005 and 2012, annual sales of E-bikes in Switzerland increased from 1,792 to 52,941. This continuous and rapid transition from human-powered bicycles to an electric bicycle technology may indicate the increasing demand for low-cost transportation technology in combination with a healthy lifestyle. Material and Methods. In the present study, from April 2012 to September 2013, we retrospectively analysed E-bike accidents treated in the Emergency Department of our hospital by focusing on the following parameters: age, gender, time, period, and cause of the accident, as well as injury and outcome. Results. Patients were predominantly male. The mean age of injured E-cyclists was 47.5 years. The main causes of injury were self-accident. Most injuries were to the head/neck. The mean ISS was 8.48. The outcome showed that 9 patients were treated as outpatients, 9 were inpatients, and 5 patients were kept in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Only six patients underwent surgery (S). Discussion. This is the first attempt to evaluate E-bike injuries in Switzerland in an acute hospital setting. Since there is increasing popular preference for E-bikes as means of transportation and injuries to the head or neck are prevalent among E-cyclists, the hazard should not to be underestimated. PMID:24778880

  6. E-Bike Injuries: Experience from an Urban Emergency Department—A Retrospective Study from Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvana Papoutsi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Between 2005 and 2012, annual sales of E-bikes in Switzerland increased from 1,792 to 52,941. This continuous and rapid transition from human-powered bicycles to an electric bicycle technology may indicate the increasing demand for low-cost transportation technology in combination with a healthy lifestyle. Material and Methods. In the present study, from April 2012 to September 2013, we retrospectively analysed E-bike accidents treated in the Emergency Department of our hospital by focusing on the following parameters: age, gender, time, period, and cause of the accident, as well as injury and outcome. Results. Patients were predominantly male. The mean age of injured E-cyclists was 47.5 years. The main causes of injury were self-accident. Most injuries were to the head/neck. The mean ISS was 8.48. The outcome showed that 9 patients were treated as outpatients, 9 were inpatients, and 5 patients were kept in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU. Only six patients underwent surgery (S. Discussion. This is the first attempt to evaluate E-bike injuries in Switzerland in an acute hospital setting. Since there is increasing popular preference for E-bikes as means of transportation and injuries to the head or neck are prevalent among E-cyclists, the hazard should not to be underestimated.

  7. Deep Heat Mining - Development of the hot dry rock and hot wet rock technologies for power and heat production in Switzerland; Deep Heat Mining. Entwicklung der Hot-Dry-Rock / Hot-Wet-Rock Technologie zur Strom- und Waermeproduktion in der Schweiz, insbesondere Deep Heat Mining, Basel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, M. O.; Hopkirk, R. J.

    2003-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the progress and achievements made for two heat mining projects in Basle and Geneva. Work initialised at further sites in southern Switzerland and in the Bernese 'Oberland' alpine area is also mentioned. Project organisation and planning topics are examined. Seismic monitoring aspects are discussed and first practical studies on using the geothermal heat in Basle using hybrid energy conversion systems are discussed. For the Geneva project, details on site selection are given and ideas on combined geothermal and gas turbine plant are discussed.

  8. Deep Heat Mining - Development of the hot dry rock and hot wet rock technologies for power and heat production in Switzerland; Deep Heat Mining. Entwicklung der Hot-Dry-Rock / Hot-Wet-Rock Technologie zur Strom- und Waermeproduktion in der Schweiz, insbesondere Deep Heat Mining, Basel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, M. O.; Hopkirk, R. J.

    2003-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the progress and achievements made for two heat mining projects in Basle and Geneva. Work initialised at further sites in southern Switzerland and in the Bernese 'Oberland' alpine area is also mentioned. Project organisation and planning topics are examined. Seismic monitoring aspects are discussed and first practical studies on using the geothermal heat in Basle using hybrid energy conversion systems are discussed. For the Geneva project, details on site selection are given and ideas on combined geothermal and gas turbine plant are discussed.

  9. Identifying and prioritising systematic review topics with public health stakeholders: A protocol for a modified Delphi study in Switzerland to inform future research agendas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Dyon; Mütsch, Margot; Kien, Christina; Gerhardus, Ansgar; Lhachimi, Stefan K

    2017-08-04

    The Cochrane Collaboration aims to produce relevant and top priority evidence that responds to existing evidence gaps. Hence, research priority setting (RPS) is important to identify which potential research gaps are deemed most important. Moreover, RPS supports future health research to conform both health and health evidence needs. However, studies that are prioritising systematic review topics in public health are surprisingly rare. Therefore, to inform the research agenda of Cochrane Public Health Europe (CPHE), we introduce the protocol of a priority setting study on systematic review topics in several European countries, which is conceptualised as pilot. We will conduct a two-round modified Delphi study in Switzerland, incorporating an anonymous web-based questionnaire, to assess which topics should be prioritised for systematic reviews in public health. In the first Delphi round public health stakeholders will suggest relevant assessment criteria and potential priority topics. In the second Delphi round the participants indicate their (dis)agreement to the aggregated results of the first round and rate the potential review topics with the predetermined criteria on a four-point Likert scale. As we invite a wide variety of stakeholders we will compare the results between the different stakeholder groups. We have received ethical approval from the ethical board of the University of Bremen, Germany (principal investigation is conducted at the University of Bremen) and a certificate of non-objection from the Canton of Zurich, Switzerland (fieldwork will be conducted in Switzerland). The results of this study will be further disseminated through peer reviewed publication and will support systematic review author groups (i.a. CPHE) to improve the relevance of the groups´ future review work. Finally, the proposed priority setting study can be used as a framework by other systematic review groups when conducting a priority setting study in a different context.

  10. Smart metering for Switzerland - Potential, success factors and measures to be taken to increase energy efficiency - Final report; Smart Metering fuer die Schweiz - Potenziale, Erfolgsfaktoren und Massnahmen fuer die Steigerung der Energieeffizienz - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dettli, R.; Philippen, D.; Reinhardt, R. [econcept AG, Zuerich (Switzerland); Schaeffler, H.; Heinemann, Ch. [Forschungsgruppe Energie- und Kommunikationstechnologien EnCT GmbH, Freiburg (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    This report examines the use of Smart Metering technology and what improvement of energy efficiency could be expected by its wide adoption in whole Switzerland. It examines the effects of feedback applications and of variable tariffs which are made possible with the use of this technology. A summary lists the ongoing system concepts and technologies of Smart Metering, feedback and variable tariffs as well as the general legal requirements for Switzerland. By means of a literature survey the worldwide experiences with feedback and variable tariffs were evaluated and the application of the results regarding their use in Switzerland examined. On this basis, the report lists suggestions for meter manufacturers, energy suppliers, distribution system operators as well as for federal and cantonal authorities as to how to use the Smart Meter technology to its full advantage. (authors)

  11. Responses of England, Germany and Switzerland to Declining School Enrolments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Catherine

    Results of interviews with educators in England, Germany, and Switzerland are combined with statistical data in this study of the effects of declining enrollment and the development of multicultural programs in those countries. In all three countries, the author encountered a prevailing resistance to program change in the face of declining…

  12. Stabilisation of the prevalence of childhood obesity in Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aeberli, I.; Henschen, I.; Molinari, L.; Zimmermann, M.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing rapidly in most industrialised countries, but several countries, including Switzerland, have recently reported a levelling off or even a reversal of this alarming trend. Study aim: Our aim was to evaluate the prevalence of childhood

  13. China-Switzerland Women Entrepreneurs’ Meeting Held in Lausanne

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuo; Fengqiang

    2015-01-01

    Co-sponsored by the CPA FFC and the French Section of the Swiss-Chinese Association(FSSCA),the China-Switzerland Women Entrepreneurs’Meeting in Lausanne last Novem ber 4,drew about 6 0participants.FSSCA President Gerald Beroud made an opening speech and presided over the meeting.The Swiss-Chinese

  14. The German-Romance Language Borders in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rash, Felicity

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on language contact phenomena at the borders of Switzerland's four language communities (German, French, Italian, and Romansch), the legal status of the four Swiss national languages, and the language policies of individual bilingual and trilingual cantons. Describes the historical movements of the language boundaries, with particular…

  15. Determinants of sheep and goat meat consumption in Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aepli, M.; Finger, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we estimated the influence of different meat prices, socio-demographic and geographic variables on sheep and goat meat demand using the Swiss household expenditure survey from 2000 to 2005, a micro data set on 20,940 households resident in Switzerland. This study is motivated by the f

  16. Determinants of sheep and goat meat consumption in Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aepli, M.; Finger, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we estimated the influence of different meat prices, socio-demographic and geographic variables on sheep and goat meat demand using the Swiss household expenditure survey from 2000 to 2005, a micro data set on 20,940 households resident in Switzerland. This study is motivated by the

  17. Stabilisation of the prevalence of childhood obesity in Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aeberli, I.; Henschen, I.; Molinari, L.; Zimmermann, M.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing rapidly in most industrialised countries, but several countries, including Switzerland, have recently reported a levelling off or even a reversal of this alarming trend. Study aim: Our aim was to evaluate the prevalence of childhood obesi

  18. "Ich kam unter die Schweizer": Teaching Switzerland as a Multi-Ethnic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Karin

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a five-week module on "Switzerland as a multi-ethnic society" intended to counteract the popular image of Switzerland as a homogenous country concerned mostly with tourism, chocolate, and watches. Instead, the module treats Switzerland through topics such as the definition of identity in a multi-ethnic society, the…

  19. [The history of detained Polish veterinarians in Switzerland 1940-1947].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospischil, A; Häsler, S

    2016-01-01

    As part of the recent history of veterinary medicine in Switzerland, in Poland and in other countries biographies ofveterinarians among Polish soldiers detained to Switzerland during WWII are described. The information is derived from a number of Swiss and Ukrainian archives and personal contacts with descendants and colleagues of these veterinarians living in Switzerland and abroad.

  20. ACADEMIC TRAINING Physics Technologies in Medicine

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    10, 11, 12, 13, 14 June LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Physics Technologies in Medicine by G. K. Von Schulthess / Univ. of Z rich, S. Wildermuth, A. Buck / Univ. Hospital Z rich, K. Jäger / Univ. Hospital Basel, R. Kreis / Univ. Hospital Bern Modern medicine is a large consumer of physics technologies. The series of lectures covers medical imaging starting with an overview and the history of medical imaging. Then follows four lectures covering x-ray imaging positron emission tomography imaging blood flow by ultrasound magnetic resonance Monday 10 June 100 Years of Medical Imaging Pr. Gustav K. von Schulthess MD, PhD / University of Zurich History and overview of Medical Imaging Tuesday 11 June X-rays: still going strong Dr. Simon Wildermuth / MD, University Hospital Zurich Multidetector computed tomography: New developments and applications Wednesday 12 June Nuclear Medicine: PET Positron Emission Tomography Dr. Alfred Buck / MD, MSc, University Hospital Zurich Elucidati...

  1. Energy policies of IEA countries - Switzerland. 2007 review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-11-26

    Switzerland is entering decisive times in its energy policy. In 2008, the country should see remarkable advance in electricity market reform. Support for renewable electricity is set to increase massively. Decisions on post-Kyoto targets are getting closer, and a CO{sub 2} tax will be introduced for heating and process fuels. Plus, new measures to increase energy efficiency and the broader use of renewable energy are high on the political agenda. Since the last in-depth review in 2003, Switzerland has made progress in most areas of energy policy. Still, more work remains to be done. Maintaining sufficient electricity capacity implies even stronger policies to promote energy efficiency and renewable energy sources. At the same time, the country will also need to decide which sources to use for large-scale power supply. High dependency on oil can become a burden in a post-Kyoto world. In particular, Switzerland's climate policy should focus more on reducing emissions from private car use, the largest and fastest-growing emitter. Current measures have not proven effective, and the costs of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions are being distorted across sectors. Switzerland's world-class energy R and D is expected to more than halve energy needs per capita by the second half of this century. This ambitious goal needs to be supported by consistent policies on energy efficiency and climate change. This book takes an in-depth look at the energy challenges facing Switzerland and provides critiques and recommendations for policy improvements. The review guides the country towards a sustainable energy future.

  2. [Skin cancer in primary care: frequency, need to further education and subjective diagnostic certainty. A cross sectional survey among general practitioners in Canton of Zurich

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badertscher, N.; Senn, O.; Rossi, P.O.; Wensing, M.; Rosemann, T.; Tandjung, R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Incidence of malignant skin lesions is rising in Switzerland. We wanted to assess the frequency of patients with suspicious skin lesions in daily practice. Furthermore, we asked for diagnostic certainty and the need of further education in skin cancer. METHODS: Survey with 1212 GPs in

  3. [Skin cancer in primary care: frequency, need to further education and subjective diagnostic certainty. A cross sectional survey among general practitioners in Canton of Zurich

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badertscher, N.; Senn, O.; Rossi, P.O.; Wensing, M.; Rosemann, T.; Tandjung, R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Incidence of malignant skin lesions is rising in Switzerland. We wanted to assess the frequency of patients with suspicious skin lesions in daily practice. Furthermore, we asked for diagnostic certainty and the need of further education in skin cancer. METHODS: Survey with 1212 GPs in th

  4. Food Adulteration in Switzerland: From 'Ravioli' over 'Springbok' to 'Disco Sushi'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubner, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    The driving force behind food adulteration is monetary profit and this has remained unchanged for at least the last hundred years. Food adulterations were and still are difficult to uncover because they occur mostly in an unpredictable and unexpected way. Very often food falsifiers take advantage of modern technology in such a way that food adulterations are difficult or sometimes even impossible to detect. Targets for food adulteration were and still are highly priced food items such as spirits, meat, seafood and olive oil. Although difficult to detect, food adulterations were in the past strong driving forces for the development of adequate detection methods in the official food control laboratories and for the enforcement of the food law. A very prominent example in this context is the 'Ravioli scandal' in Switzerland in the late 1970s which showed that cheap second-class meat could be processed into products without being discovered for long time. As a consequence the official food control laboratories in Switzerland were reinforced with more laboratory equipment and technical staff. With the introduction of new detection principles such as DNA-based analytical methods new kinds of food adulteration could and can be uncovered. Analytical methods have their limits and in some cases of food fraud there are no analytical means to detect them. In such cases the examination of trade by checking of accounts is the method of choice.

  5. Drug Checking: A prevention measure for a heterogeneous group with high consumption frequency and polydrug use - evaluation of zurich's drug checking services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaub Michael

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing party culture in Zurich presents new challenges, especially regarding the consumption of alcohol and so-called party drugs. Streetwork, the youth advisory service of the city of Zurich, has provided onsite and stationary Drug Checking facilities since 2001 and 2006, respectively. Drug Checking always involves filling out an anonymous questionnaire, which allows the collection of important information about a largely unknown group of users and their consumption patterns. Methods The questionnaires assessed sociodemographic characteristics, consumption patterns, Drug Checking experiences, information behavior and social support. The collected data were statistically analyzed by the Research Institute for Public Health and Addiction (RIPHA. Results The majority of Drug Checking service patrons were male and between 20 and 35 years old. These patrons reported high lifetime prevalences and high consumption frequencies of legal and illegal substances, and they often reported polydrug use. Aside from tobacco and alcohol, the most consumed drugs during typical party nights were ecstasy, amphetamines, cannabis and cocaine. Party drug consumers using Drug Checking services form a heterogeneous group with respect to sociodemographic characteristics and consumption patterns. Users of the onsite Drug Checking facilities were significantly younger, were less experienced with drug testing, and reported more polydrug use than users of the stationary Drug Checking service. Conclusions Drug Checking combined with a consultation appears to be an important harm reduction and prevention measure that reaches a group of consumers with high consumption frequency and polydrug use. Because of the heterogeneity of the target group, different prevention measures must be offered and embedded in an overall local concept.

  6. Safe havens in Europe: Switzerland and the ten dwarfs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Paldam

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Eleven safe havens exist in Europe providing offshore banking and low taxes. Ten of these states are very small while Switzerland is moderately small. All 11countries are richer than their large neighbors. It is shown that causality is from small to safe haven towealth, and that theoretically equilibriums are likely to exist where a certain regulation is substantially lower in a small country than in its big neighbor. This generates a large capital inflow to the safe havens. The pool of funds that may reach the safe havens is shown to be huge. It is far in excess of the absorptive capacity of the safe havens, but it still explains, why they are rich. Microstates offer a veil of anonymity to funds passing through, and Switzerland offers safe storage of funds.

  7. Time-series analysis of Campylobacter incidence in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, W; Schüpbach, G; Held, L

    2015-07-01

    Campylobacteriosis has been the most common food-associated notifiable infectious disease in Switzerland since 1995. Contact with and ingestion of raw or undercooked broilers are considered the dominant risk factors for infection. In this study, we investigated the temporal relationship between the disease incidence in humans and the prevalence of Campylobacter in broilers in Switzerland from 2008 to 2012. We use a time-series approach to describe the pattern of the disease by incorporating seasonal effects and autocorrelation. The analysis shows that prevalence of Campylobacter in broilers, with a 2-week lag, has a significant impact on disease incidence in humans. Therefore Campylobacter cases in humans can be partly explained by contagion through broiler meat. We also found a strong autoregressive effect in human illness, and a significant increase of illness during Christmas and New Year's holidays. In a final analysis, we corrected for the sampling error of prevalence in broilers and the results gave similar conclusions.

  8. Fuel tourism in border regions: The case of Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banfi, S.; Filippini, M. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland). Department of Management, Technology and Economics, Centre for Energy Policy and Economics; Universita della Svizzera italiana, Lugano (Switzerland). Istituto di microeconomia e economia Pubblica; Hunt, L.C. [University of Surrey (United Kingdom). Department of Economics, Surrey Energy Economics Centre

    2005-09-01

    This paper explores the issue of 'fuel tourism' in Switzerland. For the period 1985-1997, a panel data model for the border regions of Switzerland, (Italy, France, and Germany) is estimated. The results show a significant impact of the gasoline price differential on demand, suggesting that a decrease of 10% in the Swiss gasoline price leads to an increase in demand in the border areas of nearly 17.5%. It is shown that fuel tourism accounted for about 9% of overall gasoline sales in the three regions during the period 1985-1997 and that the recently proposed Swiss CO{sub 2}-tax might, given current conditions, eliminate net fuel tourism. (author)

  9. Out of home care in France and Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the structural similarities and dissimilarities that exist between child protection systems in France and Switzerland, as exemplified by the evolutions of the last decade. The absence of anintegrated holistic system and the great diversity of practices between territories in both countries creates a reality that is a challenge for research and practitioners alike. Furthermore, legislation in France andSwitzerland is quite similar in that there is no single defined support or welfare body of legislation for children and youth. In both countries, the need for a better understanding of this reality drives the development of better data collection processes and of new in-depth research on these issues.

  10. Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Switzerland 2012 Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Switzerland has taken bold decisions to gradually phase out nuclear power and to reduce by a fifth its greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 with domestic measures only. These are challenging objectives, and the country now needs to identify the most viable ways to meet them at least cost and minimum risk to energy security. In the absence of nuclear power, maintaining sufficient electricity capacity will require strong policies to promote energy efficiency and renewable energy. Such measures have already been outlined, but they will likely not be enough. For baseload generation, gas-fired power plants would be the simplest option. Treating their CO2 emissions the same way as in the neighbouring countries would be a strong positive incentive for investors. Because Switzerland's energy-related CO2 emissions come mostly from oil use in transport and space heating, action is most needed in these areas. Commendably, the country is making polluters pay by using a CO2 tax for financing decarbonisation efforts in space heating. Stronger efforts will be needed to reduce emissions from private car use, however. Since the 2007 IEA energy policy review, Switzerland has made clear progress in electricity market reform. Moving to a fully open market by 2015 would be a further positive step. The system of regulated end-user prices, however, is subsidising electricity consumption at a time when low-carbon power supply is becoming more constrained and expensive. It should be reconsidered. Switzerland should also continue to take an increasingly European approach to developing its electricity infrastructure, to its own benefit and to that of its neighbours.

  11. Flood damage claims reveal insights about surface runoff in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernet, D. B.; Prasuhn, V.; Weingartner, R.

    2015-12-01

    A few case studies in Switzerland exemplify that not only overtopping water bodies frequently cause damages to buildings. Reportedly, a large share of the total loss due to flooding in Switzerland goes back to surface runoff that is formed and is propagating outside of regular watercourses. Nevertheless, little is known about when, where and why such surface runoff occurs. The described process encompasses surface runoff formation, followed by unchannelised overland flow until a water body is reached. It is understood as a type of flash flood, has short response times and occurs diffusely in the landscape. Thus, the process is difficult to observe and study directly. A promising source indicating surface runoff indirectly are houseowners' damage claims recorded by Swiss Public Insurance Companies for Buildings (PICB). In most of Switzerland, PICB hold a monopoly position and insure (almost) every building. Consequently, PICB generally register all damages to buildings caused by an insured natural hazard (including surface runoff) within the respective zones. We have gathered gapless flood related claim records of most of all Swiss PICB covering more than the last two decades on average. Based on a subset, we have developed a methodology to differentiate claims related to surface runoff from other causes. This allows us to assess the number of claims as well as total loss related to surface runoff and compare these to the numbers of overtopping watercourses. Furthermore, with the good data coverage, we are able to analyze surface runoff related claims in space and time, from which we can infer spatial and temporal characteristics of surface runoff. Although the delivered data of PICB are heterogeneous and, consequently, time-consuming to harmonize, our first results show that exploiting these damage claim records is feasible and worthwhile to learn more about surface runoff in Switzerland.

  12. Intercultural Education in Spain and Switzerland: a Comparative Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferran Ferrer

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Intercultural education during the last two decades in Spain and Switzerland can be understood as balancing acts because policymakers in both countries saw their school systems enrolling a growing number of immigrant and minority students. While solutions were formulated and adopted in response to each country's unique problems and political tradition, they were also driven by forces that fostered a restrictive immigration policy toward immigrants from third world countries. This article examines the emergence of intercultural education and compares diverse practices linked to this process. Some similarities were found in both socio-cultural contexts. The use of compensatory education with culturally diverse children contributes to school segregation. Although cultural and linguistic diversity is a structural and historical component of Spanish and Swiss identities, there is a clear separation between "internal" and "external" diversity in educational policy. It is interesting, for instance, to observe that the concept used in addressing regional identities in Spain and Switzerland is "bilingual education" while the theme used for immigrants is "intercultural education". We also identified some important differences between the two contexts. The number of immigrant youth is much more important in Switzerland. On the other hand, the presence of Gypsy students is a central issue of cultural diversity in Spain. The paper also reports on the general lack of teacher education departments to prepare their pre-service students for diverse schools. Most teacher education programs acknowledge in principle the importance of pluralistic preparation of teachers. In practice, however, most teacher education programs actually represent a monocultural approach. Continuing education in the field of intercultural education is linked to individual initiatives rather than to an institutional awareness of the importance of cross-cultural training. In order to

  13. Dr. David Syz, State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Switzerland

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Dr. David Syz, State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Switzerland is seen here (seventh from right) visiting the assembly hall for the ATLAS experiment during his recent visit to CERN. To his right is Dr. Peter Jenni (blue shirt), spokesperson for the ATLAS Collaboration. The horizontal metal cylinder behind the group is one of the eight vacuum vessels for the superconducting coils of the ATLAS barrel toroid magnet system.

  14. Spatial and temporal variability of rainfall erosivity factor for Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Steel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall erosivity, considering rainfall amount and intensity, is an important parameter for soil erosion risk assessment under future land use and climate change. Despite its importance, rainfall erosivity is usually implemented in models with a low spatial and temporal resolution. The purpose of this study is to assess the temporal- and spatial distribution of rainfall erosivity (R-factor in Switzerland. Time series of 22 yr for rainfall (10 min resolution and temperature (1 h resolution data were analysed for 71 automatic gauging stations distributed throughout Switzerland. Multiple regression was used to interpolate the erosivity values of single stations and to generate a map for Switzerland. Latitude, longitude, average annual precipitation, biogeographic units (Jura, Midland, etc., aspect and elevation were used as covariates, of which average annual precipitation, elevation and the biographic unit (Western Alps were significant predictors. The mean value of long-term rainfall erosivity is 1323 MJ mm ha−1 h−1 yr−1 with a range of lowest values of 124 MJ mm ha−1 h−1 yr−1 at an elevated station in Grisons to highest values of 5611 MJ mm ha−1 h−1 yr−1 in Ticino. All stations have highest erosivity values from July to August and lowest values in the winter month. Swiss-wide the month May to October show significantly increasing trends of erosivity (p<0.005. Only in February a significantly decreasing trend of rainfall erosivity is found (p<0.01. The increasing trends of erosivity in May, September and October when vegetation cover is susceptible are likely to enhance soil erosion risk for certain agricultural crops and alpine grasslands in Switzerland.

  15. The Megalithic civilisation in Switzerland, its society and its monuments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Pauline; Berti, Jérôme

    2011-06-01

    The Swiss megaliths, just like the English sites, hold an obvious interest for archaeology and astronomy. Within the sites located in Switzerland, the megaliths of Corcelles-Concise have some particular characteristics which are, in our opinion, relevant to point out. Indeed, using recent astronomical software, we have been able to attribute to this site a probable astronomical function. This lead us to wonder about the general use of this kind of location, with some insights on a cultual plan.

  16. COMPARISON OF NANOTECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE IN TURKEY AND SWITZERLAND

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to replicate the study of Siegrist et al. [2007] and to present a comparison of nanotechnology acceptance in Turkey and Switzerland. The participants in our survey acknowledge the benefits of nanotechnology in achieving a preferred future (significance on the country's economy and on wealth creation, as well as quality of life) while reserving some sceptism on the institutions' responsibility in utilizing nanotechnology in the food domain.The most beneficial applicati...

  17. Market segmentation by motivation: The case of Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Bieger, Thomas; Laesser, Christian

    2002-01-01

    This contribution is about the segmentation of mature travel markets, as exemplified by Switzerland. Based on an extensive and representative travel survey covering 2,000 households and more than 11,000 trips, a situational, motivation-based travel market segmentation is proposed. The clustering of motivations proves to be a valuable means to segment markets. The results reveal a diminishing role of socio-demographic segment descriptors. It is more the (anticipated) travel profile and the att...

  18. Health care renunciation for economic reasons in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Hans; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Guessous, Idris

    2011-02-18

    Most societies elaborate ways to contain increasing health care expenditures. In Switzerland out of pocket payments and cuts in the catalogue of reimbursed services are used as cost-containment measures. The aims of the study were to estimate the extent of health care renunciation for economic reasons and to identify associated factors. A population-based cross-sectional survey (2008-2009) of a representative sample in the Canton of Geneva, Switzerland. Health care underuse, income level categories (13000), education, occupation, insurance status and cardiovascular comorbidities were collected using self-rated questionnaires. 765 men and 814 women aged 35-74 years participated. 14.5% (229/1579) (95% CI 12.7-16.2) renounced health care for economic reasons. Among those who renounced (N=229), 74% renounced dental care, 37% physician consultation (22% specialist, 15% general practitioner), 26% health devices, 13% medication, and 5% surgery. Income was negatively correlated with renouncement (r=-0.18, peconomic reasons (OR 1.48, 1.31-1.65). This association remained when dental care was excluded from the definition of health care renunciation. In a region of Switzerland with a high cost of living, such as Geneva, socioeconomic status may influence the use of the health care system, and renunciation for economic reasons was not uncommon. More than 30% of the lowest income group renounced health care for economical reasons in the previous year. Health care underuse and renunciation may worsen the health status of a substantial part of society.

  19. Educating teachers in Switzerland – reform and current situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Wiśniewska-Paź

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Educating teachers in the scope of higher (non-academic education sector has been a relatively new phenomenon in Switzerland. Until the end of the 90's, when Higher Pedagogical Schools were established, teachers had been educated at teaching seminars.Establishment of Higher Pedagogical Schools gave rise to a thorough reform in educating teachers in Switzerland, which aimed at improving the quality of work and professionalism of the teachers through science-oriented education (similar to the university education, and at establishing international and all-Swiss system of acknowledging diplomas received in particular canton institutions of higher education. This system makes it possible for the graduates to commence work at schools/ kindergarten departments not only in a canton of their choice, but also in a country chosen by them. At present, 12 000 students study in higher pedagogical schools, which constitutes 7% of all students in both (academic and non-academic sectors of higher education. This article describes current situation of this type of universities in Switzerland, their location, specializations, availability issues, duration of the studies and also the number of students (including percentage of foreigners, as well as the issues of prestige of the profession of a teacher, average age of the personnel in relation to education levels, degree of feminization of the profession and the demands.

  20. Mr. Charles Kleiber, State Secretary for Science and Research, Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01 : Mr Charles Kleiber, State Secretary for Science and Research, Switzerland visiting the TI8 tunnel. From l to r: Prof. Luciano Maiani, CERN Director-General, Mr Guy Hentsch, Chef de Cabinet, Mr Jean-Luc Baldy, Head of the LHC civil engineering group, Mr Charles Kleiber, State Secretary for Science and Research, Switzerland and Mr Jean-Pierre Ruder, Swiss Delegate to CERN Council. Photo 02 : Visit to the TI8 tunnel by Mr Charles Kleiber, State Secretary for Science and Research, Switzerland (third from left) with l. to r. Mr Jean-Luc Baldy, Head of the LHC civil engineering group; Prof. Luciano Maiani, CERN Director-General; Dr Jean-Pierre Ruder, Swiss Delegate to CERN Council; Dr Guy Hentsch, Chef de Cabinet; Mr Michel Buchs and Mr Frédéric Chavan, representatives of the firm Prader Losinger, Groupement ATIC responsible for the civil engineering work. Photo 03: From l to r: Mr Jean-Pierre Ruder, Swiss Delegate to CERN, Prof. Luciano Maiani, CERN Director-General, Mr Charles Kleiber, State Secretar...

  1. [Uroliths of cats in Switzerland from 2002 to 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, B; Brandenberger-Schenk, F; Rothenanger, E; Müller, C

    2016-10-01

    In this study data on composition of uroliths collected from cats and epidemiologic data of affected cats in Switzerland from 2002 to 2009 are summarised. Of 884 stones analysed 50% (n=441) were composed of calcium oxalate, 45% (n=398) of struvite, 3% (n=18) of ammonium urate, 1% (n=12) were mixed stones, 1% (n=9) were composed of silica, 3 stones were solidified blood, 2 consisted of cystine and 1of xanthine. 40% of the ureteral stones were composed of struvite. Domestic cats had significantly less calcium oxalate stones compared to British Shorthair or Persian cats. Cats with calcium oxalate stones were older and cats with struvite stones were younger than other affected cats. Female and male cats were equally affected with stones. Compared to studies from other countries, in Switzerland silica stones occurred more often and ureteral stones were more often composed of Struvite. The present study shows that occurrence and prevalence of urinary calculi of cats from Switzerland exhibited only slight differences to studies from other countries.

  2. Results of international Dobson spectrophotometer calibrations at Arosa, Switzerland, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grass, R. D.; Komhyr, W. D.; Koenig, G. L.; Evans, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    An international comparison of Dobson ozone spectrophotometers, organized and partially funded by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), was held at the Lichtklimatisches Observatorium (LKO) in Arosa, Switzerland, July-August 1990. Countries participating with a total of 18 Dobson instruments were Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Rumania, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the United Soviet Socialist Republics. The reference standard instrument for the comparison was U.S.A. Secondary Standard Dobson Spectrophotometer 65 maintained by the NOAA Climate and Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado. The mean difference in ozone obtained with the Dobson instruments relative to Dobson instrument 65, calculated from ADDSGQP observations in the air mass range 1.15-3.2, was minus 1.0 plus or minus 1.2 (1 sigma) percent. The WMO Standard Brewer Spectrometer 39 also participated. In the mean, the Brewer instrument measured 0.6 plus or minus 0.2 (1 sigma) percent more ozone than did Dobson instrument 65. Results are presented, also, of ozone vertical profile measurements made with the Dobson instruments, two Brewer spectrometers, a LIDAR, a balloon ozonesonde flown from Hohenpeissenberg, Germany, and balloon ozonesondes flown from Payerne, Switzerland.

  3. National Report Switzerland: Sounding Rocket and Balloon Activities and Related Research in Switzerland 2013-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, M.

    2015-09-01

    During the period from 2013 to 2015, many Swiss researchers conducted studies on research platforms such as balloons or sounding rockets, or at the high altitude research stations of Jungfraujoch and Gornergrat. Researchers ‘ increased interest in sounding rockets during the two-year period is especially noteworthy. The use of the high altitude research stations, in contrast, has a long tradition in Switzerland and is, thus, frequently occupied by scientists. An advantage of these stations is the ideal set-up for researchers interested in the long-term measurement of the upper atmosphere, for example. Therefore, numcrous experiments in this particular research field were conducted and published in scientific journals. After a pause, several Swiss scientists became engaged in sounding rocket experiments. RUAG Space in Nyon, for instance, in collaboration with the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) and University of Freiburg, is focusing on the effect of gravity on plant roots. In order to investigate a gravity-dependent influence, two experiments on Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings are being planned for execution during the upcoming MASTER 1 3 campaign. A team of students from HES-SO Geneva were chosen to participate in the REXUS program with their experiment called CAESAR. A new concept of a propellant management device for space vehicles was introduced and tested on the REXUS 14 rocket by the team from Geneva in the spring of 20 1 3 . Last year, another student team, now from the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, was selected to fly their experiment on another REXUS rocket. Their proposed biological study is called CEMIOS and pertains to biochemical properties of the cell membrane. Once more the high altitude research stations of Jungfraujoch and Gornergrat welcomed many national—as well as international—scientists in the past two years. The hours that the researchers spent in either station reached a record high despite the poor weather conditions

  4. A prototype web-GIS application for risk analysis of natural hazards in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Zar Chi; Nicolet, Pierrick; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Derron, Marc-Henri; Gerber, Christian; Lévy, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    measures in the area. After designing measures, the users can re-calculate risk by updating hazard intensity and object layers. This is achieved by manual editing of shape (vector) layers in the web-GIS interface interactively. Within the application, a cost-benefit analysis tool is also integrated to support the decision-making process for the selection of different protection measures. Finally, the resultant risk information (vector layers and data) can be exported in the form of shapefiles and excel sheets. A prototype application is realized using open-source geospatial software and technologies. Boundless framework with its client-side SDK environment is applied for the rapid prototyping. Free and open source components such as PostGIS spatial database, GeoServer and GeoWebCache, GeoExt and OpenLayers are used for the development of the platform. This developed prototype is demonstrated with a case study area located in Les Diablerets, Switzerland. This research work is carried out within a project funded by the Canton of Vaud, Switzerland. References: Bründl, M., Romang, H. E., Bischof, N., and Rheinberger, C. M.: The risk concept and its application in natural hazard risk management in Switzerland, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 9, 801-813, 2009. DGE: Valdorisk - Direction Générale de l'Environnement, www.vd.ch, accessed 9 January 2016, 2016. OFEV: EconoMe - Office fédéral de l'environnement, www.econome.admin.ch, accessed 9 January 2016, 2016.

  5. On the morphological characteristics of overdeepenings in high-mountain glacier beds W. Haeberli1, A. Cochachin2, U.H. Fischer3, A. Linsbauer1, C. Salazar2 1Geography Department, University of Zurich, Switzerland 2Glaciology and Water Resources Unit, Huaraz, Peru 3Nagra, Wettingen, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeberli, W.; Cochachin, A.; Fischer, U. H.; Linsbauer, A.; Salazar Checa, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Overdeepenings, i.e. closed topographic depressions with adverse slopes in the flow direction, are characteristic for glacier beds and glacially sculpted landscapes. Besides their importance as geomorphological landforms, groundwater bodies and sedimentary archives, they are of increasing interest in relation to climate-induced lake formation in de-glaciating landscapes and depth erosion under ice age conditions in connection with the long-term safety of radioactive waste repositories in some mid-latitude countries. Quantitative predictions of their shape, distribution and conditions of occurrence remain difficult. One major problem thereby relates to the still unsatisfactory treatment in glacier erosion theory of sediment evacuation at glacier beds, especially by subglacial meltwater. An alternative way of searching for realistic/empirical quantitative estimates is, therefore, to analyse the geometry of well-documented overdeepenings. The present study attempts to do this by combining statistical analyses of (a) detailed bathymetries from recently exposed lakes in the Peruvian Andes, (b) numerous bed overdeepenigs below still existing glaciers of the Swiss Alps modelled with a robust shear stress approximation linking surface slope to ice thickness at high resolution, and (c, for comparison) reconstructed overdeepenings produced by ice age glaciers in the Swiss Plateau. The sample of (a) has the advantage that geometries are exactly measured and are only subject to young/small sedimentation effects. Sample (b) allows for a comparison with a modern model calculation and with known glacier characteristics. Sample (c) may provide some insights into the question how safely results from high mountain topography can be transferred to sites with markedly different topographic, climatic and glaciological controls (cold-arid lowland). Where possible, mean and maximum values of the parameters surface area, length, width, depth, volume, adverse slope and their statistical interrelations are determined with their corresponding uncertainty ranges. For sample (b) basal shear stress (as used in the model), thermal ice types, glacier size/type, relation to flow characteristics (position along flow, confined-unconfined, confluence-diffluence-channel-forefield) are also included. As principal problem thereby remains the unsolved question of when exactly the overdeepenings had formed (present-day conditions, Holocene maximum stages, ice ages?). Some results nevertheless remain safe. Marked overdeepenings can, for instance, exist under very small cirque glaciers flowing under low shear stresses and having low melt-water input. They can form at confluences but also often occur under conditions of confined flow in rather straight channel configurations. Corresponding lakes can be dammed by huge (terminal) moraines or may form in beautifully polished pure rock beds. The full results of the study are hoped to improve the knowledge basis for practical applications (unmeasured and future lakes, depth erosion by glaciers).

  6. Fermentation of solid wastes in Switzerland; Feststoff-Vergaerung in der Schweiz. Schlussbericht 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liesch, B.; Mueller, C.

    2007-06-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a study on dry fermentation technologies. Information on the state-of-the-art of current dry fermentation systems is presented and the potential of implementing dry fermentation in Swiss agriculture is discussed. The study reveals that the current dry fermentation technologies provided by various enterprises are partly not suitable (complex, continuous operating digestion reactors, developed for handling municipal solid waste). Batch digestion reactors, however, are said by the authors to be mature for application in the Swiss agricultural area. Wet fermentation technologies are also quoted as being able to utilise organic substrates with high dry-matter content and are thus said to be economically more competitive than dry fermentation systems. Dry fermentation is quoted as being a technology with a high development potential. Details are presented on several continuous and non-continuous processes used. Also, the potential for the fermentation of solid wastes in Switzerland is reviewed. Experience made in Germany is also examined.

