WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology utilization center

  1. Clean Air Technology Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Clean Air Technology Center provides resources for emerging and existing air pollution prevention and control technologies and provides public access to data and information on their use, effectiveness and cost.

  2. NASA's Technology Utilization Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    NASA's Technology Utilization Program is described, illustrating how it can be useful in achieving improved productivity, providing more jobs, solving public sector challenges, and strengthening the international competitive situation. Underlying the program is the fact that research and development conducted in NASA's aeronautics and space programs have generated much technical information concerning processes, products, or techniques which may be useful to engineers, doctors, or to others. The program is based on acquisition and publication, working with the user, and applications engineering.

  3. Clean energy utilization technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honma, Takuya

    1992-01-01

    The technical development of clean energy including the utilization of solar energy was begun in 1973 at the time of the oil crisis, and about 20 years elapsed. Also in Japan, the electric power buying system by electric power companies for solar light electric power and wind electric power has been started in 1992, namely their value as a merchandise was recognized. As for these two technologies, the works of making the international standards and JIS were begun. The range of clean energy or natural energy is wide, and its kinds are many. The utilization of solar heat and the electric power generation utilizing waves, tide and geotherm already reached the stage of practical use. Generally in order to practically use new energy, the problem of price must be solved, but the price is largely dependent on the degree of spread. Also the reliability, durability and safety must be ensured, and the easiness of use, effectiveness and trouble-saving maintenance and operation are required. For the purpose, it is important to packaging those skillfully in a system. The cases of intelligent natural energy systems are shown. Solar light and wind electric power generation systems and the technology of transporting clean energy are described. (K.I.)

  4. Gas utilization technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biljetina, R.

    1994-01-01

    One of the constant challenges facing the research community is the identification of technology needs 5 to 15 years from now. A look back into history indicates that the forces driving natural gas research have changed from decade to decade. In the 1970s research was driven by concerns for adequate supply; in the 1980s research was aimed at creating new markets for natural gas. What then are the driving forces for the 1990s? Recent reports from the natural gas industry have helped define a new direction driven primarily by market demand for natural gas. A study prepared by the Interstate Natural Gas Association of America Foundation entitled ''Survey of Natural Research, Development, and Demonstration RD ampersand D Priorities'' indicated that in the 1990s the highest research priority should be for natural gas utilization and that technology development efforts should not only address efficiency and cost, but environmental and regulatory issues as well. This study and others, such as the report by the American Gas Association (A.G.A.) entitled ''Strategic Vision for Natural Gas Through the Year 2000,'' clearly identify the market sectors driving today's technology development needs. The biggest driver is the power generation market followed by the industrial, transportation, appliance, and gas cooling markets. This is best illustrated by the GRI 1994 Baseline Projection on market growth in various sectors between the year 1992 and 2010. This paper highlights some of the recent technology developments in each one of these sectors

  5. "Infotonics Technology Center"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzemeier, L. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States); Boysel, M. B. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States); Smith, D. R. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States)

    2004-09-30

    During this grant period July 15, 2002 thru September 30, 2004, the Infotonics Technology Center developed the critical infrastructure and technical expertise necessary to accelerate the development of sensors, alternative lighting and power sources, and other specific subtopics of interest to Department of Energy. Infotonics fosters collaboration among industry, universities and government and operates as a national center of excellence to drive photonics and microsystems development and commercialization. A main goal of the Center is to establish a unique, world-class research and development facility. A state-of-the-art microsystems prototype and pilot fabrication facility was established to enable rapid commercialization of new products of particular interest to DOE. The Center has three primary areas of photonics and microsystems competency: device research and engineering, packaging and assembly, and prototype and pilot-scale fabrication. Center activities focused on next generation optical communication networks, advanced imaging and information sensors and systems, micro-fluidic systems, assembly and packaging technologies, and biochemical sensors. With targeted research programs guided by the wealth of expertise of Infotonics business and scientific staff, the fabrication and packaging facility supports and accelerates innovative technology development of special interest to DOE in support of its mission and strategic defense, energy, and science goals.

  6. EERC Center for Biomass Utilization 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zygarlicke, Christopher J. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center; Hurley, John P. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center; Aulich, Ted R. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center; Folkedahl, Bruce C. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center; Strege, Joshua R. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center; Patel, Nikhil [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center; Shockey, Richard E. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

    2009-05-27

    The Center for Biomass Utilization® 2006 project at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) consisted of three tasks related to applied fundamental research focused on converting biomass feedstocks to energy, liquid transportation fuels, and chemicals. Task 1, entitled Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass to Syngas and Chemical Feedstocks, involved three activities. Task 2, entitled Crop Oil Biorefinery Process Development, involved four activities. Task 3, entitled Management, Education, and Outreach, focused on overall project management and providing educational outreach related to biomass technologies through workshops and conferences.

  7. Energetics Manufacturing Technology Center (EMTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Manufacturing Technology Center (EMTC), established in 1994 by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Manufacturing Technology (ManTech) Program, is Navy...

  8. Solar Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Bob

    2011-04-27

    The Department of Energy, Golden Field Office, awarded a grant to the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF) on August 1, 2005 to develop a solar and renewable energy information center. The Solar Technology Center (STC) is to be developed in two phases, with Phase I consisting of all activities necessary to determine feasibility of the project, including design and engineering, identification of land access issues and permitting necessary to determine project viability without permanently disturbing the project site, and completion of a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment. Phase II is the installation of infrastructure and related structures, which leads to commencement of operations of the STC. The STC is located in the Boulder City designated 3,000-acre Eldorado Valley Energy Zone, approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Boulder City and fronting on Eldorado Valley Drive. The 33-acre vacant parcel has been leased to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) by Boulder City to accommodate a planned facility that will be synergistic with present and planned energy projects in the Zone. The parcel will be developed by the UNLVRF. The NTSDC is the economic development arm of the UNLVRF. UNLVRF will be the entity responsible for overseeing the lease and the development project to assure compliance with the lease stipulations established by Boulder City. The STC will be operated and maintained by University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and its Center for Energy Research (UNLV-CER). Land parcels in the Eldorado Valley Energy Zone near the 33-acre lease are committed to the construction and operation of an electrical grid connected solar energy production facility. Other projects supporting renewable and solar technologies have been developed within the energy zone, with several more developments in the horizon.

  9. EERC Center for Biomass Utilization 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zygarlicke, C J; Schmidt, D D; Olson, E S; Leroux, K M; Wocken, C A; Aulich, T A; WIlliams, K D

    2008-07-28

    Biomass utilization is one solution to our nation’s addiction to oil and fossil fuels. What is needed now is applied fundamental research that will cause economic technology development for the utilization of the diverse biomass resources in the United States. This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) applied fundamental research project contributes to the development of economical biomass utilization for energy, transportation fuels, and marketable chemicals using biorefinery methods that include thermochemical and fermentation processes. The fundamental and basic applied research supports the broad scientific objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program, especially in the area of developing alternative renewable biofuels, sustainable bioenergy, technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and environmental remediation. Its deliverables include 1) identifying and understanding environmental consequences of energy production from biomass, including the impacts on greenhouse gas production, carbon emission abatement, and utilization of waste biomass residues and 2) developing biology-based solutions that address DOE and national needs related to waste cleanup, hydrogen production from renewable biomass, biological and chemical processes for energy and fuel production, and environmental stewardship. This project serves the public purpose of encouraging good environmental stewardship by developing biomass-refining technologies that can dramatically increase domestic energy production to counter current trends of rising dependence upon petroleum imports. Decreasing the nation’s reliance on foreign oil and energy will enhance national security, the economy of rural communities, and future competitiveness. Although renewable energy has many forms, such as wind and solar, biomass is the only renewable energy source that can be governed through agricultural methods and that has an energy density that can realistically compete with

  10. Hawaii technology utilization experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorn, D.W.; Miller, C.F.

    1976-12-08

    A one-year technology-transfer project involving ERDA installations and Hawaii consisted of sending teams from the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory on week-long field trips every two months to test the effectiveness of different methods of transferring technology information from federal sources to civilian clients. The team was questioned primarily on non-energy matters, and the energy questions asked related mostly to individuals or small industries. The team responed to all questions and found that a wide range of knowledge was more effective than having a sequence of experts. Hawaiians considered current major ERDA projects to be irrelevant to their needs. The team was most successful on a one-to-one basis because large groups and state agencies tend to be more policy- than action-oriented. Personal followup was considered essential. The team also learned that their visits generated ten times as many inquiries as were received unsolicited by the laboratory. Most inquiries involved biomass and use of agricultural wastes, solar energy, and transportation. An important contribution of the team's workshops was linking groups to work together on common problems. An appendix lists the subjects of queries and the names and addresses of consortium participants and Hawaiian contacts. (DCK)

  11. Clean Air Technology Center Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Clean Air Technology Center provides resources for emerging and existing air pollution prevention and control technologies and provides public access to data and information on their use, effectiveness and cost.

  12. Utility deregulation and AMR technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.

    1991-01-01

    This article reviews the effects of deregulation on other utilities and services and examines how the electric utilities can avoid the worst of these effects and capitalize of the best aspects of competition in achieving marketing excellence. The article presents deregulation as a customer service and underscores the need for utilities to learn to compete aggressively and intelligently and provide additional services available through technology such as automated meter reading

  13. Morgantown Energy Technology Center, technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This document has been prepared by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE's cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry's competitiveness in global environmental markets. METC's R ampersand D programs are focused on commercialization of technologies that will be carried out in the private sector. META has solicited two PRDAs for EM. The first, in the area of groundwater and soil technologies, resulted in twenty-one contact awards to private sector and university technology developers. The second PRDA solicited novel decontamination and decommissioning technologies and resulted in eighteen contract awards. In addition to the PRDAs, METC solicited the first EM ROA in 1993. The ROA solicited research in a broad range of EM-related topics including in situ remediation, characterization, sensors, and monitoring technologies, efficient separation technologies, mixed waste treatment technologies, and robotics. This document describes these technology development activities

  14. Increasing Counseling Center Utilization: Yeshiva University's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Victor; Nissel, Chaim; Eisenberg, Daniel; Kay, Jerald; Brown, Joshua T.

    2012-01-01

    Yeshiva University established a counseling center during the 2004-2005 academic year. As a religiously based institution, the administration recognized that there would likely be significant impediments to utilization of on-campus mental health services as a result of negative attitudes about mental illness and its treatment--stigma. To combat…

  15. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-10-31

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) Technology Assessment Program (TAP) was developed to provide detailed, comparable data for environmental technologies and to disseminate this data to D&D professionals in a manner that will facilitate the review and selection of technologies to perform decontamination and decommissioning. The objectives for this project include the following: Determine technology needs through review of the Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG) information and other applicable websites and needs databases; Perform a detailed review of industries that perform similar activities as those required in D&D operations to identify additional technologies; Define the technology assessment program for characterization and waste management problem sets; Define the data management program for characterization, dismantlement, and waste management problem sets; Evaluate baseline and innovative technologies under standard test conditions at Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) and other locations and collect data in the areas of performance, cost, health and safety, operations and maintenance, and primary and secondary waste generation; Continue to locate, verify, and incorporate technology performance data from other sources into the multimedia information system; and Develop the conceptual design for a dismantlement technology decision analysis tool for dismantlement technologies.

  16. Energy conversion and utilization technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The DOE Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies (ECUT) Program continues its efforts to expand the generic knowledge base in emerging technological areas that support energy conservation initiatives by both the DOE end-use sector programs and US private industry. ECUT addresses specific problems associated with the efficiency limits and capabilities to use alternative fuels in energy conversion and end-use. Research is aimed at understanding and improving techniques, processes, and materials that push the thermodynamic efficiency of energy conversion and usage beyond the state of the art. Research programs cover the following areas: combustion, thermal sciences, materials, catalysis and biocatalysis, and tribology. Six sections describe the status of direct contact heat exchange; the ECUT biocatalysis project; a computerized tribology information system; ceramic surface modification; simulation of internal combustion engine processes; and materials-by-design. These six sections have been indexed separately for inclusion on the database. (CK)

  17. Applied technology center business plan and market survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgin, Robert F.; Marchesini, Roberto

    1990-01-01

    Business plan and market survey for the Applied Technology Center (ATC), computer technology transfer and development non-profit corporation, is presented. The mission of the ATC is to stimulate innovation in state-of-the-art and leading edge computer based technology. The ATC encourages the practical utilization of late-breaking computer technologies by firms of all variety.

  18. News technology utilization fossil fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blišanová Monika

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Fossil fuel – “alternative energy“ is coal, petroleum, natural gas. Petroleum and natural gas are scarce resources, but they are delimited. Reserves petroleum will be depleted after 39 years and reserves natural gas after 60 years.World reserves coal are good for another 240 years. Coal is the most abundant fossil fuel. It is the least expensive energy source for generating electricity. Many environmental problems associated with use of coal:in coal production, mining creates environmental problems.On Slovakia representative coal only important internal fuel – power of source and coal is produced in 5 locality. Nowadays, oneself invest to new technology on utilization coal. Perspective solution onself shows UCG, IGCC.

  19. NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between the NIH research laboratories and external partners. With specialized teams, TTC guides the interactions of our partners from the point of discovery to patenting, from invention development to licensing. We play a key role in helping to accelerate development of cutting-edge research by connecting our partners to NIH’s world-class researchers, facilities, and knowledge.

  20. Spinoff 2002: Fortieth Anniversary Technology Utilization Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Since its inception 40 years ago, NASA's Technology Transfer Program has led the way for our nation to benefit from cutting-edge aerospace technologies. In addition to contributing to U.S. economic growth, these technologies are improving the quality of life on Earth while finding new ways to protect and preserve it. NASA's research and development efforts have advanced areas in medicine, communications, manufacturing, computer technology, and homeland security. These breakthroughs, translated into commercial products, are enhancing the lives of Americans everywhere. When a congressional mandate led NASA to develop the Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Program, the Agency began a wide dissemination of its research and development results. In doing so, NASA recognized that many of its technologies were transferable to industry for the development of commercial products. As a result, the Technology Utilization Program was born in 1962. The successful program went through several changes over the years, as its philosophy, mission, and goals adapted into the Technology Transfer Program we know today. The program strives to make the latest technologies available to industry as soon as they are developed. Each year, NASA's Spinoff publication showcases new products and services resulting from commercial partnerships between NASA and private industry. In the 2002 issue, the NASA field centers reflect upon the growth that has made these innovations available to the public. The Research and Development section examines past achievements, current successes, and future goals for each of the ten NASA centers. The Commercial Benefits section proudly highlights 51 new spinoff products, including a heart pump for patients needing a heart transplant, as well as an air purifier that destroys anthrax spores. The Technology Transfer and Outreach section describes the outreach achievements and educational successes made possible through the NASA Commercial Technology Network

  1. Distributed H2 Supply for Fuel Cell Utility Vehicles Year 6 - Activity 3.5 - Development fo a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almlie, Jay

    2012-04-15

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed a high-pressure hydrogen production system that reforms a liquid organic feedstock and water at operating pressures up to 800 bar (~12,000 psig). The advantages of this system include the elimination of energy-intensive hydrogen compression, a smaller process footprint, and the elimination of gaseous or liquid hydrogen transport. This system could also potentially enable distributed hydrogen production from centralized coal. Processes have been investigated to gasify coal and then convert the syngas into alcohol or alkanes. These alcohols and alkanes could then be easily transported in bulk to distributed high-pressure water-reforming (HPWR)-based systems to deliver hydrogen economically. The intent of this activity was to utilize the EERC’s existing HPWR hydrogen production process, previously designed and constructed in a prior project phase, as a basis to improve operational and production performance of an existing demonstration unit. Parameters to be pursued included higher hydrogen delivery pressure, higher hydrogen production rates, and the ability to refill within a 5-minute time frame.

  2. Center for Advanced Separation Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honaker, Rick

    2013-09-30

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2011, U.S. mining operations contributed a total of $232 billion to the nation’s GDP plus $138 billion in labor income. Of this the coal mining industry contributed a total of $97.5 billion to GDP plus $53 billion in labor income. Despite these contributions, the industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, CAST is now a five-university consortium – Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah and Montana Tech, - that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FE0000699, Center for Advanced Separation Technology. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in two broad areas: Advanced Pre-Combustion Clean Coal Technologies and Gas-Gas Separations. Distribution of funds is handled via competitive solicitation of research proposals through Site Coordinators at the five member universities. These were reviewed and the selected proposals were forwarded these to the DOE/NETL Project Officer for final review and approval. The successful projects are listed below by category, along with abstracts from their final reports.

  3. Follow on Research for Multi-Utility Technology Test Bed Aircraft at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (FY13 Progress Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2013-01-01

    Modern aircraft employ a significant fraction of their weight in composite materials to reduce weight and improve performance. Aircraft aeroservoelastic models are typically characterized by significant levels of model parameter uncertainty due to the composite manufacturing process. Small modeling errors in the finite element model will eventually induce errors in the structural flexibility and mass, thus propagating into unpredictable errors in the unsteady aerodynamics and the control law design. One of the primary objectives of Multi Utility Technology Test-bed (MUTT) aircraft is the flight demonstration of active flutter suppression, and therefore in this study, the identification of the primary and secondary modes for the structural model tuning based on the flutter analysis of MUTT aircraft. The ground vibration test-validated structural dynamic finite element model of the MUTT aircraft is created in this study. The structural dynamic finite element model of MUTT aircraft is improved using the in-house Multi-disciplinary Design, Analysis, and Optimization tool. In this study, two different weight configurations of MUTT aircraft have been improved simultaneously in a single model tuning procedure.

  4. Mission & Role | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI TTC serves as the focal point for implementing the Federal Technology Transfer Act to utilize patents as incentive for commercial development of technologies and to establish research collaborations and licensing among academia, federal laboratories, non-profit organizations, and industry. The TTC supports technology development activities for the National Cancer Institute and nine other NIH Institutes and Centers. TTC staff negotiate co-development agreements and licenses with universities, non-profit organizations, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to ensure compliance with Federal statutes, regulations and the policies of the National Institutes of Health. TTC also reviews employee invention reports and makes recommendations concerning filing of domestic and foreign patent applications. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  5. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    2000-01-31

    The Online Measurement of Decontamination project team received a commitment for a demonstration in May from the Sacramento (California) Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Rancho Seco site. Since this site is a member of the DOE Commercial Utilities Consortium, the demonstration will fulfill the DOE and commercial technology demonstration requirements. Discussion on deployment of the Integrated Vertical and Overhead Decontamination (IVOD) System at Rancho Seco was conducted; date for deployment tentatively scheduled for early spring. Based upon fictional requirements from SRS for a shiny monitor in a high-level waste tank, FIU-HCET developed and delivered a draft slurry monitor design and draft test plan. Experiments measuring slurry settling time for SRS slurry simulant at 10 wt% have been completed on FIU-HCET'S flow loop with SRS dip. The completed design package of the test mockup for evaluating Non-Intrusive Location of Buried Items Technologies was sent to Fluor Fernald and the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program for review. Comments are due at the end of January. Preliminary experiments to determine size distribution of aerosols generated during metal cutting were performed. A 1/4-inch-thick iron plate was cut using a plasma arc torch, and the size distribution of airborne particles was measured using a multistage impactor. Per request of DOE-Ohio, FIU-HCET participated in a weeklong value engineering study for the characterization, decontamination, and dismantlement of their critical path facility.

  6. Technology utilization and American competitiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaranda, Frank; Arnold, Ray; Fetterolf, Fred

    1992-01-01

    This session of discussions reports on two sides of the technology transfer issue. The speakers are representatives of the aluminum industry (Alcoa Aluminum) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Office of Commercial Programs. They discuss what technology transfer means, what NASA does for industry, and how information is disseminated.

  7. Utilizing Information Technology to Facilitate Rapid Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    PAGES 109 14. SUBJECT TERMS Rapid Acquisition, eCommerce , eProcurement, Information Technology, Contracting, Global Information Network...Agency. 5 eCommerce and eProcurement, and possess an adequate knowledge of information technology. D. RESEARCH QUESTIONS 1. Primary Research... eCommerce , Information Technology, and eProcurement knowledge, and government and private industry reports utilizing numerous library and Internet

  8. Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC), in the Energy and Transportation Science Division (ETSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL),...

  9. About the Clean Air Technology Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Clean Air Technology Center provides resources for emerging and existing air pollution prevention and control technologies and provides public access to data and information on their use, effectiveness and cost.

  10. License Agreements | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) licenses the discoveries of NCI and nine other NIH Institutes so new technologies can be developed and commercialized, to convert them into public health benefits.

  11. Determinants of U.S. poison center utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litovitz, Toby; Benson, Blaine E; Youniss, Jessica; Metz, Edward

    2010-06-01

    High poison center utilization has been associated with decreased emergency department usage and hospitalization rates. However, utilization requires awareness of the poison center. Penetrance, defined as the number of human poison exposures reported to a poison center per 1,000 population, has been used as a marker of poison center awareness. To identify factors that influence poison center penetrance to optimize the life- and cost-saving benefits of poison control centers. Human poison exposures that were reported to the National Poison Data System in 2001 were analyzed to identify and rank factors affecting poison center penetrance. Overall penetrance correlated with pediatric penetrance (R(2) = 0.75, p poison center that were already in or en route to a healthcare facility at the time of the call to the poison center (R(2) = 0.41, p poison center service populations were associated with lower penetrance (R(2) = 0.23, p poison center (multiple regression). Positive predictors included the percentage of the population younger than 5 years, the percentage of the adult population with a bachelor's degree, poison center certification, poison center educator FTEs (full time equivalents), Asian population percentage, and population density. The inverse correlation between pediatric penetrance and healthcare facility utilization supports prior observations of excessive healthcare utilization when a poison center is not called. Since race, language and distance are barriers to poison center utilization, and since healthcare utilization increases when poison center penetrance declines, low penetrance suggests a lack of awareness of the poison center rather than a low incidence of poisonings. Strategies to raise penetrance should be informed by an understanding of the barriers to utilization - language, Black/African American race, distance from the poison center, poverty, and lower education levels.

  12. Search Technologies | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our team of technology transfer specialists has specialized training in invention reporting, patenting, patent strategy, executing technology transfer agreements and marketing. TTC is comprised of professionals with diverse legal, scientific, and business/marketing expertise. Most of our staff hold doctorate-level technical and/or legal training.

  13. Available Technologies | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our team of technology transfer specialists has specialized training in invention reporting, patenting, patent strategy, executing technology transfer agreements and marketing. TTC is comprised of professionals with diverse legal, scientific, and business/marketing expertise. Most of our staff hold doctorate-level technical and/or legal training.

  14. Utilization of information and communication technologies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results of the study showed that: (a) most Information and communication technologies were not available meaning that rate of utilization of ICT is low. It was found that ICT posed very serious challenges to Secretarial Studies Teachers in the polytechnics. Given the present low utilization rate of ICT in Polytechnics, the ...

  15. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-04-30

    The final data package has been completed for the Mississippi State University, DIAL FTP Wall Depth Removal Characterization Technology. The package has been sent to DIAL for comments. Work is progressing on completing the transfer of glove boxes and tanks from Rocky Flats to FIU-HCET for the purpose of performing size reduction technology assessments. Vendors are being identified and security measures are being put in place to meet the High Risk Property criteria required by Rocky Flats. The FIU-HCET Technology Assessment Program has been included as one of 11 verification programs across the US and Canada described in the Interstate Technology Regulatory Cooperation (ITRC) document, ''Multi-state Evaluation of Elements Important to the Verification of Remediation Technologies'', dated January 1999. FIU-HCET will also participate in a panel discussion on technology verification programs at the International Environmental Technology Expo '99.

  16. Development of coal energy utilization technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Coal liquefaction produces new and clean energy by performing hydrogenation, decomposition and liquefaction on coal under high temperatures and pressures. NEDO has been developing bituminous coal liquefaction technologies by using a 150-t/d pilot plant. It has also developed quality improving and utilization technologies for liquefied coal, whose practical use is expected. For developing coal gasification technologies, construction is in progress for a 200-t/d pilot plant for spouted bed gasification power generation. NEDO intends to develop coal gasification composite cycle power generation with high efficiency and of environment harmonious type. This paper summarizes the results obtained during fiscal 1994. It also dwells on technologies to manufacture hydrogen from coal. It further describes development of technologies to manufacture methane and substituting natural gas (SNG) by hydrogenating and gasifying coal. The ARCH process can select three operation modes depending on which of SNG yield, thermal efficiency or BTX yield is targeted. With respect to promotion of coal utilization technologies, description is given on surveys on development of next generation technologies for coal utilization, and clean coal technology promotion projects. International coal utilization and application projects are also described. 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Recent trend in coal utilization technology. Coal utilization workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chon Ho; Son, Ja Ek; Lee, In Chul; Jin, Kyung Tae; Kim, Seong Soo [Korea Inst. of Energy Research, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The 11th Korea-U.S.A. joint workshop on coal utilization technology was held in somerset, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. from october 2 to 3, 1995. In the opening ceremony, Dr.C. Low-el Miller, associate deputy assistant secretary of office of clean coal technology, U.S.DOE, gave congratulatory remarks and Dr. Young Mok Son, president of KIER, made a keynote address. In this workshop, 30 papers were presented in the fields of emission control technology, advanced power generation systems, and advanced coal cleaning and liquid fuels. Especially, from the Korean side, not only KIER but also other private research institutes and major engineering companies including KEPCO, Daewoo Institute of Construction Technology, Jindo Engineering and Construction Co. Daewoo Institute for Advanced Engineering and universities participated in this workshop, reflecting their great interests. Attendants actively discussed about various coal utilization technologies and exchanged scientific and technical information on the state-of-art clean coal technologies under development. (author)

  18. CAD/BIM Technology Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Supporting Better Decisions in Facility, Infrastructure, and Environment ManagementAccess to technology tools to model structures before they are built can provide...

  19. 2017 Technology Showcase | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2017 Technology Showcase is an inaugural, half-day event showcased technologies developed by the National Cancer Institute's Center for Cancer Research (CCR) and the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR).

  20. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-01-31

    FIU-HCET participated in an ICT meeting at Mound during the second week of December and presented a brief videotape of the testing of the Robotic Climber technology. During this meeting, FIU-HCET proposed the TechXtract technology for possible testing at Mound and agreed to develop a five-page proposal for review by team members. FIU-HCET provided assistance to Bartlett Inc. and General Lasertronics Corporation in developing a proposal for a Program Opportunity Notice (PON). The proposal was submitted by these companies on January 5, 1999. The search for new equipment dismantlement technologies is continuing. The following vendors have responded to requests for demonstration: LUMONICS, Laser Solutions technology; CRYO-BEAM, Cryogenic cutting technology; Waterjet Technology Association, Waterjet Cutting technology; and DIAJET, Waterjet Cutting technology. Based on the tasks done in FY98, FIU-HCET is working closely with Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to revise the plan and scope of work of the pipeline plugging project in FY99, which involves activities of lab-scale flow loop experiments and a large-scale demonstration test bed.

  1. International Center for Gas Technology Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gad, L.H.

    1993-01-01

    Based on an acknowledgement of the growing importance of natural gas, a number of European countries, USA, Japan and the Russian Federation have worked together in order to establish a common center of information on natural gas technology under the auspices of the International Energy Agency. Centers were to be established in Washington and in Denmark. The centers will concern themselves with establishing an international information center for gas technology, effecting natural gas technology transfer between global regions, carrying out analytical studies on the energy market and the development of technology within the field of natural gas. The structure of the decision-making processes that will be employed is explained in addition to the organization and economy. The centers should build up a global information network between the relevant countries, their gas companies, institutions etc. (AB)

  2. Joint development utility and university and utility and research center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Roberto del Giudice R.; Valgas, Helio Moreira [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    This paper shows the background acquired by CEMIG in dealing with projects associated with R and D (Research and Development), carried out as a result of the establishment of contracts or governants with universities and research center for direct application on the solution of problems related to the operation of the system, within the scope of electrical operation planning. The various aspects of a project of this nature such as legal questions, characterization of a contract or a covenant, main developments and new opportunity areas should be covered. Finally the subject shall be dealt with under the Total Quality approach, involving the proposition of control items associated to the process and goals to be reached. (author) 7 refs., 2 figs.

  3. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-03-30

    A vendor was selected for the diamond wire technology demonstration scheduled for this summer at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). A team consisting of personnel from FIU-HCET, PPPL, and AEA Technology reviewed the submitted bids. FIU-HCET will contract this vendor. At the SRS Ninth ICT teleconference, the ICT team discussed the status of the following demonstrations: LRAD; x-ray, K-edge; Strippable Coatings; Thermal Spray Vitrification; Cutting/Shearing/Dismantlement/Size Reduction; and Electrets. The LRAD demo is complete, and the x-ray/K-edge, Strippable Coatings, and Electrets demos are ongoing. The Asbestos and Thermal Spray Vitrification demos require more laboratory testing. The Cutting/Shearing/Dismantlement/Size Reduction demo is undergoing procurement. Five FIU-HCET staff members took the 1S0 14000 environmental auditor training course February 22-26, 1999, given by ASC. The test plan for the Facility Dismantlement Technology Assessment is finished and ready for internal review.

  4. Implementation digital technologies in nuclear utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, C.; Maselli, A.J., E-mail: Tony.Maselli@Invensys.com [Invensys Operations Management, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The introduction of digital technologies into the nuclear industry has assisted in many ways and made many of the Life Extensions and Uprates a possibility. But with this introduction of digital technologies comes some potentially challenging issues which need to be addressed for ultimate project success. This presentation discusses what a nuclear utility should consider and establish when implementing digital technologies in their plant. Digital technologies have been employed in many safety critical industries such as Aerospace, Pharmaceutical, Oil and Gas, and Chemical. However, nuclear industry implementation of digital technologies has been slow and in many ways tenuous. There are even documented operating experience events in which plant trips/SCRAMs occurred during a digital system implementation. This presentation aims to prevent those issues drawing upon the lessons learned over the past 5 years. Considerations include general challenges to overcome when implementing Digital Technologies, how to justify and execute projects, evaluation of resource knowledge, and the new challenges of Cyber Security. (author)

  5. Implementation digital technologies in nuclear utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegand, C.; Maselli, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of digital technologies into the nuclear industry has assisted in many ways and made many of the Life Extensions and Uprates a possibility. But with this introduction of digital technologies comes some potentially challenging issues which need to be addressed for ultimate project success. This presentation discusses what a nuclear utility should consider and establish when implementing digital technologies in their plant. Digital technologies have been employed in many safety critical industries such as Aerospace, Pharmaceutical, Oil and Gas, and Chemical. However, nuclear industry implementation of digital technologies has been slow and in many ways tenuous. There are even documented operating experience events in which plant trips/SCRAMs occurred during a digital system implementation. This presentation aims to prevent those issues drawing upon the lessons learned over the past 5 years. Considerations include general challenges to overcome when implementing Digital Technologies, how to justify and execute projects, evaluation of resource knowledge, and the new challenges of Cyber Security. (author)

  6. Development of technologies for solar energy utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    With relation to the development of photovoltaic power systems for practical use, studies were made on thin-substrate polycrystalline solar cells and thin-film solar cells as manufacturing technology for solar cells for practical use. The technological development for super-high efficiency solar cells was also being advanced. Besides, the research and development have been conducted of evaluation technology for photovoltaic power systems and systems to utilize the photovoltaic power generation and peripheral technologies. The demonstrative research on photovoltaic power systems was continued. The international cooperative research on photovoltaic power systems was also made. The development of a manufacturing system for compound semiconductors for solar cells was carried out. As to the development of solar energy system technologies for industrial use, a study of elemental technologies was first made, and next the development of an advanced heat process type solar energy system was commenced. In addition, the research on passive solar systems was made. An investigational study was carried out of technologies for solar cities and solar energy snow melting systems. As international joint projects, studies were made of solar heat timber/cacao drying plants, etc. The paper also commented on projects for international cooperation for the technological development of solar energy utilization systems. 26 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A.Ebadian

    1999-02-28

    Search for decontamination technologies to be assessed at FIU-HCET continues. Bartlett Nuclear Inc. returned to FIU-HCET on February 15-19, 1999, to complete the demonstration of coating removal from concrete ceiling and aggressive contamination removal on uncoated concrete wall using their Robotic Climber. The design of test beds for large-scale technology demonstration of blockage locating and pipe unplugging has undergone major revision. The lab-scale test loop is also under modification. A new sampling system using isokinetic principles and consisting of thermistors, flow controller, and Wheatstone bridge will be installed on the flow loop. FIU-HCET International Coordinator attended the VII Steering Committee meeting in Lima, Peru, on February 11-12, 1999, and successfully introduced the Interactive Communication Website. Additional agenda items on the Website were proposed by the Steering Committee for upcoming committee meetings and working groups.

  8. NASA(Field Center Based) Technology Commercialization Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Under the direction of the IC(sup 2) Institute, the Johnson Technology Commercialization Center has met or exceeded all planned milestones and metrics during the first two and a half years of the NTCC program. The Center has established itself as an agent for technology transfer and economic development in- the Clear Lake community, and is positioned to continue as a stand-alone operation. This report presents data on the experimental JTCC program, including all objective measures tracked over its duration. While the metrics are all positive, the data indicates a shortage of NASA technologies with strong commercial potential, barriers to the identification and transfer of technologies which may have potential, and small financial return to NASA via royalty-bearing licenses. The Center has not yet reached the goal of self-sufficiency based on rental income, and remains dependent on NASA funding. The most important issues raised by the report are the need for broader and deeper community participation in the Center, technology sourcing beyond JSC, and the form of future funding which will be appropriate.

  9. Establishing a Center for Instructional Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, George H.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews how the University of Texas at Austin (UT-Austin) established a center to support its faculty. Addresses key questions related to the development of instructional technology (IT) centers through examples from UT-Austin. Discusses funding, fees, types of services and support, staffing, facilities provided, and training philosophy.…

  10. Utilization of cocoyam production technologies among women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study analysed utilization of improved cocoyam production technologies among women in Abia State, Nigeria. A multistage random sampling technique was used to select sixty (60) women. Data for the study were collected using a structured questionnaire and analysed with descriptive statistics and inferential statistics ...

  11. Information Technology literacy and information utilization in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information technology (IT) is widely used in variety of ways to improve the quality of learning in Nigerian universities. One significant area of application of IT is the provision of basic access to and utilization of global electronic information resources. The aim of this study is to investigate the extent of IT literacy among ...

  12. Perspectives and utilization technologies of chicory ( Cichorium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exploring and developing multiple utility technologies of plant resources is an alternative way for improving the efficiency of land used for food and fuel production. Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) has a nutritional quality comparable to lucerne as it contains similar proportions of protein, lipid, minerals and other nutrients.

  13. utilization of sweetpotato based confection technology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oma

    Keywords: Technology, Sweet potato, utilization, households, southeastern, Nigeria. INTRODUCTION. Sweet potato (lpomoea batatas L) is among the worlds most important, versatile, and under exploited food crops, with more than 133 million tones (FAOSTAT, 1997) in annual production. Sweet potato currently ranks as ...

  14. Awarensss and utilization of information technology among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper examines the awareness and utilization of Information Technologies among Agricultural scientists in Nigeria. Data were collected from 170 respondents with the aid of structured questionnaire and analysed using frequency, percentage, mean and Ordinary Least Square multiple regression. This study found that ...

  15. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-09-30

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) demonstration of the diamond wire cutting technology on the surrogate of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), Figure 1, was performed from August 23-September 3, 1999. The plated diamond wire, Figure 2, was successful in cutting through all components of the TFTR surrogate including stainless steel, inconel and graphite. The demonstration tested three different void fill materials (mortar with sand, Rheocell-15, and foam) and three cooling systems (water, air, and liquid nitrogen). The optimum combination was determined to be the use of the low-density concrete void fill, Rheocell-15 with an average density of 52 lbs/ft{sup 3}, using a water coolant. However, the liquid nitrogen performed better than expected with only minor problems and was considered to be a successful demonstration of the Bluegrass Concrete Cutting, Inc. proprietary liquid-nitrogen coolant system. Data from the demonstration is being calculated and a summary of the technology demonstration will be included in the October monthly report. An ITSR will be written comparing the diamond wire saw to the plasma arc (baseline) technology. The MTR Chemical Protective Suit, a proprietary new suit from Kimberly Clark, was evaluated from 8/9/99 to 8/12/99 at Beaver, WV. This particular suit was tested on subjects performing three different tasks: climbing through a horizontal confined space, vertical confined space (pit), and loading and unloading material using a wheel barrow. Multiple test subjects performed each task for 20 minutes each. Performance of the innovative suit was compared to two commonly used types of protective clothing. Vital statistics, including body temperature and heart rate, were continuously monitored and recorded by an authorized physician. A summary of the demonstration will be included in the October monthly report. Along with the MTR Chemical Protective Suit, the VitalSense{trademark} Telemetric Monitoring System from Mini Mitter

  16. Development of technologies for utilizing geothermal energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    In verifying the effectiveness of the deep geothermal resource exploration technology, development is being carried out on a fracture-type reservoir exploration method. The seismic exploration method investigates detailed structures of underground fracture systems by using seismic waves generated on the ground surface. Verification experiments for fiscal 1994 were carried out by selecting the Kakkonda area in which small fracture networks form reservoir beds. Geothermal resources in deep sections (deeper than 2000 m with temperatures higher than 350{degree}C) are promising in terms of amount of the resources, but anticipated with difficulty in exploration and impediments in drilling. To avoid these risks, studies are being progressed on the availability of resources in deep sections, their utilization possibility, and technologies of effective exploration and drilling. This paper summarizes the results of deep resource investigations during fiscal 1994. It also describes such technological development as hot water utilizing power generation. Development is performed on a binary cycle power generation plant which pumps and utilizes hot water of 150 to 200{degree}C by using a downhole pump. The paper also reports development on element technologies for hot rock power generation systems. It also dwells on development of safe and effective drilling and production technologies for deep geothermal resources.

  17. Technologies for Learner-Centered Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Jane; Crane, Daph

    2013-01-01

    As the number, type, and use of technologies to support learning increases, so do the opportunities for using these technologies for feedback. Learner-centered feedback is a core to the teaching-learning process. It is related to assessment in describing how learners perform in their learning, their gain in knowledge, skills, and attitudes.…

  18. Mars in Situ Resource Utilization Technology Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Santago-Maldonado, Edgardo

    2012-01-01

    We have examined the technologies required to enable Mars In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) because our understanding of Mars resources has changed significantly in the last five years as a result of recent robotic missions to the red planet. Two major developments, (1) confirmation of the presence of near-surface water in the form of ice in very large amounts at high latitudes by the Phoenix Lander and (2) the likely existence of water at lower latitudes in the form of hydrates or ice in the top one meter of the regolith, have the potential to change ISRU technology selection. A brief technology assessment was performed for the most promising Mars atmospheric gas processing techniques: Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) and Methanation (aka Sabatier), as well as an overview of soil processing technology to extract water from Martian soil.

  19. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher E. Hull

    2006-05-15

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

  20. Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher E. Hull

    2006-09-30

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

  1. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher E. Hull

    2005-11-04

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

  2. Center for Coastline Security Technology, Year 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Figure 2.6.8: Close-Up Photograph of RPUUV Tail Section. Figure 2.6.9: Force and moments applied on a hydrofoil . Figure 2.6.10: The NACA 21016... hydrofoil profile. Florida Atlantic University 4/28/08 Page 10 Center for Coastline Security Technology Year Three-Final Report Figure...as a 3D wing with a NACA 21016 hydrofoil profile (Figure 2.6.10) held by 3 cylinders (Figure 2.6.8). Center for Coastline Security Technology Year

  3. Development of beam utilization/application technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, B. H.; Kim, Y.K.; Song, T.Y.

    1999-05-01

    High power proton accelerator is considered as one of national fundamental research facilities and a key to advanced nuclear technology development, having been widely used in an un detachable relationship with nuclear research in advanced countries. The high power proton accelerator will be installed in several phases as an up front facility of the nuclear waste transmutation system. It is expected that a common understanding and a general agreement over proper utilization of the accelerator should be deduced and that a user program for beam utilization and application should be firmly established in time for the completion of each phase of the accelerator. This high power proton accelerator will consist of several component accelerators and, from up front, accelerators such as injector, RFQ, CCDTL, etc. will be installed in sequence and deliver respectively at each stage beams of 3MeV, 20MeV, 100Mev, etc. to be variously utilized for industries, defence industry, medical treatment, environmental protection and basic science research. In order for the accelerator to be fully utilized as a national fundamental research facility beyond nuclear field, it is necessary to formulate a proceeding plan of the user program for the accelerator and to cultivate industrial utilization/application studies of proton beams accelerated by injector or RFQ of the accelerator. (author). 38 refs., 84 tabs., 39 figs

  4. Development of beam utilization/application technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, B. H.; Kim, Y.K.; Song, T.Y. [and others

    1999-05-01

    High power proton accelerator is considered as one of national fundamental research facilities and a key to advanced nuclear technology development, having been widely used in an un detachable relationship with nuclear research in advanced countries. The high power proton accelerator will be installed in several phases as an up front facility of the nuclear waste transmutation system. It is expected that a common understanding and a general agreement over proper utilization of the accelerator should be deduced and that a user program for beam utilization and application should be firmly established in time for the completion of each phase of the accelerator. This high power proton accelerator will consist of several component accelerators and, from up front, accelerators such as injector, RFQ, CCDTL, etc. will be installed in sequence and deliver respectively at each stage beams of 3MeV, 20MeV, 100Mev, etc. to be variously utilized forindustries, defence industry, medical treatment, environmental protection and basic science research. In order for the accelerator to be fully utilized as a national fundamental research facility beyond nuclear field, it is necessary to formulate a proceeding plan of the user program for the accelerator and to cultivate industrial utilization/application studies of proton beams accelerated by injector or RFQ of the accelerator. (author). 38 refs., 84 tabs., 39 figs.

  5. Technologies for learner-centered feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Costello

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As the number, type, and use of technologies to support learning increases, so do the opportunities for using these technologies for feedback. Learner-centered feedback is a core to the teaching-learning process. It is related to assessment in describing how learners perform in their learning, their gain in knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Feedback, types of feedback, guidelines for effective learner-centered feedback, and feedback’s relationship to assessment are presented. Methods of providing feedback, for example, automated, audio scribe pens, digital audio, etc., and the related technologies are described. Technologies that allow instructors to make informed decisions about the use of various methods for feedback are discussed.

  6. Planning and Management of Technology Deployment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Won; Joo, Po Kook; Kim, Jun Yeon and others

    2005-08-01

    The R and D contents are summarized as follows ; Models were set-up for transferring the developed technologies to the industry and managing technology deployment center to vitalize the commercialization and then the set-up model was tried to apply for transferring technologies for commercialization and to define interfaces between the R and D and industrial applications In this project, new products and processes were developed for promoting the commercialization. Infra-structures were firmly set-up for the venture company promotion and technology deployment developed during executing the proton Engineering frontier Project. Commercialization methodology connection with industrial companies were studied by outside specializing institute. Development of gem-stone coloring and new photo catalyst producing techniques are very high value-adding technologies, therefore, experimental and theoretical R and D were transacted simultaneously to obtain the originality of the technology. The theoretical R and D was committed to a specialist outside

  7. Johnson Space Center Research and Technology Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pido, Kelle; Davis, Henry L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    As the principle center for NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) leads NASA's development of human spacecraft, human support systems, and human spacecraft operations. To implement this mission, JSC has focused on developing the infrastructure and partnerships that enable the technology development for future NASA programs. In our efforts to develop key technologies, we have found that collaborative relationships with private industry and academia strengthen our capabilities, infuse innovative ideas, and provide alternative applications for our development projects. The American public has entrusted NASA with the responsibility for space--technology development, and JSC is committed to the transfer of the technologies that we develop to the private sector for further development and application. It is our belief that commercialization of NASA technologies benefits both American industry and NASA through technology innovation and continued partnering. To this end, we present the 1998-1999 JSC Research and Technology Report. As your guide to the current JSC technologies, this report showcases the projects in work at JSC that may be of interest to U.S. industry, academia, and other government agencies (federal, state, and local). For each project, potential alternative uses and commercial applications are described.

  8. St. Luke's Medical Center: technologizing health care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumanguil, S.S.

    1994-01-01

    The computerization of the St. Luke's Medical Center improved the hospital administration and management, particularly in nuclear medicine department. The use of computer-aided X-ray simulator machine and computerized linear accelerator machine in diagnosing and treating cancer are the most recent medical technological breakthroughs that benefited thousands of Filipino cancer patients. 4 photos

  9. The evolution of resource utilization in regional burn centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastenmeier, Andrew; Faraklas, Iris; Cochran, Amalia; Pham, Tam N; Young, Samantha R; Gibran, Nicole S; Gamelli, Richard; Halerz, Marcia; Light, Timothy D; Kealey, G Patrick; Wibbenmeyer, Lucy; Latenser, Barbara; Jenabzadeh, K; Mohr, William J; Ahrenholz, David H; Saffle, Jeffrey R

    2010-01-01

    Regional burn centers provide unique multidisciplinary care that has been associated with dramatically improved outcomes for burn victims. Patients with complex skin and soft tissue injuries are increasingly admitted to these centers for definitive care. This study was designed to assess current trends in burn center resource utilization. Members of the Multicenter Trials Group of American Burn Association were invited to participate in this retrospective review of all patients admitted to their respective regional burn centers during a 10-year period. Collected data included admission diagnosis, demographics, length of stay (LOS), hospital charges, and mortality. Five regional academic burn centers participated. They collectively admitted 18,246 patients during the study period, of whom 15,219 (83.4%) had a primary burn diagnosis and 3027 (16.6%) were patients with nonburn diagnoses. During this period, annual admissions for the five centers increased by 34.7%, ranging from 19 to 83% for individual centers. Simultaneously, mean burn size decreased from 12.3 to 8.8% TBSA. From 1998 to 2006, admissions for nonburn diagnoses increased by 244.9%, whereas burn admissions increased by 31.1%. Although mean LOS was reduced by >25%, total charges for all patients increased by 37.7% after adjustment for inflation. Nonburn patients had significantly higher mean age, longer LOS, greater mortality, and higher daily charges. This review of admissions to five academic burn centers reveals that these centers are treating more patients with smaller burns and an increasing number of complex nonburn conditions. Nonburn patients represent an older and more debilitated population that consumes disproportionately more resources than burn patients. These data show a dramatic shift in burn center resource utilization and the concurrent evolution of regional burn centers into centers for the care of complex wounds.

  10. Utilizing Internet Technologies in Observatory Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cording, Dean

    2002-12-01

    The 'Internet boom' of the past few years has spurred the development of a number of technologies to provide services such as secure communications, reliable messaging, information publishing and application distribution for commercial applications. Over the same period, a new generation of computer languages have also developed to provide object oriented design and development, improved reliability, and cross platform compatibility. Whilst the business models of the 'dot.com' era proved to be largely unviable, the technologies that they were based upon have survived and have matured to the point were they can now be utilized to build secure, robust and complete observatory control control systems. This paper will describe how Electro Optic Systems has utilized these technologies in the development of its third generation Robotic Observatory Control System (ROCS). ROCS provides an extremely flexible configuration capability within a control system structure to provide truly autonomous robotic observatory operation including observation scheduling. ROCS was built using Internet technologies such as Java, Java Messaging Service (JMS), Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP), Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), eXtendible Markup Language (XML), Hypertext Transport Protocol (HTTP) and Java WebStart. ROCS was designed to be capable of controlling all aspects of an observatory and be able to be reconfigured to handle changing equipment configurations or user requirements without the need for an expert computer programmer. ROCS consists of many small components, each designed to perform a specific task, with the configuration of the system specified using a simple meta language. The use of small components facilitates testing and makes it possible to prove that the system is correct.

  11. Utilization of a Sobering Center for Acute Alcohol Intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Bernardin, Shannon; Carrico, Adam; Max, Wendy; Chapman, Susan

    2017-09-01

    The objective was to describe the population utilizing a sobering center for public alcohol intoxication and compare between single-visit users, repeat users, and high users. We conducted a secondary analysis of 1,271 adults cared for in a sobering center from July 2014 to June 2015. We divided the population into three groups-single use (one visit), repeat users (two to five visits), and high (six or more) users-and evaluated demographics, lifetime health diagnoses utilizing the Elixhauser Comorbidity Index, rates of public service utilization including ambulance and emergency department, and related costs. The population was primarily male, middle-aged, and ethnically diverse. Compared to single-visit users (n = 869), repeat (n = 287) and high users (n = 115) were older, were more likely to be currently homeless, and had spent more time homeless. Repeat and high users had significantly higher rates of hypertension, liver disease, diabetes, depression, psychoses, and drug abuse diagnoses compared to single-visit users. In addition to sobering visits, utilization of ambulance and ED and related costs were significantly greater for the high users compared to repeat and single-visit users. From an overall heterogeneous population, more frequent utilizers of the sobering center, both high and repeat users compared to low users, had significantly greater prevalence of chronic disorders, service utilization, and homelessness. Findings indicate that a sobering center can have a prominent role in the care for those with acute alcohol intoxication, particularly those individuals with chronic public intoxication who are likewise homeless. Further longitudinal research could offer important insights as to the population served over time, investigating changes in utilization and efforts toward health and housing stabilization. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  12. Utilization of maternal health services in rural primary health centers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Utilization of maternal health services in rural primary health centers in Sub- Saharan Africa. ... their pregnancies were normal during antenatal care visits, hostile attitude of health workers, poverty and mode of payment. Majority of the PHCs provided antenatal, normal delivery, and post natal services. Rural mothers lacked ...

  13. Do Monetary Incentives Increase Fitness Center Utilization? It Depends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Stephanie A; Wooldridge, Jennalee S; Ross, Kaile M; Masters, Kevin S

    2018-03-01

    To examine the effects of an employer-based monetary incentive program on membership termination and usage at a fitness center. Retrospective nested case-control study examining the relationship between participation in an incentive program, visits to the fitness center, and membership termination at 1 year. University-based fitness center. Members (N = 1122) of a university-based fitness center. Members were offered either a US$25 incentive for each month they visited the fitness center at least 10 times or no incentive. Data were extracted from the membership database and included membership termination at 1 year (yes, no), length of membership (days), participation in the incentive program (yes, no), and visits to the fitness center per month. Cox proportional hazards model. Members in the incentive program visited the fitness center on average more times per month (5.3 vs 4.3; P fitness center may be initially associated with a greater fitness center utilization but may not be associated with a reduced risk of membership termination.