  7. Occurrence of the herbicide glyphosate and its metabolite AMPA in surface waters in Switzerland determined with on-line solid phase extraction LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poiger, Thomas; Buerge, Ignaz J; Bächli, Astrid; Müller, Markus D; Balmer, Marianne E

    2017-01-01

    Glyphosate is currently one of the most important herbicides worldwide. Its unique properties provide for a wide range of uses in agriculture but also in non-agricultural areas. At the same time, its zwitterionic nature prevents the inclusion in multi-residue analytical methods for environmental monitoring. Consequently, despite its extensive use, data on occurrence of glyphosate in the aquatic environment is still scarce. Based on existing methods, we developed a simplified procedure for the determination of glyphosate and its main metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in water samples using derivatization with fluorenylmethyl chloroformate FMOC-Cl, combined with on-line solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) detection. This method was extensively tested on over 1000 samples of surface water, groundwater, and treated wastewater and proved to be simple, sensitive, and reliable. Limits of quantification of 0.005 μg/L were routinely achieved. Glyphosate and AMPA were detected in the vast majority of stream water samples in the area of Zurich, Switzerland, with median concentrations of 0.11 and 0.20 μg/L and 95th percentile concentrations of 2.1 and 2.6 μg/L, respectively. Stream water data and data from treated wastewater indicated that non-agricultural uses may significantly contribute to the overall loads of glyphosate and AMPA in surface waters. In the investigated groundwater samples, selected specifically because they had shown presence of other herbicides in previous monitoring programs, glyphosate and AMPA were generally not detected, except for two monitoring sites in Karst aquifers, indicating that these compounds show much less tendency for leaching.

  8. Grating image technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Fujio

    1995-07-01

    The word 'grating image' was first named by Toppan Printing Company, Ltd. It means that an image consists of grating dots. In 1988, we presented this new technology at the Optical Security Systems Symposium, in Switzerland. Then it was improved and applied in display application. Recently, it was further applied in 3D video systems. In this report, the development history and the recent situations of grating image technology are described.

  9. Macromolecular crowding: chemistry and physics meet biology (Ascona, Switzerland, 10-14 June 2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foffi, G; Pastore, A; Piazza, F; Temussi, P A

    2013-08-02

    interactions. Supramolecular chemistry explores the design of systems undergoing self-organization , i.e. systems capable of generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembling from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems . Chemistry may therefore be considered an information science , the science of informed matter. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the ability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibly, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by the reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels. CDC takes advantage of dynamic constitutional diversity to allow variation and selection in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation . The merging of the features-information and programmability, dynamics and reversibility, constitution and structural diversity-points towards the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry . The whole workshop could have not taken place without the help of the Centro Stefano Franscini. The CSF is the congress centre of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology of Zurich (ETH Zurich) and has been situated at Monte Verità since 1989. It is an ideal meeting point for all members of the international scientific community who wish to discuss the state-of-the-art and new challenges of any field of research. The CSF supports 20-25 international conferences every year and, since 2010, up to ten winter doctoral schools(1). The competence and professionalism of the staff were at the same level of beauty and inspiring character as that of Monte Verità. A meeting of this

  10. Macromolecular crowding: chemistry and physics meet biology (Ascona, Switzerland, 10-14 June 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foffi, G.; Pastore, A.; Piazza, F.; Temussi, P. A.

    2013-08-01

    explores the design of systems undergoing self-organization , i.e. systems capable of generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembling from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems . Chemistry may therefore be considered an information science , the science of informed matter. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the ability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibly, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by the reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels. CDC takes advantage of dynamic constitutional diversity to allow variation and selection in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation . The merging of the features—information and programmability, dynamics and reversibility, constitution and structural diversity—points towards the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry . The whole workshop could have not taken place without the help of the Centro Stefano Franscini. The CSF is the congress centre of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology of Zurich (ETH Zurich) and has been situated at Monte Verità since 1989. It is an ideal meeting point for all members of the international scientific community who wish to discuss the state-of-the-art and new challenges of any field of research. The CSF supports 20-25 international conferences every year and, since 2010, up to ten winter doctoral schools1. The competence and professionalism of the staff were at the same level of beauty and inspiring character as that of Monte Verità. A meeting of this sort, if successful, leaves the

  11. Timken steel technology used in CERN's hadron collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "The Timken Company's steel technology helped Superbolt, Inc. provide equipment to the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and its large particle physics laboratory located near Geneva, Switzerland." (1,5 page)

  12. Pure animal phobia is more specific than other specific phobias: epidemiological evidence from the Zurich Study, the ZInEP and the PsyCoLaus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Rodgers, Stephanie; Müller, Mario; Hengartner, Michael P; Aleksandrowicz, Aleksandra; Kawohl, Wolfram; Heekeren, Karsten; Rössler, Wulf; Angst, Jules; Castelao, Enrique; Vandeleur, Caroline; Preisig, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Interest in subtypes of mental disorders is growing in parallel with continuing research progress in psychiatry. The aim of this study was to examine pure animal phobia in contrast to other specific phobias and a mixed subtype. Data from three representative Swiss community samples were analysed: PsyCoLaus (n = 3720), the ZInEP Epidemiology Survey (n = 1500) and the Zurich Study (n = 591). Pure animal phobia and mixed animal/other specific phobias consistently displayed a low age at onset of first symptoms (8-12 years) and clear preponderance of females (OR > 3). Meanwhile, other specific phobias started up to 10 years later and displayed almost a balanced sex ratio. Pure animal phobia showed no associations with any included risk factors and comorbid disorders, in contrast to numerous associations found in the mixed subtype and in other specific phobias. Across the whole range of epidemiological parameters examined in three different samples, pure animal phobia seems to represent a different entity compared to other specific phobias. The etiopathogenetic mechanisms and risk factors associated with pure animal phobias appear less clear than ever.

  13. The Zurich Environmental Study (ZENS) of Galaxies in Groups along the Cosmic Web. V. Properties and Frequency of Merging Satellites and Centrals in Different Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Pipino, A; Tacchella, S; Carollo, C M; Lilly, S J; Miniati, F; Silverman, J D; van Gorkom, J H; Finoguenov, A

    2014-01-01

    We use the Zurich ENvironmental Study (ZENS) database to investigate the dependence of the merger fraction and merging galaxy properties on environment in a sample of ~1300 group galaxies with $M>10^{9.2}$ $M_{\\odot}$ and 0.05$10^{13.5}$ $M_{\\odot}$, indicating a suppression of merger activity in massive groups. The observed dependence on halo mass is almost independent of galaxy mass and merger stage. At galaxy masses >$10^{10.2}$ $M_{\\odot}$, most mergers are `dry' accretions of quenched satellites onto quenched centrals, leading to a strong increase of the merger fraction with decreasing group-centric distance at these mass scales. Both satellite and central galaxies in these high mass mergers do not differ in color and structural properties from a control sample of non-merging galaxies of equal mass and rank. At galaxy masses < $10^{10.2}$ $M_{\\odot}$ -- where we mostly probe satellite-satellite pairs and mergers between star forming systems -- close pairs (projected distance <10-20 kpc) show instea...

  14. The color of complexes and UV-vis spectroscopy as an analytical tool of Alfred Werner's group at the University of Zurich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Thomas; Berke, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Two PhD theses (Alexander Gordienko, 1912; Johannes Angerstein, 1914) and a dissertation in partial fulfillment of a PhD thesis (H. S. French, Zurich, 1914) are reviewed that deal with hitherto unpublished UV-vis spectroscopy work of coordination compounds in the group of Alfred Werner. The method of measurement of UV-vis spectra at Alfred Werner's time is described in detail. Examples of spectra of complexes are given, which were partly interpreted in terms of structure (cis ↔ trans configuration, counting number of bands for structural relationships, and shift of general spectral features by consecutive replacement of ligands). A more complete interpretation of spectra was hampered at Alfred Werner's time by the lack of a light absorption theory and a correct theory of electron excitation, and the lack of a ligand field theory for coordination compounds. The experimentally difficult data acquisitions and the difficult spectral interpretations might have been reasons why this method did not experience a breakthrough in Alfred Werner's group to play a more prominent role as an important analytical method. Nevertheless the application of UV-vis spectroscopy on coordination compounds was unique and novel, and witnesses Alfred Werner's great aptitude and keenness to always try and go beyond conventional practice.

  15. Commodities and Switzerland: Development Policy Challenges and Policy Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Thut

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available EDITOR’S NOTEThis paper, written in December 2012, is a contribution to the ‘Policy Debate’ section of the International Development Policy. In this section, academics, policy makers and practitioners engage in a dialogue on global development challenges. Papers are copy-edited but not peer-reviewed. Instead, an initial thematic contribution is followed by critical comments and reactions from different stakeholders. This paper by Werner Thut is followed by reactions and analysis from a non-profit policy institute (Alexandra Gillies, Revenue Watch Institute, New York, ‘Crafting a Strategic Response to the Commodity-Development Conundrum’, a Southern scholar (Prof. Humberto Campodonico, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima ‘Going Beyond Transparency and Good Governance’ | ‘Más allá de la transparencia y una buena gobernanza’ and a representative of the trading sector (Stéphane Graber, Secretary General of Geneva Trading & Shipping Association – ‘Reassessing the Merchants’ Role in a Globalized Economy’.PAPER’S ABSTRACTSwitzerland is one of the world’s largest commodity trading hub. The author, senior policy adviser at the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC, reviews experiences and policy options related to commodity trading from a development policy perspective. While this sector has become of strategic importance to Switzerland’s economy, it also entails a number of risks. On the other hand, Swiss development cooperation efforts focus on several resource-rich countries, whose mineral and agricultural commodities are traded via Switzerland. How can Switzerland assist these countries to reap the benefits of their natural resource wealth? This paper looks at development policy aspects of commodity trading in relation to Swiss foreign and domestic policy. It examines ongoing policy debates in Switzerland and discusses development policy options.

  16. Bovine besnoitiosis in Switzerland: imported cases and local transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Walter; Lesser, Maren; Grimm, Felix; Hilbe, Monika; Sydler, Titus; Trösch, Luzia; Ochs, Hansueli; Braun, Ueli; Deplazes, Peter

    2013-12-06

    Bovine besnoitiosis is an economically important disease of cattle, caused by Besnoitia besnoiti (Protozoa, Apicomplexa). A considerable spreading of this parasitic infection has been observed in Europe in the last ten years, mainly related to animal trade. In order to investigate the possibility of B. besnoiti being unnoticed introduced and getting established in Switzerland through the import of breeding cattle from France, a total of 767 animals (650 cattle imported from France and 117 cattle that had contact with B. besnoiti positive cattle in Swiss farms) were screened for antibodies against B. besnoiti by both a commercial ELISA and by the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). A total of 101 (13.17%) samples showed a positive reaction in ELISA (cut-off: percent of positivity [PP] ≥ 15) and 16 (2.09%) samples had IFAT titers ≥ 1:100. Eight of those samples reacted positive in Western blot (WB), corresponding to five imported Limousin cattle (two cows and one bull from France and two cows from Germany) and to three cattle born in Switzerland (one Limousin heifer born from one of the positive German cows, and two adult Braunvieh cows, that had been in contact with one of the French cows at a Swiss farm). Seven of those animals were subclinically infected and one animal showed only very mild signs. They were subsequently slaughtered, and the serological diagnosis could be confirmed by real-time PCR and/or histopathology in seven animals. The most frequent parasite localizations were the tendons and surrounding connective tissue of the distal limbs and the skin of the head region. Furthermore, B. besnoiti could be successfully isolated in vitro from one French, one German and one Swiss cattle (isolates Bb-IPZ-1-CH, Bb-IPZ-2-CH and Bb-IPZ-3-CH). In the current situation in Switzerland, prophylactic and control measures should include a serological examination of cattle to be imported from endemic areas and the culling of all confirmed positive animals from

  17. Impacts of the May 2015 bad weather in Western Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voumard, Jérémie; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Strong precipitations occurred on Western Switzerland in the beginning of May 2015, especially on May 1st. Over 100 mm of rain fell in about 24 hours in some places in Western Switzerland, with a maximum of 130 mm at La Dôle, Canton of Vaud. Those heavy rains caused different damages as debris flow, floods and landslides. Several roads and railway have been closed, preventively or due to tracks obstructions in the Alps, the Jura mountains and in the Swiss Plateau. Two landslides have disrupted two main railway tracks, causing high traffic disturbances due to deviations and affecting the railway traffic during more than one week. In the village of St-Gingolph in the Canton of Valais, the Morge river overflowed two restaurants with debris flows. Their ground floor levels have been totally destroyed. In the town of Monthey, Canton of Valais, about 300 residents along the Viège river have been evacuated during the night because of the high risk of floods. The Arve river -which flows through the Chamonix Valley in the French Alps- has reached a flow rate record with 903 m3/s compared to its standard flow of 77 m3/s at its mouth into the Rhône river in Geneva on 2nd May. Several bridges in the town had to be closed, affecting the urban traffic of the second biggest town of Switzerland. North-east of the Western Switzerland, the lakes of Neuchâtel (Canton of Neuchâtel), Biel (Canton of Bern) and Morat (Canton of Fribourg), overflowed because of the high flow rate of the Aare river. The maximum height of water level has been reached about 8 days after the first heavy rain with a water level increase of 1 meter. A lot of wood has been carried by the rivers to the shores of the lakes. The damages are only material, no injuries were identified. Financial and temporal damages consequences are high for the two destroyed restaurants. The return to normality for river flows and water levels of the lakes took several weeks. The aim of this study is to document the natural

  18. Natural hazard fatalities in Switzerland from 1946 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badoux, Alexandre; Andres, Norina; Techel, Frank; Hegg, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    A database of fatalities caused by natural hazard processes in Switzerland was compiled for the period between 1946 and 2015. Using information from the Swiss flood and landslide damage database and the Swiss destructive avalanche database, the data set was extended back in time and more hazard processes were added by conducting an in-depth search of newspaper reports. The new database now covers all natural hazards common in Switzerland, categorised into seven process types: flood, landslide, rockfall, lightning, windstorm, avalanche and other processes (e.g. ice avalanches, earthquakes). Included were all fatal accidents associated with natural hazard processes in which victims did not expose themselves to an important danger on purpose. The database contains information on 635 natural hazard events causing 1023 fatalities, which corresponds to a mean of 14.6 victims per year. The most common causes of death were snow avalanches (37 %), followed by lightning (16 %), floods (12 %), windstorms (10 %), rockfall (8 %), landslides (7 %) and other processes (9 %). About 50 % of all victims died in one of the 507 single-fatality events; the other half were killed in the 128 multi-fatality events. The number of natural hazard fatalities that occurred annually during our 70-year study period ranged from 2 to 112 and exhibited a distinct decrease over time. While the number of victims in the first three decades (until 1975) ranged from 191 to 269 per decade, it ranged from 47 to 109 in the four following decades. This overall decrease was mainly driven by a considerable decline in the number of avalanche and lightning fatalities. About 75 % of victims were males in all natural hazard events considered together, and this ratio was roughly maintained in all individual process categories except landslides (lower) and other processes (higher). The ratio of male to female victims was most likely to be balanced when deaths occurred at home (in or near a building), a situation

  19. Tuberculosis in early medieval Switzerland--osteological and molecular evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christine; Fellner, Robert; Heubi, Olivier; Maixner, Frank; Zink, Albert; Lösch, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Lesions consistent with skeletal tuberculosis were found in 13 individuals from an early medieval skeletal sample from Courroux (Switzerland). One case of Pott's disease as well as lytic lesions in vertebrae and joints, rib lesions and endocranial new bone formation were identified. Three individuals with lesions and one without were tested for the presence of Myobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) ancient DNA (aDNA), and in two cases, evidence for MTBC aDNA was detected. Our results suggest the presence of tuberculosis in the analysed material, which is in accordance with other osteological and biomolecular research that reported a high prevalence of tuberculosis in medieval skeletons.

  20. Spatial and temporal variability of rainfall erosivity factor for Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Meusburger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall erosivity, considering rainfall amount and intensity, is an important parameter for soil erosion risk assessment under future land use and climate change. Despite its importance, rainfall erosivity is usually implemented in models with a low spatial and temporal resolution. The purpose of this study is to assess the temporal- and spatial distribution of rainfall erosivity in form of the (Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation R-factor for Switzerland. Time series of 22 yr for rainfall (10 min resolution and temperature (1 h resolution data were analysed for 71 automatic gauging stations distributed throughout Switzerland. Regression-kriging was used to interpolate the rainfall erosivity values of single stations and to generate a map for Switzerland. Latitude, longitude, average annual precipitation, biogeographic units (Jura, Midland, etc., aspect and elevation were used as covariates, of which average annual precipitation, elevation and the biographic unit (Western Central Alps were significant (p<0.01 predictors. The mean value of long-term rainfall erosivity is 1330 MJ mm ha−1 h−1 yr−1 with a range of lowest values of 124 MJ mm ha−1 h−1 yr−1 at an elevated station in Grisons to highest values of 5611 MJ mm ha−1 h−1 yr−1 in Ticino. All stations have highest erosivity values from July to August and lowest values in the winter months. Swiss-wide the month May to October show significantly increasing trends of rainfall erosivity for the observed period (p<0.005. Only in February a significantly decreasing trend of rainfall erosivity is found (p<0.01. The increasing trends of rainfall erosivity in May, September and October when vegetation cover is scarce are likely to enhance soil erosion risk for certain agricultural crops and alpine grasslands in Switzerland.

  1. [Abortion in sheep: epidemic Salmonella abortusovis outbreak 2005 in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Tavel, L; Fivian, R; Kirchhofer, M; Boujon, P; Hirsbrunner, G

    2005-10-01

    In spring 2005, the outbreak of contagious abortion caused by Salmonella Abortusovis in 6 sheep flocks in Switzerland led to considerable economic losses. The Swiss small ruminant health service (BGK) evaluated this case. The aim was to identify the source of the epidemic in order to avoid further spread of infection and to evaluate the possibility of using vaccination. Moreover, a strategy for prevention of future outbreaks was developed. This article aims to increase disease awareness of food animal practitioners for Salmonella Abortusovis abortion in sheep.

  2. Summer North Atlantic Oscillation and flood variability in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Juan Carlos; Schulte, Lothar; Badoux, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    The study analyses the possible links between flood frequency in Switzerland and the North Atlantic dynamics over the last two centuries. Given the intricate topography of Switzerland, it will generate a territorial division to retain main physiographic and environmental dissimilarities between different regions. The flood variability in Switzerland over the period 1800-2010 has been determined from a flood damage index for July and August months. The index considers very severe and catastrophic floods from existing flood inventories, summarizing both the severity of these events, their spatial extent and the regional differences. Special attention will be focused on the disparities between flood dynamics at northern and southern slopes of the Alps. The analysis of the possible links between floods and North Atlantic dynamics is focused on the low-frequency atmospheric circulation patterns. Summer climate in the North Atlantic-European sector shows a principal pattern of year-to-year variability, although this pattern is weaker than the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in winter and is confined to northern latitudes. By analogy the climatology community refers to this pattern as the Summer North Atlantic Oscillation (SNAO), which is defined as the main empirical orthogonal function of the standardized anomalies of the European mean sea level pressure during July and August. The flood damage index provides evidences of floods clusters in: 1830-1851, 1881-1927, 1977-1990 and 2005 to present. These clusters coincide with those reported from Switzerland and from some areas of the European continent such as the Czech Republic, Italy and the eastern half of the Iberian Peninsula. This link is not so close when compared with the flood occurrences in Germany. The analysis of the principal mode of low-frequency atmospheric variability shows that the Swiss river catchments situated on the center and southern flank of the Alps are affected by atmospherically unstable areas

  3. Gunshot deaths in Geneva, Switzerland: 2001 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Harpe, Romano; Mohamed, Nadja Ben; Burkhardt, Sandra

    2013-09-01

    We have conducted a retrospective study of all gunshot deaths that occurred in Geneva, Switzerland, over a 10-year period (2001-2010). The 133 cases reviewed were classified according to the manner of death, that is, suicide (106 cases), homicide (25 cases), and accident (2 cases). Various data from police authorities and the medicolegal examinations of the bodies were studied, including the age and sex of the victims, location of the event, type of firearm used, concomitant use or nonuse of alcohol and/or other drugs, seasonality, and entry site. These various elements were compared with data found in the literature.

  4. Selling Dreams: An Overview of Slimming Products' Advertisements in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Nadège Droz; Pedro Marques-Vidal

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this work was to assess weight loss claims of slimming products available in Switzerland. Method: Between May 2008 and February 2013, 31 advertisements for 13 slimming products were analyzed. Results: Total daily weight loss claims ranged between 300 g and 1 kg. 84% of the advertisements included the photograph of a woman, 61% showed a picture of a person before and after using the product, and 51% claimed that the product had improved marital relationships. The terms ‘n...

  5. Dr. David Syz, State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Dr. David Syz, State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Switzerland, toured the assembly hall of the ATLAS experiment on a recent visit to CERN.Photos 01, 02: Dr. Peter Jenni, spokesperson for the ATLAS experiment (second from left), explains to Dr. David Syz (fourth from left) and accompanying visitors the process of integration of a 26-metre-long coil of the barrel toroid magnet system into its coil casing.Photo 03: Dr. Peter Jenni (extreme right) with Dr. David Syz (front row, fourth from right) behind a stack of 26-metre-long 'racetrack' coils awaiting integration into their coil casings.

  6. [Old and offline? : Findings on the use of the Internet by people aged 65 years and older in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Alexander; Schelling, Hans Rudolf

    2016-10-01

    The supply of information and communication is becoming continuously more focused on the Internet. While the age groups up to 64 years have shown a vast increase in the use of the Internet since 1997, intensive use of the Internet by age groups above 64 years lags behind and this is not only the case in Switzerland. Against this background and an interest in finding out more about Internet (non)use of older people, two representative surveys were conducted in Switzerland, one in 2009 and another one in 2014. The data used were acquired throughout Switzerland via a standardized telephone survey. The random sample (2014) consisted of 1037 people aged between 65 and 100 years old. Although the digital divide between the age groups has lessened over the past years, only 55.7 % of the elderly people interviewed were using the Internet in the autumn of 2014. Internet usage differs greatly between age groups. Resources such as education, income and health positively impact actual use of the Internet. Additionally, recommendations from a person's social environment, as well as an affinity for technology and a personal benefit assessment have a positive impact on Internet usage. In particular, security concerns and difficulties of use were mentioned as predominant reasons for the non-use of the Internet. Some of the people questioned felt excluded from society because they did not use the Internet. Internet usage among elderly people depends on individual and social resources, as well as on general attitude towards technology and personal benefit expectations. The exclusion of today's elderly "offliners" should be avoided, even if the digital divide will decrease in the future.

  7. Intermediate steps towards the 2000-Watt society in Switzerland: an energy-economic scenario analysis[Dissertation 17314

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, T. F

    2007-07-01

    In this dissertation by Thorsten Frank Schulz the intermediate steps necessary to realise the 2000-Watt Society in Switzerland are examined. An analysis of an energy-economic scenario shows that the 2000-Watt Society should be seen as a long-term goal. According to the author, the major changes required to allow the implementation of this project concern energy-transformation and energy-demand technologies. Electricity will, according to the author, play an important role in a service-oriented society in the future. In such a transformation even intermediate steps are associated with considerable expense. The aims of the 2000-Watt Society project are listed. Energy and CO{sub 2} balances for the domestic and transport sectors are presented and discussed. Complementary analyses are presented concerning fuel cells and wood-based fuel technologies. Finally, the implications of the 2000-Watt society and the effects of technological change are summarised and an outlook is presented.

  8. Socioeconomic disparities in childhood cancer survival in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Martin; Rueegg, Corina S; Schmidlin, Kurt; Spoerri, Adrian; Niggli, Felix; Grotzer, Michael; von der Weid, Nicolas X; Egger, Matthias; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Zwahlen, Marcel; Kuehni, Claudia E

    2016-06-15

    In this study, we investigated whether childhood cancer survival in Switzerland is influenced by socioeconomic status (SES), and if disparities vary by type of cancer and definition of SES (parental education, living condition, area-based SES). Using Cox proportional hazards models, we analyzed 5-year cumulative mortality in all patients registered in the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry diagnosed 1991-2006 below 16 years. Information on SES was extracted from the Swiss census by probabilistic record linkage. The study included 1602 children (33% with leukemia, 20% with lymphoma, 22% with central nervous system (CNS) tumors); with an overall 5-year survival of 77% (95%CI 75-79%). Higher SES, particularly parents' education, was associated with a lower 5-year cumulative mortality. Results varied by type of cancer with no association for leukemia and particularly strong effects for CNS tumor patients, where mortality hazard ratios for the different SES indicators, comparing the highest with the lowest group, ranged from 0.48 (95%CI: 0.28-0.81) to 0.71 (95%CI: 0.44-1.15). We conclude that even in Switzerland with a high quality health care system and mandatory health insurance, socioeconomic differences in childhood cancer survival persist. Factors causing these survival differences have to be further explored, to facilitate universal access to optimal treatment and finally eliminate social inequalities in childhood cancer survival.

  9. Revised regulation on the Hiring of Domestic Staff in Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Permanent Mission of Switzerland has informed CERN of the publication of the official translation of the 'Directive on the hiring of private servants by staff members of diplomatic missions, permanent missions, consular posts and international organisations in Switzerland', which came into effect on 1st May 2006. The members of the personnel concerned are reminded that they must comply with the provisions of the revised Directive, which replaces that of 1st May 1998, and present a copy to their domestic staff. The full text of the revised Directive is available on the Swiss Mission's website: http://www.dfae.admin.ch/geneva_miss/f/home/guide/dir.html (original French version); http://www.dfae.admin.ch/geneva_miss/e/home/guide/dir.html (English translation). This notification cancels the information published in document CERN/DSU-DO/RH/9304 on 19 October 1999. Relations with the Host States Service Tel.: 72848 relations.secretariat@cern.ch www.cern.ch/relations

  10. Dose calibrators quality controls in Switzerland: six years of experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochud, F.; Spring, Ph.; Baechler, S. [Institut Universitaire de Radiophysique Appliquee, Lausanne (Switzerland); Twerenbold, D. [METAS, Lindenweg 50, Bern-Wabern (Switzerland); Linder, R. [Bundesamt fur Gesundheit, Abteilung Strahlenschutz, Bern (Switzerland); Leibundgut, F. [Raditec radiation and technology, Schoftland (Switzerland)

    2006-07-01

    In Switzerland, the legal use of open radioactive sources in nuclear medicine and the general requirements for quality controls are defined in a federal ordinance. The metrological traceability is guaranteed through a directive of the Swiss metrological office (M.E.T.A.S.) that requires each instrument to be monitored at least once a year through either a verification or an intercomparison. The verification is performed onsite by an accredited laboratory with a set of three gamma sources (Co-57, Cs-137 and Co-60) and - if applicable - a beta source (Sr-90/Y- 90). The intercomparison is made through conventional mail. A source of I-131 or Tc- 99 m is measured both in the nuclear medicine department and in an accredited laboratory. The maximum tolerated error is 10% for gamma sources and 20% for beta sources. This methodology guarantees that the instruments have a correct response for most of the energy range used in practice. Not all nuclides are systematically probed and manufacturers are ultimately responsible for the calibration factors. The precision of the measurements performed in Switzerland is satisfactory with only about 6% of the measurements out of the tolerances. This monitoring also allowed us to improve the skills of the personnel and update the park of instruments by getting rid of dose calibrators displaying old units. (authors)

  11. Selling dreams: an overview of slimming products' advertisements in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droz, Nadège; Marques-Vidal, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess weight loss claims of slimming products available in Switzerland. Between May 2008 and February 2013, 31 advertisements for 13 slimming products were analyzed. Total daily weight loss claims ranged between 300 g and 1 kg. 84% of the advertisements included the photograph of a woman, 61% showed a picture of a person before and after using the product, and 51% claimed that the product had improved marital relationships. The terms 'natural', 'miracle/extraordinary' and 'scientific' were present in 92%, 77% and 31% of the advertisements, respectively. Cost for one package of the product ranged between CHF 49.00 and 59.00 (USD 52.00 and 63.00), and no correlation was found between cost and weight loss claims. No differences were found for weight loss claims according to presence or absence of a picture or of the terms 'natural', 'miracle/extraordinary', and 'scientific'. Assuming that 5.3% of readers bought the product, yearly revenues would range between CHF 12.5 and 33.8 million (USD 13.4 and 36.2 million). In Switzerland, advertisements for slimming products use positive and reassuring terms to attract consumers, which are lured by unreachable, false promises of rapid and easy weight loss. © 2014 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  12. Geology of Northwestern Switzerland - with special emphasis on Opalinus Clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhard, M

    2007-07-01

    This report describes the variations of the geological structures of Northwestern Switzerland during about the last 200 million years. This gives an explanation for the present partition of the different rock layers in the studied domain. The geology of Switzerland is dominated by the formation of the Alps. The Mont Terri geology is best explained within the framework of the tectonic Wilson cycle: assembly of Pangea in Late Paleozoic times culminating in the Variscan orogeny, collapse and decay of this earlier mountain chain, peneplanation and new rifting leading to the opening of the alpine Tethys Ocean during the Mesozoic, followed by plate convergence, subduction, collision and new mountain-building in the Neogene. The Mont Terri geology bears witness to the same suite of events as the Alps; tectonically speaking, Mont Terri is part of the Alps. Africa continues to push Apulia against the larger European plate and the question arises as to what the geological future has in store for our hills and mountains. Recent GPS (Global Positioning System) data Iead to believe that it will be just erosion and decay.

  13. Selling Dreams: An Overview of Slimming Products' Advertisements in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadège Droz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this work was to assess weight loss claims of slimming products available in Switzerland. Method: Between May 2008 and February 2013, 31 advertisements for 13 slimming products were analyzed. Results: Total daily weight loss claims ranged between 300 g and 1 kg. 84% of the advertisements included the photograph of a woman, 61% showed a picture of a person before and after using the product, and 51% claimed that the product had improved marital relationships. The terms ‘natural', ‘miracle/extraordinary' and ‘scientific' were present in 92%, 77% and 31% of the advertisements, respectively. Cost for one package of the product ranged between CHF 49.00 and 59.00 (USD 52.00 and 63.00, and no correlation was found between cost and weight loss claims. No differences were found for weight loss claims according to presence or absence of a picture or of the terms ‘natural', ‘miracle/extraordinary', and ‘scientific'. Assuming that 5.3% of readers bought the product, yearly revenues would range between CHF 12.5 and 33.8 million (USD 13.4 and 36.2 million. Conclusions: In Switzerland, advertisements for slimming products use positive and reassuring terms to attract consumers, which are lured by unreachable, false promises of rapid and easy weight loss.

  14. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  15. THE ZURICH ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY (ZENS) OF GALAXIES IN GROUPS ALONG THE COSMIC WEB. V. PROPERTIES AND FREQUENCY OF MERGING SATELLITES AND CENTRALS IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipino, A.; Cibinel, A.; Tacchella, S.; Carollo, C. M.; Lilly, S. J.; Miniati, F. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-PauiI-Strasse 27, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Silverman, J. D. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Van Gorkom, J. H. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Finoguenov, A., E-mail: anna.cibinel@cea.fr [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Hällströmin katu 2a, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-12-20

    We use the Zurich Environmental Study database to investigate the environmental dependence of the merger fraction Γ and merging galaxy properties in a sample of ∼1300 group galaxies with M > 10{sup 9.2} M {sub ☉} and 0.05 < z < 0.0585. In all galaxy mass bins investigated in our study, we find that Γ decreases by a factor of ∼2-3 in groups with halo masses M {sub HALO} > 10{sup 13.5} M {sub ☉} relative to less massive systems, indicating a suppression of merger activity in large potential wells. In the fiducial case of relaxed groups only, we measure a variation of ΔΓ/Δlog (M {sub HALO}) ∼ –0.07 dex{sup –1}, which is almost independent of galaxy mass and merger stage. At galaxy masses >10{sup 10.2} M {sub ☉}, most mergers are dry accretions of quenched satellites onto quenched centrals, leading to a strong increase of Γ with decreasing group-centric distance at these mass scales. Both satellite and central galaxies in these high-mass mergers do not differ in color and structural properties from a control sample of nonmerging galaxies of equal mass and rank. At galaxy masses of <10{sup 10.2} M {sub ☉} where we mostly probe satellite-satellite pairs and mergers between star-forming systems close pairs (projected distance <10-20 kpc) show instead ∼2 × enhanced (specific) star formation rates and ∼1.5 × larger sizes than similar mass, nonmerging satellites. The increase in both size and star formation rate leads to similar surface star formation densities in the merging and control-sample satellite populations.

  16. Coxiella burnetii Infections in Small Ruminants and Humans in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magouras, I; Hunninghaus, J; Scherrer, S; Wittenbrink, M M; Hamburger, A; Stärk, K D C; Schüpbach-Regula, G

    2017-02-01

    The recent Q fever epidemic in the Netherlands raised concerns about the potential risk of outbreaks in other European countries. In Switzerland, the prevalence of Q fever in animals and humans has not been studied in recent years. In this study, we describe the current situation with respect to Coxiella (C.) burnetii infections in small ruminants and humans in Switzerland, as a basis for future epidemiological investigations and public health risk assessments. Specific objectives of this cross-sectional study were to (i) estimate the seroprevalence of C. burnetii in sheep and goats, (ii) quantify the amount of bacteria shed during abortion and (iii) analyse temporal trends in human C. burnetii infections. The seroprevalence of C. burnetii in small ruminants was determined by commercial ELISA from a representative sample of 100 sheep flocks and 72 goat herds. Herd-level seroprevalence was 5.0% (95% CI: 1.6-11.3) for sheep and 11.1% (95% CI: 4.9-20.7) for goats. Animal-level seroprevalence was 1.8% (95% CI: 0.8-3.4) for sheep and 3.4% (95% CI: 1.7-6) for goats. The quantification of C. burnetii in 97 ovine and caprine abortion samples by real-time PCR indicated shedding of >10(4) bacteria/g in 13.4% of all samples tested. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting C. burnetii quantities in a large number of small ruminant abortion samples. Annual human Q fever serology data were provided by five major Swiss laboratories. Overall, seroprevalence in humans ranged between 1.7% and 3.5% from 2007 to 2011, and no temporal trends were observed. Interestingly, the two laboratories with significantly higher seroprevalences are located in the regions with the largest goat populations as well as, for one laboratory, with the highest livestock density in Switzerland. However, a direct link between animal and human infection data could not be established in this study.

  17. User needs for climate change scenarios in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andreas; Liniger, Mark; Flückiger Knutti, Jacqueline

    2017-04-01

    In the framework of the recently founded National Center for Climate Services (NCCS) new climate change scenarios for Switzerland are currently under development that will be released in 2018 ("CH2018 scenarios"). An important component herein is the consideration of user needs in order to ensure that the new scenarios are user tailored and hence find a wide applicability in different sectors in Switzerland. A comprehensive market research was conducted to get a better overview of who the users of climate scenarios are and what they need. The survey targeted the most climate relevant sectors, and involved representatives from administration, research and private companies across Switzerland. The survey comprised several qualitative group interviews with key stakeholders, a written questionaire, answered by more than one hundred users and two specific workshops gathering the needs in dissemination. Additionally, the survey results were consolidated at a national symposium with around 150 participants from research, administration and practice. The results of the survey show the necessity to classify the users of climate scenarios according to their level of usage and according to the different sectors. It turns out that the less intensive the usage of the climate scenarios is, the more important becomes the need of comprehensibility, clarity and support when disseminating new climate scenarios. According to the survey it is especially the non-experts that should be better addressed in the new cycle of national climate scenarios. In terms of content, the survey reveals strongest needs for quantitative information on changes in extremes, an aspect that was handled in a qualitative way only in the predecessor climate scenario suite CH2011. Another cross-sectoral need are physically consistent data in time, space and between several variables. For instance, in agriculture the combination of heat and dryness is an important aspect, while the same is true in the energy

  18. Selection of asset investment models by hospitals: examination of influencing factors, using Switzerland as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    Hospitals are responsible for a remarkable part of the annual increase in healthcare expenditure. This article examines one of the major cost drivers, the expenditure for investment in hospital assets. The study, conducted in Switzerland, identifies factors that influence hospitals' investment decisions. A suggestion on how to categorize asset investment models is presented based on the life cycle of an asset, and its influencing factors defined based on transaction cost economics. The influence of five factors (human asset specificity, physical asset specificity, uncertainty, bargaining power, and privacy of ownership) on the selection of an asset investment model is examined using a two-step fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis. The research shows that outsourcing-oriented asset investment models are particularly favored in the presence of two combinations of influencing factors: First, if technological uncertainty is high and both human asset specificity and bargaining power of a hospital are low. Second, if assets are very specific, technological uncertainty is high and there is a private hospital with low bargaining power, outsourcing-oriented asset investment models are favored too. Using Qualitative Comparative Analysis, it can be demonstrated that investment decisions of hospitals do not depend on isolated influencing factors but on a combination of factors. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. 76 FR 70037 - Importation of Live Swine, Swine Semen, Pork, and Pork Products From Liechtenstein and Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... Semen, Pork, and Pork Products From Liechtenstein and Switzerland AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... importation of animals and animal products to add Liechtenstein and Switzerland to the region of Europe that...) a proposed rule \\1\\ to add Liechtenstein and Switzerland to the region of Europe that we...

  20. Investor acceptance of wind energy in Switzerland - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerer, M. J.

    2009-10-15

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the views of 17 developers and investors in Switzerland which were collected during two sets of interviews - one in autumn 2008 with 13 developers and investors and one in the first half of 2009 with 15 developers and investors. According to the authors, this report does not present the opinion of specialists, but is rather a compilation and synthesis of the remarks made by several industry practitioners who were interviewed. The authors state that this report covers opinions, not facts. The effects of the financial crisis on wind energy are commented on and strategies that can increase the potential for success are reviewed. Basic recommendations concerning wind energy are made for Swiss policy makers.

  1. Spatial Patterns of Wind Speed Distributions in Switzerland

    CERN Document Server

    Laib, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an initial exploration of high frequency records of extreme wind speed in two steps. The first consists in finding the suitable extreme distribution for $120$ measuring stations in Switzerland, by comparing three known distributions: Weibull, Gamma, and Generalized extreme value. This comparison serves as a basis for the second step which applies a spatial modelling by using Extreme Learning Machine. The aim is to model distribution parameters by employing a high dimensional input space of topographical information. The knowledge of probability distribution gives a comprehensive information and a global overview of wind phenomena. Through this study, a flexible and a simple modelling approach is presented, which can be generalized to almost extreme environmental data for risk assessment and to model renewable energy.

  2. Icing-up map of Switzerland; Vereisungskarte der Schweiz - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierer, S.; Cattin, R. [Meteotest, Berne (Switzerland); Steiner, Ph. [Bundesamt fuer Meteorologie und Klimatologie MeteoSchweiz, Zuerich (Switzerland); Gruenewald, T.; Steinkogler, W.; Lehning, M. [WSL-Institut fuer Schnee- und Lawinenforschung SLF, Davos Dorf (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    This illustrated final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at the preparation of a map of Switzerland which shows the incidence of icing-up on structures. Nationwide information on water vapour in clouds, temperatures and wind data derived from 'MeteoSchweiz''s COSMO-2 operational weather forecasting system were used as input data for an icing-up algorithm which calculated ice-loading on a cylindrical, freely-rotating structure. Icing-up incidence thus calculated was verified using existing measured data for locations in the Swiss Alps and the Jura mountains. Advice is given on the interpretation of the map's data, which is also available on the Internet. Examples of ice formation are presented including hoar frost, clear ice and wet snow. The development of the map is looked at in detail and its evaluation is discussed.