  14. Advanced clean coal technology international symposium 2001. Current status of high efficiency coal utilization technology and coal ash utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Papers are presented under the following session headings: current status of coal utilization technology; movement for environmental control in the USA, EU and Japan; and coal combustion products utilization technologies.

  15. Environmental products from EPRI`s Environmental Control Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andes, G.M.; Maybach, G.B. [Electric Power Research Inst., Barker, NY (United States). Environmental Control Technology Center

    1994-12-31

    Since 1987, developments from the research at EPRI`s Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC) have been applied to coal-fired utility power plants to maximize emissions control systems, decrease capital and operating costs, and increase system reliability. The ECTC has made several significant advancements in both wet and dry FGD technologies over the years and is currently being utilized to investigate many future environmental issues, such as the measurement and control of toxic compounds and SOx/NOx emissions. This paper discusses the equipment capabilities of the ECTC, the scope of ongoing research, and the industry benefits resulting from the EPRI products generated from the Center. Two specific case studies of environmental products from the Center are profiled to describe the development of products at the ECTC, and the transition of research products to commercial prototypes. One such product, the On-Line Chemistry Monitor, allows for real-time monitoring of critical FGD chemistry parameters, while the other, the Automatic Limestone Grind Control system, provides for precise control of reagent grind to maximize performance, cost, and utilization.

  16. Information and consulting center in plasma technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizireanu, S.; Aldea, E.; Mitu, B.; Dinescu, G.

    2001-01-01

    Plasma technologies are clean, non-expensive, and easy to adapt to small-scale production. They are largely used in various modern sectors of research, industry, medicine, biology and environmental protection. At the present time a pressure to transfer the knowledge from education and research sectors toward the industrial ones was established by the financing policies at national and European levels. Nevertheless, mainly in the last decade, an informational gap sets up in Romania between the suppliers of know-how in the plasma technologies and their beneficiaries. The newly appearing companies have little knowledge about the possibilities of our research and education. In turn, the research and education sectors do not know what companies are using nowadays plasma technologies, what kinds of technologies are needed and what aspects should be stressed in educational activity. The Information and Consulting Center in Plasma Technologies is an infrastructure project aiming at gathering information and expertise in plasma technologies with emphasizing on the Romanian capabilities. The information is accessible via Internet at the address http://www.alpha2.infim.ro. By accessing the center web page one enters into the main menu or it is possible to navigate by choosing key words, as for instance: objectives, plasma diagnostics, plasma technologies, which are listed in a dedicated search box. The information is organized in databases. In the database frame there are three main categories, which lead to detailed information about: - Users of plasma technologies, the technology type, the address; - Suppliers of plasma technologies, including the main research institutes with links to the relating Internet sites; - Education and training centers including the universities and their departments dedicated to plasma physics. The expertise is organized in three categories. They are instrumentation and equipment, plasma diagnostics and plasma technologies. In the

  17. Utilizing Technology to Encourage Healthy Lifestyles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Shuster

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In our fast paced world, using technology allows us to connect with people and assist them in developing healthier lifestyles within their time limits due to families, work, and other responsibilities. The goal of our project was the development of online, technology-based, nutrition, health, and fitness education challenges using social media as a means of helping consumers develop healthy lifestyle changes. Participants completed preassessments and postassessments to determine overall program impact and to self-report perceptions of knowledge gained and practice/behavior change. Results from the challenges indicated participants gained knowledge on nutrition, health and fitness topics while making strides towards lifestyle changes and adoption of healthy habits. Results revealed healthier eating habits were developed and physical activity was increased with many participants losing weight. Ease of participating was the most reported reason for participating in the challenges. To determine “best practice,” varying lengths of time for the challenges from four, seven, and thirteen weeks allowed the educators to derive implications for future programming, including branding, length of the challenge, frequency, and participant behavior change. To remain relevant and reach a greater diversity of populations, educators need to continue to explore and utilize various social media tools.

  18. Development of Beam Utilization Technologies and Support for Users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyeryung; Jung, Myunghwan; Noh, Yongoh; Lee, Sooyeon; Kim, Hyukwook; Kil, Jaekeun; Lee, Nayoung; Ra, Sekin; Lee, Miejeen; Kim, Sora

    2013-02-01

    The Final goals are to achieve the 2nd goals of the Proton Engineering Frontier Project, development of proton beam utilization technologies, to incubate the potential users, and to develop fundamental technologies. Based on these achievements, we are going to enhance the accelerator utilization and maximize contribution to the local society after accelerator construction completion. For the these goals, we were operating user program reflecting the results of 3rd step planning. We support 38 small projects during 2 years. As results of activation of beam utilization, we acquired 768 users at the end of 2012. We survey proton beam technology proposals, individuals and institutions participation letter of intent through the research of 'Planning of a support program for both basic research by using accelerator and manpower cultivation'. And inaugurated KOPUA (Korea Proton Accelerator User Association) on March 28, 2012 with 152 members. We secured experimental conditions at TR23 and TR103 and reflected in the target room design and operation scenarios via investigate the requirements. Through these requirements, we make a remote sample transfer system, beam regulating system, hot cell and sample transport container. Moreover, we develop proton beam technologies such as in-vivo proton beam irradiation system, comparison of the biological effects for pulse beam and continuous beam, basic experiments for the metal nanopaticle synthesis, research for radioactivatied samples and devices, conceptual design and calculation for neutron source target and calculation of the isotope production yield. Proton accelerator can be utilized in a variety of field, including NT, BT, IT, ST, ET, Nuclear, medical, and some of the user facilities required were constructed through this project, Experience for the construction and operation of these facilities can be reflected to the construction of the rest 8 target room of proton accelerator center

  19. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh W. Rimmer

    2004-05-12

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the seventeen subprojects awarded in the first year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices. Due to the time taken up by the solicitation/selection process, these cover the initial 6-month period of project activity only. The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 1999, U.S. mining operations produced $66.7 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $533 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, this endeavor has been expanded into a seven-university consortium--Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah, Montana Tech, New Mexico Tech and University of Nevada, Reno--that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (1) Solid-solid separation (2) Solid-liquid separation (3) Chemical/Biological Extraction (4) Modeling and Control, and (5) Environmental Control.

  20. The Center for Environmental Technology Innovative Technology Screening Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, C.M.

    1995-02-01

    The Center for Environmental Technology's (CET) mission is to provide a fully integrated system for accelerated evaluation, development, commercialization, and public acceptance of creative environmental solutions which match the foremost demands in today's environmentally sensitive world. In short, CET will create a means to provide quick, effective solutions for environmental needs. To meet this mission objective, CET has created a unique and innovative approach to eliminating the usual barriers in developing and testing environmental technologies. The approach paves the way for these emerging, cutting-edge technologies by coordinating environmental restoration and waste management activities of industry, universities, and the government to: efficiently and effectively transfer technology to these users, provide market-driven, cost-effective technology programs to the public and DOE, and aid in developing innovative ideas by initiating efforts between DOE facilities and private industry. The central part to this mission is selecting and evaluating specific innovative technologies for demonstration and application at United States Department of Energy (DOE) installations. The methodology and criteria used for this selection, which is called the CET Innovative Technology Screening Process, is the subject of this paper. The selection criteria used for the screening process were modeled after other DOE technology transfer programs and were further developed by CET's Technology Screening and Evaluation Board (TSEB). The process benefits both CET and the proposing vendors by providing objective selection procedures based on predefined criteria. The selection process ensures a rapid response to proposing vendors, all technologies will have the opportunity to enter the selection process, and all technologies are evaluated on the same scale and with identical criteria

  1. User-centered Technologies For Blind Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Sánchez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to review, summarize, and illustrate research work involving four audio-based games created within a user-centered design methodology through successive usability tasks and evaluations. These games were designed by considering the mental model of blind children and their styles of interaction to perceive and process data and information. The goal of these games was to enhance the cognitive development of spatial structures, memory, haptic perception, mathematical skills, navigation and orientation, and problem solving of blind children. Findings indicate significant improvements in learning and cognition from using audio-based tools specially tailored for the blind. That is, technologies for blind children, carefully tailored through user-centered design approaches, can make a significant contribution to cognitive development of these children. This paper contributes new insight into the design and implementation of audio-based virtual environments to facilitate learning and cognition in blind children.

  2. CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGY (CAST) PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan; Hull, Christopher

    2014-09-30

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2011, U.S. mining operations contributed a total of $232 billion to the nation’s GDP plus $138 billion in labor income. Of this the coal mining industry contributed a total of $97.5 billion to GDP plus $53 billion in labor income. Despite these contributions, the industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations.

  3. Bibliography: injection technology applicable to geothermal utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darnell, A.J.; Eichelberger, R.L.

    1982-03-19

    This bibliography cites 500 documents that may be helpful in planning, analysis, research, and development of the various aspects of injection technology in geothermal applications. These documents include results from government research; development, demonstration, and commercialization programs; selected references from the literature; symposia; references from various technical societies and installations; reference books; reviews; and other selected material. The cited references are from (1) subject searching, using indexing, storage, and retrieval information data base of the Department of Energy's Technical Information Center's on-line retrieval system, RECON; (2) searches of references from the RECON data base, of work by authors known to be active in the field of geothermal energy research and development; (3) subject and author searches by the computerized data storage and retrieval system of Chemical Abstracts, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC; and (4) selected references from texts and reviews on this subject. Each citation includes title, author, author affiliation, date of publication, and source. The citations are listed in chronological order (most recent first) in each of the subject categories for which this search was made. The RECON accession number is also given.

  4. The Stanford University US-Japan Technology Management Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dasher, Richard

    2002-01-01

    This grant established the U.S.-Japan Technology Management Center, Stanford University School of Engineering, as an ongoing center of excellence for the study of emerging trends and interrelationships between technology...

  5. University Students` Perception and Utilization of Technology for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Technology utilization can be described as the application of information and communication technology to teaching and learning. This paper examines university students` perceptions and utilization of technology for learning at Haramaya University in Ethiopia (as a case). The researcher used survey research design and ...

  6. Utilization of Information and Communication Technology (ICT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Such services include internet, portal, network, printing etc.the research revealed that, 73.49% of the respondents are aware of the services provides by the center. Of the total percentage of the respondents, however, 20.91% use the center occasionally, while 20.47% use the center very often. A workshop and other training ...

  7. The 10th Anniversary Of Daejeon Environmental Technology Development Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-12-01

    This book describes the Daejeon Environment Technology Development Center with pictures for ten years. It also introduces the purpose of the foundation and background of center, structure of the center, main project and role of the center, center logo, current situation of cost of project, research business for 10 years, business supporting the environmental corporate, environment education, public relations activity and vision and prospect of the Daejeon Environmental Technology Development Center.

  8. Tiger Team Assessment, Energy Technology Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The Office Special Projects within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) has the responsibility to conduct Tiger Team Assessments for the Secretary of Energy. This report presents the assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities under the DOE/Rockwell Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700 for the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) and of other DOE-owned buildings and facilities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) site in southeastern Ventura County, California, not covered under Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700, but constructed over the years under various other contracts between DOE and Rockwell International. ETEC is an engineering development complex operated for DOE by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. ETEC is located within SSFL on land owned by Rockwell. The balance of the SSFL complex is owned and operated by Rocketdyne, with the exception of a 42-acre parcel owned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary mission of ETEC is to provide engineering, testing, and development of components related to liquid metals technology and to conduct applied engineering development of emerging energy technologies

  9. Tiger Team Assessment, Energy Technology Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    The Office Special Projects within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) has the responsibility to conduct Tiger Team Assessments for the Secretary of Energy. This report presents the assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities under the DOE/Rockwell Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700 for the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) and of other DOE-owned buildings and facilities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) site in southeastern Ventura County, California, not covered under Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700, but constructed over the years under various other contracts between DOE and Rockwell International. ETEC is an engineering development complex operated for DOE by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. ETEC is located within SSFL on land owned by Rockwell. The balance of the SSFL complex is owned and operated by Rocketdyne, with the exception of a 42-acre parcel owned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary mission of ETEC is to provide engineering, testing, and development of components related to liquid metals technology and to conduct applied engineering development of emerging energy technologies.

  10. Center for BioBased Binders and Pollution Reduction Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiel, Jerry [Univ. of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Funding will support the continuation of the Center for Advanced Bio-based Binders and Pollution Reduction Technology Center (CABB) in the development of bio-based polymers and emission reduction technologies for the metal casting industry. Since the formation of the center several new polymers based on agricultural materials have been developed. These new materials have show decreases in hazardous air pollutants, phenol and formaldehyde as much as 50 to 80% respectively. The polymers termed bio-polymers show a great potential to utilize current renewable agricultural resources to replace petroleum based products and reduce our dependence on importing of foreign oil. The agricultural technology has shown drastic reductions in the emission of hazardous air pollutants and volatile organic compounds and requires further development to maintain competitive costs and productivity. The project will also research new and improved inorganic binders that promise to eliminate hazardous emissions from foundry casting operations and allow for the beneficial reuse of the materials and avoiding the burdening of overcrowded landfills.

  11. Spiral analysis-improved clinical utility with center detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongzhi; Yu, Qiping; Kurtis, Mónica M; Floyd, Alicia G; Smith, Whitney A; Pullman, Seth L

    2008-06-30

    Spiral analysis is a computerized method that measures human motor performance from handwritten Archimedean spirals. It quantifies normal motor activity, and detects early disease as well as dysfunction in patients with movement disorders. The clinical utility of spiral analysis is based on kinematic and dynamic indices derived from the original spiral trace, which must be detected and transformed into mathematical expressions with great precision. Accurately determining the center of the spiral and reducing spurious low frequency noise caused by center selection error is important to the analysis. Handwritten spirals do not all start at the same point, even when marked on paper, and drawing artifacts are not easily filtered without distortion of the spiral data and corruption of the performance indices. In this report, we describe a method for detecting the optimal spiral center and reducing the unwanted drawing artifacts. To demonstrate overall improvement to spiral analysis, we study the impact of the optimal spiral center detection in different frequency domains separately and find that it notably improves the clinical spiral measurement accuracy in low frequency domains.

  12. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher E. Hull

    2005-01-20

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2003, U.S. mining operations produced $57 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $564 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (1) Solid-solid separation; (2) Solid-liquid separation; (3) Chemical/Biological Extraction; (4) Modeling and Control; and (5) Environmental Control.

  13. Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Hull

    2009-10-31

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2003, U.S. mining operations produced $57 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $564 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, this endeavor has been expanded into a seven-university consortium -- Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah, Montana Tech, New Mexico Tech and University of Nevada, Reno - that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (1) Solid-solid separation; (2) Solid-liquid separation; (3) Chemical/biological extraction; (4) Modeling and control; and (5) Environmental control. Distribution of funds is handled via competitive solicitation of research proposals through Site Coordinators at the seven member universities. These were first reviewed and ranked by a group of technical reviewers (selected primarily from industry). Based on these reviews, and an assessment of overall program requirements, the CAST Technical Committee made an initial selection/ranking of proposals and forwarded these to the DOE/NETL Project Officer for final review and approval. The successful projects are listed by category, along with brief abstracts of their aims and objectives.

  14. Utilization of Educational Technology in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Takashi

    1980-01-01

    Gives an overview of the development of educational technology in Japan evident in the increase of publications, the diffusion of technological innovations, and the organization of research pertaining to the field. (Author/MER)

  15. 76 FR 39811 - International Center for Technology Assessment and the Center for Food Safety; Noxious Weed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... dated July 18, 2002, the International Center for Technology Assessment and the Center for Food Safety... Inspection Service [Docket No. APHIS-2011-0081] International Center for Technology Assessment and the Center for Food Safety; Noxious Weed Status of Kentucky Bluegrass Genetically Engineered for Herbicide...

  16. Architecture academic by information technologies utilization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research aims at studying teaching modern architecture with information technology approach. Today, information technology is used to transmit knowledge in many universities of the world. Information technology tools are potentially capable of providing engineering students with a broad continuum of curriculum in ...

  17. Scientific Data Management Center for Enabling Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vouk, Mladen A.

    2013-01-15

    Managing scientific data has been identified by the scientific community as one of the most important emerging needs because of the sheer volume and increasing complexity of data being collected. Effectively generating, managing, and analyzing this information requires a comprehensive, end-to-end approach to data management that encompasses all of the stages from the initial data acquisition to the final analysis of the data. Fortunately, the data management problems encountered by most scientific domains are common enough to be addressed through shared technology solutions. Based on community input, we have identified three significant requirements. First, more efficient access to storage systems is needed. In particular, parallel file system and I/O system improvements are needed to write and read large volumes of data without slowing a simulation, analysis, or visualization engine. These processes are complicated by the fact that scientific data are structured differently for specific application domains, and are stored in specialized file formats. Second, scientists require technologies to facilitate better understanding of their data, in particular the ability to effectively perform complex data analysis and searches over extremely large data sets. Specialized feature discovery and statistical analysis techniques are needed before the data can be understood or visualized. Furthermore, interactive analysis requires techniques for efficiently selecting subsets of the data. Finally, generating the data, collecting and storing the results, keeping track of data provenance, data post-processing, and analysis of results is a tedious, fragmented process. Tools for automation of this process in a robust, tractable, and recoverable fashion are required to enhance scientific exploration. The SDM center was established under the SciDAC program to address these issues. The SciDAC-1 Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center succeeded in bringing an initial set of advanced

  18. KBTAC [Knowledge-Based Technology Application Center] - The EPRI [Electric Power Research Institute]-sponsored knowledge-based technology application center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.; Wood, R.M.; Scherer, J.

    1990-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has announced the establishment of the Knowledge-Based Technology Application Center (KBTAC), whose goal is to assist member utilities with expert system technology and applications. The center, established November 7, 1989, is located on the campus of Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, and will be operated jointly by Kaman Sciences Corporation and the university. The mission of the KBTAC is to assist EPRI member utilities to develop, test, and transfer expert systems into nuclear power plant operations, maintenance, and administration

  19. Utilization of Cocoyam Production Technologies among Women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    random sampling technique was used to select sixty (60) .... computed by dividing the total utilization score by the number of respondents ..... Pseudo R2. 0.7076. Log likelihood. -144.9756. P≤ 10, ** P≤ 0.5 and ***P P≤ 0.1. Source: Field survey, 2014. Constraints Militating Against the Utilization of Cocoyam Production.

  20. Spatial Information Technology Center at Fulton-Montgomery Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinton, Michael E.

    2004-01-01

    The Spatial Information Technology Center (SITC) at Fulton-Montgomery Community College (FMCC) continued to fulfill its mission and charter by successfully completing its third year of operations under Congressional funding and NASA sponsorship. Third year operations (01 Oct 02 - 30 Sep 03) have been funded and conducted utilizing two authorized Research Grants NAG 13-00043 (via a one-year no-cost extension expiring Sep 03) and NAG 13-02053 (one-year no-cost extension expiring Sep 04). Drawdowns and reporting of fiscal activities for SlTC operations continues to pass through the Institute for the Application of Geo-spatial Technology (IAGT) at Cayuga Community College in Auburn, New York. Fiscal activity of the Center is reported quarterly via SF 272 to IAGT, thus this report contains only a budgetary overview and forecast of future expenditures for the remaining funds of NAG 13 - 02053. Funds from NAG 13 - 00043 were exhausted during the fourth quarter of fiscal year FY02 - 03, which necessitated initial draw down of NAG 13 - 02053. The IAGT receives no compensation for administrative costs as authorized and approved by NASA in each award budget. This report also includes the necessary addendums for each NAG award, as required by federal guidelines, though no reportable activities took place within this report period. Attached are the signed Report of New Technology/lnventions and a Final Property Report identifying qualifying equipment purchased by the Center. As an academic, economic and workforce development oriented program, the Center has made significant strides in bringing the technology, knowledge and applications of the spatial information technology field to the region it serves. Through the mission of the Center, the region's educational, economic development and work force communities have become increasingly educated to the benefits of spatial (Geospatial) technology, particularly in the region's K-12 arena. SlTC continues to positively affect the

  1. Utilization of Microcapsule Technology in Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanxiang; Li, Xiaolong; Liu, You-Nian; Zhang, Fengqin

    2015-12-01

    Microencapsulation technology has greatly accelerated the development of food industry and has a bright future for further applications. In this review paper, we introduce the current researches, latest advances and trends of core materials, wall materials, microencapsulation technology, as well as the encapsulation of food additives, bioactive substance, esculent oils, probiotics and other substances, and their application in food industry.

  2. Program strategy document for the Nuclear Materials Transportation Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferson, R.M.

    1979-07-01

    A multiyear program plan is presented which describes the program of the Nuclear Materials Transportation Technology Center (TIC) at Sandia Laboratories. The work element plans, along with their corresponding work breakdown structures, are presented for TTC activities in the areas of Technology and Information Center, Systems Development, Technology, and Institutional Issues for the years from 1979 to 1985

  3. Episode-Centered Guidelines for Teacher Belief Change toward Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Erkan; Kim, ChanMin

    2017-01-01

    Teachers' episodic memories influence their beliefs. The investigation of episodic memories can help identify the teacher beliefs that limit technology-integration. We propose the Episode-Centered Belief Change (ECBC) model that utilizes teachers' episodic memories for changing beliefs impeding effective technology integration. We also propose…

  4. SDM center technologies for accelerating scientific discoveries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoshani, Arie; Altintas, Ilkay; Choudhary, Alok; Critchlow, Terence; Kamath, Chandrika; Ludaescher, Bertram; Nieplocha, Jarek; Parker, Steve; Ross, Rob; Samatova, Nagiza; Vouk, Mladen

    2007-01-01

    With the increasing volume and complexity of data produced by ultra-scale simulations and high-throughput experiments, understanding the science is largely hampered by the lack of comprehensive, end-to-end data management solutions ranging from initial data acquisition to final analysis and visualization. The SciDAC-1 Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center succeeded in bringing an initial set of advanced data management technologies to DOE application scientists in astrophysics, climate, fusion, and biology. Equally important, it established collaborations with these scientists to better understand their science as well as their forthcoming data management and data analytics challenges. Our future focus is on improving the SDM framework to address the needs of ultra-scale science during SciDAC-2. Specifically, we are enhancing and extending our existing tools to allow for more interactivity and fault tolerance when managing scientists' workflows, for better parallelism and feature extraction capabilities in their data analytics operations, and for greater efficiency and functionality in users' interactions with local parallel file systems, active storage, and access to remote storage. These improvements are necessary for the scalability and complexity challenges presented by hardware and applications at ultra scale, and are complemented by continued efforts to work with application scientists in various domains

  5. Availability and utilization of information communication technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of ICT in learning is critical in development of any society. Today's learning has emphasized its importance as basis for 21st century knowledge acquisition. This study investigated the availability and utilization of ICT facilities in Madonna University, Nigeria with particular reference to the Okija campus. It employed ...

  6. Langley Research Center Utility Risk from Future Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, Russell J.; Ganoe, Rene

    2015-01-01

    The successful operation of NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) depends on services provided by several public utility companies. These include Newport News Waterworks, Dominion Virginia Power, Virginia Natural Gas and Hampton Roads Sanitation District. LaRC's plan to respond to future climate change should take into account how these companies plan to avoid interruption of services while minimizing cost to the customers. This report summarizes our findings from publicly available documents on how each company plans to respond. This will form the basis for future planning for the Center. Our preliminary findings show that flooding and severe storms could interrupt service from the Waterworks and Sanitation District but the potential is low due to plans in place to address climate change on their system. Virginia Natural Gas supplies energy to produce steam but most current steam comes from the Hampton trash burning plant, thus interruption risk is low. Dominion Virginia Power does not address climate change impacts on their system in their public reports. The potential interruption risk is considered to be medium. The Hampton Roads Sanitation District is projecting a major upgrade of their system to mitigate clean water inflow and infiltration. This will reduce infiltration and avoid overloading the pump stations and treatment plants.

  7. Center for Global Health announces grants to support portable technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI's Center for Global Health announced grants that will support the development and validation of low-cost, portable technologies. These technologies have the potential to improve early detection, diagnosis, and non-invasive or minimally invasive treatm

  8. Turbine Inflow Characterization at the National Wind Technology Center: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, A.; Schreck, S.; Scott, G.; Kelley, N.; Lundquist, J.

    2012-01-01

    Utility-scale wind turbines operate in dynamic flows that can vary significantly over timescales from less than a second to several years. To better understand the inflow to utility-scale turbines, two inflow towers were installed and commissioned at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado, in 2011. These towers are 135 m tall and instrumented with a combination of sonic anemometers, cup anemometers, wind vanes, and temperature measurements to characterize the inflow wind speed and direction, turbulence, stability and thermal stratification to two utility-scale turbines. Herein, we present variations in mean and turbulent wind parameters with height, atmospheric stability, and as a function of wind direction that could be important for turbine operation as well as persistence of turbine wakes. Wind speed, turbulence intensity, and dissipation are all factors that affect turbine performance. Our results shown that these all vary with height across the rotor disk, demonstrating the importance of measuring atmospheric conditions that influence wind turbine performance at multiple heights in the rotor disk, rather than relying on extrapolation from lower levels.

  9. Distributed utility technology cost, performance, and environmental characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Y; Adelman, S

    1995-06-01

    Distributed Utility (DU) is an emerging concept in which modular generation and storage technologies sited near customer loads in distribution systems and specifically targeted demand-side management programs are used to supplement conventional central station generation plants to meet customer energy service needs. Research has shown that implementation of the DU concept could provide substantial benefits to utilities. This report summarizes the cost, performance, and environmental and siting characteristics of existing and emerging modular generation and storage technologies that are applicable under the DU concept. It is intended to be a practical reference guide for utility planners and engineers seeking information on DU technology options. This work was funded by the Office of Utility Technologies of the US Department of Energy.

  10. Assessing the readiness of hospice volunteers to utilize technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Shaunfield, Sara; Oliver, Debra Parker; Demiris, George; Schneider, Greg

    2012-09-01

    Although hospice volunteer programs contribute to patient care, little is known about their utilization and adaptation of technology. A survey was posted to the Hospice Volunteer Association Web site to assess technology use among volunteer coordinators and volunteers. Results revealed that participants have access to computers, Internet, and e-mail at the hospice agency and routinely use cellular phones and e-mail. Despite the use of technology, communication problems with volunteers hindered the coordinator's ability to manage scheduling, training, and volunteer assignments for patient care. Coordinators and volunteers felt comfortable utilizing technology but were less comfortable using technology in the patients' home. Several areas are identified for development and integration of advanced technology in volunteer programs. Future research is needed to ease technology implementation and increase volunteer acceptance.

  11. Information and Library Programs at the Technology Application Center (TAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Eugene

    The Technology Application Center (TAC) at the University of New Mexico is one of six National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) regional dissemination centers originally established to disseminate NASA technology to private industry on a regional basis. A fee is charged for TAC's services so it has been market oriented and has sought to…

  12. The Center for Interactive Learning: An Incubator for Hatching Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Janet

    1999-01-01

    Describes a state-of-the-art community college facility (Center for Interactive Learning) that helps professors integrate technology and instruction to provide students with unique technology-enhanced learning experiences. The center's planning, distinctive features, and amenities are detailed. (GR)

  13. Plastic solid waste utilization technologies: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Arun Kumar; Shivashankar, Murugesh; Majumder, Suman

    2017-11-01

    Plastics are used in more number of applications in worldwide and it becomes essential part of our daily life. In Indian cities and villages people use the plastics in buying vegetable as a carry bag, drinking water bottle, use of plastic furniture in home, plastics objects uses in kitchen, plastic drums in packing and storage of the different chemicals for industrial use, use plastic utensils in home and many more uses. After usage of plastics it will become part of waste garbage and create pollution due to presence of toxic chemicals and it will be spread diseases and give birth to uncontrolled issues in social society. In current scenario consumption of plastic waste increasing day by day and it is very difficult to manage the plastic waste. There are limited methodologies available for reutilization of plastic waste again. Such examples are recycling, landfill, incineration, gasification and hydrogenation. In this paper we will review the existing methodologies of utilization of plastic waste in current scenario

  14. About TTC | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The TTC facilitates licensing and co-development partnerships between biomedical industry, academia, and government agencies and the research laboratories of the NCI and nine other institutes and centers of NIH.

  15. Constraints to utilization of draft animal power technology at farm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    Constraints to utilization of draft animal power technology at farm level in. Uganda. S.Okurut, W.R.Odogola ., A. Candia . and A.R. Saasa . Agricultural Engineering and Appropriate Technology Research Institute, AEATRI. P. O. Box 7144, Kampala, Uganda. Abstract. Animal traction utilisation in Uganda dates back to 1909 ...

  16. Partnering Events | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our team of technology transfer specialists has specialized training in invention reporting, patenting, patent strategy, executing technology transfer agreements and marketing. TTC is comprised of professionals with diverse legal, scientific, and business/marketing expertise. Most of our staff hold doctorate-level technical and/or legal training.

  17. ECONOMIC AND ENERGETICAL ANALYSIS OF IMPROVED WASTE UTILIZATION PLASMA TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serghei VAMBOL

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Energy and economic evaluation of the improved plasma waste utilization technological process, as well as an expediency substantiation of the use of improved plasma technology by comparing its energy consumption with other thermal methods of utilization. Methodology. Analysis of existing modern and advanced methods of waste management and its impact on environmental safety. Considering of energy and monetary costs to implement two different waste management technologies. Results. Studies have shown regular gasification ensure greater heating value due to differences, a significant amount of nitrogen than for plasma gasification. From the point of view of minimizing energy and monetary costs and environmental safety more promising is to offer advanced technology for plasma waste. To carry out the energy assessment of the appropriateness of the considered technologies-comparative calculation was carried out at the standard conditions. This is because in the processing of waste produced useful products, such as liquefied methane, synthetic gas (94% methane and a fuel gas for heating, suitable for sale that provides cost-effectiveness of this technology. Originality. Shown and evaluated ecological and economic efficiency of proposed improved plasma waste utilization technology compared with other thermal techniques. Practical value. Considered and grounded of energy and monetary costs to implement two different waste management technologies, namely ordinary gasification and using plasma generators. Proposed plasma waste utilization technology allows to obtain useful products, such as liquefied methane, synthetic gas and a fuel gas for heating, which are suitable for sale. Plant for improved plasma waste utilization technological process allows to compensate the daily and seasonal electricity and heat consumption fluctuations by allowing the storage of obtained fuel products.

  18. KBTAC: EPRI's center to assist the nuclear industry to apply the knowledge-based technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chinglu; Naser, J.A.; Sun, B.K.H.

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear utility industry's complex engineering and procedure systems offer many opportunities for use of the knowledge-based technology such as expert systems and neural networks. The ability of expert systems to enhance human experts makes them an important tool in the areas of engineering, operations and maintenance. However, many current industry applications are research projects or turnkey systems supplied by vendors. These often do not impart to utility technical staff a clear understanding of the capabilities of knowledge-based systems (KBS). More importantly, simply using completed applications does not meet utilities' need to acquire the capabilities to build their own knowledge-based systems. Thus, EPRI is supporting its member utilities utilization of knowledge-based technology for power plant engineering, operations, and maintenance applications through the establishment of the Knowledge-Based Technology Application Center (KBTAC)

  19. National Rehabilitation Hospital Assistive Technology Research Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Materson, RIchard

    1999-01-01

    .... The common theme in all the projects is application of technologies and methods developed or heavily used by the military to enhancement of medical rehabilitation and independent living for people with disabilities...

  20. National Rehabilitation Hospital Assistive Technology Research Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Toerge, John

    1998-01-01

    .... The common theme" in all the projects is application of technologies and methods developed or heavily used by the military to enhancement of medical rehabilitation and independent living for people with disabilities...

  1. Utilization of 5 MeV electron accelerator center and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiromi

    1990-01-01

    Electron beam process gives instantaneous effect as compared with heating process, and has such merits that energy consumption is very small, objects can be treated from outside, harmful chemicals are not used and treatment can be done as packed. The spread of electron beam process is largely due to the results of the development of highly reliable accelerators and utilization technologies, but as observed from all industrial fields, it is limited to only a part. In order to contribute to the solution of problems and the spread of electron beam process, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. installed a 5 MeV, 200 kW large power accelerator developed by RDI in USA in the Electron Irradiation Application and Development Center opened in Tsukuba City. The Center was completed in June, 1989, and has carried out the activities of the development of irradiation utilization technologies, test irradiation and entrusted irradiation service. The features of electron beam process are high dose rate, the possibility of on and off as occasion demands, the preparation of radiation sources and the disposal of wastes being unnecessary, and no environmental problem. The industrialized processes, the types, energy and use of electron accelerators, the Tsukuba irradiation facilities and others are reported. (K.I.)

  2. User-centered Technologies For Blind Children

    OpenAIRE

    Jaime Sánchez

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review, summarize, and illustrate research work involving four audio-based games created within a user-centered design methodology through successive usability tasks and evaluations. These games were designed by considering the mental model of blind children and their styles of interaction to perceive and process data and information. The goal of these games was to enhance the cognitive development of spatial structures, memory, haptic perception, mathe...

  3. Center of Excellence in Wireless Technology Objectives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    align their pre-competitive R&D efforts. Feed Indian requirements and specifications in International wireless Standards bodies. Develop IPR suitable for inclusion in 4G standards. Focus on Indian requirements (high system capacity). Involve all IITs/IISc in the IPR-driven research effort. Early technology trials of Indian-made ...

  4. Bessines: Rebirth of a technological excellence center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-06-01

    Areva's mining activity is rooted in the Limousin region of central France. For over 65 years, Bessines-sur-Gartempe has been closely involved with global energy and industrial issues. Geologists came here first as explorers, followed by miners and chemical engineers. This is the heritage on which Areva is drawing to help satisfy the steadily growing demand for energy. The SEPA's (Service d'etudes, de Procedes et Analyses) role is to develop new ways to process and use mineral ores. A world renowned R and D center, modernizing its research facilities is a key part of the program to revitalize the Bessines site. Between 1947 and 2001, close to 250 mining sites were exploited in France producing 76,000 tons of uranium. The Areva group (through the CEA and COGEMA) operated 55 % of these sites, all of which have been reclaimed today. UREKA is an educational center created by Areva to inform the public about uranium mining and French know-how in this field. This museum is unique in the world of mining. Depleted uranium is a byproduct of the uranium enrichment process. It harbors real energy potential that Areva intends to tap in the future. The effectiveness of lead-212 in targeting and destroying cancer cells was demonstrated several years ago. The Geosciences Center in made of four entities spread over 4,000 m 2 , regrouping the whole of Areva's mining knowledge and history. The wealth of mineralogical, petrographic and documentary data found there has been accumulated over more than 60 years of exploration and mining

  5. Supporting learner-centered technology integration through situated mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Marian Goode

    Situated mentoring was used as a professional development method to help 11 high school science teachers integrate learner-centered technology. The teachers' learner-centered technology beliefs and practices as well as their perception of barriers to learner-centered technology integration were explored before and after participating in the mentoring program. In addition, the participants' thoughts about the effectiveness of various components of the mentoring program were analyzed along with the mentor's observations of their practices. Situated mentoring can be effective for supporting learner-centered technology integration, in particular decreasing the barriers teachers experience. Goal setting, collaborative planning, reflection, and onsite just-in-time support were thought to be the most valuable components of the mentoring program.

  6. Strategic rigidity and foresight for technology adoption among electric utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Arsalan Nisar; Palacios, Miguel; Ruiz, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    The variation in the adoption of a technology as a major source of competitive advantage has been attributed to the wide-ranging strategic foresight and the integrative capability of a firm. These possible areas of competitive advantage can exist in the periphery of the firm's strategic vision and can get easily blurred as a result of rigidness and can permeate in the decision-making process of the firm. This article explores how electric utility firms with a renewable energy portfolio can become strategically rigid in terms of adoption of newer technologies. The reluctance or delay in the adoption of new technology can be characterized as strategic rigidness, brought upon as a result of a firm's core competence or core capability in the other, more conventional technology arrangement. This paper explores the implications of such rigidness on the performance of a firm and consequently on the energy eco-system. The paper substantiates the results by emphasizing the case of Iberdrola S.A., an incumbent firm as a wind energy developer and its adoption decision behavior. We illustrate that the very routines that create competitive advantage for firms in the electric utility industry are vulnerable as they might also develop as sources of competitive disadvantage, when firms confront environmental change and uncertainty. - Highlights: • Present a firm-level perspective on technology adoption behavior among electric utilities. • Firms with mature technology can become rigid towards newer technologies. • Case study analysis of a major electric utility firm. • Implications of ‘technology rigidness’ on the energy eco-system

  7. 2017 Technology Showcase Presentations | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentations from the 2017 Technology Showcase by NIH Intramural Research Program scientists held at Frederick National Laboratories for Cancer Research on June 7, 2017. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  8. A feasibility study for a manufacturing technology deployment center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-31

    The Automation & Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) and the Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to determine the feasibility of a regional industrial technology institute to be located at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Central Facility in Waxahachie, Texas. In response to this opportunity, ARRI and TEEX teamed with the DOE Kansas City Plant (managed by Allied Signal, Inc.), Los Alamos National Laboratory (managed by the University of California), Vought Aircraft Company, National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), SSC Laboratory, KPMG Peat Marwick, Dallas County Community College, Navarro Community College, Texas Department of Commerce (TDOC), Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center (TMAC), Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology, Arkansas Science and Technology Authority, Louisiana Productivity Center, and the NASA Mid-Continent Technology Transfer Center (MCTTC) to develop a series of options, perform the feasibility analysis and secure industrial reviews of the selected concepts. The final report for this study is presented in three sections: Executive Summary, Business Plan, and Technical Plan. The results from the analysis of the proposed concept support the recommendation of creating a regional technology alliance formed by the states of Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana through the conversion of the SSC Central facility into a Manufacturing Technology Deployment Center (MTDC).

  9. Student Technology Use in a Self-Access Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Joachim; Mynard, Jo; Rubesch, Troy

    2011-01-01

    Technology has played an increasingly vital role in self-access learning over the past twenty years or so, yet little research has been conducted into learners' actual use of the technology both for self-directed learning and as part of everyday life. This paper describes an ongoing action research project at a self-access learning center (SALC)…

  10. university students` perception and utilization of technology for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-01

    Feb 1, 2018 ... university students` perceptions and utilization of technology for learning at Haramaya University in. Ethiopia (as a case). The researcher used survey research design and questionnaire (students=298) ... access online learning materials, doing assignments, projects and sharing personal and educational.

  11. Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation: Demonstration Bulletin: Organic Extraction Utilizing Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    This technology utilizes liquified gases as the extracting solvent to remove organics, such as hydrocarbons, oil and grease, from wastewater or contaminated sludges and soils. Carbon dioxide is generally used for aqueous solutions, and propane is used for sediment, sludges and ...

  12. Utilization of sweetpotato based confection technology: A panacea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Utilization of sweet potato-based confectionary was used as a step to reducing food crisis among women farmers in Imo state because of the health benefits, environmental friendliness and ability to make a home food secured with little investments. This is because such technology will help serve as an avenue to reduce ...

  13. Utilization Of Yam Minisett Technology Among Farmers In Delta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examined the utilization of minisett technology among farmers in Delta North Agricultural Zone of Delta State, Nigeria. Two local government areas were purposively sampled based on their outstanding involvement in yam production. Two communities were also purposively selected from the area from where 50 ...

  14. SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy, Kenneth I. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-09-14

    This project focuses on leveraging scientific visualization and analytics software technology as an enabling technology for increasing scientific productivity and insight. Advances in computational technology have resulted in an "information big bang," which in turn has created a significant data understanding challenge. This challenge is widely acknowledged to be one of the primary bottlenecks in contemporary science. The vision for our Center is to respond directly to that challenge by adapting, extending, creating when necessary and deploying visualization and data understanding technologies for our science stakeholders. Using an organizational model as a Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET), we are well positioned to be responsive to the needs of a diverse set of scientific stakeholders in a coordinated fashion using a range of visualization, mathematics, statistics, computer and computational science and data management technologies.

  15. Center for the Utilization of Biological Engineering in Space (CUBES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As NASA shifts its focus from low-Earth orbit to deep space missions, the agency is investing in the development of technologies that will allow long-duration...

  16. Technology Transfer Center to Assume Patenting and Licensing Responsibilities | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) is undergoing a reorganization that will bring patenting and licensing responsibilities to the Shady Grove and Frederick offices by October 2015. The reorganization is a result of an effort begun in 2014 by NIH to improve the organizational structure of technology transfer at NIH to meet the rapid rate of change within science, technology, and industry, and to better align the science and laboratory goals with the licensing and patenting process.

  17. Biomass torrefaction: A promising pretreatment technology for biomass utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, ZhiWen; Wang, Mingfeng; Ren, Yongzhi; Jiang, Enchen; Jiang, Yang; Li, Weizhen

    2018-02-01

    Torrefaction is an emerging technology also called mild pyrolysis, which has been explored for the pretreatment of biomass to make the biomass more favorable for further utilization. Dry torrefaction (DT) is a pretreatment of biomass in the absence of oxygen under atmospheric pressure and in a temperature range of 200-300 degrees C, while wet torrrefaction (WT) is a method in hydrothermal or hot and high pressure water at the tempertures within 180-260 degrees C. Torrrefied biomass is hydrophobic, with lower moisture contents, increased energy density and higher heating value, which are more comparable to the characteristics of coal. With the improvement in the properties, torrefied biomass mainly has three potential applications: combustion or co-firing, pelletization and gasification. Generally, the torrefaction technology can accelerate the development of biomass utilization technology and finally realize the maximum applications of biomass energy.

  18. The transfer of technologies for biomass energy utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneiders, H.H.

    1995-01-01

    The first part of the paper presents the common perception of technology transfer as a trade relationship rather than a systematic approach to establish a complex technological capacity in a given field. It aims to correct this misperception by introducing some other ideas: (a) the need to support the people, adjust the relevant organizations and establish the capacities to provide the products and services; (b) the typical life cycles of technologies from the initial concept to the final stages of transfer and sustainable dissemination; (c) the needs and expectations of the groups targeted by the technologies for biomass energy utilization. The second part of the paper discusses one example of successful technology transfer: the use of large biomass-burning stoves for food preparation in public institutions and private restaurants in East Africa. The third part of the paper highlights two non-technological barriers to the transfer of biomass energy technologies: (a) weak market forces and business interests and a large number of State activities and projects and (b) conflicting interests of end-users, craftsmen, private and public project partners, which can threaten the success of the attempted technology transfer, even after local adaptation. Finally, suggestions are made for overcoming some of these problems. (author)

  19. Mars In-Situ Resource Utilization Technology Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Muscatello, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    We have examined the technologies required to enable Mars Tn-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) because our understanding of Mars resources has changed significantly in the last five years as a result of recent robotic missions to the red planet [1-4]. Two major developments, (1) confirmation of the presence of near-surface water in the form of ice in very large amounts at high latitudes by the Phoenix Lander and (2) the likely existence of water at lower latitudes in the form of hydrates or ice in the top one meter of the regolith, have the potential to change ISRU technology selection. A brief technology assessment was performed for the most promising Mars atmospheric gas processing techniques: Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) and Methanation (aka Sabatier), as well as an overview of soil.processing technology to extract water from Martian soil.

  20. Factors Relevant to Utility Integration of Intermittent Renewable Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Y.; Parsons, B.

    1993-08-24

    This study assesses factors that utilities must address when they integrate intermittent renewable technologies into their power-supply systems; it also reviews the literature in this area and has a bibliography containing more than 350 listings. Three topics are covered: (1) interface (hardware and design-related interconnection), (2) operability/stability, and (3) planning. This study finds that several commonly held perceptions regarding integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies are not valid. Among fmdings of the study are the following: (1) hardware and system design advances have eliminated most concerns about interface, (2) cost penalties have not occurred at low to moderate penetration levels (and high levels am feasible); and (3) intermittent renewable energy technologies can have capacity values. Obstacles still interfering with intermittent renewable technologies are also indentified.

  1. Factors relevant to utility integration of intermittent renewable technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Yih-huei; Parsons, B.K.

    1993-08-01

    This study assesses factors that utilities must address when they integrate intermittent renewable technologies into their power-supply systems; it also reviews the literature in this area and has a bibliography containing more than 350 listings. Three topics are covered: (1) interface (hardware and design-related interconnection), (2) operability/stability, and (3) planning. This study finds that several commonly held perceptions regarding integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies are not valid. Among findings of the study are the following: (1) hardware and system design advances have eliminated most concerns about interface; (2) cost penalties have not occurred at low to moderate penetration levels (and high levels are feasible); and (3) intermittent renewable energy technologies can have capacity values. Obstacles still interfering with intermittent renewable technologies are also identified.

  2. Utilizing technological innovations to enhance psychotherapy supervision, training, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Jeffrey E

    2011-06-01

    Recent technological advances in the use of the Internet and video technologies has greatly impacted the provision of psychotherapy and other clinical services as well as how the training of psychotherapists may be conducted. When utilized appropriately these technologies may provide greater access to needed services to include treatment, consultation, supervision, and training. Specific ethical challenges and pitfalls are discussed and recommendations are made for the ethical use of these technologies. Additionally, innovative practices from the seven articles in the special section that follows are highlighted and reviewed. These articles present a number of innovations that can take psychotherapy training, research, supervision, and treatment forward toward increased effectiveness. Recommendations for integrating these innovations into ongoing practices are provided and for additional research to build on the important work of the authors in this special section are provided.

  3. Initiation and Maintenance of Fitness Center Utilization in an Incentive-Based Employer Wellness Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Jean Marie; Crespin, Daniel J; Rothman, Alexander J

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the initiation and maintenance of participation in an employer-based wellness program that provides financial incentives for fitness center utilization. Using multivariate analysis, we investigated how employees' demographics, health status, exercise-related factors, and lifestyle change preferences affect program participation. Forty-two percent of eligible employees participated in the program, and 24% earned a $20 incentive at least once by utilizing a gym eight times or more in a month. On average, participants utilized fitness centers 7.0 months each year and earned credit 4.5 months. Participants' utilization diminished after their first year in the program. Factors associated with initiation and maintenance of fitness center utilization were similar. Declining utilization over time raises concern about the long-run effectiveness of fitness-focused wellness programs. Employers may want to consider additional levers to positively reinforce participation.

  4. TechPort Featured at Glenn Research Center's Technology Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Jeannette P.; Diem, Priscilla S.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Technology Portfolio (TechPort) System was featured at NASA Glenn Research Center's Technology Day on May 24, 2016. This event, which coincided with GRC's 75th Anniversary celebration, drew nearly 250 registered guests including aerospace and technology representatives, local business leaders, state and local government officials, and members of academia. GRC's Director of the Office of Technology Incubation and Innovation and Center Chief Technologist, John Sankovic, presented the opening remarks. Several technical and business-focused panel sessions were convened. NASA's Associate Administrator for the Space Technology Mission Directorate, Steve Jurczyk, GRC's Director of Space Flight Systems, Bryan Smith, and NASA astronaut and U.S. Navy Captain, Sunita Williams, were engaged as a panel for a discussion about "NASA's Journey to Mars: Science Fiction Meets Reality." Another panel moderated by the Executive Director of the Cleveland Water Alliance, Bryan Stubbs, involved a discussion with four GRC technologists on the subject of global water scarcity and water treatment concerns. The GRC panelists shared information on the development of snow-sensing, hyperspectral imaging, and non-equilibrium plasma technologies. Technology Day attendees received overviews of GRC's technologies and partnership objectives, and were introduced to areas for potential collaboration. They were also informed about opportunities to license technologies and how to do business with NASA.

  5. Manufacturing Technology Information Analysis Center: Knowledge Is Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safar, Michal

    1992-01-01

    The Center's primary function is to facilitate technology transfer within DoD, other government agencies and industry. The DoD has recognized the importance of technology transfer, not only to support specific weapon system manufacture, but to strengthen the industrial base that sustains DoD. MTIAC uses an experienced technical staff of engineers and information specialists to acquire, analyze, and disseminate technical information. Besides ManTech project data, MTIAC collects manufacturing technology from other government agencies, commercial publications, proceedings, and various international sources. MTIAC has various means of disseminating this information. Much of the technical data is on user accessible data bases. The Center researches and writes a number of technical reports each year and publishes a newsletter monthly. Customized research is performed in response to specific inquiries from government and industry. MTIAC serves as a link between Government and Industry to strengthen the manufacturing technology base through the dissemination of advanced manufacturing information.

  6. Overview of Stirling Technology Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Schifer, Nicholas A.; Williams, Zachary D.; Metscher, Jonathan F.

    2016-01-01

    Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) are under development to provide power on future space science missions where robotic spacecraft will orbit, fly by, land, or rove using less than a quarter of the plutonium the currently available RPS uses to produce about the same power. NASA Glenn Research Center's newly formulated Stirling Cycle Technology Development Project (SCTDP) continues development of Stirling-based systems and subsystems, which include a flight-like generator and related housing assembly, controller, and convertors. The project also develops less mature technologies under Stirling Technology Research, with a focus on demonstration in representative environments to increase the technology readiness level (TRL). Matured technologies are evaluated for selection in future generator designs. Stirling Technology Research tasks focus on a wide variety of objectives, including increasing temperature capability to enable new environments, reducing generator mass and/or size, improving reliability and system fault tolerance, and developing alternative designs. The task objectives and status are summarized.

  7. Technology Readiness of Early Career Nurse Trainees: Utilization of the Technology Readiness Index (TRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odlum, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Health Information Technology (HIT) adoption by clinicians, including nurses, will lead to reduction in healthcare costs and clinical errors and improve health outcomes. Understanding the importance of technology adoption, the current study utilized the Technology Readiness Index to explore technology perceptions of nursing students. Our analysis identifies factors that may influence perceptions of technology, including decreased optimism for students with clinical experience and increased discomfort of US born students. Our study provides insight to inform training programs to further meet the increasing demands of skilled nursing staff.