  3. Procedure for obtaining visas for Switzerland and France Signature rights

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2012-01-01

    In accordance with the Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization’s personnel on to their territories.  Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply. Within the framework of those procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the note verbale procedure as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Conventions d’accueil. Kirsti ASPOLA (PH – CMO) Oliver BRÜNING (BE – ABP) Michelle CONNOR (PH – AGS) Patrick FASSNACHT (PH-ADO) David FOSTER (IT – DI) Nathalie GRÜB (PH – AGS) Tjitske KEHRER (DG-DI) Tadeusz KURTYKA (DG – PRJ) Markus NORDBERG (PH – ADO) Cécile NOELS (DG – PRJ) Maria QUINTAS (HR – SPS) Kate RICHARDSON (PH-AGS) Jeanne ROSTANT (PH – AGS) José SALICIO-DIEZ (PH – AGS) Ulla TIHINEN (PH – AG...

  4. Procedure for obtaining visas for Switzerland and France

    CERN Document Server

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2011-01-01

    SIGNATURE RIGHTS - In accordance with the Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization’s personnel on to their territories.  Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply. Within the framework of those procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the note verbale procedure as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Conventions d’accueil.  Kirsti ASPOLA (PH – CMO) Oliver BRÜNING (BE – ABP) Michelle CONNOR (PH – AGS) Patrick FASSNACHT (PH-ADO) David FOSTER (IT – DI) Nathalie GRÜB (PH – AGS) Tjitske KEHRER (DG-DI) Tadeusz KURTYKA (DG – PRJ) Cécile NOELS (DG – PRJ) Maria QUINTAS (HR – SPS) Kate RICHARDSON (PH-AGS) Jeanne ROSTANT (PH – AGS) José SALICIO-DIEZ (PH – AGS) Ulla TIHINEN (PH – A...

  5. Procedure for obtaining visas for Switzerland and France - Signature rights

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    In accordance with the Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization’s personnel on to their territories.  Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply.   Within the framework of those procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the note verbale procedure as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Conventions d’accueil. Kirsti ASPOLA (PH – CMO) Oliver BRÜNING (BE – ABP) Michelle CONNOR (PH – AGS) Patrick FASSNACHT (PH-ADO) David FOSTER (IT – DI) Nathalie GRÜB (PH – AGS) Tadeusz KURTYKA (DG – PRJ) Markus NORDBERG (PH – ADO) Cécile NOELS (DG – PRJ) Maria QUINTAS (HR – SPS) Kate RICHARDSON (PH-AGS) Jeanne ROSTANT (PH – AGS) José SALICIO-DIEZ (PH – AGS) Ulla TIHINEN (PH – AGS) Emmanuel...

  6. Procedure for obtaining visas for Switzerland and France - Signature rights

    CERN Document Server

    DG Unit

    2010-01-01

    In accordance with the Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization’s personnel onto their territories. Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply. Within the framework of those procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the Note verbale procedure as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Protocoles d’accueil. Kirsti ASPOLA (PH – CMO) Oliver BRÜNING (BE – ABP) Michelle CONNOR (PH – AGS) Sylvie DETHURENS FAVEZ (HR – SPS) David FOSTER (IT – DI) Nathalie GRUB (PH – AGS) Tadeusz KURTYKA (DG – PRJ) Jean-Pol MATHEYS (BE – ASR) Cécile NOELS (DG – PRJ) Connie POTTER (PH – AGS) Maria QUINTAS (HR – SPS) Jeanne ROSTANT (PH – AGS) José SALICIO-DIEZ (PH – AGS) Ulla...

  7. Procedure for obtaining visas for Switzerland and France - signature rights

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    In accordance with the Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization’s personnel on to their territories. Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply. Within the framework of those procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the note verbale procedure as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Protocoles d’accueil. Kirsti ASPOLA Oliver BRÜNING Inger CARRIERO Michelle CONNOR Lyndon EVANS Nathalie GRUB David JACOBS Tadeusz KURTYKA Jean-Pol MATHEYS Catherine NEDERMAN Chris ONIONS Connie POTTER Jeanne ROSTANT Ulla TIHINEN Emmanuel TSESMELIS Rüdiger VOSS The French and Swiss Authorities will reject any request signed by a person who is not on this list. We would like to remind you that in accordance with the memorandum of 7 December 2000 issued by the Director of the Administration, (ref. DG/DA/00-119), "the Organization shall not request any legitimisat...

  8. On the effects of subsurface parameters on evaporite dissolution (Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidane, Ali; Zechner, Eric; Huggenberger, Peter; Younes, Anis

    2014-05-01

    Uncontrolled subsurface evaporite dissolution could lead to hazards such as land subsidence. Observed subsidences in a study area of Northwestern Switzerland were mainly due to subsurface dissolution (subrosion) of evaporites such as halite and gypsum. A set of 2D density driven flow simulations were evaluated along 1000 m long and 150 m deep 2D cross sections within the study area that is characterized by tectonic horst and graben structures. The simulations were conducted to study the effect of the different subsurface parameters that could affect the dissolution process. The heterogeneity of normal faults and its impact on the dissolution of evaporites is studied by considering several permeable faults that include non-permeable areas. The mixed finite element method (MFE) is used to solve the flow equation, coupled with the multipoint flux approximation (MPFA) and the discontinuous Galerkin method (DG) to solve the diffusion and the advection parts of the transport equation.

  9. [Population development and economic growth. A simulation analysis for Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, C; Straubhaar, T

    1996-01-01

    "A simulation exercise of a general equilibrium model for Switzerland makes clear that the macroeconomic impacts of aging populations are not very strong. There is no need for urgent policy actions to avoid severe negative economic consequences....However, the aging of population affects negatively the net income of the active labor force. An increasing share of their gross salaries goes to the retirement system to finance the pension payments of a growing number of pensioners. Attempts to moderate the elderly dependency ratio would lower this burden for the active labor force. Options are an increase of the female participation rate, an increase of the labor participation rate of the elderly--[which] also means a higher retirement age--and an increasing flow of immigrants. But socioeconomic problems might probably generate practical limits on the extent to which immigration can be increased." (SUMMARY IN ENG AND FRE) excerpt

  10. Procedure for obtaining visas for Switzerland and France - Signature rights

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    In accordance with the Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization’s personnel on to their territories. Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply.   Within the framework of those procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the Note verbale procedure as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Conventions d’accueil. Kirsti ASPOLA (EP – CMO) Maria BARROSO LOPEZ (IT – DI) Catherine BRANDT (DG – DI) Michelle CONNOR (TH – GS) Gaëlle DUPERRIER (EP – AGS) Patrick FASSNACHT (EP – ADO) Fernando FERNANDEZ SAVORGNANO (HR – TA) Nathalie GOURIOU (EP – AGS) Nathalie GRÜB (EP – AGS) Laurie HEMERY (BE – ASR) Cécile NOELS (ATS – DO) Tania PARDO (EP – AGS) Maria QUINTAS (HR – TA) Kate RICHARDSON (EP –  A...

  11. Procedure for obtaining visas for Switzerland and France - Signature rights

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    In accordance with the Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization’s personnel onto their territories. Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply.   Within the framework of those procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the note verbale procedure as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Conventions d’accueil. 1. Kirsti ASPOLA (PH – CMO) 2. Catherine BRANDT (DG – IR) 3. Oliver BRÜNING (BE – ABP) 4. Michelle CONNOR (PH – AGS) 5. Patrick FASSNACHT (PH – ADO) 6. Fernando FERNANDEZ SAVORGNANO (HR – TA) 7. David FOSTER (IT – DI) 8. Nathalie GRÜB (PH – AGS) 9. Cécile NOELS (DG – DI) 10. Maria QUINTAS (HR – TA) 11. Kate RICHARDSON (PH –  AGS) 12. Jeanne ROSTANT (PH – AGS) 13. José SALICIO-DIEZ (...

  12. Procedure for obtaining visas for Switzerland and France - Signature rights

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    In accordance with the Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization’s personnel on to their territories. Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply.   Within the framework of those procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the Note verbale procedure as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Conventions d’accueil. 1.     Kirsti ASPOLA (PH – CMO) 2.     Catherine BRANDT (DG – IR) 3.     Oliver BRÜNING (BE – HDO) 4.     Michelle CONNOR (PH – DI) 5.     Gaëlle DUPERRIER (PH – DI) 6.     Patrick FASSNACHT (PH – ADO) 7.     Fernando FERN...

  13. Procedure for obtaining visas for Switzerland and France - Signature rights

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    In accordance with the Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization’s personnel on to their territories. Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply.   Within the framework of those procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the Note verbale procedure as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Conventions d’accueil. Kirsti ASPOLA (EP – CMO) Maite BARROSO LOPEZ (IT – DI) Catherine BRANDT (DG – DI) Michelle CONNOR (TH – GS) Gaëlle DUPERRIER (EP – AGS) Patrick FASSNACHT (EP – ADO) Fernando FERNANDEZ SAVORGNANO (HR – TA) Nathalie GRÜB (EP – AGS) Laurie HEMERY (BE – ASR) Cécile NOELS (ATS – DO) Tania PARDO (EP – AGS) Maria QUINTAS (HR – TA) Kate RICHARDSON (EP –  AGS) Jeanne ROSTANT (TH – GS)...

  14. [Cervical cancer screening in Switzerland - current practice and future challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untiet, Sarah; Schmidt, Nicole; Low, Nicola; Petignat, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    At the beginning of the 20th Century, cervical cancer was the leading cause of death from cancer in women. A marked decline in cervical cancer has been observed since the 1960s, in parallel with the introduction of the Papanicolau (Pap) test as a cytological screening method. Today, Pap smear screening is still the most widely used tool for cervical cancer prevention. Testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical specimens or a combination of Pap and HPV testing are also now available. In this article we compare current guidelines for cervical cancer screening in Switzerland with those in other European countries. In view of the opportunities offered by HPV testing and, since 2008, HPV vaccination, current guidelines for cervical cancer screening should be updated. Both the choice of screening tests and general organization of cervical cancer screening should be reviewed.

  15. [Anti-smoking activities in Switzerland and their evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, F; Abelin, T

    1979-03-01

    Activities against smoking in Switzerland are planned and evaluated by the "Swiss Interagency Council on Smoking and Health". With special regard to the particular local situation it tries to coordinate the programs of its members (private organization as well as state authorities) in accordance with a multi-step plan (information about the effects of smoking, publicity, motivation for change of behavior, support of smoking-withdrawal programs, influencing legislation). Evaluation of anti-smoking programs so far has only been fragmentary, showing some circumstantial evidence for a trend towards non-smoking. It is planned to evaluate the impact of future programs by periodical surveys of representative samples of the adult population, monitoring knowledge of the hazards of smoking, attitudes towards smoking, motivation for change of behavior as well as the actual smoking habits.

  16. A study of fairness judgments in China, Switzerland and Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Gao

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This study compares judgments of the fairness of economic actions among survey populations in Switzerland, and both student and non-student groups in the People's Republic of China, with the earlier Kahneman, Knetsch and Thaler (1986a surveys of Canadians. The findings suggest that fairness concerns matter among all of these groups, and the general patterns of what was and was not considered to be fair were similar. However, there were also some significant differences with the influence of fairness being weaker in the two Chinese samples than in the groups from the Western countries, with the influence being weakest in the Chinese student population for the wage related topics. On the whole, almost no significant gender differences were found in any of the new surveys.

  17. Mapping of mires in Switzerland - starting point and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuettel, M. [Federal Office of Environment, Forests and Landscape, Bern (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    Modern mapping of Swiss mires aims at nature conservation and is based on a phyto-ecological approach to mire definition, which recognizes certain plant associations as being mire vegetation. In particular, apart from societies of raised bogs (Oxycocco-Sphagnetea) and transitional bogs (Scheuchzerietalia palustris), the Phragmition, Magnocaricion, Coercion Norse, Caricion davallianae as well as Molinion and Filipendulion/ Calthion alliances also form part of mire vegetation, regardless of the presence of a peat layer or its thickness. Mires in Switzerland are, therefore, primarily wetlands. Accordingly approximately 14.70 km{sup 2} of raised and transitional bogs (only 1/3 in a primary stage) and approximately 184.70 km{sup 2} of fens of national importance have been mapped and placed under protection. Total mire area has been estimated to be about 224.10 km{sup 2}. (orig.) (8 refs.)

  18. CAS course on Power Converters in Baden, Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    2014-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) recently organised a specialised course on Power Converters, which was held at the Hotel du Parc in Baden, Switzerland from 7 to 14 May 2014.   Photo courtesy of Markus Fischer, Paul Scherrer Institut. Following some recapitulation lectures on accelerators and the requirements on power converters, the course covered a wide range of topics related to the different types of power converters needed for particle accelerators. Topical seminars completed the programme. The course was very successful, attended by 84 students representing 21 nationalities, mostly from European countries but also from America, Brazil, Canada, China, Iran, Jordan and Thailand. Feedback from the participants was very positive, reflecting the high standard of the lectures and teaching. In addition to the academic programme, the participants also had an opportunity to take part in a full-day site visit to ABB and PSI and an excursion to the Rhine Fall...

  19. Dental fear and satisfaction with dental services in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armfield, Jason M; Enkling, Norbert; Wolf, Christian A; Ramseier, Christoph A

    2014-01-01

    Dental satisfaction is associated with continuity of dental care, compliance with dentist advice, and positive health outcomes. It is expected that people with higher dental fear might have less dental satisfaction because of more negative dental experiences. The objective of this study was to examine satisfaction and reasons for satisfaction with dental practitioners in Switzerland and variations by dental fear. A national sample of 1,129 Swiss residents aged 15-74 (mean = 43.2 years) completed a personal interview at their home with questions assessing dental fear, dental service use, general satisfaction with their dentist, and reasons for satisfaction or dissatisfaction. Overall, 47.9 percent of participants responded that they were satisfied with their dentist and 47.6 percent that they were very satisfied. Satisfaction differed significantly by gender, language spoken, region of residence, and educational attainment. Greater dental fear was significantly associated with greater dissatisfaction with the dentist. The percentage of people who were very satisfied with the dentist ranged from 56.0 percent among people with no fear to 30.5 percent for participants with "quite a lot" of fear but was higher (44.4 percent) for people who stated that they were "very much" afraid of the dentist. The most common reasons attributed for satisfaction with dentists were interpersonal characteristics of the dentist and staff. People with "quite a lot" of fear were found to endorse these sentiments least. Although higher dental fear was associated with more dissatisfaction with the dentist, the level of satisfaction among fearful individuals in Switzerland is still high. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  20. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  1. Opportunities for Switzerland to Contribute to the Production of Algal Biofuels: the Hydrothermal Pathway to Bio-Methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnoud-Velásquez, Mariluz; Refardt, Dominik; Vuille, François; Ludwig, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae have a significant potential to be a sustainable source of fuel and thus are of interest in the transition to a sustainable energy system, in particular for resource-dependent countries such as Switzerland. Independence of fossil fuels, considerable reduction of CO(2) emissions, and abandoning nuclear energy may be possible with an integrated system approach including the sourcing of biofuels from different types of biomass. Today, a full carbon-to-fuel conversion is possible, and has been recently demonstrated with an advanced hydrothermal technology. The potential to develop algal biofuels is viewed as high thanks to the possibility they offer to uncouple bioenergy from food production. Nevertheless, technological breakthroughs must take place before commercial production becomes a reality, especially to meet the necessary cost savings and efficiency gains in the algae cultivation structure. In addition, an integrated management of waste resources to promote the nutrient recovery appears today as imperative to further improve the economic viability and the environmental sustainability of algal production. We provide here a review that includes the global technological status of both algae production and their conversion into biofuels in order to understand first the added value of algal energy in general before we focus on the potential of algae to contribute specifically to the Swiss energy system to the horizon 2050. In this respect, the hydrothermal conversion pathway of microalgal biomass into synthetic natural gas (SNG) is emphasized, as research into this technology has received considerable attention in Switzerland during the last decade. In addition, SNG is a particularly relevant fuel in the Swiss context due to the existing gas grid and to the opportunity it offers to cover a wide spectrum of energy applications, in particular cogeneration of heat and electricity or use as a transport fuel in the growing gas car fleet.

  2. Advancement of the 10-species subgingival Zurich Biofilm model by examining different nutritional conditions and defining the structure of the in vitro biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammann Thomas W

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodontitis is caused by a highly complex consortium of bacteria that establishes as biofilms in subgingival pockets. It is a disease that occurs worldwide and its consequences are a major health concern. Investigations in situ are not possible and the bacterial community varies greatly between patients and even within different loci. Due to the high complexity of the consortium and the availability of samples, a clear definition of the pathogenic bacteria and their mechanisms of pathogenicity are still not available. In the current study we addressed the need of a defined model system by advancing our previously described subgingival biofilm model towards a bacterial composition that reflects the one observed in diseased sites of patients and analysed the structure of these biofilms. Results We further developed the growth media by systematic variation of key components resulting in improved stability and the firm establishment of spirochetes in the 10-species subgingival Zurich biofilm model. A high concentration of heat-inactivated human serum allowed the best proliferation of the used species. Therefore we further investigated these biofilms by analysing their structure by confocal laser scanning microscopy following fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The species showed mutual interactions as expected from other studies. The abundances of all organisms present in this model were determined by microscopic counting following species-specific identification by both fluorescence in situ hybridisation and immunofluorescence. The newly integrated treponemes were the most abundant organisms. Conclusions The use of 50% of heat-inactivated human serum used in the improved growth medium resulted in significantly thicker and more stable biofilms, and the quantitative representation of the used species represents the in vivo community of periodontitis patients much closer than in biofilms grown in the two media with less or no

  3. Advancement of the 10-species subgingival Zurich biofilm model by examining different nutritional conditions and defining the structure of the in vitro biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Thomas W; Gmür, Rudolf; Thurnheer, Thomas

    2012-10-05

    Periodontitis is caused by a highly complex consortium of bacteria that establishes as biofilms in subgingival pockets. It is a disease that occurs worldwide and its consequences are a major health concern. Investigations in situ are not possible and the bacterial community varies greatly between patients and even within different loci. Due to the high complexity of the consortium and the availability of samples, a clear definition of the pathogenic bacteria and their mechanisms of pathogenicity are still not available. In the current study we addressed the need of a defined model system by advancing our previously described subgingival biofilm model towards a bacterial composition that reflects the one observed in diseased sites of patients and analysed the structure of these biofilms. We further developed the growth media by systematic variation of key components resulting in improved stability and the firm establishment of spirochetes in the 10-species subgingival Zurich biofilm model. A high concentration of heat-inactivated human serum allowed the best proliferation of the used species. Therefore we further investigated these biofilms by analysing their structure by confocal laser scanning microscopy following fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The species showed mutual interactions as expected from other studies. The abundances of all organisms present in this model were determined by microscopic counting following species-specific identification by both fluorescence in situ hybridisation and immunofluorescence. The newly integrated treponemes were the most abundant organisms. The use of 50% of heat-inactivated human serum used in the improved growth medium resulted in significantly thicker and more stable biofilms, and the quantitative representation of the used species represents the in vivo community of periodontitis patients much closer than in biofilms grown in the two media with less or no human serum. The appearance of T. denticola, P. gingivalis, and

  4. Governing Uncertainties in Sustainable Energy Transitions—Insights from Local Heat Supply in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basil Bornemann

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The governance of sustainable energy transitions (SET is facing multiple technological, economic, societal and political uncertainties. In practice, these energy-related uncertainties play a role not only at the level of “major politics,” but also in the policymaking of local decision makers and planners. This paper seeks to attain a more differentiated understanding of how uncertainties concerning the energy transition play out and are dealt with in policymaking and planning “on the ground.” To do so, the paper combines conceptual reflections with an explorative empirical study on local heat supply policy in Switzerland. In conceptual regards, it proposes some distinctions of types of uncertainties related to energy transitions, and a typology of strategic decision options for dealing with uncertainty. On this basis, the paper reveals similarities and differences regarding the perception of uncertainties and ways of dealing with them in a number of Swiss cities. These insights evoke further questions about the causes and effects of different sensitivities to uncertainty and ways of dealing with them.

  5. a Database for the Architectural Heritage Recovery Between Italy and Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, I.; Del Giudice, M.; Zerbinatti, M.

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show some results coming from the international Interreg-AlpStone project, a research whose main aim is the protection and valorisation of a rural Cultural Heritage, theme of recent growing interest. In particular the background of this contribute is the traditional stone architecture placed in the territory between Italy and Switzerland, while into the foreground is put the method to right document, archive and analyse information about the objects of study. The response comes from BIM technologies (acronym of Building Information Modeling) which objective is the creation of a dynamical and interoperable system allowing the share of information through a unique database. If these methods have been largely employed on new constructions, they still haven't been enough tested on the field of historical architecture. In order to fill this gap, the paper suggest a method leading to the creation of a Cultural Heritage information system, which arise during the survey phase and continue through the detection of different building information, the proposal of recovery solutions, the asset georeferentiation on the territory and finally the moment of sharing information on a web platform. The creation of an architectural database is made possible by a survey based on point clouds. The latter constitute then the input data for the creation of a 3D model made with a parametric software allowing the increase of various kind of information. The future work plans will complete this project by locating the Cultural Heritage models on a webGIS.

  6. Intermediate steps towards the 2000 W society in Switzerland: An energy-economic scenario analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Thorsten F.; Kypreos, Socrates [Energy Economics Group, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Barreto, Leonardo [Energy Economics Group, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Austrian Energy Agency, A-1060 Vienna (Austria); Wokaun, Alexander [General Energy, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2008-04-15

    In the future, sustainable development under the umbrella of the 2000 W society could be of major interest. Could the target of the 2000 W society, i.e. a primary energy per capita (PEC) consumption of 2000 W, be realized until 2050? Various combinations of PEC and CO{sub 2} targets are tested, and the additional costs to be paid by the society are estimated. The assessment is carried out with the Swiss MARKAL model, a bottom-up energy-system model projecting future technology investments for Switzerland. The analysis reveals that the 2000 W society should be seen as a long-term goal. For all contemplated scenarios, a PEC consumption of 3500 W per capita (w/cap) is feasible in the year 2050. However, strong PEC consumption targets can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions to an equivalent of 5% per decade at maximum. For stronger CO{sub 2} emission reduction goals, corresponding targets must be formulated explicitly. At an oil price of 75 US${sub 2000}/bbl in 2050, the additional (cumulative, discounted) costs to reach a 10% CO{sub 2} reduction per decade combined with a 3500 W per capita target amount to about 40 billion US${sub 2000}. On the contrary, to reach pure CO{sub 2} reduction targets is drastically cheaper, challenging the vision of the 2000 W society. (author)

  7. Trends of Ozone in Switzerland since 1992 (TROZOS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez, C.; Mathis, H.; Furger, M.; Prevot, A.S.H

    2004-07-01

    This work reports on the trends of the daily afternoon (noon to midnight) maximum ozone concentrations at 15 of the 16 stations of the Swiss air quality monitoring network (NABEL) during the period 1992-2002. The use of numerous meteorological parameters and additional data allowed a detailed seasonal analysis of the influence of the weather on the ozone maxima at the different stations. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed separately for each station and season in order to detect the parameters which best explain the variability of the daily ozone maximum concentrations. During the warm seasons (summer and spring) the most explanatory parameters are those related to the ozone production, in particular the afternoon temperature. In winter, the most explanatory variables are the ones influencing the vertical mixing and thus the ozone destruction by titration with NO and dry deposition, like the afternoon global radiation. The trends of both the measured and meteorologically corrected ozone maxima were calculated. The year-to-year variability in the ozone maxima was lowered by a factor of 3 by the meteorological correction. Significantly positive trends of corrected ozone maxima of 0.3 - 1.1 ppb/year were found at the low altitude stations in winter and autumn as well as at Lausanne - urban station - in all the seasons, mainly due to the lower loss of ozone by reaction with NO as a consequence of the decreased emissions of primary pollutants during the 90s. This could be partially confirmed by the lower trends of O{sub X} (sum O{sub 3} of and NO{sub 2}) maxima compared to the trends in ozone maxima. The absence of negative trends of the median or mean ozone maxima north of the Alps in summer suggests that the decrease in the emissions of ozone precursors did not have a strong impact on the afternoon maximum ozone concentrations during the last decade. In contrast to the project TOSS (Trends of Ozone in Southern Switzerland), no significantly negative

  8. Drought analysis in Switzerland: spatial and temporal features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franca, Gaetano; Molnar, Peter; Burlando, Paolo; Bonaccorso, Brunella; Cancelliere, Antonino

    2015-04-01

    Drought as a natural hazard may have negative impacts even in regions characterized by a general abundance of water resources. The Swiss Alpine region has experienced several extreme meteorological events (heat waves, droughts) during the last fifty years that have caused human and economic losses. Though Swiss climate is far from arid or semi-arid, natural climatic variability, exacerbated by climate change, could lead to more severe impacts from naturally occurring meteorological droughts (i.e. lack or significant reduction of precipitation) in the future. In this work, spatial and temporal features of meteorological droughts in Switzerland have been explored by the identification and probabilistic characterization of historic drought events on gridded precipitation data during the period 1961-2012. The run method has been applied to both monthly and annual precipitation time series to probabilistically characterize drought occurrences as well as to analyze their spatial variability. Spatial features have also been investigated by means of Principal Components Analysis (PCA) applied to Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) series at 3, 6, and 12-month aggregated time scale, in order to detect areas with distinct precipitation patterns, accounting for seasonality throughout year and including both wet and dry conditions. Furthermore, a probabilistic analysis of drought areal extent has been carried out by applying an SPI-based procedure to derive Severity-Area-Frequency (SAF) curves. The application of run method reveals that Ticino and Valais are the most potentially drought-prone Swiss regions, since accumulated deficit precipitation is significantly higher (up to two times) than in the rest of the country. Inspection of SPI series reveals many events in which precipitation has shown significant anomalies from the average in the period 1961-2012 at the investigated time scales. Anomalies in rainfall seem to exhibit high spatial correlation, showing uniform sub

  9. Effort-reward and work-life imbalance, general stress and burnout among employees of a large public hospital in Switzerland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hämmig, Oliver; Brauchli, Rebecca; Bauer, Georg F

    2012-01-01

    .... The study was based on survey data collected in 2007 among the personnel of a large public hospital in the canton of Zurich covering a random sample of 502 employees of all professions and positions...

  10. Reaching for the Sky: The Growth of Mountain Tourism in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Jennifer Truran

    1999-01-01

    Addresses the beginnings of Swiss tourism, its barriers, and the development and role of transportation in mountain tourism. Considers the environmental problems caused by mountain tourism in Switzerland and provides seven teaching ideas. (CMK)

  11. The End of the Otter and of Otter Reintroduction Plans in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber D.

    1990-02-01

    Full Text Available Otters are now extinct in Switzerland. Switzerland has to be considered as a country where viable otter populations cannot exist now and in the foreseeable future, because PCB levels in fish are much too high and not decreasing. Reintroduction programs cannot be justified. The message to the public is that sometimes nature cannot be repaired, pollution is out of control and we must learn from the lesson of PCB-caused otter extinction.

  12. The Causality Between Economic Growth and Immigration in Germany and Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    MANUEL GONZÁLEZ-GÓMEZ; Mª SOLEDAD OTERO GIRÁLDEZ

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the relationship between immigration and the economic growth in Germany and Switzerland during the period 1970-2005 by using a cointegration approach. Both countries have gone through a similar learning process. First they encouraged low-skilled and temporary workers. More recently, they have attracted high-skilled people and restricted the recruitment of low-skilled immigrants. Our empirical analysis reveals important differences between Germany and Switzerland. The resul...

  13. Trends in vitamin, mineral and dietary supplement use in Switzerland. The CoLaus study

    OpenAIRE

    Marques-Vidal, P; Vollenweider, P.; Waeber, G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Vitamin/mineral (VMS) and dietary supplements (DS) use is common in Switzerland, but nothing is known regarding the factors associated with their initiation, discontinuation or continuation of intake. SUBJECTS/METHODS: Prospective study conducted between 2003-2006 and 2009-2012 in Lausanne, Switzerland among 4676 participants (2525 women, age range 35-75 years). VMS were defined as single or multivitamin/multimineral preparations; DS were defined as any dietary suppl...

  14. National survey report on PV power applications in Switzerland 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huesser, P. [Nova Energie GmbH, Aarau (Switzerland); Hostettler, T. [Ingenieurbuero Hostettler, Berne (Switzerland)

    2007-07-01

    This annual report was published by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) as part of the International Energy Agency's work on the exchange and dissemination of information on photovoltaic power systems (PVPS). The political situation in Switzerland with regard to the promotion of photovoltaics (PV) and new legislation in the energy area is discussed. The report provides information on installed PV power, costs and prices and the Swiss PV industry. Examples of PV applications are presented and data on the cumulative installed PV power in various application sectors is presented and discussed. Highlights, major projects and various demonstration and field-test programmes are dealt with, as are public budgets for market stimulation. Figures on the development, production and prices of PV cells and modules are presented. Swiss balance-of-system products are reviewed, as are PV-related services and the value of the Swiss PV business. A review of non-technical factors and new initiatives completes the report.

  15. Procedure for obtaining visas for Switzerland and France - Signature Rights

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2005-01-01

    In accordance with the Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization's personnel on to their territories.  Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply. Within the framework of those procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the note verbale procedure as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Protocoles d'accueil. Olivier BRÜNING Philip BRYANT Lyndon EVANS John FERGUSON Catherine JONES Nicolas KOULBERG Hélène HALLER-MAUGER Michelle MAZERAND Chris ONIONS Monica PEPE-ALTARELLI The French and Swiss Authorities will reject any request signed by a person who is not on this list. We would like to remind you that in accordance with the memorandum of 7 December 2000 issued by the Director of the Administration, (ref. DG/DA/00-119), 'the Organization shall not request any legitimisation document (or residence permit) or visa from the Host States for perso...

  16. Procedure for obtaining visas for Switzerland and France

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Signature Rights In accordance with the Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization's personnel on to their territories. Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply. Within the framework of those procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the note verbale procedure as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Protocoles d'accueil. Oliver BRÜNING Philip BRYANT Lyndon EVANS John FERGUSON David JACOBS Catherine JONES Hélène HALLER-MAUGER Michelle MAZERAND Chris ONIONS Claudio PARRINELLO The French and Swiss Authorities will reject any request signed by a person who is not on this list. We would like to remind you that in accordance with the memorandum of 7 December 2000 issued by the Director of the Administration, (ref. DG/DA/00-119), 'the Organization shall not request any legitimisation document (or residence permit) or visa from the Host States for persons registered as EXTERNAL' (p...

  17. Procedure for obtaining visas for Switzerland and France - Signature Rights

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    In accordance with their Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization's personnel onto their territories. Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply. Within the framework of these procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the note verbale procedure, as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Protocoles d'accueil. Oliver BRÜNING Philip BRYANT Lyndon EVANS John FERGUSON Hélène HALLER-MAUGER David JACOBS Catherine NEDERMAN Chris ONIONS Claudio PARRINELLO Jeanne ROSTANT The French and Swiss Authorities will reject any request signed by a person who is not on this list. We would like to remind you that, in accordance with the memorandum of 7 December 2000 issued by the Director of Administration, (ref. DG/DA/00-119), 'the Organization shall not request any legitimisation document (or residence permit) or visa from the Host States for persons registered as EXTERNAL' (people w...

  18. Procedure for obtaining visas for Switzerland and France

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Signature Rights In accordance with the Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organizations personnel on to their territories. Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply. Within the framework of those procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the note verbale procedure as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Protocoles daccueil. Oliver BRÜNING Philip BRYANT Lyndon EVANS John FERGUSON Hélène HALLER-MAUGER David JACOBS Catherine NEDERMAN Chris ONIONS Claudio PARRINELLO Jeanne ROSTANT The French and Swiss Authorities will reject any request signed by a person who is not on this list. We would like to remind you that in accordance with the memorandum of 7 December 2000 issued by the Director of the Administration, (ref. DG/DA/00-119), 'the Organization shall not request any legitimisation document (or residence permit) or visa from the Host States for persons registered as E...

  19. PROCEDURE FOR OBTAINING VISAS FOR SWITZERLAND AND FRANCE

    CERN Document Server

    DSU Department

    2008-01-01

    SIGNATURE RIGHTS In accordance with the Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization’s personnel onto their territories. Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply. Within the framework of those procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the "note verbale" procedure as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the "Protocoles d’accueil": •\tOliver BRÜNING •\tInger CARRIERO •\tLyndon EVANS •\tHélène HALLER-MAUGER •\tDavid JACOBS •\tPhilippe LEBRUN •\tJean-Pol MATHEYS •\tCatherine NEDERMAN •\tChris ONIONS •\tJeanne ROSTANT The French and Swiss Authorities will reject any request signed by a person who is not on this list. We would like to remind you that in accordance with the memorandum of 7 December 2000 issued by the Director of the Administration (ref. DG/DA/00-119), "the Organization shall not request any legitimisation document (or resid...

  20. Procedure for obtaining visas for Switzerland and France - Signature Rights

    CERN Document Server

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2005-01-01

    In accordance with the Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization's personnel on to their territories.  Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply. Within the framework of those procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the note verbale procedure as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Protocoles d'accueil. Olivier BRÜNING Philip BRYANT Lyndon EVANS John FERGUSON Catherine JONES Nicolas KOULBERG Hélène HALLER-MAUGER Michelle MAZERAND Chris ONIONS Monica PEPE-ALTARELLI The French and Swiss Authorities will reject any request signed by a person who is not on this list. We would like to remind you that, in accordance with the memorandum of 7 December 2000 issued by the Director of Administration (ref. DG/DA/00-119), 'the Organization shall not request any legitimisation document (or residence permit) or visa from the Host States for persons registered as EXTERNAL' (people who do...

  1. PROCEDURE FOR OBTAINING VISAS FOR SWITZERLAND AND FRANCE

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    SIGNATURE RIGHTS In accordance with the Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization’s personnel on to their territories. Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply. Within the framework of those procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the note verbale procedure as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Protocoles d’accueil. •\tOliver BRÜNING •\tVinod CHOHAN •\tLyndon EVANS •\tJohn FERGUSON •\tHélène HALLER-MAUGER •\tDavid JACOBS •\tPhilippe LEBRUN •\tCatherine NEDERMAN •\tChris ONIONS •\tClaudio PARRINELLO •\tJeanne ROSTANT The French and Swiss Authorities will reject any request signed by a person who is not on this list. We would like to remind you that in accordance with the memorandum of 7 December 2000 issued by the Director of the Administration, (ref. DG/DA/00-119), "the Organization shall not request any legitimisation d...

  2. Procedure for obtaining visas for Switzerland and France

    CERN Document Server

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2006-01-01

    Signature rights In accordance with their Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization's personnel onto their territories. Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply. Within the framework of these procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the note verbale procedure, as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Protocoles d'accueil. Oliver BRÜNING Philip BRYANT Lyndon EVANS John FERGUSON Catherine JONES Nicolas KOULBERG Hélène HALLER-MAUGER Michelle MAZERAND Chris ONIONS Claudio PARRINELLO The French and Swiss Authorities will reject any request signed by a person who is not on this list. We would like to remind you that, in accordance with the memorandum of 7 December 2000 issued by the Director of the Administration (ref. DG/DA/00-119), 'the Organization shall not request any legitimisation document (or residence permit) or visa from the Host States for persons registered as EXTERNA...

  3. Procedure for obtaining visas for Switzerland and France

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2004-01-01

    Signature Rights In accordance with the Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization's personnel on to their territories. Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply. Within the framework of those procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the note verbale procedure as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Protocoles d'accueil. Jean BOILLOT Philip BRYANT Lyndon EVANS Nicolas KOULBERG Hélène HALLER-MAUGER Michelle MAZERAND Steve MYERS Chris ONIONS Monica PEPE-ALTARELLI Agnita QUERROU Jean-Pierre RIUNAUD We would like to remind you that in accordance with the memorandum of 7 December 2000 issued by the Director of the Administration, (ref. DG/DA/00-119), "the Organization shall not request any legitimisation document (or residence permit) or visa from the Host States for persons registered as EXTERNAL" (people who do not hold a contract of employment, association or apprenticeship w...

  4. PROCEDURE FOR OBTAINING VISAS FOR SWITZERLAND AND FRANCE

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    SIGNATURE RIGHTS In accordance with the Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization’s personnel on to their territories. Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply. Within the framework of those procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the note verbale procedure as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Protocoles d’accueil. •\tOliver BRÜNING •\tPhilip BRYANT •\tLyndon EVANS •\tJohn FERGUSON •\tHélène HALLER-MAUGER •\tDavid JACOBS •\tPhilippe LEBRUN •\tCatherine NEDERMAN •\tChris ONIONS •\tClaudio PARRINELLO •\tJeanne ROSTANT The French and Swiss Authorities will reject any request signed by a person who is not on this list. We would like to remind you that in accordance with the memorandum of 7 December 2000 issued by the Director of the Administration, (ref. DG/DA/00-119), "the Organization shall not request any legitimisation document (or residence per...

  5. Ectoparasite infestations of Badgers (Meles meles in Western Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Do Linh San

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Between 1999 and 2004, 160 badger carcasses (mainly road casualties and culled animals were collected in a 600-km2 rural area of Western Switzerland (Broye region. Body and fur inspections indicated that 88.4% of the animals were infested with at least one of the following ectoparasite categories: lice (76.0%, ticks (57.5% and fleas (19.7%. Nevertheless, the number of parasites was low, in average 2.6 fleas, 4.8 ticks and/or 17.1 lice per infested animal. No significant intersexual and age-related differences (adults vs subadults, adults vs young were found as concerns prevalence and abundance of ectoparasites. The lower, and more constant infection by fleas in the course of the year, is concordant with the hypothesis which proposes that badgers frequently switch sleeping places in order to avoid a build up of ectoparasites in the nest material. It remains unclear whether the low loads of ticks and lice recorded in both low and high density badger populations are due to the efficiency of auto- and allo-grooming in this species, to frequent replacement or aeration of the bedding material by individual badgers, or to another, yet to be discovered mechanism. Further studies are needed to clarify whether these results are therefore indicative of a limited role of Eurasian badgers as a potential reservoir of diseases transmitted by ectoparasites.

  6. Improving the organ donor card system in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, David

    2013-08-22

    This paper analyses the current organ donor card system in Switzerland and identifies five problems that may be partially responsible for the country's low deceased organ donation rates. There are two minor issues concerning the process of obtaining a donor card: the Swisstransplant website understates the prospective benefits of donation, and the ease with which donor cards can be obtained raises questions regarding whether any consent to donation provided is truly informed. Furthermore, there are two major practical problems that might affect those who carry an organ donor card: the lack of a central donor registry increases the likelihood that donors' wishes will be "lost", and there is a high probability that family members will veto organ donation. The fact that these two practical problems are not mentioned to potential donors by Swisstransplant constitutes the fifth problem. Donation rates would probably improve if more accurate information about the benefits of donation were provided to potential donors, a central donor registry were created, and families were not permitted to veto donation from those on the registry.