  8. Utilization of a Marketing Strategy at Naval Regional Medical Center Great Lakes, Great Lakes, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    UTILIZATION OF A MARKETING STRATEGY AToNAVAL REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER GREAT LAKES NGREAT LAKES, ILLINOIS I DTIC S1 ELECTE I A Graduate Research...IWORK UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. rCCESSION NO. 11. TITLE (bw* u S.wufty asification) Utilization of A Marketing Strategy At Naval Regional Medical Center...Applied Research Question. ........ 37 Summary of the Steps of a Marketing Strategy .. ..... 38 Applicability to the Military Health Care System

  9. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  10. Centers for manufacturing technology: Industrial Advisory Committee Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    An advisory committee, composed of senior managers form industrial- sector companies and major manufacturing trade associations and representatives from appropriate educational institutions, meets semi-annually to review and advise the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology (ORCMT) on its economic security program. Individual papers have been indexed separately for the database.

  11. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described

  12. SAVANNAH RIVER TECHNOLOGY CENTER MONTHLY REPORT AUGUST 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1999-06-21

    'This monthly report summarizes Programs and Accomplishments of the Savannah River Technology Center in support of activities at the Savannah River Site. The following categories are addressed: Reactor, Tritium, Separations, Environmental, Waste Management, General, and Items of Interest.'

  13. The Role of Community Technology Centers in Promoting Youth Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Rebecca A.; Pastor, Manuel, Jr.; Servon, Lisa J.; Rosner, Rachel; Wallace, Antwuan

    2010-01-01

    Recent data suggest that the digital divide between White and minority youth persists, particularly in terms of home access to computers and the Internet. Community technology centers (CTCs) are an important alternative access point, especially for low-income youth of color. Such institutions, however, do much more, providing not just access, but…

  14. Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology. A Summary Report of Activities Completed at the National Center for Hydrogen Technology - Year 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Michael [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology (NCHT) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research on hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT's inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding for hydrogen-related projects ($24 million for projects in the NCHT, which includes federal and corporate partner development funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT Program's nine activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan that refers to realistic testing of technologies at adequate scale, process intensification, and contaminant control. A number of projects have been completed that range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in Year 6 of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  15. Technology developments for Japanese BWR MOX fuel utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, M.; Mochida, T.; Nomata, T.; Asahi, K.

    1997-01-01

    The Long-Term Program for Research, Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy established by the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan asserts that Japan will promote systematic utilization of MOX fuel in LWRs. Based on this Japanese nuclear energy policy, we have been pushing development of MOX fuel technology aimed at future full scale utilization of this fuel in BWRs. In this paper, the main R and D topics are described from three subject areas, MOX core and fuel design, MOX fuel irradiation behaviour, and MOX fuel fabrication technology. For the first area, we explain the compatibility of MOX fuel with UO 2 core, the feasibility of the full MOX core, and the adaptability of MOX design methods based on a mock-up criticality experiment. In the second, we outline the Tsuruga MOX irradiation program and the DOMO program, and suggest that MOX fuel behaviour is comparable to ordinary BWR UO 2 fuel behaviour. In the third, we examine the development of a fully automated MOX bundle assembling apparatus and its features. (author). 14 refs, 11 figs, 3 tabs

  16. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-15

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

  17. UNDER-UTILIZATION OF COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTERS IN PURWOREJO REGENCY, CENTRAL JAVA

    OpenAIRE

    Atik Triratnawati

    2006-01-01

    The basic strategy of the Ministry of Health to achieve Health For All In Indonesia 2010 is through health paradigm, decentralization, professionalism and health service management. Community health centers play an important role to achieve the goal. Unfortunately, underutilization of community health centers is still a problem in Purworejo. The purpose of this study was to know the utilization of community health centers using a sociological health approach. Qualitative research by observati...

  18. Innovative technology summary report: Light duty utility arm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Light-Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System is a mobile, multi-axis positioning system capable of deploying tools and sensors (end effecters) inside radioactive waste tanks for tank wall inspection, waste characterization, and waste retrieval. The LDUA robotic manipulator enters a tank through existing openings (risers) in the tank dome of the underground tanks. Using various end effecters, the LDUA System is a versatile system for high-level waste tank remediation. The LDUA System provides a means to deploy tools, while increasing the technology resources available to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Ongoing end effecter development will provide additional capabilities to remediate the waste tanks

  19. Utilization of nuclear technology in medicine: MINT and USM cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainul Hayati Daud

    1997-01-01

    Cooperation in the medicial application of nuclear technology between MINT and USM was first started in early 1990 under the technical assistance and cooperation program of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The cooperation was further strengthened through the Bilateral Technical assistance program of Malaysia-Australia. Under the cooperation, projects related to nuclear technology were implemented and assistance received was in the form of expert service, equipment and training. Several pharmaceutical kits were developed and used for the radiotherapy and radiodiagnotic. The cooperation has led to the establishment of nuclear medicine service center at hospital USM and tissue banks, one at Hospital USM and other at MINT. On the 29 April 1997, a MoU was signed between MINT and USM with the objective to widen the scope of the cooperation, to include human resource developement and commercialization of R and D

  20. Development of a national center for hydrogen technology. A summary report of activities completed at the national center hydrogen technology from 2005 to 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Michael J. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research of hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT's inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding of hydrogen-related projects ($20 million for the NCHT project which includes federal and corporate development partner funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT project's 19 activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan. A number of projects have been completed which range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified to transportation-grade quality in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in the first 5 years of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  1. Proceedings of the advanced research and technology development direct utilization, instrumentation and diagnostics contractors' review meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiling, D.W. (USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (USA)); Goldberg, P.M. (eds.) (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The 1990 Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Direct Utilization, and Instrumentation and Diagnostics Contractors Review Meeting was held September 16--18, 1990, at the Hyatt at Chatham Center in Pittsburgh, PA. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, and the Pittsburgh and Morgantown Energy Technology Centers. Each year the meeting provides a forum for the exchange of information among the DOE AR TD contractors and interested parties. This year's meeting was hosted by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and was attended by 120 individuals from industry, academia, national laboratories, and other governmental agencies. Papers were presented on research addressing coal surface, science, devolatilization and combustion, ash behavior, emission controls for gases particulates, fluid bed combustion and utilization in diesels and turbines. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  2. 75 FR 14128 - Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology Postdoctoral Researcher and Visiting Fellow...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... (NIST) Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (CNST) is establishing a financial assistance program... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology [Docket Number: 100311136-0140-01] Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology Postdoctoral Researcher and Visiting Fellow...

  3. Re-Engineering the ISS Payload Operations Control Center During Increased Utilization and Critical Onboard Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Stephanie R. B.; Marsh, Angela L.

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in utilization and hours of payload operations being executed onboard the International Space Station (ISS), upgrading the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) ISS Payload Control Area (PCA) was essential to gaining efficiencies and assurance of current and future payload health and science return. PCA houses the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) responsible for the execution of all NASA payloads onboard the ISS. POIC Flight Controllers are responsible for the operation of voice, stowage, command, telemetry, video, power, thermal, and environmental control in support of ISS science experiments. The methodologies and execution of the PCA refurbishment were planned and performed within a four-month period in order to assure uninterrupted operation of ISS payloads and minimal impacts to payload operations teams. To vacate the PCA, three additional HOSC control rooms were reconfigured to handle ISS real-time operations, Backup Control Center (BCC) to Mission Control in Houston, simulations, and testing functions. This involved coordination and cooperation from teams of ISS operations controllers, multiple engineering and design disciplines, management, and construction companies performing an array of activities simultaneously and in sync delivering a final product with no issues that impacted the schedule. For each console operator discipline, studies of Information Technology (IT) tools and equipment layouts, ergonomics, and lines of sight were performed. Infusing some of the latest IT into the project was an essential goal in ensuring future growth and success of the ISS payload science returns. Engineering evaluations led to a state of the art Video Wall implementation and more efficient ethernet cabling distribution providing the latest products and the best solution for the POIC. These engineering innovations led to cost savings for the project. Constraints involved in the management of

  4. Technologies and experimental approaches in the NIH Botanical Research Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Stephen; Birt, Diane F; Cassileth, Barrie R; Cefalu, William T; Chilton, Floyd H; Farnsworth, Norman R; Raskin, Ilya; van Breemen, Richard B; Weaver, Connie M

    2009-01-01

    There are many similarities between research on combinatorial chemistry and natural products and research on dietary supplements and botanicals in the NIH Botanical Research Centers. The technologies in the centers are similar to those used by other NIH-sponsored investigators. All centers rigorously examine the authenticity of botanical dietary supplements and determine the composition and concentrations of the phytochemicals therein, most often by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. Several of the centers specialize in fractionation and high-throughput evaluation to identify the individual bioactive agent or a combination of agents. Some centers are using DNA microarray analyses to determine the effects of botanicals on gene transcription with the goal of uncovering the important biochemical pathways they regulate. Other centers focus on bioavailability and uptake, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of the phytochemicals as for all xenobiotics. Because phytochemicals are often complex molecules, synthesis of isotopically labeled forms is carried out by plant cells in culture, followed by careful fractionation. These labeled phytochemicals allow the use of accelerator mass spectrometry to trace the tissue distribution of 14C-labeled proanthocyanidins in animal models of disease. State-of-the-art proteomics and mass spectrometry are also used to identify proteins in selected tissues whose expression and posttranslational modification are influenced by botanicals and dietary supplements. In summary, the skills needed to carry out botanical centers’ research are extensive and may exceed those practiced by most NIH investigators. PMID:18258642

  5. Advertising Technology and Visual Attraction of Cities Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inaam Albazzaz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Advertising technology represents a component of elements of the visual attraction in the urban scape, made its way transmission process of messages between the ends of the source ofinformation (sender and the Destination information (receiver of the final recipient of themessage, It serves as a social marked and a means of cultural expression, It is part of the inalienable in creating identity and determine the spatial relationships and also is a reflection ofurban culture to the community. This technology has become an increasing feature of the present era, characterized as the era of the three revolutions: (the information revolution, the technologyrevolution, and the media revolution, Where it became an integral part of the visual system surrounding of urban our environment in which we live,, And it worked to change the contemporary urban experience through the attraction and love to stay and stimulating social interactions within a decade and urban spaces that contain the contemporary urban forms, and this is what it will focus the research. The research’s problem is determined by :there is no clear perception about the definition of advertisement technology and its impact on the urban scape of the city centers according the concept of visual attraction. And clarify the goal of research in : Definition advertising technology and determine the most important aspects and indicators according the concept of visual attraction of the city centers. To achieve this goal was adopted the following approach: building a conceptual framework for technology advertising through definition of the basic concepts of research and review the historical development of it within the framework of the urban scape, and then a study of the most important intellectual concepts associated represented by (communication theory and built in investigating this technology (communication channel aims to deliver a message or information from the sender to the receiver

  6. IAEA and International Science and Technology Center sign cooperative agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA and the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) today signed an agreement that calls for an increase in cooperation between the two organizations. The memorandum of understanding seeks to amplify their collaboration in the research and development of applications and technology that could contribute to the IAEA's activities in the fields of verification and nuclear security, including training and capacity building. IAEA Safeguards Director of Technical Support Nikolay Khlebnikov and ISTC Executive Director Adriaan van der Meer signed the Agreement at IAEA headquarters in Vienna on 22 October 2008. (IAEA)

  7. Establishment of the Center for Biomedical Technology Innovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-12-15

    The report discussed the following topics: (1) Orthopedic Devices; (2) Hybrid Vector and Method Resulting in Protein Overproduction by Eukaryotic Cells; (3) Surgical Simulator; (4) CBTI (Center for Biomedical Technology Innovation) as an Incubator for Start-up Companies; (5) Voice-activated, computer-assisted surgical robotics; (6) Through transmission ultrasonic 3-D holography for diagnostic imaging; (7) CBTI's Scibermed{trademark} Virtual Institute (SVI); and (8) Laser Oxygenation Tomography.

  8. Establishment of the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher E. Hull

    2006-09-30

    This Final Technical Report covers the eight sub-projects awarded in the first year and the five projects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41091: Establishment of the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

  9. ESTABLISHMENT OF THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh W. Rimmer

    2003-07-01

    Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the eight sub-projects awarded in the first year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41091: Establishment of the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices. Due to the time taken up by the solicitation/selection process, these cover the initial 6-month period of activity only.

  10. Intelligent products for enhancing the utilization of tracking technology in transportation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, Gerben G.; Buijs, Paul; Szirbik, Nick B.; Wortmann, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – Many transportation companies struggle to effectively utilize the information provided by tracking technology for performing operational control. The research as presented in this paper aims to identify the problems underlying the inability to utilize tracking technology within this

  11. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    1999-10-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. Information specifically related to 9H production is presented for continuity in H program reporting, but lies outside the ATS program. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q98 through 3Q99. The most significant accomplishments are listed.

  12. User-Centered Design and Interactive Health Technologies for Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito Dabbs, Annette; Myers, Brad A.; Mc Curry, Kenneth R.; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Hawkins, Robert P.; Begey, Alex; Dew, Mary Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Despite recommendations that patients be involved in the design and testing of health technologies, few reports describe how to involve patients in systematic and meaningful ways to ensure that applications are customized to meet their needs. User-centered design (UCD) is an approach that involves end-users throughout the development process so that technology support tasks, are easy to operate, and are of value to users. In this paper we provide an overview of UCD and use the development of Pocket Personal Assistant for Tracking Health (Pocket PATH), to illustrate how these principles and techniques were applied to involve patients in the development of this interactive health technology. Involving patient-users in the design and testing ensured functionality and usability, therefore increasing the likelihood of promoting the intended health outcomes. PMID:19411947

  13. Digital Technologies Supporting Person-Centered Integrated Care - A Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øvretveit, John

    2017-09-25

    Shared electronic health and social care records in some service systems are already showing some of the benefits of digital technology and digital data for integrating health and social care. These records are one example of the beginning "digitalisation" of services that gives a glimpse of the potential of digital technology and systems for building coordinated and individualized integrated care. Yet the promise has been greater than the benefits, and progress has been slow compared to other industries. This paper describes for non-technical readers how information technology was used to support integrated care schemes in six EU services, and suggests practical ways forward to use the new opportunities to build person-centered integrated care.

  14. Publications in academic medical centers: technology-facilitated culture clash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Eta S

    2014-05-01

    Academic culture has a set of norms, expectations, and values that are sometimes tacit and sometimes very explicit. In medical school and other health professions educational settings, probably the most common norm includes placing a high value on peer-reviewed research publications, which are seen as the major evidence of scholarly productivity. Other features of academic culture include encouraging junior faculty and graduate students to share their research results at professional conferences and lecturing with slides as a major way to convey information. Major values that faculty share with journal editors include responsible conduct of research and proper attribution of others' words and ideas. Medical school faculty also value technology and are often quick to embrace technological advances that can assist them in their teaching and research. This article addresses the effects of technology on three aspects of academic culture: education, presentations at professional meetings, and research publications.The technologies discussed include online instruction, dissemination of conference proceedings on the Internet, plagiarism-detection software, and new technologies deployed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the home of PubMed. The author describes how the ease of deploying new technologies without faculty changing their norms and behavior in the areas of teaching and research can lead to conflicts of values among key stakeholders in the academic medical community, including faculty, journal editors, and professional associations. The implications of these conflicts and strategies for managing them are discussed.

  15. Armstrong Flight Research Center Research Technology and Engineering Report 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, David F.

    2016-01-01

    I am honored to endorse the 2015 Neil A. Armstrong Flight Research Center’s Research, Technology, and Engineering Report. The talented researchers, engineers, and scientists at Armstrong are continuing a long, rich legacy of creating innovative approaches to solving some of the difficult problems and challenges facing NASA and the aerospace community.Projects at NASA Armstrong advance technologies that will improve aerodynamic efficiency, increase fuel economy, reduce emissions and aircraft noise, and enable the integration of unmanned aircraft into the national airspace. The work represented in this report highlights the Center’s agility to develop technologies supporting each of NASA’s core missions and, more importantly, technologies that are preparing us for the future of aviation and space exploration.We are excited about our role in NASA’s mission to develop transformative aviation capabilities and open new markets for industry. One of our key strengths is the ability to rapidly move emerging techniques and technologies into flight evaluation so that we can quickly identify their strengths, shortcomings, and potential applications.This report presents a brief summary of the technology work of the Center. It also contains contact information for the associated technologists responsible for the work. Don’t hesitate to contact them for more information or for collaboration ideas.

  16. Low Temperature Heat Source Utilization Current and Advanced Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, James H. Jr.; Dambly, Benjamin W.

    1992-06-01

    Once a geothermal heat source has been identified as having the potential for development, and its thermal, physical, and chemical characteristics have been determined, a method of utilization must be decided upon. This compendium will touch upon some of these concerns, and hopefully will provide the reader with a better understanding of technologies being developed that will be applicable to geothermal development in East Africa, as well as other parts of the world. The appendices contain detailed reports on Down-the-Well Turbo Pump, The Vapor-Turbine Cycle for Geothermal Power Generation, Heat Exchanger Design for Geothermal Power Plants, and a Feasibility Study of Combined Power and Water Desalting Plant Using Hot Geothermal Water. [DJE-2005

  17. Utilization of professional mental health services according to recognition rate of mental health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo Jung; Ju, Young Jun; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2017-04-01

    Despite the positive effect of community-based mental health centers, the utilization of professional mental health services appears to be low. Therefore, we analyzed the relationship between regional recognition of mental health centers and utilization of professional mental health services. We used data from the Community Health Survey (2014) and e-provincial indicators. Only those living in Seoul, who responded that they were either feeling a lot of stress or depression, were included in the study. Multiple logistic regression analysis using generalized estimating equations was performed to examine both individual- and regional-level variables associated with utilization of professional mental health services. Among the 7338 participants who reported depression or stress, 646 (8.8%) had consulted a mental health professional for their symptoms. A higher recognition rate of mental health centers was associated with more utilization of professional mental health services (odds ratio [OR]=1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.03-1.07). Accessibility to professional mental health services could be improved depending on the general population's recognition and attitudes toward mental health centers. Therefore, health policy-makers need to plan appropriate strategies for changing the perception of mental health services and informing the public about both the benefits and functions of mental health centers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Improvements in water reactor fuel technology and utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The International Symposium on Improvements in Water Reactor Fuel Technology and Utilization was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and held in Stockholm from 15 to 19 September 1986 at the invitation of the Government of Sweden. The aim was to give scientists and engineers working in these fields the opportunity to exchange information on their achievements to date and their future work. It was attended by about 170 participants from 29 Member States and one international organization. A total of 37 papers and 12 posters covering a wide range of topics related to water reactor fuel was presented. The number of participants as well as the large number of fuel vendors from Europe, Japan and the United States of America and some reactor utilities proved that the timing and the topic of the Symposium were well chosen. In general, the Symposium has shown that current water reactor fuels perform reliably and meet current performance requirements. The factors which could limit fuel performance under high burnup conditions and load follow mode of operation were discussed and defined. All 49 presentations were divided into 6 sections: introduction (3 general papers); fuel design and performance (15 papers); fuel materials and behavior (8 papers); structural materials (5 papers); fuel fabrication (6 papers) and poster section (12 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these presentations

  19. Space Resource Utilization: Technologies and Potential Synergism with Terrestrial Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Gerald B.

    2015-01-01

    Space Resources and Their Uses: The idea of using resources in space to support human exploration and settlement or for economic development and profit beyond the surface of Earth has been proposed and discussed for decades. Work on developing a method to extract oxygen from lunar regolith started even before humans set foot on the Moon for the first time. The use of space resources, commonly referred to as In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), involves the processes and operations to harness and utilize resources in space (both natural and discarded) to create products for subsequent use. Potential space resources include water, solar wind implanted volatiles (hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen, etc.), vast quantities of metals and minerals in extraterrestrial soils, atmospheric constituents, unlimited solar energy, regions of permanent light and darkness, the vacuum and zero-gravity of space itself, trash and waste from human crew activities, and discarded hardware that has completed its primary purpose. ISRU covers a wide variety of concepts, technical disciplines, technologies, and processes. When considering all aspects of ISRU, there are 5 main areas that are relevant to human space exploration and the commercialization of space: 1. Resource Characterization and Mapping, 2. In Situ Consumables Production, 3. Civil Engineering and Construction, 4. In Situ Energy Production and Storage, and 5. In Situ Manufacturing.

  20. NASA Johnson Space Center SBIR STTR Program Technology Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishen, Kumar

    2007-01-01

    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program increases opportunities for small businesses to participate in research and development (R&D), increases employment, and improves U.S. competitiveness. Specifically the program stimulates U.S. technological innovation by using small businesses to meet federal R&D needs, increasing private-sector commercialization of innovations derived from federal R&D, and fostering and encouraging the participation of socially disadvantaged businesses. In 2000, the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program extended and strengthened the SBIR Program, increasing its emphasis on pursuing commercial applications by awarding contracts to small business concerns for cooperative R&D with a nonprofit research institution. Modeled after the SBIR Program, STTR is nevertheless a separately funded activity. Technologies that have resulted from the Johnson Space Center SBIR STTR Program include: a device for regenerating iodinated resin beds; laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis or LASIK; a miniature physiological monitoring device capable of collecting and analyzing a multitude of real-time signals to transmit medical data from remote locations to medical centers for diagnosis and intervention; a new thermal management system for fibers and fabrics giving rise to new line of garments and thermal-enhancing environments; and a highly electropositive material that attracts and retains electronegative particles in water.

  1. 76 FR 11498 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ...; Comment Request; Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction... technology transfer customers and stakeholders have never been assessed systematically. Input from these... and instruments, contact John D. Hewes, Ph.D., Technology Transfer Specialist, Technology Transfer...

  2. ECUT (Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies) program: Biocatalysis project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baresi, Larry

    1989-01-01

    The Annual Report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1988 research activities and accomplishments, for the Biocatalysis Project of the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies (ECUT) Division. The ECUT Biocatalysis Project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. The Biocatalysis Project is a mission-oriented, applied research and exploratory development activity directed toward resolution of the major generic technical barriers that impede the development of biologically catalyzed commercial chemical production. The approach toward achieving project objectives involves an integrated participation of universities, industrial companies and government research laboratories. The Project's technical activities were organized into three work elements: (1) The Molecular Modeling and Applied Genetics work element includes research on modeling of biological systems, developing rigorous methods for the prediction of three-dimensional (tertiary) protein structure from the amino acid sequence (primary structure) for designing new biocatalysis, defining kinetic models of biocatalyst reactivity, and developing genetically engineered solutions to the generic technical barriers that preclude widespread application of biocatalysis. (2) The Bioprocess Engineering work element supports efforts in novel bioreactor concepts that are likely to lead to substantially higher levels of reactor productivity, product yields and lower separation energetics. Results of work within this work element will be used to establish the technical feasibility of critical bioprocess monitoring and control subsystems. (3) The Bioprocess Design and Assessment work element attempts to develop procedures (via user-friendly computer software) for assessing the energy-economics of biocatalyzed chemical production processes, and initiation of technology transfer for advanced bioprocesses.

  3. Utilizing information technologies for lifelong monitoring in diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzi, Davide; Lanzola, Giordano

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technologies have long been acknowledged to support information sharing along the whole chain of care, from the clinic to the homes of patients and their relatives. Thus they are increasingly being considered for improving the delivery of health care services also in light of clinical and technological achievements that propose new treatments requiring a tighter interaction among patients and physicians. The multiagent paradigm has been utilized within an architecture for delivering telemedicine services to chronic outpatients at their domiciles and enforcing cooperation among patients, caregivers, and different members of the health care staff. The architecture sees each communication device such as a palmtop, smart phone, or personal digital assistant as a separate agent upon which different services are deployed, including telemetry, reminders, notifications, and alarms. Decoupling services from agents account for a highly configurable environment applicable to almost any context that can be customized as needed. The architecture has been used for designing and implementing a prototypical software infrastructure, called LifePhone, that runs on several communication devices. A basic set of services has been devised with which we were able to configure two different applications that address long-term and short-term monitoring scenarios for diabetes patients. The long-term scenario encompasses telemetry and reminder services for patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis, which is a treatment for chronic renal failure, a diabetes complication. The short-term scenario incorporates telemetry and remote alarms and is applicable for training patients to use an artificial pancreas. Our experiments proved that an infrastructure such as LifePhone can be used successfully for bridging the interaction gap that exists among all the components of a health care delivery process, improving the quality of service and possibly reducing the overall

  4. Clinical utility of RapidArc™ radiotherapy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infusino, Erminia

    2015-01-01

    RapidArc™ is a radiation technique that delivers highly conformal dose distributions through the complete rotation (360°) and speed variation of the linear accelerator gantry. This technique, called volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), compared with conventional radiotherapy techniques, can achieve high-target volume coverage and sparing damage to normal tissues. RapidArc delivers precise dose distribution and conformity similar to or greater than intensity-modulated radiation therapy in a short time, generally a few minutes, to which image-guided radiation therapy is added. RapidArc has become a currently used technology in many centers, which use RapidArc technology to treat a large number of patients. Large and small hospitals use it to treat the most challenging cases, but more and more frequently for the most common cancers. The clinical use of RapidArc and VMAT technology is constantly growing. At present, a limited number of clinical data are published, mostly concerning planning and feasibility studies. Clinical outcome data are increasing for a few tumor sites, even if only a little. The purpose of this work is to discuss the current status of VMAT techniques in clinical use through a review of the published data of planning systems and clinical outcomes in several tumor sites. The study consisted of a systematic review based on analysis of manuscripts retrieved from the PubMed, BioMed Central, and Scopus databases by searching for the keywords “RapidArc”, “Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy”, and “Intensity-modulated radiotherapy”

  5. Future Directions in Rotorcraft Technology at Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Edwin W.; Ormiston, Robert A; Young, Larry A.

    2000-01-01

    Members of the NASA and Army rotorcraft research community at Ames Research Center have developed a vision for 'Vertical Flight 2025'. This paper describes the development of that vision and the steps being taken to implement it. In an effort to realize the vision, consistent with both NASA and Army Aviation strategic plans, two specific technology development projects have been identified: (1) one focused on a personal transportation system capable of vertical flight (the 'Roto-Mobile') and (2) the other on small autonomous rotorcraft (which is inclusive of vehicles which range in grams of gross weight for 'MicroRotorcraft' to thousands of kilograms for rotorcraft uninhabited aerial vehicles). The paper provides a status report on these projects as well as a summary of other revolutionary research thrusts being planned and executed at Ames Research Center.

  6. Vaccines for HIV | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of an effective HIV vaccine has been an ongoing area of research. The high variability in HIV-1 virus strains has represented a major challenge in successful development. Ideally, an effective candidate vaccine would provide protection against the majority of clades of HIV. Two major hurdles to overcome are immunodominance and sequence diversity. This vaccine utilizes a strategy for overcoming these two issues by identifying the conserved regions of the virus and exploiting them for use in a targeted therapy. NCI seeks licensees and/or research collaborators to commercialize this technology, which has been validated in macaque models.

  7. A survey of Vaccine Utilization in a Private Medical Center in Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of routine immunization in a private clinic was undertaken to evaluate vaccine utilization. A retrospective evaluation of attendance at a private clinic routine immunization center was done. Quantity of vaccines received was compared to the number of children who attended immunization sessions over a three year ...

  8. A survey of Vaccine Utilization in a Private Medical Center in Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Safe and effective vaccines have been successful in reducing childhood morbidity and mortality. A study of routine immunization in a private clinic was undertaken to evaluate vaccine utilization. A retrospective evaluation of attendance at a private clinic routine immunization center was done. Quantity of vaccines received ...

  9. Utilizing Solar Power Technologies for On-Orbit Propellant Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikes, John C.; Howell, Joe T.; Henley, Mark W.

    2006-01-01

    The cost of access to space beyond low Earth orbit may be reduced if vehicles can refuel in orbit. The cost of access to low Earth orbit may also be reduced by launching oxygen and hydrogen propellants in the form of water. To achieve this reduction in costs of access to low Earth orbit and beyond, a propellant depot is considered that electrolyzes water in orbit, then condenses and stores cryogenic oxygen and hydrogen. Power requirements for such a depot require Solar Power Satellite technologies. A propellant depot utilizing solar power technologies is discussed in this paper. The depot will be deployed in a 400 km circular equatorial orbit. It receives tanks of water launched into a lower orbit from Earth, converts the water to liquid hydrogen and oxygen, and stores up to 500 metric tons of cryogenic propellants. This requires a power system that is comparable to a large Solar Power Satellite capable of several 100 kW of energy. Power is supplied by a pair of solar arrays mounted perpendicular to the orbital plane, which rotates once per orbit to track the Sun. The majority of the power is used to run the electrolysis system. Thermal control is maintained by body-mounted radiators; these also provide some shielding against orbital debris. The propellant stored in the depot can support transportation from low Earth orbit to geostationary Earth orbit, the Moon, LaGrange points, Mars, etc. Emphasis is placed on the Water-Ice to Cryogen propellant production facility. A very high power system is required for cracking (electrolyzing) the water and condensing and refrigerating the resulting oxygen and hydrogen. For a propellant production rate of 500 metric tons (1,100,000 pounds) per year, an average electrical power supply of 100 s of kW is required. To make the most efficient use of space solar power, electrolysis is performed only during the portion of the orbit that the Depot is in sunlight, so roughly twice this power level is needed for operations in sunlight

  10. National Wind Technology Center sitewide, Golden, CO: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the nation`s primary solar and renewable energy research laboratory, proposes to expand its wind technology research and development program activities at its National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Golden, Colorado. NWTC is an existing wind energy research facility operated by NREL for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Proposed activities include the construction and reuse of buildings and facilities, installation of up to 20 wind turbine test sites, improvements in infrastructure, and subsequent research activities, technology testing, and site operations. In addition to wind turbine test activities, NWTC may be used to support other NREL program activities and small-scale demonstration projects. This document assesses potential consequences to resources within the physical, biological, and human environment, including potential impacts to: air quality, geology and soils, water resources, biological resources, cultural and historic resources, socioeconomic resources, land use, visual resources, noise environment, hazardous materials and waste management, and health and safety conditions. Comment letters were received from several agencies in response to the scoping and predecisional draft reviews. The comments have been incorporated as appropriate into the document with full text of the letters contained in the Appendices. Additionally, information from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site on going sitewide assessment of potential environmental impacts has been reviewed and discussed by representatives of both parties and incorporated into the document as appropriate.

  11. National Wind Technology Center sitewide, Golden, CO: Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the nation's primary solar and renewable energy research laboratory, proposes to expand its wind technology research and development program activities at its National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Golden, Colorado. NWTC is an existing wind energy research facility operated by NREL for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Proposed activities include the construction and reuse of buildings and facilities, installation of up to 20 wind turbine test sites, improvements in infrastructure, and subsequent research activities, technology testing, and site operations. In addition to wind turbine test activities, NWTC may be used to support other NREL program activities and small-scale demonstration projects. This document assesses potential consequences to resources within the physical, biological, and human environment, including potential impacts to: air quality, geology and soils, water resources, biological resources, cultural and historic resources, socioeconomic resources, land use, visual resources, noise environment, hazardous materials and waste management, and health and safety conditions. Comment letters were received from several agencies in response to the scoping and predecisional draft reviews. The comments have been incorporated as appropriate into the document with full text of the letters contained in the Appendices. Additionally, information from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site on going sitewide assessment of potential environmental impacts has been reviewed and discussed by representatives of both parties and incorporated into the document as appropriate

  12. 75 FR 80830 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Technology Transfer Center External Customer Satisfaction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... Request; Technology Transfer Center External Customer Satisfaction Survey (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance...: Technology Transfer Center External Customer Satisfaction Survey (NCI). Type of Information Collection...: Obtain information on the satisfaction of TTC's external customers with TTC customer services; collect...

  13. Utilization of electronic communication (E-mail) with patients at university and college health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neinstein, L

    2000-07-01

    To examine the utilization and potential uses and problems of electronic communication with patients. University and college health centers were surveyed about the type of utilization and policies of electronic communication with patients. The survey group consisted of 99 health centers predominantly serving students representing small-, medium-, and large-sized public and private colleges and universities. Eighty-nine health centers completed the survey. Of the responding health centers, 63.6% use some form of electronic communication with patients. Twenty-seven percent of the health centers give out some form of medical advice via E-mail or the Internet; 14.7% give out some laboratory results via E-mail; 3.4% make appointments via E-mail; and 63.6% give out administrative advice by E-mail. While there was consistent concern expressed about confidentiality and security, only five health centers had a policy about electronic communication. Uses were most common in nonclinical areas but did include health education, Web sites, medical advice, laboratory results, appointment-making or confirmation, and contacting hard-to-reach patients including those studying abroad. While electronic communication with patients was common, provision of direct medical advice was less common. Issues receiving little attention include determining the types of electronic communication that is acceptable to staff and students, determining the level of security of their current information system, educating staff about confidentiality and security issues, and establishing a comprehensive policy regarding electronic communication with patients.

  14. UNDER-UTILIZATION OF COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTERS IN PURWOREJO REGENCY, CENTRAL JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atik Triratnawati

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The basic strategy of the Ministry of Health to achieve Health For All In Indonesia 2010 is through health paradigm, decentralization, professionalism and health service management. Community health centers play an important role to achieve the goal. Unfortunately, underutilization of community health centers is still a problem in Purworejo. The purpose of this study was to know the utilization of community health centers using a sociological health approach. Qualitative research by observation, in-depth interview and focus group discussion were done among different types of group. The study was done in Purworejo District on February and March 2000. The main problems related to underutilization of community health centers are mostly on administration (less quality services, un-efficient, long hours waiting, strong bureaucratic system (physician has a dominant power, overlapping programs, poor coordination and integration with other divisions and cultural behavior of the community (labeling/stigma, self-care dominant, lack of community participation. To overcome under-utilization of community health centers the administration and bureaucracy should be changed into more efficient, not bureaucratic management. In addition social changes of the community culture is needed. As a consequence through these changes the staff of the health centers will be more efficient and effective.

  15. Scientific and educational center "space systems and technology"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, I. V.; Loginov, Y. Y.; Zelenkov, P. V.

    2015-10-01

    The issues of engineers training in the aerospace university on the base of Scientific and Educational Center "Space Systems and Technology" are discussed. In order to improve the quality of education in the Siberian State Aerospace University the research work of students, as well as the practice- oriented training of engineers are introduced in the educational process. It was made possible as a result of joint efforts of university with research institutes of the Russian Academy of Science and industrial enterprises. The university experience in this area promotes the development of a new methods and forms of educational activities, including the project-oriented learning technologies, identifying promising areas of specialization and training of highly skilled engineers for aerospace industry and other institutions. It also allows you to coordinate the work of departments and other units of the university to provide the educational process in workshops and departments of the industrial enterprises in accordance with the needs of the target training. Within the framework of scientific and education center the students perform researches, diploma works and master's theses; the postgraduates are trained in advanced scientific and technical areas of enterprise development.

  16. Development and Utilization of Technology on Indian Mango Fruit Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenda A. Bronce

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This project aimed to develop and utilize technology on Indian mango fruit processing. Chemical properties of matured unripe and ripe Indian mangoes were determined in terms of total sugar, reducing sugar, starch, titratable acidity and pH. Fermentation parameters investigated in the study were amount of sugar added (20 and 25% fermentation medium, acidity of fermentation medium (addition of 1.33 and 1.66 grams of citric acid for ripe and dilution of water for unripe, degree of ripening of Indian mango fruits (ripe and unripe and ageing period (3 and 4 months. Sixteen treatments were done in triplicates and a composite sample was taken from each treatment for sensory evaluation. Results of the preference test were subjected to statistical analysis. The physicochemical properties of Indian mango wine produced using best fermentation parameters were determined. Appropriate packaging material was selected and packaging design was developed for Indian mango wine. Project cooperators were selected and the technology was transferred through training and production runs. Results of preference test showed that the wine with best sensory properties was prepared using matured unripe Indian mango diluted with water and added with 25% sugar. According to the panel of sensory experts, the taste of Indian mango wine was strong with proper blending of sweetness and sourness, its mouth feel was smooth and good balance, aroma was hot pungent and its color and appearance was clear and light yellow. Its titratable acidity was 0.622%, pH was 5, alcohol content was 11% and brix was 5°.

  17. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy leads the U.S. utilization of bariatric surgery at academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, J Esteban; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of a recent single state bariatric surgery registry revealed that laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy was the most common bariatric procedure starting in 2012. The objective of this study was to examine the trend in utilization of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy performed at academic medical centers in the United States. Using ICD-9 diagnosis and procedure codes, clinical data obtained from the University HealthSystem Consortium database for all bariatric procedures performed for the treatment of severe obesity between October 1, 2011, and June 30, 2014. Quarterly trends in utilization for the 4 most commonly performed bariatric operations were examined, and comparisons between procedures were performed. A total of 54,953 bariatric procedures were performed. Utilization of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy increased from 23.7% of all bariatric procedures during the fourth quarter of 2011 to 60.7% during the second quarter of 2014 while laparoscopic gastric bypass decreased from 62.2% to 37.0%, respectively. Utilization of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy surpassed that of laparoscopic gastric bypass in the second quarter of 2013 (50.6% versus 45.8%). During the same time period, utilization of open gastric bypass fell from 6.6% to 1.5%, and the use of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding decreased from 7.5% to .8%. Within the context of U.S. academic medical centers, there has been a significant increase in the utilization of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, which has surpassed laparoscopic gastric bypass utilization since 2013. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is now the most commonly performed bariatric procedure at the national level within academic centers. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Supply-side barriers to maternal health care utilization at health sub-centers in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    There exist several barriers to maternal health service utilization in developing countries. Most of the previous studies conducted in India have focused on demand-side barriers, while only a few have touched upon supply-side barriers. None of the previous studies in India have investigated the factors that affect maternal health care utilization at health sub-centers (HSCs) in India, despite the fact that these institutions, which are the geographically closest available public health care facilities in rural areas, play a significant role in providing affordable maternal health care. Therefore, this study aims to examine the supply-side determinants of maternal service utilization at HSCs in rural India. This study uses health facility data from the nationally representative District-Level Household Survey, which was administered in 2007-2008 to examine the effect of supply-side variables on the utilization of maternal health care services across HSCs in rural India. Since the dependent variables (the number of antenatal registrations, in-facility deliveries, and postnatal care services) are count variables and exhibit considerable variability, the data were analyzed using negative binomial regression instead of Poisson regression. The results show that those HSCs run by a contractual auxiliary nurse midwife (ANM) are likely to offer a lower volume of services when compared to those run by a permanent ANM. The availability of obstetric drugs, weighing scales, and blood pressure equipment is associated with the increased utilization of antenatal and postnatal services. The unavailability of a labor/examination table and bed screen is associated with a reduction in the number of deliveries and postnatal services. The utilization of services is expected to increase if essential facilities, such as water, telephones, toilets, and electricity, are available at the HSCs. Monitoring of ANM's work by Village Health and Sanitation Committee (VHSC) and providing in

  19. Supply-side barriers to maternal health care utilization at health sub-centers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Singh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction There exist several barriers to maternal health service utilization in developing countries. Most of the previous studies conducted in India have focused on demand-side barriers, while only a few have touched upon supply-side barriers. None of the previous studies in India have investigated the factors that affect maternal health care utilization at health sub-centers (HSCs in India, despite the fact that these institutions, which are the geographically closest available public health care facilities in rural areas, play a significant role in providing affordable maternal health care. Therefore, this study aims to examine the supply-side determinants of maternal service utilization at HSCs in rural India. Data and Methods This study uses health facility data from the nationally representative District-Level Household Survey, which was administered in 2007–2008 to examine the effect of supply-side variables on the utilization of maternal health care services across HSCs in rural India. Since the dependent variables (the number of antenatal registrations, in-facility deliveries, and postnatal care services are count variables and exhibit considerable variability, the data were analyzed using negative binomial regression instead of Poisson regression. Results The results show that those HSCs run by a contractual auxiliary nurse midwife (ANM are likely to offer a lower volume of services when compared to those run by a permanent ANM. The availability of obstetric drugs, weighing scales, and blood pressure equipment is associated with the increased utilization of antenatal and postnatal services. The unavailability of a labor/examination table and bed screen is associated with a reduction in the number of deliveries and postnatal services. The utilization of services is expected to increase if essential facilities, such as water, telephones, toilets, and electricity, are available at the HSCs. Monitoring of ANM’s work by Village

  20. ECUT (Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies Program). Biocatalysis Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Presented are the FY 1985 accomplishments, activities, and planned research efforts of the Biocatalysis Project of the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies (ECUT) Program. The Project's technical activities were organized as follows: In the Molecular Modeling and Applied Genetics work element, research focused on (1) modeling and simulation studies to establish the physiological basis of high temperature tolerance in a selected enzyme and the catalytic mechanisms of three species of another enzyme, and (2) determining the degree of plasmid amplification and stability of several DNA bacterial strains. In the Bioprocess Engineering work element, research focused on (1) studies of plasmid propagation and the generation of models, (2) developing methods for preparing immobilized biocatalyst beads, and (3) developing an enzyme encapsulation method. In the Process Design and Analysis work element, research focused on (1) further refinement of a test case simulation of the economics and energy efficiency of alternative biocatalyzed production processes, (2) developing a candidate bioprocess to determine the potential for reduced energy consumption and facility/operating costs, and (3) a techno-economic assessment of potential advancements in microbial ammonia production.

  1. Process technology of luwak coffee through bioreactor utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadipernata, M.; Nugraha, S.

    2018-01-01

    Indonesia has an advantage in producing exotic coffee that is Luwak coffee. Luwak coffee is produced from the fermentation process in digestion of civet. Luwak coffee production is still limited due to the difficulty level in the use of civet animals as the only medium of Luwak coffee making. The research was conducted by developing technology of luwak coffee production through bioreactor utilization and addition the bacteria isolate from gastric of civet. The process conditions in the bioreactor which include temperature, pH, and bacteria isolate of civet are adjusted to the process that occurs in civet digestion, including peristaltic movement on the stomach and small intestine of the civet will be replaced by the use of propellers that rotate on the bioreactor. The result of research showed that proximat analysis data of artificial/bioreactor luwak coffee did not significant different with original luwak coffee. However, the original luwak coffee has higher content of caffeine compared to bioreactor luwak coffee. Based on the cuping test the bioreactor luwak coffee has a value of 84.375, while the original luwak coffee is 84.875. As the result, bioreactor luwak coffee has excellent taste that similiar with original luwak coffee taste.

  2. Acceptability and perceived utility of drone technology among emergency medical service responders and incident commanders for mass casualty incident management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Alexander; Chai, Peter R; Griswold, Matthew K; Lai, Jeffrey T; Boyer, Edward W; Broach, John

    2017-01-01

    This study seeks to understand the acceptability and perceived utility of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology to Mass Casualty Incidents (MCI) scene management. Qualitative questionnaires regarding the ease of operation, perceived usefulness, and training time to operate UAVs were administered to Emergency Medical Technicians (n = 15). A Single Urban New England Academic Tertiary Care Medical Center. Front-line emergency medical service (EMS) providers and senior EMS personnel in Incident Commander roles. Data from this pilot study indicate that EMS responders are accepting to deploying and operating UAV technology in a disaster scenario. Additionally, they perceived UAV technology as easy to adopt yet impactful in improving MCI scene management.

  3. Ophthalmic patients' utilization of technology and social media: an assessment to improve quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleo, Chelsea L; Hark, Lisa; Leiby, Benjamin; Dai, Yang; Murchison, Ann P; Martinez, Patricia; Haller, Julia A

    2014-10-01

    E-health tools have the potential to improve the quality of care for ophthalmic patients, many of whom have chronic conditions. However, little research has assessed ophthalmic patients' use or acceptance of technological devices and social media platforms for health-related purposes. The present study evaluated utilization of technological devices and social media platforms by eye clinic patients, as well as their willingness to receive health reminders through these technologies. A 31-item paper questionnaire was administered to eye clinic patients (n=843) at an urban, tertiary-care center. Questions focused on technology ownership, comfort levels, frequency of use, and preferences for receiving health reminders. Demographic data were also recorded. Eye clinic patients most commonly owned cellular phones (90%), landline phones (81%), and computers (80%). Overall, eye clinic patients preferred to receive health reminders through phone calls and e-mail and used these technologies frequently and with a high level of comfort. Less than 3% of patients preferred using social networking to receive health reminders. In addition, age was significantly associated with technology ownership, comfort level, and frequency of use (p<0.05). The majority of patients 18-45 years of age preferred to receive appointment reminders via text message (57%) and e-mail (53%). This age group also used these technologies more frequently and with a higher comfort level (p<0.001). These data support the proposal that e-mail and text-messaging e-health tools are likely to be immediately adopted by eye clinic patients and therefore have the greatest potential to improve health outcomes and increase quality of care. Eye clinic patients are interested in these technologies for appointment reminders, general eye and vision health information, asking urgent medical questions, and requesting prescription refills. Future controlled trials could further explore the efficacy of e-health tools for these

  4. Manpower development and international cooperation in Nuclear Technology and Education Center, JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiba, Koreyuki; Tojo, Takao; Takada, Kazuo; Nomura, Masayuki

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear Technology and Education Center was founded in 1958 and now has two branches, Tokyo Education Center at Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo and Tokai Education Center at Tokai, Ibaraki-ken. The objective was to educate and train nuclear engineers and scientists for implementing the nation's program of atomic energy research, development and utilization. A variety of training courses have been prepared and carried out to meet the requirements of the nuclear community. In recent years, activities of getting the public acceptance have become important for nuclear energy deployment in Japan. Many short courses have been implemented at JAERI sites and cities for providing the public including high school teachers with basic knowledge on nuclear energy. International training programs of the center were started with the cooperation of the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) in 1985 and of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in 1987. International seminars were implemented for improving nuclear safety by inviting participants from the former Soviet Union, central/east European countries and the neighboring countries of Japan under the direction of the Science and Technology Agency (STA) in 1992. STA and JAERI are starting new programs of helping Asian and Pacific countries to develop nuclear manpower. (author)

  5. Two new research melters at the Savannah River Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, J.R.; Coughlin, J.T.; Minichan, R.L.; Zamecnik, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) complex leader in the development of vitrification technology. To maintain and expand this SRTC core technology, two new melter systems are currently under construction in SRTC. This paper discusses the development of these two new systems, which will be used to support current as well as future vitrification programs in the DOE complex. The first of these is the new minimelter, which is a joule-heated glass melter intended for experimental melting studies with nonradioactive glass waste forms. Testing will include surrogates of Defense Waste processing Facility (DWPF) high-level wastes. To support the DWPF testing, the new minimelter was scaled to the DWPF melter based on melt surface area. This new minimelter will replace an existing system and provide a platform for the research and development necessary to support the SRTC vitrification core technology mission. The second new melter is the British Nuclear Fuels, Inc., research melter system (BNFL melter), which is a scaled version of the BNFL low-activity-waste (LAW) melter proposed for vitrification of LAW at Hanford. It is designed to process a relatively large amount of actual radiative Hanford tank waste and to gather data on the composition of off-gases that will be generated by the LAW melter. Both the minimelter and BNFL melter systems consist of five primary subsystems: melter vessel, off-gas treatment, feed, power supply, and instrumentation and controls. The configuration and design of these subsystems are tailored to match the current system requirements and provide the flexibility to support future DOE vitrification programs. This paper presents a detailed discussion of the unique design challenges represented by these two new melter systems

  6. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damevski, Kostadin [Virginia State Univ., Petersburg, VA (United States)

    2009-03-30

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discover through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedened computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) tackles these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative hig-performance scientific computing.

  7. The Assimilation of Assistive Technology in Residential Care Centers for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Carmeli

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available People with intellectual disability (ID require special support in order to achieve independence in their daily life. Persons with ID are less exposed to assistive technology, although studies have shown that the availability of aids afford an opportunity to reach independence and cooperation. The aim of this study was to examine the nature of the relationship between involvement of the physiotherapy (PT team and the degree to which assistive technology was used. A questionnaire was sent to all PTs employed at all 54 residential care centers for persons with ID of the Division for Mental Retardation at the Ministry of Social Affairs in Israel. A significantly positive correlation was found between the degree of involvement of the PT and the utilization of assistive technology. The study results may be summarized by stating that PTs demonstrated a great deal of involvement, particularly in relation to the extent of their work in the residential care centers. PT's awareness of the importance was indicated as the major reason to use assistive technology.

  8. Utility survey on nuclear power plant siting and nuclear energy centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cope, D.F.; Bauman, H.F.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the large U.S. utilities were surveyed by telephone and mail on questions concerning nuclear power plant siting and nuclear energy centers (NECs). The main purpose of the survey was for guidance of ERDA's NEC program. The questions covered the following topics: availability of sites; impact of environmental and other restraints; plans for development of multi-unit sites; interest in NEC development; interest in including fuel-cycle facilities in NECs; and opinions on the roles desired for the state and Federal governments in power plant siting. The main conclusion of the survey was that, while many utilities were considering multiple-unit sites of 2 to 5 units, none were planning larger energy centers at the present time. However, several expressed interest in NECs as a long-range future development

  9. Utility survey on nuclear power plant siting and nuclear energy centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cope, D. F.; Bauman, H. F.

    1977-06-28

    Most of the large U.S. utilities were surveyed by telephone and mail on questions concerning nuclear power plant siting and nuclear energy centers (NECs). The main purpose of the survey was for guidance of ERDA's NEC program. The questions covered the following topics: availability of sites; impact of environmental and other restraints; plans for development of multi-unit sites; interest in NEC development; interest in including fuel-cycle facilities in NECs; and opinions on the roles desired for the state and Federal governments in power plant siting. The main conclusion of the survey was that, while many utilities were considering multiple-unit sites of 2 to 5 units, none were planning larger energy centers at the present time. However, several expressed interest in NECs as a long-range future development.

  10. Combined Neutron Center for European Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagniel, Jean-Michel

    2002-01-01

    High-power proton linacs are needed as driver for several applications, namely transmutation of nuclear waste using Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS), spallation neutron sources (ESS in Europe) and other fields of basic and applied research (next generation of radioactive ion beam facilities, neutrino factories, muon colliders, irradiation facilities for material testing...). The possible synergies among these projects will be pointed out and the feasibility study of high-power proton linac used as driver of a multi-user facility (CONCERT) will be presented. There was excellent scientific, technical and economic reasons to study a Combined Neutron Center for European Research and Technology (CONCERT) based on a high-power proton accelerator. Such an installation would serve condensed matter studies by spallation neutron scattering, a technological irradiation tool and R and D facility for an hybrid reactor demonstrator, a radioactive ion beam facility for nuclear physics, R and D developments for a muon/neutrino facility. The installation could therefore constitute a European center of excellence in the field of neutronics where a large number of scientific and technical executives could be trained. The CONCERT Project Team has performed the feasibility study of such a multi-user facility with: - a review of the beam needs for the different applications, - an analyze of their compatibility, - the definition of the scope of a site-independent project, - a selection of the most appropriate options regarding scientific, technical, financial, organizational and administrative aspects, - an estimation of the costs for construction, operation and the needs in manpower. The conceptual design report [17] is sufficiently detailed to minimize contingencies on those parts of the project having a large potential impact in terms of performances, costs or delays. (author)

  11. Health information technology adoption in California community health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Katherine K; Rudin, Robert S; Wilson, Machelle D

    2015-12-01

    National and state initiatives to spur adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) and health information exchange (HIE) among providers in rural and underserved communities have been in place for 15 years. Our goal was to systematically assess the impact of these initiatives by quantifying the level of adoption and key factors associated with adoption among community health centers in California. Cross-sectional statewide survey. We conducted a telephone survey of all California primary care community health centers (CHCs) from August to September 2013. Multiple logistic regressions were fit to test for associations between various practice characteristics and adoption of EHRs, meaningful use-certified EHRs, and HIE. For the multivariable model, we included those variables which were significant at the P = .10 level in the univariate tests. We received responses from 194 CHCs (73.5% response rate). Adoption of any EHRs (80.3%) and meaningful use-certified EHRs (94.6% of those with an EHR) was very high. Adoption of HIE is substantial (48.7%) and took place within a few years (mean = 2.61 years; SD = 2.01). More than half (54.7%) of CHCs are able to receive data into the EHR indicating some level of interoperability. Patient engagement capacity is moderate, with 21.6% offering a PHR, and 55.2% electronic visit summaries. Rural location and belonging to a multi-site clinic organization both increase the odds of adoption of EHRs, HIE, and electronic visit summary, with the odds ratio ranging from 0.63 to 3.28 (all P values adoption of health information technology (IT) in rural areas may be the result of both federal and state investments. As CHCs lack access to capital for investments, continued support of technology infrastructure may be needed for them to further leverage health IT to improve healthcare.

  12. Drug utilization profile in adult patients with refractory epilepsy at a tertiary referral center

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas-Lima, Priscila de; Baldoni, Andre de Oliveira; Alexandre, Veriano; Pereira, Leonardo Regis Leira; Sakamoto, Americo Ceiki

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the utilization profile of antiepileptic drugs in a population of adult patients with refractory epilepsy attending a tertiary center. Method Descriptive analyses of data were obtained from the medical records of 112 patients. Other clinical and demographic characteristics were also registered. Results Polytherapies with ≥3 antiepileptic drugs were prescribed to 60.7% of patients. Of the old agents, carbamazepine and clobazam were the most commonly prescribed (72.3% ...

  13. Profile of the electric utilities in the Brazilian Southeast and Center west regions, 1989-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The characteristics and performance of the electric utilities operating in the south-east and center-west regions of Brazil are presented. These regions consume 70% of all the electric power produced in the country. The informations supplied in this report include for each regions the characteristics of the system, the demand and growth rate and the electricity consumed by the industrial, commercial and residential sectors. 44 figs., 134 tabs

  14. Economic Development Activities at the Young - Rainey Science, Technology, & Research (STAR) Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul S. Sacco; Carl Smeigh; John Caponiti, Jr.

    2008-06-30

    Project mission was to mitigate the adverse economic effects of closing the U.S. Department of Energy's Pinellas Plant in Largo, Florida. This project was to facilitate the physical renovation of the plant and to help maintain and create jobs for the employees that worked at the plant when DOE terminated its operations. It also included finding and attracting high technology, industrial manufacturing and related firms to utilize the space and high tech equipment to remain at the plant. Stakeholders included the affected plant employees, local government and related public organizations, and businesses and universities in the Tampa Bay Florida area. The $17.6 million funded for this project helped produce 2,780 jobs at the Young - Rainey STAR Center at an average cost of $6,328. Rental income from STAR Center tenants and third party cash input amounted to approximately $66 million over the project period of 13.3 years.

  15. Evaluation of the "Angelina Jolie Effect" on Screening Mammography Utilization in an Academic Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesch, Marco D; Schetter, Susann; Segel, Joel; Chetlen, Alison

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the impact on screening mammography at our institution, comparing weekly utilization in the 2 years before and the 2 years after Ms Angelina Jolie disclosed in the New York Times on May 13, 2013, that she had had a prophylactic double mastectomy. All 48,110 consecutive screening mammograms conducted at our institution between May 16, 2011, and May 16, 2015, were selected from our electronic medical record system. We used interrupted time series statistical models and graphical methods on utilization data to understand utilization changes before and after Ms Jolie's news. The graphed trend of weekly screening mammogram utilization failed to show changes around the time of interest. Analytical models and statistical tests also failed to show a step change increase or acceleration of utilization around May 2013. However, graphical and time series analyses showed a flattening of utilization in the middle of 2014. In our well-powered analysis in a large regional breast imaging center, we found no support for the hypothesis that this celebrity news drove increased screening. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Barriers to utilization of childbirth services of a rural birthing center in Nepal: A qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resham Bahadur Khatri

    Full Text Available Maternal mortality and morbidity are public health problems in Nepal. In rural communities, many women give birth at home without the support of a skilled birth attendant, despite the existence of rural birthing centers. The aim of this study was to explore the barriers and provide pragmatic recommendations for better service delivery and use of rural birthing centers.We conducted 26 in-depth interviews with service users and providers, and three focus group discussions with community key informants in a rural community of Rukum district. We used the Adithya Cattamanchi logic model as a guiding framework for data analysis.Irregular and poor quality services, inadequate human and capital resources, and poor governance were health system challenges which prevented service delivery. Contextual barriers including difficult geography, poor birth preparedness practices, harmful culture practices and traditions and low level of trust were also found to contribute to underutilization of the birthing center.The rural birthing center was not providing quality services when women were in need, which meant women did not use the available services properly because of systematic and contextual barriers. Approaches such as awareness-raising activities, local resource mobilization, ensuring access to skilled providers and equipment and other long-term infrastructure development works could improve the quality and utilization of childbirth services in the rural birthing center. This has resonance for other centers in Nepal and similar countries.

  17. Barriers to utilization of childbirth services of a rural birthing center in Nepal: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Khadka Narayan; Homer, Caroline S. E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality and morbidity are public health problems in Nepal. In rural communities, many women give birth at home without the support of a skilled birth attendant, despite the existence of rural birthing centers. The aim of this study was to explore the barriers and provide pragmatic recommendations for better service delivery and use of rural birthing centers. Methods We conducted 26 in-depth interviews with service users and providers, and three focus group discussions with community key informants in a rural community of Rukum district. We used the Adithya Cattamanchi logic model as a guiding framework for data analysis. Results Irregular and poor quality services, inadequate human and capital resources, and poor governance were health system challenges which prevented service delivery. Contextual barriers including difficult geography, poor birth preparedness practices, harmful culture practices and traditions and low level of trust were also found to contribute to underutilization of the birthing center. Conclusion The rural birthing center was not providing quality services when women were in need, which meant women did not use the available services properly because of systematic and contextual barriers. Approaches such as awareness-raising activities, local resource mobilization, ensuring access to skilled providers and equipment and other long-term infrastructure development works could improve the quality and utilization of childbirth services in the rural birthing center. This has resonance for other centers in Nepal and similar countries. PMID:28493987

  18. Business of Nuclear Safety Analysis Office, Nuclear Technology Test Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Masahiko

    1981-01-01

    The Nuclear Technology Test Center established the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office to execute newly the works concerning nuclear safety analysis in addition to the works related to the proving tests of nuclear machinery and equipments. The regulations for the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office concerning its organization, business and others were specially decided, and it started the business formally in August, 1980. It is a most important subject to secure the safety of nuclear facilities in nuclear fuel cycle as the premise of developing atomic energy. In Japan, the strict regulation of safety is executed by the government at each stage of the installation, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear facilities, based on the responsibility for the security of installers themselves. The Nuclear Safety Analysis Office was established as the special organ to help the safety examination related to the installation of nuclear power stations and others by the government. It improves and puts in order the safety analysis codes required for the cross checking in the safety examination, and carries out safety analysis calculation. It is operated by the cooperation of the Science and Technology Agency and the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy. The purpose of establishment, the operation and the business of the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office, the plan of improving and putting in order of analysis codes, and the state of the similar organs in foreign countries are described. (Kako, I.)

  19. The Utilization of Education Technology in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Angela

    2017-01-01

    With the rise of technology, many educational organizations are scrambling to find ways to incorporate technology into effective learning strategies. Although there is a significant need to equip curriculum with active learning technology objectives, the challenges that are sometimes overlooked lies within faculty perceived barriers and how they…

  20. Utilization of Information and Communication Technologies in Mathematics Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadati, Farzaneh; Tarmizi, Rohani Ahmad; Ayub, Ahmad Fauzi Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Attention to integrate technology in teaching and learning has provided a major transformation in the landscape of education. Therefore, many innovations in teaching and learning have been technology-driven. The study attempted to examine what is engineering students' perception regarding the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT)…

  1. Groundwater-risk analysis of New York utilizing GIS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillenbrand, Charles John, III

    Using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology, data layers can be processed and analyzed to produce a regional groundwater-risk grid of New York State (NYS). GIS can be used to assess the potential to introduce contaminants at the ground surface, and assess the potential for the contaminants to migrate through the vadose zone and be introduced to an aquifer at the water-table. The potential to introduce contaminants to the ground surface was assessed utilizing existing database information in combination with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Multi-Resolution Land Classification (MRLC) land use grid. The databases allowed an analysis of contaminant association with Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes, risk evaluation of the contaminants using groundwater intake values protective of human health, the development of SIC code-risk values, the construction of a SIC code-risked facility point coverage, and the construction of a land use-risk grid; this grid assesses the potential to introduce contaminants to the ground surface. Aquifer susceptibility was determined by analyzing vadose zone residence time assuming saturated conditions. Vadose zone residence time is a measure of the vadose zone's ability to attenuate and retard the migration of contaminants. Existing data layers were processed to produce a depth to water-table (vadose zone thickness) grid. Existing GIS data layers of soil, surficial geology and bedrock geology, along with review of literature and pump/slug test data, enabled the creation of thickness, porosity and vertical hydraulic conductivity grids for the three considered components of the vadose zone. The average linear velocity was then calculated for each vadose zone component by dividing their hydraulic conductivity grid by their respective porosity grid. The thickness grid of each vadose zone component was then divided by their respective average linear velocity grid to produce vadose zone residence time grids. The sum

  2. Center for Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostadin, Damevski [Virginia State Univ., Petersburg, VA (United States)

    2015-01-25

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedented computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)1 tackles these these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative high-performance scientific computing.

  3. The Electronic Health Literacy and Utilization of Technology for Health in a Remote Hawaiian Community: Lana'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Nash Ak; Humphry, Joseph

    2018-03-01

    The Lana'i Community Health Center (LCHC) like other health care organizations, is striving to implement technology-enabled care (TEC) in the clinical setting. TEC includes such technological innovations as patient portals, mobile phone applications, wearable health sensors, and telehealth. This study examines the utilization of communication technology by members of the Lana'i community and LCHC staff and board members in the home and in their daily lives and evaluates the community's electronic health literacy. Quantitative surveys and qualitative focus groups were utilized. These revealed that members of the Lana'i community and LCHC staff and board members regularly utilize technology, in the form of smart cell phones, WiFi, and internet texting. This community has integrated technology into their daily lives, even though they live on an isolated island with 3,102 people; however, despite this integration, the electronic health literacy of this population appears insufficient for proper understanding and utilization of TEC, limiting the potential of patient portals or remote monitoring of patient generated data for chronic disease prevention and management without additional education and mentoring. It is therefore in the best interest of the LCHC and other health organizations wishing to implement TEC in a rural community such as Lana'i to include a strong educational component with use of TEC, and perhaps establish a mentor/partnership program for the highly-challenged patient.

  4. Technology Transfer Challenges: A Case Study of User-Centered Design in NASA's Systems Engineering Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Jason

    2009-01-01

    The Upper Stage (US) section of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Ares I rocket will require internal access platforms for maintenance tasks performed by humans inside the vehicle. Tasks will occur during expensive critical path operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) including vehicle stacking and launch preparation activities. Platforms must be translated through a small human access hatch, installed in an enclosed worksite environment, support the weight of ground operators and be removed before flight - and their design must minimize additional vehicle mass at attachment points. This paper describes the application of a user-centered conceptual design process and the unique challenges encountered within NASA's systems engineering culture focused on requirements and "heritage hardware". The NASA design team at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) initiated the user-centered design process by studying heritage internal access kits and proposing new design concepts during brainstorming sessions. Simultaneously, they partnered with the Technology Transfer/Innovative Partnerships Program to research inflatable structures and dynamic scaffolding solutions that could enable ground operator access. While this creative, technology-oriented exploration was encouraged by upper management, some design stakeholders consistently opposed ideas utilizing novel, untested equipment. Subsequent collaboration with an engineering consulting firm improved the technical credibility of several options, however, there was continued resistance from team members focused on meeting system requirements with pre-certified hardware. After a six-month idea-generating phase, an intensive six-week effort produced viable design concepts that justified additional vehicle mass while optimizing the human factors of platform installation and use. Although these selected final concepts closely resemble heritage internal access platforms, challenges from the application of the

  5. Activities of JAXA's Innovative Technology Center on Space Debris Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, T.; Kurosaki, H.; Nakajima, A.

    The innovative technology research center of JAXA is developing observational technologies for GEO objects in order to cope with the space debris problem. The center had constructed the optical observational facility for space debris at Mt. Nyukasa, Nagano in 2006. As observational equipments such as CCD cameras and telescopes were set up, the normal observation started. In this paper, the detail of the facilities and its activities are introduced. The observational facility contains two telescopes and two CCD cameras. The apertures of the telescopes are 35cm and 25 cm, respectively. One CCD camera in which 2K2K chip is installed can observe a sky region of 1.3 times 1.3-degree using the 35cm telescope. The other CCD camera that contains two 4K2K chips has an ability to observe 2.6 times 2.6-degree's region with the 25cm telescope. One of our main objectives is to detect faint GEO objects that are not catalogued. Generally, the detection limit of GEO object is determined by the aperture of the telescope. However, by improving image processing techniques, the limit may become low. We are developing some image processing methods that use many CCD frames to detect faint objects. We are trying to use FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) system to reduce analyzing time. By applying these methods to the data taken by a large telescope, the detection limit will be significantly lowered. The orbital determination of detected GEO debris is one of the important things to do. Especially, the narrow field view of an optical telescope hinders us from re-detection of the GEO debris for the orbital determination. Long observation time is required for one GEO object for the orbital determination that is inefficient. An effective observation strategy should be considered. We are testing one observation method invented by Umehara that observes one inertia position in the space. By observing one inertia position for two nights, a GEO object that passed through the position in the

  6. Bridging the Technology Readiness "Valley of Death" Utilizing Nanosats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Robert A.; Millar, Pamela S.; Norton, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating new technology is a hallmark of space missions. Missions demand ever-improving tools and techniques to allow them to meet the mission science requirements. In Earth Science, these technologies are normally expressed in new instrument capabilities that can enable new measurement concepts, extended capabilities of existing measurement techniques, or totally new detection capabilities, and also, information systems technologies that can enhance data analysis or enable new data analyses to advance modeling and prediction capabilities. Incorporating new technologies has never been easy. There is a large development step beyond demonstration in a laboratory or on an airborne platform to the eventual space environment that is sometimes referred to as the "technology valley of death." Studies have shown that non-validated technology is a primary cause of NASA and DoD mission delays and cost overruns. With the demise of the New Millennium Program within NASA, opportunities for demonstrating technologies in space have been rare. Many technologies are suitable for a flight project after only ground testing. However, some require validation in a relevant or a space flight environment, which cannot be fully tested on the ground or in airborne systems. NASA's Earth Science Technology Program has initiated a nimble program to provide a fairly rapid turn-around of space validated technologies, and thereby reducing future mission risk in incorporating new technologies. The program, called In-Space Validation of Earth Science Technology (InVEST), now has five tasks in development. Each are 3U CubeSats and they are targeted for launch opportunities in the 2016 time period. Prior to formalizing an InVEST program, the technology program office was asked to demonstrate how the program would work and what sort of technologies could benefit from space validation. Three projects were developed and launched, and have demonstrated the technologies that they set out to validate

  7. Utilization of Information and Communication Technologies as a Predictor of Educational Stress on Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskicumali, Ahmet; Arslan, Serhat; Demirtas, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between utilization of information and communication technologies and educational stress. Participants were 411 secondary school students. Educational Stress Scale and Utilization of Information and Communication Technologies Scale were used as measures. The relationships between students'…

  8. Utilization of Dental Services in Public Health Center: Dental Attendance, Awareness and Felt Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pewa, Preksha; Garla, Bharath K; Dagli, Rushabh; Bhateja, Geetika Arora; Solanki, Jitendra

    2015-10-01

    In rural India, dental diseases occur due to many factors, which includes inadequate or improper use of fluoride and a lack of knowledge regarding oral health and oral hygiene, which prevent proper screening and dental care of oral diseases. The objective of the study was to evaluate the dental attendance, awareness and utilization of dental services in public health center. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 251 study subjects who were visiting dental outpatient department (OPD) of public health centre (PHC), Guda Bishnoi, and Jodhpur using a pretested proforma from month of July 2014 to October 2014. A pretested questionnaire was used to collect the data regarding socioeconomic status and demographic factors affecting the utilization of dental services. Pearson's Chi-square test and step-wise logistic regression were applied for the analysis. Statistically significant results were found in relation to age, educational status, socioeconomic status and gender with dental attendance, dental awareness and felt needs. p-value health center should be based on the felt need of the population to increase attendance as well as utilization of dental services, thereby increasing the oral health status of the population.

  9. 78 FR 77662 - Notice of Availability (NOA) for General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... (NOA) for General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center Construction (GPW/IT)--Tracy Site.... ACTION: Notice of Availability (NOA) for General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center... FR 65300) announcing the publication of the General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology...

  10. External radiation levels in installations of nuclear technology center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maletta, Paulo Guilherme M.; Filipetto, Joao; Wakabayashi, Tetsuaki; Silva, Teogenes A. da

    2005-01-01

    The radiological protection is a basic activity of nuclear technology center so that can carry through its activities with security, having to be planned and executed with total effectiveness. One of the basic tools of the radiological protection is the adoption of monitoring programs, that have as objective generality to evaluate the radiological conditions of the workstation and to assure that these conditions are acceptable safe for the displayed individuals, either workers or members of the public, as established in the basic norms of radiological protection. The Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN, first institution in Brazil, created in 1952 to entirely dedicate the related works to the nuclear area, to own 39 building, of which they are kept the Triga Reactor, Irradiation Gamma Laboratory, Reject Laboratory, Calibration Dosemeters Laboratory and others. In such installations, radioactive materials are produced, handled, processed and stored, being necessary the levels of external radiation ambient monitoring. As part of the radioprotection plan, monitoring 63 points on strategically located in the external areas to the building of CDTN, using characterized and calibrated thermoluminescence dosemeters. This work describes the dose distribution of the points, the doses evaluation procedure and the 4 results carried through between 2001 and 2004. The data demonstrate the attendance to the level of security established in the basic norm, what it contributed for the operation licensing of to the IBAMA. (author)

  11. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) conducted December 7--11, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with PETC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at PETC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site Survey activities at PETC. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the Plan's results will be incorporated into the PETC Survey findings for inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 64 refs., 23 figs., 29 tabs.

  12. Technology Transfer from University-Based Research Centers: The University of New Mexico Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Everett M.; Hall, Brad; Hashimoto, Michio; Steffensen, Morten; Speakman, Kristen L.; Timko, Molly K.

    1999-01-01

    A study of 55 research centers at the University of New Mexico investigated the nature of the typical center, why funding has risen during the 1990s, reasons for founding the centers, the director's role, how university-based research centers transfer technology to private companies and other organizations, and what determines program…

  13. Utilization and outcome of laparoscopic versus robotic general and bariatric surgical procedures at Academic Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamere, James; Gebhart, Alana; Vu, Stephen; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2015-07-01

    Robotic-assisted general and bariatric surgery is gaining popularity among surgeons. The aim of this study was to analyze the utilization and outcome of laparoscopic versus robotic-assisted laparoscopic techniques for common elective general and bariatric surgical procedures performed at Academic Medical Centers. We analyzed data from University HealthSystem Consortium clinical database from October 2010 to February 2014 for all patients who underwent laparoscopic versus robotic techniques for eight common elective general and bariatric surgical procedures: gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, gastric band, antireflux surgery, Heller myotomy (HM), cholecystectomy (LC), colectomy, rectal resection (RR). Utilization and outcome measures including demographics, in-hospital mortality, major complications, 30-day readmission, length of stay (LOS), and costs were compared between techniques. 96,694 laparoscopic and robotic procedures were analyzed. Utilization of the robotic approach was the highest for RR (21.4%), followed by HM (9.1%). There was no significant difference in in-hospital mortality or major complications between laparoscopic versus robotic techniques for all procedures. Only two procedures had improved outcome associated with the robotic approach: robotic HM and robotic LC had a shorter LOS compared to the laparoscopic approach (2.8 ± 3.6 vs. 2.3 ± 2.1; respectively, p bariatric surgical procedures with the highest utilization for rectal resection. Compared to conventional laparoscopy, there were no observed clinical benefits associated with the robotic approach, but there was a consistently higher cost.

  14. KSC In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Technologies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — (1) Identify and evaluate CO2/CO separation technologies that are compatible with the high operating temperatures (700-850oC) of the Solid Oxide Electrolysis...

  15. UTILIZATION OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES IN MATHEMATICS LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Saadati

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Attention to integrate technology in teaching and learning has provided a major transformation in the landscape of education. Therefore, many innovations in teaching and learning have been technology-driven. The study attempted to examine what is engineering students’ perception regarding the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT in mathematics learning as well as investigate their opinion about how ICT can be integrated to improve teaching and learning processes. The subjects were Iranian engineering students from two universities. The finding showed they are fully aware of importance of ICT in teaching and learning mathematics. Whilst, they were feeling comfortable and confident with technology, they do not have more experience of using technology in mathematics classes before. The findings supported the other studies, which indicated the potentials of ICT to facilitate students’ learning, improve teaching, and enhance institutional administration as established in the literature.Keywords: Technology, Mathematics Learning, Facebook, Attitude Toward ICT DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.5.2.1498.138-147

  16. Utilization Of Information And Communication Technology (ICT) For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, frequent power failure and inability to provide alternative power supply are major constraints to effective utilization of the ICT. The paper recommends, among others, provision of solar energy/power, hand wind computers and adequate funding of the libraries. The Information Technologist Vol. 5 (2) 2008: pp.

  17. Texas Manufacturing Technology Center feasibility study for the Inland Regional Industrial Technology Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This document presents the Texas Manufacturing Technology Center (TMTC) Business Plan to convert the Central Facility of the Superconducting Super Collider project to alternate uses. The plan is divided into six sections: (1) Executive Summary, (2) Market and Benefit Analysis, (3) Marketing Strategy, (4) Services, (5) Organization and Operations Overview, and (6) Financial Plan. Each area is supported by separate documents that address individual opportunities and challenges associated with transitioning the facility, and its asset base to new uses for benefit of the locality, state, region and nation

  18. UTILIZING THE RIGHT MIX OF ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUP TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergren, C; Wade Whitaker, W; Mary Flora, M

    2007-05-25

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) Figure 1 is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina. During operations, which started in 1951, hazardous substances (chemicals and radionuclides) were released to the environment. The releases occurred as a result of inadvertent spills and waste disposal in unlined pits and basins which was common practice before environmental regulations existed. The hazardous substances have migrated to the vadose zone and groundwater in many areas of the SRS, resulting in 515 waste units that are required by environmental regulations, to undergo characterization and, if needed, remediation. In the initial years of the SRS environmental cleanup program (early 1990s), the focus was to use common technologies (such as pump and treat, air stripping, excavation and removal) that actively and tangibly removed contamination. Exclusive use of these technologies required continued and significant funding while often failing to meet acceptable clean-up goals and objectives. Recognizing that a more cost-effective approach was needed, SRS implemented new and complementary remediation methods focused on active and passive technologies targeted to solve specific remediation problems. Today, SRS uses technologies such as chemical/pH-adjusting injection, phytoremediation, underground cutoff walls, dynamic underground stripping, soil fracturing, microbial degradation, baroballs, electrical resistance heating, soil vapor extraction, and microblowers to more effectively treat contamination at lower costs. Additionally, SRS's remediation approach cost effectively maximizes cleanup as SRS works proactively with multiple regulatory agencies. Using GIS, video, animation, and graphics, SRS is able to provide an accurate depiction of the evolution of SRS groundwater and vadose zone cleanup activities to convince stakeholders and regulators of the effectiveness of various cleanup

  19. Self-assembling nano-diameter needlelike pinning centers in YBCO, utilizing a foreign element dopant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawh, Ravi-Persad [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Physics Department, University of Houston, 632 Science and Research Bldg 1, Houston Texas 77204-5005 (United States); Weinstein, Roy [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Physics Department, University of Houston, 632 Science and Research Bldg 1, Houston Texas 77204-5005 (United States); Obot, Victor [Department of Mathematics, Texas Southern University, 3100 Cleburne St, Houston Texas 77004-4597 (United States); Parks, Drew [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Physics Department, University of Houston, 632 Science and Research Bldg 1, Houston Texas 77204-5005 (United States); Gandini, Alberto [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Physics Department, University of Houston, 632 Science and Research Bldg 1, Houston Texas 77204-5005 (United States); Skorpenske, Harley [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Physics Department, University of Houston, 632 Science and Research Bldg 1, Houston Texas 77204-5005 (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Although pinning centers created by irradiation presently produce the highest J{sub c}, it is probable that ultimately these will be emulated by chemical pinning centers. The best pinning centers produced by irradiation nevertheless provide guidelines for desirable morphology of chemical pinning structures. The highest J{sub c} produced earlier in textured HTS was obtained using isotropic high-energy ions produced by fission of {sup 235}U. This so-called U/n process produces pinning centers of diameter {<=} 4.5 nm, with an effective length of {approx}2.7 {mu}m. Maximum J{sub c} occurs for pinning center density of {approx}10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}. We use this as a model for desired chemical pinning centers. Our approach to introducing chemical pinning centers has been to produce precipitates within the HTS containing elements not native to the HTS, and to seek needlelike (columnar) deposits of small diameter. We report here on the formation of needlelike or columnar deposits in textured Y123 containing a dopant foreign to Y123. It serves as a demonstration that self-assembling nanometer diameter columns utilizing a dopant foreign to the HTS system are a feasible goal. These deposits, however, do not fully meet the ultimate requirements of pinning centers because the desired deposits should be smaller. The self-assembling columns formed contain titanium, are {approx}500 nm in diameter, and up to 10 {mu}m long. The size and morphology of the deposits vary with the mass of admixed Ti dopant. J{sub c} is decreased for small dopant mass. At larger dopant masses needlelike precipitates form, and J{sub c} increases again. A small range of mass of admixed Ti exists in which J{sub c} is enhanced by pinning. In the range of admixed Ti mass studied in these experiments there is a negligible effect on T{sub c}. Magnetization studies of J{sub c} are also reported.

  20. Integrated Multi-Team Decision Making Processes and Effectiveness and the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mathieu, John

    2004-01-01

    .... This program established a three part implementation path: First, the Advanced Technology Center will focus on key issues in propulsion and advanced power systems as well as take a leadership role in Next Generation Manufacturing technology...

  1. Program strategy document for the nuclear materials. Transportation Technology Center (FY 80)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferson, R.M.

    1980-04-01

    The TTC's program is divided into four principal areas, Technology and Information Center, Systems Development, Technology, and Institutional Issues. These areas are broken into activities, elements, and subelements which are delineated in this document

  2. Planning nuclear energy centers under technological and demand uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, P.M.; Palmedo, P.F.

    1976-01-01

    The question considered is whether new nuclear power plants should be located in nuclear energy centers, or ''power parks'' with co-located fabrication and reprocessing facilities. That issue has been addressed in a recent study by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and remains under investigation at Brookhaven and elsewhere. So far, however, the advisability of this policy has been analyzed primarily within the framework of a single view of the future. Suggestions of the types of questions that should be asked regarding this policy if it is properly to be viewed as an example of decision making under uncertainty are made. It is concluded that ''A consideration of the various uncertainties involved in the question of dispersed vs. remote siting of energy facilities introduces a number of new elements into the analysis. On balance those considerations provide somewhat greater support for the clustered concept. The NEC approach seems to provide somewhat greater flexibility in accomodating possible future electricity generating technologies. Increased regulatory and construction efficiencies possible in an NEC reduces the impact of demand uncertainty as does the lower costs associated with construction acceleration or deceleration.'' It is also noted that, in the final analysis, ''it is the public's perception of the relative costs and benefits of a measure that determine the acceptability or unacceptability of a particular innovation,'' not the engineer's cost/benefit analysis. It is further noted that if the analysis can identify limits on analytical methods and models, it will not make the job of energy decision-making any easier, but it may make the process more responsive to its impact on society

  3. An assessment of General Aviation utilization of advanced avionics technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinby, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    Needs of the general aviation industry for services and facilities which might be supplied by NASA were examined. In the data collection phase, twenty-one individuals from nine manufacturing companies in general aviation were interviewed against a carefully prepared meeting format. General aviation avionics manufacturers were credited with a high degree of technology transfer from the forcing industries such as television, automotive, and computers and a demonstrated ability to apply advanced technology such as large scale integration and microprocessors to avionics functions in an innovative and cost effective manner. The industry's traditional resistance to any unnecessary regimentation or standardization was confirmed. Industry's self sufficiency in applying advanced technology to avionics product development was amply demonstrated. NASA research capability could be supportive in areas of basic mechanics of turbulence in weather and alternative means for its sensing.

  4. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerke, Frank G.

    2001-01-01

    This cooperative program between the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology and Caterpillar, Inc. is aimed at demonstrating electric turbocompound technology on a Class 8 truck engine. This is a lab demonstration program, with no provision for on-truck testing of the system. The goal is to demonstrate the level of fuel efficiency improvement attainable with the electric turbocompound system. Also, electric turbocompounding adds an additional level of control to the air supply which could be a component in an emissions control strategy

  5. Utilization of Virtual Server Technology in Mission Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, Larry; Lankford, Kimberly; Pitts, R. Lee; Pruitt, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Virtualization provides the opportunity to continue to do "more with less"---more computing power with fewer physical boxes, thus reducing the overall hardware footprint, power and cooling requirements, software licenses, and their associated costs. This paper explores the tremendous advantages and any disadvantages of virtualization in all of the environments associated with software and systems development to operations flow. It includes the use and benefits of the Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI) specification, and identifies lessons learned concerning hardware and network configurations. Using the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center as an example, we demonstrate that deploying virtualized servers as a means of managing computing resources is applicable and beneficial to many areas of application, up to and including flight operations.

  6. Use of indigenous technology in processing and utilization of non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information used for this paper came from both primary and secondary sources. Ten (10) respondents were interviewed from each secondary source of information. The use of indigenous technology to process these forest products to forest foods is currently limited by use of crude methods, inability to expand production ...

  7. Designing Technology-Enabled Instruction to Utilize Learning Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Randall; Nyland, Robert; Bodily, Robert; Chapman, John; Jones, Brian; Young, Jay

    2017-01-01

    A key notion conveyed by those who advocate for the use of data to enhance instruction is an awareness that learning analytics has the potential to improve instruction and learning but is not currently reaching that potential. Gibbons (2014) suggested that a lack of learning facilitated by current technology-enabled instructional systems may be…

  8. Appraisal of the Availability and Utilization of New Technological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    Items 31 - 36 ... society (Katz, 2001) that is, a society that requires higher levels of skills and qualifications for employment. The old ... learning and the universities are expected to do this using new technologies. To meet the changing ... softwares and CD-ROM (Compact Disk – Read Only Memory). The teaching and learning of ...

  9. university students` perception and utilization of technology for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-01

    Feb 1, 2018 ... Students` perception in relation to gender and their ... data also revealed that students have been using mobile technology, social media and internet to .... February 2018. 21. Sisay Awgichew Wondemtegegn and promote positive interdependence of learning among learners (Cavas, 2009). The impact of.

  10. Modern technologies of waste utilization from industrial tire production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimov, Yusuf; Gilmanshin, Iskander; Gilmanshina, Suriya

    2016-06-01

    The innovative technology of waste tire production recovery from JSC "Nizhnekamskshina", which determines the possibility of obtaining a new type of composite material in the form fiber filled rubber compound (FFRC) as the raw material, production of rubber products with high technical and operational characteristics.

  11. Barriers to Successful Information Technology (IT) Utilization by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research evaluated barriers to the use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) among librarians in academic libraries in Ogun State, Nigeria. One hundred and twenty one (121) structured questionnaires were administered in a total sampling technique among librarians in twelve institutions. The questionnaire ...

  12. Blood Product Utilization Among Trauma and Nontrauma Massive Transfusion Protocols at an Urban Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Eshan U; Ness, Paul M; Marshall, Christi E; Gniadek, Thomas; Efron, David T; Miller, Peter M; Zeitouni, Joseph A; King, Karen E; Bloch, Evan M; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2017-09-01

    Hospital-wide massive transfusion protocols (MTPs) primarily designed for trauma patients may lead to excess blood products being prepared for nontrauma patients. This study characterized blood product utilization among distinct trauma and nontrauma MTPs at a large, urban academic medical center. A retrospective study of blood product utilization was conducted in patients who required an MTP activation between January 2011 and December 2015 at an urban academic medical center. Trauma MTP containers included 6 red blood cell (RBC) units, 5 plasma units, and 1 unit of apheresis platelets. Nontrauma MTP containers included 6 RBC and 3 plasma units. There were 334 trauma MTP activations, 233 nontrauma MTP activations, and 77 nontrauma MTP activations that subsequently switched to a trauma MTP ("switched activations"). All nontrauma MTP activations were among bleeding patients who did not have a traumatic injury (100% [233/233]). Few patients with a nontrauma activation required ad hoc transfusion of RBC units (1.3% [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.3%-3.7%]) or plasma (3.4% [95% CI, 1.5%-6.7%]), and only 45.5% (95% CI, 39.0%-52.1%) required ad hoc transfusion of apheresis platelets. Compared to trauma and switched activations, nontrauma activations transfused a lower median number of RBC, plasma, and apheresis platelet units (P use of hospital-wide nontrauma MTPs are warranted since an MTP designed for nontrauma patient populations may yield a key strategy to optimize blood product utilization in comparison to a universal MTP for both trauma and nontrauma patients.

  13. Library Technology Centers and Community Building: Yale University Library Electronic Text Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg-Hart, Diane Y.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses various communities that have contributed to the development of the Yale University Library Electronic Text Center (ETC) and describes the evolution of the ETC from a center for the support of electronic texts in the humanities to an electronic resource center providing support in the creation of World Wide Web resources. (LRW)

  14. Utilizing HPC Network Technologies in High Energy Physics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2088631; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Because of their performance characteristics high-performance fabrics like Infiniband or OmniPath are interesting technologies for many local area network applications, including data acquisition systems for high-energy physics experiments like the ATLAS experiment at CERN. This paper analyzes existing APIs for high-performance fabrics and evaluates their suitability for data acquisition systems in terms of performance and domain applicability. The study finds that existing software APIs for high-performance interconnects are focused on applications in high-performance computing with specific workloads and are not compatible with the requirements of data acquisition systems. To evaluate the use of high-performance interconnects in data acquisition systems a custom library, NetIO, is presented and compared against existing technologies. NetIO has a message queue-like interface which matches the ATLAS use case better than traditional HPC APIs like MPI. The architecture of NetIO is based on a interchangeable bac...

  15. Utilizing Technology in Manual Material Handling and Safe Lifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Mick

    2016-02-01

    There is great potential to decrease injuries with the use of these new technologies, especially musculoskeletal disorders and repetitive task-related injuries. Initial costs can be considerable for some of these units, but they are much cheaper than a back surgery. As with all technology, the first designs cost a small fortune, but as we are seeing even now, the pricing is decreasing and the quality is increasing for these devices. In 30 years, we might all have flying cars like "Back to the Future II" predicted we would in 2015 or be able to figure out a tricorder like on "Star Trek"! For more information on exoskeletons, exoskeletonreport.com is a great resource.

  16. Utilization of Near Field Communication Technology for Loyalty Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferina Ferdianti

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Near Field Communication (NFC is one of wireless technology developed at this time. We can use a mobile phone to do many transactions with NFC. Mobile developments have created to provide convenience for users in all aspects. However, at this time the function of NFC just limited for payment and micropayment. Beside it, there are assets that support to increase sales with attention of loyality management system. In this system, discounts or prizes are given based on data mining for every transaction costumers. Loyalty management has three concept, those are Frequency, Recency and Quantity. The goals are minimizing the cost, making purchase process faster, and managing data obtained through the NFC technology more simple. The result of this paper is the procedure to use data mining of NFC for loyalty management and system design using Unified Modeling Language approach.

  17. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS(ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth A. Yackly

    2001-06-01

    The following paper provides an overview of GE's H System{trademark} technology, and specifically, the design, development, and test activities associated with the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program. There was intensive effort expended in bringing this revolutionary advanced technology program to commercial reality. In addition to describing the magnitude of performance improvement possible through use of H System{trademark} technology, this paper discusses the technological milestones during the development of the first 9H (50Hz) and 7H (60 Hz) gas turbines. To illustrate the methodical product development strategy used by GE, this paper discusses several technologies that were essential to the introduction of the H System{trademark}. Also included are analyses of the series of comprehensive tests of materials, components and subsystems that necessarily preceded full scale field testing of the H System{trademark}. This paper validates one of the basic premises with which GE started the H System{trademark} development program: exhaustive and elaborate testing programs minimized risk at every step of this process, and increase the probability of success when the H System{trademark} is introduced into commercial service. In 1995, GE, the world leader in gas turbine technology for over half a century, in conjunction with the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory's ATS program, introduced its new generation of gas turbines. This H System{trademark} technology is the first gas turbine ever to achieve the milestone of 60% fuel efficiency. Because fuel represents the largest individual expense of running a power plant, an efficiency increase of even a single percentage point can substantially reduce operating costs over the life of a typical gas-fired, combined-cycle plant in the 400 to 500 megawatt range. The H System{trademark} is not simply a state-of-the-art gas turbine. It is an advanced, integrated, combined-cycle system in which every

  18. 76 FR 2147 - UAW-Chrysler National Training Center Technology Training Joint Programs Staff, Detroit, MI; UAW...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ...-Chrysler National Training Center Technology Training Joint Programs Staff, Detroit, MI; UAW-Chrysler Technical Training Center Technology Training Joint Programs Staff, Warren, MI; Notice of Revised... investigation, the Department confirmed that the proportion of Technology Training Joint Programs Staff...

  19. Assessing Community Informatics: A Review of Methodological Approaches for Evaluating Community Networks and Community Technology Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Dara

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes the emerging community informatics evaluation literature to develop an understanding of the indicators used to gauge project impacts in community networks and community technology centers. The study finds that community networks and community technology center assessments fall into five key areas: strong democracy; social capital;…

  20. 76 FR 8371 - Notice Correction; Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction Surveys (NCI) The Federal... project titled, ``Technology Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction Survey (NCI)'' was... will include multiple customer satisfaction surveys over the course of three years. At this time, only...

  1. 78 FR 65300 - Notice of Availability (NOA) for General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... (NOA) for General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center Construction (GPW/IT)--Tracy Site... proposed action to construct a General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center at Defense..., Suite 02G09, Alexandria, VA 22350- 3100. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ann Engelberger at (703) 767...

  2. Radiation utilization in technology; Strahlungsanwendung in der Technik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiess, Lothar [Technische Univ. Ilmenau (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofftechnik

    2013-04-01

    In the course of the harmonization of the European legislation for the radiation protection the German radiation protection law must be adapted. RoeV and StrlSchV must be summarized to only one law. The education in the technical instruction can play here a pioneering role. In the course of this absolutely necessary new adjustment the law and directives texts must follow the technical progress and the developing state of the technology more unambiguously. Currently too many technical instruction groups are established in the radiation protection and partly wrong technical definitions are used. This leads partly to incorrect approval conditions using technical radiation sources. (orig.)

  3. Utilizing technology for longitudinal communication with homeless youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Kimberly; Begun, Stephanie; DePrince, Anne; Haffejee, Badiah; Kaufmann, Sarah

    2014-10-01

    The current study investigated forms of technology (phone calls, texts, email and Facebook) for maintaining contact with homeless youth over baseline, 1-week, 6-week, and 3-month follow-up interviews. The study combined quantitative tracking of youths' response patterns and open-ended interviews regarding youths' preferred methods of communication. Results indicate that maintaining communication with homeless youth requires persistence, including frequent contact attempts over several days. Cell phone contacts (calls or texts) were most successful in communicating with youth, with e-mail and Facebook messaging useful when phones were lost or stolen. Youth who maintained contact were strikingly similar to youth who discontinued contact.

  4. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted horn DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include fill speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

  5. Natick Soldier Systems Center Science and Technology Board (9th)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    Theresa A. Baus is currently Head of the Technology Partnerships Office ( TPO ) and Head, Office of Research And Technology Applications (ORTA) at the Naval... TPO encompasses all aspects of partnering activities with industry, academia, state and local governments and other federal laboratories. The TPO is...was the Northeast Regional Coordinator for the FLC from 2006 to 2009. Previous to her appointment as Head, TPO , Dr. Baus was the Technology

  6. Utilizing integrated facility design to improve the quality of a pediatric ambulatory surgery center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelly, Nicole; Zeallear, Brian; Reed, Mark; Martin, Lynn

    2013-07-01

    The aim was to use Integrated Facility Design (IFD) to design a surgery center that enhances the delivery of health care by developing processes that provide highly efficient patient, family, and provider flows while adding value and utilizing costly resources effectively. Integrated Facility Design is an adaptation of the Toyota 3P (Production, Preparation, Process) Program. The goal of IFD is to accelerate development time and lower start-up costs. The use of IFD produced a savings of $30 million in project costs and enabled a completion date 3.5 months ahead of schedule. The designed patient flow processes resulted in dramatic improvements in patient, family, and provider throughput. The use of IFD in the design of a pediatric ambulatory clinic and surgery resulted in significant cost savings and improved clinical efficiency. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Scanning diamond NV center probes compatible with conventional AFM technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tony X.; Stöhr, Rainer J.; Yacoby, Amir

    2017-10-01

    Scanning probe microscopy using nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond has become a versatile tool with applications in physics, chemistry, life sciences, and earth and planetary sciences. However, the fabrication of diamond scanning probes with high photon collection efficiency, NV centers with long coherence times, and integrated radio frequency (RF) remains challenging due to the small physical dimensions of the probes and the complexity of the fabrication techniques. In this work, we present a simple and robust method to reliably fabricate probes that can be integrated with conventional quartz tuning fork based sensors as well as commercial silicon AFM cantilevers. An integrated RF micro-antenna for NV center spin manipulation is directly fabricated onto the probe making the design versatile and compatible with virtually all AFM instruments. This integration marks a complete sensor package for NV center-based magnetometry and opens up this scanning probe technique to the broader scientific community.

  8. CRADA Payment Options | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI TTC CRADA PAYMENT OPTIONS: Electronic Payments by Wire Transfer via Fedwire, Mail a check to the Institute or Center, or Automated Clearing House (ACH)/Electronic Funds Transfer (ETF) payments via Pay.gov (NCI ONLY).

  9. The Relationship between Selected Educational Technologies and Student-Centered versus Teacher-Centered Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmer, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Not all teachers and students have equal access to technology. This inequality of access creates an uneven instructional practice that may result in varied student learning. By and large, students have limited access to technology within the confines of the classroom. New educational technologies provide schools with an opportunity to broaden and…

  10. Energy technologies for distributed utility applications: Cost and performance trends, and implications for photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyer, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Utilities are evaluating several electric generation and storage (G ampersand S) technologies for distributed utility (DU) applications. Attributes of leading DU technologies and implications for photovoltaics (PV) are described. Included is a survey of present and projected cost and performance for: (1) small, advanced combustion turbines (CTs); (2) advanced, natural gas-fired, diesel engines (diesel engines); and (3) advanced lead-acid battery systems (batteries). Technology drivers and relative qualitative benefits are described. A levelized energy cost-based cost target for PV for DU applications is provided. The analysis addresses only relative cost, for PV and for three selected alternative DU technologies. Comparable size, utility, and benefits are assumed, although relative value is application-specific and often technology- and site-specific

  11. Development of HANARO Activation Analysis System and Utilization Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y. S.; Moon, J. H.; Cho, H. J.

    2007-06-01

    1. Establishment of evaluation system using a data for a neutron activation analysis : Improvement of NAA measurement system and its identification, Development of combined data evaluation code of NAA/PGAA, International technical cooperation project 2. Development of technique for a industrial application of high precision gamma nuclide spectroscopic analysis : Analytical quality control, Development of industrial application techniques and its identification 3. Industrial application research for a prompt gamma-ray activation analysis : Improvement of Compton suppression counting system (PGAA), Development of applied technology using a PGAA system 4. Establishment of NAA user supporting system and KOLAS management : Development and validation of KOLAS/ISO accreditation testing and identification method, Cooperation researches for a industrial application, Establishment of integrated user analytical supporting system, Accomplishment of sample irradiation facility

  12. Absorption technology for solar and waste heat utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, G.

    1993-01-01

    Absorption heat pumps, first developed in the 19th century, have received renewed and growing attention in the past two decades. With the increasing cost of oil and electricity, the particular features of this heat-powered cycle have made it attractive for both residential and industrial applications. Solar-powered air conditioning, gas-fired domestic cooling and waste-heat-powered temperature boosters are some of the applications on which intensive research and development has been conducted. This paper describes the operation of absorption systems and discusses several practical applications. It surveys recent advances in absorption technology, including the selection of working fluids, cycle improvements and multi-staging, and fundamentals of the combined heat and mass transfer in absorption processes. (author)

  13. Development of HANARO Activation Analysis System and Utilization Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Y. S.; Moon, J. H.; Cho, H. J. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    1. Establishment of evaluation system using a data for a neutron activation analysis : Improvement of NAA measurement system and its identification, Development of combined data evaluation code of NAA/PGAA, International technical cooperation project 2. Development of technique for a industrial application of high precision gamma nuclide spectroscopic analysis : Analytical quality control, Development of industrial application techniques and its identification 3. Industrial application research for a prompt gamma-ray activation analysis : Improvement of Compton suppression counting system (PGAA), Development of applied technology using a PGAA system 4. Establishment of NAA user supporting system and KOLAS management : Development and validation of KOLAS/ISO accreditation testing and identification method, Cooperation researches for a industrial application, Establishment of integrated user analytical supporting system, Accomplishment of sample irradiation facility.

  14. Approach to improve construction management utilizing information technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woo Bang; Moon, Jin Yeong

    2003-01-01

    Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP) has been managed Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) construction projects including basic project planning, design, procurement, construction and start-up for nearly 30 years, and taken the leading role in the self-reliance program for constructing NPP. To maintain its leading position of construction technology and export it to other countries, it is more likely required to build the strong and competitive business management system to improve internal business efficiency and transparency, and also to respond to the change of external business circumstances such as electricity market opening. KHNP is implementing Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) System as a business innovation tool to improve business efficiency, which changes the way of performing work from organizational system to process-oriented system in order to optimize the company resources to achieve above goals. This change should be made based on the results of performing Business Process Re-engineering (BPR) to maximize overall business efficiency. For the construction project management area, the establishment of Integrated Construction Information Sharing System based on Information Technology (IT) is the most important part. It makes possible to build collaboration system with 'Win-Win strategy' between the project owner and all related entities and to contribute to secure transparency and cut the project cost down. We would like to introduce our NPP Construction Project Management System, Infrastructure for Information System, Information Sharing System among construction related entities and Implementation Practices in this paper and also include the suggestions on our customary practice and subject that should be improved

  15. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    1999-04-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer conflation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. The objective of this task is to design 7H and 9H compressor rotor and stator structures with the goal of achieving high efficiency at lower cost and greater durability by applying proven GE Power Systems (GEPS) heavy-duty use design practices. The designs will be based on the GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) CF6-80C2 compressor. Transient and steady-state thermo-mechanical stress analyses will be run to ensure compliance with GEPS life standards. Drawings will be prepared for forgings, castings, machining, and instrumentation for full speed, no load (FSNL) tests of the first unit on both 9H and 7H applications.

  16. Mobile integrated temporary utility system. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The Mobile Integrated Temporary Utility System (MITUS) integrates portable electrical power along with communications and emergency alarm and lighting capabilities to provide safe, centralized power to work areas that need to be de-energized for decommissioning work. MITUS consists of a portable unit substation; up to twenty portable kiosks that house the power receptacles, communications, and emergency alarm and lighting systems; and a central communications unit. This system makes sequential decommissioning efforts efficient and cost-effective by allowing the integrated system to remain intact while being moved to subsequent work sites. Use of the MITUS also eliminates the need to conduct zero-energy tests and implement associated lock-out/tag-out procedures at partially de-energized facilities. Since the MITUS is a designed system, it can be customized to accommodate unique facility conditions simply by varying kiosks and transformer configurations. The MITUS is an attractive alternate to the use of portable generators with stand-alone communications and emergency system. It is more cost-effective than upgrading or reconfiguring existing power distribution systems

  17. Check valve diagnostics utilizing acoustic and magnetic technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agostinelli, A.