  7. Objectivity in journalistic cultures of Spain and Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Oller Alonso

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we study the idea of objectivity of journalists within the journalistic cultures of Spain and Switzerland. To understanding this idea within the professional context we use the concept of journalistic culture that is based on the thin line between national culture and the universal concept of culture as a lifestyle. The first part of our empirical study is based on the international project Worlds of Journalism (WoJ, a quantitative study directed by Hanitzsch (2009. Secondly we present the qualitative study based on interviews of 39 journalists from different spanish and swiss media (press, radio and television. The objectives are to understand the journalists´ perceptions of objectivity in their professional work. Their ideas of objectivity help us to understand certain values and traditions in these countries. The results of the interviews (qualitative study confirm what has been noted in the survey (quantitative study. However, we can see important aspects associated with interventionism that emphasises the results of the quantitative study.

  8. Procedure for obtaining visas for Switzerland and France

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Signature Rights In accordance with the Status Agreements with CERN, Switzerland and France facilitate the entry of members of the Organization's personnel on to their territories. Where relevant, detailed procedures for obtaining visas apply. Within the framework of those procedures, only the following individuals are authorised to initiate the note verbale procedure as well as to sign the Official Invitation Letters and the Protocoles d'accueil. Oliver BRÜNING Philip BRYANT Lyndon EVANS John FERGUSON David JACOBS Catherine JONES Hélène HALLER-MAUGER Michelle MAZERAND Chris ONIONS Claudio PARRINELLO The French and Swiss Authorities will reject any request signed by a person who is not on this list. We would like to remind you that in accordance with the memorandum of 7 December 2000 issued by the Director of the Administration, (ref. DG/DA/00-119), 'the Organization shall not request any legitimisation document (or residence permit) or visa from the Host States for persons registered as EXTERNAL' (p...

  9. Valuing water resources in Switzerland using a hedonic price model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Diana; Siber, Rosi; Brouwer, Roy; Logar, Ivana; Sanadgol, Dorsa

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, linear and spatial hedonic price models are applied to the housing market in Switzerland, covering all 26 cantons in the country over the period 2005-2010. Besides structural house, neighborhood and socioeconomic characteristics, we include a wide variety of new environmental characteristics related to water to examine their role in explaining variation in sales prices. These include water abundance, different types of water bodies, the recreational function of water, and water disamenity. Significant spatial autocorrelation is found in the estimated models, as well as nonlinear effects for distances to the nearest lake and large river. Significant effects are furthermore found for water abundance and the distance to large rivers, but not to small rivers. Although in both linear and spatial models water related variables explain less than 1% of the price variation, the distance to the nearest bathing site has a larger marginal contribution than many neighborhood-related distance variables. The housing market shows to differentiate between different water related resources in terms of relative contribution to house prices, which could help the housing development industry make more geographically targeted planning activities.

  10. Measles epidemic in Switzerland and other parts of Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    TIS Commission

    2008-01-01

    There has been a measles epidemic in Switzerland since November 2006. By April 2008 the number of cases had reached almost 2500, with over 1300 since the beginning of the year alone. All cantons are affected but to varying degrees, the largest number of cases occurring in the north and east of the country. In all cases, the low vaccination coverage is responsible for the spread of this highly contagious disease. The contagious period starts 4 days before the rash appears and lasts until 4 days afterwards. In the event of infection, children must be kept away from school and measures must be taken to protect those who come into contact with them, which may include vaccination if the infection is less than 72 hours old. The Swiss and international health authorities recommend the following measures to prevent the spread of the disease: those who have already contracted the disease, received 2 doses of the vaccine (often in the form of the combined MMR - measles, mumps, rubella...

  11. Hazardous Glaciers In Switzerland: A Statistical Analysis of Inventory Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, M.; Funk, M.; Wegmann, M.

    Because of the recent increase in both occupation and economical activities in high mountain areas, a systematic overview of potential hazard zones of glaciers is needed to avoid the constuction of settlements and infrastructures in endangered areas in fu- ture. Historical informations about glacier disasters show that catastrophic events can happen repeatedly for the same causes and with the same dramatic consequences. Past catastrophic events are not only useful to identify potentially dangerous glaciers, but represent an indication of the kind of glacier hazards to expect for any given glacier. An inventory containing all known events having caused damages in the past has been compiled for Switzerland. Three different types of glacier hazards are distinguished , e.g. ice avalanches, glacier floods and glacier length changes.Hazardous glaciers have been identified in the alpine cantons of Bern, Grison, Uri, Vaud and Valais so far. The inventory data were analysed in terms of periodicity of different types of events as well as of damage occured.

  12. Class Councils in Switzerland: Citizenship Education in Classroom Communities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Wyss

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Democracy depends on the participation of citizens. Citizenship educationis taking place in classroom communities to prepare pupils for their role ascitizens. Class councils are participatory forms of citizenship educationguaranteeing the children’s right to form and express their views freely aswritten down in the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Theoreticaldeficiencies and empirical objections have been formulated againstparticipation in the school setting. Despite widespread practices, empiricaldata about class councils in Switzerland barely exists. In our researchproject we video-recorded fourteen class councils in secondary schools, weinterviewed the teacher and four pupils of each class, and all the pupilsfilled in a standardized questionnaire. Class councils are very popular formsof education with pupils although the actual power to influence decisions bydeliberation is doubted to some extent. Quantitative analysis of the videorecordingsshows the wide range of forms of class councils that exist inrespect to the talking time of the pupils. To express one’s own viewpointand to understand the standpoint of other discussants, constructarguments and counterarguments, participate, and lead discussions aredifficult tasks. Based on the empirical research the project describes threeforms of class councils that differ in the degree of favouring thedevelopment of communicative competences as a part of citizenshipeducation.

  13. An empirical perspective for understanding climate change impacts in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henne, Paul; Bigalke, Moritz; Büntgen, Ulf; Colombaroli, Daniele; Conedera, Marco; Feller, Urs; Frank, David; Fuhrer, Jürg; Grosjean, Martin; Heiri, Oliver; Luterbacher, Jürg; Mestrot, Adrien; Rigling, Andreas; Rössler, Ole; Rohr, Christian; Rutishauser, This; Schwikowski, Margit; Stampfli, Andreas; Szidat, Sönke; Theurillat, Jean-Paul; Weingartner, Rolf; Wilcke, Wolfgan; Tinner, Willy

    2017-01-01

    Planning for the future requires a detailed understanding of how climate change affects a wide range of systems at spatial scales that are relevant to humans. Understanding of climate change impacts can be gained from observational and reconstruction approaches and from numerical models that apply existing knowledge to climate change scenarios. Although modeling approaches are prominent in climate change assessments, observations and reconstructions provide insights that cannot be derived from simulations alone, especially at local to regional scales where climate adaptation policies are implemented. Here, we review the wealth of understanding that emerged from observations and reconstructions of ongoing and past climate change impacts in Switzerland, with wider applicability in Europe. We draw examples from hydrological, alpine, forest, and agricultural systems, which are of paramount societal importance, and are projected to undergo important changes by the end of this century. For each system, we review existing model-based projections, present what is known from observations, and discuss how empirical evidence may help improve future projections. A particular focus is given to better understanding thresholds, tipping points and feedbacks that may operate on different time scales. Observational approaches provide the grounding in evidence that is needed to develop local to regional climate adaptation strategies. Our review demonstrates that observational approaches should ideally have a synergistic relationship with modeling in identifying inconsistencies in projections as well as avenues for improvement. They are critical for uncovering unexpected relationships between climate and agricultural, natural, and hydrological systems that will be important to society in the future.

  14. Evaluation of e-bike accidents in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, T; Scaramuzza, G; Schmitt, K-U

    2014-12-01

    The acceptance and usage of electric bicycles has rapidly increased in Switzerland in the last years. Hence this topic has been addressed by policy makers with the aim to facilitate new transport modes and, moreover, to improve their safety. Police-recorded accidents of the years 2011 and 2012 involving a total of 504 e-bikers and 871 bicyclists were analysed. National figures were compared with those of a rural and an urban environment. Most e-bikers who were involved in accidents were 40-65 years old. It was found that most e-bikers sustained single accidents and that helmet usage was higher in the investigated rural environment than in the investigated urban area. The evaluation of the injury severity of e-bikers, particularly compared to bicyclists, lead to diverging results. The findings presented in this study are intended to serve as a benchmark since basic information on characteristics of e-bike accidents is provided. With respect to differences between the injury severity of e-bikers and bicyclists to-date no clear statement can be drawn. It is suggested to regularly evaluate e-bike accidents to show trends and/or identify changes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Visas for Switzerland and France - Time needed to process applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Please note that any person required to be in possession of a visa in order to take up functions at CERN must start the application process sufficiently early to allow the visa to be issued in time.   The submission of an incomplete application, local circumstances and an increase in applications before the summer holiday period can all result in considerable variation in the time needed to process your application and issue the visa. You are therefore recommended to submit your visa application at least three months, and not later than 21 days, prior to your departure date. We would also like to remind you that the Swiss Consulate in Paris and the French Consulate in Geneva can issue visas exclusively to people resident within their respective spheres of competence (i.e. those who are holders of a French or Swiss residence permit respectively). You must therefore obtain all visas required for stays longer than three months in France or Switzerland from the visa-issuing authority competent for ...

  16. ACADEMIC TRAINING: Physics Technologies in Medicine

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    10, 11, 12, 13, 14 June LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Physics Technologies in Medicine by G. K. Von Schulthess / Univ. of Zürich, S. Wildermuth, A. Buck / Univ. Hospital Zürich, K. Jäger / Univ. Hospital Basel, R. Kreis / Univ. Hospital Bern Modern medicine is a large consumer of physics technologies. The series of lectures covers medical imaging starting with an overview and the history of medical imaging. Then follows four lectures covering x-ray imaging positron emission tomography imaging blood flow by ultrasound magnetic resonance Monday 10 June 100 Years of Medical Imaging Pr. Gustav K. von Schulthess MD, PhD / University of Zurich History and overview of Medical Imaging Tuesday 11 June X-rays: still going strong Dr. Simon Wildermuth / MD, University Hospital Zurich Multidetector computed tomography: New developments and applications Wednesday 12 June Nuclear Medicine: PET Positron Emission Tomography Dr. Alfred Buck / MD, MSc, University...

  17. ACADEMIC TRAINING: Physics Technologies in Medecine

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    10, 11, 12, 13, 14 June LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Physics Technologies in Medecine by G. K. Von Schulthess / Univ. of Zürich, S. Wildermuth, A. Buck / Univ. Hospital Zürich, K. Jäger / Univ. Hospital Basel, R. Kreis / Univ. Hospital Bern Modern medicine is a large consumer of physics technologies. The series of lectures covers medical imaging starting with an overview and the history of medical imaging. Then follows four lectures covering x-ray imaging positron emission tomography imaging blood flow by ultrasound magnetic resonance Monday 10 June 100 Years of Medical Imaging Pr. Gustav K. von Schulthess MD, PhD / University of Zurich History and overview of Medical Imaging Tuesday 11 June X-rays: still going strong Dr. Simon Wildermuth / MD, University Hospital Zurich Multidetector computed tomography: New developments and applications Wednesday 12 June Nuclear Medicine: PET Positron Emission Tomography Dr. Alfred Buck / MD, MSc, University...

  18. Passive multi-family house in Unteraegeri, Switzerland; Pilotobjekt Passiv-MFH Staempfli in Unteraegeri/ZG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staempfli, A. [Rita und Armin Staempfli, Seewen (Switzerland); Frei, B.; Reichmuth, F.; Huber, H. [Hochschule fuer Technik und Architektur (HTA), WTT HLKS, Luzern (Switzerland)

    2003-07-01

    This comprehensive report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) describes an apartment house in Unteraegeri, Switzerland, that is built to passive-house standards and contains four apartments. The history of this project is reviewed and the various technologies used including high-insulation windows, fan-assisted balanced ventilation, solar collectors and a combined heat and power unit are discussed. Various detail difficulties experienced are commented on, these being partly of a technical nature and partly due to the energy-relevant behaviour of certain tenants. Also, higher energy consumption resulting from having to adhere to certain building regulations are discussed. In a second part of the report, the results of measurements made by the University of Applied Sciences in Lucerne are presented in graphical form and discussed. Detailed plans of the building are presented and schematics of the various heating and ventilation installations are discussed.

  19. The use of airborne LiDAR data for the analysis of debris flow events in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Scheidl

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A methodology of magnitude estimates for debris flow events is described using airborne LiDAR data. Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR is a widely used technology to generate digital elevation information. LiDAR data in alpine regions can be obtained by several commercial companies where the automated filtering process is proprietary and varies from companies to companies. This study describes the analysis of geomorphologic changes using digital terrain models derived from commercial LiDAR data. The estimation of the deposition volumes is based on two digital terrain models covering the same area but differing in their time of survey. In this study two surveyed deposition areas of debris flows, located in the canton of Berne, Switzerland, were chosen as test cases. We discuss different grid interpolating techniques, other preliminary work and the accuracy of the used LiDAR data and volume estimates.

  20. The provision of out-of-hours care and associated costs in an urban area of Switzerland: a cost description study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senn Oliver

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Switzerland, General Practitioners (GPs play an important role for out-of-hours emergency care as one service option beside freely accessible and costly emergency departments of hospitals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the services provided and the economic consequences of a Swiss GP out-of-hours service. Methods GPs participating in the out-of-hours service in the city of Zurich collected data on medical problems (ICPC coding, mode of contact, mode of resource use and services provided (time units; diagnostics; treatments. From a health care insurance perspective, we assessed the association between total costs and its two components (basic costs: charges for time units and emergency surcharge; individual costs: charges for clinical examination, diagnostics and treatment in the discretion of the GP. Results 125 GPs collected data on 685 patient contacts. The most prevalent health problems were of respiratory (24%, musculoskeletal (13% and digestive origin (12%. Home visits (61% were the most common contact mode, followed by practice (25% and telephone contacts (14%. 82% of patients could be treated by ambulatory care. In 20% of patients additional technical diagnostics, most often laboratory tests, were used. The mean total costs for one emergency patient contact were €144 (95%-CI: 137-151. The mode of contact was an important determinant of total costs (mean total costs for home visits: €176 [95%-CI: 168-184]; practice contact: €90 [95%-CI: 84-98]; telephone contact: €48 [95%-CI: 40-55]. Basic costs contributed 83% of total costs for home visits and 70% of total costs for practice contacts. Individual mean costs were similarly low for home visits (€30 and practice contacts (€27. Medical problems had no relevant influence on this cost pattern. Conclusions GPs managed most emergency demand in their out-of-hours service by ambulatory care. They applied little diagnostic testing and basic care. Our

  1. The provision of out-of-hours care and associated costs in an urban area of Switzerland: a cost description study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Klaus; Imhof, Daniel; Chmiel, Corrine; Zoller, Marco; Senn, Oliver; Rosemann, Thomas; Huber, Carola A

    2010-12-20

    In Switzerland, General Practitioners (GPs) play an important role for out-of-hours emergency care as one service option beside freely accessible and costly emergency departments of hospitals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the services provided and the economic consequences of a Swiss GP out-of-hours service. GPs participating in the out-of-hours service in the city of Zurich collected data on medical problems (ICPC coding), mode of contact, mode of resource use and services provided (time units; diagnostics; treatments). From a health care insurance perspective, we assessed the association between total costs and its two components (basic costs: charges for time units and emergency surcharge; individual costs: charges for clinical examination, diagnostics and treatment in the discretion of the GP). 125 GPs collected data on 685 patient contacts. The most prevalent health problems were of respiratory (24%), musculoskeletal (13%) and digestive origin (12%). Home visits (61%) were the most common contact mode, followed by practice (25%) and telephone contacts (14%). 82% of patients could be treated by ambulatory care. In 20% of patients additional technical diagnostics, most often laboratory tests, were used. The mean total costs for one emergency patient contact were €144 (95%-CI: 137-151). The mode of contact was an important determinant of total costs (mean total costs for home visits: €176 [95%-CI: 168-184]; practice contact: €90 [95%-CI: 84-98]; telephone contact: €48 [95%-CI: 40-55]). Basic costs contributed 83% of total costs for home visits and 70% of total costs for practice contacts. Individual mean costs were similarly low for home visits (€30) and practice contacts (€27). Medical problems had no relevant influence on this cost pattern. GPs managed most emergency demand in their out-of-hours service by ambulatory care. They applied little diagnostic testing and basic care. Our findings are of relevance for policy makers even from other

  2. Occurrence and assemblage composition of millipedes (Myriapoda, Diplopoda and terrestrial isopods (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea in urban areas of Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc Vilisics

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial isopods and millipedes, members of the invertebrate macro-decomposer guild, were collected through pitfall traps in three Swiss cities (Zurich, Lucerne, Lugano. A total of 7,198 individuals of 17 isopod species (7093 ind., and 10 millipede species (105 ind. were captured. Besides the Alpine endemic isopod (Trichoniscus alemannicus and millipede (Cylindroiulus verhoeffi, urban assemblages were mainly composed of widespread, native European and even cosmopolitan species, which are frequent in anthropogenic areas. Overall species richness (isopods and millipedes combined was similar in Zurich (17 species and Lucerne (16, while only 13 species were sampled in Lugano. According to the Sørensen index of similarity, species composition of Zurich and Lucerne were more alike, while the one of Lugano was more distinct from the other two cities.This result can be explained by the spatial proximity of Zurich and Lucerne in the north of the Alps compared to Lugano, which is located more distantly and in the south of the Alps. Dominant isopods and millipedes in Zurich and Lucerne were found to be widespread synanthropic species in temperate Europe (Porcellio scaber, Trachelipus rathkii and Ophyiulus pilosus while the dominant isopod in Lugano (Trachelipus razzautii is a species with a north-eastern Mediterranean distribution. Our study reveals that the urban millipede and isopod fauna in Swiss cities mainly consists of widespread species, but species of narrower distribution (e.g. T. alemannicus, C. verhoeffi may also find suitable habitats in cities. Despite some signs of biotic homogenization, our study also found compositional differences of millipede and isopod assemblages between northern and southern cities that suggest geographical effects of the regional species pool.

  3. Occurrence and assemblage composition of millipedes (Myriapoda, Diplopoda) and terrestrial isopods (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea) in urban areas of Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilisics, Ferenc; Bogyó, Dávid; Sattler, Thomas; Moretti, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Terrestrial isopods and millipedes, members of the invertebrate macro-decomposer guild, were collected through pitfall traps in three Swiss cities (Zurich, Lucerne, Lugano). A total of 7,198 individuals of 17 isopod species (7093 ind.), and 10 millipede species (105 ind.) were captured. Besides the Alpine endemic isopod (Trichoniscus alemannicus) and millipede (Cylindroiulus verhoeffi), urban assemblages were mainly composed of widespread, native European and even cosmopolitan species, which are frequent in anthropogenic areas. Overall species richness (isopods and millipedes combined) was similar in Zurich (17 species) and Lucerne (16), while only 13 species were sampled in Lugano. According to the Sørensen index of similarity, species composition of Zurich and Lucerne were more alike, while the one of Lugano was more distinct from the other two cities. This result can be explained by the spatial proximity of Zurich and Lucerne in the north of the Alps compared to Lugano, which is located more distantly and in the south of the Alps. Dominant isopods and millipedes in Zurich and Lucerne were found to be widespread synanthropic species in temperate Europe(Porcellio scaber, Trachelipus rathkii and Ophyiulus pilosus) while the dominant isopod in Lugano (Trachelipus razzautii) is a species with a north-eastern Mediterranean distribution. Our study reveals that the urban millipede and isopod fauna in Swiss cities mainly consists of widespread species, but species of narrower distribution (e.g. Trichoniscus alemannicus, Cylindroiulus verhoeffi) may also find suitable habitats in cities. Despite some signs of biotic homogenization, our study also found compositional differences of millipede and isopod assemblages between northern and southern cities that suggest geographical effects of the regional species pool. PMID:22536109

  4. Assessement of user needs for climate change scenarios in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andreas; Liniger, Mark; Flückiger-Knutti, Jacqueline

    2016-04-01

    There is a growing demand to assess and inform about future climate change and its impacts on society and ecosystems and to deduce appropriate adaptation strategies. The basis for such assessments are reliable and up-to-date climate change scenarios on the local to regional scale. In Switzerland, an important step has been accomplished by the release of the climate scenarios in 2011 ("CH2011"). New climate model simulations, an improved scientific understanding and new statistical downscaling tools make an update of these scenarios necessary. An important component toward the new national scenarios "CH2018" are the consideration of user needs in order to ensure that the new scenarios are user-tailored and hence find a wide applicability. The new CH2018 scenarios are developed in the framework of the recently founded National Center for Climate Services (NCCS). To get a better overview of who the users of climate scenarios are and what they need, a comprehensive market research was undertaken. The survey targeted the most climate-relevant sectors, and considered representatives from administration, research and private companies across Switzerland. The survey comprised several qualitative group interviews with key stakeholders, as well as a written questionaire, answered by more than one hundred users. Additionally, two workshops were organized to gather the needs in dissemination of climate scenarios. The results of the survey show the necessity to classify the user needs according to the level of usage: "intensive users" are mainly researchers who handle large climate scenario data for further use in subsequent impact studies; "extensive users" are usually from administrations or consulting companies and perform simple calculations for specific questions or use provided graphics and tables; "facilitators" are usually from media, NGOs or schools and process and disseminate scenario information for a specific target group. The less intensive the usage of climate

  5. Water geochemistry to estimate reservoir temperature of Stabio springs, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, Sebastian; Soma, Linda

    2017-04-01

    The Mendrisiotto region located in Southern Switzerland and close to the Italian border, is characterized by the presence of a thick sequence of Mesozoic limestones and dolostones above a volcanic rocks from Permian (Bernoulli, 1964). Within the carbonates, fractures and dissolution processes increased limestone permeability and favored the widespread presence of springs. The presence of few localized H2S and CH4 bearing springs is known from historical times in Stabio. Its localization is related to the faulting affecting the area (Balderer et Al., 2007). These waters were classified by Greber et Al. (1997) as Na-(Ca)-(Mg)-HCO3-Cl-(SO4) type with having a total dissolved solid content in the range of 0.8 and 1.2 gl-1. According with Balderer et Al. (2007) the stable isotopic composition deviates from the global meteoric water line (IAEA, 1984) being the values of δ18O and δ2H respectively 0.8 ‰ and 5‰ lower than the normal shallow groundwater of the area. The values of δ13C of TDIC (-1.54‰ 1.44 ) indicate exchange with CO2 of thermo - metamorphic or even Mantle origin. While 14C in TDIC (7.95, 26.0 pMC) and 3H (1.1 ±0.7, 3.1±0.7 TU) indicates uprising of deep water along faults with some mixing. To estimate reservoir temperature, a new sampling was conducted in 2015 for chemical and isotopic analysis. The sampling was carried out from the only source that allows getting water directly from the dolostone in order to avoid mixing. Although some differences are noticed respect to previous studies, the results show a substantial agreement for stable isotopic composition of water, δ13C and 14C of TDIC. Reservoir temperature was calculated by using several geothermometers. The results show a great variability ranging from 60 ˚ C using Silica to more than 500 ˚ C using cationic ( Na - Ca) geothermometers; indicating that besides mixing, exchange processes and chemical reactions along flow path affect results. This study was partially funded by Azienda

  6. Accumulation of cadmium and uranium in arable soils in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, Moritz; Ulrich, Andrea; Rehmus, Agnes; Keller, Armin

    2017-02-01

    Mineral phosphorus (P) fertilizers contain contaminants that are potentially hazardous to humans and the environment. Frequent mineral P fertilizer applications can cause heavy metals to accumulate and reach undesirable concentrations in agricultural soils. There is particular concern about Cadmium (Cd) and Uranium (U) accumulation because these metals are toxic and can endanger soil fertility, leach into groundwater, and be taken up by crops. We determined total Cd and U concentrations in more than 400 topsoil and subsoil samples obtained from 216 agricultural sites across Switzerland. We also investigated temporal changes in Cd and U concentrations since 1985 in soil at six selected Swiss national soil monitoring network sites. The mean U concentrations were 16% higher in arable topsoil than in grassland topsoil. The Cd concentrations in arable and grassland soils did not differ, which we attribute to soil management practices and Cd sources other than mineral P fertilizers masking Cd inputs from mineral P fertilizers. The mean Cd and U concentrations were 58% and 9% higher, respectively, in arable topsoil than in arable subsoil, indicating that significant Cd and U inputs to arable soils occurred in the past. Geochemical mass balances confirmed this, indicating an accumulation of 52% for Cd and 6% for U. Only minor temporal changes were found in the Cd concentrations in topsoil from the six soil-monitoring sites, but U concentrations in topsoil from three sites had significantly increased since 1985. Sewage sludge and atmospheric deposition were previously important sources of Cd to agricultural soils, but today mineral P fertilizers are the dominant sources of Cd and U. Future Cd and U inputs to agricultural soils may be reduced by using optimized management practices, establishing U threshold values for mineral P fertilizers and soils, effectively enforcing threshold values, and developing and using clean recycled P fertilizers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  7. Smartphone use and smartphone addiction among young people in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Severin; Castro, Raquel Paz; Kwon, Min; Filler, Andreas; Kowatsch, Tobias; Schaub, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Smartphone addiction, its association with smartphone use, and its predictors have not yet been studied in a European sample. This study investigated indicators of smartphone use, smartphone addiction, and their associations with demographic and health behaviour-related variables in young people. Methods A convenience sample of 1,519 students from 127 Swiss vocational school classes participated in a survey assessing demographic and health-related characteristics as well as indicators of smartphone use and addiction. Smartphone addiction was assessed using a short version of the Smartphone Addiction Scale for Adolescents (SAS-SV). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to investigate demographic and health-related predictors of smartphone addiction. Results Smartphone addiction occurred in 256 (16.9%) of the 1,519 students. Longer duration of smartphone use on a typical day, a shorter time period until first smartphone use in the morning, and reporting that social networking was the most personally relevant smartphone function were associated with smartphone addiction. Smartphone addiction was more prevalent in younger adolescents (15–16 years) compared with young adults (19 years and older), students with both parents born outside Switzerland, persons reporting lower physical activity, and those reporting higher stress. Alcohol and tobacco consumption were unrelated to smartphone addiction. Discussion Different indicators of smartphone use are associated with smartphone addiction and subgroups of young people have a higher prevalence of smartphone addiction. Conclusions The study provides the first insights into smartphone use, smartphone addiction, and predictors of smartphone addiction in young people from a European country, which should be extended in further studies. PMID:26690625

  8. Inter-communal migrations in Switzerland: a "mountain factor"?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Camenisch

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available To go beyond existing publications on inter-communal migrations in Switzerland, this paper focuses on a comparison of behaviours between communes of different types: rural, urban, mountain, tourist, etc. It is based on two sets of data: the Swiss Population Census (1999-2008 and the Swiss Household Panel. This paper has two main conclusions of this paper: first, contrary to the dominant practice which compares communes according to their respective difference between in-migration and out-migration rate, this paper highlights the contrast between “warm” and “cold” communes (comparing the migration rate itself; there is a "mountain factor" which means that most inter-communal migrations occur within the mountain zone, or within the Swiss Plateau.Prolongeant les publications existantes sur les migrations intercommunales en Suisse, l'article focalise son attention sur les comportements différenciés des communes selon les types dont elles relèvent: urbaines, montagnardes, touristiques, rurales, etc. Il repose sur l'utilisation des données du recensement fédéral de la population (1999-2008 et sur celles du Panel Suisse des Ménages. Il parvient à deux conclusions principales: les communes que l'on compare le plus souvent en fonction de leur bilan migratoire, peuvent aussi être utilement différenciées selon qu'elles sont « chaudes » ou « froides » (avec un taux de migration fort ou faible, quelque soit le solde; il existe un "effet montagne" qui signifie ici la propension des migrations à se faire principalement à l'intérieur de la zone de montagne suisse ou à l'intérieur du Plateau suisse.

  9. Impact of climate change in Switzerland on socioeconomic snow indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmucki, Edgar; Marty, Christoph; Fierz, Charles; Weingartner, Rolf; Lehning, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Snow is a key element for many socioeconomic activities in mountainous regions. Due to the sensitivity of the snow cover to variations of temperature and precipitation, major changes caused by climate change are expected to happen. We analyze the evolution of some key snow indices under future climatic conditions. Ten downscaled and postprocessed climate scenarios from the ENSEMBLES database have been used to feed the physics-based snow model SNOWPACK. The projected snow cover has been calculated for 11 stations representing the diverse climates found in Switzerland. For the first time, such a setup is used to reveal changes in frequently applied snow indices and their implications on various socioeconomic sectors. Toward the end of the twenty-first century, a continuous snow cover is likely only guaranteed at high elevations above 2000 m a.s.l., whereas at mid elevations (1000-1700 m a.s.l.), roughly 50 % of all winters might be characterized by an ephemeral snow cover. Low elevations (below 500 m a.s.l.) are projected to experience only 2 days with snowfall per year and show the strongest relative reductions in mean winter snow depth of around 90 %. The range of the mean relative reductions of the snow indices is dominated by uncertainties from different GCM-RCM projections and amounts to approximately 30 %. Despite these uncertainties, all snow indices show a clear decrease in all scenario periods and the relative reductions increase toward lower elevations. These strong reductions can serve as a basis for policy makers in the fields of tourism, ecology, and hydropower.

  10. Geothermal energy in Switzerland - outline lecture; Uebersichtsvortrag Geothermie Schweiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, M. [Bundesamt fuer Energiewirtschaft, Bern (Switzerland); Gorhan, H.L. [Elektrowatt Engineering AG, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1997-12-01

    CO{sub 2}- emission in Switzerland need to be reduced over the next 50 years. In 1990, a first step towards improvement was taken by the Swiss Feseral Office of Energy by establishing the ``Energy 2000`` action plan. Apart from practical recommendations for general energy saving measures, this programme provides also clear objectives in respect to increased and more effecient utilization of indigenious and renewable energy resources. Geothermal energy is one of these resources. In addition to the amount of geothermal heat delivered in 1990, it is planned to produce a further 170 GWh of geothermal energy by the year 2000. This correesponnds to about 6% of a total of 3000 GWh which, it is envisaged, will be produced by all alternative heat resources together by the year 2000. Today, most geothermal energy is provided by shallow borehole heat exchangers. However, intensive development of wide ranging and innovative geothermal techniques is taking place at present. These R and D activities, as well as projects at present being realised, receive significant support from the Swiss Federal Office of Energy. (orig.) [Deutsch] In den kommenden 50 Jahren soll und muss CO{sub 2}-Emission in der Sweiz betraechtlich reduziert werden. Einen ersten Schritt dazu bildet das. im Jahre 1990 vom bundesamtes fuer Energiewirtschaft erarbeitete, Programm ``Energie 2000``. Nebst konkreten Vorschlaegen zum allgemeinen Energiesparen wurden in diesem programm auch Zielsetzungen fuer eine vermehrte, innovative und efficiente Nutzung von einheimischen und erneuerbaren Energieressourcen formuliert. Dazu zaelt auch die Geometrie. Zusaetzlich zur bereits im Jahre 1990 produzierten Waerme soll die Geometrie im Jahr 2000 ca. 170 GWh an Waermeenergie lifern. Das entspricht ca.6% der fuer das Jahr 2000 geplanten Gesamtalternativ- Energieproduktion von 3000 GWh. Bei der geothermischen Energieproduktion satmmt bis heute der groesste Anteil von untiefen Erdwaermesonden. Die Anwendung neuer und

  11. Smartphone use and smartphone addiction among young people in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Severin; Castro, Raquel Paz; Kwon, Min; Filler, Andreas; Kowatsch, Tobias; Schaub, Michael P

    2015-12-01

    Smartphone addiction, its association with smartphone use, and its predictors have not yet been studied in a European sample. This study investigated indicators of smartphone use, smartphone addiction, and their associations with demographic and health behaviour-related variables in young people. A convenience sample of 1,519 students from 127 Swiss vocational school classes participated in a survey assessing demographic and health-related characteristics as well as indicators of smartphone use and addiction. Smartphone addiction was assessed using a short version of the Smartphone Addiction Scale for Adolescents (SAS-SV). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to investigate demographic and health-related predictors of smartphone addiction. Smartphone addiction occurred in 256 (16.9%) of the 1,519 students. Longer duration of smartphone use on a typical day, a shorter time period until first smartphone use in the morning, and reporting that social networking was the most personally relevant smartphone function were associated with smartphone addiction. Smartphone addiction was more prevalent in younger adolescents (15-16 years) compared with young adults (19 years and older), students with both parents born outside Switzerland, persons reporting lower physical activity, and those reporting higher stress. Alcohol and tobacco consumption were unrelated to smartphone addiction. Different indicators of smartphone use are associated with smartphone addiction and subgroups of young people have a higher prevalence of smartphone addiction. The study provides the first insights into smartphone use, smartphone addiction, and predictors of smartphone addiction in young people from a European country, which should be extended in further studies.

  12. Flows of engineered nanomaterials through the recycling process in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Guzman, Alejandro; Sun, Tianyin; Nowack, Bernd

    2015-02-01

    The use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in diverse applications has increased during the last years and this will likely continue in the near future. As the number of applications increase, more and more waste with nanomaterials will be generated. A portion of this waste will enter the recycling system, for example, in electronic products, textiles and construction materials. The fate of these materials during and after the waste management and recycling operations is poorly understood. The aim of this work is to model the flows of nano-TiO2, nano-ZnO, nano-Ag and CNT in the recycling system in Switzerland. The basis for this study is published information on the ENMs flows on the Swiss system. We developed a method to assess their flow after recycling. To incorporate the uncertainties inherent to the limited information available, we applied a probabilistic material flow analysis approach. The results show that the recycling processes does not result in significant further propagation of nanomaterials into new products. Instead, the largest proportion will flow as waste that can subsequently be properly handled in incineration plants or landfills. Smaller fractions of ENMs will be eliminated or end up in materials that are sent abroad to undergo further recovery processes. Only a reduced amount of ENMs will flow back to the productive process of the economy in a limited number of sectors. Overall, the results suggest that risk assessment during recycling should focus on occupational exposure, release of ENMs in landfills and incineration plants, and toxicity assessment in a small number of recycled inputs.

  13. Damage costs due to bedload transport processes in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badoux, A.; Andres, N.; Turowski, J. M.

    2014-02-01

    In Alpine regions, floods are often associated with erosion, transport and deposition of coarse sediment along the streams. These processes are related to bedload transport and pose a hazard in addition to the elevated water discharge. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to total damage caused by natural hazards. Using the Swiss flood and landslide damage database - which collects financial damage data of naturally triggered floods, debris flows and landslides - we estimated the contribution of fluvial bedload transport processes to total damage costs in Switzerland. For each database entry an upper and lower limit of financial losses caused by or related to bedload transport processes was estimated, and the quality of the estimate was judged. When compared to total damage, the fraction of bedload transport damage in the 40 yr study period lies between 0.32 and 0.37. However, this value is highly variable for individual years (from 0.02 to 0.72). Bedload transport processes have induced cumulative financial losses between CHF 4.3 and 5.1 billion. Spatial analysis revealed a considerable heterogeneous distribution with largest damage for mountainous regions. The analysis of the seasonal distribution shows that more than 75 % of the bedload damage costs occurs in summer (June-August), and ∼ 23% in autumn (September-November). With roughly 56 %, by far most of the damage has been registered in August. Bedload transport processes are presently still inadequately understood, and the predictive quality of common bedload equations is often poor. Our analysis demonstrates the importance of bedload transport as a natural hazard and financial source of risk, and thus the need for future structured research on transport processes in steep streams.

  14. Chlamydia-related abortions in cattle from Graubunden, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, N; Thoma, R; Spaeni, P; Weilenmann, R; Teankum, K; Brugnera, E; Zimmermann, D R; Vaughan, L; Pospischil, A

    2006-09-01

    In 2001, the first case of bovine chlamydial abortion was reported in canton Graubunden, Switzerland. In this region, Chlamydophila (Cp.) abortus is endemic in small ruminants. Hence, we aimed to investigate the incidence of chlamydia-related abortions in cattle from Graubunden. During breeding seasons of 2003-2004, formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded placenta specimens (n = 235) from late-term abortions in cattle were analyzed by histopathology, immunohistochemistry with a Chlamydiaceae-specific monoclonal antibody against chlamydial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and 2 different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods (16 S ribosomal ribonucleic acid [rRNA] PCR, intergenic spacer [IGS-S] PCR), followed by PCR product sequencing. In 149 of 235 cases (63.4%), histopathologic lesions such as purulent and/or necrotizing placentitis were observed. Chlamydial antigen was clearly demonstrated in immunohistochemistry in only 1 of 235 cases (0.4%). Cp. abortus or Cp. psittaci was found in 12 of 235 (5.1%) and 10 of 235 cases (4.2%) by 16 S rRNA PCR and IGS-S PCR, respectively. However, we detected, by 16 S rRNA PCR, 43 of 235 cases (18.3%) to be positive for chlamydia-like organisms. In contrast to the situation in small ruminants in the canton Graubunden, bovine abortion from Cp. abortus seems not to play an important role. Nevertheless, zoonotic potential should be taken into account when handling abortion material from cattle. The significance of chlamydia-like isolates other than Waddlia chondrophila remains an open question in abortion and needs further investigation.

  15. Flows of engineered nanomaterials through the recycling process in Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero-Guzman, Alejandro; Sun, Tianyin; Nowack, Bernd, E-mail: nowack@empa.ch

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Recycling is one of the likely end-of-life fates of nanoproducts. • We assessed the material flows of four nanomaterials in the Swiss recycling system. • After recycling, most nanomaterials will flow to landfills or incineration plants. • Recycled construction waste, plastics and textiles may contain nanomaterials. - Abstract: The use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in diverse applications has increased during the last years and this will likely continue in the near future. As the number of applications increase, more and more waste with nanomaterials will be generated. A portion of this waste will enter the recycling system, for example, in electronic products, textiles and construction materials. The fate of these materials during and after the waste management and recycling operations is poorly understood. The aim of this work is to model the flows of nano-TiO{sub 2}, nano-ZnO, nano-Ag and CNT in the recycling system in Switzerland. The basis for this study is published information on the ENMs flows on the Swiss system. We developed a method to assess their flow after recycling. To incorporate the uncertainties inherent to the limited information available, we applied a probabilistic material flow analysis approach. The results show that the recycling processes does not result in significant further propagation of nanomaterials into new products. Instead, the largest proportion will flow as waste that can subsequently be properly handled in incineration plants or landfills. Smaller fractions of ENMs will be eliminated or end up in materials that are sent abroad to undergo further recovery processes. Only a reduced amount of ENMs will flow back to the productive process of the economy in a limited number of sectors. Overall, the results suggest that risk assessment during recycling should focus on occupational exposure, release of ENMs in landfills and incineration plants, and toxicity assessment in a small number of recycled inputs.