    1991-01-01

    The potential hazards associated with check valve failures make it necessary to detect check valve problems before they cause significant damage. In the nuclear industry, check valve failures are known to have resulted in damaging water hammer conditions, overpressurization of low pressure systems, steam binding of auxiliary feedwater pumps, and other serious component damage in power plant environments. Similar problems exist in fossil power and various process industries, but the resources dedicated to valve maintenance issues are greatly reduced. However, the trend toward plant life extension, predictive maintenance, and maximum operating efficiency will raise the general awareness of check valve maintenance in commercial (non-nuclear) applications. Although this paper includes specific references to the nuclear industry, the check valve problem conditions and diagnostic techniques apply across all power and process plant environments. The ability to accurately diagnose check valve conditions using non-intrusive, predictive maintenance testing methods allows for a more cost-efficient, productive maintenance program. One particular diagnostic system, called Quickcheck trademark, assists utilities in addressing these concerns. This article presents actual field test data and analysis that demonstrate the power of check valve diagnostics. Prior to presenting the field data, a brief overview of the system is overviewed

  18. ANALYZES OF ANTIPLATELETS AND ANTICOAGULANTS UTILIZATION IN PATIENTS TREATED IN CARDIOVASCULAR REHABILITATION CENTER FROM CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boban Marko

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Discordance with the guidelines and underutilization of pharmacotherapy for secondary prevention frequently exists in clinical practice. Aim of our study was to assess the prescription routine and drug utilization patterns for antiplatelets and peroral anticoagulants in tertiary medical center specialized for cardiovascular rehabilitation. Methods: study included 96 consecutive patients scheduled for cardiovascular rehabilitation in period 1-6 months after the acute treatment for ischemic 87(80.2% and valvular heart disease 18(19.8%. Patients were divided according to etiology of heart disease and type of acute cardiovascular treatments (conservative, percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI and surgery. Results: Dual antiplatelet therapy was the most commonly applied regimen in 84(87.5% of conservatively treated myocardial infarctions, 47(61.9% of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI and 13(58.9% of surgically treated group (p>0.05. Among studied group of patients significant differences in utilization were found for warfarin, or combinations of antiplatelets with warfarin(p0.05. All four of patients that received triple therapy (4.17% were from surgical group. Underutilization of antiplatelets in ischemic heart disease was at 11(14.3% what was congruent with the developed industrial nations. Conclusions: Acute cardiovascular treatment type, but not heart disease etiology, had significant influence on subsequent prescription routine. Decreased use of pharmacological agents for secondary prevention in surgical patients was revealed. Drug utilization analyzes can offer improvement in optimizing medical treatments, quality of care and decrease unnecessary polypragmasia, as well as improve economical efficiency of medical management.

  19. 7. Annual seminar of the scientific initiation of the Center for Development of Nuclear Technology. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This seminar presents the Scientific Initiation Program developed at the CDTN - Brazilian Center for the Development of Nuclear Technology and focuses on activities of the sectors of: radiopharmaceutical production; radiation applied to health; waste management; structural integrity; environment; nanotechnology and nuclear materials; reactor technology; mineral technology; reactor and analytical techniques

  20. Technological Preferences, Levels of Utilization and Attitude of Students Towards Mobile Learning Technologies in Chartered Universities, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gitumu Mugo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The affordances of mobile technologies are being felt in many sectors of world’s economy including university education. By solving the limitations of fixed instructional technologies, mobile technologies have received ready acceptance in the education place. The purpose of the study was to investigate the student technological preferences, their levels of utilization as well as attitudes toward mobile technologies. The target population was 30,752 third year undergraduate students in Kenyan Universities. The participants (n = 375 were selected by systematic random sampling. They provided data using self-fill questionnaires. Results indicated that the smartphone was the most popular mobile device; Tecno was the most preferred handset brand; and Android was the most popular operating system. Safaricom was the dominant service provider amongst the student population. Regarding the levels of utilization of mobile technologies by students, it was concluded that though students use their mobile devices sufficiently, the use of the devices for accessing teaching and learning content was considerably low. On the attitude of students towards mobile technologies, it was observed that a sizeable number of students preferred to use the technologies over other existing instructional technologies. The findings of this study will be useful to instructional technologists, education policy makers, mobile handset manufacturers, mobile service providers and university managers as they partner to roll out digital learning infrastructure for Kenyan tertiary education.

  1. Radiofrequency exposure from wireless LANs utilizing Wi-Fi technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kenneth R

    2007-03-01

    This survey measured radiofrequency (RF) fields from wireless local area networks (WLANs) using Wi-Fi technology against a background of RF fields in the environment over the frequency range 75 MHz-3 GHz. A total of 356 measurements were conducted at 55 sites (including private residences, commercial spaces, health care and educational institutions, and other public spaces) in four countries (U.S., France, Germany, Sweden). Measurements were conducted under conditions that would result in the higher end of exposures from such systems. Where possible, measurements were conducted in public spaces as close as practical to the Wi-Fi access points. Additional measurements were conducted at a distance of approximately 1 m from a laptop while it was uploading and downloading large files to the WLAN. This distance was chosen to allow a useful comparison of fields in the far-field of the antenna in the laptop, and give a representative measure of the exposure that a bystander might receive from the laptop. The exposure to the user, particularly if the antenna of the client card were placed against his or her body, would require different measurement techniques beyond the scope of this study. In all cases, the measured Wi-Fi signal levels were very far below international exposure limits (IEEE C95.1-2005 and ICNIRP) and in nearly all cases far below other RF signals in the same environments. An discusses technical aspects of the IEEE 802.11 standard on which WLANs operate that are relevant to determining the levels of RF energy exposure from WLANs. Important limiting factors are the low operating power of client cards and access points, and the low duty cycle of transmission that normally characterizes their operation.

  2. Research Tools and Materials | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Tools can be found in TTC's Available Technologies and in scientific publications. They are freely available to non-profits and universities through a Material Transfer Agreement (or other appropriate mechanism), and available via licensing to companies.

  3. Co-Development Agreements | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's TTC uses three different co-development agreements to help industry and academia interact and partner with National Institutes of Health laboratories and scientists to support technology development activities.

  4. Renal Cancer Biomarkers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic cancer biomarkers from clinical specimens.

  5. Factors shaping effective utilization of health information technology in urban safety-net clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sheba; Garth, Belinda; Fish, Allison; Baker, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Urban safety-net clinics are considered prime targets for the adoption of health information technology innovations; however, little is known about their utilization in such safety-net settings. Current scholarship provides limited guidance on the implementation of health information technology into safety-net settings as it typically assumes that adopting institutions have sufficient basic resources. This study addresses this gap by exploring the unique challenges urban resource-poor safety-net clinics must consider when adopting and utilizing health information technology. In-depth interviews (N = 15) were used with key stakeholders (clinic chief executive officers, medical directors, nursing directors, chief financial officers, and information technology directors) from staff at four clinics to explore (a) nonhealth information technology-related clinic needs, (b) how health information technology may provide solutions, and (c) perceptions of and experiences with health information technology. Participants identified several challenges, some of which appear amenable to health information technology solutions. Also identified were requirements for effective utilization of health information technology including physical infrastructural improvements, funding for equipment/training, creation of user groups to share health information technology knowledge/experiences, and specially tailored electronic billing guidelines. We found that despite the potential benefit that can be derived from health information technologies, the unplanned and uninformed introduction of these tools into these settings might actually create more problems than are solved. From these data, we were able to identify a set of factors that should be considered when integrating health information technology into the existing workflows of low-resourced urban safety-net clinics in order to maximize their utilization and enhance the quality of health care in such settings.

  6. Annual report of nuclear technology and education center. April 1, 2002 - March 31, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in FY 2002. It includes the domestic educational activities in Tokyo Education Center in Komagome Tokyo for RI and radiation engineers and Tokai Education Center in Tokai for nuclear engineers, and the international training activities for Asia-Pacific region which were planned and administrated by International Technology Transfer Division. The new course so called 'Introductory Course for the Use and the Experiment of Neutron' was started with good appreciation by the participants. All scheduled course plan in Tokyo Education Center and Tokai Education Center was accomplished and the total number of the trainee of both Center was 1,297. The courses for RI and radiation engineers implemented in Tokyo Education Center were closed in this FY and transferred to Tokai Establishment in next FY where the course will be integrated with the ones at Tokai Education Center. The land of Tokyo Education Center will be returned to land-owner by the end of FY 2003 after dismantlement of the facilities. The equipments and instruments used in Tokyo Education Center were transferred to Tokai Education Center after finishing all courses in Tokyo in this FY. The improvement and re-arrangement of the facilities in Tokyo Education Center were proceeded to prepare the courses from Tokyo Education Center. (author)

  7. Utilizing TOPSIS intensified with adjustment similarity factor to determine price of technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Seyedhosseini

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Technology transfer has been a very frequent activity in the industrial world nowadays. Technology valuation, and in particular technology pricing, has played a considerable role in these transactions, in spite of a huge amount of limitations in the pricing methodologies applied. Making a sound, traceable and reliable means for applying the price evaluation procedure, seems as a technological requirement to be traced for. The objective of delivering this paper is to introduce a new numerical technology pricing method to provide the two transacting parties a unique compromised price. A three-dimensional model for technology pricing is proposed and The TOPSPS algorithm has been utilized to select the most similar technologies to the intended one and the constructed scoring system is applied to calculate the final technology price accordingly.

  8. Examination of incentive mechanisms for innovative technologies applicable to utility and nonutility power generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, K.A. [Illinois Commerce Commission, Springfield, IL (United States); Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.

    1993-08-01

    Innovative technologies, built by either utility or nonutility power generators, have the potential to lower costs with less environmental emissions than conventional technologies. However, the public-good nature of information, along with uncertain costs, performance, and reliability, discourages rapid adoption of these technologies. The effect of regulation of electricity production may also have an adverse impact on motivation to innovate. Slower penetration of cleaner, more efficient technologies could result in greater levels of pollution, higher electricity prices, and a reduction in international competitiveness. Regulatory incentives could encourage adoption and deployment of innovative technologies of all kinds, inducting clean coal technologies. Such incentives must be designed to offset risks inherent in innovative technology and encourage cost-effective behavior. To evaluate innovative and conventional technologies equally, the incremental cost of risk (ICR) of adopting the innovative technology must be determined. Through the ICR, the magnitude of incentive required to make a utility (or nonutility) power generator equally motivated to use either conventional or innovative technologies can be derived. Two technology risks are examined: A construction risk, represented by a 15% cost overrun, and an operating risk, represented by a increased forced outage rate (decreased capacity factor). Different incentive mechanisms and measurement criteria are used to assess the effects of these risks on ratepayers and shareholders. In most cases, a regulatory incentive could offset the perceived risks while encouraging cost-effective behavior by both utility and nonutility power generators. Not only would the required incentive be recouped, but the revenue requirements would be less for the innovative technology; also, less environmental pollution would be generated. In the long term, ratepayers and society would benefit from innovative technologies.

  9. Technology requirements to be addressed by the NASA Lewis Research Center Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydelott, J. C.; Rudland, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is responsible for the planning and execution of a scientific program which will provide advance in space cryogenic fluid management technology. A number of future space missions were identified that require or could benefit from this technology. These fluid management technology needs were prioritized and a shuttle attached reuseable test bed, the cryogenic fluid management facility (CFMF), is being designed to provide the experimental data necessary for the technology development effort.

  10. Integrating Technology into Classroom: The Learner-Centered Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, Baris; Karaoglan Yilmaz, Fatma Gizem; Yilmaz, Ramazan

    2013-01-01

    In this study, to present an instructional model by considering the existing models of instructional design (ARCS, ADDIE, ASSURE, Dick and Carey, Seels and Glasgow, Smith and Ragan etc.) with the nature of technology-based education and to reveal analysis, design, development, implementation, evaluation, and to revise levels with lower levels of…

  11. Hypermedia Laboratory, Defense Applied Information Technology Center; Review for 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    technology and the CCL system to produce an Artificial Inteligence driven Hypermedia environment to access heterogenous database systems. The development...8, December 1988 a minicomputer * HYPERTEXT * multiuser dgis artificial inteligence hypermedi Hypermedia for ASCII Hyperext on the VAX is an ASCII...CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Hypermedia, Artificial Intelligence

  12. NIH Employee Invention Report (EIR) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIH researchers must immediately contact their Laboratory or Branch Chief and inform him or her of a possible invention, and then consult with your NCI TTC Technology Transfer Manager about submitting an Employee Invention Report (EIR) Form. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  13. TEC Center: Linking Technology, Education and Cultural Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoter, Elaine; Shonfeld, Miri; Asmaa, N. Ganayem

    2012-01-01

    To many people, "Israel" is perceived as a "high-tech" nation, but in the same breath, as a "nation in conflict." So why not apply Israel's technological advantage to battle the multicultural conflict within? In this article, we will review the multicultural segregation in Israel, the traditional attempts to bring…

  14. Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

  15. Water Reclamation Technology Development at Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Pickering, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Who We Are: A staff of approximately 14 BS, MS, and PhD-Level Engineers and Scientists with experience in Aerospace, Civil, Environmental, and Mechanical Engineering, Chemistry, Physical Science and Water Pollution Microbiology. Our Primary Objective: To develop the next generation water recovery system technologies that will support NASA's long duration missions beyond low-earth orbit.

  16. A Measurement Management Technology for Improving Energy Efficiency in Data Centers and Telecommunication Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrik Hamann, Levente Klein

    2012-06-28

    Data center (DC) electricity use is increasing at an annual rate of over 20% and presents a concern for the Information Technology (IT) industry, governments, and the society. A large fraction of the energy use is consumed by the compressor cooling to maintain the recommended operating conditions for IT equipment. The most common way to improve the DC efficiency is achieved by optimally provisioning the cooling power to match the global heat dissipation in the DC. However, at a more granular level, the large range of heat densities of today's IT equipment makes the task of provisioning cooling power optimized to the level of individual computer room air conditioning (CRAC) units much more challenging. Distributed sensing within a DC enables the development of new strategies to improve energy efficiency, such as hot spot elimination through targeted cooling, matching power consumption at rack level with workload schedule, and minimizing power losses. The scope of Measurement and Management Technologies (MMT) is to develop a software tool and the underlying sensing technology to provide critical decision support and control for DC and telecommunication facilities (TF) operations. A key aspect of MMT technology is integration of modeling tools to understand how changes in one operational parameter affect the overall DC response. It is demonstrated that reduced ordered models for DC can generate, in less than 2 seconds computational time, a three dimensional thermal model in a 50 kft{sup 2} DC. This rapid modeling enables real time visualization of the DC conditions and enables 'what if' scenarios simulations to characterize response to 'disturbances'. One such example is thermal zone modeling that matches the cooling power to the heat generated at a local level by identifying DC zones cooled by a specific CRAC. Turning off a CRAC unit can be simulated to understand how the other CRAC utilization changes and how server temperature responds

  17. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges (standing, center) poses with members of the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG), which is holding the 1999 Technology Fair Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  18. Integrating Primary Care Into Community Mental Health Centers: Impact on Utilization and Costs of Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupski, Antoinette; West, Imara I; Scharf, Deborah M; Hopfenbeck, James; Andrus, Graydon; Joesch, Jutta M; Snowden, Mark

    2016-11-01

    This evaluation was designed to assess the impact of providing integrated primary and mental health care on utilization and costs for outpatient medical, inpatient hospital, and emergency department treatment among persons with serious mental illness. Two safety-net, community mental health centers that received a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration (PBHCI) grant were the focus of this study. Clinic 1 had a ten-year history of providing integrated services whereas clinic 2 began integrated services with the PBHCI grant. Difference-in-differences (DID) analyses were used to compare individuals enrolled in the PBHCI programs (N=373, clinic 1; N=389, clinic 2) with propensity score-matched comparison groups of equal size at each site by using data obtained from medical records. Relative to the comparison groups, a higher proportion of PBHCI clients used outpatient medical services at both sites following program enrollment (pcare for persons with severe mental illness and may also curb hospitalizations and associated costs in more established programs.

  19. PTC test bed upgrades to provide ACSES testing support capabilities at transportation technology center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    FRA Task Order 314 upgraded the Positive Train Control (PTC) Test Bed at the Transportation Technology Center to support : testing of PTC systems, components, and related equipment associated with the Advanced Civil Speed Enforcement System : (ACSES)...

  20. Semi-annual report of Nuclear Technology and Development Center (CDTN) - July to December 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The main activities developed by the several divisions of Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) are described, including areas of reactor tecnologies, fuel cycle, materials and component, nuclear safety and tecnical substructure. (C.G.C.) [pt

  1. National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC); (NREL) National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Jennifer; Sprik, Sam

    2014-03-11

    This presentation gives an overview of the National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC), describes how NFCTEC benefits the hydrogen and fuel cell community, and introduces a new fuel cell cost/price aggregation project.

  2. How You Can Partner with NIH | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) provides an array of agreements to support the National Cancer Institute's partnering. Deciding which type of agreement to use can be a challenge: CRADA, MTA, collaboration, agreement, CTA, Materials-CRADA

  3. CD-ROM technology at the EROS data center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, Michael E.; Weinheimer, Mary C.

    1993-01-01

    The vast amount of digital spatial data often required by a single user has created a demand for media alternatives to 1/2" magnetic tape. One such medium that has been recently adopted at the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Data Center is the compact disc (CD). CD's are a versatile, dynamic, and low-cost method for providing a variety of data on a single media device and are compatible with various computer platforms. CD drives are available for personal computers, UNIX workstations, and mainframe systems, either directly connected, or through a network. This medium furnishes a quick method of reproducing and distributing large amounts of data on a single CD. Several data sets are already available on CD's, including collections of historical Landsat multispectral scanner data and biweekly composites of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data for the conterminous United States. The EROS Data Center intends to provide even more data sets on CD's. Plans include specific data sets on a customized disc to fulfill individual requests, and mass production of unique data sets for large-scale distribution. Requests for a single compact disc-read only memory (CD-ROM) containing a large volume of data either for archiving or for one-time distribution can be addressed with a CD-write once (CD-WO) unit. Mass production and large-scale distribution will require CD-ROM replication and mastering.

  4. Work-Centered Support System Technology: A New Interface Client Technology for the Battlespace Infosphere

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eggleston, Robert G; Young, Michael J; Whitaker, Randell D

    2000-01-01

    .... Although the infosphere's core web and agent technologies are clearly able to provide a heterogeneous infosphere, improved interface technologies are also needed to address problems of information...

  5. Personalized Integrated Educational System: Technology Functions for the Learner- Centered Paradigm of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigeluth, Charles M.; Aslan, Sinem; Chen, Zengguan; Dutta, Pratima; Huh, Yeol; Lee, Dabae; Lin, Chun-Yi; Lu, Ya-Huei; Min, Mina; Tan, Verily; Watson, Sunnie Lee; Watson, William R.

    2015-01-01

    The learner-centered paradigm of instruction differs in such fundamental ways from the teacher-centered paradigm that it requires technology to serve very different functions. In 2006, a research team at Indiana University began to work on identifying those functions and published their results in 2008. Subsequently, the team elaborated and…

  6. Technology-Based Biliteracy Centers for the 21st Century Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, Sandra; Ramos, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this reflective article is to present an alternative that incorporates the four language skills in all content areas through technology-based dual-language centers for emergent bilinguals at the elementary level. The authors propose a matrix to plan the centers and include three examples to facilitate language transfer in English…

  7. Factors Influencing Adoption of Information Technology Infrastructure Library: Utilizing the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Din S. Z.

    2013-01-01

    There is a shortage of evidence based research that provides organizations with the necessary information in support of their technology adoption decisions in relation to ITSM technologies. As such, this research study attempted to bridge the gap by offering insight on possible factors that could influence such decisions. An examination of…

  8. Teaching the originator to make whoopie. [ORNL Engineering Technology Division Word Processing Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    A small Word Processing (Whoopie) Center was established in March 1979, as part of the Engineering Technology Division (ETD), Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Reports preparation information revealed many training items for editors and word processors but none for informing the author. The ETD Word Processing Center has begun a series of sessions with each section in ETD to help originators become more familiar with the Center and its equipment. 5 figures.

  9. Knowledge and utilization of information communication technology (ICT) among health science students at the University of Gondar, North Western Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woreta, Solomon Assefa; Kebede, Yigzaw; Zegeye, Desalegn Tegabu

    2013-03-03

    Despite the relatively huge ICT investment and policy deployment in higher institutions in Ethiopia, there is still scant information about the success of implementation of the Information Communication Technology (ICT) in the higher education. This study, therefore, was carried out with an aim to assess knowledge and utilization of Information Communication Technology (ICT) among medicine and health science students and its associated factors in Gondar College of Medicine and Health sciences, University of Gondar. A cross-sectional study was conducted at the College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Ethiopia. Data regarding socio-demographic characteristics of the students, level of knowledge and utilization of ICT were collected by means of a self-administered questionnaire. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 13. A total of 1096 students responded giving a response rate of 97.8%. The mean age of the study participants was 20.3 (±1. 3) years. Females constitute only 26% of the respondents. The majority (79%) were fulltime students. Only half of the respondents (51%) had ICT knowledge and only 46% students utilized ICT while 47% of the respondents never used electronic communication (e.g. email or chat room) and 39% of the respondents never used Microsoft office (e.g. word (®) or WordPerfect (®)). ICT knowledge [AOR = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.7-3.5], family educational background [AOR = 4.36, 95% CI: 2.16-8.80], and perceived quality of training [AOR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.8] showed strong and positive associations with ICT utilization. Students from urban areas were more likely to utilize ICT compared with those from rural areas [AOR = 2.7, 95% CI: 2.097, 3.497], and information technology training was found to be positively associated with ICT utilization [AOR = 2. 07, 95% CI: 1.18, 3.62]. The result showed that students' knowledge was inadequate and utilization of ICT was poor. Therefore, the university should sustain professional development to

  10. Knowledge and utilization of information communication technology (ICT) among health science students at the University of Gondar, North Western Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the relatively huge ICT investment and policy deployment in higher institutions in Ethiopia, there is still scant information about the success of implementation of the Information Communication Technology (ICT) in the higher education. This study, therefore, was carried out with an aim to assess knowledge and utilization of Information Communication Technology (ICT) among medicine and health science students and its associated factors in Gondar College of Medicine and Health sciences, University of Gondar. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at the College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Ethiopia. Data regarding socio-demographic characteristics of the students, level of knowledge and utilization of ICT were collected by means of a self-administered questionnaire. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 13. Results A total of 1096 students responded giving a response rate of 97.8%. The mean age of the study participants was 20.3 (±1. 3) years. Females constitute only 26% of the respondents. The majority (79%) were fulltime students. Only half of the respondents (51%) had ICT knowledge and only 46% students utilized ICT while 47% of the respondents never used electronic communication (e.g. email or chat room) and 39% of the respondents never used Microsoft office (e.g. word ® or WordPerfect ®). ICT knowledge [AOR = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.7-3.5], family educational background [AOR = 4.36, 95% CI: 2.16-8.80], and perceived quality of training [AOR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.8] showed strong and positive associations with ICT utilization. Students from urban areas were more likely to utilize ICT compared with those from rural areas [AOR = 2.7, 95% CI: 2.097, 3.497], and information technology training was found to be positively associated with ICT utilization [AOR = 2. 07, 95% CI: 1.18, 3.62]. Conclusions The result showed that students’ knowledge was inadequate and utilization of ICT was poor. Therefore, the

  11. Waste management of the Nuclear Technology Development Center - CDTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miaw, S.T.W.; Oliveira Lopes, M.J. de; Tello, C.C.O. de; Silva, E.M.P. da; Guzella, M.F.R.; Reis, L.C.A.; Menezes Cussiol, N.A. de

    1993-01-01

    Liquid and solid wastes of low radiation level are produced at the Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN). Trying to minimise the waste volume and to give proper treatment, the wastes, are segregated at their origin according their radiological, chemistry and physical characteristics. The Radioactive Waste Program was established in 1983 based on CNEN resolution 6/73 and more recently modernized following CNEN Norm NE-6.05. This paper describes all activities involved in CDTN's Program. (B.C.A.). 6 refs, 02 tabs, 01 fig

  12. A User Centered Approach to Developing Emergent Technology Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Restrepo-Giraldo, John Dairo; McAloone, Timothy Charles; Schlegel, Tanja

    2008-01-01

    Current participatory design methods do not allow designers to gain the insight required to develop products with emerging technologies, that is, products that do not have any precedents in the users’ knowledge base and experience. This poses challenges to the designers, as input from users cannot...... was to identify the main form factor drivers for the design of such a phone. Five possible usage scenarios were identified and five form factors were derived from testing these scenarios, which were subsequently evaluated by potential users, through highly focused feedback sessions. The paper also discusses some...

  13. Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay C. Almlie; Bruce Wood; Rich Schlupp

    2007-03-01

    In November 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), ePowerSynergies, Inc. (ePSI), and Resurfice Corporation teamed to develop, produce, and demonstrate the world's first and only fuel cell-powered ice resurfacer. The goals of this project were: {sm_bullet} To educate the public on the readiness, practicality, and safety of fuel cells powered by hydrogen fuel and {sm_bullet} To establish a commercialization pathway in an early-adopter, niche market. The vehicle was developed and produced in a short 3-month span. The vehicle made its world debut at U.S. Senator Byron Dorgan's (D-ND) 2005 Hydrogen Energy Action Summit. Subsequently, the vehicle toured North America appearing at numerous public events and conferences, receiving much attention from international media outlets.

  14. Department of Nuclear Equipment 'High Technology Center - HITEC' - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopec, J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The main activities of the Department for Nuclear Equipment High Technology Centre in 2008 were focused on the development of specialized systems using linear accelerators for medical applications, realized within the frame of the Innovative Economy Operational Program: · Calculations, simulations and design of accelerator structures and beam shaping devices · Design of a model of carrying structures · Building stands for carrying out critical component examinations and tests A new evolutionary algorithm has been implemented in a three-dimensional treatment planning system for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning optimization. A design for a multi leaf collimator, second model, was worked out. The Department received an Award for the Polkam TBI therapeutic table in the first edition of the '' Teraz-Polska '' national contest for the best Polish innovative product. Equipment manufactured by the High Technology Centre and especially for total body irradiation techniques was presented for the first time during the Biennial Meeting of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology in Goeteborg, Sweden. The second edition of the School of Medical Accelerator Physics organized in October 2008 was well received by medical physicists and physicians. (author)

  15. Analysis of the national scientific production on the utilization of digital technologies for nurses’ education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Rolim de Holanda

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to seek evidence available in the national scientific literature regarding the utilization of digital teaching technologies in nurses’ education. The adopted research method was integrative literature review. The articles were selected on PubMed, LILACS, Medline, IBECS, and SciELO databases guided by the following question: what digital teaching technologies are used in nursing courses in Brazil? Eleven articles were selected. Results showed that the following were utilized: virtual learning environments, education software, interactive multimedia (CD-ROM, virtual simulations, hypertexts, digital games, websites, and virtual discussion groups (e-group/listservers. The evidence, in this study, shows that digital technologies are materials capable of optimizing knowledge acquisition complementary to traditional education, encouraging students to learning to learn. Descriptors: Education, Nursing; Teaching; Educational Technology; Nursing.

  16. 5 CFR 792.218 - Does the law apply only to on-site Federal child care centers that are utilized by Federal families?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Federal child care centers that are utilized by Federal families? 792.218 Section 792.218 Administrative... law apply only to on-site Federal child care centers that are utilized by Federal families? The bill includes non-Federal center-based child care as well as care in family child care homes, as long as the...

  17. Test facilities for radioactive materials transport packages (Transportation Technology Center Inc., Pueblo, Colorado, USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlon, P.C.L.

    2001-01-01

    Transportation Technology Center, Inc. is capable of conducting tests on rail vehicle systems designed for transporting radioactive materials including low level waste debris, transuranic waste, and spent nuclear fuel and high level waste. Services include rail vehicle dynamics modelling, on-track performance testing, full scale structural fatigue testing, rail vehicle impact tests, engineering design and technology consulting, and emergency response training. (author)

  18. What's new with nurseries and reforestation projects at the Missoula Technology and Development Center?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob Simonson

    2011-01-01

    The USDA Forest Service Missoula Technology and Development Center (MTDC) offers technical expertise, technology transfer, and new equipment development to federal, state, and private forest nurseries. Current and recently completed projects at MTDC include a front and mid-mount tractor evaluation, ATV-pulled mechanical tree planter, greenhouse snow remover, freeze...

  19. What's New With Nurseries and Reforestation Projects at the Missoula Technology and Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Vachowski

    2006-01-01

    The USDA Forest Service Missoula Technology and Development Center (MTDC) offers technical expertise, technology transfer, and new equipment development to Federal, State, and private forest nurseries. Current and recently completed projects at MTDC include a nursery soil moisture meter, remote data collection systems, low cost weather stations, electronic soil...

  20. Crossing the Great Divide: Adoption of New Technologies, Therapeutics and Diagnostics at Academic Medical Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMonaco, Harold J.; Koski, Greg

    2007-01-01

    The role of new technology in healthcare continues to expand from both the clinical and financial perspectives. Despite the importance of innovation, most academic medical centers do not have a clearly defined process for technology assessment. Recognizing the importance of new drugs, diagnostics and procedures in the care of patients and in the…

  1. Monitoring technology and firm boundaries: physician-hospital integration and technology utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Jeffrey S; Snir, Eli M

    2010-05-01

    We study the relationship between physician-hospital integration and its relation to monitoring IT utilization. We develop a theoretical model in which monitoring IT may complement or substitute for integration and test these relationships using a novel data source. Physician labor market heterogeneity identifies the empirical model. We find that monitoring IT utilization is increasing in integration, implying that expanded firm boundaries complement monitoring IT adoption. We argue that the relationship between monitoring IT and firm boundaries depends upon the contractibility of the monitored information.

  2. Distributed architecture for operation and supervision center: the solution adopted in CELESC, an electric power utility of Santa Catarina State - South Brazil; A solucao adotando arquitetura distribuida para centro de operacao e supervisao na CELESC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Claudio de Jesus; Kina, Eduardo Tomio [Asea Brown Boveri, XX (Brazil); Antunes, Milton de Haro; Silva, Jorge Henrique C. [Centrais Eletricas de Santa Catarina SA, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    This work aims at presenting the SDSC, CELESC`s, an electric power utility of Santa Catarina State - South Brazil, Control and Supervision Digital System, project, on the context of the CELESC`s Control and Supervision Guide Plan. The work also describes the solution adopted by the company in terms of technology and Operation Centers` arquitecture 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Incidence of transfusion reactions: a multi-center study utilizing systematic active surveillance and expert adjudication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E.; Roubinian, Nareg H.; Chowdhury, Dhuly; Brambilla, Don; Murphy, Edward L.; Wu, Yanyun; Ness, Paul M.; Gehrie, Eric A.; Snyder, Edward L.; Hauser, R. George; Gottschall, Jerome L.; Kleinman, Steve; Kakaiya, Ram; Strauss, Ronald G.

    2017-01-01

    Background Prevalence estimates of serious hazards of transfusion vary widely. We hypothesized that the current reporting infrastructure in the United States fails to capture many transfusion reactions, and undertook a multi-center study utilizing active surveillance, data review, and adjudication to test this hypothesis. Study Design and Methods A retrospective record review was completed for a random sample of 17% of all inpatient transfusion episodes over 6 months at 4 academic tertiary care hospitals, with an episode defined as all blood products released to a patient in 6 hours. Data were recorded by trained clinical research nurses, and serious reactions were adjudicated by a panel of transfusion medicine experts. Results Of 4857 transfusion episodes investigated, 1.1% were associated with a serious reaction. Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) was the most frequent serious reaction noted, being identified in 1% of transfusion episodes. Despite clinical notes describing a potential transfusion association in 59% of these cases, only 5.1% were reported to the transfusion service. Suspected transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI/possible TRALI), anaphylactic, and hypotensive reactions were noted in 0.08%, 0.02%, and 0.02% of transfusion episodes. Minor reactions, including febrile non-hemolytic and allergic, were noted in 0.62% and 0.29% of transfusion episodes, with 30–50% reported to the transfusion service. Conclusion Underreporting of cardiopulmonary transfusion reactions is striking among academic, tertiary care hospitals. Complete and accurate reporting is essential to identify, define, establish pathogenesis, and mitigate/treat transfusion reactions. A better understanding of the failure to report may improve the accuracy of passive reporting systems. PMID:27460200

  4. Utilization of Radium 226 from the oncology center - evaluation of staff exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andryskowski, G.

    2007-01-01

    226R a found application in oncological therapy due to its long half-life and the type of emitted radiation. After many years of application it was replaced by less radio toxic short-lived isotopes. In some oncology centres 226R a is still stored even though it is not used in therapy. The necessity of sealing it in glass, which is associated with long-lasting and direct exposure of a worker to radiation, is an indispensable condition if radium is to be collected by the Radioactive Waste Disposal Plant. The aim of the study is to present the problem of radium utilization on the basis of our own experience, which will make it easier to perform these activities in other oncology centers in Poland. After the initial analysis, it was calculated that a person working for 3 hours at a distance of 50 cm from 72 unprotected sources of radium 266 of total activity of 31 GBq would be exposed to a dose of 91.5 mSv. As this dose is about five times higher than the annual effective dose for category A workers, work in such conditions is strictly prohibited. After application of a lead shield, decrease of the dose (simultaneous exposure to the activity of only 5 sources) and the use of a hand-held gas burner enabling work behind the lead shield, a worker sealing radium in glass is exposed to a dose of 2 mSv. Estimation of the exposure was performed on the basis of individual and environmental dosimetry, measurement of radioactive contamination and dose rate. Mathematically calculated analysis of the hazard enabling determination of precise working conditions is a necessity which must be fulfilled before performing these activities. In the evaluation of hazard, not only external exposure was taken into account but also the possibility of external and internal exposure as well. Before starting work leakproofness of the sources was controlled. (author)

  5. Spatial interpretation of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Payload Operations Control Center using virtual reality technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Patricia F.

    1993-01-01

    In its search for higher level computer interfaces and more realistic electronic simulations for measurement and spatial analysis in human factors design, NASA at MSFC is evaluating the functionality of virtual reality (VR) technology. Virtual reality simulation generates a three dimensional environment in which the participant appears to be enveloped. It is a type of interactive simulation in which humans are not only involved, but included. Virtual reality technology is still in the experimental phase, but it appears to be the next logical step after computer aided three-dimensional animation in transferring the viewer from a passive to an active role in experiencing and evaluating an environment. There is great potential for using this new technology when designing environments for more successful interaction, both with the environment and with another participant in a remote location. At the University of North Carolina, a VR simulation of a the planned Sitterson Hall, revealed a flaw in the building's design that had not been observed during examination of the more traditional building plan simulation methods on paper and on computer aided design (CAD) work station. The virtual environment enables multiple participants in remote locations to come together and interact with one another and with the environment. Each participant is capable of seeing herself and the other participants and of interacting with them within the simulated environment.

  6. Technology roadmap study on carbon capture, utilization and storage in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xian; Fan, Jing-Li; Wei, Yi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technology will likely become an important approach to reduce carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions and optimize the structure of energy consumption in China in the future. In order to provide guidance and recommendations for CCUS Research, Development and Demonstration in China, a high level stakeholder workshop was held in Chongqing in June 2011 to develop a technology roadmap for the development of CCUS technology. This roadmap outlines the overall vision to provide technically viable and economically affordable technological options to combat climate change and facilitate socio-economic development in China. Based on this vision, milestone goals from 2010 to 2030 are set out in accordance with the technology development environment and current status in China. This study identifies the critical technologies in capture, transport, utilization and storage of CO 2 and proposes technical priorities in the different stages of each technical aspect by evaluating indices such as the objective contribution rate and technical maturity, and gives recommendations on deployment of full-chain CCUS demonstration projects. Policies which would support CCUS are also suggested in this study. - Highlights: • A technology roadmap for CCUS development in China from 2010 to 2030 is presented. • Sound data and analysis in combination with expert workshops are used. • Critical technologies in CCUS are identified. • Priority actions of all stages are identified and proposed. • Guidance and recommendations for CCUS RD and D are provided

  7. Analysis Approach to Identify Factors Influencing Digital Learning Technology Adoption and Utilization in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubaker Kashada

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has given learners the ability to learn anytime and anywhere at their own pace facilitated by interactive and adaptive software. Digital learning technology is more than just providing students with a laptop. Digital learning requires a combination of technology, digital content, and instruction. This study aims to identify and observe the impact and mediation of top management support in relation to the successful adoption of digital learning technologies in developing countries. A questionnaire was designed and distributed to rate the successful adoption and utilization of digital learning technologies in developing countries and data was analyzed using structural equation modeling. This study provides empirical evidence and explains many complex factors, such as user awareness, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and information communication technology infrastructure, in the context of top management support to facilitate the effective utilization of a digital learning technology. Mediating the top management support between adoption of a digital learning technology and user awareness, perceived usefulness, and perceived ease of use provides clear and crucial evidence to support the effective adoption of a digital learning technology.

  8. VACET: Proposed SciDAC2 Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethel, W; Johnson, C; Hansen, C; Parker, S; Sanderson, A; Silva, C; Tricoche, X; Pascucci, V; Childs, H; Cohen, J; Duchaineau, M; Laney, D; Lindstrom, P; Ahern, S; Meredith, J; Ostrouchov, G; Joy, K; Hamann, B

    2006-01-01

    This project focuses on leveraging scientific visualization and analytics software technology as an enabling technology for increasing scientific productivity and insight. Advances in computational technology have resulted in an 'information big bang',' which in turn has created a significant data understanding challenge. This challenge is widely acknowledged to be one of the primary bottlenecks in contemporary science. The vision for our Center is to respond directly to that challenge by adapting, extending, creating when necessary and deploying visualization and data understanding technologies for our science stakeholders. Using an organizational model as a Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET), we are well positioned to be responsive to the needs of a diverse set of scientific stakeholders in a coordinated fashion using a range of visualization, mathematics, statistics, computer and computational science and data management technologies

  9. The role of utilities in enabling technology innovation: The BC hydro alternative & emerging energy strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Alex; Leclair, Donna; Morrison, Allison

    2010-09-15

    In order for renewable energy to play a dominant role in the global electricity supply mix, emerging renewable energy technologies - such as wave, tidal, enhanced geothermal, and 3rd generation photovoltaic technologies - must prove their technical merits and achieve cost parity with conventional sources of supply. BC Hydro, a government-owned electric utility, launched an Alternative and Emerging Energy Strategy that describes its role as an enabler of technology innovation. This paper describes BC Hydro's goal, objectives and actions to accelerate the commercialization that will yield a diversity of supply options and a growing, local clean-tech cluster.

  10. Review of the Technology-Utilization Level of String Instrument Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döger, Didem; Kiliç, Ilgim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the technology-utilization level of Fine Arts High School string instrument teachers. A pattern based on descriptive method has been used to conduct the researchers. Research data has been collected via literature review and questionnaire developed and prepared by the researcher. SPSS program has been…

  11. TEST DESIGN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) OF ADD-ON NOX CONTROL UTILIZING OZONE INJECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses the test design for environmental technology verification (ETV) of add-0n nitrogen oxides (NOx) control utilizing ozone injection. (NOTE: ETV is an EPA-established program to enhance domestic and international market acceptance of new or improved commercially...

  12. Enhancing the Utilization of Information Communication Technology (ICT) among Home Economics Lecturers in South Eastern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejinkeonye, Uju Bridget; Usoroh, Comfort I.

    2016-01-01

    The study was on enhancing the utilization of information communication Technology (ICT) among Home Economics lecturers in south Eastern Nigeria. The study adopted a survey method. The area of the study is south eastern Nigeria. Three research questions guided the study. The population was made up of 63 Home Economics lecturers from the six…

  13. Utilizing Technology Effectively to Improve Millennials' Educational Performance: An Exploratory Look at Business Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles, Maria; Eastman, Jacqueline K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss how technological tools, such as Web 2.0 and online learning management systems, can be utilized to improve Millennials' educational performance. Design/methodology/approach: An exploratory survey of Millennial business students was conducted to measure their self-reported use and perceived…

  14. The Role of Relevance in Future Teachers' Utility Value and Interest toward Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Ugur; Akcaoglu, Mete

    2018-01-01

    Seeing the relevance of tasks for future use is important for developing value and interest in them. We employed a pre- and post-test quasi-experimental design using a mixed-methods approach to examine if reflecting on the relevance of technology to future teaching practices influences elementary and secondary preservice teachers' utility value…

  15. NASA Earth Science Mission Control Center Enterprise Emerging Technology Study Study (MCC Technology Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dan; Horan, Stephen; Royer, Don; Sullivan, Don; Moe, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of the study to identify technologies that could have a significant impact on Earth Science mission operations when looking out at the 5-15 year horizon (through 2025). The potential benefits of the new technologies will be discussed, as well as recommendations for early research and development, prototyping, or analysis for these technologies.

  16. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center. Report to the Steering Committee, February 1996. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Carbon Injection System and the Trace Element Removal test blocks. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued with impinger capture solutions. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (Carbon Injection System) was utilized in the TER test configuration this month. The B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit is being installed utilizing the Mini Pilot Flue Gas System. The 1.0 MW Cold- Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. Monthly inspections were conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems, and will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff.

  17. An Analysis of Information Technology Adoption by IRBs of Large Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Hurdle, John F

    2015-02-01

    The clinical research landscape has changed dramatically in recent years in terms of both volume and complexity. This poses new challenges for Institutional Review Boards' (IRBs) review efficiency and quality, especially at large academic medical centers. This article discusses the technical facets of IRB modernization. We analyzed the information technology used by IRBs in large academic institutions across the United States. We found that large academic medical centers have a high electronic IRB adoption rate; however, the capabilities of electronic IRB systems vary greatly. We discuss potential use-cases of a fully exploited electronic IRB system that promise to streamline the clinical research work flow. The key to that approach utilizes a structured and standardized information model for the IRB application. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Racial/ethnic disparities in the utilization of high-technology hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Samson, Linda F; Lu, Ning

    2010-09-01

    Hospitals with high-technology services may have better outcomes. However, access to high-technology hospitals might not be uniform across racial/ethnic groups. This study examined if racial/ethnic minorities, compared to whites, are less likely to utilize hospitals that have the availability of technology services and infrastructure items such as computed tomography, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, diagnostics radiation facility, and a level 1 trauma unit. Data were obtained from the 2003 Healthcare Cost & Utilization Project's Nationwide Inpatient Sample and the 2003 American Hospital Association's annual survey data. The sample consisted of 3381 324 patients admitted to and discharged from 368 hospitals in 18 states in the United States. Logistic regression results suggest that Hispanic patients are less likely than whites to utilize high-technology hospitals when controlling for other factors (odds ratio[OR], 0.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.28-0.79). Our study adds empirical evidence that significant gaps persist in access to care between minorities and whites. Particularly, access to high-technology hospitals for Hispanics appears to be a major problem.

  19. LARGE-SCALE MECURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGY TESTING FOR LIGNITE-FIRED UTILITIES-OXIDATION SYSTEMS FOR WET FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael J. Holmes; Steven A. Benson; Jeffrey S. Thompson

    2004-03-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a consortium-based effort directed toward resolving the mercury (Hg) control issues facing the lignite industry. Specifically, the EERC team--the EERC, EPRI, URS, ADA-ES, Babcock & Wilcox, the North Dakota Industrial Commission, SaskPower, and the Mercury Task Force, which includes Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Otter Tail Power Company, Great River Energy, Texas Utilities (TXU), Montana-Dakota Utilities Co., Minnkota Power Cooperative, BNI Coal Ltd., Dakota Westmoreland Corporation, and the North American Coal Company--has undertaken a project to significantly and cost-effectively oxidize elemental mercury in lignite combustion gases, followed by capture in a wet scrubber. This approach will be applicable to virtually every lignite utility in the United States and Canada and potentially impact subbituminous utilities. The oxidation process is proven at the pilot-scale and in short-term full-scale tests. Additional optimization is continuing on oxidation technologies, and this project focuses on longer-term full-scale testing. The lignite industry has been proactive in advancing the understanding of and identifying control options for Hg in lignite combustion flue gases. Approximately 1 year ago, the EERC and EPRI began a series of Hg-related discussions with the Mercury Task Force as well as utilities firing Texas and Saskatchewan lignites. This project is one of three being undertaken by the consortium to perform large-scale Hg control technology testing to address the specific needs and challenges to be met in controlling Hg from lignite-fired power plants. This project involves Hg oxidation upstream of a system equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). The team involved in conducting the technical aspects of the project includes the EERC, Babcock & Wilcox, URS, and ADA-ES. The host sites include Minnkota Power Cooperative Milton R. Young

  20. Breast Imaging Utilizing Dedicated Gamma Camera and (99m)Tc-MIBI: Experience at the Tel Aviv Medical Center and Review of the Literature Breast Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even-Sapir, Einat; Golan, Orit; Menes, Tehillah; Weinstein, Yuliana; Lerman, Hedva

    2016-07-01

    The scope of the current article is the clinical role of gamma cameras dedicated for breast imaging and (99m)Tc-MIBI tumor-seeking tracer, as both a screening modality among a healthy population and as a diagnostic modality in patients with breast cancer. Such cameras are now commercially available. The technology utilizing a camera composed of a NaI (Tl) detector is termed breast-specific gamma imaging. The technology of dual-headed camera composed of semiconductor cadmium zinc telluride detectors that directly converts gamma-ray energy into electronic signals is termed molecular breast imaging. Molecular breast imaging system has been installed at the Department of Nuclear medicine at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv in 2009. The article reviews the literature well as our own experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. ASSESSMENT OF CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR REDUCING EMISSIONS OF SO2 AND NOX FROM EXISTING COAL-FIRED UTILITY BOILERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report reviews information and estimated costs on 15 emissioncontrol technology categories applicable to existing coal-fired electric utility boilers. he categories include passive controls such as least emission dispatching, conventional processes, and emerging technologies ...

  2. The Utility of an Efficient Outcomes Assessment System at University Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopta, S. Mark; Petrik, Megan L.; Saunders, Stephen M.; Mond, Michael; Hirsch, Glenn; Kadison, Richard; Raymond, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Due to increased demands placed on university counseling centers (UCCs) in recent years, there is a need for these centers to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of their psychological services. Regularly monitoring client progress is one approach to increase the likelihood of positive clinical outcomes. This article describes the use of the…

  3. Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaic Projects: A Technology and Market Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.; Lowder, T.; Canavan, B.

    2012-04-01

    Over the last several years, solar energy technologies have been, or are in the process of being, deployed at unprecedented levels. A critical recent development, resulting from the massive scale of projects in progress or recently completed, is having the power sold directly to electric utilities. Such 'utility-scale' systems offer the opportunity to deploy solar technologies far faster than the traditional 'behind-the-meter' projects designed to offset retail load. Moreover, these systems have employed significant economies of scale during construction and operation, attracting financial capital, which in turn can reduce the delivered cost of power. This report is a summary of the current U.S. utility-scale solar state-of-the-market and development pipeline. Utility-scale solar energy systems are generally categorized as one of two basic designs: concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaic (PV). CSP systems can be further delineated into four commercially available technologies: parabolic trough, central receiver (CR), parabolic dish, and linear Fresnel reflector. CSP systems can also be categorized as hybrid, which combine a solar-based system (generally parabolic trough, CR, or linear Fresnel) and a fossil fuel energy system to produce electric power or steam.

  4. Utilization of Educational Innovations and Technology in Research and Extension Functions of State Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalinda M. Comia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The study focused on the extent of utilization of the educational innovations and technology in research and extension functions of SUs. The descriptive design, triangulation method, and purposive sampling were applied in this study. The findings revealed that majority of the respondents are married adults and master’s degree graduates with education as their area of specialization. They are permanent in status and have considerable years in the University serving as research or extension officer. Research of SUs have common research thrusts in terms of environment and natural resources management but differ in their own respective agenda; similarly the SUs share common extension thrusts and concerns but differ in their programs, activities and projects related to community services. Commonly encountered problems concern inadequate funds and inability to access the available technology. Officers utilized educational innovations on research and extension to a moderate extent but software and hardware were utilized to a great extent; likewise internet-based communication was utilized to a great extent for research but used moderately for extension. This implies that compared to research, most of the extension functions do not require the use of internet-based communication. From the results of the study, it was recommended that review of the existing allocation of funds for technology development may be done to improve the existing hardware, software and communication facilities.

  5. The development and technology transfer of software engineering technology at NASA. Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, C. L.; Erb, D. M.; Izygon, M. E.; Fridge, E. M., III; Roush, G. B.; Braley, D. M.; Savely, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    The United State's big space projects of the next decades, such as Space Station and the Human Exploration Initiative, will need the development of many millions of lines of mission critical software. NASA-Johnson (JSC) is identifying and developing some of the Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) technology that NASA will need to build these future software systems. The goal is to improve the quality and the productivity of large software development projects. New trends are outlined in CASE technology and how the Software Technology Branch (STB) at JSC is endeavoring to provide some of these CASE solutions for NASA is described. Key software technology components include knowledge-based systems, software reusability, user interface technology, reengineering environments, management systems for the software development process, software cost models, repository technology, and open, integrated CASE environment frameworks. The paper presents the status and long-term expectations for CASE products. The STB's Reengineering Application Project (REAP), Advanced Software Development Workstation (ASDW) project, and software development cost model (COSTMODL) project are then discussed. Some of the general difficulties of technology transfer are introduced, and a process developed by STB for CASE technology insertion is described.

  6. Role and interest of new technologies in data processing for space control centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denier, Jean-Paul; Caspar, Raoul; Borillo, Mario; Soubie, Jean-Luc

    1990-10-01

    The ways in which a multidisplinary approach will improve space control centers is discussed. Electronic documentation, ergonomics of human computer interfaces, natural language, intelligent tutoring systems and artificial intelligence systems are considered and applied in the study of the Hermes flight control center. It is concluded that such technologies are best integrated into a classical operational environment rather than taking a revolutionary approach which would involve a global modification of the system.