  16. Exploring Societal Preferences for Energy Sufficiency Measures in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne eMoser

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many countries are facing a challenging transition towards more sustainable energy systems, which produce more renewables and consume less energy. The latter goal can only be achieved through a combination of efficiency measures and changes in people’s lifestyles and routine behaviours (i.e. sufficiency. While research has shown that acceptance of technical efficiency is relatively high, there is a lack of research on societal preferences for sufficiency measures. However, this is an important prerequisite for designing successful interventions to change behaviour.This paper analyses societal preferences for different energy-related behaviours in Switzerland. We use an online choice-based conjoint analysis (N=150 to examine preferences for behaviours with high technical potentials for energy demand reduction in the following domains: mobility, heating and food. Each domain comprises different attributes across three levels of sufficiency. Respondents were confronted with trade-off situations evoked through different fictional lifestyles that comprised different combinations of attribute levels. Through a series of trade-off decisions, participants were asked to choose their preferred lifestyle. The results revealed that a vegetarian diet was considered the most critical issue that respondents were unwilling to trade off, followed by distance to workplace and means of transportation. The highest willingness to trade off was found for adjustments in room temperature, holiday travel behaviours, and living space. Participants’ preferences for the most energy-sufficient lifestyles were rather low. However, the study showed that there were lifestyles with substantive energy-saving potentials that were well accepted among respondents. Our study results suggest that the success of energy-sufficiency interventions might depend strongly on the targeted behaviour. We speculate that they may face strong resistance (e.g., vegetarian diet. Thus, it seems

  17. Open Distance Learning at Southern Switzerland Universities - A comprehensive and multilingual approach involving universities, teachers, students, and administration

    OpenAIRE

    Flueckiger, Federico; Mazza, Riccardo

    2001-01-01

    The new universities of Italian speaking part of Switzerland are developing with high priority a multilingual open distance learning environment. Within the framework of the Virtual Campus Switzerland Programme we started three projects in order to set up a virtual campus with strong local roots and with closed relationships to other universities of Switzerland and of the close foreign countries. The main objective of these activities is to expand the offer of modular courses, to make them av...

  18. Development of a Historical Hydrological online research and application platform for Switzerland - Historical Hydrological Atlas of Switzerland (HHAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetter, Oliver

    2017-04-01

    It is planned to develop and maintain a historical hydrological online platform for Switzerland, which shall be specially designed for the needs of research and federal, cantonal or private institutions being interested in hydrological risk assessment and protection measures. The aim is on the one hand to facilitate the access to raw data which generally is needed for further historical hydrological reconstruction and quantification, so that future research will be achieved in significantly shorter time. On the other hand, new historical hydrological research results shall be continuously included in order to establish this platform as a useful tool for the assessment of hydrological risk by including the long term experience of reconstructed pre-instrumental hydrological extreme events like floods and droughts. Meteorological parameters that may trigger extreme hydrological events, like monthly or seasonally resolved reconstructions of temperature and precipitation shall be made accessible in this platform as well. The ultimate goal will be to homogenise the reconstructed hydrological extreme events which usually appeared in the pre anthropogenic influence period under different climatological as well as different hydrological regimes and topographical conditions with the present day state. Long term changes of reconstructed small- to extreme flood seasonality, based on municipal accounting records, will be included in the platform as well. This helps - in combination with the before mentioned meteorological parameters - to provide an increased understanding of the major changes in the generally complex overall system that finally causes hydrological extreme events. The goal of my presentation at the Historical Climatology session is to give an overview about the applied historical climatological and historical hydrological methodologies that are applied on the historical raw data (evidence) to reconstruct pre instrumental hydrological events and meteorological

  19. Homicide-suicide cases in Switzerland and their impact on the Swiss Weapon Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabherr, Silke; Johner, Stephan; Dilitz, Carine; Buck, Ursula; Killias, Martin; Mangin, Patrice; Plattner, Thomas

    2010-12-01

    Homicide followed by the suicide of the offender is a well-known phenomenon. In most cases, it takes place in the context of the so-called "family tragedies." A recent series of such family tragedies in Switzerland prompted an intensive debate in the media and the Swiss government concerning the Swiss Weapon Law, in particular the requirement to keep personal army weapons at home. The present study of Homicide-Suicide cases in Switzerland, thus focuses on the role played by guns, especially military weapons, in such crimes. We investigated retrospectively 75 cases of Homicide-Suicide, comprising 172 individuals and spanning a period of 23 years in western and central Switzerland. Our results show that if guns were used in 76% of the cases, army weapons were the cause of death in 25% of the total. In 28% of the deaths caused by a gunshot, the exact type of the gun and its origin could not be determined. Thus, the majority of Homicide-Suicide cases in Switzerland involve the use of guns. The exact percentage of cases were military weapons were involved could not be defined. In our opinion, a stricter weapons law, restricting access to firearms, would be a factor of prevention of Homicide- Suicide cases in Switzerland.

  20. Patient safety issues in office-based surgery and anaesthesia in Switzerland: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, Stuart; Schwappach, David; Harder, Yves; Staender, Sven; Elger, Bernice

    2017-08-01

    To identify the spectrum of patient safety issues in office-based surgery and anaesthesia in Switzerland. Purposive sample of 23 experts in surgery and anaesthesia and quality and regulation in Switzerland. Data were collected via individual qualitative interviews using a researcher-developed semi-structured interview guide between March 2016 and September 2016. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using conventional content analysis. Issues were categorised under the headings "structure", "process", and "outcome". Experts identified two key overarching patient safety and regulatory issues in relation to office-based surgery and anaesthesia in Switzerland. First, experts repeatedly raised the current lack of data and transparency of the setting. It is unknown how many surgeons are operating in offices, how many and what types of operations are being done, and what the outcomes are. Secondly, experts also noted the limited oversight and regulation of the setting. While some standards exists, most experts felt that more minimal safety standards are needed regarding the requirements that must be met to do office-based surgery and what can and cannot be done in the office-based setting are needed, but they advocated a self-regulatory approach. There is a lack of empirical data regarding the quantity and quality office-based surgery and anaesthesia in Switzerland. Further research is needed to address these research gaps and inform health policy in relation to patient safety in office-based surgery and anaesthesia in Switzerland. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  1. Boron neutron capture synovectomy at SINQ in Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crompton, N.E.A.; Kuehne, G.; Crawford, J. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Gay, S.; Pap, T. [Rheumatology Clinic, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2000-10-01

    One percent of the Swiss population suffers from the crippling disease rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of the hand with associated inflammation of various finger joints. Loss of manual dexterity results in a greatly reduced quality of life, especially in the elderly. Current medical treatment of pharmaceutically unresponsive RA involves either surgery or application of the {beta}-emitters: Yttrium or Erbium. However, both procedures have disadvantages. The small size of the finger joints makes surgery impractical and is therefore not practiced in Switzerland. However, application of Yttrium or Erbium presents a radiation protection problem because the arthritic joint has the potential to leak. For this reason application of {beta}-emitters for RA does not have FDA approval in the US. A promising alternative has recently been under investigation at MIT: Neutron Capture Synovectomy (NCS). Treatment of the arthritic human hand, in particular the metacarpopharangeal and proximal interpharangeal finger joints, involves prior injection of an enriched Boron-10 compound and subsequent irradiation with thermal neutrons. This method avoids the drawbacks of the existing treatments. Introduction of NCS to the SINQ will require preclinical studies to establish the treatment conditions necessary and the effectivity of the planned treatment (Phase 0). The studies will include neutron exposures of cell cultures and joint samples at the new neutron capture radiography facility (NCR) on the cold neutron guide 13. Introduction of NCS will also require construction of a suitable treatment facility for human patients at Sektor 80 of SINQ. Prerequisites which ensure comfortable and expedient treatment of the patient and exposure conditions respecting the demands of radiation protection regulations and the complete safety of the patient must be fulfilled in the construction of the NCS treatment facility. A temporary construction is envisaged for the early clinical trials (Phase I). A more

  2. Soil organic phosphorus characterisation on a glacial chronosequence (Damma, Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosch, Klaus A.; Requejo, María I.; Bünemann, Else K.

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic phosphorus (P) may play a significant role in ecosystem P dynamics, yet, little is known about the development of different organic P classes over time. According to the commonly accepted model, relative proportions of organic P are expected to increase quickly after the commencement of soil development, subsequently remaining relatively stable over time. We tested this hypothesis on a young soil chronosequence in the Damma glacier forefield (Switzerland), where we examined the development of different organic P classes over time. In detail, we hypothesized that organic P compounds resistant against broadly active phosphatase-enzymes would increase with soil age. Soil samples (0-5 cm) were taken on 21 sites with 6 to 136 years of soil development. Using enzyme addition assays to soil extracts (0.25 M NaOH / 0.05 M EDTA), four organic P classes were detected: a) Monoester-like P (organic P hydrolysed by an acid phosphatase), b) DNA-like P (organic P hydrolysed by a nuclease in combination with an acid phosphatase, minus monoester-like P), c) Inositol Phosphate-like P (organic P hydrolysed by a phytase, minus monoester like P) and d) Enzyme stable P (difference between total extracted organic P and the three enzyme labile P classes a, b and c). NaOH-EDTA extractable inorganic and organic P increased with soil age from 4.2 and 5.2 mg kg-1 at the youngest sites to 23.9 and 64.5 mg kg-1 at the oldest sites, respectively. On all sites, more organic than inorganic P was extracted. We observed a strong linear relationship between organic and inorganic P along the chronosequence. Between 60 and 100% of extractable organic P was hydrolysed by the added enzymes, without a clear trend with respect to soil age. On most sites, Inositol phosphate-like P was the most prominent organic P class (1.8-24.3 mg kg-1). However, on some sites higher amounts of monoester-like P were detected (0.4-23.4 mg kg-1). DNA-like P ranged from nil to 12.9 mg kg-1. Thus, we observed a

  3. Deep crustal reflections from a Vibroseis survey in northern Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finckh, P.; Ansorge, J.; Mueller, St.; Sprecher, Chr.

    1984-10-01

    In 1982 a Vibroseis survey comprising 180 km of reflection profiles was run in northern Switzerland in order to investigate the suitability of the crystalline basement for the deposition of highly radioactive waste. A configuration was chosen with 144 channels, 25 m of geophone spacing, 20 s sweeps ranging from 11 to 61 Hz and stacking of 4 or 8 sweeps of 3 simultaneous vibrators at twice the geophone spacing. The listening time was generally 4 s and at 4 sites it was extended to 11s for the detection of deeper crustal reflectors. This survey unravelled the complicated fault and thrust system beneath the Swiss folded Jura mountains. The stack from 4 s to 11 s reveals clearly a strong sloping reflector between 3.0 and 3.5 s which is strong evidence for a pronounced differentiation in the upper crust. A series of reflections is observed between 5.8 and 7.2 s the top of which can be correlated with the Conrad discontinuity. A strong "layered" signal between 9.0 and 9.5 s is interpreted as reflections from the M-discontinuity. The main features are compatible with results from nearby refraction surveys in the southern Rhinegraben rift system which show a distinct velocity increase of about 0.5 km/s in the lower crust at a depth ranging from 15 to 20 km, followed by an inversion zone or a laminated structure before reaching the Moho at about 27 km depth. The correlation of the field recordings with the first 10 s of the up-sweep only, shows some loss of resolution in the uppermost 3 s because of the lower frequency content of the signal. However, the lower parts of the sections are nearly identical. The fact that the deeper reflectors in the sections can consistently be traced laterally is a strong argument for using this processing technique. Thus high-coverage Vibroseis surveys utilizing up-sweep can be processed for deep crustal reflections even if the recording time is restricted to the standard 4 s, provided the surface static corrections are carried out with high

  4. Rethinking Urban Form: Switzerland as a “Horizontal Metropolis”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Viganò

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In light of the rapid population growth forecast for the coming years and the powerful transformations already occurring throughout its whole territory, today’s Switzerland stands in urgent need of critical reflection on its urban future. A novel set of concepts and actions is needed in order to produce new visions and operational tools capable of critically reconsidering mainstream debates about Switzerland’s future urban growth. On the one hand, national policies and narratives tend de facto towards lending increasing support to a dynamic of “metropolization,” which usually leads to stronger territorial hierarchization strategies and processes aiming at a spatial condensation of urban services and functions in specific, selected locations. On the other hand, however, the Swiss territory—with its deep rootedness in federalism and its unique aggregative structure—still embodies key features of what, at different times, has been named a single “Grande Ville,” a “dezentralisierte Großstadt,” a “Ville-Territoire” or, more recently, “Stadtland Schweiz.” The country as a whole is still characterized by extended and layered conditions of inhabitability, where the dispersion of the urban fabric, enmeshed within the agricultural and forested landscape, is articulated through horizontal rather that vertical relationships. This paper offers a novel reflection on how the ongoing metropolization process could be seen as a positive force if a markedly different idea of metropolitan space is introduced—the “Horizontal Metropolis.” Its key idea is to distribute and enlarge the benefits which metropolization, if conducted in line with the tradition of decentralization and horizontality, could bring to the Swiss territory and its population. The “Horizontal Metropolis” concept recovers and leverages the various forms of inhabitability and their relation with the infrastructural support. It considers the long

  5. [How patient safety programmes can be successfully implemented - an example from Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobler, Irene; Mascherek, Anna; Bezzola, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Internationally, the implementation of patient safety programmes poses a major challenge. In the first part, we will demonstrate that various measures have been found to be effective in the literature but that they often do not reach the patient because their implementation proves difficult. Difficulties arise from both the complexity of the interventions themselves and from different organisational settings in individual hospitals. The second part specifically describes the implementation of patient safety improvement programmes in Switzerland and discusses measures intended to bridge the gap between the theory and practice of implementation in Switzerland. Then, the national pilot programme to improve patient safety in surgery is presented, which was launched by the federal Swiss government and has been implemented by the patient safety foundation. Procedures, challenges and highlights in implementing the programme in Switzerland on a national level are outlined. Finally, first (preliminary) results are presented and critically discussed.

  6. Seismicity, state of stress and induced seismicity in the molasse basin and Jura (N-Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deichmann, N. [Schweizerischer Erdbebendienst, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Burlini, L. [Institut of Geology, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-07-01

    This illustrated report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) is one of a series of appendices dealing with the potential for geological sequestration of CO{sub 2} in Switzerland. This report takes a look at the seismicity, state of stress and induced seismicity in the molasse basin and Jura Mountains in northern Switzerland. Data collected since 1983 by the Swiss Earthquake Service and the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Wastes NAGRA on the tectonics and seismic properties of North-western Switzerland is noted. The results are illustrated with a number of maps and graphical representations and are discussed in detail. Cases of induced seismicity as resulting from both natural and man-made causes are examined.

  7. Obesity framing for health policy development in Australia, France and Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchett, Annabelle D; Yeatman, Heather R; Johnson, Keryn M

    2016-03-01

    The obesity epidemic is a consequence of the interaction of cultural, environmental, genetic and behavioural factors; framing the issue is central to determining appropriate solutions. This study used content and thematic framing analysis to explore portrayal of responsibility for obesity in policy documents in Australia, France and Switzerland. For Australia and France, obesity causality was a combination of individual and environmental factors, but for Switzerland, it was predominantly individual. The primary solutions for all countries were health promotion strategies and children's education. Industry groups proposed more school education while health advocates advised government intervention. Where France emphasized cultural attitudes towards taste, Australia focused on sport. The French were most keen on legislating against unhealthy foods compared with Switzerland where there was opposition towards regulation of individual's choices. To curb the increasing prevalence of obesity, allocation of responsibility needs to be considered and initiatives enacted accordingly.

  8. Attitudes towards morphine use among nurses and physicians working in French-speaking Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira M

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Maria Ferreira,1 Henk Verloo,2 Margarida Maria S Vieira,3 Pedro Marques-Vidal4 1Sion Hospital, Sion, Switzerland; 2Haute École de Santé La Source, Lausanne, Switzerland; 3Instituto de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Lisbon, Portugal; 4Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland Abstract: There is little information regarding risk perceptions and attitudes towards morphine use in Switzerland. Thus, we aimed at assessing such attitudes in a sample of health professionals drawn from five nonuniversity hospitals in the French-speaking canton of Valais, Switzerland. The sample included 431 nurses and 40 physicians (age range: 20–63 years, and risk perceptions and attitudes towards morphine use were assessed using a validated questionnaire. More than half of the participants showed a negative attitude regarding most adverse events related to morphine. In bivariate analyses, participants working in geriatrics showed a more negative attitude towards use of morphine than did participants working in medicine and surgery. Compared with Swiss participants, non-Swiss participants also showed a more negative attitude regarding use of morphine. Conversely, no differences were found between the sexes, professions (nurses versus physicians, years of experience (≤14 years versus >14 years, or religions (Catholic versus other/no religion. These findings were further confirmed by multivariate adjustment. Our results indicate that attitudes regarding morphine use are mainly driven by its potential adverse effects and vary according to specialty and nationality. Educational measures directed at health professionals working in geriatrics or coming from abroad might reduce the high morphinophobia levels observed in these groups. Keywords: morphinophobia, cross-sectional study, nurses, physicians, Switzerland

  9. Energy Research in Switzerland in 1997; Energieforschung 1997. Ueberblicksberichte/Recherche energetique 1997. Rapports de synthese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-15

    listed in the geothermal area, increasing the economic efficiency of drilling, life-expectancy of heat probes, use of aquifers, geological aspects and deep heat mining are noted. Small hydropower issues reported on include direct and indirect support for projects, public relations and the Internet. Wind topics reported on include measurement and documentation, information centres and various wind park projects. In the solar chemistry area work concerning process heat, chemical energy storage, photo-electric processes as well as the storage and transport of hydrogen are reported on. As far as combustion technology is concerned, work done at various Swiss institutions is noted, including optical measurement methods and numerical simulation. Also, pollutant reduction is commented on. In the energy storage area, long-term and short-term underground heat-storage systems and their modelling are discussed. Nuclear energy topics include probabilistic safety analysis, human reliability, stress-corrosion cracking and other corrosion effects as well as accident management, waste disposal and future reactor concepts. A further report deals with regulatory safety research in the nuclear area. Nuclear fusion is reviewed at an international level and work done in Switzerland is reviewed. The fuel cells and accumulators report takes a look at current work on natural gas and hydrogen-powered fuel cells with polymer and ceramic electrolytes and work done on various types of accumulators and super-condensers is mentioned. Traffic topics reported on include modular body technologies, drive systems, hybrid drive technologies, safety aspects and eco-balances. Experience gained in fleet trials is reviewed. Finally, the report on the fundamentals of Swiss energy economics reports on perspectives for energy consumption, cantonal energy policies, cost and economic viability of energy systems, solar energy and steering taxes and the opening of energy markets.

  10. Energy Research in Switzerland in 2001; Energieforschung 2001. Ueberblicksberichte/Recherche energetique 2001. Rapports de synthese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-15

    refrigerants and system optimisation are reported on as are combined heat and power units. Batch processes are discussed. Various pilot and demonstration projects are reported on, as is work done in the fuel-cell area. As far as combustion technology is concerned, work done is noted, including turbulent combustion, low-temperature, high-pressure combustion, optical measurement methods and numerical simulation of combustion processes. Pilot and demonstration projects are noted. In the solar energy area, the accreditation of testing facilities and the ageing of collectors are discussed as are urban installations and solar kits. Also, work done on high-temperature solar energy, its storage and electricity production are noted. In the photovoltaics section, the wide range of Swiss work in this area is noted. Work done on roll-to-roll PV technology, compound and dye-based cells is reported on as is work done in the areas of building integration and electrical system technology. Various studies and projects are noted. Work done in co-operation with the IEA and the IEC is noted. In the solar chemistry area, work done on magnetrons, low and medium temperature process heat, high-temperature production of chemical energy carriers, solar fuels and photo-chemical processes are reported on, as well as the production, storage and use of hydrogen. The report on the biomass program takes a look at wood pellet production, system optimisation and particle emissions, the digestion of biogenic wastes and bio fuels. Some of the work listed in the geothermal area includes the heat potential of the drainage water from the new St.-Gothard and Loetschberg railway tunnels, long-term behaviour of geothermal probes and surface-near and deep geothermal power. Results obtained in various projects are discussed. Wind topics reported on include planning aids, location assessment and a wind data bank for Switzerland. Small hydropower issues reported on include support for preliminary studies and environmental

  11. Energy Research in Switzerland in 2001; Energieforschung 2001. Ueberblicksberichte/Recherche energetique 2001. Rapports de synthese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-15

    refrigerants and system optimisation are reported on as are combined heat and power units. Batch processes are discussed. Various pilot and demonstration projects are reported on, as is work done in the fuel-cell area. As far as combustion technology is concerned, work done is noted, including turbulent combustion, low-temperature, high-pressure combustion, optical measurement methods and numerical simulation of combustion processes. Pilot and demonstration projects are noted. In the solar energy area, the accreditation of testing facilities and the ageing of collectors are discussed as are urban installations and solar kits. Also, work done on high-temperature solar energy, its storage and electricity production are noted. In the photovoltaics section, the wide range of Swiss work in this area is noted. Work done on roll-to-roll PV technology, compound and dye-based cells is reported on as is work done in the areas of building integration and electrical system technology. Various studies and projects are noted. Work done in co-operation with the IEA and the IEC is noted. In the solar chemistry area, work done on magnetrons, low and medium temperature process heat, high-temperature production of chemical energy carriers, solar fuels and photo-chemical processes are reported on, as well as the production, storage and use of hydrogen. The report on the biomass program takes a look at wood pellet production, system optimisation and particle emissions, the digestion of biogenic wastes and bio fuels. Some of the work listed in the geothermal area includes the heat potential of the drainage water from the new St.-Gothard and Loetschberg railway tunnels, long-term behaviour of geothermal probes and surface-near and deep geothermal power. Results obtained in various projects are discussed. Wind topics reported on include planning aids, location assessment and a wind data bank for Switzerland. Small hydropower issues reported on include support for preliminary studies and environmental

  12. Nuclear phase-out in Switzerland. Rationality first; Atomausstieg in der Schweiz. Vernunft hat Vorfahrt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leidinger, Tobias [Luther Rechtsanwaltsgesellschaft, Duesseldorf (Germany).

    2017-05-15

    Just a few months ago, the Swiss voters have rejected the initiative of the Green Party to accelerate the nuclear phase-out in Switzerland with an impressive majority. Once again, it becomes clear that in Switzerland on issues of energy policy rationality and not ideology is leading. With their vote against an accelerated nuclear phase-out, the Swiss citizens underlined that they have no sympathy for radical, ideologically proposals for solutions, which on closer inspection are expensive, risky and immature. The majority has understood that the extensive expansion of renewable energies and power grids is burdened with numerous risks and uncertainties.

  13. A Study Tour of Old-age Insurance Systems In Switzerland and France

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>A Chinese delegation of leaders from provincial and municipal departments of civil affairs and retired cadres and homes for the aged visited Switzerland and France from April 18 to 28,and attended a seminar on the old-age insurance system in Switzerland.The visit,to learn of the successful experience of developed European countries,was made at the invitation of the Swiss-Chinese Association and the China-Spain Association of International Culture and Friendship and organized by the CPAFFC.

  14. The crystal structure of (001) twinned xilingolite, Pb3Bi2S6, from Mittal-Hohtenn, Valais, Switzerland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berlepsch, Peter; Armbruster, Thomas; Makovicky, Emil

    2002-01-01

    geology, xilingolite, crystal structure, twinning, lillianite homologue, electron-microprobe analyses, cannizzarite, Bi-containing galena, Mittal-Hohtenn, Valais, Switzerland......geology, xilingolite, crystal structure, twinning, lillianite homologue, electron-microprobe analyses, cannizzarite, Bi-containing galena, Mittal-Hohtenn, Valais, Switzerland...

  15. 76 FR 28910 - Importation of Live Swine, Swine Semen, Pork, and Pork Products From Liechtenstein and Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... Semen, Pork, and Pork Products From Liechtenstein and Switzerland AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... the importation of animals and animal products to add Liechtenstein and Switzerland to the region of... the regulations list regions of the world that are declared free of or low-risk for CSF....

  16. Kinematics of the 1991 Randa rockslides (Valais, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sartori

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available About 22 mio m3 of rock fell from a cliff near the village of Randa (10 km north of Zermatt, Switzerland on 18 April 1991. A second retrogressive rockslide of about 7 mio m3 followed on 9 May 1991. At present, a rock mass situated above the scarp is still slowly moving toward the valley, involving several mio m 3 of rock. A kinematic approach to study of this well-documented rockslide was made "a posteriori" in order to identify the parameters relevant to the detection of such failures involving large volumes of rock. A 3-D model of the pre-rockslide geometry is presented, and is used to interpret the geostructural, hydrogeological, and chronological data. The steepness of the cliff, the massive lithology (mainly orthogneiss, the location on a topographic ridge outcropping at the confluence between a glacial cirque and the main valley, and the existence of previous events of instability were the preexisting field conditions that affected the stability of the area. The structural cause of instability was a 30 dipping, more than 500-m-long, persistent fault, which cut the base of the rock face. Together with a steeply dipping set of persistent joints, this basal discontinuity delimited a 20- mio-m 3 rock block, with a potential sliding direction approximately parallel to the axis of the valley. To the North, the fractures delimiting the unstable mass were less persistent and separated by rock bridges; this rock volume acted as key block. This topographic and structural configuration was freed from glacier support about 15 000 years BP. The various mechanisms of degradation that led to the final loss of equilibrium required various amounts of time. During the late-and post-glacial periods, seismic activity and weathering of the orthogneiss along the fissure network due to infiltration of meteoric water, joined to reduce the mechanical resistance of the sliding surfaces and the rocks bridges. In addition, crystallisation of clay minerals due to

  17. Highlights and recent progress in micro-optics%瑞士微光学的研究焦点及最新进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. P. Herzig; M. T. Gale

    2003-01-01

    @@ Micro-optics and diffractive optics have a long tradition in Switzerland, in particular at the Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchátel (IMT-Uni NE) and at CSEM's Photonics Division in Zurich (formerly PSI / RCA Laboratories, Zurich). Driven by the pioneering work of these institutesand strongly supported by the Swiss Priority Program OPTIQUE during 1993~1999, micro-optics has penetrated into Swiss industry and has resulted in a number of start-up companies. Today, microoptical elements and design services are available from a multitude of Swiss companies and facilities,including CSEM, Heptagon, Colibrys, Suss Micro-Optics Neuchátel, and Leister Technologies.

  18. First report of sandfly fever virus infection imported from Malta into Switzerland, October 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze, D; Korte, W; Rafeiner, P; Niedrig, M

    2012-07-05

    We report the first documented cases of sandfly fever virus infection in travellers returning from Malta to Switzerland in autumn 2011. These cases illustrate the importance of considering sandfly-borne viral infection in the differential diagnosis of febrile patients from the Mediterranean island Malta. Raising awareness among physicians is relevant especially now at the beginning of the summer tourist season.

  19. Incidence of severe anorexia nervosa in Switzerland : 40 years of development (vol 35, pg 250, 2004)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milos, G; Spindler, A; Schnyder, U; Martz, J; Hoek, HW; Willi, J

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The current study examined the development of the incidence of severe anorexia nervosa with five sampling periods covering the years 1956-1995 in a geographically defined region of Switzerland. Method: Applying the same methodology as in the earlier sampling periods, the medical records o

  20. Greenhouse vegetable production in The Netherlands and Switzerland: A grounded look at sector competitiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mann, S.; Breukers, A.; Schweiger, J.; Mack, G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop a theory that is sufficiently adapted to sector competitiveness. The case of greenhouse vegetable production in The Netherlands and Switzerland is used to explain differences in sector competitiveness. Design/methodology/approach – Interviews focusin

  1. Competition between Public Supervision and Professional Management: An Ethnographic Study of School Governance Reforms in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangartner, Judith; Svaton, Carla Jana

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses insights from an ethnographic study of local governance practices in the Canton of Bern, Switzerland, under changing policy conditions. Recent reforms introduced and strengthened the position of head teachers, enhanced the responsibility of the municipalities and introduced new quality management procedures in local…

  2. More than a Culture Capsule: Teaching Switzerland and Austria in the German Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabisch, Peter Karl

    2012-01-01

    This essay offers some direction for greater integration of Austria and Switzerland into every level of the German language and culture curriculum. By excavating a number of now nearly forgotten intercultural connections between these alpine countries and the U.S., it is possible to present a more complete and complex picture of German-speaking…

  3. From Autonomy to Quality Management: NPM Impacts on School Governance in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangartner, Judith; Svaton, Carla Jana

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the impact of discourses on "New Public Management" (NPM) on compulsory schooling in Switzerland during the last two decades and traces its implementation in the Canton of Bern. The analysis suggests that while NPM reformers initially promoted increased school autonomy, the introduction of market elements and school…

  4. Business Students' Perception of Sales Careers: Differences between Students in Switzerland, Turkey, and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaya, Fahri; Quigley, Charles; Bingham, Frank; Hari, Juerg; Nasir, Aslihan

    2014-01-01

    This research measures perceptual differences between sales and sales careers among business students studying in the United States, Switzerland, and Turkey. Earlier studies indicate that selling and a sales career are not viewed favorably by students in the United States and several other countries. This study expands on prior studies by…

  5. Gifted Education in Switzerland: Widely Acknowledged, but Obstacles Still Exist in Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Oppliger, Victor

    2014-01-01

    With its strong federalism and direct democracy, as well as the high level of autonomy of its cantons, Switzerland does not have mandatory national policies and regulations on gifted education. Responsibility for the promotion of high-end learners is in the hands of the cantonal boards of education, and depends largely on their current…

  6. Diversity and distribution of freshwater amphipod species in Switzerland (Crustacea: Amphipoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altermatt, Florian; Alther, Roman; Fišer, Cene; Jokela, Jukka; Konec, Marjeta; Küry, Daniel; Mächler, Elvira; Stucki, Pascal; Westram, Anja Marie

    2014-01-01

    Amphipods are key organisms in many freshwater systems and contribute substantially to the diversity and functioning of macroinvertebrate communities. Furthermore, they are commonly used as bioindicators and for ecotoxicological tests. For many areas, however, diversity and distribution of amphipods is inadequately known, which limits their use in ecological and ecotoxicological studies and handicaps conservation initiatives. We studied the diversity and distribution of amphipods in Switzerland (Central Europe), covering four major drainage basins, an altitudinal gradient of>2,500 m, and various habitats (rivers, streams, lakes and groundwater). We provide the first provisional checklist and detailed information on the distribution and diversity of all amphipod species from Switzerland. In total, we found 29 amphipod species. This includes 16 native and 13 non-native species, one of the latter (Orchestia cavimana) reported here for the first time for Switzerland. The diversity is compared to neighboring countries. We specifically discuss species of the genus Niphargus, which are often receiving less attention. We also found evidence of an even higher level of hidden diversity, and the potential occurrence of further cryptic species. This diversity reflects the biogeographic past of Switzerland, and suggests that amphipods are ideally suited to address questions on endemism and adaptive radiations, post-glaciation re-colonization and invasion dynamics as well as biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships in aquatic systems.

  7. Productivity, quality and sustainability of winter wheat underlong-term conventional and organic management in Switzerland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Jochen; Gunst, Lucie; Mäder, Paul

    2015-01-01

    protection as wellas preceding crop effects may modulate system performance with respect to wheat grain yield, qualityand environmental performance of the systems.Our aim was to evaluate data of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) performance from the DOK long-term systems experiment in Switzerland comparing...

  8. Pathways Fostering Mobility to Higher Education for Vulnerable Immigrants in France, Switzerland and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Jake; Guégnard, Christine; Koomen, Maarten; Imdorf, Christian; Kamanzi, Canisius; Meyer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In this article we wish to clarify not only if, but also how--through which institutional settings--higher education (HE) is accessed by students from vulnerable immigrant groups in France, Switzerland and Canada. We are interested in the possible educational mobility that immigrant youths can experience arising from country-specific educational…

  9. Smoking and Adolescence: Exploring Tobacco Consumption and Related Attitudes in Three Different Adolescent Groups in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosson, Marlene; Maggiori, Christian; Gygax, Pascal Mark; Gay, Christelle

    2012-01-01

    The present study constitutes an investigation of tobacco consumption, related attitudes and individual differences in smoking or non-smoking behaviors in a sample of adolescents of different ages in the French-speaking part of Switzerland. We investigated three school-age groups (7th-grade, 9th-grade, and the second-year of high school) for…

  10. The Rise of Work-Based Academic Education in Austria, Germany and Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Austria, Germany and Switzerland are renowned for their extensive systems of collective vocational skill formation, which, however, have developed largely in separation from higher education. This divide has become increasingly contested as a result of a variety of socioeconomic factors that have led to an increasing demand for higher level…

  11. Sinnerite, Cu6As4S9, from the Lengenbach Quarry, Binn Valley, Switzerland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindi, Luca; Makovicky, Emil; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    We have characterized the crystal structure of sinnerite, Cu6As4S9, a rare sulfosalt mineral from the ores of the Lengenbach quarry, Binn Valley, Canton Valais, Switzerland, by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis. We found sinnerite to be structurally identical to synthetic Cu6As...

  12. Can "Vocationalisation" of Education Go Too Far? The Case of Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    While countries with predominantly academic school-based upper secondary education have been "discovering" vocational education and training (VET) for some time, countries with "vocationalised" education systems such as Austria, Germany or Switzerland are critically reviewing their own situations. This paper takes up the case…

  13. Tracking an Elusive Population: Family Carers of Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in Romandy (Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jecker-Parvex, Maurice; Breitenbach, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Despite a long-standing tradition of institutional placement in Switzerland, many older adults with intellectual disabilities continue to be supported by aging parents and siblings. For various reasons, these carers and the adults concerned have been overlooked up to now. To find out how many such families are providing housing and care of this…

  14. Second-Generation Turkish Youth in Europe: Explaining the Academic Disadvantage in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Steve

    2011-01-01

    This investigation examines the role of students' home and school variables in producing the achievement gap between second-generation Turkish students and their native peers in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland. Using the data from PISA 2006, this study supports past findings that both home and school resources affect the educational outcomes of…

  15. Experiences and Concepts Related to Gifted Education and Talent Development in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Oppliger, Victor

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a summary of efforts and projects related to the provision of gifted students and talent development in Swiss schools and with partners in the German speaking Central Europe. In the first part, relevant activities about teacher education in Switzerland based on a cooperative arrangement with the University of Connecticut will…

  16. Energy balance of a glacier surface: analysis of Automatic Weather Station data from the Morteratschgletscher, Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.; Klok, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    We describe and analyze a complete 1-yr data set from an automatic weather station (AWS) located on the snout of the Morteratschgletscher, Switzerland. The AWS stands freely on the glacier surface and measures pressure, windspeed, wind direction, air temperature and humidity, incoming and reflected

  17. Petrology of the Northern Adula Region, Switzerland (with particular reference to the Glaucophane-Bearing Rocks)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, van der L.

    1959-01-01

    Geological and petrographical investigations were carried out in the northern part of the so-called Adula Nappe, one of the deepest Pennine nappes. The area under consideration lies in the SE of Switzerland, near Vals, S of Ilanz. This area is situated north of the Lepontinic gneiss-region, the

  18. Tularemia among free-ranging mice without infection of exposed humans, Switzerland, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Origgi, Francesco C; König, Barbara; Lindholm, Anna K; Mayor, Désirée; Pilo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The animals primarily infected by Francisella tularensis are rapidly consumed by scavengers, hindering ecologic investigation of the bacterium. We describe a 2012 natural tularemia epizootic among house mice in Switzerland and the assessment of infection of exposed humans. The humans were not infected, but the epizootic coincided with increased reports of human cases in the area.

  19. Incidence of severe anorexia nervosa in Switzerland : 40 years of development (vol 35, pg 250, 2004)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milos, G; Spindler, A; Schnyder, U; Martz, J; Hoek, HW; Willi, J

    Objective: The current study examined the development of the incidence of severe anorexia nervosa with five sampling periods covering the years 1956-1995 in a geographically defined region of Switzerland. Method: Applying the same methodology as in the earlier sampling periods, the medical records

  20. Transition Systems and Non-Standard Employment in Early Career: Comparing Japan and Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imdorf, Christian; Helbling, Laura Alexandra; Inui, Akio

    2017-01-01

    Even though Japan and Switzerland are characterised by comparatively low youth unemployment rates, non-standard forms of employment are on the rise, posing a risk to the stable integration of young labour market entrants. Drawing on the French approach of societal analysis, this paper investigates how country-specific school-to-work transition…

  1. A new, sibling species of cave flatworm from Switzerland (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Dendrocoelidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluys, R.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes a new species of Dendrocoelum, collected from a swiss cave, representing the second species of this genus to be reported from subterranean localities in switzerland. The new species closely resembles two other species, D. clujanum and D. stenophallus, both from Roumania.

  2. What Is a Doctorate? Changing Meanings and Practices in Communication Sciences in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Carole; Lepori, Benedetto

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we analyse the organisation of the doctorate in communication sciences in the context of the overall discussion on the changing organisation of doctoral studies in Switzerland. We focus on three tensions which appear central for the field, namely the employment status of doctoral students, the importance of academic vs.…

  3. Health care-associated rotavirus illness in pediatric inpatients in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppa, Ivo M; Karmaus, Wilfried; Ehlken, Birgit; Fruhwirth, Martin; Heininger, Ulrich; Plenge-Bonig, Anita; Forster, Johannes

    2006-06-01

    A longitudinal study of health care-associated transmission of rotaviruses (RVs) in pediatric inpatients 0-48 months old in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland showed that almost one third of all cases occurred in patients 2 months old or younger. The effectiveness of vaccination against RV from 2 months of age onward remains to be evaluated.