  7. A regional technology transfer program. [North Carolina Industrial Applications Center for the Southeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The proliferation of online searching capabilities among its industrial clients, changes in marketing staff and direction, use of Dun and Bradstreet marketing service files, growth of the Annual Service Package program, and services delivered to clients at the NASA funded North Carolina Science and Technology Research Center are described. The library search service was reactivated and enlarged, and a survey was conducted on the NC/STRC Technical Bulletin's effectiveness. Several quotations from clients assess the overall value of the Center's services.

  8. An analysis of the Spanish electrical utility industry. Economies of scale, technological progress and efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcos, Angel; De Toledo, Pablo Alvarez

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose a model to explain the behaviour of the Spanish electrical utility industry during the period 1987-1997, under the then existing regulatory system (Marco Legal Estable). The paper will study the presence of economies of scale, the effect of technological progress and the differences in the efficiency of the different companies within the market. The paper concludes that the Spanish electrical utility industry was not, in fact, characterized by economies of scale during this period, but witnessed a great improvement in efficiency within that period. All the critical market factors remind stable. (author)

  9. Role of national centers of research and development in nuclear technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, J.-J.; Millies, Pierre.

    1977-01-01

    National Research Centers are shown to play a leading role in nuclear technology transfer, whatever may be the directing scheme of nuclear development in the country envisaged. The first act of the Center consists in training specialists in the various nuclear fields. It must ensure the transfer of technological knowledge towards industry (in metallurgy, mechanics, electronics) and other nuclear auxiliary techniques, together with the transfer towards administration (laws). A simplified scheme of nuclear development strategy based on the French scheme (the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) with its subsidiary Companies) is presented that is usable for developing countries [fr

  10. The roles and functions of a lunar base Nuclear Technology Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J. A., Jr.

    This paper describes the roles and functions of a special Nuclear Technology Center which is developed as an integral part of a permanent lunar base. Numerous contemporary studies clearly point out that nuclear energy technology will play a major role in any successful lunar/Mars initiative program and in the overall establishment of humanity's solar system civilization. The key role of nuclear energy in the providing power has been recognized. A Nuclear Technology Center developed as part of a permanent lunar base can also help bring about many other nuclear technology applications, such as producing radioisotopes for self-illumination, food preservation, waste sterilization, and medical treatment; providing thermal energy for mining, materials processing and agricultural; and as a source of emergency habitat power. Designing such a center will involve the deployment, operation, servicing and waste product management and disposal of megawatt class reactor power plants. This challenge must be met with a minimum of direct human support at the facility. Furthermore, to support the timely, efficient integration of this Nuclear Technology Center in the evolving lunar base infrastructure, an analog of such a facility will be needed here on Earth.

  11. The roles and functions of a lunar base Nuclear Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the roles and functions of a special Nuclear Technology Center which is developed as an integral part of a permanent lunar base. Numerous contemporary studies clearly point out that nuclear energy technology will play a major role in any successful lunar/Mars initiative program and in the overall establishment of humanity's solar system civilization. The key role of nuclear energy in the providing power has been recognized. A Nuclear Technology Center developed as part of of a permanent lunar base can also help bring about many other nuclear technology applications, such as producing radioisotopes for self-illumination, food preservation, waste sterilization, and medical treatment; providing thermal energy for mining, materials processing and agricultural; and as a source of emergency habitat power. Designing such a center will involve the deployment, operation, servicing and waste product management and disposal of megawatt class reactor power plants. This challenge must be met with a minimum of direct human support at the facility. Furthermore, to support the timely, efficient integration of this Nuclear Technology Center in the evolving lunar base infrastructure, an analog of such a facility will be needed here on Earth. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  12. The project of Esfahan Nuclear Technology Center (ENTEC) and the transfer of nuclear tecnology in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khazaneh, Reza

    1977-01-01

    In 1974, the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) decided to set up a Nuclear Technology Center on Esfahan (ENTEC) in collaboration with France's Technicatome Company and the CEA. This center is scheduled to go into operation during 1976-1980. The purposes for setting up ENTEC are threefold: a. to give scientific and technical support to the operation of nuclear power plants and nuclear industries in Iran. b. to carry out research and development in the area of nuclear technology on an industrial level. c. to give supplementary education and training to the manpower needs for the AEOI. To carry out the program of technology transfer, temporary laboratories have been set up in Tehran for engineers, technicians and training programs have been organized primarily in France. The ENTEC project will also include a school for education of junior scientists and engineers in the field of nuclear technology

  13. THE INFLUENCE OF TECHNOLOGY ON THE PERFORMANCE OF BRAZILIAN CALL CENTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Gião

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Call centers (CCs show an evolution over the course of time. There is an intensive use of technology in CCs, although not always a positive side. The article is based on a survey carried out among the 103 Brazilian companies that have come (falta algum complemento, não conseguimos entender a frase and call center services and seeks to verify the contribution of technology in four distinct dimensions: cost reduction, customer relations, communication channels and monitoring of employees. The theoretical framework is eclectic based on strategic considerations, details of the technical areas of telecommunications and information technology, marketing. It focus particularly in the area of customer relations and especially of various national and international studies that have been developed regarding service and customer satisfaction. The results show that heavy use of technology does not mean a general improvement in performance in all dimensions assessed and some dimensions choices to be made over others

  14. Solid and liquid radioactive waste management of the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) - NUCLEBRAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzella, M.F.R.; Miaw, S.T.W.; Mourao, R.P.; Prado, M.A.S. do; Reis, L.C.A.; Santos, P.O.; Silva, E.M.P.

    1986-01-01

    Low level liquid and solid wastes are produced in several laboratories of the NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT CENTER (CDTN)-NUCLEBRAS. In the last years, the intensification of technical activities at the Center has increased the radioactive waste volumes. Therefore, the implementation of a Radioactive Waste Management Program has begun. This Program includes the systematic of activities from the waste collection to the transportation for the final disposal. The liquid and solid waste are collected separately in proper containers and stored for later treatment according to the processes available or under development at the Center. (Author) [pt

  15. Solid and liquid radioactive waste management of the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN)- Nuclebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzella, M.F.R.; Mourao, R.P.; Reis, L.C.A.; Silva, E.M.P.; Miaw, S.T.W.; Prado, M.A.S.; Santos, P.O.

    1986-01-01

    Low level liquid and solid wastes are produced in several laboratories of the NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT CENTER (CDTN) - NUCLEBRAS. In the last years, the intensification of technical activities at the Center has increased the radioactive waste volumes. Therefore, the implementation of a Radioactive Waste Management Program has begun. This Program includes the systematic of activities from the waste collection to the transportation for the final disposal. The liquid and solid waste are collected separately in proper containers and stored for later treatment according to the processes available or under development at the Center. (Author) [pt

  16. Acceptance and Utilization of Technology (UTAUT) as a Method of Technology Acceptance Model of Mitigation Disaster Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siswanto, T.; Shofiati, R.; Hartini, H.

    2018-01-01

    www.mitigasi-bencana.com as a knowledge management website created based on survey results in April-July 2014 in East Java and Central Java provinces, indicates a gap between the expectations and reality that exist in the services provided by the regional disaster management agency. Based on condition analysis, the gaps that occur can be reduced if the community has the understanding and knowledge of adequate disaster mitigation. The problem that arises later is whether the chosen technology solution is appropriate and acceptable to the public? The methodology used in this study using the Technology Acceptance Model development is the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Utilization of Technology (UTAUT). Feedback obtained from respondents KarangTaruna youth SelogedongBantul, www.mitigasi-bencana.com can be accepted by the respondents, but from processed data is obtained only UTAUT hypotheses on the relationship dimension eligible for Social Expectancy on the Attitude toward technology, which means the higher the perception of the Social Expectancy, the higher the perception of the Attitude toward technology. Because www.mitigasi-bencana.com is new socialized so that society still need time to explore content information and knowledge contained therein. To be accepted by user, a knowledge management application must prepare various aspects of Performance Expectancy, Effort Expectancy, Social Factors, Facilitating Conditions and Attitude.

  17. Awareness and pattern of utilizing family planning services among women attending urban health care center Azizabad Sukkur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, N.A.; Nisar, N.

    2008-01-01

    To assess level of awareness and pattern of utilizing family planning services among women (15-49 years) of reproductive age at Urban Health Center, Azizabad Sukkur, Sindh. A cross-sectional study was conducted from April to June 2005 at Urban Health Care Center Azizabad Sukkur. Two hundred women of reproductive age group were interviewed by using a pre tested semi structured questionnaire visiting the health care center during the study period. Information was obtained after taking informed consent regarding socio demographic characteristics, knowledge, attitude and pattern of utilizing family planning services. The data was entered and analyzed by using statistical package SPSS version 13. About 75% of women and 42.5% husbands were found illiterate, 85% women were housewives, 69.5% were married before 18 years of age and 54% had nuclear family. Regarding desired number of children women responded one child (3%), 2-3 children (11%), 4-5 (37.5%), more than five children (36%), 5.5% said that children are God gifted and 7% did not answer. About 60% of women reported use of at least one contraceptive method and 40% had never used any contraceptive method. The women who received counseling from the health care provider were 48.5% and only 6% received information through media. Religious prohibition, shortage of female staff and cost of family planning contraceptive methods were the main reasons identified for not utilizing contraceptive methods. The unsatisfactory variables were long waiting hours at the center, non-availability of contraceptive, shortage of the female staff and cost. Limited number of women was aware and practice contraception in the area and utilization of family planning services were low. The efforts should be made for providing information to couple and improving quality of family planning services in the area. (author)

  18. Utilization of Information and Communication Technology in Coordination Between the National Library with the Provincial Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimas Gammayani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes are rapidly occur in this world, especially developments in the field of information and communication technology. Man must be able to adjust quickly to keep up. Developments in information and communication technology has made it easier for people in work. Utilization of information and communication technology are expected to make work performed by humans is more effective and efficient. National Library of Indonesia mandated by Law No. 43 of 2007 as an adviser to all types of libraries throughout Indonesia. In carrying out the task, the National Library should coordinate with local government including the provincial government, represented by the provincial library which can be said to represent the provincial government in the affairs of the library. National Library of Indonesia in coordination with the provincial library has been facilitated by information and communication technology such as telephone, fax and internet. In addition, coordination can also be done through conventional correspondency or direct face to face. This study tried to define which communication system that is commonly used by the National Library of Indonesia when coordinating with the provincial library and the reasons that lie behind them. The method used in this research is descriptive with a participatory approach, the researchers and respondents are equal and shared a mutual cooperation. This research indicates that face-to-face coordination is more preferred, because face-to-face coordination offers a social and economical benefit. Keywords: library, national library, provincial library, utilization technology

  19. Final Report for "Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svetlana Shasharina

    2010-12-01

    The goal of the Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software is to fundamentally changing the way scientific software is developed and used by bringing component-based software development technologies to high-performance scientific and engineering computing. The role of Tech-X work in TASCS project is to provide an outreach to accelerator physics and fusion applications by introducing TASCS tools into applications, testing tools in the applications and modifying the tools to be more usable.

  20. Final Report for 'Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shasharina, Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software is to fundamentally changing the way scientific software is developed and used by bringing component-based software development technologies to high-performance scientific and engineering computing. The role of Tech-X work in TASCS project is to provide an outreach to accelerator physics and fusion applications by introducing TASCS tools into applications, testing tools in the applications and modifying the tools to be more usable.

  1. Technical Data Management Center: a focal point for meteorological and other environmental transport computing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGill, B.; Maskewitz, B.F.; Trubey, D.K.

    1981-01-01

    The Technical Data Management Center, collecting, packaging, analyzing, and distributing information, computer technology and data which includes meteorological and other environmental transport work is located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, within the Engineering Physics Division. Major activities include maintaining a collection of computing technology and associated literature citations to provide capabilities for meteorological and environmental work. Details of the activities on behalf of TDMC's sponsoring agency, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, are described

  2. Effects of a pain education program in Complementary and Alternative Medicine treatment utilization at a VA medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosio, David; Lin, Erica H

    2015-06-01

    Past studies have shown that U.S. Veterans are consumers of CAM. However, more than 75% of Veteran non-users report they would utilize these treatment options if made available. Thus, Veterans may not be fully aware of the CAM options currently available to them in the current U.S. VA health care system. The current study tested the hypothesis that Veterans would report an increase in CAM utilization after completing a formal pain education program in a VA medical center. The study used a quasi-experimental, one-group, pre/post-test design. Midwestern, U.S. VA Medical Center. The responses from 103 Veterans who elected to participate in the program and the assessment measures were included in the outcome analyses. "Pain Education School" is a 12-week, educational program that is open to all Veterans and their families. It is a comprehensive program that introduces patients to 23 different disciplines at the VA Medical Center that deal with chronic, non-cancer pain. An adaptation of the Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire(©), SECTION A: Use of Alternative Health Care Providers. There was a significant difference found in overall utilization of CAM after completing the pain education program. The most utilized CAM modality was the chiropractor; the least utilized were hypnosis and aromatherapy. Not all health care systems or providers may have access to an education-focused, professionally driven program as an amenity. However, lessons can be learned from this study in terms of what pain providers may be able to accomplish in their practice. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Toward a Student-Centered Measure of Learning Management System Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Eric; Defranco, Joanna F.

    2012-01-01

    Colleges and universities have spent significant financial and human resources deploying and promoting educational technologies, including Learning Management Systems (LMS). A large body of research now exists on the impact of technology on student learning, including the roles of blended learning, hybrid classes, and distance learning. Yet,…

  4. Estimating CO2 Emission Reduction of Non-capture CO2 Utilization (NCCU) Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Dong Woog; Gyu, Jang Se; Kwak, No-Sang; Lee, In Young; Jang, Kyung Ryoung; Shim, Jae-Goo; Choi, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Estimating potential of CO 2 emission reduction of non-capture CO 2 utilization (NCCU) technology was evaluated. NCCU is sodium bicarbonate production technology through the carbonation reaction of CO 2 contained in the flue gas. For the estimating the CO 2 emission reduction, process simulation using process simulator (PRO/II) based on a chemical plant which could handle CO 2 of 100 tons per day was performed, Also for the estimation of the indirect CO 2 reduction, the solvay process which is a conventional technology for the production of sodium carbonate/sodium bicarbonate, was studied. The results of the analysis showed that in case of the solvay process, overall CO 2 emission was estimated as 48,862 ton per year based on the energy consumption for the production of NaHCO 3 (7.4 GJ/tNaHCO 3 ). While for the NCCU technology, the direct CO 2 reduction through the CO 2 carbonation was estimated as 36,500 ton per year and the indirect CO 2 reduction through the lower energy consumption was 46,885 ton per year which lead to 83,385 ton per year in total. From these results, it could be concluded that sodium bicarbonate production technology through the carbonation reaction of CO 2 contained in the flue was energy efficient and could be one of the promising technology for the low CO 2 emission technology.

  5. The Ef fects of Technology Usabilitiy and Individual Technology Readiness on Utilization of Electronic Document Management System (EDMS: A Research on Employee of University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuman Atilla

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Electronic Document Management System (EDMS is software which is utilized for writing, sending and storing, briefly managing the processes and operations of the corporations and institutions. In this empirical research, the statistical differences are investigated between users’ concerns about usability of mentioned technology, users’ technological readiness levels and users’ utilization status of EDMS sample is formed by 189 administrative staff of a university hospital in Ankara. According to findings, significant statistical differences are found between some dimensions of technology usability (usability effectiveness, learnability,helpfulness satisfaction, some dimensions of technology readiness (discomfort and insecurity and the utilization status (user, nonuser of EDMS.

  6. Management support services to the Office of Utility Technologies. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-16

    The Office of Utility Technologies works cooperatively with industry and the utility sector to realize the market potential for energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Under this contract, BNF has provided management support services for OUT R&D activities for the following Program offices: (1) Office of Energy Management; (2) Office of Solar Energy Conversion; (3) Office of Renewable Energy Conversion; and (4) Deputy Assistant Secretary. During the period between 4/17/91 and 9/17/93, BNF furnished the necessary personnel, equipment, materials, facilities and travel required to provide management support services for each of the above Program Offices. From 9/18/93 to 12/17/93, BNF has been involved in closeout activities, including final product deliverables. Research efforts that have been supported in these Program Offices are: (1) for Energy Management -- Advanced Utility Concepts Division; Utility Systems Division; Integrated Planning; (2) for Solar Energy Conversion -- Photovoltaics Division; Solar Thermal and Biomass Power Division; (3) for Renewable Energy Conversion -- Geothermal Division; Wind, Hydroelectric and Ocean Systems Division; (4) for the Deputy Assistant Secretary -- support as required by the Supporting Staff. This final report contains summaries of the work accomplished for each of the Program Offices listed above.

  7. Are health centers in Thailand ready for health information technology? : a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijsanayotin, Boonchai; Speedie, Stuart

    2006-01-01

    The Thailand universal health care coverage scheme was instituted in 2001 and The Thailand Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) is restructuring its information systems to support this reform. The MOPH anticipates developing computerized health information systems which can provide information for administration tasks and can improve both healthcare delivery and public health services. To achieve these target goals, knowledge about users and organizations is vital. The knowledge of how health center workers currently use information technology (IT), their knowledge of IT, and acceptance of IT are not only beneficial to policy makers but also to system designers and implementers. The primary objective of this study is to learn how health centers in Thailand use IT, the level of basic IT knowledge among their workers, and their acceptance of health IT. We surveyed a random cross sectional sample of 1,607 health centers representing the total of 9,806 in Thailand in 2005. With an 82% response rate, the preliminary results indicate that information technology usage is pervasive in health centers. The respondents showed a moderately high degree of health information technology acceptance with a modest level of basic IT knowledge. There were no differences in degrees of acceptance among the four geographic regions. The mean score of "intention to use IT" was 5.6 on a scale of 7 and the average basic IT knowledge score was 13 out of 20. These results suggests the possibility of project success if the national health center information system projects are developed and implemented.

  8. The Research Results of Radioactive Waste Management Technology Center Year 1997/1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The research results of Radioactive Waste Management Technology Center, National Atomic Energy Agency of Indonesia year 1997/1998 contain paper as form of research results on radioactive waste management related fields. There were included many aspects such as radioactive waste processing, storage, decontamination, decommissioning, safety and environmental aspects. There are 26 papers indexed individually (ID)

  9. Technology Can Help Young Children Succeed. PACER Center ACTion Information Sheets: PHP-c70

    Science.gov (United States)

    PACER Center, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Parents of young children with disabilities are discovering that carefully selected computer software and mobile apps can provide many benefits such as improved self-esteem, a longer attention span, and inclusion among family and other children that help their children succeed at home and in school. PACER's Simon Technology Center (STC) can help…

  10. Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. Staiger

    2007-06-01

    This report provides a quantitative inventory and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. From December 1963 through May 2000, liquid radioactive wastes generated by spent nuclear fuel reprocessing were converted into a solid, granular form called calcine. This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins.

  11. The Research Results of Radioactive Waste Management Technology Center Year 1996/1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budiman, P.; Martono, H.; Las, T.; Lubis, E.; Mulyanto; Wisnubroto, D. S.; Sucipta

    1997-12-01

    The research results of Radioactive Waste Management Technology Center, National Atomic Energy Agency of Indonesia year 1996/1997 contain paper as form of research results on radioactive waste management related fields. There were included many aspects such as radioactive waste processing, storage, decontamination, decommissioning, safety and environmental aspects. There are 24 papers and 12 short communications indexed individually(ID)

  12. The Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC): Providing Analysis and Insights on Clean Technology Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Nicholi S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-28

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC) provides objective analysis and up-to-date data on global supply chains and manufacturing of clean energy technologies. Policymakers and industry leaders seek CEMAC insights to inform choices to promote economic growth and the transition to a clean energy economy.

  13. Progress Made in Lunar In-Situ Resource Utilization Under NASA's Exploration Technology and Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Gerald B.; Larson, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Incorporation of In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) and the production of mission critical consumables for 9 propulsion, power, and life support into mission architectures can greatly reduce the mass, cost, and risk of missions 10 leading to a sustainable and affordable approach to human exploration beyond Earth. ISRU and its products can 11 also greatly affect how other exploration systems are developed, including determining which technologies are 12 important or enabling. While the concept of lunar ISRU has existed for over 40 years, the technologies and systems 13 had not progressed much past simple laboratory proof-of-concept tests. With the release of the Vision for Space 14 Exploration in 2004 with the goal of harnessing the Moon.s resources, NASA initiated the ISRU Project in the 15 Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) to develop the technologies and systems needed to meet 16 this goal. In the five years of work in the ISRU Project, significant advancements and accomplishments occurred in 17 several important areas of lunar ISRU. Also, two analog field tests held in Hawaii in 2008 and 2010 demonstrated 18 all the steps in ISRU capabilities required along with the integration of ISRU products and hardware with 19 propulsion, power, and cryogenic storage systems. This paper will review the scope of the ISRU Project in the 20 ETDP, ISRU incorporation and development strategies utilized by the ISRU Project, and ISRU development and 21 test accomplishments over the five years of funded project activity.

  14. Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low Rank Coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloosterman, Jeff

    2012-12-31

    Air Products has developed a potentially ground-breaking technology – Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) – to replace the solvent-based acid gas removal (AGR) systems currently employed to separate sulfur containing species, along with CO{sub 2} and other impurities, from gasifier syngas streams. The Sour PSA technology is based on adsorption processes that utilize pressure swing or temperature swing regeneration methods. Sour PSA technology has already been shown with higher rank coals to provide a significant reduction in the cost of CO{sub 2} capture for power generation, which should translate to a reduction in cost of electricity (COE), compared to baseline CO{sub 2} capture plant design. The objective of this project is to test the performance and capability of the adsorbents in handling tar and other impurities using a gaseous mixture generated from the gasification of lower rank, lignite coal. The results of this testing are used to generate a high-level pilot process design, and to prepare a techno-economic assessment evaluating the applicability of the technology to plants utilizing these coals.

  15. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC): Advancing the frontiers of computational science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules, J. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) provides researchers with high-performance computing tools to tackle science`s biggest and most challenging problems. Founded in 1974 by DOE/ER, the Controlled Thermonuclear Research Computer Center was the first unclassified supercomputer center and was the model for those that followed. Over the years the center`s name was changed to the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center and then to NERSC; it was relocated to LBNL. NERSC, one of the largest unclassified scientific computing resources in the world, is the principal provider of general-purpose computing services to DOE/ER programs: Magnetic Fusion Energy, High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Health and Environmental Research, and the Office of Computational and Technology Research. NERSC users are a diverse community located throughout US and in several foreign countries. This brochure describes: the NERSC advantage, its computational resources and services, future technologies, scientific resources, and computational science of scale (interdisciplinary research over a decade or longer; examples: combustion in engines, waste management chemistry, global climate change modeling).

  16. The Technology Services Of Cassava And Sugar Cane Cultivation At Starch Technology Center In 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Tri Atmodjo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The current agricultural system should be able to create agriculture that has high productivity but with low cost input. The agricultural system is an efficient and environmentally friendly agricultural system which capable of utilizing the potential of local resources optimally for the purpose of sustainable agriculture development. This low input farming system is better known as Low Input Sustainable Agriculture LISA.Optimization of Integrated Farming System intended to exploit the potential of local resources for the purpose of sustainable agricultural development.. Integrated agriculture is a system that reuses or recycles the waste arising from the system. for the utilization process to occur effectively and efficiently. it should be integrated agricultural production in one area. In the area there are sectors of production of crops livestock and fishery are interconnected to obtain an area that has a complete ecosystem in which all components of production will not be waste because it will be utilized by other components. The main characteristic of crop-cattle integration is the presence of synergism or mutually beneficial linkages between crops and livestock. Livestock uses plant waste as a source of feed and plants get organic fertilizer from livestock manure.

  17. An Investigation of Factors Affecting Utilization of Information Technology (IT by Agricultural Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Rezaei

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out with the aim of investigating factors affecting utilization of information technology by students of agriculture. A survey approach was used in this study and a questionnaire was developed to gather the data. The study population was postgraduate students (MS and PhD of economic and agricultural development faculty in Tehran University who were selected by applying random sampling technique. Sample size for students was 61 persons. Data was analyzed by using SPSS/WIN software. The results of the research indicated that there was a positive significant relationship between using of information technology by students and their age, average, prior experience, information technology skills, innovativeness, perceived ease of use, attitude and self-efficacy. The relationship between computer anxiety and using of IT was negative. Stepwise Regression Analysis showed that innovativeness and attitude predict 53.2 percent of variations of IT use by students.

  18. The development of uranium foil farication technology utilizing twin roll method for Mo-99 irradiation target

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, C K; Park, H D

    2002-01-01

    MDS Nordion in Canada, occupying about 75% of global supply of Mo-99 isotope, has provided the irradiation target of Mo-99 using the rod-type UAl sub x alloys with HEU(High Enrichment Uranium). ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) through co-operation with BATAN in Indonesia, leading RERTR (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors) program substantially for nuclear non-proliferation, has designed and fabricated the annular cylinder of uranium targets, and successfully performed irradiation test, in order to develop the fabrication technology of fission Mo-99 using LEU(Low Enrichment Uranium). As the uranium foils could be fabricated in laboratory scale, not in commercialized scale by hot rolling method due to significant problems in foil quality, productivity and economic efficiency, attention has shifted to the development of new technology. Under these circumstances, the invention of uranium foil fabrication technology utilizing twin-roll casting method in KAERI is found to be able to fabricate LEU or...

  19. 6th Conference on Coal Utilization Technology; Dai 6 kai sekitan riyo gijutsu kaigi koenshu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The paper compiled the papers presented in the 6th Conference on Coal Utilization Technology held in September 1996. With relation to the fluidized bed boiler, reported were Field operation test of Wakamatsu PFBC combined cycle power plant and Development of pressurized internally circulating fluidized bed combustion technology. Regarding the coal reformation, Development of advanced coal cleaning process, Coal preparation and coal cleaning in the dry process, etc. Concerning the combustion technology, Study of the O2/CO2 combustion technology, Development of pressurized coal partial combustor, etc. About the CWM, Development of low rank coals upgrading and their CWM producing technology, Technique of CWM distribution system, etc. Relating to the coal ash, Engineering characteristics of the improved soil by deep mixing method using coal ash, Employment of fluidized bed ash as a basecourse material, On-site verification trials using fly ash for reclamation behind bulkheads, Water permeabilities of pulverized fuel ash, Separation of unburned carbon from coal fly ash through froth flotation, Practical use technology of coal ash (POZ-O-TEC), etc

  20. Health care utilization among rheumatoid arthritis patients referred to a rheumatology center: unequal needs, unequal care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, C. E.; Triemstra, M.; Rupp, I.; Dinant, H. J.; van den Bos, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    To quantify the utilization of health care by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and to estimate the contribution of patient characteristics to the explanation of the use of care, in order to evaluate whether those in need of care actually receive care. A questionnaire survey and a clinical

  1. Use of Adult Day Care Centers: Do They Offset Utilization of Health Care Services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iecovich, Esther; Biderman, Aya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Based on the medical offset effect, the goal of the study was to examine the extent to which users and nonusers of adult day care centers (ADCC) differ in frequency of use of out-patient health services (visits to specialists) and in-patient health services (number of hospital admissions, length of hospitalizations, and visits to…

  2. The Concept of Center of Gravity: Does it Have Utility in Joint Doctrine and Campaign Planning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    against his weakness. You vagý to use Judo , not fight a boxing match. The Marine Corps’ approach to identifying and attacking centers of gravity is...hear him. Then after Harvey had become deaf and blind , he should have kicked Harvey in the side of his knee to immobilize him. Then and only then, he

  3. Utilization of communication technology by patients enrolled in substance abuse treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Erin A; Acquavita, Shauna P; Harding, Emily; Stitzer, Maxine L

    2013-04-01

    Technology-based applications represent a promising method for providing efficacious, widely available interventions to substance abuse treatment patients. However, limited access to communication technology (i.e., mobile phones, computers, internet, and e-mail) could significantly impact the feasibility of these efforts, and little is known regarding technology utilization in substance abusing populations. A survey was conducted to characterize utilization of communication technology in 266 urban, substance abuse treatment patients enrolled at eight drug-free, psychosocial or opioid-replacement therapy clinics. Survey participants averaged 41 years of age and 57% had a yearly household income of less than $15,000. The vast majority reported access to a mobile phone (91%), and to SMS text messaging (79%). Keeping a consistent mobile phone number and yearly mobile contract was higher for White participants, and also for those with higher education, and enrolled in drug-free, psychosocial treatment. Internet, e-mail, and computer use was much lower (39-45%), with younger age, higher education and income predicting greater use. No such differences existed for the use of mobile phones however. Concern regarding the digital divide for marginalized populations appears to be disappearing with respect to mobile phones, but still exists for computer, internet, and e-mail access and use. Results suggest that mobile phone and texting applications may be feasibly applied for use in program-client interactions in substance abuse treatment. Careful consideration should be given to frequent phone number changes, access to technology, and motivation to engage with communication technology for treatment purposes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of Outreach by a Regional Burn Center: Could Referral Criteria Revision Help with Utilization of Resources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Nicholas H; Leonard, Clint; Rae, Lisa

    2017-09-07

    The objectives of this study were to identify trends in preburn center care, assess needs for outreach and education efforts, and evaluate resource utilization with regard to referral criteria. We hypothesized that many transferred patients were discharged home after brief hospitalizations and without need for operation. Retrospective chart review was performed for all adult and pediatric transfers to our regional burn center from July 2012 to July 2014. Details of initial management including TBSA estimation, fluid resuscitation, and intubation status were recorded. Mode of transport, burn center length of stay, need for operation, and in-hospital mortality were analyzed. In two years, our burn center received 1004 referrals from other hospitals including 713 inpatient transfers. Within this group, 621 were included in the study. Among transferred patients, 476 (77%) had burns less than 10% TBSA, 69 (11%) had burns between 10-20% TBSA, and 76 (12%) had burns greater than 20% TBSA. Referring providers did not document TBSA for 261 (42%) of patients. Among patients with less than 10% TBSA burns, 196 (41%) received fluid boluses. Among patients with TBSA < 10%, 196 (41%) were sent home from the emergency department or discharged within 24 hours, and an additional 144 (30%) were discharged within 48 hours. Overall, 187 (30%) patients required an operation. In-hospital mortality rates were 1.5% for patients who arrived by ground transport, 14.9% for rotor wing transport, and 18.2% for fixed wing transport. Future education efforts should emphasize the importance of calculating TBSA to guide need for fluid resuscitation and restricting fluid boluses to patients that are hypotensive. Clarifying the American Burn Association burn center referral criteria to distinguish between immediate transfer vs outpatient referral may improve patient care and resource utilization.

  5. Lewis Research Center studies of multiple large wind turbine generators on a utility network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, L. J.; Triezenberg, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    A NASA-Lewis program to study the anticipated performance of a wind turbine generator farm on an electric utility network is surveyed. The paper describes the approach of the Lewis Wind Energy Project Office to developing analysis capabilities in the area of wind turbine generator-utility network computer simulations. Attention is given to areas such as, the Lewis Purdue hybrid simulation, an independent stability study, DOE multiunit plant study, and the WEST simulator. Also covered are the Lewis mod-2 simulation including analog simulation of a two wind turbine system and comparison with Boeing simulation results, and gust response of a two machine model. Finally future work to be done is noted and it is concluded that the study shows little interaction between the generators and between the generators and the bus.

  6. A Study of Alternate Approaches to Utilization Review of Laboratory Services within an Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-06

    11. TITLE (Include Security Clasification ) A STUDY OF ALTERNATE APPROACHES TO UTILIZATION REVIEW OF LABORATORY SERVICES WITHIN AN ARMY MEDICAL...Primidone Quinidine Procainamide + N-acetyl Salicylates Procanamide Theophylline (aminophylline) Propoxyphene Valproic Acid Virology Viral Isolation...Stool Culture, Bacterial Neg 27.8 Pos 35.8 Stool Culture, Viral Neg 472 Pos 505 Blood Culture Neg 17.4 Pos 38.4 CBC w/Differential 7 Stool, Fecal

  7. Combining total energy and energy industrial center concepts to increase utilization efficiency of geothermal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, B. P.

    1974-01-01

    Integrating energy production and energy consumption to produce a total energy system within an energy industrial center which would result in more power production from a given energy source and less pollution of the environment is discussed. Strong governmental support would be required for the crash drilling program necessary to implement these concepts. Cooperation among the federal agencies, power producers, and private industry would be essential in avoiding redundant and fruitless projects, and in exploiting most efficiently our geothermal resources.

  8. Characterization and integrity testing of flexible film materials utilizing a unique corona beam technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Gregory J.

    2005-11-01

    The characterization, porosity, permeability and integrity of conductive and non-conductive medical and consumer flexible barrier packaging material are determined utilizing a novel electron beam technology and electronic instrumentation in an open atmosphere for 100% real-time, on-line testing. The electron beam developed in an open atmosphere maintains its prescribed frequency through the use of a nitrogen cover gas, ionizing the gas to create a corona beam. The corona beam discharge, maintained at a high negative voltage, forms from the holes or anomalies in the flexible barrier material. The anomaly is detected and analyzed in order to determine the presence of viral and sub-viral sized voids or holes, as well as other anomalies such as blisters and bubbles. The process can also utilize an established range of acceptability to certify materials that require a well defined level of permeability. This process can be performed by the flexible barrier film manufacturer to certify a specific quality level. It can be performed by the material fabricator to ensure quality standards for preformed materials. It can also be performed by the product packaging manufacturer that uses the packaging material to wrap their products and confirm the integrity of the final sealed package by measuring the atmosphere inside the finished package. There are many other packaging applications that can utilize this technology for film characterization, validation and integrity testing within the pharmaceutical, medical device, and food processing industries, as well as other industrial applications.

  9. JV Task 126 - Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Bituminous Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason Laumb; John Kay; Michael Jones; Brandon Pavlish; Nicholas Lentz; Donald McCollor; Kevin Galbreath

    2009-03-29

    The EERC developed an applied research consortium project to test cost-effective mercury (Hg) control technologies for utilities burning bituminous coals. The project goal was to test innovative Hg control technologies that have the potential to reduce Hg emissions from bituminous coal-fired power plants by {ge}90% at costs of one-half to three-quarters of current estimates for activated carbon injection (ACI). Hg control technology evaluations were performed using the EERC's combustion test facility (CTF). The CTF was fired on pulverized bituminous coals at 550,000 Btu/hr (580 MJ/hr). The CTF was configured with the following air pollution control devices (APCDs): selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit, electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFDS). The Hg control technologies investigated as part of this project included ACI (three Norit Americas, Inc., and eleven Envergex sorbents), elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation catalysts (i.e., the noble metals in Hitachi Zosen, Cormetech, and Hitachi SCR catalysts), sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) (a proprietary EERC additive, trona, and limestone), and blending with a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. These Hg control technologies were evaluated separately, and many were also tested in combination.

  10. Accelerated Adoption of Advanced Health Information Technology in Beacon Community Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emily; Wittie, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To complement national and state-level HITECH Act programs, 17 Beacon communities were funded to fuel community-wide use of health information technology to improve quality. Health centers in Beacon communities received supplemental funding. This article explores the association between participation in the Beacon program and the adoption of electronic health records. Using the 2010-2012 Uniform Data System, trends in health information technology adoption among health centers located within and outside of Beacon communities were explored using differences in mean t tests and multivariate logistic regression. Electronic health record adoption was widespread and rapidly growing in all health centers, especially quality improvement functionalities: structured data capture, order and results management, and clinical decision support. Adoption lagged for functionalities supporting patient engagement, performance measurement, care coordination, and public health. The use of advanced functionalities such as care coordination grew faster in Beacon health centers, and Beacon health centers had 1.7 times higher odds of adopting health records with basic safety and quality functionalities in 2010-2012. Three factors likely underlie these findings: technical assistance, community-wide activation supporting health information exchange, and the layering of financial incentives. Additional technical assistance and community-wide activation is needed to support the use of functionalities that are currently lagging. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  11. Advancing Partner Notification Through Electronic Communication Technology: A Review of Acceptability and Utilization Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellowski, Jennifer; Mathews, Catherine; Kalichman, Moira O; Dewing, Sarah; Lurie, Mark N; Kalichman, Seth C

    2016-06-01

    A cornerstone of sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention is the identification, tracing, and notification of sex partners of index patients. Although partner notification reduces disease burden and prevents new infections as well as reinfections, studies show that only a limited number of partners are ever notified. Electronic communication technologies, namely, the Internet, text messaging, and phone calls (i.e., e-notification), have the potential to expand partner services. We conducted a systematic review of studies that have investigated the acceptability and utility of e-notification. We identified 23 studies that met the following criteria: (a) 9 studies presented data on the acceptability of technology-based communications for contacting sex partner(s), and (b) 14 studies reported on the utilization of communication technologies for partner notification. Studies found high levels of interest in and acceptability of e-notification; however, there was little evidence for actual use of e-notification. Taken together, results suggest that electronic communications could have their greatest impact in notifying less committed partners who would otherwise be uninformed of their STI exposure. In addition, all studies to date have been conducted in resource-rich countries, although the low cost of e-notification may have its greatest impact in resource-constrained settings. Research is needed to determine the best practices for exploiting the opportunities afforded by electronic communications for expanding STI partner services.

  12. Minimal support technology and in situ resource utilization for risk management of planetary spaceflight missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, K. L.; Rygalov, V. Ye.; Johnson, S. B.

    2009-04-01

    All artificial systems and components in space degrade at higher rates than on Earth, depending in part on environmental conditions, design approach, assembly technologies, and the materials used. This degradation involves not only the hardware and software systems but the humans that interact with those systems. All technological functions and systems can be expressed through functional dependence: [Function]˜[ERU]∗[RUIS]∗[ISR]/[DR];where [ERU]efficiency (rate) of environmental resource utilization[RUIS]resource utilization infrastructure[ISR]in situ resources[DR]degradation rateThe limited resources of spaceflight and open space for autonomous missions require a high reliability (maximum possible, approaching 100%) for system functioning and operation, and must minimize the rate of any system degradation. To date, only a continuous human presence with a system in the spaceflight environment can absolutely mitigate those degradations. This mitigation is based on environmental amelioration for both the technology systems, as repair of data and spare parts, and the humans, as exercise and psychological support. Such maintenance now requires huge infrastructures, including research and development complexes and management agencies, which currently cannot move beyond the Earth. When considering what is required to move manned spaceflight from near Earth stations to remote locations such as Mars, what are the minimal technologies and infrastructures necessary for autonomous restoration of a degrading system in space? In all of the known system factors of a mission to Mars that reduce the mass load, increase the reliability, and reduce the mission’s overall risk, the current common denominator is the use of undeveloped or untested technologies. None of the technologies required to significantly reduce the risk for critical systems are currently available at acceptable readiness levels. Long term interplanetary missions require that space programs produce a craft

  13. Accelerator laboratories: development centers for experimental physics and technology in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazari, M.

    1989-01-01

    Three years ago in this Nuclear Center the author and Professor Graef expounded the inception and development of experimental physics and new techniques centered about laboratories and equipped in our country with positive ion accelerators. Extracted here is the information on the laboratories that have allowed professional training as well as the furtherance of scientific productivity in each group. An additional proposal as to how the technical groups knowledgeable in advanced technology might contribute significantly to adequate preparation of youth at the intermediate level able to generate innocuous micro industries in their own neighbourhood. (Author). 5 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  14. Exploring the experience of clients with tetraplegia utilizing assistive technology for computer access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folan, Alyce; Barclay, Linda; Cooper, Cathy; Robinson, Merren

    2015-01-01

    Assistive technology for computer access can be used to facilitate people with a spinal cord injury to utilize mainstream computer applications, thereby enabling participation in a variety of meaningful occupations. The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of the experiences of clients with tetraplegia trialing assistive technologies for computer access during different stages in a public rehabilitation service. In order to explore the experiences of clients with tetraplegia trialing assistive technologies for computer use, qualitative methodology was selected. Data were collected from seven participants using semi-structured interviews, which were audio-taped, transcribed and analyzed thematically. Three main themes were identified. These were: getting back into life, assisting in adjusting to injury and learning new skills. The findings from this study demonstrated that people with tetraplegia can be assisted to return to previous life roles or engage in new roles, through developing skills in the use of assistive technology for computer access. Being able to use computers for meaningful activities contributed to the participants gaining an enhanced sense of self-efficacy, and thereby quality of life. Implications for Rehabilitation Findings from this pilot study indicate that people with tetraplegia can be assisted to return to previous life roles, and develop new roles that have meaning to them through the use of assistive technologies for computer use. Being able to use the internet to socialize, and complete daily tasks, contributed to the participants gaining a sense of control over their lives. Early introduction to assistive technology is important to ensure sufficient time for newly injured people to feel comfortable enough with the assistive technology to use the computers productively by the time of discharge. Further research into this important and expanding area is indicated.

  15. Utilization and evaluation of noncore chemotherapy regimens within an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jared, Jason R; Mably, Mary S; Makielski, Rory; Reed, Michael P; Fallon, Michael J; Liu, Glenn; Mulkerin, Daniel; Callander, Natalie S

    2017-10-01

    Uniformity of evidence-based chemotherapy prescribing using approved, standard, or "core" regimens provides systems-based safety. Noncore chemotherapy regimens are non-standard-of-care regimens requested by physicians on a patient-by-patient basis. Chemotherapy Council, a Pharmacy & Therapeutics subcommittee, assesses all requests and determines approval status based upon submitted evidence and patient-specific factors. This study's purpose is to describe noncore chemotherapy regimens utilization, efficacy, and clinical outcomes in patients receiving noncore chemotherapy regimens. This retrospective chart review includes a two-stage utilization and outcomes evaluation of patients receiving noncore chemotherapy regimens. Stage I, a demographics and utilization assessment of patients receiving noncore chemotherapy regimens, has data collection including patient age, sex, performance score, malignancy, and noncore chemotherapy regimen use justification. Stage II assesses noncore chemotherapy regimen-related, patient-specific outcomes of breast cancer noncore chemotherapy regimen patients. Breast cancer patients were evaluated on regimen and clinical outcomes including disease stage, regimen duration, discontinuation reason, subsequent chemotherapy, survival, and time from noncore chemotherapy regimen until death. Within stage I, 307 patient-specific noncore chemotherapy regimen requests were submitted. The most commonly submitted rationale was modification of a core regimen (33%), followed by patient-specific factors (29%) and salvage therapy (22%). For stage II, 29 breast cancer patients received a noncore chemotherapy regimen and most (54%) received a modified core regimen. The vast majority of noncore chemotherapy regimen discontinuation was due to either regimen completion (42%) or disease progression (42%). Nonelective hospitalizations (35%) and mortality (30%) were found during the median 13.3 months of follow up. Noncore chemotherapy regimen use provides

  16. Quality improvement in healthcare delivery utilizing the patient-centered medical home model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinci, Fevzi; Patel, Poonam M

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that the United States dedicates so much of its resources to healthcare, the current healthcare delivery system still faces significant quality challenges. The lack of effective communication and coordination of care services across the continuum of care poses disadvantages for those requiring long-term management of their chronic conditions. This is why the new transformation in healthcare known as the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) can help restore confidence in our population that the healthcare services they receive is of the utmost quality and will effectively enhance their quality of life. Healthcare using the PCMH model is delivered with the patient at the center of the transformation and by reinvigorating primary care. The PCMH model strives to deliver effective quality care while attempting to reduce costs. In order to relieve some of our healthcare system distresses, organizations can modify their delivery of care to be patient centered. Enhanced coordination of services, better provider access, self-management, and a team-based approach to care represent some of the key principles of the PCMH model. Patients that can most benefit are those that require long-term management of their conditions such as chronic disease and behavioral health patient populations. The PCMH is a feasible option for delivery reform as pilot studies have documented successful outcomes. Controversy about the lack of a medical neighborhood has created concern about the overall sustainability of the medical home. The medical home can stand independently and continuously provide enhanced care services as a movement toward higher quality care while organizations and government policy assess what types of incentives to put into place for the full collaboration and coordination of care in the healthcare system.

  17. A Patient-Centered Emergency Department Management Strategy for Sickle-Cell Disease Super-Utilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Grant G; Hahn, Hallie R; Powel, Alex A; Leverence, Robert R; Morris, Linda A; Thompson, Lara G; Zumberg, Marc S; Borde, Deepa J; Tyndall, Joseph A; Shuster, Jonathan J; Yealy, Donald M; Allen, Brandon R

    2017-04-01

    A subpopulation of sickle-cell disease patients, termed super-utilizers, presents frequently to emergency departments (EDs) for vaso-occlusive events and may consume disproportionate resources without broader health benefit. To address the healthcare needs of this vulnerable patient population, we piloted a multidisciplinary intervention seeking to create and use individualized patient care plans that alter utilization through coordinated care. Our goals were to assess feasibility primarily, and to assess resource use secondarily. We evaluated the effects of a single-site interventional study targeted at a population of adult sickle-cell disease super-utilizers using a pre- and post-implementation design. The pre-intervention period was 06/01/13 to 12/31/13 (seven months) and the post-intervention period was 01/01/14 to 02/28/15 (14 months). Our approach included patient-specific best practice advisories (BPA); an ED management protocol; and formation of a "medical home" for these patients. For 10 subjects targeted initially we developed and implemented coordinated care plans; after deployment, we observed a tendency toward reduction in ED and inpatient utilization across all measured indices. Between the annualized pre- and post-implementation periods we found the following: ED visits decreased by 16.5 visits/pt-yr (95% confidence interval [CI] [-1.32-34.2]); ED length of state (LOS) decreased by 115.3 hours/pt-yr (95% CI [-82.9-313.5]); in-patient admissions decreased by 4.20 admissions/pt-yr (95% CI [-1.73-10.1]); in-patient LOS decreased by 35.8 hours/pt-yr (95% CI [-74.9-146.7]); and visits where the patient left before treatment were reduced by an annualized total of 13.7 visits. We observed no patient mortality in our 10 subjects, and no patient required admission to the intensive care unit 72 hours following discharge. This effort suggests that a targeted approach is both feasible and potentially effective, laying a foundation for broader study.

  18. A Review of User-Centered Design for Diabetes-Related Consumer Health Informatics Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeRouge, Cynthia; Wickramasinghe, Nilmini

    2013-01-01

    User-centered design (UCD) is well recognized as an effective human factor engineering strategy for designing ease of use in the total customer experience with products and information technology that has been applied specifically to health care information technology systems. We conducted a literature review to analyze the current research regarding the use of UCD methods and principles to support the development or evaluation of diabetes-related consumer health informatics technology (CHIT) initiatives. Findings indicate that (1) UCD activities have been applied across the technology development life cycle stages, (2) there are benefits to incorporating UCD to better inform CHIT development in this area, and (3) the degree of adoption of the UCD process is quite uneven across diabetes CHIT studies. In addition, few to no studies report on methods used across all phases of the life cycle with process detail. To address that void, the Appendix provides an illustrative case study example of UCD techniques across development stages. PMID:23911188

  19. Available decontamination and decommissioning capabilities at the Savannah River Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polizzi, L.M.; Norkus, J.K.; Paik, I.K.; Wooten, L.A.

    1992-08-19

    The Safety Analysis and Engineering Services Group has performed a survey of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) technical capabilities, skills, and experience in Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities. The goal of this survey is to enhance the integration of the SRTC capabilities with the technical needs of the Environmental Restoration Department D&D program and the DOE Office of Technology Development through the Integrated Demonstration Program. This survey has identified technical capabilities, skills, and experience in the following D&D areas: Characterization, Decontamination, Dismantlement, Material Disposal, Remote Systems, and support on Safety Technology for D&D. This review demonstrates the depth and wealth of technical capability resident in the SRTC in relation to these activities, and the unique qualifications of the SRTC to supply technical support in the area of DOE facility D&D. Additional details on specific technologies and applications to D&D will be made available on request.

  20. Available decontamination and decommissioning capabilities at the Savannah River Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polizzi, L.M.; Norkus, J.K.; Paik, I.K.; Wooten, L.A.

    1992-08-19

    The Safety Analysis and Engineering Services Group has performed a survey of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) technical capabilities, skills, and experience in Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) activities. The goal of this survey is to enhance the integration of the SRTC capabilities with the technical needs of the Environmental Restoration Department D D program and the DOE Office of Technology Development through the Integrated Demonstration Program. This survey has identified technical capabilities, skills, and experience in the following D D areas: Characterization, Decontamination, Dismantlement, Material Disposal, Remote Systems, and support on Safety Technology for D D. This review demonstrates the depth and wealth of technical capability resident in the SRTC in relation to these activities, and the unique qualifications of the SRTC to supply technical support in the area of DOE facility D D. Additional details on specific technologies and applications to D D will be made available on request.

  1. The Use of DOE Technologies at The World Trade Center Incident: Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, B.; Kovach, J.; Carpenter, C.; Blair, D.

    2003-01-01

    In response to the attack of the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11, 2001, the International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE) National Hazmat Program (OENHP) assembled and deployed a HAZMAT Emergency Management Team (Team) to the disaster site (Site). The response team consisted of a Certified Industrial Hygienist and a rotating team of industrial hygienists, safety professionals, and certified HAZMAT instructors. Through research funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the IUOE conducted human factors assessments on baseline and innovative technologies during real-world conditions and served as an advocate at the WTC disaster site to identify opportunities for the use and evaluation of DOE technologies. From this work, it is clear that opportunities exist for more DOE technologies to be made readily available for use in future emergencies

  2. Available decontamination and decommissioning capabilities at the Savannah River Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polizzi, L.M.; Norkus, J.K.; Paik, I.K.; Wooten, L.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Safety Analysis and Engineering Services Group has performed a survey of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) technical capabilities, skills, and experience in Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) activities. The goal of this survey is to enhance the integration of the SRTC capabilities with the technical needs of the Environmental Restoration Department D ampersand D program and the DOE Office of Technology Development through the Integrated Demonstration Program. This survey has identified technical capabilities, skills, and experience in the following D ampersand D areas: Characterization, Decontamination, Dismantlement, Material Disposal, Remote Systems, and support on Safety Technology for D ampersand D. This review demonstrates the depth and wealth of technical capability resident in the SRTC in relation to these activities, and the unique qualifications of the SRTC to supply technical support in the area of DOE facility D ampersand D. Additional details on specific technologies and applications to D ampersand D will be made available on request

  3. The Use of DOE Technologies at The World Trade Center Incident: Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, B.; Kovach, J.; Carpenter, C.; Blair, D.

    2003-02-25

    In response to the attack of the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11, 2001, the International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE) National Hazmat Program (OENHP) assembled and deployed a HAZMAT Emergency Management Team (Team) to the disaster site (Site). The response team consisted of a Certified Industrial Hygienist and a rotating team of industrial hygienists, safety professionals, and certified HAZMAT instructors. Through research funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the IUOE conducted human factors assessments on baseline and innovative technologies during real-world conditions and served as an advocate at the WTC disaster site to identify opportunities for the use and evaluation of DOE technologies. From this work, it is clear that opportunities exist for more DOE technologies to be made readily available for use in future emergencies.

  4. Johnson Space Center Research and Technology Annual Report 1998-1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, George W. S.

    2004-01-01

    As the principle center for NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) leads NASA development of human spacecraft, human support systems, and human spacecraft operations. An important element in implementing this mission, JSC has focused on developing the infrastructure and partnerships that enable the technology development for future NASA programs. In our efforts to develop key technologies, we have found that collaborative relationships with private industry and academia strengthen our capabilities, infuse innovative ideas, and provide alternative applications for our development projects. The American public has entrusted NASA with the responsibility for space technology development, and JSC is committed to the transfer of the technologies that we develop to the private sector for further development and application. It is our belief that commercialization of NASA technologies benefits both American industry and NASA through technology innovation and continued partnering. To this end, we present the 1998-1999 JSC Research and Technology Report. As your guide to the current JSC technologies, this report showcases the projects in work at JSC that may be of interest to U.S. industry, academia, and other government agencies (federal, state, and local). For each project, potential alternative uses and commercial applications are described. To aid in your search, projects are arranged according to the Major Product Groups used by CorpTech to classify and index types of industry. Some projects fall into multiple categories and are placed under the predominant category, for example, an artificial intelligence project is listed under the Computer Software category, while its function is to automate a process (Automation category).

  5. Thermal insulation research plan for the Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies (ECUT) materials program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fine, H.A.

    1986-08-01

    This report documents both the process and the output of the process of establishing a peer review panel primarily from the private sector to suggest research and development activities appropriate for government sponsorship through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies (ECUT) Program on the subject of thermal insulation. We expect to use information and guidance from the document during the federal budgetary process to allow more informed decision making. All related results of that budgetary decision making will affect what the DOE or Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) can and will sponsor during this or subsequent years through detailed decisions of DOE and ORNL program managers.

  6. Technological drivers in data centers and telecom systems: Multiscale thermal, electrical, and energy management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garimella, Suresh V.; Persoons, Tim; Weibel, Justin; Yeh, Lian-Tuu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Thermal management approaches reviewed against energy usage of IT industry. ► Challenges of energy efficiency in large-scale electronic systems highlighted. ► Underlying drivers for progress at the business and technology levels identified. ► Thermal, electrical and energy management challenges discussed as drivers. ► Views of IT system operators, manufacturers and integrators represented. - Abstract: We identify technological drivers for tomorrow’s data centers and telecommunications systems, including thermal, electrical and energy management challenges, based on discussions at the 2nd Workshop on Thermal Management in Telecommunication Systems and Data Centers in Santa Clara, California, on April 25–26, 2012. The relevance of thermal management in electronic systems is reviewed against the background of the energy usage of the information technology (IT) industry, encompassing perspectives of different sectors of the industry. The underlying drivers for progress at the business and technology levels are identified. The technological challenges are reviewed in two main categories – immediate needs and future needs. Enabling cooling techniques that are currently under development are also discussed

  7. Institutional overviews. Overview of the JAEA and the Nuclear Nonproliferation Science and Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senzaki, Masao

    2006-01-01

    The Nuclear Nonproliferation Science and Technology Center (NPSTC) was formed within the new Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) to carry out safeguards and material control duties for the JAEA. Development of technologies and procedures for safeguards is an important duty. In addition, the new NPSTC will assume a 'think tank' role in support of the nonproliferation regime, help train nonproliferation experts, and cooperate with academic, government and non-governmental organizations on nonproliferation issues. This report briefly summarizes the formation of the JAEA and describes the duties and structure of the NPSTC in detail. (author)

  8. Technology test bed and hydrogen cold flow facilities at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, Robert; Gautney, Tim

    1993-01-01

    The Technology Test Bed and Hydrogen Cold Flow facilities at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama provide unique testing capabilities for the aerospace community. Located at the Advanced Engine Test Facility (AETF), these facilities are operated and maintained by MSFC Propulsion Laboratory personnel. They provide a systems and components level testing platform for validating new technology concepts and advanced systems design and for gaining a better understanding of the test article internal environments. A discussion follows of the particular capabilities of each facility to provide a range of testing options for specific test articles.

  9. The International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) and ISTC projects related to nuclear safety. Information review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tocheny, Lev V.

    2003-01-01

    The ISTC is an intergovernmental organization created ten years ago by Russia, USA, EU and Japan in Moscow. The Center supports numerous science and technology projects in different areas, from biotechnologies and environmental problems to all aspects of nuclear studies, including those focused on the development of effective innovative concepts and technologies in the nuclear field, in general, and for improvement of nuclear safety, in particular. The presentation addresses some technical results of the ISTC projects as well as methods and approaches employed by the ISTC to foster close international collaboration and manage projects towards fruitful results. (author)

  10. Optics-Based Quantum Information and Sensing Platforms Utilizing the Nitrogen-Vacancy Center in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Michael

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center is a point defect in the diamond crystal lattice, forming a localized-electron system with unique optical and spin properties. In particular, optical control and read-out of the spin state, combined with long spin coherence times, make it an attractive candidate for both high-sensitivity magnetometry and as a solid-state spin qubit for quantum information processing (QIP). This dissertation documents the design, implementation, and characterization of systems aimed at each of these applications. First, the development of a GaP-on-diamond integrated photonics platform for QIP is presented. This work is motivated in part by the scalability advantages that are inherent to photonic device integration, and more fundamentally by the large potential improvements in performance. Specifically, coupling NV centers to integrated optical resonators should enable orders of magnitude improvement in entanglement generation rate through improved photon collection efficiency. This will be crucial for the development of even small-scale QIP systems, as NV-NV spin entanglement has so far only been demonstrated at rates far below the spin decoherence rate, effectively limiting NV-based QIP to two-qubit systems. Large numbers of integrated optical devices were fabricated, including optical resonators. Passive transmission measurements were performed on hundreds of individual devices, enabling statistical performance metrics and device yields to be extracted for several components. Device-coupled single-photon measurements are also presented, indicating photon collection efficiencies as high as 9%, corresponding to an efficiency-limited entanglement rate far exceeding the best reported spin decoherence rate. These results put the GaP-on-diamond platform in a competitive position relative to other photonic integration efforts for QIP. Next, a magneto-optical microscope for bio-sensing applications is presented. The microscope images photoluminescence

  11. Access to information: assessment of the use of automated interaction technologies in call centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando de Souza Meirelles

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose of at lowering costs and reendering the demanded information available to users with no access to the internet, service companies have adopted automated interaction technologies in their call centers, which may or may not meet the expectations of users. Based on different areas of knowledge (man-machine interaction, consumer behavior and use of IT 13 propositions are raised and a research is carried out in three parts: focus group, field study with users and interviews with experts. Eleven automated service characteristics which support the explanation for user satisfaction are listed, a preferences model is proposed and evidence in favor or against each of the 13 propositions is brought in. With balance scorecard concepts, a managerial assessment model is proposed for the use of automated call center technology. In future works, the propositions may become verifiable hypotheses through conclusive empirical research.

  12. Calcine Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staiger, Merle Daniel; M. C. Swenson

    2005-01-01

    This report documents an inventory of calcined waste produced at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center during the period from December 1963 to May 2000. The report was prepared based on calciner runs, operation of the calcined solids storage facilities, and miscellaneous operational information that establishes the range of chemical compositions of calcined waste stored at Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The report will be used to support obtaining permits for the calcined solids storage facilities, possible treatment of the calcined waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and to ship the waste to an off-site facility including a geologic repository. The information in this report was compiled from calciner operating data, waste solution analyses and volumes calcined, calciner operating schedules, calcine temperature monitoring records, and facility design of the calcined solids storage facilities. A compact disk copy of this report is provided to facilitate future data manipulations and analysis.

  13. Disparities in Assisted Reproductive Technology Utilization by Race and Ethnicity, United States, 2014: A Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieke, Ada C; Zhang, Yujia; Kissin, Dmitry M; Barfield, Wanda D; Boulet, Sheree L

    2017-06-01

    Disparities in infertility and access to infertility treatments, such as assisted reproductive technology (ART), by race/ethnicity, have been reported. However, identifying disparities in ART usage may have been hampered by missing race/ethnicity information in ART surveillance. We review infertility prevalence and treatment disparities, use recent data to examine ART use in the United States by race/ethnicity and residency in states with mandated insurance coverage for in vitro fertilization (IVF), and discuss approaches for reducing disparities. We used 2014 National ART Surveillance System (NASS) data to calculate rates of ART procedures per million women 15-44 years of age, a proxy measure of ART utilization, for Census-defined racial/ethnic groups in the United States; rates were further stratified by the presence of insurance mandates for IVF treatment. Missing race/ethnicity data (35.6% of cycles) were imputed. Asian/Pacific Islander (A/PI) women had the highest rates of ART utilization at 5883 ART procedures per million women 15-44 years of age in 2014, whereas American Indian/Alaska Native non-Hispanic women had the lowest rates at 807 per million, compared with other racial/ethnic groups. In each racial/ethnic category, ART utilization rates were higher for women in states with an insurance mandate for IVF treatment versus those without. In 2014, A/PI women had the highest rates of ART utilization. ART utilization for all racial/ethnic groups was higher in states with insurance mandates for IVF than those without, although disparities were still evident. Although mandates may increase access to infertility treatments, they are not sufficient to eliminate these disparities.

  14. International Regulations and Recommendations for Utility Data for Health Technology Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowen, Donna; Azzabi Zouraq, Ismail; Chevrou-Severac, Helene; van Hout, Ben

    2017-12-01

    Recommendations and guidelines for the collection, generation, source and usage of utility data for health technology assessment (HTA) vary across different countries, with no international consensus. Many international agencies generate their own guidelines providing details on their preferred methods for HTA submissions, and there is variability in both what they recommend and the clarity and amount of detail provided in their guidelines. This article provides an overview of international regulations and recommendations for utility data in HTA for a selection of key HTA countries: Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain (Catalonia), Sweden and the UK (England/Wales and Scotland). International guidelines are typically clear and detailed for the selection of countries assessed regarding the source description of health states (e.g. generic preference-based measure) and who should provide preference weights for these health states (e.g. general population for own country). Many guidelines specify the use of off-the-shelf generic preference-based measures, and some further specify a measure, such as EQ-5D. However, international guidelines are either unclear or lack detailed guidance regarding the collection (e.g. patients report own health), source (e.g. clinical trial) and usage (e.g. adjusting for comorbidities) of utility values. It is argued that there is a need for transparent and detailed international guidelines on utility data recommendations to provide decision makers with the best possible evidence. Where this is not possible it is recommended that best practice should be used to inform the collection, source and usage of utility values in HTA.

  15. Fully Integrated, Miniature, High-Frequency Flow Probe Utilizing MEMS Leadless SOI Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ned, Alex; Kurtz, Anthony; Shang, Tonghuo; Goodman, Scott; Giemette. Gera (d)

    2013-01-01

    This work focused on developing, fabricating, and fully calibrating a flowangle probe for aeronautics research by utilizing the latest microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), leadless silicon on insulator (SOI) sensor technology. While the concept of angle probes is not new, traditional devices had been relatively large due to fabrication constraints; often too large to resolve flow structures necessary for modern aeropropulsion measurements such as inlet flow distortions and vortices, secondary flows, etc. Mea surements of this kind demanded a new approach to probe design to achieve sizes on the order of 0.1 in. (.3 mm) diameter or smaller, and capable of meeting demanding requirements for accuracy and ruggedness. This approach invoked the use of stateof- the-art processing techniques to install SOI sensor chips directly onto the probe body, thus eliminating redundancy in sensor packaging and probe installation that have historically forced larger probe size. This also facilitated a better thermal match between the chip and its mount, improving stability and accuracy. Further, the leadless sensor technology with which the SOI sensing element is fabricated allows direct mounting and electrical interconnecting of the sensor to the probe body. This leadless technology allowed a rugged wire-out approach that is performed at the sensor length scale, thus achieving substantial sensor size reductions. The technology is inherently capable of high-frequency and high-accuracy performance in high temperatures and harsh environments.

  16. Mars Atmospheric In Situ Resource Utilization Projects at the Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Anthony; Hintze, Paul; Meier, Anne; Bayliss, Jon; Karr, Laurel; Paley, Steve; Marone, Matt; Gibson, Tracy; Surma, Jan; Mansell, Matt; hide

    2016-01-01

    The atmosphere of Mars, which is 96 percent carbon dioxide (CO2), is a rich resource for the human exploration of the red planet, primarily by the production of rocket propellants and oxygen for life support. Three recent projects led by NASAs Kennedy Space Center have been investigating the processing of CO2. The first project successfully demonstrated the Mars Atmospheric Processing Module (APM), which freezes CO2 with cryocoolers and combines sublimated CO2 with hydrogen to make methane and water. The second project absorbs CO2 with Ionic Liquids and electrolyzes it with water to make methane and oxygen, but with limited success so far. A third project plans to recover up to 100 of the oxygen in spacecraft respiratory CO2. A combination of the Reverse Water Gas Shift reaction and the Boudouard reaction eventually fill the reactor up with carbon, stopping the process. A system to continuously remove and collect carbon has been tested with encouraging results.

  17. Determining rules for closing customer service centers: A public utility company's fuzzy decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekorvin, Andre; Shipley, Margaret F.; Lea, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    In the present work, we consider the general problem of knowledge acquisition under uncertainty. Simply stated, the problem reduces to the following: how can we capture the knowledge of an expert when the expert is unable to clearly formulate how he or she arrives at a decision? A commonly used method is to learn by examples. We observe how the expert solves specific cases and from this infer some rules by which the decision may have been made. Unique to our work is the fuzzy set representation of the conditions or attributes upon which the expert may possibly base his fuzzy decision. From our examples, we infer certain and possible fuzzy rules for closing a customer service center and illustrate the importance of having the decision closely relate to the conditions under consideration.

  18. A survey of poison center knowledge and utilization among urban and rural residents of Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaluka, Onyinye N; Corrado, Rachel; Brooks, Daniel E; Nelson, Deborah B

    2015-01-01

    Poison control centers (PCCs) hold great potential for saving health care resources particularly by preventing unnecessary medical evaluations. We developed a survey to better identify the needs and experiences of our service community. We hope to use these data to improve PCC outreach education and overall use of our services. A written questionnaire was developed in English and then translated into Spanish. Subjects agreeing to participate were then asked two verbal questions in English: are you at least 18 years of age? And; in what language would you like to complete the questionnaire; English or Spanish? All questionnaires completed by subjects ≥18 years of age were included. Questionnaires with missing responses, other than zip code, were included. Data collected include gender, age, zip code, primary language, ethnicity, education, health insurance status and experiences with the PCC. Subjects were not compensated for participation. Arizona zip codes were divided into "rural" or "urban" based on a census data website. Percentages and odds ratios were determined based on completed responses. Smaller subgroups, for some variables, were combined to increase sample sizes and improve statistical relevance. Overall, women and subjects with children at home (regardless of ethnicity) were significantly more likely to have heard of the PCC although Blacks and Spanish-speakers were significantly less likely to have heard of the PCC. Similarly, respondents with children at home and those reporting a prior home poisoning (regardless of ethnicity) were significantly more likely to have called the PCC. Blacks were significantly less likely to have called the PCC. These findings were similar among people living in urban zip codes but not statistically significant among rural responders. Based on a small survey, race and language spoken at home were variables identified as being associated with decreased awareness of poison centers. Focusing on these specific groups may

  19. An analysis of collaborative technological advancements achieved through the Center for Network Innovation and Experimentation

    OpenAIRE

    Quarles, Eric L.

    2008-01-01

    The primary focus of this thesis is to produce an analysis of collaborative technology advancements experienced through the experimental cycles which the members of the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Network Innovation and Experimentation (CENETIX) participate. These experiments, which include Maritime Interdiction Operations (MIO) and Tactical Network Topology (TNT) scenarios, have advanced a great deal since their inception and there is a need for a detailed study into which c...

  20. Tiger Team Assessment of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, [August 19--September 13, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy (DOE) Tiger Team Assessment conducted at Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, between August 19 and September 13, 1991. A team comprised of professionals from the Department, its contractors, and consultants conducted the assessment. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy the status of environment, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) programs at PETC. A management assessment was performed

  1. Readiness for meaningful use of health information technology and patient centered medical home recognition survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Peter; Sharac, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Determine the factors that impact HIT use and MU readiness for community health centers (CHCs). The HITECH Act allocates funds to Medicaid and Medicare providers to encourage the adoption of electronic health records (EHR), in an effort to improve health care quality and patient outcomes, and to reduce health care costs. We surveyed CHCs on their Readiness for Meaningful Use (MU) of Health Information Technology (HIT) and Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) Recognition, then we combined responses with 2009 Uniform Data System data to determine which factors impact use of HIT and MU readiness. Nearly 70% of CHCs had full or partial EHR adoption at the time of survey. Results are presented for centers with EHR adoption, by the length of time that their EHR systems have been in operation.

  2. Factors associated with the utilization of primary care emergency centers in a Spanish region with high population dispersion: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Otero-García, Laura; Blasco-Hernández, Teresa; San Sebastián, Miguel

    2014-09-03

    Adequate access to primary care emergency centers is particularly important in rural areas isolated from urban centers. However, variability in utilization of emergency services located in primary care centers among inhabitants of nearby geographical areas is understudied. The objectives of this study are twofold: 1) to analyze the association between the availability of municipal emergency care centers and utilization of primary care emergency centers (PCEC), in a Spanish region with high population dispersion; and 2) to determine healthcare providers' perceptions regarding PCEC utilization. A mixed-methods study was conducted. Quantitative phase: multilevel logistic regression modeling using merged data from the 2003 Regional Health Survey of Castile and Leon and the 2001 census data (Spain). Qualitative phase:14 in-depth- interviews of rural-based PCEC providers. Having PCEC as the only emergency center in the municipality was directly associated with its utilization (p use. PCEC users were considered to be predominantly workers and students with scheduling conflicts with rural primary care opening hours. The location of emergency care centers is associated with PCEC utilization. Increasing access to primary care by extending hours may be an important step toward optimal PCEC utilization. Further research would determine whether lower PCEC use by certain groups is associated with disparities in access to care.

  3. Geothermal Research at the Geo-Heat Center Oregon Institute of Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, John W.

    1997-01-01

    The Geo-Heat Center was established in 1975 to provide information and technical services for geothermal energy direct-use and development--mainly utilizing low- and moderate-temperature resources (<150oC). The Center is funded by the Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE). Our main functions are (1) technical assistance, (2) resource information, (3) advising and referrals, (4) speaker’s bureau, (5) tours of geothermal systems, (6) publications, (7) research, and (8) stocking a geothermal library. During 1997, the Geo-Heat Center staff provided assistance to 761 individuals, companies and municipalities--up to eight hours of technical assistance can be provided free of charge. Staff members have also participated in numerous international geothermal direct-use projects. The Center has developed a “Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook” and publishes a free “Quarterly Bulletin” on geothermal direct-use projects and research. The Geo-Heat Center also has a website (http://www.oit.edu/~geoheat). Several of these direct-use research projects are discussed in the paper, including: a) Downhole Heat Exchangers, b) A Cost Comparison of Commercial Ground- Source Heat Pump Systems, c) A Spreadsheet for Geothermal Energy Cost Evaluation, d) Utilization of Silica Waste from Geothermal Power Production, e) Fossil Fuel-Fired Peak Heating for Geothermal Greenhouses, f) Selected Cost Considerations for the Geothermal District Heating in Existing Single-Family Residential Areas, and g) Collocated Resources Inventory of Wells and Hot Springs in the Western U.S.

  4. A Health Assessment Survey of Veteran Students: Utilizing a Community College-Veterans Affairs Medical Center Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra-Hebert, Anita D; Santurri, Laura; DeChant, Richard; Watts, Brook; Sehgal, Ashwini R; Aron, David C

    2015-10-01

    To assess health status among student veterans at a community college utilizing a partnership between a Veterans Affairs Medical Center and a community college. Student veterans at Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland, Ohio, in January to April 2013. A health assessment survey was sent to 978 veteran students. Descriptive analyses to assess prevalence of clinical diagnoses and health behaviors were performed. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess for independent predictors of functional limitations. 204 students participated in the survey (21% response rate). Self-reported depression and unhealthy behaviors were high. Physical and emotional limitations (45% and 35%, respectively), and pain interfering with work (42%) were reported. Logistic regression analyses confirmed the independent association of self-reported depression with functional limitation (odds ratio [OR] = 3.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-7.8, p stress disorder with pain interfering with work (OR 3.9, CI 1.1-13.6, p student veterans at a community college. A partnership between a Veterans Affairs Medical Center and a community college can be utilized to help understand the health needs of veteran students. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  5. Carbon footprint of forest and tree utilization technologies in life cycle approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgár, András; Pécsinger, Judit

    2017-04-01

    In our research project a suitable method has been developed related the technological aspect of the environmental assessment of land use changes caused by climate change. We have prepared an eco-balance (environmental inventory) to the environmental effects classification in life-cycle approach in connection with the typical agricultural / forest and tree utilization technologies. The use of balances and environmental classification makes possible to compare land-use technologies and their environmental effects per common functional unit. In order to test our environmental analysis model, we carried out surveys in sample of forest stands. We set up an eco-balance of the working systems of intermediate cutting and final harvest in the stands of beech, oak, spruce, acacia, poplar and short rotation energy plantations (willow, poplar). We set up the life-cycle plan of the surveyed working systems by using the GaBi 6.0 Professional software and carried out midpoint and endpoint impact assessment. Out of the results, we applied the values of CML 2001 - Global Warming Potential (GWP 100 years) [kg CO2-Equiv.] and Eco-Indicator 99 - Human health, Climate Change [DALY]. On the basis of the values we set up a ranking of technology. By this, we received the environmental impact classification of the technologies based on carbon footprint. The working systems had the greatest impact on global warming (GWP 100 years) throughout their whole life cycle. This is explained by the amount of carbon dioxide releasing to the atmosphere resulting from the fuel of the technologies. Abiotic depletion (ADP foss) and marine aquatic ecotoxicity (MAETP) emerged also as significant impact categories. These impact categories can be explained by the share of input of fuel and lube. On the basis of the most significant environmental impact category (carbon footprint), we perform the relative life cycle contribution and ranking of each technologies. The technological life cycle stages examined

  6. Solar thermal technologies - Potential benefits to U.S. utilities and industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, K. L.; Gates, W. R.

    1983-01-01

    Solar energy systems were investigated which complement nuclear and coal technologies as a means of reducing the U.S. dependence on imported petroleum. Solar Thermal Energy Systems (STES) represents an important category of solar energy technologies. STES can be utilized in a broad range of applications servicing a variety of economic sectors, and they can be deployed in both near-term and long-term markets. The net present value of the energy cost savings attributable to electric utility and IPH applications of STES were estimated for a variety of future energy cost scenarios and levels of R&D success. This analysis indicated that the expected net benefits of developing an STES option are significantly greater than the expected costs of completing the required R&D. In addition, transportable fuels and chemical feedstocks represent a substantial future potential market for STES. Due to the basic nature of this R&D activity, however, it is currently impossible to estimate the value of STES in these markets. Despite this fact, private investment in STES R&D is not anticipated due to the high level of uncertainty characterizing the expected payoffs. Previously announced in STAR as N83-10547

  7. Solar thermal technologies - Potential benefits to U.S. utilities and industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, K. L.; Gates, W. R.

    1983-08-01

    Solar energy systems were investigated which complement nuclear and coal technologies as a means of reducing the U.S. dependence on imported petroleum. Solar Thermal Energy Systems (STES) represents an important category of solar energy technologies. STES can be utilized in a broad range of applications servicing a variety of economic sectors, and they can be deployed in both near-term and long-term markets. The net present value of the energy cost savings attributable to electric utility and IPH applications of STES were estimated for a variety of future energy cost scenarios and levels of R&D success. This analysis indicated that the expected net benefits of developing an STES option are significantly greater than the expected costs of completing the required R&D. In addition, transportable fuels and chemical feedstocks represent a substantial future potential market for STES. Due to the basic nature of this R&D activity, however, it is currently impossible to estimate the value of STES in these markets. Despite this fact, private investment in STES R&D is not anticipated due to the high level of uncertainty characterizing the expected payoffs. Previously announced in STAR as N83-10547

  8. Core modifications of the Texas A and M Nuclear Science Center reactor for improved commercial utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Ken L.; Randall, John D.; Feltz, Donald E.; Taft, Joseph P.

    1980-01-01

    As a result of increasing demand for reactor services by industrial organizations as well as university experimenters, the Texas A and M Nuclear Science Center recently modified its core design with the objective of providing more irradiation positions with a higher neutron flux. This was accomplished by loading a core comprised of 87 FLIP fuel elements with peripheral bundle locations left vacant on three of the four core faces. Minor problems were encountered in predicting and achieving sufficient core excess reactivity as well as in maintaining adequate linearity of monitoring instruments positioned near the notches. The final core design was successful in providing three core slots with effective neutron fluxes of approximately 2.5 x 10 13 , an increase by a factor of 3-4 over previously available irradiation positions on the core face. Other reflector and face irradiation facilities showed slight increases as well. Appropriate sample holders have been designed for the new positions and initial customer reaction has been positive. Higher sample specific activities result in lower cost per curie of activity for commercial users, and the increased capability allows academic researchers to pursue projects previously impractical due to insufficient flux. (author)

  9. The role of exergy in increasing utilization of green energy and technologies. Paper no. IGEC-1-Keynote-Rosen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    The use of exergy is described as a measure for identifying and explaining the benefits of green energy and technologies, so the benefits can be clearly understood and appreciated by experts and non-experts alike, and the utilization of green energy and technologies can be increased. Exergy can be used to assess and improve energy systems, and can help better understand the benefits of utilizing green energy by providing more useful and meaningful information than energy provides. Exergy clearly identifies efficiency improvements and reductions in thermodynamic losses attributable to green technologies. Exergy can also identify better than energy the environmental benefits and economics of energy technologies. Exergy should be utilized to engineers and scientists, as well as decision and policy makers, involved in green energy and technologies. (author)

  10. Installation of a technological center for highly efficient optical gratings at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loechel, B; Erko, A; Lemke, St; Senf, F; Nelles, B; Schmidt, M

    2013-01-01

    In 2009 Carl Zeiss stopped the manufacture of precision gratings. All users of their gratings were very concerned about this decision, since they all need precision gratings for their experiments. One of the institutes of the HZB, the Institute for Nanometer Optics and Technology (INT), has extensive experience in micro fabrication (technology group). In spring 2010, HZB decided to take over the old C. Zeiss grating fabrication and build up its own technology center for grating fabrication. In March 2010, the INT applied to the Senate of Berlin for funding for our project from the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). In October 2010, HZB received an approval of its application from the Senate of Berlin (contract No 20072013 2/43). Using this governmental support, HZB will install all necessary equipment and processes to fulfill these demands until end of 2013.

  11. Digital Technologies Supporting Person-Centered Integrated Care – A Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Øvretveit

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Shared electronic health and social care records in some service systems are already showing some of the benefits of digital technology and digital data for integrating health and social care. These records are one example of the beginning “digitalisation” of services that gives a glimpse of the potential of digital technology and systems for building coordinated and individualized integrated care. Yet the promise has been greater than the benefits, and progress has been slow compared to other industries. This paper describes for non-technical readers how information technology was used to support integrated care schemes in six EU services, and suggests practical ways forward to use the new opportunities to build person-centered integrated care.

  12. Digital Divide in the Utilization of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Counsellor Education in Nigerian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyo, Mfon

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated digital divide in the utilization of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in counsellor education in Nigerian universities. It had two research questions and two hypotheses tested at 0.05 level of significance. It adopted a survey design and used ICT Utilization Questionnaire (IUQ) in gathering data from the…

  13. EERC Center for Biomass Utilization 2008-2010. Phases I-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zygarlicke, Christopher J. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Hurley, John P. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Auich, Ted R. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Folkedahl, Bruce C. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Strege, Josua R. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Patel, Nikhil M. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Swanson, Michael L. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Martin, Christopher L [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Olson, Edwin S. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Oster, Benjamin G. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Stanislowski, Joshua J. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Nyberg, Carolyn M. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Wocken, Chad A. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Pansegrau, Paul D. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2015-07-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects nonhydro renewable electric energy increases of 140% and liquid transportation biofuels growing by 32,200 barrels a day between 2012 and 2040 (U.S. Energy Information Administration, 2014). This is the EIA base case scenario, and this outlook could be a low estimate depending on the many assumptions involved in making such projections, not the least of which are climate change and the resultant legislation. The climate change postulate is based on increasing levels of CO2 being introduced into the atmosphere through anthropogenic activity such as fossil fuel combustion for energy use. Renewable energy, and biomass conversion to energy in particular, is a net-zero CO2 emission generator. When biomass is converted to energy, it emits CO2; however, this CO2 is balanced in a cycle where the production of biomass removes CO2 from the atmosphere for growth and then releases it back into the atmosphere to be taken up by new growth of biomass feedstocks for energy. In comparison, fossil fuels are examples of CO2 that has been removed from the atmosphere and sequestered and which, when converted to energy, is a new addition to the atmospheric levels of CO2, which has been linked to climate change. While recent advances in technology used for extracting oil and gas from tight formations have increased the availability of fossil fuels for energy, the end game needs to focus on providing sustainable energy sources for the United States as well as the world. If, in the future, legislation is enacted that places a fee on atmospheric CO2 emissions, this may make the use of biomass for energy more economically attractive, increasing its use. Research that focuses on the future sustainability of energy production is part of the answer to bringing about game-changing technologies that can provide energy in a

  14. Increase in Utilization of Afterhours Medical Imaging: A Study of Three Canadian Academic Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Shivani; Dhalla, Irfan; Lebovic, Gerald; Rogalla, Patrik; Dowdell, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of our study were to assess trends in afterhours medical imaging utilization for emergency department (ED) and inpatient (IP) patient populations from 2006-2013, including analysis by modality and specialty and with adjustment for patient volume. For this retrospective study, we reviewed the number of CT, MRI, and ultrasound studies performed for the ED and IP patients during the afterhours time period (5pm - 8am on weekdays and 24 hours on weekends and statutory holidays) from 2006-2013 at three different Canadian academic hospitals. We used the Jonckheere-Terpstra (JT) test to determine statistical significance of imaging and patient volume trends. A regression model was used to examine whether there was an increasing trend over time in the volume of imaging tests per 1000 patients. For all three sites from 2006-2013 during the afterhours time period: There was a statistically significant increasing trend in total medical imaging volume, which also held true when the volumes were assessed by modality and by specialty. There was a statistically significant increasing trend in ED and IP patient volume. When medical imaging volumes were adjusted for patient volumes, there was a statistically significant increasing trend in imaging being performed per patient. Afterhours medical imaging volumes demonstrated a statistically significant increasing trend at all three sites from 2006-2013 when assessed by total volume, modality, and specialty. During the same time period and at all three sites, the ED and IP patient volumes also demonstrated a statistically significant increasing trend with more medical imaging, however, being performed per patient. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The utilization of fluorescent cholangiography during robotic cholecystectomy at an inner-city academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sidharth; Huang, Raymond; Hui, Shirley; Smith, Michael C; Chung, Paul J; Schwartzman, Alexander; Sugiyama, Gainosuke

    2017-11-27

    In recent years, fluorescent cholangiography using Indocyanine green (ICG) dye has been used to aid identification of structures during robotic cholecystectomy. We sought to compare cholecystectomy with ICG dye versus laparoscopic cholecystectomy at an inner-city academic medical center. Between January 2013 and July 2016, we identified 287 patients of which 191 patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy and 96 patients underwent robotic cholecystectomy with ICG dye. Preoperative risk variables of interest included age, sex, race, body mass index (BMI), and acute cholecystitis. Primary outcome of interest was conversion to open procedures while secondary outcome was length of stay. The two groups were similar in their BMI (31.98 vs. 31.10 kg/m 2 for the laparoscopic and robotic, respectively, p = 0.32). The laparoscopic group had a greater mean age compared to the robotic group (47.77 vs. 43.61 years, p = 0.04). There was no significant difference in sex and emergency surgery between the two groups. Fewer open conversions were found in the robotic than the laparoscopic group [2 (2.1%) vs. 17 (8.9%), p = 0.03]. In multiple logistic regression, robotic cholecystectomy with ICG also showed a lower risk of conversion compared to laparoscopic cholecystectomy, but the difference did not reach statistical significance (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.11-1.65, p = 0.22). ICG fluorescent cholangiography during robotic cholecystectomy may contribute to proper identification of biliary structures and may reduce the rates of open conversion. The preliminary results of fewer open conversions are promising. Further studies with a large randomized prospective controlled study should be taken for further evaluation.

  16. The Clinical and Economic Impact of Generic Locking Plate Utilization at a Level II Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcphillamy, Austin; Gurnea, Taylor P; Moody, Alastair E; Kurnik, Christopher G; Lu, Minggen

    2016-12-01

    In today's climate of cost containment and fiscal responsibility, generic implant alternatives represent an interesting area of untapped resources. As patents have expired on many commonly used trauma implants, generic alternatives have recently become available from a variety of sources. The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical and economic impact of a cost containment program using high quality, generic orthopaedic locking plates. The implants available for study were anatomically precontoured plates for the clavicle, proximal humerus, distal radius, proximal tibia, distal tibia, and distal fibula. Retrospective review. Level II Trauma center. 828 adult patients with operatively managed clavicle, proximal humerus, distal radius, proximal tibia, tibial pilon, and ankle fractures. Operative treatment with conventional or generic implants. The 414 patients treated with generic implants were compared with 414 patients treated with conventional implants. There were no significant differences in age, sex, presence of diabetes, smoking history or fracture type between the generic and conventional groups. No difference in operative time, estimated blood loss or intraoperative complication rate was observed. No increase in postoperative infection rate, hardware failure, hardware loosening, malunion, nonunion or need for hardware removal was noted. Overall, our hospital realized a 56% reduction in implant costs, an average savings of $1197 per case, and a total savings of $458,080 for the study period. Use of generic orthopaedic implants has been successful at our institution, providing equivalent clinical outcomes while significantly reducing implant expenditures. Based on our data, the use of generic implants has the potential to markedly reduce operative costs as long as quality products are used. Therapeutic Level III.

  17. The World Wide Web and Technology Transfer at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Bianco, David J.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) began using the World Wide Web (WWW) in the summer of 1993, becoming the first NASA installation to provide a Center-wide home page. This coincided with a reorganization of LaRC to provide a more concentrated focus on technology transfer to both aerospace and non-aerospace industry. Use of the WWW and NCSA Mosaic not only provides automated information dissemination, but also allows for the implementation, evolution and integration of many technology transfer applications. This paper describes several of these innovative applications, including the on-line presentation of the entire Technology Opportunities Showcase (TOPS), an industrial partnering showcase that exists on the Web long after the actual 3-day event ended. During its first year on the Web, LaRC also developed several WWW-based information repositories. The Langley Technical Report Server (LTRS), a technical paper delivery system with integrated searching and retrieval, has proved to be quite popular. The NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS), an outgrowth of LTRS, provides uniform access to many logically similar, yet physically distributed NASA report servers. WWW is also the foundation of the Langley Software Server (LSS), an experimental software distribution system which will distribute LaRC-developed software with the possible phase-out of NASA's COSMIC program. In addition to the more formal technology distribution projects, WWW has been successful in connecting people with technologies and people with other people. With the completion of the LaRC reorganization, the Technology Applications Group, charged with interfacing with non-aerospace companies, opened for business with a popular home page.

  18. Utilization of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Resources and Job Effectiveness among Library Staff in the University of Calabar and Cross River University of Technology, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntui, Aniebiet Inyang; Inyang, Comfort Linus

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated utilization of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) resources and job effectiveness among library staff in the University of Calabar and Cross River University of Technology, Nigeria. To achieve the purpose of this study, four hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. Ex-post facto research design was adopted…

  19. NASA Technology Utilization House technical support package Summary of results and house description

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The Technology Utilization House (Tech House) was designed and constructed to demonstrate to the building industry and the public the benefits of aerospace technology and other new technology that are presently available or will be in very near future. Use of solar energy, conservation of energy and of water, safety, and security were incorporated in the design of the house. The terms to be incorporated into the house and to assist in the design of the house were evaluated. An architectural engineering team was employed to investigate energy conservation ideas, determine cost effectiveness of new materials and systems, and prepare specifications and drawings for the house. The Tech House was constructed during the spring of 1976. All the systems were monitored to insure proper operation, and data were collected during a one year occupancy. Results obtained during the family live-in period, comments on the acceptance of the various energy-saving systems by the family, and suggestions for improvement of the systems are presented.

  20. Space Technology Demonstrations Using Low Cost, Short-Schedule Airborne and Range Facilities at the Dryden Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John; Kelly, John; Jones, Dan; Lee, James

    2013-01-01

    There is a national effort to expedite advanced space technologies on new space systems for both government and commercial applications. In order to lower risk, these technologies should be demonstrated in a relevant environment before being installed in new space systems. This presentation introduces several low cost, short schedule space technology demonstrations using airborne and range facilities available at the Dryden Flight Research Center.

  1. Decreasing 30-day surgical mortality in a VA Medical Center utilizing the ACS NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuy, SreyRam; Romero, Ramon A L

    2017-07-01

    The Overton Brooks VA Medical Center Surgical Service had a high mortality. In an effort to reduce surgical mortality, we implemented a series of quality improvement interventions, including utilization of the ACS Surgical Risk Calculator to identify high-risk surgical patients for discussion in a multidisciplinary Pre-Operative Consultation Committee. Retrospective study describing the implementation of a risk stratification intervention incorporating the ACS Surgical Risk Calculator Tool and a multidisciplinary Pre-Operative Consultation Committee to target high-risk patients. Measurement of 30 day surgical mortality and risk adjusted Observed to Expected (O/E) mortality ratio. From May 2013 to September 2014, 614 high-risk patients were selected utilizing the ACS Risk Calculator and presented at the Pre-Operative Consultation Committee. Following implementation of this risk stratification intervention, 30-day mortality decreased by 66% from 0.9% to 0.3%, and risk adjusted O/E mortality ratio decreased from 2.5 to 0.8. Among the high risk patients presented, there was no increase in referrals to other facilities. There was a significant increase in cases requiring further preoperative optimization, from 6.3% at the beginning of the study period to 17.5% at the end of the study period. Implementation of a preoperative risk stratification intervention utilizing the ACS Surgical Risk Calculator along with a multidisciplinary Pre-Operative Consultation Committee can be successfully accomplished, with a significant decrease in 30-day surgical mortality. This is the first published report of utilization of the ACS Risk calculator as part of a systematic quality improvement tool to decrease surgical mortality. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. NASA Space Engineering Research Center for utilization of local planetary resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramohalli, Kumar; Lewis, John S.

    1991-01-01

    Because of a change in the NASA funding cycle, the present reporting period covers only the six months from March to September 1991. Nevertheless, remarkable progress was made in a number of areas, some of the most noteworthy of which are: (1) Engineering operation of a breadboard CO2 yields O2 demonstration plant that produced over 10 grams of oxygen per day during several runs of over 100 hours each with a single electrolytic cell. Complete automation of controls, monitoring of various inputs/outputs and critical internal variables, diagnostics, and emergency shutdown in an orderly manner were also included. Moreover, 4-cell and 16-cell units, capable of much higher rates of production, were assembled and tested. (2) Demonstration of a 200 percent increase in the carbothermal reduction of ilmenite through vapor deposition of carbon layers on particles of that material. (3) Demonstration of the deposition of strong iron films from carbonyl chemical vapor deposition, establishing the crucial role of additive gases in governing the process. (4) Discovery of an apparent 800 percent increase in the conversion rates of a modified ilmenite simulant in a plasma-augmented reactor, including direct enhancement by solar radiation absorption. (5) Proof that test specimens of lunar soil with small amounts of metallic additives, recrystallized at moderate temperatures, exhibit an improvement of several orders of magnitude in ductility/tensile strength. (6) Experiments establishing the feasibility of producing silicon-based polymers from indigenous lunar materials. (7) Application of CCD technology to the production of maps of TiO2 abundance, defining primary ilmenite deposits, on the disk of the full moon. (8) Attainment of a discovery rate of approximately 3 new near-Earth asteroids per month by Spacewatch, more than doubling the previous global rate. (9) Coordination of industry and university magma electrolysis investigations in a workshop designed to define remaining

  3. Development of the advanced load leveling air conditioning technology utilizing unutilized energy; Miriyo energy kodo katsuyo fuka heijunka reidanbo gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    A heat supply plant utilizing unutilized energy is called for environment-friendly efficient operation including stable heat supply, energy saving, CO{sub 2} emission control and power load leveling. Toshiba developed the optimum operation system for environment-friendly efficient operation considering heat demand prediction and characteristics of a heat supply plant. The demonstration test result showed that this system is effective to reduce power cost of a heat supply plant by nearly 15%. This system was promoted by joint research of NEDO, Heat Pump and Thermal Storage Technology Center of Japan and Toshiba supported by Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, MITI. (translated by NEDO)

  4. A Virtual Geophysical Network: Using Industry Standard Technology to Link Geographically Distributed Sensors and Data Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, T. K.; Benson, R. B.; Crotwell, H. P.

    2003-12-01

    The IRIS Data Management System has long supported distributed data centers as a method of providing scientific researchers access to data from seismological networks around the world. For nearly a decade, the NetDC system used email as the method through which users could access data centers located around the globe in a seamless fashion. More recently the IRIS DMC has partnered with the University of South Carolina to develop a new method through which a virtual data center can be created. The Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) technology is an industry standard distributed computing architecture. Traditionally used by major corporations, IRIS has developed a Data Handling Interface (DHI) system that is capable of connecting services at participating data centers (servers) to applications running on end-users computing platforms (clients). For seismology we have identified three services. 1) A network service that provides information about geophysical observatories around the world such as where the sensors exist, what types of information are recorded on the sensors, and calibration information that allows proper use of the data, 2) an event service that allows applications to access information about earthquakes and seismological events and 3) waveform services that allow users to gain access to seismograms or time series data from other geophysical sensors. Seismological Data Centers operate the servers thereby allowing a variety of client applications to directly access the information at these data centers. Currently IRIS, the U. of South Carolina, UC Berkeley, and a European Data Center (ORFEUS) have been involved in the DHI project. This talk will highlight some of the DHI enabled clients that allow geophysical information to be directly transferred to the clients. Since the data center servers appear with the same interface specification (Interface Definition Language) a client that can talk to one DHI server can talk to any DHI enabled

  5. Implementing Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) with State of the Art PT&I Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Sean; Sasser, Chase

    2016-01-01

    Building on the work that was started two decades ago, Jacobs Space Operations Group has utilized state of the art PTI technologies to assess the current condition of the assets they manage under the Test and Operations Support Contract (TOSC). Specifically, the Asset Management department leveraged the benefits of ultrasound technology to quantify a motor issue in the Liquid Oxygen Storage Area, and troubleshoot the sources prior to loading the tank to perform Verification and Validation (VV) activities. This technology was efficient, easy to implement, and provided system engineers with data on a possible source of the problem. In situations where legacy motors are exhibiting unexpected noises, it may seem easier to remove and refurbish the motor and replace the bearings because that solution resolves most of the common causes of the noise. However, that solution would have involved additional spending and may not have solved issues stemming from the foundation, if those existed. By utilizing the ultrasound equipment provided by UE Systems, the sound profiles allowed Jacobs TOSC team to determine that the issue resembled a faulty bearing. After replacing the bearing, the unexpected noise ceased.

  6. Saline agriculture: A technology for economic utilization and improvement of saline environments (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, Z.; Malik, K.A.; Khurshid, S.J.; Awan, A.R.; Akram, M.; Hashmi, Z.; Ali, Y.; Gulnaz, A.; Hussain, M.; Hussain, F.

    2005-01-01

    The salinity problem is one of the severe constraints for agriculture in Pakistan. In a socio-economic and salinity and drainage survey over an area of about 25000 acres of salt-affected land recently, crop production is found to be very low. Livestock is underfed and malnourished. Pakistan has spent and allocated over one billion US dollars on Salinity Control and Reclamation Projects (SCARP), of course, with dubious results. Over the years, a Saline Agriculture Technology has been developed as a cheap alternative at NIAB for comfortably living with salinity and to profitably utilize saline land rather than its reclamation. The soil improvement is a fringe benefit in this approach. The Saline Agriculture Technology has been tested at laboratory level, at field stations and at farms of some progressive farmers. Now we are sharing this technology with farming communities through a 'Saline Agriculture Farmer Participatory Development Project in Pakistan', with assistance from the National Rural Support Programme. The new project has been launched simultaneously in all four provinces of Pakistan on 25000 acres of salt-affected land. Under this project seeds of salt tolerant crop varieties wheat, cotton, rice, castor, brassica and barley and saplings of trees/shrubs, e.g. Acacia ampliceps, A. nilotica, Casuarina glauca, ber, jaman, etc selected for development work in various institutions of Pakistan are being provided to farmers. Know-how on new irrigation techniques like bed-and-corrugation and bed-and-furrow, agronomic practices like laser land leveling, planting on beds and in auger holes and soil/water amendment practices (use of gypsum and mineral acids) are being shared with farmers. These interventions are quite efficient, save water up to 40% and enable farmers to utilize bad quality water. In general, farmers are being familiarized with prevalent animal diseases, nutritional problems and prophylactic techniques. They are being helped in developing Saline

  7. The Clinical Utility of a Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Microarray in Patients With Epilepsy at a Tertiary Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabik, Sarah A; Standridge, Shannon M; Greiner, Hansel M; Neilson, Derek E; Pilipenko, Valentina V; Zimmerman, Sarah L; Connor, Jessica A; Spaeth, Christine G

    2015-11-01

    Microarray testing has revolutionized clinical cytogenetics, as it provides a significantly higher resolution and greater clinical yield than karyotype analysis. This study assessed the clinical utility of single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray in patients with epilepsy. Study subjects were patients between the ages of birth to 23 years who were diagnosed with epilepsy and had a microarray performed at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. Statistical analysis explored the association of microarray results and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), seizure type, and structural malformations. Approximately 17.7% (26/147) of participants had an abnormal microarray as defined by laboratory guidelines. There were no differences in frequency of abnormal brain MRI or seizure type between the abnormal and normal microarray groups. There was a higher prevalence of musculoskeletal malformations (P microarrays. Clinicians should consider microarray analysis in individuals who have epilepsy, especially in combination with musculoskeletal malformation or cardiovascular malformation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Catalytic Technologies for Biodiesel Fuel Production and Utilization of Glycerol: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuaki Maeda

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available More than 10 million tons of biodiesel fuel (BDF have been produced in the world from the transesterification of vegetable oil with methanol by using acid catalysts (sulfuric acid, H2SO4, alkaline catalysts (sodium hydroxide, NaOH or potassium hydroxide, KOH, solid catalysts and enzymes. Unfortunately, the price of BDF is still more expensive than that of petro diesel fuel due to the lack of a suitable raw material oil. Here, we review the best selection of BDF production systems including raw materials, catalysts and production technologies. In addition, glycerol formed as a by-product needs to be converted to useful chemicals to reduce the amount of glycerol waste. With this in mind, we have also reviewed some recent studies on the utilization of glycerol.

  9. [Utilization of technological resources within the framework of operation of a Mobile Mental Health Unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoni, D; Sarantidis, D; Katsadoros, K

    2016-01-01

    Telepsychiatry was introduced in the early 1950's for the provision of mental health services from a distance. In 1990 the progress made in telecommunications technologies caused a significant expansion in telepsychiatry services. It can refer to store and forward technologies, interactive technologies, remote monitoring technologies and it is applied to contribute to the lift of restrictions placed on providing mental health services. Restrictions may exist due to geographic isolation, lack of specialized services, high cost of moving patients etc. The positive cost-benefit analysis and the reliability of diagnosis and efficacy of interventions through telepsychiatry have been documented in various research papers referring to a wide range of contexts such as prisons, remote areas, general and psychiatric hospitals. Since 2003 the Mobile Mental Health Unit of South- Eastern (SE) Cyclades has been using videoconferencing in order to provide mental health services in thirteen islands. This area shares many of the characteristics of remote areas such as residential dispersion, lack of mental health services and frequent lack of access to services in urban centers. Telepsychiatry in conjunction with physical presence of professionals was launched by the Mobile Mental Health Unit in order to provide assistance to the evaluation of patients, to therapeutic interventions, to medicine prescription, to crisis intervention, to psychoeducation of patients and their families and to the implementation of educational and administrative activities . The use of existing technology in combination with the development of human resources has enabled continuity of care, crisis intervention and avoidance of involuntary hospitalization for a significant number of persons. Moreover, it has improved cooperation and coordination between the interdisciplinary team and local authorities and agencies. When professionals located in different parts are collaborating via telepsychiatry it is

  10. Assisted Reproductive Technology in Iran: The First National Report on Centers, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrandokht Abedini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the worldwide increase in infertility, it is both necessary and important to have assisted reproductive technology (ART registries. In Iran, donation and surrogacy programs are approved by decrees from religious scholars. ART has been used since 1984 in Iran and the first Iranian infant conceived by gamete intra-fallopian transfer (GIFT was born in 1989. This report, however, is the first national report on Iranian ART centers. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study, conducted under the supervision of the Iranian Ministry of Health, presented a summary of the numbers and percentages of centers that provided infertility services in Iran, as well as the status of ART in Iran during 2011. Results: A total of 52 centers reported treatment cycles and performed approximately 29000 intrauterine insemination (IUI, in addition to 35000 in vitro fertilization (IVF and intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI cycles. Conclusion: Iran has considerable potential to provide IVF services for both Iranians as well as other nationalities throughout the region. This proves the need for a national center that will implement a registry system.