  4. Organizations(2): "Social Capitalism" and Adult Education: The Migros Co-Operative in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Journal of Adult Education, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Half of all adult education programs in Switzerland are conducted through Migros, the country's largest cooperative and largest private company. Migros' educational network principle specializes in teaching languages but also offers 174 subject areas as well as other activities and services. Some Migros adult education innovations are described.…

  5. Pathways Fostering Mobility to Higher Education for Vulnerable Immigrants in France, Switzerland and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Jake; Guégnard, Christine; Koomen, Maarten; Imdorf, Christian; Kamanzi, Canisius; Meyer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In this article we wish to clarify not only if, but also how--through which institutional settings--higher education (HE) is accessed by students from vulnerable immigrant groups in France, Switzerland and Canada. We are interested in the possible educational mobility that immigrant youths can experience arising from country-specific educational…

  6. Incidence of severe anorexia nervosa in Switzerland : 40 years of development (vol 35, pg 250, 2004)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milos, G; Spindler, A; Schnyder, U; Martz, J; Hoek, HW; Willi, J

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The current study examined the development of the incidence of severe anorexia nervosa with five sampling periods covering the years 1956-1995 in a geographically defined region of Switzerland. Method: Applying the same methodology as in the earlier sampling periods, the medical records o

  7. From Autonomy to Quality Management: NPM Impacts on School Governance in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangartner, Judith; Svaton, Carla Jana

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the impact of discourses on "New Public Management" (NPM) on compulsory schooling in Switzerland during the last two decades and traces its implementation in the Canton of Bern. The analysis suggests that while NPM reformers initially promoted increased school autonomy, the introduction of market elements and school…

  8. UC Riverside physicists contribute to state-of-the-art detector installed in Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    "UC Riverside scientists led by Gail Hanson, a distinguished professor of physics, are part of a collaboration of approximately 2300 international physicists who announced Dec. 19 that the world's largest silicon tracking detector at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, had been successfully installed. (2 pages)

  9. UC Riverside physicists contribute to state-of-the-art detector installed in Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    UC Riverside scientists led by Gail Hanson, a distinguished professor of physics, are part of a collaboration of approximately 2300 international physicists who announced Dec. 19 that the world 's largest silicon tracking detector at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, had been successfully installed

  10. Greenhouse vegetable production in The Netherlands and Switzerland: A grounded look at sector competitiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mann, S.; Breukers, A.; Schweiger, J.; Mack, G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop a theory that is sufficiently adapted to sector competitiveness. The case of greenhouse vegetable production in The Netherlands and Switzerland is used to explain differences in sector competitiveness. Design/methodology/approach – Interviews focusin

  11. Maintaining Switzerland's Top Innovation Capacity. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 487

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumotte, Florence

    2006-01-01

    Despite some weakening in the 1990s, partly due to sluggish trend growth, the Swiss innovation performance has been very strong. There are, however, areas in which policy reforms could strengthen innovation further and help Switzerland maintain its lead in the face of a changing global environment. Boosting competition, simplifying administrative…

  12. H.E. Professor Dragoljub Popovic, Ambassador to Switzerland of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    H. E. Professor Dragoljub Popovic, Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia to Switzerland, visiting the ATLAS cavern. From left to right: Dr Torsten Akesson, Deputy Spokesman of the ATLAS experiment; H. E. Professor Dragoljub Popovic; Mrs Simone Hajos, Project Engineer, LHC civil engineering; Dr Peter Adzic, Chairman of the Committee of the Republic of Serbia for relations with CERN.

  13. Formation des enseignants et education bilingue en Suisse (Teacher Training and Bilingual Education in Switzerland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthoud, Anne-Claude; Gajo, Laurent

    1998-01-01

    A discussion of bilingual education teacher training in Switzerland begins with an introduction to the unique and complex linguistic situation of the country, the political and policy context for bilingual education, and the organization of teacher training in general. A more detailed description of both pre-service and in-service training of…

  14. Petrology of the Northern Adula Region, Switzerland (with particular reference to the Glaucophane-Bearing Rocks)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, van der L.

    1959-01-01

    Geological and petrographical investigations were carried out in the northern part of the so-called Adula Nappe, one of the deepest Pennine nappes. The area under consideration lies in the SE of Switzerland, near Vals, S of Ilanz. This area is situated north of the Lepontinic gneiss-region, the deep

  15. Supporting the Integration of Sustainability into Higher Education Curricula—A Case Study from Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Wilhelm Hamiti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available From the perspective of different stakeholders, education for sustainable development (ESD in higher education is highly desirable. In practice, however, this may present challenges, as it involves systemic and cultural changes as well as organizational transformation. A working group at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences supported such a transformative process with the aim of fostering, linking and subsequently deepening the dimensions of sustainable development in the existing curricula. By means of an assessment tool (spider diagram developed through a bottom-up action research procedure, the working group initiated a discussion on sustainability among university lecturers, research associates and students. Results support the hypothesis that resistance to incorporating dimensions of sustainability into the curriculum can effectively be avoided by such an approach. The effectiveness of the assessment tool increased the commitment and the willingness of lecturers to share a common goal of demonstrating the relevance of sustainability in higher education.

  16. Euthanasia and assisted suicide: comparison of legal aspects in Switzerland and other countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, S; La Harpe, R; Harding, T W; Sobel, J

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the legal aspects associated with assisted suicide in Switzerland and compare them with those in other countries. Like euthanasia, assisted suicide is a subject that induces much discussion in many countries. While the law is very liberal in some countries, such as Belgium and the Netherlands (where both euthanasia and assisted suicide take place), these practices are very controversial in other countries, such as France, where they remain taboo subjects. In the United States of America, the laws concerning assisted suicide can differ greatly from one state to another. For example, in Oregon, assisted suicide is allowed if applied by a medical doctor; in others, this act is illegal. In Canada, it is punishable according to the Criminal Code. In Switzerland euthanasia is punishable by law. However, the penal code does not condemn assisted suicide, whether carried out by a medical doctor or another person, provided it is not carried out through selfish motives. The application of these practices has become simplified in recent years and societies for the right to die with dignity based on this principle have come into being (Exit and Dignitas). In the French- and German-speaking parts of Switzerland the association Exit assists individuals living in Switzerland with serious progressive and incurable disease in their engagement to end their life. The association Dignitas, in the German-speaking part of Switzerland, also undertakes--in the same circumstances--to assist individuals coming from foreign countries. Dignitas welcomes several such individuals every year, especially from Germany, where a similar approach does not currently exist.

  17. Sports-related sudden cardiac deaths in the young population of Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, Cristina; Kellerhals, Christoph; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Gräni, Christoph; Trachsel, Lukas D.; Schmied, Christian M.; Saguner, Ardan M.; Eser, Prisca; Herzig, David; Bolliger, Stephan; Michaud, Katarzyna; Wilhelm, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Background In Switzerland, ECG screening was first recommended for national squad athletes in 1998. Since 2001 it has become mandatory in selected high-risk professional sports. Its impact on the rates of sports-related sudden cardiac death (SCD) is unknown. Objective We aimed to study the incidence, causes and time trends of sports-related SCD in comparison to SCD unrelated to exercise in Switzerland. Methods We reviewed all forensic reports of SCDs of the German-speaking region of Switzerland in the age group of 10 to 39 years, occurring between 1999 and 2010. Cases were classified into three categories based on whether or not deaths were associated with sports: no sports (NONE), recreational sports (REC), and competitive sports (COMP). Results Over the 12-year study period, 349 SCD cases were recorded (mean age 30±7 years, 76.5% male); 297 cases were categorized as NONE, 31 as REC, and 21 as COMP. Incidences of SCD per 100,000 person-years [mean (95% CI)] were the lowest in REC [0.43 (0.35–0.56)], followed by COMP [1.19 (0.89–1.60)] and NONE [2.46 (2.27–2.66)]. In all three categories, coronary artery disease (CAD) with or without acute myocardial infarction (MI) was the most common cause of SCD. Three professional athletes were identified in COMP category which all had SCD due to acute MI. There were no time trends, neither in overall, nor in cause-specific incidences of SCD. Conclusions The incidence of SCD in young individuals in Switzerland is low, both related and unrelated to sports. In regions, like Switzerland, where CAD is the leading cause of SCD associated with competitions, screening for cardiovascular risk factors in addition to the current PPS recommendations might be indicated to improve detection of silent CAD and further decrease the incidence of SCD. PMID:28350812

  18. A Review on Sensor, Signal, and Information Processing Algorithms (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    exploration [1, 3]. With recent advances in hardware technology , it has been possible to deploy a large number of devices that are able to sense...University (United Kingdom), ETH Zurich (Switzerland), the University of Karlsruhe (Germany), the Interactive Institute (Sweden), and VTT Electronics... technology , it has been possible to deploy a large number of devices that are capable to sense, communicate, and infer information about physical phe- nomena

  19. Optimization of a Large-scale Microseismic Monitoring Network in Northern Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, T.; Husen, S.; Mignan, A.; Bethmann, F.

    2011-12-01

    We have performed a computer aided network optimization for a regional scale microseismic network in northeastern Switzerland. The goal of the optimization was to find the geometry and size of the network that assures a location precision of 0.5 km in the epicenter and 2.0 km in focal depth for earthquakes of magnitude ML>= 1.0, by taking into account 67 existing stations in Switzerland, Germany and Austria, and the expected detectability of Ml 1 earthquakes in the study area. The optimization was based on the simulated annealing approach by Hardt and Scherbaum (1993), that aims to minimize the volume of the error ellipsoid of the linearized earthquake location problem (D-criterion). We have extended their algorithm: to calculate traveltimes of seismic body waves using a finite differences raytracer and the three-dimensional velocity model of Switzerland, to calculate seismic body waves amplitudes at arbitrary stations assuming Brune source model and using scaling relations recently derived for Switzerland, and to estimate the noise level at arbitrary locations within Switzerland using a first order ambient seismic noise model based on 14 land-use classes defined by the EU-project CORINE and open GIS data. Considering 67 existing stations in Switzerland, Germany and Austria, optimizations for networks of 10 to 35 new stations were calculated with respect to 2240 synthetic earthquakes of magnitudes between ML=0.8-1.1. We incorporated the case of non-detections by considering only earthquake-station pairs with an expected signal-to-noise ratio larger than 10 for the considered body wave. Station noise levels were derived from measured ground motion for existing stations and from the first order ambient noise model for new sites. The stability of the optimization result was tested by repeated optimization runs with changing initial conditions. Due to the highly non linear nature and size of the problem, station locations in the individual solutions show small

  20. Energy Research in Switzerland in 1999; Energieforschung 1999. Ueberblicksberichte/Recherche energetique 1999. Rapports de synthese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-15

    This comprehensive annual report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) contains the overview-reports that were made by the heads of the following Swiss energy research programmes for the year 1999: Efficient use of energy in buildings and hot-water systems, solar architecture, electricity, ambient heat and heat-pumps, solar energy, photovoltaics, biomass, geothermal energy, small hydropower, wind energy, solar chemistry and hydrogen, combustion technologies, heat storage, nuclear energy and nuclear safety, nuclear fusion, fuel cells, accumulators and traffic. In the following, just a selection of the large number of topics covered are mentioned. Under the topic of efficient energy use in buildings, an environmental optimisation tool and an eco-inventory are mentioned and work done on the use of grass-fibres for insulation is noted along with new developments in highly efficient insulation systems, refurbishment of windows, thermo-active building components, as well as ventilation and heating systems. The efficient use of energy in hot-water preparation is discussed in a further report. In the solar architecture area, the validation of simulation programs and the trial of refurbishment concepts making indirect use of solar energy for heating, lighting and power generation are covered. Electrical topics include distribution and islanding, flywheel energy storage, high-temperature superconductors, power consumption of personal computers and household electronics, drives and compressors as well as saving energy in railway coaches. In the ambient heat and heat-pump area, projects on the modelling of heat probes are noted, as are those concerning intermediate injection, small ammonia heat-pumps, optimisation of combined heat and power plants, low-temperature heating, commercial cooling and disposal of used refrigerants. In the solar energy area, further work on software aids for the calculation of solar gain and developments in coatings for solar collectors are

  1. Entre la ideología y la institución: El establecimiento de idiomas extranjeros modernos en la educación superior en una comparación entre Prusia y Zurich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Tröhler

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo examina los diferentes tratamientos de la enseñanza de idiomas extranjeros modernos en Prusia y Zurich. Al plantear la comparación, procedí contextualmente de tres maneras. Primero, examino la significación cuantitativa de la enseñanza de idiomas extranjeros modernos con respecto a otros temas de escuela en los diversos tipos de Gimnasios o Institutos. En segundo lugar, fijo los progresos de los tipos de Institutos y de sus planes de estudios en lo referente a elementos formales de organización futura de la escuela, tales como administración o control. Y tercero, examino esta organización total de la escuela en el contexto de convicciones culturales fundamentales en los dos territorios. Más allá de las afinidades transnacionales, la contextualización de la organización total dentro de convicciones culturales revela las diferencias fundamentales que llegan a ser visibles justo cuando nos referimos a idiomas extranjeros modernos

  2. Optimisation of the energy-piles of the Midfield Dock at Zurich airport; Mesures et optimisation de l'installation avec pieux energetiques du Dock Midfield de l'aeroport de Zuerich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahud, D. [Scuola Universitaria Professionale della Svizzera Italiana (SUPSI), Istituto di Sostenibilita Applicata all' Ambiente Costruito (ISAAC), Dipartimento Ambiente, Costruzioni e Design DACD, Trevano-Canobbio (Switzerland); Hubbuch, M. [Hochschule Waedenswil (HSW), Abteilung Facility Management, Waedenswil (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    This comprehensive report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of measurements made on the energy-pile system of the Midfield Dock at Zurich airport. The measurements began in October 2004 and lasted for a period of two years. The system's heat balance, and, in particular, the annual heating and cooling demands are reported as being close to the design values. The report presents a description of the energy-pile and heat pump installations and discusses their performance. The results of measurements made are presented in graphical form. Ground-temperature profiles are looked at and the results of a simulation of thermal performance are discussed. The economical performance of the system is reported as being excellent. The cost of the thermal energy delivered (heating and cooling) is quoted at 0.06 CHF/kWh as compared with 0.08 CHF/kWh for a conventional solution. This means that the additional investment in the energy-pile system is paid back in about 8 years.

  3. Requirements for Clinical Trials with Gene Therapy and Transplant Products in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This chapter aims to describe and summarize the regulation of gene and cell therapy products in Switzerland and its legal basis. Product types are briefly described, as are Swiss-specific terminologies such as the term "transplant product," which means products manufactured from cells, tissues, or even whole organs. Although some parts of this chapter may show a guideline character, they are not legally binding, but represent the current thinking of Swissmedic, the Swiss Agency for Therapeutic Products. As so far the experience with marketing approval of gene therapy and cell therapy products in Switzerland is limited, this chapter focuses on the regulation of clinical trials conducted with these products. Quality, nonclinical, and clinical aspects are summarized separately for gene therapy products and transplant products.

  4. The Impact of Smoking Bans on Smoking and Consumer Behavior: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Stefan; Marti, Joachim; Maclean, Johanna Catherine

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we exploit the progressive implementation of smoking bans in public venues at the state level in Switzerland to evaluate both the direct effects on smoking and the potential unintended consequences of these legislations on consumer behaviors as measured by visiting restaurants/bars and discos ('going out'). Our results indicate that public venue smoking bans in Switzerland reduce smoking rates, but the findings do not emerge until 1 year following the ban. This pattern of results is consistent with delays in ban enforcement on the part of business owners, difficulties in changing addictive behaviors such as smoking, and/or learning on the part of smokers. We find evidence that smoking bans influence going-out behavior and there is substantial heterogeneity across venue and consumer characteristics. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Main karst and caves of Switzerland; El karst y las cuevas mas importantes de Suiza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeannin, P. Y.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of the main karst areas and cave systems in Switzerland. The first part encloses descriptions of the main geological units that hold karst and caves in the country and summarizes a brief history of research and protection of the cave environments. The second part presents three regions enclosing large cave systems. Two regions in the Alps enclose some of the largest limestone caves in Europe: Siebenhengste (Siebenhengste cave system with ∼160 km and Barenschacht with 70 km) and Bodmeren-Silberen (Holloch cave system with 200 km and Silberen System with 39 km). These systems are also among the deepest with depths ranging between 880 and 1340 m. The third example is from the Jura Mountains (northern Switzerland). (Author)

  6. Biological treatment of organic wastes in Switzerland; Tratamiento biologico de residuos organicos en Suiza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, C.; Lott-Fischer, J; Gandolla, M.

    1996-12-01

    Disposing of the waste produced by our society is an ever-growing problem. In a small and mountainous country like Switzerland, it has become more and more difficult to find new sites for landfills or other waste treatment plants, not only due to increasing opposition from the public, but also because appropriate sites are simply becoming rarer and rarer. The obligation, not only to treat the waste produced in an environmentally sustainable way, but also to reduce the amounts generated, has in fact been recognised for over a decade now and a general strategy for waste management has been defined. The treatment of the organic part of our wastes obviously plays an important role in this policy. The purpose of this study is to present an overall view the situation of compostable waste in Switzerland. This category of waste may be defined as solid organic waste that has been source-separated and collected separately. (Author)

  7. Beyond Watches and Chocolate-Global Mental Health Elective in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Andres R; Weiss, Andrea; von Blumenthal, Suzanne; Lang, Undine E; Huber, Christian G; Schwartz, Bruce J

    2016-08-01

    Despite increasing interest in global mental health training opportunities, only a few psychiatry residency programs offer global mental health training experiences in developing countries and even fewer programs offer it in other first-world countries. The authors developed a global mental health elective giving US psychiatry residents the opportunity to visit Switzerland to study and experience the mental health care system in this European country. This elective focuses on four major learning objectives: (1) the system of training and curriculum of postgraduate psychiatry education in Switzerland, (2) clinical and organizational aspects of Swiss mental health, (3) administrative aspects of Swiss mental health care delivery, and (4) scholarly activity. This program was uniquely tailored for psychiatry residents. The preliminary experiences with US psychiatry residents show that they value this learning experience, the opportunity to access a different mental health care system, as well as the potential to build international connections with peers.

  8. Organ Donation in Switzerland - An Analysis of Factors Associated with Consent Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, Isabelle; Immer, Franz F.; Jüni, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim Switzerland has a low post mortem organ donation rate. Here we examine variables that are associated with the consent of the deceased’s next of kin (NOK) for organ donation, which is a prerequisite for donation in Switzerland. Methods and Analysis During one year, we registered information from NOK of all deceased patients in Swiss intensive care units, who were approached for consent to organ donation. We collected data on patient demographics, characteristics of NOK, factors related to the request process and to the clinical setting. We analyzed the association of collected predictors with consent rate using univariable logistic regression models; predictors with p-values donation, and respecting personal values and cultural differences, could be of importance for increasing donation rates. Additional measures are needed to address the pronounced differences in consent rates between language regions. PMID:25208215

  9. Nigel Griffiths flies the flag for UK excellence; First visit to Switzerland by a trade minister for three years

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    The DTI minister, Nigel Griffiths, is to make a three-day trade visit to Switzerland. As well as talking with various Swiss ministers and officials he will open the 'Britain at CERN' exhibition (1 page).

  10. Visit of the Honorable Madeleine M. Kunin, Ambassador of the United States to Switzerland and Mr. David Jaberg, Political Officer

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1998-01-01

    Photo 01 : The Honorable M. Kunin, Ambassador of the United States of Switzerland signs the Guest Book with the Director General C.H. Llewellyn Smith. Photo 03 : with M. Michel Della Negra. Photo 07 : with Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesman.

  11. The Wonder of Rain Forest Based on Modern Technology——Masoala Hall of Rain Forest in Zurich Zoo%现代科技营造的热带雨林奇观——苏黎世动物园的马苏可立热带雨林馆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雱

    2011-01-01

    马苏阿拉热带雨林馆是一项大胆创意的原始森林和濒危动物保护的景观项目,是苏黎世动物园和它在拥有着丰富的热带雨林资源但正受到各种威胁的马达加斯加岛自然保护项目之间的直接联系.这个项目的理念是为了从心灵深处激发公众对自然保护的敏感性,让更多人有直观的保护濒危动植物的切身感受和理念,从而也会更直接地参与到切实的贡献上.各种先进技术结合而成的技术系统营造并维系着这一马达加斯加野生热带雨林的仿真环境,并演示了动(植)物同展示和经营的一种全新模式.%Masoala Hall of Rain Forest is a bold and creative landscape project which aims at the protection of rain forests and endangered animals. It represents a direct link between the Zurich Zoo and its nature conservation project on the island of Madagascar exposed to all kinds of dangers. The concept of this project is to stimulate the public's sensitivity to nature conservation, as such to make more people have an intuitive feeling and idea of immediate protection of endangered species, so that they will be more directly involved on a practical contribution. A technical system which combines a few advanced technologies builds and sustains the simulation of wild tropical rainforest environment of Madagascar in Africa, which demonstrates a brand-new mode of exhibition and operation of zoo and botanical garden.

  12. Wind turbines in Switzerland - Bat mortality; Eoliennes en Suisse - Mortalite de chauves-souris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leuzinger, Y.; Lugon, A.; Bontadina, F.

    2008-03-15

    There are growing concerns about possible negative impact of wind turbines on bats. In this study we evaluated the occurrence of bat mortality caused by wind turbines in Switzerland. From about 20 existing wind turbines in year 2007 we selected five medium to large sized turbines in two hilly regions of Switzerland. Between June and October we searched 10 times in regular intervals for carcasses on the ground (total 50 controls) in a circle of up to 40 m distance to the tower. We measured detectability and bait removal rates by experiments at every site (using 12 dummy bats and 10 dead mice per site, respectively). Two bat carcasses were found at two sites, one of the migrating species N. leisleri in August, another in September, belonging to the non-migrating species P. pipistrellus. The detectability was 74 {+-} 13% (mean {+-} standard deviation). The removal rate was 72 {+-} 25% in the first 2-3 days and an average of 91% in the control intervals of 15 days. Estimates of seasonal bat mortality, corrected for season, detectability and removal rate, revealed an average of 8.2 (range 4.9 - 11.4) dead bats per turbine and season. This study demonstrates the occurrence of bat mortality caused by wind turbines in Switzerland. However, the estimated mortality per season remains in international comparisons small to medium at the studied sites. The mortality of individuals of endangered and protected species is a serious issue, but most important, the long-term effect on populations is difficult to assess. In the case of the investigated wind turbines the negative impact on bats does not generally preclude the development of wind energy sites in Switzerland. We recommend avoiding sites in and near woodlands. The abundance of local and migratory bats at planned sites should be evaluated, obligatory in the case of larger wind parks and at exposed sites (ridge tops, mountain passes, river valleys), in order to consider adequately bat conservation. (author)

  13. Economic comparison of the monitoring programmes for bluetongue vectors in Austria and Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinior, B; Brugger, K; Köfer, J; Schwermer, H; Stockreiter, S; Loitsch, A; Rubel, F

    2015-05-02

    With the bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) outbreak in 2006, vector monitoring programmes (according to EU regulation 1266/2007) were implemented by European countries to obtain information on the spatial distribution of vectors and the vector-free period. This study investigates the vector monitoring programmes in Austria and Switzerland by performing a retrospective cost analysis for the period 2006-2010. Two types of costs were distinguished: costs financed directly via the national bluetongue programmes and costs contributed in-kind by the responsible institutions and agricultural holdings. The total net costs of the monitoring programme in Austria amounted to €1,415,000, whereby in Switzerland the costs were valued at €94,000. Both countries followed the legislation complying with requirements, but differed in regard to sampling frequency, number of trap sites and sampling strategy. Furthermore, the surface area of Austria is twice the area of Switzerland although the number of ruminants is almost the same in both countries. Thus, for comparison, the costs were normalised with regard to the sampling frequency and the number of trap sites. Resulting costs per trap sample comprised €164 for Austria and €48 for Switzerland. In both countries, around 50 per cent of the total costs can be attributed to payments in-kind. The benefit of this study is twofold: first, veterinary authorities may use the results to improve the economic efficiency of future vector monitoring programmes. Second, the analysis of the payment in-kind contribution is of great importance to public authorities as it makes the available resources visible and demonstrates how they have been used.

  14. UC Riverside physicists contribute to state-of-the-art detector installed in Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    PMUC Riverside scientists led by Gail Hanson, a distinguished professor of physics, are part of a collaboration of approximately 2300 international physicists who announced Dec. 19 that the world 's largest silicon tracking detector at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, had been successfully installed (see also ). Called the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) Silicon Strip Tracking Detector, the six-ton instrument has a total surface area of 205 square meters, about the same as a singles tennis court.

  15. UC Riverside physicists contribute to state-of-the-art detector installed in Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    UC Riverside scientists led by Gail Hanson, a distinguished professor of physics, are part of a collaboration of approximately 2300 international physicists who announced Dec. 19 that the world's largest silicon tracking detector at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, had been successfully installed (see also ). Called the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) Silicon Strip Tracking Detector, the six-ton instrument has a total surface area of 205 square meters, about the same as a singles tennis court.

  16. Substitution between Working Hours and Employment: An Empirical Analysis for Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Marti

    2000-01-01

    Due to high unemployment rates since the mid 70s, there is a controversial political debate in Europe on the effects of substituting employment for working hours. Does a shorter working week reduce unemployment rates? Whereas this question has been a point of discussion in many Western European countries since the mid 80s, it only became relevant in Switzerland when unemployment started to increase in the 90s. This study investigates the substitution question in a static and a dynamic framewo...

  17. Profiles of international archives: Les archives Jean Piaget, University of Geneva, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burman, Jeremy Trevelyan

    2013-05-01

    This research report provides a look behind closed doors at the Jean Piaget Archives in Geneva, Switzerland. It situates the potential visitor, contextualizes the Archives in its own history, and then describes what scholars can expect to find. New details about Piaget's views on Equal Rights and Equal Pay are also provided, including a look at how they affected the women who worked his factory (esp. Bärbel Inhelder). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Cultures and Strategies in the Regulation of Nanotechnology in Germany, Austria, Switzerland and the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In: NanoEthics 8 (2): 121-140; SpringerThis interdisciplinary, social scientific analysis of the regulatory discourse on nanotechnology in the three German-speaking countries of Germany, Austria and Switzerland and in the EU between 2000 and 2013 has shown three distinct phases, characterised by shifts in the configuration of actors and in the thematic scope from nanotechnology to nano-materials. Compared to modes of governance based on traditional statutory law, modes of governance based on ...

  19. Linx individual B132 from north-eastern Switzerland sighted in Trentino (northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brugnoli A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A subadult lynx was caught in February 2008 in the Swiss National Park, fitted with a Gps-Gsm radio-collar and later genetically identified as B132 - i.e., a male born in 2006 in North-Eastern Switzerland -. B132 is at present located in the western Trentino region, more than 200 km away from his mother's home range. This is the furthest dispersal ever documented outside of Scandinavia for a Eurasian lynx.

  20. Sun protective behaviour and sunburn prevalence in primary and secondary schoolchildren in western Switzerland.

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Although solar overexposure during childhood and adolescence increases the risk of melanoma, determinants of sunburn and sun protective behaviours of Swiss children have scarcely been explored. We investigated sunburn occurrence and sun protective behaviours of schoolchildren in western Switzerland, the region with the highest incidence of melanoma in Europe. Self-reported questionnaires were administered during regular classes to pupils in 5th (primary school, n = 431), 8th and 11th grade...

  1. CPAFFC Vice President Su Guang Leads Delegation to Austria, Switzerland and Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>ACPAFFC delegation led by its vice president Su Guangpaid a goodwill visit to Austria, Switzerland and Germany from August 13 to 22, 2003 at the invitation of the Austrian Association for Promotion of Friendship and Cultural Relations with China (AAPFCRC), the Swiss- Chinese Association and the Association of German-Chinese Friendship Stuttgart.In Austria, Hans Ager, president of the Federal Council and board member of the AAPFCRC,

  2. Resurgence of HIV infection among men who have sex with men in Switzerland: mathematical modelling study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ard van Sighem

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New HIV infections in men who have sex with men (MSM have increased in Switzerland since 2000 despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART. The objectives of this mathematical modelling study were: to describe the dynamics of the HIV epidemic in MSM in Switzerland using national data; to explore the effects of hypothetical prevention scenarios; and to conduct a multivariate sensitivity analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The model describes HIV transmission, progression and the effects of cART using differential equations. The model was fitted to Swiss HIV and AIDS surveillance data and twelve unknown parameters were estimated. Predicted numbers of diagnosed HIV infections and AIDS cases fitted the observed data well. By the end of 2010, an estimated 13.5% (95% CI 12.5, 14.6% of all HIV-infected MSM were undiagnosed and accounted for 81.8% (95% CI 81.1, 82.4% of new HIV infections. The transmission rate was at its lowest from 1995-1999, with a nadir of 46 incident HIV infections in 1999, but increased from 2000. The estimated number of new infections continued to increase to more than 250 in 2010, although the reproduction number was still below the epidemic threshold. Prevention scenarios included temporary reductions in risk behaviour, annual test and treat, and reduction in risk behaviour to levels observed earlier in the epidemic. These led to predicted reductions in new infections from 2 to 26% by 2020. Parameters related to disease progression and relative infectiousness at different HIV stages had the greatest influence on estimates of the net transmission rate. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The model outputs suggest that the increase in HIV transmission amongst MSM in Switzerland is the result of continuing risky sexual behaviour, particularly by those unaware of their infection status. Long term reductions in the incidence of HIV infection in MSM in Switzerland will require increased and sustained uptake of effective

  3. Incorporation monitoring with triage measurements in Switzerland; Inkorporationsueberwachung mit Triagemessungen in der Schweiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmiger, Raphael [Bundesamt fuer Gesundheit BAG, Liebefeld (Switzerland). Abteilung Strahlenschutz

    2017-08-01

    The actual valid concept of incorporation monitoring in Switzerland was implemented in 1999 with the regulation on personal dosimetry based on the recommendations of an expert group for dosimetry of the Helvetian commission for radiation protection (KSR). IN the sense of an uncomplicated and practical solution for the respective companies it is a two-step monitoring using two different measuring methods: a simplified triage measurement performed by the company and the incorporation measurement by an authorized dosimetry station.

  4. Analysis, results and conclusion of magnetotelluric data acquired in northern Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neeraj; Samrock, Friedemann; Grayver, Alexander; Saar, Martin O.

    2017-04-01

    In early 2016, a magnetotelluric (MT) survey of the Aargau region of northern Switzerland was performed in order to understand the potential of the magnetotelluric method to characterise the electrical resistivity properties of the subsurface in Switzerland, and more widely, in areas with high amounts of cultural electromagnetic (EM) noise. Subsurface electrical resisitivity properties are interesting as they can help identify underground aquifers or geothermal resources and possibly provide insight into the large-scale movement of fluid. The north of Switzerland is a challenging and representative environment, with significant EM infrastructure, including powerlines and numerous other sources of noise related to human activity and use of industrial equipment. Here, we present the results of the survey together with detailed analysis of the issues encountered and challenges faced when doing this survey. In particular, we concentrate on data quality issues in the raw time series, the impact of using a remote reference over single site processing and the distribution of transfer functions. The final set of transfer functions for the survey, which includes twelve successful sites, is shown to suffer from noise issues in certain frequency ranges. A 1-D inversion of SSQ averaged transfer functions and comparison to existing borehole data demonstrates that geologic data is captured in the MT data recorded in northern Switzerland. Further, 2-D forward modelling supports the idea that good geologic information exists in the data despite the noise issues, which for now, impede a robust multi-dimensional inversion. Finally, suggestions for future work and methods to improve the quality of data when surveying in high EM noise environments are offered with a view to being able to reliably perform MT surveys closer to urban environments.

  5. Utopia Switzerland (2) - A Country Without CO{sub 2} Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streit, Marco [Aare-Tessin Ltd for Electricity, Bahnhofquai 12, 4601 Olten (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    Global warming and climate change are major themes in the today's energy policy discussion. Awarding Al Gore and the IPCC with the Nobel price in 2007 shows the importance of the climate change for the whole world. That we are running into climatic problems is already known since several decades and possibilities to solve the CO{sub 2} emissions were proposed and discussed since years, but a reduction in the CO{sub 2} emissions is not detectable. This might be due to the fact, that the major part of CO{sub 2} production (traffic and heating) is not consequently touched. It seems to be easier to discuss about renewable energies in the electricity market than in other areas. And the consequences of discussing stepping out of nuclear all over the world, has enforced the problem. Although the renaissance of nuclear has started and the known positive impact to the climate from this energy source, it is not forced to be the solution for the biggest problem of the near future. There are only a few countries worldwide which produce electricity without or with only small amounts of CO{sub 2} emissions like Norway or Switzerland. Those countries could be demonstration countries to show the possibilities for reducing and avoiding CO{sub 2} emissions. Would it be possible to replace all fossil energy sources during a reasonable period of time by using nuclear energy and hydrogen as an energy storage system? Is this scenario technical feasible and of economic interest for a small, developed country like Switzerland? If yes, Switzerland might be a good candidate to establish the first CO{sub 2}-free industrial developed state in the world. Looking much more ahead this study will discuss a simple but might be effective scenario for Switzerland. The study is based on a paper presented at IYNC 2006 and will update the used data as well as going in more details. (authors)

  6. The bus crash in Sierre (Switzerland. From trauma to reprocessing: The role of schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik de Soir

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, Erik de Soir describes his involvement in the organised response to a coach crash occurred in Sierre, Switzerland, in which twenty-two Belgian and Dutch schoolchildren died, along with six adults. The author highlights the needs of the various actors, the different psychological aspects to be considered, and the complexity of the situation. He also notes the problems encountered in the management of the situation, with the goal of learning important technical lessons for the future.

  7. Seroprevalence of Bartonella henselae infection and correlation with disease status in cats in Switzerland.

    OpenAIRE

    Glaus, Toni M; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Greene, C; Glaus, B; Wolfensberger, C; Lutz, Hans

    1997-01-01

    The prevalence of infection with Bartonella henselae was investigated in cats from different areas of Switzerland. Serum samples of 728 cats were examined for antibodies to B. henselae by immunofluorescent antibody testing, and the results were analyzed with a view to a possible correlation between a positive titer and signalment, clinical signs, infection with feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), feline coronavirus (FCoV), or feline spumavirus (FeSFV), and the l...

  8. BibliOpass – An Open Library Network in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Rivier

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The idea underlying BibliOpass is very simple: extending borrowers' rights to all libraries participating in the network. As in other countries, users of Swiss libraries are more and more mobile, especially the categories of students, teachers or researchers. Universities and technology institute have become more specialized and less general, aiming to improve their reputation at an international level. Students often need to visit different universities during their studies. BibliOpass supports this trend regarding library use in relation to this new mobility. Strangely, similar projects in other countries are not so frequent: Sconul Research Extra in Great Britain which groups together more than 150 higher education institutions is the best example. Basically, BibliOpass makes it simpler for a borrower to use other libraries. More than 600 libraries throughout the country are at present involved in the BibliOpass network. A patron registered as a ‘normal user’ in his or her main library (called ‘Home library’ may borrow items in any other library (called ‘Guest library’ without needing to obtain a new user card or paying extra fees. The user must observe the rules of the guest library (for example number of items and duration of loan. Items must be returned to their originating library for management reasons. BibliOpass is a new, complementary service to Inter Library Loan (ILL, the traditional way to obtain books from other libraries.

  9. Development of Clinical Pharmacy in Switzerland: Involvement of Community Pharmacists in Care for Older Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersberger, Kurt E; Messerli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    The role of the community pharmacist in primary care has been undergoing change in Switzerland in parallel to international developments: it has become more clinically and patient oriented. Special services of community pharmacists to older patients taking long-term or multiple medications, discharged from hospitals or experiencing cognitive impairment or disability have been developed. These services require more clinical knowledge and skills from community pharmacists and are based on, for example, 'simple or intermediate medication reviews' focused primarily to improve medication adherence and rational drug use by a patient. Reflecting the new role of community pharmacies, this article describes the current services provided by community pharmacies in Switzerland, e.g., 'polymedication check', 'weekly pill organizer', and 'services for chronic patients', as well as new Swiss educational and reimbursement systems supporting development of these services. In the international context, involvement of community pharmacists in patient-oriented care is growing. This review summarizes positive and negative experiences from implementation of community pharmacy services in Switzerland and provides examples for the development of such services in other countries.

  10. Complementing hydropower with PV and wind: optimal energy mix in a fully renewable Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujardin, Jérôme; Kahl, Annelen; Kruyt, Bert; Lehning, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Like several other countries, Switzerland plans to phase out its nuclear power production and will replace most or all of it by renewables. Switzerland has the chance to benefit from a large hydropower potential and has already exploited almost all of it. Currently about 60% of the Swiss electricity consumption is covered by hydropower, which will eventually leave a gap of about 40% to the other renewables mainly composed of photovoltaics (PV) and wind. With its high flexibility, storage hydropower will play a major role in the future energy mix, providing valuable power and energy balance. Our work focuses on the interplay between PV, wind and storage hydropower, to analyze the dynamics of this complex system and to identify the best PV-wind mixing ratio. Given the current electricity consumption and the currently installed pumping capacity of the storage hydropower plants, it appears that the Swiss hydropower system can completely alleviate the intermittency of PV and wind. However, some seasonal mismatch between production and demand will remain, but we show that oversizing the production from PV and wind or enlarging the reservoir capacity can be a solution to keep it to an acceptable level or even eliminate it. We found that PV, wind and hydropower performs the best together when the share of PV in the solar - wind mix is between 20 and 60%. These findings are quantitatively specific for Switzerland but qualitatively transferable to similar mountainous environments with abundant hydropower resources.

  11. Modeling indoor air pollution of outdoor origin in homes of SAPALDIA subjects in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Reto; Schindler, Christian; Eeftens, Marloes; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Ducret-Stich, Regina E; Ineichen, Alex; Davey, Mark; Phuleria, Harish C; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Künzli, Nino

    2015-09-01

    Given the shrinking spatial contrasts in outdoor air pollution in Switzerland and the trends toward tightly insulated buildings, the Swiss Cohort Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults (SAPALDIA) needs to understand to what extent outdoor air pollution remains a determinant for residential indoor exposure. The objectives of this paper are to identify determining factors for indoor air pollution concentrations of particulate matter (PM), ultrafine particles in the size range from 15 to 300nm, black smoke measured as light absorbance of PM (PMabsorbance) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and to develop predictive indoor models for SAPALDIA. Multivariable regression models were developed based on indoor and outdoor measurements among homes of selected SAPALDIA participants in three urban (Basel, Geneva, Lugano) and one rural region (Wald ZH) in Switzerland, various home characteristics and reported indoor sources such as cooking. Outdoor levels of air pollutants were important predictors for indoor air pollutants, except for the coarse particle fraction. The fractions of outdoor concentrations infiltrating indoors were between 30% and 66%, the highest one was observed for PMabsorbance. A modifying effect of open windows was found for NO2 and the ultrafine particle number concentration. Cooking was associated with increased particle and NO2 levels. This study shows that outdoor air pollution remains an important determinant of residential indoor air pollution in Switzerland.

  12. Self-burning - a rare suicide method in Switzerland and other industrialised nations - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, S; Reisch, T; Bartsch, Ch

    2014-12-01

    News items reporting self-immolation by Tibetans have been on the increase in recent years. After examining the corpse of a Swiss man who had committed suicide by deliberate self-burning, we wondered how often this occurs in Switzerland. The Federal Statistics Office (FSO) does not register self-burning specifically so no official national data on this form of suicide are available. However, we had access to the data from a Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) project Suicides in Switzerland between 2000 and 2010, which collected information on all (4885) cases of suicide investigated by the various institutes of forensic medicine. From this data pool we extracted 50 cases (1.02%) of suicide by self-burning, in order to determine the details and to identify the possible reasons for choosing this method. To look at our results in the light of studies from other countries, we searched the literature for studies that had also retrospectively examined suicide by self-immolation based on forensic records. Our results showed that, on the whole, personal aspects of self-burning in Switzerland do not differ from those in other industrialised nations. Some data, including religious and sociocultural background, were unfortunately missing - not only from our study but also from the similar ones. In our opinion, the most important prevention strategy is to make healthcare professionals more aware of this rare method of suicide.

  13. Seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus in domestic pigs and wild boars in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burri, C; Vial, F; Ryser-Degiorgis, M-P; Schwermer, H; Darling, K; Reist, M; Wu, N; Beerli, O; Schöning, J; Cavassini, M; Waldvogel, A

    2014-12-01

    Hepatitis E is considered an emerging human viral disease in industrialized countries. Studies from Switzerland report a human seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) of 2.6-21%, a range lower than in adjacent European countries. The aim of this study was to determine whether HEV seroprevalence in domestic pigs and wild boars is also lower in Switzerland and whether it is increasing and thus indicating that this zoonotic viral infection is emerging. Serum samples collected from 2,001 pigs in 2006 and 2011 and from 303 wild boars from 2008 to 2012 were analysed by ELISA for the presence of HEV-specific antibodies. Overall HEV seroprevalence was 58.1% in domestic pigs and 12.5% in wild boars. Prevalence in domestic pigs was significantly higher in 2006 than in 2011. In conclusion, HEV seroprevalence in domestic pigs and wild boars in Switzerland is comparable with the seroprevalence in other countries and not increasing. Therefore, prevalence of HEV in humans must be related to other factors than prevalence in pigs or wild boars.

  14. An Investigation of Factors Motivating Student’s Study at The International Hotel Management Institute Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengky Efendy

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, in this era of globalisation the hospitality industry needs well educated employees. Therefore the hotel school has to provide human resources to fit any position in the hospitality industry. The author chose the International Hotel Management Institute (IMI-Switzerland for research too specifically investigates factors affecting students’ motivations to study. The author’s experience was that many students of hospitality are not very motivated to study hotel management. Students get bored while having lectures, are not motivated to go to the library to research, and yet to be educated is the main reasons that students come to IMI to study hospitality. The author has set several objectives in chapter two to ensure the flow of this research. The literature review will be covered in motivating of students study for hotel school education.Literature review which is critically analysed by the author was chosen by the author according the field of study. The sample chosen for this research was motivation students study from first, second, third and fourth year students in IMI- Switzerland Several motivation of this research was the reference book of this field study, and the length of time for making this dissertation. After the primary data were collected and analysed, it was discovered that most of all students in IMI-Switzerland is to have a better chance of getting a job after finishing the course. 

  15. In Their Own Words: The Health and Sexuality of Immigrant Women with Infibulation Living in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Villani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Female genital mutilation (FGM is a significant public health problem. It is estimated that around 14,700 women affected by FGM live in Switzerland, primarily among women with a history of migration. Our qualitative research investigated the sexual health of immigrant women living with FGM in Switzerland, describing their own perception of health, reproductive life and sexuality. We conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with a group of eight immigrant women of sub-Saharan origin living in Switzerland with Type III FGM (infibulation. Seven of the women were from Somalia and one was from the Ivory Coast. All of the Somali women were mothers and married (two separated, and the Ivorian woman was a single mother. The women in our study reported a low level of sexual satisfaction and reproductive health. They affirmed their desire to improve, or at least change, their condition. Although they rarely talk with their husbands about sexual subject matter, they would like to include them more and improve dialogue. Specific socio-sexual management is recommended when caring for immigrant women living with FGM in order to respond to their specific health care needs. Multidisciplinary approaches may be able to offer more comprehensive health care, including facilitated communication to improve dialogue between women and health care professionals, and eventually between women and their husbands in discussing sexual subject matter.

  16. Health problems among detainees in Switzerland: a study using the ICPC-2 classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Dominique

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the health status of prisoners in Switzerland. The aim of this study was to provide a detailed description of the health problems presented by detainees in Switzerland's largest remand prison. Methods In this retrospective cross-sectional study we reviewed the health records of all detainees leaving Switzerland's largest remand prison in 2007. The health problems were coded using the International Classification for Primary Care (ICPC-2. Analyses were descriptive, stratified by gender. Results A total of 2195 health records were reviewed. Mean age was 29.5 years (SD 9.5; 95% were male; 87.8% were migrants. Mean length of stay was 80 days (SD 160. Illicit drug use (40.2% and mental health problems (32.6% were frequent, but most of these detainees (57.6% had more generic primary care problems, such as skin (27.0%, infectious diseases (23.5%, musculoskeletal (19.2%, injury related (18.3%, digestive (15.0% or respiratory problems (14.0%. Furthermore, 7.9% reported exposure to violence during arrest by the police. Conclusion Morbidity is high in this young, predominantly male population of detainees, in particular in relation to substance abuse. Other health problems more commonly seen in general practice are also frequent. These findings support the further development of coordinated primary care and mental health services within detention centers.

  17. Illegal import of bushmeat and other meat products into Switzerland on commercial passenger flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, H; Dürr, S; Hauser, R; Wood, K; Tenger, B; Lörtscher, M; Schüpbach-Regula, G

    2013-12-01

    Illegal imports of meat can present substantial risks to public and animal health. Several European countries have reported considerable quantities of meat imported on commercial passenger flights. The objective of this study was to estimate the quantity of meat illegally imported into Switzerland, with a separate estimation for bushmeat. Data were obtained by participation in intervention exercises at Swiss international airports and by analysing data on seizures during the four-year period 2008 to 2011. The study revealed that a wide array of animal species was imported into Switzerland. From the database, the average annual weight of meat seized during the period analysed was 5.5 tonnes, of which 1.4% was bushmeat. However, in a stochastic model the total annual inflow of illegal meat imports was estimated at 1,013 tonnes (95% CI 226 to 4,192) for meat and 8.6 tonnes (95% CI 0.8 to 68.8) for bushmeat. Thus, even for a small European country such as Switzerland the quantities of illegally imported meat and meat products are substantial and the consequences for public and animal health could be high. To reduce the risk, it is essential that surveillance at European airports is harmonised and that passenger information campaigns clarify the consequences of the illegal import of meat, particularly bushmeat.

  18. Vitamin D status among children and adolescents on anticonvulsant drugs in southern Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramelli, Vera; Ramelli, Gian Paolo; Lava, Sebastiano A G; Siegenthaler, Giordano M; Cantù, Marco; Bianchetti, Mario G; Ceschi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    It is recognised that vitamin D status is often inadequate (anticonvulsant drugs induce the enzymes responsible for its metabolism. The purpose of the present study was to address vitamin D status among children and adolescents treated with anticonvulsant drugs and control subjects who reside in southern Switzerland, a high solar radiation region. Between January and May 2013, total serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was assessed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in 58 children and adolescents with epilepsy and 29 controls residing in southern Switzerland. Dark-skinned individuals, females wearing dress styles covering practically the whole body and subjects with body mass index ≥85th percentile for age and sex were excluded. Concentration of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was similar in epilepsy patients (48 [37-62] nmol/l; median and interquartile range) and controls (53 [47-64] nmol/l). An inadequate serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration was common both among patients (55%) and control subjects (34%). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was significantly lower among patients treated with anticonvulsant drugs that induce the metabolism of vitamin D (30 [21-51] nmol/l) than among the remaining patients (51 [40-65] nmol/l) and controls. The present study indicates a relevant tendency towards inadequate vitamin D status among children with and without anticonvulsant drug management who reside in southern Switzerland. This tendency is more prominent in patients treated with anticonvulsant drugs that induce the metabolism of 25-hydroxyvitamin D.

  19. Portuguese migrants in Switzerland: healthcare and health status compared to Portuguese residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Luís; Azevedo, Ana; Barros, Henrique; Paccaud, Fred; Marques-Vidal, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Most migrant studies have compared health characteristics between migrants and nationals of the host country. We aimed at comparing health characteristics of migrants with nationals from their home country. Portuguese national health survey (2005-6; 30,173 participants aged 18-75 years) and four national health surveys conducted in Switzerland (2002, 2004, 2007 and 2011, totalling 1,170 Portuguese migrants of the same age range). Self-reported data on length of stay, cardiovascular risk factors, healthcare use and health status were collected. Resident Portuguese were significantly older and more educated than migrants. Resident Portuguese had a higher mean BMI and prevalence of obesity than migrants. Resident Portuguese also reported more frequently being hypertensive and having their blood pressure screened within the last year. On the contrary, migrant Portuguese were more frequently smokers, had a medical visit in the previous year more frequently and self-rated their health higher than resident Portuguese. After adjustment for age, gender, marital status and education, migrants had a higher likelihood of smoking, of having a medical visit the previous year, and of self-rating their current health as good or very good than resident Portuguese. Compared to Portuguese residents, cholesterol screening in the previous year was more common only among migrants living in Switzerland for more than 17 years. Portuguese migrants in Switzerland do not differ substantially from resident Portuguese regarding most cardiovascular risk factors. Migrants consider themselves healthier than Portuguese residents and more often had a recent medical visit.

  20. Ozone air pollution and foliar injury development on native plants of Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, Kristopher; Skelly, John M.; Schaub, Marcus; Kraeuchi, Norbert; Hug, Christian; Landolt, Werner; Bleuler, Peter

    2003-09-01

    Visible ozone-induced foliar injury on native forest species of Switzerland was identified and confirmed under ambient OTC-conditions and related to the current European AOT40 standard. - The objectives of this study were to examine the foliar sensitivity to ozone exposure of 12 tree, shrub, and herbaceous species native to southern Switzerland and determine the seasonal cumulative ozone exposures required to induce visible foliar injury. The study was conducted from the beginning of May through the end of August during 2000 and 2001 using an open-top chamber research facility located within the Lattecaldo Cantonal Forest Nursery in Canton Ticino, southern Switzerland (600 m asl). Plants were examined daily and dates of initial foliar injury were recorded in order to determine the cumulative AOT40 ppb h ozone exposure required to cause visible foliar injury. Plant responses to ozone varied significantly among species; 11 species exhibited visible symptoms typical of exposures to ambient ozone. The symptomatic species (from most to least sensitive) were Populus nigra, Viburnum lantana, Salix alba, Crataegus monogyna, Viburnum opulus, Tilia platyphyllos, Cornus alba, Prunus avium, Fraxinus excelsior, Ribes alpinum, and Tilia cordata; Clematis spp. did not show foliar symptoms. Of the 11 symptomatic species, five showed initial injury below the critical level AOT40 10 ppmh O{sub 3} in the 2001 season.

  1. [Switzerland as a "Veterinary Area": The development of federal veterinary policy, A.D. 941 - 1886.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häsler, S

    2010-01-01

    The earliest recorded animal disease notification on the territory of contemporary Switzerland is found in the chronicles of the monastery of St. Gall and dates back to A.D. 941. Disease control in Switzerland began in medieval towns, with the regulation of livestock and the meat trade. Later, there were attempts to keep entire small areas such as valleys free of animal epidemics. Because livestock tended to be transported in one direction only - away from rural areas for sale in towns and for export - disease in animal-raising areas usually did not spread very far. Albrecht von Haller's epidemiological research from 1773 established the fundamentals of effective disease control. The cantons introduced extensive measures for protecting their territories on the basis of animal transport controls. With the development of the railways and the international livestock trade around 1850, the risk of animal epidemics increased considerably, leading to the need for measures on national and international levels. The first federal law on animal disease control was introduced in Switzerland in 1872, thus creating a nation-wide "veterinary area". In 1886 the law was amended to include mandatory controls of imported livestock and meat by a newly-created border veterinary service.

  2. Elimination of restraints on the propagation of combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems in Switzerland; Beseitigung von Hemmnissen bei der Verbreitung von Waermekraftkopplung (WKK) in der Schweiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieder, S.; Landis, F. [Interface Politikstudien Forschung Beratung, Luzern (Switzerland); Lienhard, A.; Marti Locher, F. [Universitaet Bern, Kompetenzzentrum fuer Public Management (KPM), Bern (Switzerland); Krummenacher, S. [Enerprice Partners AG, Technopark Luzern, Root Laengenbold (Switzerland)

    2009-04-15

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) discusses the results of study initiated by the SFOE that was to investigate the reasons for the low level of proliferation of CHP technology in Switzerland. The two main questions asked - which factors inhibit the use of CHP in particular application areas and which energy-policy measures can remove such obstacles - are discussed. The use of CHP in various areas of application from waste incineration plants through to units used in residential buildings is analysed and commented on. Recommendations on measures that can be taken to enhance the use of CHP are discussed. Three strategy variants available to the public services area are presented and discussed. It is noted that a consensus between players in the technical and political areas is necessary

  3. Assessment of the geothermal energy potential of the 'Canton de Vaud', Switzerland; Evaluation du potentiel geothermique du canton de Vaud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, J. [Jules Wilhelm, Pully (Switzerland); Bianchetti, G. [ALPGEO, Sierre (Switzerland); Vuataz, F.-D. [University of Neuchatel, Neuchatel (Switzerland)

    2003-07-01

    This report presents an assessment of the geothermal energy potential in the provincial state of Vaud in western Switzerland. According to the authors the prospect for the three current main technologies: low-temperature surface water, deep hot water springs and advanced geothermal systems, is good. In about 10 years it would be possible to extract some 3.6x10{sup 6} MJ per year from low-temperature surface water while the energy production from deep hot springs could be near to 2x10{sup 4} MJ. Finally, in the forthcoming 20 years the construction of 3 advanced geothermal power plants ('Deep Heat Mining', i.e. the extraction of deep-rock thermal energy by water circulation) could produce about 30 MW electricity in a cogeneration operation mode. Recommendations are given regarding measures needed at the political level to promote geothermal power plants.

  4. Surveillance and simulation of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie in small ruminants in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zurbriggen Andreas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE emerged in European cattle livestock in 1986 a fundamental question was whether the agent established also in the small ruminants' population. In Switzerland transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs in small ruminants have been monitored since 1990. While in the most recent TSE cases a BSE infection could be excluded, for historical cases techniques to discriminate scrapie from BSE had not been available at the time of diagnosis and thus their status remained unclear. We herein applied state-of-the-art techniques to retrospectively classify these animals and to re-analyze the affected flocks for secondary cases. These results were the basis for models, simulating the course of TSEs over a period of 70 years. The aim was to come to a statistically based overall assessment of the TSE situation in the domestic small ruminant population in Switzerland. Results In sum 16 TSE cases were identified in small ruminants in Switzerland since 1981, of which eight were atypical and six were classical scrapie. In two animals retrospective analysis did not allow any further classification due to the lack of appropriate tissue samples. We found no evidence for an infection with the BSE agent in the cases under investigation. In none of the affected flocks, secondary cases were identified. A Bayesian prevalence calculation resulted in most likely estimates of one case of BSE, five cases of classical scrapie and 21 cases of atypical scrapie per 100'000 small ruminants. According to our models none of the TSEs is considered to cause a broader epidemic in Switzerland. In a closed population, they are rather expected to fade out in the next decades or, in case of a sporadic origin, may remain at a very low level. Conclusions In summary, these data indicate that despite a significant epidemic of BSE in cattle, there is no evidence that BSE established in the small ruminant population in

  5. Modelling economic losses of historic and present-day high-impact winter storms in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, Christoph; Martius, Olivia; Stucki, Peter; Bresch, David; Dierer, Silke; Brönnimann, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Windstorms can cause significant financial damage and they rank among the most hazardous meteorological hazards in Switzerland. Risk associated with windstorms involves the combination of hazardous weather conditions, such as high wind gust speeds, and socio-economic factors, such as the distribution of assets as well as their susceptibilities to damage. A sophisticated risk assessment is important in a wide range of areas and has benefits for e.g. the insurance industry. However, a sophisticated risk assessment needs a large sample of storm events for which high-resolution, quantitative meteorological and/or loss data are available. Latter is typically an aggravating factor. For present-day windstorms in Switzerland, the data basis is generally sufficient to describe the meteorological development and wind forces as well as the associated impacts. In contrast, historic windstorms are usually described by graphical depictions of the event and/or by weather and loss reports. The information on historic weather events is overall sparse and the available historic weather and loss reports mostly do not provide quantitative information. It has primarily been the field of activity of environmental historians to study historic weather extremes and their impacts. Furthermore, the scarce availability of atmospheric datasets reaching back sufficiently in time has so far limited the analysis of historic weather events. The Twentieth Century Reanalysis (20CR) ensemble dataset, a global atmospheric reanalysis currently spanning 1871 to 2012, offers potentially a very valuable resource for the analysis of historic weather events. However, the 2°×2° latitude-longitude grid of the 20CR is too coarse to realistically represent the complex orography of Switzerland, which has considerable ramifications for the representation of smaller-scale features of the surface wind field influenced by the local orography. Using the 20CR as a starting point, this study illustrates a method to

  6. Conrad Gessner-Kongress, Zürich, 6.-9. Juni 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs Leu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available To mark the 500th birthday of Conrad Gessner, the Leonardo da Vinci of Switzerland, an international congress was organized by the University and the Zentralbibliothek Zurich, which attracted many researchers to Zurich. Nearly 50 presentations illuminated work, life and contemporaries of the famous Zurich polymath and naturalist.

  7. Robotics: Science and Systems IV

    OpenAIRE

    Brock, Oliver; Trinkle, Jeff; Ramos, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    The conference Robotics: Science and Systems was held at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich Switzerland, from June 25 to June 28, 2008. More than 280 international researchers attended this single track conference to learn about the most exciting robotics research and most advanced robotic systems. The program committee, led by sixteen area chairs, selected 40 papers out of 163 submissions. The program also included seven invited talks and two early career spotlight pre...

  8. Thermal conductivity: calibration of in-situ measurements (i.e. 'cable-free temperature probe') with laboratory determination as a basis for the geothermal mapping of the Canton of Zurich and the surrounding Swiss Cantons; Thermische Leitfaehigkeit: Eichung von in-situ Messungen (d.h. 'kabellose Temperatursonde') mit Laborbestimmungen als Grundlage fuer die geothermische Kartierung des Kanton ZH und der umliegenden Kantone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaerli, U. [Geologie und Geophysik, Zuerich (Switzerland); Rohner, E.; Signorelli, S.; Wagner, R. [Geowatt AG, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2007-07-01

    The aim of these investigations is to create a first basic data set for geothermal mapping in Kanton Zurich and adjacent regions. These data include undisturbed ground temperatures, thermal conductivities and porosities of rocks as well as heat flow determinations. The temperature profiles in the ground have been logged, to depths up to 300 m in several borehole heat exchangers, in the Canton Zurich and adjacent regions. A new, patented wireless instrument developed by the authors (NIMO-T / Non-wired Immersible Measuring Object for Temperature) was used to perform the measurements. Such measurements are possible in backfilled boreholes with installed double U-tube heat exchangers, not yet connected to the heat pump, filled with water standing since at least 7 days. A total of 33 boreholes have been measured; 24 of them enabled heat flow determinations. The NIMO-T probe (weight 100 g, length 20 cm, diameter 2 cm; with a built-in miniature data logger) sinks though its own weight with about 7 m per minute in one of the water-filled U-tube limbs and records every 25 cm a temperature and pressure (=measuring depth) value. Relative temperature accuracy is {+-} 0.0015 {sup o}K, for depth {+-} 20 cm. After the probe has reached the U-tube bottom it can be easily flushed back to the surface by pumping, where data readout to a laptop computer follows. For terrestrial heat flow determinations the rock thermal conductivities (of the undisturbed, water-saturated, compact rocks at in-situ pressure) would be needed. Laboratory measurements on rock samples (cores, cuttings) can only approximate these conditions. The thermal conductivities and related porosities of cuttings have been compared and calibrated by measurements on cores. The ground temperatures are influenced in the uppermost 20 meters by seasonal surface temperature variations, between 20 and about 100 m depth by climatic warming in the past 200-300 years. Below 100 m the temperature increase with depth is more or

  9. 23.5 kW photovoltaic installation on the Customs House, Kreuzlingen, Switzerland; P+D Projekt 23.5 kWp PV Anlage Zollhof Kreuzlingen - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehni, T.; Stadelmann, G. [Boehni Energie und Umwelt GmbH, Frauenfeld (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) describes the 23.5 kW photovoltaic installation on the Customs House in Kreuzlingen, Switzerland. The objective of the 'Zollhof' photovoltaic solar power plant is to provide the local population with a 'hands-on' solar cell experience, that, according to the authors, should lead to better understanding of renewable energy technology. The commissioning and initial operation of the installation is commented on, as are the above-average production figures of the plant. The power produced is sold by the local utility to its customers as electricity from renewable resources.

  10. Energy Research in Switzerland in 1999; Energieforschung 1999. Ueberblicksberichte/Recherche energetique 1999. Rapports de synthese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-15

    at an international level and work done in Switzerland is looked at. The fuel cells and accumulators report takes a look at current work on natural gas and hydrogen-powered fuel cells with polymer and ceramic electrolytes. Work done on various types of accumulators and super-condensers is mentioned. Traffic topics reported on include lightweight body technologies, efficient drive systems, mobility behaviour, hybrid drive technologies, electric vehicle pricing and various pilot and demonstration projects.

  11. FameLab Switzerland: a CERN PhD student triumphs

    CERN Multimedia

    Alexander Brown

    2013-01-01

    Would you be able to explain your work to a non-specialist in just three minutes? On Friday 24 May, the Swiss national final of FameLab saw six young researchers from CERN attempt just that. FameLab is an international competition in the style of a TV talent show, seeking out the next generation of talent in science communication.   Participants in the Swiss national final of FameLab alongside Deni Subasic, presenter of the event (far left), on Friday 24 May. Having qualified from the Geneva heat held in the Globe in March, the six CERN representatives took to the stage in Moods bar in Zurich. As well as particle physics, from the fundamental building blocks (literally) of the Standard Model to medical applications, the line-up featured immunology, neurology and genetics. Although slideshows are strictly banned from FameLab, other visual props are strongly encouraged. For instance, Piotr Traczyk (CMS) represented the apparent chaos of particle collisions by throwing together two decks of ca...

  12. Airborne and Ground-Based Platforms for Data Collection in Small Vineyards: Examples from the UK and Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David R.; Gómez, Cristina; Fahrentrapp, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    still some limitations which constrain their use, including battery power and flight time, data connectivity, and payload capacity, such platforms nevertheless offer quick, low-cost, easy, and repeatable ways to capture valuable contextual data for small vineyards, complementing other sources of data used in Precision Viticulture (PV) and vineyard management. As these technologies continue to evolve very quickly, and more lightweight sensors become available for the smaller ground and airborne platforms, this will offer even more possibilities for a wider range of information to be acquired to aid in the monitoring, mapping, and management of small vineyards. The paper is illustrated with some examples from the UK and Switzerland.

  13. His Excellency Mr Ali Naci Koru Ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of Turkey to the United Nations Office at Geneva and other international organisations in Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Ali Naci Koru Ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of Turkey to the United Nations Office at Geneva and other international organisations in Switzerland

  14. THE PLACE OF SWITZERLAND IN ROMANIA'S FOREIGN TRADE WITH EFTA DURING 2007-2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAMFIR PAUL BOGDAN

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper it is presented in a synthetic manner the overall evolution of bilateral trade between Romania and Switzerland in the current period of post-accession of our country to EU. Therefore, in order to be successed on this market - to achieve and maintain stable and long-term commercial relations partners, romanian exporters should pay very attention strict implementation of contractual terms, equality rules, conditions and delivery terms and possibly to inform previously on local prices of competing firms. Also it is important to emphasize that the current EU's legal framework regarding trade relations influenced positively the entire climate of bilateral trade between Romanian and Swiss economic agents. At the same time, the bilateral agreements are also applied by Romania in virtue of its quality as member state of EU that automatically adopted and implemented EU legislation, the international treaties and agreements with third countries. Thus, it is noticeable that in post-accession period to the EU, our country in the field of foreign trade with Switzerland applies the legal framework of EU that has as main effect the development of trade conducted between Romanian and Swiss companies. Also, regarding Romania's foreign trade with EFTA states in the current period of post accession to EU it can be noticed a major improvement, due to the three countries of The European Free Trade Association (EFTA except Switzerland is subject to the European Economic Area (EEA Agreement. In this context the elimination of customs duties in trade between our country and EFTA states leads undoubtedly to entry on Romanian market of products with high quality designed to meet the requirements of domestic demand.

  15. Colorectal Cancer Screening in Switzerland: Cross-Sectional Trends (2007-2012 in Socioeconomic Disparities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey A Fedewa

    Full Text Available Despite universal health care coverage, disparities in colorectal cancer (CRC screening by income in Switzerland have been reported. However, it is not known if these disparities have changed over time. This study examines the association between socioeconomic position and CRC screening in Switzerland between 2007 and 2012.Data from the 2007 (n = 5,946 and 2012 (n = 7,224 population-based Swiss Health Interview Survey data (SHIS were used to evaluate the association between monthly household income, education, and employment with CRC screening, defined as endoscopy in the past 10 years or fecal occult blood test (FOBT in the past 2 years. Multivariable Poisson regression was used to estimate prevalence ratios (PR and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI adjusting for demographics, health status, and health utilization.CRC screening increased from 18.9% in 2007 to 22.2% in 2012 (padjusted: = 0.036. During the corresponding time period, endoscopy increased (8.2% vs. 15.0%, padjusted:$6,000 vs. lowest income (≤$2,000 group in 2007 (24.5% vs. 10.5%, PR:1.37, 95%CI: 0.96-1.96 and in 2012 (28.6% vs. 16.0%, PR:1.45, 95%CI: 1.09-1.92; this disparity did not significantly change over time.While CRC screening prevalence in Switzerland increased from 2007 to 2012, CRC screening coverage remains low and disparities in CRC screening by income persisted over time. These findings highlight the need for increased access to CRC screening as well as enhanced awareness of the benefits of CRC screening in the Swiss population, particularly among low-income residents.

  16. Salmonella enterica serotype Virchow associated with human infections in Switzerland: 2004-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adank Luzius

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonellosis is one of the most important foodborne diseases and a major threat to public health. Salmonella serotype Virchow ranks among the top five serovars in Europe. Method A total of 153 strains isolated from different patients from 2004 through 2009 in Switzerland were further characterized by (i assessing phenotypic antibiotic resistance profiles using the disk diffusion method and (ii by genotyping using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE after macrorestriction with XbaI in order to evaluate strain relationship. Results The relative frequency of S. Virchow among other Salmonella serovars varied between 4th to 8th rank. The annual incidence ranged from 0.45/100'000 in 2004 to 0.40/100'000 in 2009. A total of 48 strains (32% were resistant to one to 3 antimicrobials, 54 strains (36% displayed resistance patterns to more than three antibiotics. No trend was identifiable over the years 2004 to 2009. We found a high prevalence (62% of nalidixic acid resistant strains, suggesting an equally high rate of decreased fluoroqionolone susceptibility, whereas intermediate resistance to ciprofloxacin was negligible. Two strains were extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL producers. Analysis of PFGE patterns uncovered a predominant cluster (similarity coefficient above 80% consisting of 104 of the 153 strains. Conclusion The worldwide increase of antibiotic resistances in Salmonella is an emerging public health problem. For Switzerland, no clear trend is identifiable over the years 2004 to 2009 for S. Virchow. Antimicrobial susceptibility and resistance profiles varied considerably within this period. Nevertheless, the situation in Switzerland coincided with findings in other European countries. Genotyping results of this strain collection revealed no evidence for an undetected outbreak within this time period.

  17. Opinions and social values related to the disposal of nuclear waste in Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidl, Roman; Stefanelli, Annalisa [ETH Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. for Environmental Decisions

    2015-07-01

    Discourse in media and politics about nuclear waste and its disposal in so-called ''Endlager'' (Germany) or ''Tiefenlager'' (geological deep ground repositories; Switzerland) often consider positions and arguments of diverse interest groups. Mostly polarized discussions are in the focus. However, we find a temporally consistent pattern of four opinion clusters in German speaking communities in Switzerland: one cluster in favor of a repository (perceiving mostly benefits) and one cluster with high-risk ratings opposing a repository; a third cluster of moderate opposition is ambivalent regarding risks and benefits, whereas a fourth cluster seems indifferent. Moreover, in qualitative interviews we found high importance of the development of the participatory process. Participants were sensitive to value related issues such as absence of political influence, transparency, comprehensive and independent information. Important to note is the problem that some of these values can be used as pro- or con-argument regarding a repository by different individuals. For instance, all agree that safety is essential - but both conclusions, to be for or against a repository, are possible. A recent study focused on the arguments, underlying people's opinions. The salient arguments that participants report are related to the sense of responsibility for the country to store safely the nuclear waste and to avoid its export. Moreover, people recognize the necessity of a safe solution for the storage in order to preserve future generations from the risks of nuclear waste. These arguments may be relevant for the fact that participants, on average, have a favorable position regarding a deep ground repository in Switzerland.

  18. Paleotemperature reconstructions from speleothem fluid inclusions between 14 - 10 ka BP in Milandre cave (NW Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, Stéphane; Häuselmann, Anamaria; Fleitmann, Dominik; Leuenberger, Markus

    2016-04-01

    In cave environments, speleothems constitute a well preserved and precisely dated continental climate archive that record past environmental changes such as paleotemperature or moisture source, namely through oxygen and hydrogen isotopes variations. Fluid inclusions are common in speleothems and they correspond to micrometric voids that often contain fossil liquid water representing past precipitation falling above the cave nearly at the time the inclusions were sealed. To measure the δD and δ18O isotopic composition of speleothem fluid inclusions, we extracted submicrolitre amounts of water from stalagmites (old and recent) coming from Milandre cave (Switzerland) using a new online method developed at the University of Bern (Affolter et al., 2014). The released water is then flushed directly to a Picarro L1102-i or L2140-i laser based instrument that allows to simultaneously monitor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes. At Milandre cave site, a two year isotope monitoring campaign has confirmed that isotopes in precipitation for northwestern Switzerland are principally controlled by air temperature (Affolter et al., 2015). Therefore, when combined with calcite δ18O, the fluid inclusion water isotopes can be used to calculate paleotemperatures. We reconstructed a cold season biased (roughly autumn - winter - spring) paleotemperature trend for the time interval covering the Allerød, the Younger Dryas cold interval and the early Holocene (13'900 - 9'900 BP). References: Affolter S., Fleitmann D., and Leuenberger M.: New online method for water isotope analysis of speleothem fluid inclusions using laser absorption spectroscopy (WS-CRDS), Clim. Past, 10, 1291-1304, doi:10.5194/cp-10-1291-2014, 2014. Affolter S., Häuselmann A.D., Fleitmann D., Häuselmann P., Leuenberger M.: Triple isotope (δD, δ17O, δ18O) study on precipitation, drip water and speleothem fluid inclusions for a Western Central European cave (NW Switzerland), Quat. Sci. Rev., 127, pp. 73-89, 2015.

  19. Modelling economic losses of historic and present-day high-impact winter windstorms in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Welker

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the wind gusts and associated economic loss patterns of high-impact winter windstorms in Switzerland between 1871 and 2011. A novel approach for simulating windstorm-related gusts and losses at regional to local scales is applied to a sample of 84 windstorms. The approach involves the dynamical downscaling of the Twentieth Century Reanalysis (20CR ensemble mean to 3-km horizontal grid size using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. Economic losses are simulated at municipal level for present-day asset distribution based on the downscaled (parameterised wind gusts at high spatiotemporal resolution using the open-source impact model climada. A comparison with insurance loss data for two recent windstorms (“Lothar” in 1999, “Joachim” in 2011 indicates that the loss simulation allows to realistically simulate the spatial patterns of windstorm losses. The loss amplitude is strongly underestimated for ‘Lothar’, while it is in reasonable agreement for ‘Joachim’. Possible reasons are discussed. Uncertainties concerning the loss simulation arise from the wind gust estimation method applied; estimates can differ considerably among the different methods, in particular over high orography. Furthermore, the quality of the loss simulation is affected by the underlying simplified assumptions regarding the distribution of assets and their susceptibilities to damage. For the whole windstorm sample, composite averages of simulated wind gust speed and loss are computed. Both composites reveal high values for the densely populated Swiss Plateau and lower values for south-eastern Switzerland; metropolitan areas stand out in the loss composite. Eight of the top 10 events concerning the losses simulated for present-day asset distribution and summed over all Swiss municipalities occurred after 1950. It remains uncertain whether this is due to decadal-scale changes of winter windstorms in Switzerland or merely due to a

  20. Juvenile technologies in foreign publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shpagina E.M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the review of foreign publications, concerning the juvenile technologies used in France, Canada, Germany and Switzerland. The paper presents legal, social and psychotherapeutic aspects of juvenile judiciary in foreign countries. The authors paid special attention to the complexity of approaches to young children and teenagers who found themselves in complicated life circumstances or got into trouble with the law. The article gives examples of using the following techniques: cognitive-behavioral intervention, mediation, family therapy (including family background and family history, relations theory, narrative practices, utilization of «emotional intelligence» resources.

  1. Rebuilding the Chalberhoeni small hydro power station in Saanen, Switzerland; Chalberhoeni - Rapport Final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavin, G. [Stucky SA, Renens (Switzerland); Wagner, T. [Sigmaplan, Berne (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    These two final illustrated reports for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) deal with various aspects of the Chalberhoeni small hydro project in Saanen, Switzerland. The first report presents data on the catchment area involved, available head, residual water quantities, installed power and annual production figures. Investments and operating costs are looked at. The second report describes the project and discusses regional planning aspects, hydrological basics and environmental issues in connection with the renewal project, including details on invertebrates found in the stream and their relevance to fishing and nature protection issues.

  2. Proceedings of the CAS - CERN Accelerator School: Power Converters, Baden, Switzerland, 7-14 May 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, R

    2015-01-01

    These proceedings collate lectures given at the twenty-eighth specialized course organised by the CERN Accelerator School (CAS). The course was held at the Hotel du Parc, Baden, Switzerland from 7 - 14 May 2014, in collaboration with the Paul Scherrer Institute. Following introductory lectures on accelerators and the requirements on power converters, the course covered components and topologies of the different types of power converters needed for particle accelerators. Issues of design, control and exploitation in a sometimes-hostile environment were addressed. Site visits to ABB and PSI provided an insight into state-of-the-art power converter production and operation, while topical seminars completed the programme.

  3. Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense (Yamane et al., 1986) in Switzerland: first molecular evidence and case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicht, Barbara; de Marval, Floriane; Peduzzi, Raffaele

    2007-09-01

    We report the first cases of locally-acquired Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense (Yamane, Kamo, Bylund and Wikgren, 1986) in Switzerland, confirmed by genetic analysis (18S rRNA, COI and ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2 genes). Diphyllobothriasis in this country is attributed to the tapeworm D. latum (Linnaeus, 1758) but the increasing popularity of raw fish culinary specialities (sushi, carpaccio, tartare) brings out a new diagnostic problem, so that people can get infected by exotic species of tapeworms.

  4. European School of High-Energy Physics, Beatenberg, Switzerland, 26 August - 8 September 2001

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The 2001 European School of High-Energy Physics (formerly the CERN-JINR School of Physics) will be organized jointly by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva, Switzerland and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna, Russia, together with the University of Bern. The basic aim of the School is to teach various aspects of high-energy physics, but especially theoretical physics, to young experimental physicists, mainly from the Member States of CERN and of JINR. The Schools of Physics are designed to give a survey of up-to-date information, rather than to be a training course.

  5. 6th Annual European Antibody Congress 2010: November 29–December 1, 2010, Geneva, Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Alain; Wurch, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    The 6th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapinn Ltd., was held in Geneva, Switzerland, which was also the location of the 4th and 5th EAC.1,2 As was the case in 2008 and 2009, the EAC was again the largest antibody congress held in Europe, drawing nearly 250 delegates in 2010. Numerous pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies active in the field of therapeutic antibody development were represented, as were start-up and academic organizations and representatives from the...

  6. Risk factors for antibiotic resistance in Campylobacter spp. isolated from raw poultry meat in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuser Jürg

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The world-wide increase of foodborne infections with antibiotic resistant pathogens is of growing concern and is designated by the World Health Organization as an emerging public health problem. Thermophilic Campylobacter have been recognised as a major cause of foodborne bacterial gastrointestinal human infections in Switzerland and in many other countries throughout the world. Poultry meat is the most common source for foodborne cases caused by Campylobacter. Because all classes of antibiotics recommended for treatment of human campylobacteriosis are also used in veterinary medicine, in view of food safety, the resistance status of Campylobacter isolated from poultry meat is of special interest. Methods Raw poultry meat samples were collected throughout Switzerland and Liechtenstein at retail level and examined for Campylobacter spp. One strain from each Campylobacter-positive sample was selected for susceptibility testing with the disc diffusion and the E-test method. Risk factors associated with resistance to the tested antibiotics were analysed by multiple logistic regression. Results In total, 91 Campylobacter spp. strains were isolated from 415 raw poultry meat samples. Fifty-one strains (59% were sensitive to all tested antibiotics. Nineteen strains (22% were resistant to a single, nine strains to two antibiotics, and eight strains showed at least three antibiotic resistances. Resistance was observed most frequently to ciprofloxacin (28.7%, tetracycline (12.6%, sulphonamide (11.8%, and ampicillin (10.3%. One multiple resistant strain exhibited resistance to five antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, and erythromycin. These are the most important antibiotics for treatment of human campylobacteriosis. A significant risk factor associated with multiple resistance in Campylobacter was foreign meat production compared to Swiss meat production (odds ratio = 5.7. Conclusion Compared to the situation in other

  7. Students' View of Evidence-Based Medicine: A Survey in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reto Kaderli

    2012-02-01

    Conclusions: Medical students in Switzerland were aware of their moderate knowledge in EBM and Medical Statistics and aimed for an improvement. More courses in EBM and journal clubs must be introduced and access to information resources must be ensured with an early introduction in search engines (i.e. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, etc.. A general strengthening of the knowledge on EBM and Medical Statistics among medical students may be a good way of educating the critical number of academic physicians and establishing a foundation for their future academic environment. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(1.000: 34-40

  8. Comparison of different multiple flow algorithms for topographic RUSLE factor (LS) calculation in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, Pascal; Liniger, Hanspeter; Prasuhn, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion is a well-known challenge both from a global perspective and in Switzerland, and it is assessed and discussed in many projects (e.g. national or European erosion risk maps). Meaningful assessment of soil erosion requires models that adequately reflect surface water flows. Various studies have attempted to achieve better modelling results by including multiple flow algorithms in the topographic length and slope factor (LS-factor) of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). The choice of multiple flow algorithms is wide, and many of them have been implemented in programs or tools like Saga-Gis, GrassGis, ArcGIS, ArcView, Taudem, and others. This study compares six different multiple flow algorithms with the aim of identifying a suitable approach to calculating the LS factor for a new soil erosion risk map of Switzerland. The comparison of multiple flow algorithms is part of a broader project to model soil erosion for the entire agriculturally used area in Switzerland and to renew and optimize the current erosion risk map of Switzerland (ERM2). The ERM2 was calculated in 2009, using a high resolution digital elevation model (2 m) and a multiple flow algorithm in ArcView. This map has provided the basis for enforcing soil protection regulations since 2010 and has proved its worth in practice, but it has become outdated (new basic data are now available, e.g. data on land use change, a new rainfall erosivity map, a new digital elevation model, etc.) and is no longer user friendly (ArcView). In a first step towards its renewal, a new data set from the Swiss Federal Office of Topography (Swisstopo) was used to generate the agricultural area based on the existing field block map. A field block is an area consisting of farmland, pastures, and meadows which is bounded by hydrological borders such as streets, forests, villages, surface waters, etc. In our study, we compared the six multiple flow algorithms with the LS factor calculation approach used in

  9. Diabetes prevalence and metabolic risk profile in an unselected population visiting pharmacies in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rey A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Alexandre Rey,1 Martin Thoenes,1,2 Rolf Fimmers,3 Christoph A Meier,4 Peter Bramlage51Sanofi Aventis, Medical Department, Meyrin, Switzerland; 2Institute for Clinical Pharmacology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University Dresden, Germany; 3Institut für Medizinische Biometrie, Informatik und Epidemiologie, Universität Bonn, Germany; 4Klinik für Innere Medizin, Stadtspital Triemli, Zürich, Switzerland; 5Institut für Pharmakologie und präventive Medizin, Mahlow, GermanyBackground: Diabetes represents one of the major health challenges in Switzerland, and early diagnosis and treatment is mandatory to prevent or delay diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. For the purpose of identifying affected individuals, early screening in pharmacies is a valuable option. In this survey, we aimed to determine blood glucose and metabolic control in an unselected population of individuals visiting Swiss pharmacies.Methods: The subjects responded to a short questionnaire and underwent a single capillary blood glucose test for screening purposes. They were classified as normal, indeterminate, impaired fasting glucose, and diabetes according to predefined blood glucose levels.Results: A total of 3135 individuals (mean age 56 years in 18 cantons were screened in November 2010; of these, 4.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.5–4.9 had previously been diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetes was newly diagnosed in 1.9% (95% CI 1.5–2.4, and 11.5% (95% CI 10.4–12.6 had impaired fasting glucose. Subjects with impaired glucose control had an increased body mass index, a frequent family history of diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and a low level of physical activity. Prevalence of impaired glucose control was different between the French/Italian-speaking part of Switzerland (new diabetes 4.9%; impaired fasting glucose 12.7% and the German-speaking part (new diabetes 1.9%; impaired fasting glucose 10.3%.Conclusion: Our study shows a

  10. The Cybathlon promotes the development of assistive technology for people with physical disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riener, Robert

    2016-05-31

    The Cybathlon is a new kind of championship, where people with physical disabilities compete against each other at tasks of daily life, with the aid of advanced assistive devices including robotic technologies. The first championship will take place at the Swiss Arena Kloten, Zurich, on 8 October 2016. Six disciplines are part of the competition comprising races with powered leg prostheses, powered arm prostheses, functional electrical stimulation driven bikes, powered wheelchairs, powered exoskeletons and brain-computer interfaces. This commentary describes the six disciplines and explains the current technological deficiencies that have to be addressed by the competing teams. These deficiencies at present often lead to disappointment or even rejection of some of the related technologies in daily applications. The Cybathlon aims to promote the development of useful technologies that facilitate the lives of people with disabilities. In the long run, the developed devices should become affordable and functional for all relevant activities in daily life.

  11. CH50% - A Switzerland with a consumption of fossil energy split in half; CH50% - Eine Schweiz mit halbiertem Verbrauch an fossilen Energien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The Swiss Academy of Engineering Sciences has investigated the possibilities and the consequences of a consumption reduction by 50 % of fossil energy agents within a time frame of 20 to 40 years. A working group of the Academy has made a study on the subject of if and when it would be possible to reduce the consumption of fossil energy in Switzerland by 50 % compared to 1990. The working group came to the conclusion that a reduction of well over 40 % would be feasible by the year 2020, principally due to an improvement in efficiency. This takes into account the substitution potential by renewable energy alternatives. A reduction by 50% will be possible in the second quarter of the 21st century under the condition that both today's known technologies are indeed exploited and that energy prices are increased. For Switzerland's economy and society no unacceptable impacts will thereby result. (author) [German] Die Schweizerische Akademie der Technischen Wissenschaften (SATW) hat Moeglichkeiten und Konsequenzen eines um 50 % verringerten Verbrauchs an fossilen Energietraegern in der Schweiz in einem Zeitrahmen von 20-40 Jahren untersucht. Eine Arbeitsgruppe ihrer Kommission Energie unter dem Vorsitz von Hans Jucker (bis 1997 VR-Praesident der Alusuisse-Lonza Holding AG) kam zum Schluss, dass bis zum Jahre 2020 eine Reduktion um gut 40 % primaer durch Effizienzverbesserungen moeglich ist. Dabei ist das Substitutionspotential durch erneuerbare Energien beruecksichtigt. Eine Halbierung ist im Verlaufe des 2. Quartals des 21. Jahrhunderts erreichbar, wobei vorausgesetzt wird, dass die heute bekannten Technologien tatsaechlich genutzt werden und die Energie verteuert wird. Dabei werden f?r Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft keine unzumutbaren Auswirkungen erwartet.

  12. New on-line method for water isotope analysis of fluid inclusions in speleothems using laser absorption spectroscopy: Application to stalagmites from Borneo and Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, Stéphane; Fleitmann, Dominik; Nele Meckler, Anna; Leuenberger, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Speleothems are recognised as key continental archives for paleoclimate reconstructions. They contain fluid inclusions representing past drip water trapped in the calcite structure. Speleothem can be precisely dated and therefore the oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopes of fluid inclusions constitute powerful proxies for paleotemperature or to investigate changes in the moisture source over several interglacial-glacial cycles. To liberate fluid inclusion water and to analyse its isotopic composition, a new online extraction method developed at Bern is used. The principle can be summarised as follows: Prior to crushing, the sample is placed into a copper tube, fixed to the line previously heated to 140° C and flushed with a nitrogen and standard water mixture. Thereafter, the speleothem sample is crushed using a simple hydraulic crushing device and the released water from fluid inclusions is transferred by the nitrogen-standard water mixture flow to a Picarro L1102-i isotopic liquid water and water vapor analyser. The measuring principle is based on wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) technology that allows us to simultaneously monitor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes. Reproducibility of standard water measurements is typically better than 1.5 o for δD and 0.4 o for δ18O. With this method, we successfully analysed δD and δ18O isotopic composition of a stalagmite from Northern Borneo (tropical West Pacific) covering almost two glacial-interglacial cycles from MIS 12 to early MIS 9 (460-330 ka) as well as recent samples from Switzerland and Borneo. These results are used in combination with calcite δ18O to reconstruct paleotemperature. Currently, we are measuring a stalagmite from Milandre cave (Jura, Switzerland) covering the Bølling-Allerød, Younger Dryas cold phase and the Holocene.

  13. Host preferences in host-seeking and blood-fed mosquitoes in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönenberger, A C; Wagner, S; Tuten, H C; Schaffner, F; Torgerson, P; Furrer, S; Mathis, A; Silaghi, C

    2016-03-01

    The avian zoonotic agent for West Nile virus (WNV) can cause neuroinvasive disease in horses and humans and is expanding its range in Europe. Analyses of the risk for transmission to these hosts in non-endemic areas are necessary. Host preferences of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae), the main vectors of WNV, were determined in Switzerland using animal-baited trap (horse, chickens) experiments at a natural and a periurban site. This was undertaken on four occasions during May-September 2014. In addition, the hosts of 505 blood-fed mosquitoes collected in a zoo and in the field were determined. Mosquito data obtained in the animal bait experiments were corrected for host weight and body surface area and by Kleiber's scaling factor. Collections of 11-14 different mosquito species were achieved with these approaches. Statistically significant host preferences were identified in three species in both approaches. The other species showed opportunistic feeding behaviours to varying extents. Specifically, the invasive species Hulecoeteomyia japonica (= Aedes japonicus) was identified for the first time as feeding on avians in nature. Abundance data, spatiotemporal activity and laboratory vector competence for WNV suggested that, in addition to the main WNV vector Culex pipiens, H. japonica and Aedimorphus vexans (= Aedes vexans) are the most likely candidate bridge vectors for WNV transmission in Switzerland.

  14. Cervical cancer screening in Switzerland: cross-sectional trends (1992–2012) in social inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullati, Stéphane; Manor, Orly; Courvoisier, Delphine S.; Bouchardy, Christine; Guessous, Idris

    2017-01-01

    Background: Incidence and mortality of cervical cancer declined thanks to Pap smear screening. However cervical cancer screening (CCS) inequalities are documented, including in high income countries. This population-based study aims to assess the importance and 20-year trends of CCS inequalities in Switzerland, where healthcare costs and medical coverage are among the highest in the world. Methods: We analyzed data from five waves of the population-based Swiss Health Interview Survey (SHIS) covering the period 1992–2012. Multivariable Poisson regression were used to estimate weighted prevalence ratios (PR) of CCS and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) adjusting for socio-economic, socio-demographic characteristics, family status, health status, and use of healthcare. Results: The study included 32’651 women aged between 20 and 70 years old. Between 1992 and 2012, rates of CCS over the past 3 years fluctuated between 71.7 and 79.6% (adjusted P changes occurred in screening recommendations and in social circumstances of the targeted population, CCS rates remained fairly stable in Switzerland between 1992 and 2012. At the same time, inequalities in CCS persisted over that period. PMID:28177486

  15. Increasing prevalence of infectious diseases in asylum seekers at a tertiary care hospital in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch-Infanger, Constantine; Bättig, Veronika; Kremo, Jürg; Widmer, Andreas F; Egli, Adrian; Bingisser, Roland; Battegay, Manuel; Erb, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The increasing number of refugees seeking asylum in Europe in recent years poses new challenges for the healthcare systems in the destination countries. The goal of the study was to describe the evolution of medical problems of asylum seekers at a tertiary care centre in Switzerland. At the University Hospital Basel, we compared all asylum seekers during two 1-year time periods in 2004/05 and 2014/15 concerning demographic characteristics and reasons for referrals and hospitalizations. Hundred ninety five of 2'544 and 516 of 6'243 asylum seekers registered at the national asylum reception and procedure centre Basel were referred to the University Hospital Basel in 2004/05 and 2014/15, and originated mainly from Europe (62.3%, mainly Turkey) and Africa (49.1%, mainly Eritrea), respectively. Median age was similar in both study periods (26.9 and 26.2 years). Infectious diseases in asylum seekers increased from 22.6% to 36.6% (pasylum seekers required isolation precautions with median duration of 6-9.5 days in both study periods. The changing demography of asylum seekers arriving in Switzerland in the current refugee crisis has led to a shift in disease patterns with an increase of infectious diseases and the re-emergence of migration-associated neglected infections. Physicians should be aware of these new challenges.

  16. A catalog of high-impact windstorms in Switzerland since 1859

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucki, P.; Brönnimann, S.; Martius, O.; Welker, C.; Imhof, M.; von Wattenwyl, N.; Philipp, N.

    2014-11-01

    In recent decades, extremely hazardous windstorms have caused enormous losses to buildings, infrastructure and forests in Switzerland. This has increased societal and scientific interest in the intensity and frequency of historical high-impact storms. However, high-resolution wind data and damage statistics mostly span recent decades only. For this study, we collected quantitative (e.g., volumes of windfall timber, losses relating to buildings) and descriptive (e.g., forestry or insurance reports) information on the impact of historical windstorms. To define windstorm severity, normalized and declustered quantitative data were processed by extreme value statistics. Descriptive information was classified using a conceptual guideline. Validation with independent damage information, as well as comparison with wind measurements and a reanalysis, indicates that the most hazardous winter storms are captured, while too few moderate windstorms are detected. Strong storms in the wind measurements and reanalysis are thus added to the catalog. The final catalog encompasses approximately 240 high-impact windstorms in Switzerland since 1859. It features three robust severity classes and contains eight extreme windstorms. Evidence of high winter storm activity in the early and late 20th century compared to the mid-20th century in both damage and wind data indicates a co-variability of hazard and related damage on decadal timescales.

  17. Change of residence in Switzerland and Swiss "Attestation de départ" (departure certificate)

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    1. Change of residence in Switzerland Members of the personnel residing in Switzerland are advised to notify the competent Swiss authorities in their canton of residence of any change of address. a) Procedure for those residing in the Canton of Geneva: – go in person to the “Accueil” Section of the Office Cantonal de la Population, 88 Route de Chancy, 1213 Onex (open Mondays to Fridays from 9.00 a.m. to 3.30 p.m., tel. 022 546 48 88, http://www.ge.ch/ocp), or – complete the form “Annonce de changement d’adresse” (available at: (http://www.geneve.ch/ocp/formulaires.html) and send it by post to the Office Cantonal de la Population, Service des étrangers et confédérés, case postale 2652, 1211 Genève 2. b) Procedure for those residing in the Canton of Vaud: –\tgo in person to the offices of the Contrôle de l’habitant of your commune of residence. This does not, however, release members of the personnel from the obligation to inform CERN of any change o...

  18. Inventory and perspectives of chronic disease management programs in Switzerland: an exploratory survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Peytremann-Bridevaux

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe chronic disease management programs active in Switzerland in 2007, using an exploratory survey. Methods: We searched the internet (Swiss official websites and Swiss web-pages, using Google, a medical electronic database (Medline, reference lists of pertinent articles, and contacted key informants. Programs met our operational definition of chronic disease management if their interventions targeted a chronic disease, included a multidisciplinary team (≥2 healthcare professionals, lasted at least six months, and had already been implemented and were active in December 2007. We developed an extraction grid and collected data pertaining to eight domains (patient population, intervention recipient, intervention content, delivery personnel, method of communication, intensity and complexity, environment, clinical outcomes. Results: We identified seven programs fulfilling our operational definition of chronic disease management. Programs targeted patients with diabetes, hypertension, heart failure, obesity, psychosis and breast cancer. Interventions were multifaceted; all included education and half considered planned follow-ups. The recipients of the interventions were patients, and healthcare professionals involved were physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists and case managers of various backgrounds. Conclusions: In Switzerland, a country with universal healthcare insurance coverage and little incentive to develop new healthcare strategies, chronic disease management programs are scarce. For future developments, appropriate evaluations of existing programs, involvement of all healthcare stakeholders, strong leadership and political will are, at least, desirable.

  19. Where are the Sunday babies? II. Declining weekend birth rates in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerchl, Alexander; Reinhard, Sarah C.

    2008-02-01

    Birth dates from almost 3 million babies born between 1969 and 2005 in Switzerland were analyzed for the weekday of birth. As in other countries but with unprecedented amplitude, a very marked non-random distribution was discovered with decreasing numbers of births on weekends, reaching -17.9% in 2005. While most of this weekend births avoidance rate is due to fewer births on Sundays (up to -21.7%), the downward trend is primarily a consequence of decreasing births on Saturdays (up to -14.5%). For 2005, these percentages mean that 3,728 fewer babies are born during weekends than could be expected from equal distribution. Most interestingly and surprisingly, weekend birth-avoiding rates are significantly correlated with birth numbers ( r = 0.86), i.e. the lower the birth number per year, the lower the number of weekend births. The increasing avoidance of births during weekends is discussed as being a consequence of increasing numbers of caesarean sections and elective labor induction, which in Switzerland reach 29.2 and 20.5%, respectively, in 2004. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that both primary and secondary caesarean sections are significantly correlated with weekend birth avoidance rates. It is therefore likely that financial aspects of hospitals are a factor determining the avoidance of weekend births by increasing the numbers of caesarean sections.

  20. An empirical investigation of the efficiency effects of integrated care models in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Reich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study investigates the efficiency gains of integrated care models in Switzerland, since these models are regarded as cost containment options in national social health insurance. These plans generate much lower average health care expenditure than the basic insurance plan. The question is, however, to what extent these total savings are due to the effects of selection and efficiency. Methods: The empirical analysis is based on data from 399,274 Swiss residents that constantly had compulsory health insurance with the Helsana Group, the largest health insurer in Switzerland, covering the years 2006 to 2009. In order to evaluate the efficiency of the different integrated care models, we apply an econometric approach with a mixed-effects model. Results: Our estimations indicate that the efficiency effects of integrated care models on health care expenditure are significant. However, the different insurance plans vary, revealing the following efficiency gains per model: contracted capitated model 21.2%, contracted non-capitated model 15.5% and telemedicine model 3.7%. The remaining 8.5%, 5.6% and 22.5% respectively of the variation in total health care expenditure can be attributed to the effects of selection. Conclusions: Integrated care models have the potential to improve care for patients with chronic diseases and concurrently have a positive impact on health care expenditure. We suggest policy makers improve the incentives for patients with chronic diseases within the existing regulations providing further potential for cost-efficiency of medical care.

  1. An empirical investigation of the efficiency effects of integrated care models in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Reich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study investigates the efficiency gains of integrated care models in Switzerland, since these models are regarded as cost containment options in national social health insurance. These plans generate much lower average health care expenditure than the basic insurance plan. The question is, however, to what extent these total savings are due to the effects of selection and efficiency.Methods: The empirical analysis is based on data from 399,274 Swiss residents that constantly had compulsory health insurance with the Helsana Group, the largest health insurer in Switzerland, covering the years 2006 to 2009. In order to evaluate the efficiency of the different integrated care models, we apply an econometric approach with a mixed-effects model.Results: Our estimations indicate that the efficiency effects of integrated care models on health care expenditure are significant. However, the different insurance plans vary, revealing the following efficiency gains per model: contracted capitated model 21.2%, contracted non-capitated model 15.5% and telemedicine model 3.7%. The remaining 8.5%, 5.6% and 22.5% respectively of the variation in total health care expenditure can be attributed to the effects of selection.Conclusions: Integrated care models have the potential to improve care for patients with chronic diseases and concurrently have a positive impact on health care expenditure. We suggest policy makers improve the incentives for patients with chronic diseases within the existing regulations providing further potential for cost-efficiency of medical care.

  2. Issues around the Prescription of Half Tablets in Northern Switzerland: The Irrational Case of Quetiapine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel S. Allemann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prescription of fragmented tablets is useful for individualisation of dose but includes several drawbacks. Although without score lines, the antipsychotic drug quetiapine was in 2011 the most often prescribed 1/2 tablet in discharge prescriptions at the University Hospital in Basel (USB, 671 beds. We aimed at analysing the prescription patterns of split tablets in general and of quetiapine in particular in Switzerland. Methods. All orders of community pharmacies for unit-of-use soft pouch blisters placed at Medifilm AG, the leader company in Switzerland for repackaging into pouch blisters, were analysed. Results. Out of 4,784,999 tablets that were repacked in 2012 in unit-of-use pouch blisters, 8.5% were fragmented, mostly in half (87.6%, and were predominantly psycholeptics (pipamperone 15.8%. Prescription of half quetiapine appears to be a Basel specificity (highest rates of fragments and half quetiapine. Conclusions. Prescription of fragmented tablet is frequent. It represents a safety issue for the patient, and a pharmaceutical care issue for the pharmacist. In ambulatory care, the patient’s cognitive and physical capacities must be clarified, suitability of the splitting of the tablet must be checked, appropriate aids must be offered, like a pill-splitting device in order to improve accuracy, and safe use of the drug must be ensured.

  3. Wind storm loss estimations in the Canton of Vaud (Western Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, C.; Beniston, M.

    2012-12-01

    A storm loss model that was first developed for Germany is applied to the much smaller geographic area of the canton of Vaud, in Western Switzerland. 24 major wind storms that struck the region during the period 1990-2010 are analysed, and outputs are compared to loss observations provided by an insurance company. Model inputs include population data and daily maximum wind speeds from weather stations. These measured wind speeds are regionalised in the canton of Vaud following different methods, using either basic interpolation techniques from Geographic Information Systems (GIS), or by using an existing extreme wind speed map of Switzerland whose values are used as thresholds. A third method considers the wind power, integrating wind speeds temporally over storm duration to calculate losses. Outputs show that the model leads to similar results for all methods, with Pearson's correlation and Spearman's rank coefficients of roughly 0.7. Bootstrap techniques are applied to test the model's robustness. Impacts of population growth and possible changes in storminess under conditions of climate change shifts are also examined for this region, emphasizing high shifts in economic losses related to small increases of input wind speeds.

  4. Estimation of selenium intake in Switzerland in relation to selected food groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny-Burri, J; Haldimann, M; Dudler, V

    2010-11-01

    The selenium concentration in foods was analysed in order to identify principal sources of this trace element in Switzerland. Selenium intake estimations based on three different approaches were carried out. From the relationship between intake and serum/plasma concentration, the selenium intake was estimated to 66 µg day(-1). The second approach based on measured food groups combined with consumption statistics; and the third approach consisted of duplicate meal samples. With the last two methods, over 75% of the serum/plasma based intake was confirmed. Swiss pasta made of North American durum wheat was the food with the highest contribution to the dietary intake, followed by meat. The strong decrease in imports of selenium-rich North American wheat of the last years was not reflected in the present intake estimations. It appears that this intake loss was compensated by a consumption increase of other foods. Compared with former intake estimations, selenium intake seems to be in Switzerland nearly constant for the last 25 years.

  5. Microsatellite-based characterization of the Castanea sativa cultivar heritage of southern Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbin, Davide; Hohl, Leandro; Conza, Lisa; Jermini, Mauro; Gessler, Cesare; Conedera, Marco

    2007-12-01

    Southern Switzerland has a long tradition of chestnut cultivation as a staple food. Local inhabitants constantly selected varieties according to the ripening period, the type of use, and the adaptability to the territory. As a result, the panorama of chestnut varieties is very complex, as reflected by more than 120 different variety names in an area of 26,000 ha. Since 1994, 47 varieties have been conserved in the chestnut germplasm of southern Switzerland (CSS), including Marroni, Euro-Japanese, and French varieties. A selection of 164 individuals from the CSS was analysed by 8 SSR markers (4 of which were developed in this study). Microsatellite analysis indicated that the CSS was accurately established, as 86% of the individuals grafted were correctly labeled. The identification of 98 genotypes, 10 clonal chestnut groups, 4 synonym groups, and 12 homonym groups reflected the complex ethnogeographical structure of the chestnut distribution. The 17 Marroni individuals considered clustered in 2 differentiated genetic groups instead of only 1 as expected. The fundamental problem of the frequent cases of homonymy and synonymy is discussed, as is the need for criteria for discriminating between polyclonal varieties and distinct homonymous varieties.

  6. Diagnosis of whooping cough in Switzerland: differentiating Bordetella pertussis from Bordetella holmesii by polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittet, Laure F; Emonet, Stéphane; François, Patrice; Bonetti, Eve-Julie; Schrenzel, Jacques; Hug, Melanie; Altwegg, Martin; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Posfay-Barbe, Klara M

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella holmesii, an emerging pathogen, can be misidentified as Bordetella pertussis by routine polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In some reports, up to 29% of the patients diagnosed with pertussis have in fact B. holmesii infection and invasive, non-respiratory B. holmesii infections have been reported worldwide. This misdiagnosis undermines the knowledge of pertussis' epidemiology, and may lead to misconceptions on pertussis vaccine's efficacy. Recently, the number of whooping cough cases has increased significantly in several countries. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether B. holmesii was contributing to the increase in laboratory-confirmed cases of B. pertussis in Switzerland. A multiplex species-specific quantitative PCR assay was performed on 196 nasopharyngeal samples from Swiss patients with PCR-confirmed Bordetella infection (median age: 6 years-old, minimum 21 days-old, maximum 86 years-old), formerly diagnosed as Bordetella pertussis (IS481+). No B. holmesii (IS481+, IS1001-, hIS1001+) was identified. We discuss whether laboratories should implement specific PCR to recognize different Bordetella species. We conclude that in Switzerland B. holmesii seems to be circulating less than in neighboring countries and that specific diagnostic procedures are not necessary routinely. However, as the epidemiological situation may change rapidly, periodic reevaluation is suggested.

  7. Diagnosis of whooping cough in Switzerland: differentiating Bordetella pertussis from Bordetella holmesii by polymerase chain reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure F Pittet

    Full Text Available Bordetella holmesii, an emerging pathogen, can be misidentified as Bordetella pertussis by routine polymerase chain reaction (PCR. In some reports, up to 29% of the patients diagnosed with pertussis have in fact B. holmesii infection and invasive, non-respiratory B. holmesii infections have been reported worldwide. This misdiagnosis undermines the knowledge of pertussis' epidemiology, and may lead to misconceptions on pertussis vaccine's efficacy. Recently, the number of whooping cough cases has increased significantly in several countries. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether B. holmesii was contributing to the increase in laboratory-confirmed cases of B. pertussis in Switzerland. A multiplex species-specific quantitative PCR assay was performed on 196 nasopharyngeal samples from Swiss patients with PCR-confirmed Bordetella infection (median age: 6 years-old, minimum 21 days-old, maximum 86 years-old, formerly diagnosed as Bordetella pertussis (IS481+. No B. holmesii (IS481+, IS1001-, hIS1001+ was identified. We discuss whether laboratories should implement specific PCR to recognize different Bordetella species. We conclude that in Switzerland B. holmesii seems to be circulating less than in neighboring countries and that specific diagnostic procedures are not necessary routinely. However, as the epidemiological situation may change rapidly, periodic reevaluation is suggested.

  8. Herbalists of Today's Switzerland and Their Plant Knowledge. A Preliminary Analysis from an Ethnobotanical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Cero, Maja; Saller, Reinhard; Weckerle, Caroline S

    2015-01-01

    Herbal medicine is a popular part of primary health care in Switzerland. Following an ethnobotanical approach, in this study we seek to identify Swiss herbalists with broad, empirical medicinal plant knowledge and use. We aim to consider different areas of the medicinal landscape including biomedicine, complementary and alternative medicine, and self-medication. A total of 61 expert interviews were conducted from February 2010 to November 2011. The transfer of knowledge was analyzed according to a Switzerland-related selection of historical and recent popular as well as scientific herbal books. A total of 254 medicinal plant species, belonging to 218 genera and 87 families, were recorded in 934 use reports. Predominantly leaves and flowers are used for the treatment of dermatological, respiratory, nervous, and gastrointestinal problems. Recent to historical herbal books are an important source of plant knowledge. Medicinal plants are used for self-medication and professional health care and despite different underlying medicinal concepts and philosophies, herbalists largely agree on the most important medicinal plant species. © 2015 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  9. Carbon budgets of thirteen years at the FLUXNET cropland site Oensingen, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmel, Carmen; Revill, Andrew; Hörtnagl, Lukas; Eugster, Werner

    2017-04-01

    The FLUXNET cropland site at Oensingen, Switzerland (CH-Oe2) is located on the Swiss Plateau, which is representative for the average domain of agricultural crop production in Switzerland. The site is managed under the low pesticide integrated production (IP) farming protocol and features a crop rotation focusing on winter wheat, but also includes winter barley, rapeseed, peas and potatoes as well as intermediate cover crops. Thirteen years of eddy covariance and meteorological measurements are available for the site. The carbon imports through manure applications and sowing, along with the exports through harvests, were quantified. In this study, we analyze the carbon budgets of all crop types and measurement years. These results will be compared to changes in soil carbon content. We will answer the questions: (1) Has the crop rotation and field management resulted in a net carbon source or sink? (2) To what extent are the different crop types linked to net carbon exchanges? (3) What are the climatic potential drivers for the interannual cropland carbon budget? (4) Is the carbon budget reflected in the changes in soil carbon content?

  10. [Typing and sensitivity of meningococci isolated in Switzerland 1988-1990].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohner, P; Pepey, B; Hirschel, B; Auckenthaler, R

    1992-02-15

    Since 1906 severe infections due to Neisseria meningitidis have been reported in Switzerland. The clinical application of antimicrobial agents reduced the mortality rate due to meningococcal infections from 82% before 1939 to 22% after 1942. However, the annual incidence remained at about 1.5 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. During the years 1988 to 1990, 177 strains isolated in Switzerland have been typed with a dot ELISA using 15 different monoclonal antibodies. The distribution of serogroups was as follows: A (0.6%), B (70.6%), C (22.6%), and W135 (0.6%), while 5.6% could not be assigned to a serogroup. The most common associations of serogroup, serotype and subtype were: B:15:P1.16 (15.3%), B:4:P1.15 (13.6%), and C:2a:P1.2 (9.0%). The susceptibility of 174 strains was determined by an agar-dilution procedure. All strains were susceptible to cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, minocycline and spiramycin. One strain showed reduced sensitivity to penicillin (MIC = 0.25 mg/l), while another strain was resistant to rifampicin, 3% were resistant of erythromycin and 75% to sulfadiazine.

  11. Enter FameLab and become the new face of science in Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    Paola Catapano, FameLab@Cern Project coordinator, Communication Group

    2011-01-01

    Are you 18 to 35 years old and studying or working in science in Switzerland? Are you passionate about your job and keen on exciting public imagination with a vision of the 21st century of science? Then this competition is for you!   FameLab is an international science communication competition for young researchers. It aims to find the new voices of science and engineering across the world. CERN has been chosen as the venue of the regional semi-finals for Switzerland. To compete, all you have to do is prepare a 3-minute talk that is scientifically accurate but also engaging to a non-scientific audience and impress your jury and your audience on Saturday 4 Februrary, 2012 at the Globe of Science and Innovation. Famelab aims to provide new opportunities for scientists to develop their skills as communicators. FameLab was set up in 2005 by Cheltenham Festivals, one of the UK’s premier cultural organisations, in partnership with NESTA (Nat...

  12. First description of Onchocerca jakutensis (Nematoda: Filarioidea in red deer (Cervus elaphus in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Bosch

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-seven species of the genus Onchocerca (Nematoda; Filarioidea can cause a vector-borne parasitic disease called onchocercosis. Most Onchocerca species infect wild and domestic ungulates or the dog, and one species causes river blindness in humans mainly in tropical Africa. The European red deer (Cervus e. elaphus is host to four species, which are transmitted by blackflies (simuliids or biting midges (ceratopogonids. Two species, Onchocerca flexuosa and Onchocerca jakutensis, produce subcutaneous nodules, whereas Onchocerca skrjabini and Onchocerca garmsi live free in the hypodermal serous membranes. During the hunting season, September 2013, red deer (n = 25, roe deer (Capreolus c. capreolus, n = 6 and chamois (Rupicapra r. rupicapra, n = 7, all shot in the Grisons Region (Switzerland were investigated for the presence of subcutaneous nodules which were enzymatically digested, and the contained Onchocerca worms were identified to species by light and scanning electron microscopy as well as by PCR/sequencing. In addition, microfilariae from skin samples were collected and genetically characterized. Neither nodules nor microfilariae were discovered in the roe deer and chamois. Adult worms were found in 24% of red deer, and all of them were identified as O. jakutensis. Two morphologically different microfilariae were obtained from five red deer, and genetic analysis of a skin sample of one red deer indicated the presence of another Onchocerca species. This is the first report of O. jakutensis in Switzerland with a prevalence in red deer similar to that in neighbouring Germany.

  13. Potential for geological sequestration of CO{sub 2} in Switzerland - Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, L. W.; Chevalier, G. [Institut fuer Geologie, Universitaet Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Leu, W. [Geoform AG, Geologische Beratungen und Studien, (former Minusio) Villeneuve (Switzerland)

    2010-08-15

    Reduction of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions is considered by the scientific to be a necessary step towards mitigating climate change. One of the many approaches to this problem is to capture waste CO{sub 2} from industrial sources and inject it into deep, porous geological formations. Under optimal geological conditions, huge amounts of CO{sub 2} can be stored (sequestered) safely over periods of many millennia. This reports estimates the theoretical potential for the geological sequestration option within Switzerland. Only geological criteria for CO{sub 2} sequestration have been taken into account. The conclusions are based on the review of over 150 scientific publications, on unpublished data owned by the petroleum industry, and on the expert opinions of the authors and on five reviewers. The methodology follows an existing evaluation scheme that was developed for the same purpose in Canada. Here the approach has been modified to suit the geological setting and available data in Switzerland, according to international best-practice principles for reservoir safety. Owing to the scarcity of quantitative information on the subsurface of Switzerland, the study relies on 9 qualitative and semi-quantitative attributes (including natural seismicity and the occurrence of faults) derived from analysis of deep drill holes and geological and geophysical data. The weighted combinations of these attributes have been ranked on a numerical scale between 0 (negligible potential) and 1 (high potential). Application of this scheme allows the map of Switzerland to be contoured with respect to CO{sub 2} sequestration potential with a resolution of a few km{sup 2}. The conclusions are as follows. The crystalline metamorphic and igneous rocks of the Alps and the sediments underlying the large valleys of Ticino, Grisons and Valais are unsuitable for CO{sub 2} sequestration. In contrast, the sedimentary rocks below the Central Plateau, and to a lesser extent those below the Jura

  14. Escuela secundaria Stettbach Zurich-Suiza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyer, Rudolf

    1977-05-01

    Full Text Available This school complex consists of three clearly defined and independent buildings, separated by public or private gardens. The buildings occupy 10% of the lot, with the rest of the land being used for gardens and play areas. The main building of the school complex is the secondary level school, with capacity for 720 students, 24 classrooms and various rooms for complementary functions such as domestic science, art, work rooms, carpentry, storerooms, and areas for teachers, administration offices and services. The gymnasium has three gymnastic exercise halls, which can be converted into one large hall for sports competitions, a first aid station, a library, workshops, bicycle parking area and complementary services. The building to be used as a kindergarden has playrooms, dressing rooms and bathrooms. The exterior of the building is outstanding as a result of the balance achieved between the bare concrete and the extensive garden áreas and outdoor patios. In the interior, the plastic richness of the structural elements themselves has been used to the maximum advantage —concrete for the walls, columns and beams; ceramic forging; etc.— which are exposed, providing interesting contrasts.Este complejo escolar se compone de tres núcleos claramente diferenciados e independientes, separados entre sí por espacios verdes, públicos o privados. Las construcciones ocupan el 10% del solar, quedando el resto para jardines y campos de juego. El núcleo principal del conjunto es la escuela secundaria, con capacidad para 720 alumnos, 24 ciases y diversos salones destinados a funciones complementarias, tales como: labores femeninas, dibujo, enseñanzas prácticas, carpintería, almacenes, y locales para profesores, dirección y servicios. El gimnasio consta de tres salas para ejercicios gimnásticos, convertibles en una sola para deportes de competición, una estación sanitaria de primeros auxilios, una biblioteca, talleres, aparcamiento para bicicletas y servicios anexos. El núcleo destinado a jardín de infancia se compone de equipos de juego, vestuarios y aseos. La edificación se destaca exteriormente por el equilibrio logrado entre las construcciones acabadas en hormigón visto, y los amplios espacios verdes y patios al aire libre. En el interior se advierte un aprovechamiento máximo de la riqueza plástica de los propios elementos estructurales —hormigón en muros, pilares y vigas, forjados cerámicos, etc.—, que permanecen expuestos, dando lugar a interesantes planteamientos formales.

  15. Debris flows on forested cones - reconstruction and comparison of frequencies in two catchments in Val Ferret, Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Bollschweiler, M.; Stoffel, M.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Debris flows represent a major threat to infrastructure in many regions of the Alps. Since systematic acquisition of data on debris-flow events in Switzerland only started after the events of 1987, there is a lack of historical knowledge on earlier debris-flow events for most torrents. It is therefore the aim of this study to reconstruct the debris-flow activity for the Reuse de Saleinaz and the La Fouly torrents in Val Ferret (Valais, Switzerland). In total, 556 incre...

  16. Low level impurities in imported wheat are a likely source of feral transgenic oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Schulze, Juerg; Brodmann, Peter; Oehen, Bernadette; Bagutti, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    In Switzerland, the cultivation of genetically modified (GM) oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) and the use of its seeds for food and feed are not permitted. Nevertheless, the GM oilseed rape events GT73, MS8×RF3, MS8 and RF3 have recently been found in the Rhine port of Basel, Switzerland. The sources of GM oilseed rape seeds have been unknown. The main agricultural good being imported at the Rhine port of Basel is wheat and from 2010 to 2013, 19 % of all Swiss wheat imports originated from Ca...

  17. Trends and stabilization up to 2022 in overweight and obesity in Switzerland, comparison to France, UK, US and Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Heinz; Dietrich, Eva S; Venetz, Werner P

    2010-02-01

    In Switzerland a rapid increase in the total overweight population (BMI > or = 25) from 30.3% to 37.3% and in the obese segment (BMI > or = 30) from 5.4% to 8.1% was observed between 1992 and 2007. The objective of this study is to produce a projection until 2022 for the development of adult overweight and obesity in Switzerland based on four National Health Surveys conducted between 1992 and 2007. Based on the projection, these prevalence rates may be expected to stabilize until 2022 at the 2007 level. These results were compared with future projections estimated for France, UK, US and Australia using the same model.

  18. Trends and Stabilization up to 2022 in Overweight and Obesity in Switzerland, Comparison to France, UK, US and Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Werner P. Venetz; Dietrich, Eva S.; Heinz Schneider

    2010-01-01

    In Switzerland a rapid increase in the total overweight population (BMI ≥ 25) from 30.3% to 37.3% and in the obese segment (BMI ≥ 30) from 5.4% to 8.1% was observed between 1992 and 2007. The objective of this study is to produce a projection until 2022 for the development of adult overweight and obesity in Switzerland based on four National Health Surveys conducted between 1992 and 2007. Based on the projection, these prevalence rates may be expected to stabilize until 2022 at the 2007 level...

  19. Electricity, thermal energy, safety, and beer. Contracting in Switzerland; Strom, Waerme, Sicherheit und Bier. Contracting in der Schweiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1999-03-01

    The Elektra Birseck Muenchenstein (EBM) company has been offering its customers contracting products since 1982. On account of the great number of realized projects in Switzerland it belongs to the contractors with the most experience. The article deals both with the bases of contracting in Switzerland and with a topical practical example. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Elektra Birseck Muenchenstein (EBM) bietet ihren Kunden seit 1982 Contracting-Produkte an und gehoert aufgrund der Vielzahl realisierter Projekte in der Schweiz zu den Contracting-Anbietern mit den meisten Erfahrungen. Der Beitrag behandelt sowohl die Grundlagen des Contractings in der Schweiz als auch ein aktuelles Praxisbeispiel. (orig.)

  20. Frequency and severity of aggressive incidents in acute psychiatric wards in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Joachim E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aggression and violence and negative consequences thereof are a major concern in acute psychiatric inpatient care globally. Variations in study designs, settings, populations, and data collection methods render comparisons of the incidence of aggressive behaviour in high risk settings difficult. Objective To describe the frequency and severity of aggressive incidents in acute psychiatric wards in the German speaking part of Switzerland. Methods We conducted a prospective multicentre study on 24 acute admission wards in 12 psychiatric hospitals in the German speaking part of Switzerland. Aggressive incidents were recorded by the revised Staff Observation Aggression Scale (SOAS-R and we checked the data collection for underreporting. Our sample comprised 2344 treatment episodes of 2017 patients and a total of 41'560 treatment days. Results A total of 760 aggressive incidents were registered. We found incidence rates per 100 treatment days between 0.60 (95% CI 0.10–1.78 for physical attacks and 1.83 (1.70–1.97 for all aggressive incidents (including purely verbal aggression. The mean severity was 8.80 ± 4.88 points on the 22-point SOAS-R-severity measure; 46% of the purely verbally aggression was classified as severe (≥ 9 pts.. 53% of the aggressive incidents were followed by a coercive measure, mostly seclusion or seclusion accompanied by medication. In 13% of the patients, one ore more incidents were registered, and 6.9% of the patients were involved in one ore more physical attack. Involuntary admission (OR 2.2; 1.6–2.9, longer length of stay (OR 2.7; 2.0–3.8, and a diagnosis of schizophrenia (ICH-10 F2 (OR 2.1; 1.5–2.9 was associated with a higher risk for aggressive incidents, but no such association was found for age and gender. 38% of the incidents were registered within the first 7 days after admission. Conclusion Aggressive incidents in acute admission wards are a frequent and serious problem. Due to the