  11. Utilization of information technology in eastern North Carolina physician practices: determining the existence of a digital divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, David A; Layman, Elizabeth J

    2008-02-13

    The United States Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has emphasized the importance of utilizing health information technologies, thus making the availability of electronic resources critical for physicians across the country. However, few empirical assessments exist regarding the current status of computerization and utilization of electronic resources in physician offices and physicians' perceptions of the advantages and disadvantages of computerization. Through a survey of physicians' utilization and perceptions of health information technology, this study found that a "digital divide" existed for eastern North Carolina physicians in smaller physician practices. The physicians in smaller practices were less likely to utilize or be interested in utilizing electronic health records, word processing applications, and the Internet.

  12. Recent advances in the utilization and the irradiation technology of the refurbished BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekeyser, J.; Benoit, P.; Decloedt, C.; Pouleur, Y.; Verwimp, A.; Weber, M.; Vankeerberghen, M.; Ponsard, B.

    1999-01-01

    Operation and utilization of the materials testing reactor BR2 at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK·CEN) has since its start in 1963 always followed closely the needs and developments of nuclear technology. In particular, a multitude of irradiation experiments have been carried out for most types of nuclear power reactors, existing or under design. Since the early 1990s and increased focus was directed towards more specific irradiation testing needs for light water reactor fuels and materials, although other areas of utilization continued as well (e.g. fusion reactor materials, safety research, ...), including also the growing activities of radioisotope production and silicon doping. An important milestone was the decision in 1994 to implement a comprehensive refurbishment programme for the BR2 reactor and plant installations. The scope of this programme comprised very substantial studies and hardware interventions, which have been completed in early 1997 within planning and budget. Directly connected to this strategic decision for reactor refurbishment was the reinforcement of our efforts to requalify and upgrade the existing irradiation facilities and to develop advanced devices in BR2 to support emerging programs in the following fields: - LWR pressure vessel steel, - LWR irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), - reliability and safety of high-burnup LWR fuel, - fusion reactor materials and blanket components, - fast neutron reactor fuels and actinide burning, - extension and diversification of radioisotope production. The paper highlights these advances in the areas of BR2 utilisation and the ongoing development activities for the required new generation of irradiations devices. (author)

  13. Research on technology utilizing data freeway for base nuclear power materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Mitsutane; Kurihara, Yutaka; Noda, Tetsuji; Shiraishi, Haruki; Kitajima, Masahiro; Nagakawa, Josei; Yamamoto, Norikazu

    1997-01-01

    In order to carry out the selection of the nuclear power materials which are used in radiation, from high temperature to very low temperature, and in corrosive environment, and the development of the materials effectively, the construction of huge material data base is indispensable. The development of the distributed type material data base called 'freeway' is advanced jointly by National Research Institute for Metals, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation and Japan Science and Technology Corporation. It has been aimed at that the results obtained in each research institute are made into a data base by that institute, and those data bases can be utilized mutually through network. In fiscal year 1996, the transfer to the system, by which the function showing the contents of system data and the function of data retrieval can be utilized from internet, was begun jointly. The present state of the data freeway, the operation environment of World Wide Web, and the trial making of the computation program for forecasting the change of the chemical composition of materials by neutron irradiation are reported. (K.I.)

  14. [Technology: training centers--a new method for learning surgery in visceral surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troidl, H

    1996-01-01

    The importance of training centers can be best described after first answering a few questions like: 1. What kind of surgery will we deal with in the future? 2. What kind of surgeon do we need for this surgery, if it is basically different? 3. How will this surgeon have to be educated/trained for this different surgery? Although I am aware of the fact, that statements about future prospects are usually doomed to fail, I maintain that endoscopic surgery will be an essential part of general surgery. If this is so, surgery will be dominated by extremely complicated technology, new techniques and new instruments. It will be a "different" surgery. It will offer more comfort at the same safety. The surgeon of the future will still need a certain personality; he will still need intuition and creativity. To survive in our society, he will have to be an organiser and even a businessman. Additionally, something new has to be added: he will have to understand modern, complicated technology and will have to use totally different instruments for curing surgical illness. This makes it clear that we will need a different education/training and may be even a different selection of surgeons. We should learn from other professions sharing common interests with surgery, for example, sports where the common interest is achieving most complicated motions and necessarily highly differentiated coordination. Common interest with airline pilots is the target of achieving absolute security. They have a highly differentiated selection and training concept. Training centers may be-under certain prerequisites-a true alternative for this necessary form of training. They must have a concept, i.e. contents and aims have to be defined, structured and oriented on the requirements of surgery for the patient. Responsibility for the concept, performance and control can only be in the hands of Surgical Societies and Universities. These prerequisites correspond most likely to training centers being

  15. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1998-01-12

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) test block with the Carbon Injection System. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future project work is identified.

  16. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Newly Generated Liquid Waste Demonstration Project Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, A.K.

    2000-02-01

    A research, development, and demonstration project for the grouting of newly generated liquid waste (NGLW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center is considered feasible. NGLW is expected from process equipment waste, decontamination waste, analytical laboratory waste, fuel storage basin waste water, and high-level liquid waste evaporator condensate. The potential grouted waste would be classed as mixed low-level waste, stabilized and immobilized to meet RCRA LDR disposal in a grouting process in the CPP-604 facility, and then transported to the state.

  17. NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) Advanced Technology AT5 Virtualized Infiniband Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John H.; Bledsoe, Benjamin C.; Wagner, Mark; Shakshober, John; Fromkin, Russ

    2013-01-01

    The NCCS is part of the Computational and Information Sciences and Technology Office (CISTO) of Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Sciences and Exploration Directorate. The NCCS's mission is to enable scientists to increase their understanding of the Earth, the solar system, and the universe by supplying state-of-the-art high performance computing (HPC) solutions. To accomplish this mission, the NCCS (https://www.nccs.nasa.gov) provides high performance compute engines, mass storage, and network solutions to meet the specialized needs of the Earth and space science user communities

  18. The Use of Assessment Center Technology for the Prevention and Reduction of Professional Burnout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stalnova I.A.,

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dynamism of professional activity, increasing workload and working time shortage, high social responsibility for results and other factors increase the probability of formation of burnout in government employees. This actualizes the search for new forms and methods of professional qualification of government employees based on an assessment of their psychological qualities. We discuss the problem of professional and personal burnout in Rosreestr employees, reveal the symptoms of this syndrome. As a tool for preventing and reducing the negative impact of professional deformation in Rosreestr workers, we propose the use of assessment center technology successfully tested in the international practice and requiring adaptation to Russian realities.

  19. Assessing consumer benefits of selected gas appliance technology center tasks. Topical report, April-December 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.R.; Bournakis, A.D.; Worek, W.M.; Kalensky, D.C.; Dombrowski, L.P.

    1992-12-01

    The Gas Appliance Technology Center (GATC) was created in 1983 to assist the gas industry in bringing about a new generation of reasonably priced, advanced gas appliances. The objective of the report is to evaluate consumer benefits of sixteen selected GATC tasks for the time period between 1983 and 1990. Tasks were selected for review based upon their degree of industry impact and how well they represented activities in the four targeted research areas of Space Conditioning, Commercial Appliances, Residential Appliances, and Codes and Standards

  20. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Newly Generated Liquid Waste Demonstration Project Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    A research, development, and demonstration project for the grouting of newly generated liquid waste (NGLW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center is considered feasible. NGLW is expected from process equipment waste, decontamination waste, analytical laboratory waste, fuel storage basin waste water, and high-level liquid waste evaporator condensate. The potential grouted waste would be classed as mixed low-level waste, stabilized and immobilized to meet RCRA LDR disposal in a grouting process in the CPP-604 facility, and then transported to the state

  1. Patterns of Utilization of Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Outcomes in Black Women After Breast Conservation at a Large Multidisciplinary Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards-Bennett, Sophia M.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; McCormick, Beryl; Zhang, Zhigang; Azu, Michelle; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Brown, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Population-based studies have reported that as many of 35% of black women do not undergo radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservation surgery (BCS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether this trend persisted at a large multidisciplinary cancer center, and to identify the factors that predict for noncompliance with RT and determine the outcomes for this subset of patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2007, 83 black women underwent BCS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and were therefore eligible for the present study. Of the 83 women, 38 (46%) had Stage I, 38 (46%) Stage II, and 7 (8%) Stage III disease. Of the study cohort, 31 (37%) had triple hormone receptor-negative tumors. RT was recommended for 81 (98%) of the 83 patients (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: Of the 81 women, 12 (15%) did not receive the recommended adjuvant breast RT. Nonreceipt of chemotherapy (p = .003) and older age (p = .009) were associated with nonreceipt of RT. With a median follow-up of 70 months, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 99% (actuarial 5-year rate, 97%), 96% (actuarial 5-year rate, 93%), 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 92%), 92% (actuarial 5-year rate, 89%), and 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 91%), respectively. Conclusion: We found a greater rate of utilization adjuvant breast RT (85%) among black women after BCS than has been reported in recent studies, indicating that excellent outcomes are attainable for black women after BCS when care is administered in a multidisciplinary cancer center.

  2. Thermal Energy for Lunar In Situ Resource Utilization: Technical Challenges and Technology Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Pierce E. C.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Heller, Richard S.; Gustafson, Robert; Stern, Ted; Nakamura, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen production from lunar raw materials is critical for sustaining a manned lunar base but is very power intensive. Solar concentrators are a well-developed technology for harnessing the Sun s energy to heat regolith to high temperatures (over 1375 K). The high temperature and potential material incompatibilities present numerous technical challenges. This study compares and contrasts different solar concentrator designs that have been developed, such as Cassegrains, offset parabolas, compound parabolic concentrators, and secondary concentrators. Differences between concentrators made from lenses and mirrors, and between rigid and flexible concentrators are also discussed. Possible substrate elements for a rigid mirror concentrator are selected and then compared, using the following (target) criteria: (low) coefficient of thermal expansion, (high) modulus of elasticity, and (low) density. Several potential lunar locations for solar concentrators are compared; environmental and processing-related challenges related to dust and optical surfaces are addressed. This brief technology survey examines various sources of thermal energy that can be utilized for materials processing on the lunar surface. These include heat from nuclear or electric sources and solar concentrators. Options for collecting and transporting thermal energy to processing reactors for each source are examined. Overall system requirements for each thermal source are compared and system limitations, such as maximum achievable temperature are discussed.

  3. Utilization of Virtual Reality Content in Grade 6 Social Studies Using Affordable Virtual Reality Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Steven O. Zantua

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Reality is fast becoming a breakthrough in education technology and is headed towards a path where learning has become immersive. Virtual reality (VR offers both learners and educators a great opportunity to bridge gaps in the pedagogical sense. With the emergence of the Google Cardboard (GCB platform, a low-cost, virtual reality gadget comes a wide range of opportunities for educators and institutions to bring about an immersive type of learning environment for the 21st-century learner. Using Grade 6 Middle school students, this research explores the learning outcomes and student reactions using the GCB and Google Expeditions application. The study showed no significant difference in pre-test scores of the control and experimental group. There is however, a significant difference in the scores of the experimental group compared to the control group after post-test. Utilizing t-test in comparing the two groups, it was found that the mean of the post-test scores for Group A (experimental was significantly higher than Group B(control. The result of the independent samples t-test was significant, t(18 = 2.33, p = .032, suggesting that the mean of posttest score was significantly different between Groups A and B. This difference in score performance gives light to how VR can be used as a tool that enhances the learning experience. By using VR technology that is low cost and effective, more institutions will be able to help students learn better.

  4. Modeling and Analysis Compute Environments, Utilizing Virtualization Technology in the Climate and Earth Systems Science domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, A.; Nemani, R. R.; Wang, W.; Votava, P.; Hashimoto, H.

    2010-12-01

    Given the increasing complexity of climate modeling and analysis tools, it is often difficult and expensive to build or recreate an exact replica of the software compute environment used in past experiments. With the recent development of new technologies for hardware virtualization, an opportunity exists to create full modeling, analysis and compute environments that are “archiveable”, transferable and may be easily shared amongst a scientific community or presented to a bureaucratic body if the need arises. By encapsulating and entire modeling and analysis environment in a virtual machine image, others may quickly gain access to the fully built system used in past experiments, potentially easing the task and reducing the costs of reproducing and verify past results produced by other researchers. Moreover, these virtual machine images may be used as a pedagogical tool for others that are interested in performing an academic exercise but don't yet possess the broad expertise required. We built two virtual machine images, one with the Community Earth System Model (CESM) and one with Weather Research Forecast Model (WRF), then ran several small experiments to assess the feasibility, performance overheads costs, reusability, and transferability. We present a list of the pros and cons as well as lessoned learned from utilizing virtualization technology in the climate and earth systems modeling domain.

  5. A wireless recording system that utilizes Bluetooth technology to transmit neural activity in freely moving animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Robert E; Collins, Vernell; Deadwyler, Sam A

    2009-09-15

    A new wireless transceiver is described for recording individual neuron firing from behaving rats utilizing Bluetooth transmission technology and a processor onboard for discrimination of neuronal waveforms and associated time stamps. This universal brain activity transmitter (UBAT) is attached to rodents via a backpack and amplifier headstage and can transmit 16 channels of captured neuronal firing data via a Bluetooth transceiver chip over very large and unconstrained distances. The onboard microprocessor of the UBAT allows flexible online control over waveform isolation criteria via transceiver instruction and the two-way communication capacity allows for closed-loop applications between neural events and behavioral or physiological processes which can be modified by transceiver instructions. A detailed description of the multiplexer processing of channel data as well as examples of neuronal recordings in different behavioral testing contexts is provided to demonstrate the capacity for robust transmission within almost any laboratory environment. A major advantage of the UBAT is the long transmission range and lack of object-based line of sight interference afforded by Bluetooth technology, allowing flexible recording capabilities within multiple experimental paradigms without interruption. Continuous recordings over very large distance separations from the monitor station are demonstrated providing experimenters with recording advantages not previously available with other telemetry devices.

  6. Space Solar Power Satellite Technology Development at the Glenn Research Center: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudenhoefer, James E.; George, Patrick J.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). is participating in the Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology program (SERT) for the development of a solar power satellite concept. The aim of the program is to provide electrical power to Earth by converting the Sun's energy and beaming it to the surface. This paper will give an overall view of the technologies being pursued at GRC including thin film photovoltaics, solar dynamic power systems, space environmental effects, power management and distribution, and electric propulsion. The developmental path not only provides solutions to gigawatt sized space power systems for the future, but provides synergistic opportunities for contemporary space power architectures. More details of Space Solar Power can be found by reading the references sited in this paper and by connecting to the web site http://moonbase.msfc.nasa.gov/ and accessing the "Space Solar Power" section "Public Access" area.

  7. Energy Center Structure Optimization by using Smart Technologies in Process Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilkina, Svetlana V.

    2018-03-01

    The article deals with practical application of fuzzy logic methods in process control systems. A control object - agroindustrial greenhouse complex, which includes its own energy center - is considered. The paper analyzes object power supply options taking into account connection to external power grids and/or installation of own power generating equipment with various layouts. The main problem of a greenhouse facility basic process is extremely uneven power consumption, which forces to purchase redundant generating equipment idling most of the time, which quite negatively affects project profitability. Energy center structure optimization is largely based on solving the object process control system construction issue. To cut investor’s costs it was proposed to optimize power consumption by building an energy-saving production control system based on a fuzzy logic controller. The developed algorithm of automated process control system functioning ensured more even electric and thermal energy consumption, allowed to propose construction of the object energy center with a smaller number of units due to their more even utilization. As a result, it is shown how practical use of microclimate parameters fuzzy control system during object functioning leads to optimization of agroindustrial complex energy facility structure, which contributes to a significant reduction in object construction and operation costs.

  8. Advanced Reactor Technology Options for Utilization and Transmutation of Actinides in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-09-01

    Renewed interest in the potential of nuclear energy to contribute to a sustainable worldwide energy mix is strengthening the IAEA's statutory role in fostering the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, in particular the need for effective exchanges of information and collaborative research and technology development among Member States on advanced nuclear power technologies (Articles III-A.1 and III-A.3). The major challenges facing the long term development of nuclear energy as a part of the world's energy mix are improvement of the economic competitiveness, meeting increasingly stringent safety requirements, adhering to the criteria of sustainable development, and public acceptability. The concern linked to the long life of many of the radioisotopes generated from fission has led to increased R and D efforts to develop a technology aimed at reducing the amount of long lived radioactive waste through transmutation in fission reactors or accelerator driven hybrids. In recent years, in various countries and at an international level, more and more studies have been carried out on advanced and innovative waste management strategies (i.e. actinide separation and elimination). Within the framework of the Project on Technology Advances in Fast Reactors and Accelerator Driven Systems (http://www.iaea.org/inisnkm/nkm/aws/fnss/index.html), the IAEA initiated a number of activities on utilization of plutonium and transmutation of long lived radioactive waste, accelerator driven systems, thorium fuel options, innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles, non-conventional nuclear energy systems, and fusion/fission hybrids. These activities are implemented under the guidance and with the support of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Department's Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR). This publication compiles the analyses and findings of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Studies of Advanced Reactor Technology Options for Effective Incineration of Radioactive Waste (2002

  9. NASA In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Technology and Development Project Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Gerald B.; Lason, William E.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.; Mclemore, Carole; Johnson, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Since the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) was released in 2004, NASA, in conjunction with international space agencies, industry, and academia, has continued to define and refine plans for sustained and affordable robotic and human exploration of the Moon and beyond. With the goal of establishing a lunar Outpost on the Moon to extend human presence, pursue scientific activities, use the Moon to prepare for future human missions to Mars, and expand Earth s economic sphere, a change in how space exploration is performed is required. One area that opens up the possibility for the first time of breaking our reliance on Earth supplied consumables and learn to live off the land is In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). ISRU, which involves the extraction and processing of space resources into useful products, can have a substantial impact on mission and architecture concepts. In particular, the ability to make propellants, life support consumables, and fuel cell reagents can significantly reduce the cost, mass, and risk of sustained human activities beyond Earth. However, ISRU is an unproven capability for human lunar exploration and can not be put in the critical path of lunar Outpost success until it has been proven. Therefore, ISRU development and deployment needs to take incremental steps toward the desired end state. To ensure ISRU capabilities are available for pre-Outpost and Outpost deployment by 2020, and mission and architecture planners are confident that ISRU can meet initial and long term mission requirements, the ISRU Project is developing technologies and systems in three critical areas: (1) Regolith Excavation, Handling and Material Transportation; (2) Oxygen Extraction from Regolith; and (3) Volatile Extraction and Resource Prospecting, and in four development stages: (I) Demonstrate feasibility; (II) Evolve system w/ improved technologies; (III) Develop one or more systems to TRL 6 before start of flight development; and (IV) Flight development for

  10. The National Space Science and Technology Center's Education and Public Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, G. N.; Denson, R. L.

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the National Space Science and Technology Center's (NSSTC) Education and Public Outreach program (EPO) is to support K-20 education by coalescing academic, government, and business constituents awareness, implementing best business/education practices, and providing stewardship over funds and programs that promote a symbiotic relationship among these entities, specifically in the area of K-20 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education. NSSTC EPO Program's long-term objective is to showcase its effective community-based integrated stakeholder model in support of STEM education and to expand its influence across the Southeast region for scaling ultimately across the United States. The Education and Public Outreach program (EPO) is coordinated by a supporting arm of the NSSTC Administrative Council called the EPO Council (EPOC). The EPOC is funded through federal, state, and private grants, donations, and in-kind contributions. It is comprised of representatives of NSSTC Research Centers, both educators and scientists from the Alabama Space Science and Technology Alliance (SSTA) member institutions, the Alabama Space Grant Consortium and the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Education Office. Through its affiliation with MSFC and the SSTA - a consortium of Alabama's research universities that comprise the NSSTC, EPO fosters the education and development of the next generation of Alabama scientists and engineers by coordinating activities at the K-20 level in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Education, the Alabama Commission on Higher Education, and Alabama's businesses and industries. The EPO program's primary objective is to be Alabama's premiere organization in uniting academia, government, and private industry by way of providing its support to the State and Federal Departments of Education involved in systemic STEM education reform, workforce development, and innovative uses of technology. The NSSTC EPO

  11. Impact of Mobile Dose-Tracking Technology on Medication Distribution at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelm, Matthew; Campbell, Udobi

    2016-05-01

    Medication dose-tracking technologies have the potential to improve efficiency and reduce costs associated with re-dispensing doses reported as missing. Data describing this technology and its impact on the medication use process are limited. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of dose-tracking technology on pharmacy workload and drug expense at an academic, acute care medical center. Dose-tracking technology was implemented in June 2014. Pre-implementation data were collected from February to April 2014. Post-implementation data were collected from July to September 2014. The primary endpoint was the percent of re-dispensed oral syringe and compounded sterile product (CSP) doses within the pre- and post-implementation periods per 1,000 discharges. Secondary endpoints included pharmaceutical expense generated from re-dispensing doses, labor costs, and staff satisfaction with the medication distribution process. We observed an average 6% decrease in re-dispensing of oral syringe and CSP doses from pre- to post-implementation (15,440 vs 14,547 doses; p = .047). However, when values were adjusted per 1,000 discharges, this trend did not reach statistical significance (p = .074). Pharmaceutical expense generated from re-dispensing doses was significantly reduced from pre- to post-implementation ($834,830 vs $746,466 [savings of $88,364]; p = .047). We estimated that $2,563 worth of technician labor was avoided in re-dispensing missing doses. We also saw significant improvement in staff perception of technology assisting in reducing missing doses (p = .0003), as well as improvement in effectiveness of resolving or minimizing missing doses (p = .01). The use of mobile dose-tracking technology demonstrated meaningful reductions in both the number of doses re-dispensed and cost of pharmaceuticals dispensed.

  12. Regulating technological change - The strategic reactions of utility companies towards subsidy policies in the German, Spanish and UK electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenzel, Till; Frenzel, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on how incumbent electric utilities strategically react to subsidy schemes supporting renewable energy technologies in the UK, Germany, and Spain. Firms coordinate the development of their technological capabilities and their political activities to shape their regulatory environment. Analysing the diffusion of wind power in these countries, we show that the different ways, in which firms coordinate their technological and political strategies, lead to very different market outcomes, both for the firms' market share and the size of the overall market. Although incumbents are usually seen as being resistant to change in energy systems, we show that Spanish utilities proactively drive the diffusion of wind power. We speculate about the relation between the ownership structure of the energy system and its inertia with respect to the integration of new technologies. We derive novel policy implications that explicitly take into account the strategic actions of incumbent firms shaping the technological and regulatory system

  13. A New Spin on Library Media Centers: The Hub of the School with the Help of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaser, Linda R.

    2005-01-01

    Library media centers can evolve into technological, informational, and recreational hub of schools and can help technophobes access their many resources. A greater and better understanding of what it is exactly that library media specialists do can thus be achieved.

  14. Structural study of cold central plant recycling sections at the National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) test track.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) contracted with the National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) to install, instrument, and monitor three pavement test sections at the NCAT Test Track during the 2012-2014 track cycle. The ...

  15. Advanced hydrogen/methanol utilization technology demonstration. Phase II: Hydrogen cold start of a methanol vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    This is the Phase 11 Final Report on NREL Subcontract No. XR-2-11175-1 {open_quotes}Advanced Hydrogen/Methane Utilization Demonstration{close_quotes} between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Alternative Fuels Utilization Program, Golden, Colorado and Hydrogen Consultants, Inc. (HCI), Littleton, Colorado. Mr. Chris Colucci was NREL`s Technical Monitor. Colorado State University`s (CSU) Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory was HCI`s subcontractor. Some of the vehicle test work was carried out at the National Center for Vehicle Emissions Control and Safety (NCVECS) at CSU. The collaboration of the Colorado School of Mines is also gratefully acknowledged. Hydrogen is unique among alternative fuels in its ability to burn over a wide range of mixtures in air with no carbon-related combustion products. Hydrogen also has the ability to burn on a catalyst, starting from room temperature. Hydrogen can be made from a variety of renewable energy resources and is expected to become a widely used energy carrier in the sustainable energy system of the future. One way to make a start toward widespread use of hydrogen in the energy system is to use it sparingly with other alternative fuels. The Phase I work showed that strong affects could be achieved with dilute concentrations of hydrogen in methane (11). Reductions in emissions greater than the proportion of hydrogen in the fuel provide a form of leverage to stimulate the early introduction of hydrogen. Per energy unit or per dollar of hydrogen, a greater benefit is derived than simply displacing fossil-fueled vehicles with pure hydrogen vehicles.

  16. Heat Pump Water Heater Technology: Experiences of Residential Consumers and Utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashdown, BG

    2004-08-04

    benefits. Because it produces hot water by extracting heat from the air it tends to dehumidify and cool the room in which it is placed. Moreover, it tends to spread the water heating load across utility non-peak periods. Thus, electric utilities with peak load issues could justify internal programs to promote this technology to residential and commercial customers. For practical purposes, consumers are indifferent to the manner in which water is heated but are very interested in product attributes such as initial first cost, operating cost, performance, serviceability, product size, and installation costs. Thus, the principal drivers for penetrating markets are demonstrating reliability, leveraging the dehumidification attributes of the HPWH, and creating programs that embrace life-cycle cost principles. To supplement this, a product warranty with scrupulous quality control should be implemented; first-price reduction through engineering, perhaps by reducing level of energy efficiency, should be pursued; and niche markets should be courted. The first step toward market penetration is to address the HPWH's performance reliability. Next, the manufacturers could engage select utilities to aggressively market the HPWH. A good approach would be to target distinct segments of the market with the potential for the highest benefits from the technology. Communications media that address performance issues should be developed. When marketing to new home builders, the HPWH could be introduced as part of an energy-efficient package offered as a standard feature by builders of new homes within a community. Conducting focus groups across the United States to gather input on HPWH consumer values will feed useful data back to the manufacturers. ''Renaming'' and ''repackaging'' the HPWH to improve consumer perception, appliance aesthetics, and name recognition should be considered. Once an increased sales volume is achieved, the manufacturers

  17. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center 1987--1988 report to the President

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    During the past year, technical progress has been made in all Plasma Fusion Center (PFC) research programs. The Plasma Fusion Center is recognized as one of the leading university research laboratories in the physics and engineering aspects of magnetic confinement fusion. Its research programs have produced significant results on several fronts: the basic physics of high-temperature plasmas (plasmas theory, RF heating, free electron lasers, development of advanced diagnostics, and intermediate-scale experiments on the Versator tokamak and Constance mirror devices), major confinement results on the Alcator C tokamak, including pioneering investigations of the stability, heating, and confinement properties of plasmas at high densities, temperatures and magnetic fields, experiments on the medium-scale TARA tandem mirror, including the development of novel MHD stabilization techniques in axisymmetric geometry, and a broad program of fusion technology and engineering development that addresses problems in several critical subsystem areas (e.g., magnet systems, superconducting materials development, environmental and safety studies, advanced millimeter-wave source development, and system studies of fusion reactor design, operation, and technology requirements

  18. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, 1984-1985. Report to the President

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    During the past year, technical progress has been made in all Plasma Fusion Center (PFC) research programs. The Plasma Fusion Center is recognized as one of the leading university research laboratories in the physics and engineering aspects of magnetic confinement fusion. Its research programs have produced significant results on four fronts: (1) the basic physics of high-temperature plasmas (plasma theory, rf heating, free electron lasers, development of advanced diagnostics and small-scale experiments on the Versator tokamak and Constance mirror devices); (2) major confinement results on the Alcator C tokamak, including pioneering investigations of the stability, heating, and confinement properties of plasmas at high densities, temperatures and magnetic fields; (3) development of an innovative design for axisymmetric tandem mirrors with inboard thermal barriers, with initial operation of the TARA tandem mirror experiment beginning in 1984; and (4) a broad program of fusion technology and engineering development that addresses problems in several critical subsystem areas (e.g., magnet systems, superconducting materials development, environmental and safety studies, advanced millimeter wave source development, and system studies of fusion reactor design, operation, and technology requirements). A review of these programs is given

  19. Evaluation of Technological Trends and Demands of the Manufacturing Industry to a Center of R&D&I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leone Peter Correia da Silva Andrade

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The manufacturing industry is fairly representative in the Brazilian economy. The research activities in technology, development and innovation promoted by technology centers are of great importance to boost the competitiveness of this segment. In this context, this work aims presenting the development of the strategic planning for a Center of R&D&I (Research & Development & Innovation, looking 20 years ahead, on a macro level, creating a master plan which summarizes the future focus areas of competence for technology research, development and innovation, coping with manufacturing trends, using a participative workshop approach. Thus, it is expected that this center offer integrated technological solutions with high added value that promote the development and competitiveness of the manufacturing industry, in the prospects for medium and long term. In order to achieve the project objectives taking the principle of strategic planning was followed. On the one hand, focus was placed on the internal perspective analyzing the current status of the Center. On the other hand, the environment of the Center (external perspective was analyzed. Matching the analysis results regarding both perspectives future competence areas were derived, according to global technological trends as well as national and local industrial demand. Thus, the competencies required to be developed by a technology center to meet the manufacturing industry over the next twenty years would be derived.

  20. A Comparison of Delivery Formats to Encourage Student-Centered Learning in a Power Engineering Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Mathew J.; Webster, Rustin D.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a student-centered approach to a power engineering technology course using the flipped or inverted classroom as well as active learning in the form of group discussions and team problem solving. The study compares student performance and perceptions of a traditional, teaching-centered classroom to two different flipped…

  1. Annual report of nuclear technology and education center. April 1, 2003 - March 31, 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) is Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in FY 2003. It includes the domestic educational activities and the international training activities mainly for Asia-Pacific region as well as the activities of the research and the development for training courses and administrative aspects. The courses yet carried out in Tokyo Education Center were begun to operate in the facilities of the Tokai Research Establishment. Aiming at carrying out training activities more effectively and efficiently, the training division system related to the training fields have started together with that. Most of the scheduled training courses for the FY2003 have been carried out as planned and the total number of the trainees completing the courses was 1,311. The building of the Tokyo Education Center was demolished and removed after the decontamination, decommissioning procedures. The land was returned to the land owner by the end of FY 2003. In addition to these activities, research and development for the improvement of education and training were carried out. (author)

  2. Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies: Building a Global Infrastructure for Climate Change Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ahrens, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ananthakrishnan, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bell, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bharathi, S. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Brown, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Chen, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chervenak, A. L. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Cinquini, L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Pasadena, CA (United States); Drach, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, I. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fox, P. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Hankin, S. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (PMEL), Seattle, WA (United States); Harper, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Hook, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Jones, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Middleton, D. E. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Miller, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nienhouse, E. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Schweitzer, R. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (PMEL), Seattle, WA (United States); Schuler, R. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Shipman, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shoshani, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Siebenlist, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sim, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Strand, W. G. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Wang, F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilcox, H. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Wilhelmi, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2010-08-16

    Established within DOE’s Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-) 2 program, with support from ASCR and BER, the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) is a consortium of seven laboratories (Argonne National Laboratory [ANL], Los Alamos National Laboratory [LANL], Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory [LBNL], Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory [LLNL], National Center for Atmospheric Research [NCAR], Oak Ridge National Laboratory [ORNL], and Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory [PMEL]), and two institutes (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute [RPI] and the University of Southern California, Information Sciences Institute [USC/ISI]). The consortium’s mission is to provide climate researchers worldwide with a science gateway to access data, information, models, analysis tools, and computational capabilities required to evaluate extreme-scale data sets. Its stated goals are to (1) make data more useful to climate researchers by developing collaborative technology that enhances data usability; (2) meet the specific needs that national and international climate projects have for distributed databases, data access, and data movement; (3) provide a universal and secure web-based data access portal for broad-based multi-model data collections; and (4) provide a wide range of climate data-analysis tools and diagnostic methods to international climate centers and U.S. government agencies. To this end, the ESG-CET is working to integrate all highly publicized climate data sets—from climate simulations to observations—using distributed storage management, remote high-performance units, high-bandwidth wide-area networks, and user desktop platforms in a collaborative problem-solving environment.

  3. Research Center for Optical Physics: Education and Technology for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    During the past eleven years since its inception, RCOP has excelled in its two primary goals: 1) training of the scientists and engineers needed for the twenty-first century with special emphasis on underrepresented citizens and 2) research and technological development in areas of relevance to NASA. In the category of research training, as of May 2003, RCOP produced 36 Bachelors degrees, 25 Masters degrees, and 13 Doctoral degrees. Of these, all 36 Bachelors degrees, 16 of the Masters degrees and 9 of the Doctoral degrees were awarded to African Americans. Four of the Doctoral graduates and one of the Masters graduates are working at NASA Field Centers. RCOP has also provided research experiences to 130 undergraduate students and 22 high school students through a number of outreach programs held during the summer and the academic year. RCOP has also been crucial to the development of the Ph.D. program in physics at Hampton University by providing high quality research training and technical electives required for a Doctoral degree in physics. RCOP has also excelled in research and technological development. Since 1992, RCOP researchers have leveraged over 8 million dollars in additional research funding, published 152 papers in refereed journals and proceedings, and given 125 presentations at refereed international conferences in the United States and eight other countries. RCOP also developed numerous collaborations with other research centers, universities and industries. In recognition of this outstanding work, RCOP is the first research center in the United States invited to join the Joint Open Laboratory for Laser Crystals and Precise Laser Systems headed by Dr. Alexander Kaminiskii of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

  4. Development of New Materials and Technologies for Welding and Surfacing at Research and Production Center 'Welding Processes and Technologies'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozyrev, N A; Kryukov, R E; Galevsky, G V; Titov, D A; Shurupov, V M

    2015-01-01

    The paper provides description of research into the influence of new materials and technologies on quality parameters of welds and added metal carried out at research and production center «Welding processes and technologies».New welding technologies of tanks for northern conditions are considered, as well as technologies of submerged arc welding involving fluxing agents AN - 348, AN - 60, AN - 67, OK. 10.71 and carbon-fluorine containing additives, new flux cored wires and surfacing technologies, teaching programs and a trainer for welders are designed. (paper)

  5. From Natural Monopoly to Public Utility: Technological Determinism and the Political Economy of Infrastructure in Progressive-Era America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaiss, Adam

    In present-day debates regarding telecommunication policy, one frequently hears the terms natural monopoly and public utility. This article investigates the origins of these ideas, finding that Richard T. Ely-a celebrated American economist of the late nineteenth century-embedded in the term "natural monopoly" a narrative of technological determinism. By arguing that certain services had monopolizing tendencies hardwired into them, Ely argued for their regulation. Ely's theory of natural monopoly formed the basis of Wisconsin's 1907 public utilities law, which served as a model for many other states' regulatory policies. The modern notion of public utility thus carries with it the technological determinism of Ely's natural monopoly idea. By tracing the lineage of these two terms, this article recaptures the influence that activists and progressive politicians exercised over the formation of large technological systems during the Second Industrial Revolution.

  6. (Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center): Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending June 30, 1987. [Advanced Coal Research and Technology Development Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-02-01

    Research programs on coal and coal liquefaction are presented. Topics discussed are: coal science, combustion, kinetics, surface science; advanced technology projects in liquefaction; two stage liquefaction and direct liquefaction; catalysts of liquefaction; Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and thermodynamics; alternative fuels utilization; coal preparation; biodegradation; advanced combustion technology; flue gas cleanup; environmental coordination, and technology transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base. (CBS)

  7. Update and Expansion of the Center of Automotive Technology Excellence Under the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irick, David

    2012-08-30

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its seventh year of operation under this agreement, its thirteenth year in total. During this period the Center has involved eleven GATE Fellows and three GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the center’s focus area: Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Control Systems. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resources brought to the university (including related research contracts) exceeds $2,000,000.

  8. Utilizing Lean Six Sigma Methodology to Improve the Authored Works Command Approval Process at Naval Medical Center San Diego.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Michelle M; Liwanag, Maureen; Mount, Charles; Rodriguez, Rechell; Avalos-Reyes, Elisea; Smith, Andrew; Collette, David; Starsiak, Michael; Green, Richard

    2018-03-14

    Inefficiencies in the command approval process for publications and/or presentations negatively impact DoD Graduate Medical Education (GME) residency programs' ability to meet ACGME scholarly activity requirements. A preliminary review of the authored works approval process at Naval Medical Center San Diego (NMCSD) disclosed significant inefficiency, variation in process, and a low level of customer satisfaction. In order to facilitate and encourage scholarly activity at NMCSD, and meet ACGME requirements, the Executive Steering Council (ESC) chartered an interprofessional team to lead a Lean Six Sigma (LSS) Rapid Improvement Event (RIE) project. Two major outcome metrics were identified: (1) the number of authored works submissions containing all required signatures and (2) customer satisfaction with the authored works process. Primary metric baseline data were gathered utilizing a Clinical Investigations database tracking publications and presentations. Secondary metric baseline data were collected via a customer satisfaction survey to GME faculty and residents. The project team analyzed pre-survey data and utilized LSS tools and methodology including a "gemba" (environment) walk, cause and effect diagram, critical to quality tree, voice of the customer, "muda" (waste) chart, and a pre- and post-event value stream map. The team selected an electronic submission system as the intervention most likely to positively impact the RIE project outcome measures. The number of authored works compliant with all required signatures improved from 52% to 100%. Customer satisfaction rated as "completely or mostly satisfied" improved from 24% to 97%. For both outcomes, signature compliance and customer satisfaction, statistical significance was achieved with a p customer satisfaction with the authored works approval process, leading to 100% signature compliance, a comprehensive longitudinal repository of all authored work requests, and a 97% "completely or mostly satisfied

  9. Utility of intracardiac echocardiography for catheter ablation of complex cardiac arrhythmias in a medium-volume training center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueiras-Rama, David; de Torres-Alba, Fernando; Castrejón-Castrejón, Sergio; Estrada, Alejandro; Figueroa, Jorge; Salvador-Montañés, Óscar; López, Teresa; Moreno-Yanguela, Mar; López Sendón, José L; Merino, José L

    2015-04-01

    New electrophysiology tools like intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) might help to minimize and early detect complications during cardiac ablation procedures. The aim of the study was to assess the utility and vascular safety of ICE during catheter ablation of complex cardiac arrhythmias in a medium-volume training center. Prospective, observational study consisted of consecutive patients who underwent catheter-based ablation of complex cardiac arrhythmias. All procedures were performed using three-dimensional electro-anatomical mapping and routine cannulation of right and left femoral veins. The ICE probe was initially positioned at the mid-level of the right atrium and properly moved to monitor different steps of the procedure and identify complications. All procedure-related vascular complications were registered. One hundred two patients (age 61.4 ± 13.1 years, 69 male) underwent 110 ablation procedures. Pulmonary vein isolation was the most common ablation substrate (55.4%). Ventricular tachycardia (17.2%) and left atrial flutter procedures (16.4%) were also common. The use of ICE enabled us to early initiate anticoagulation and to optimize the transseptal puncture. It also provided the capability to early detect life-threatening complications such as tamponade (3.6%), along with important information during the procedure such as exact catheter location, lesion formation, and stability during radiofrequency delivery. Such benefits were not associated with a higher number of vascular complications. The use of ICE during catheter-based ablation of complex cardiac substrates provides technical features that may decrease complications and increase accuracy while applying radiofrequency, especially in training centers where fellows start to perform complex procedures. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Integration of modern remote sensing technologies for faster utility mapping and data extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Aleksandar; Govedarica, Miro; Vrtunski, Milan; Petrovacki, Dusan

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of the application of modern remote sensing technologies in current research shows a significant increase in interest in fast and efficient detection of underground installations. The most important reasons of the said application are preventing damage during excavation works, as well as the formation of the cadastre of underground utilities suitable for operating and maintaining of such resources. Given the wide area of application in the detection of underground installations, ground penetrating radar scanning technology (GPR), in this instance, is used as prevalent method for the purpose of the acquisition radargram of pipelines and the comparison with the results of the acquisition of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle - UAV drone Aibot X6 equipped with Optris PI Lightweight Kit (which consists of a miniaturized lightweight PC and a weight-optimized PI450 Optris LW infrared camera). The aim of the research presented in the this paper is to analyze the benefits of integrating a mobile system capable of very fast, reliable and relatively inexpensive detection of heating pipelines using thermal imaging aerial inspection and GPR technology for control sampling of radargrams on specific locations of routes in order to achieve following: a simple identification of the characteristics of heating pipelines, prevention and registration of damage, as well as automated data extraction. The results of integrated application of the above-mentioned remote sensing technologies have shown that, within 10min of planned flight, it is possible to detect and georeference routes of heating pipelines in the area of 50.000m2 by application of thermal imaging inspection that assigns an adequate temperature value to each pixel in an image. The experiment showed that the registration is also possible in the case of pre-insulated and conventionally insulated heating pipes, and the difference in temperature measurements above the routes and the environment was up to 4 degrees. It should be

  11. Prevalence of and factors associated with utilization of herbal medicines among outpatients in primary health centers in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Hattie; Fleming, Tyler; Chhoun, Pheak; Tuot, Sovannary; Brody, Carinne; Yi, Siyan

    2018-04-02

    Traditional, complementary and alternative medicine (TCAM) is seen as a way to provide healthcare in both developed and developing countries across the world. In Cambodia, there is a long tradition of using TCAM. However, scant studies have been conducted on the extent of Cambodian TCAM use and how it interacts with allopathic health care to date. In this study, we examined the prevalence of and factors associated with utilization of herbal medicines among patients with chronic diseases in primary health care settings in Cambodia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2015 with outpatients receiving treatment and care for chronic diseases in two urban and two rural primary health centers purposively selected from Phnom Penh, Kampong Cham and Siem Reap. Every eligible patient was randomly selected at the health centers using a systematic sampling procedure. I-CAM-Q was used to measure TCAM use. A multivariate logistic regression model was constructed to identify factors associated with herbal medicine use. In total, 1602 patients were included in this study, of whom 77.7% were female, and 51.2% were recruited from urban primary health centers with a mean age of 46.5 years (SD = 15.2). Of total, 27.0% reported at least one consultation with a TCAM provider in the past 12 months. The most common modality of TCAM used was herbal medicine (89%). Herbs were obtained at drug or folk stores (36.9%), from herbalists directly (28.5%) or from their own gardens (18.6%). Of herb users, 55.2% reported that herbs were somewhat helpful. After adjustment, herb users were significantly more likely to be female (AOR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.12-2.67), have completed less schooling (AOR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.45-0.96), were unemployed or homemakers (AOR = 0.23, 95% CI = 0.13-0.52) and have a gastrointestinal illness (AOR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.39-0.62). Herbal medicines are broadly used among chronic disease patients in Cambodia. Understanding TCAM use in

  12. Utilizing Radiofrequency Identification Technology to Improve Safety and Management of Blood Bank Supply Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coustasse, Alberto; Meadows, Pamela; Hall, Robert S; Hibner, Travis; Deslich, Stacie

    2015-11-01

    The importance of efficiency in the supply chain of perishable products, such as the blood products used in transfusion services, cannot be overstated. Many problems can occur, such as the outdating of products, inventory management issues, patient misidentification, and mistransfusion. The purpose of this article was to identify the benefits and barriers associated with radiofrequency identification (RFID) usage in improving the blood bank supply chain. The methodology for this study was a qualitative literature review following a systematic approach. The review was limited to sources published from 2000 to 2014 in the English language. Sixty-five sources were found, and 56 were used in this research study. According to the finding of the present study, there are numerous benefits and barriers to RFID utilization in blood bank supply chains. RFID technology offers several benefits with regard to blood bank product management, including decreased transfusion errors, reduction of product loss, and more efficient inventory management. Barriers to RFID implementation include the cost associated with system implementation and patient privacy issues. Implementation of an RFID system can be a significant investment. However, when observing the positive impact that such systems may have on transfusion safety and inventory management, the cost associated with RFID systems can easily be justified. RFID in blood bank inventory management is vital to ensuring efficient product inventory management and positive patient outcomes.

  13. Utilization of internet technology by low-income adults: the role of health literacy, health numeracy, and computer assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jakob D; King, Andy J; Davis, LaShara A; Guntzviller, Lisa M

    2010-09-01

    To examine whether low-income adults' utilization of Internet technology is predicted or mediated by health literacy, health numeracy, and computer assistance. Low-income adults (N = 131) from the midwestern United States were surveyed about their technology access and use. Individuals with low health literacy skills were less likely to use Internet technology (e.g., email, search engines, and online health information seeking), and those with low health numeracy skills were less likely to have access to Internet technology (e.g., computers and cell phones). Consistent with past research, males, older participants, and those with less education were less likely to search for health information online. The relationship between age and online health information seeking was mediated by participant literacy. The present study suggests that significant advances in technology access and use could be sparked by developing technology interfaces that are accessible to individuals with limited literacy skills.

  14. Integrating Traditional Chinese Medicine Services in Community Health Centers: Insights into Utilization Patterns in the Pearl River Region of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent C. H. Chung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In China's healthcare reform, community health centers (CHCs are designed to take a pivotal role in providing primary care. Whilst about 20% of all outpatient care in China is delivered by the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM sector, hospitals, instead of CHCs, are major providers. Using current patterns of patient utilization this study aims to inform CHCs on how they may strengthen access to TCM services. Three thousand three hundred and sixty CHC patients from six cities within the urban Pearl Delta Region were enumerated using multistage cluster sampling. Fifty-two percent had visited herbalists within three months with a mean visit frequency of 1.50 times. Herbal treatments, which are cheaper than western medicines, were more popular amongst those who needed to pay out of pocket including the uninsured. Herbal medicines appeared to be an alternative for those who are underinsured. Acupuncturists and massage therapists were visited by smaller proportions, 6.58% and 5.98%, respectively, with a mean three-month visit of 0.27 and 0.26 times. Access was restricted by lack of social insurance coverage. Whilst increasing provision of TCM in CHCs might respond to patient demand, increasing insurance coverage for TCM needs to be evaluated using current evidence on safety and effectiveness.

  15. A new concept for medical imaging centered on cellular phone technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Yair; Ivorra, Antoni; Rubinsky, Boris

    2008-04-30

    According to World Health Organization reports, some three quarters of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In addition, in developing countries over 50% of medical equipment that is available is not being used because it is too sophisticated or in disrepair or because the health personnel are not trained to use it. The goal of this study is to introduce and demonstrate the feasibility of a new concept in medical imaging that is centered on cellular phone technology and which may provide a solution to medical imaging in underserved areas. The new system replaces the conventional stand-alone medical imaging device with a new medical imaging system made of two independent components connected through cellular phone technology. The independent units are: a) a data acquisition device (DAD) at a remote patient site that is simple, with limited controls and no image display capability and b) an advanced image reconstruction and hardware control multiserver unit at a central site. The cellular phone technology transmits unprocessed raw data from the patient site DAD and receives and displays the processed image from the central site. (This is different from conventional telemedicine where the image reconstruction and control is at the patient site and telecommunication is used to transmit processed images from the patient site). The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate that the cellular phone technology can function in the proposed mode. The feasibility of the concept is demonstrated using a new frequency division multiplexing electrical impedance tomography system, which we have developed for dynamic medical imaging, as the medical imaging modality. The system is used to image through a cellular phone a simulation of breast cancer tumors in a medical imaging diagnostic mode and to image minimally invasive tissue ablation with irreversible electroporation in a medical imaging interventional mode.

  16. A new concept for medical imaging centered on cellular phone technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Granot

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available According to World Health Organization reports, some three quarters of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In addition, in developing countries over 50% of medical equipment that is available is not being used because it is too sophisticated or in disrepair or because the health personnel are not trained to use it. The goal of this study is to introduce and demonstrate the feasibility of a new concept in medical imaging that is centered on cellular phone technology and which may provide a solution to medical imaging in underserved areas. The new system replaces the conventional stand-alone medical imaging device with a new medical imaging system made of two independent components connected through cellular phone technology. The independent units are: a a data acquisition device (DAD at a remote patient site that is simple, with limited controls and no image display capability and b an advanced image reconstruction and hardware control multiserver unit at a central site. The cellular phone technology transmits unprocessed raw data from the patient site DAD and receives and displays the processed image from the central site. (This is different from conventional telemedicine where the image reconstruction and control is at the patient site and telecommunication is used to transmit processed images from the patient site. The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate that the cellular phone technology can function in the proposed mode. The feasibility of the concept is demonstrated using a new frequency division multiplexing electrical impedance tomography system, which we have developed for dynamic medical imaging, as the medical imaging modality. The system is used to image through a cellular phone a simulation of breast cancer tumors in a medical imaging diagnostic mode and to image minimally invasive tissue ablation with irreversible electroporation in a medical imaging interventional mode.

  17. Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Holloway

    2005-09-30

    Beginning the fall semester of 1999, The University of Maryland, Departments of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering and the Institute for Systems Research served as a U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies. A key goal was to produce a graduate level education program that educated and prepared students to address the technical challenges of designing and developing hybrid electric vehicles, as they progressed into the workforce. A second goal was to produce research that fostered the advancement of hybrid electric vehicles, their controls, and other related automotive technologies. Participation ended at the University of Maryland after the 2004 fall semester. Four graduate courses were developed and taught during the course of this time, two of which evolved into annually-taught undergraduate courses, namely Vehicle Dynamics and Control Systems Laboratory. Five faculty members from Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and the Institute for Systems Research participated. Four Ph.D. degrees (two directly supported and two indirectly supported) and seven Master's degrees in Mechanical Engineering resulted from the research conducted. Research topics included thermoelectric waste heat recovery, fuel cell modeling, pre- and post-transmission hybrid powertrain control and integration, hybrid transmission design, H{sub 2}-doped combustion, and vehicle dynamics. Many of the participating students accepted positions in the automotive industry or government laboratories involved in automotive technology work after graduation. This report discusses the participating faculty, the courses developed and taught, research conducted, the students directly and indirectly supported, and the publication list. Based on this collection of information, the University of Maryland firmly believes that the key goal of the program was met and that the majority of the

  18. Rheo-small-angle neutron scattering at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcar, L.; Pozzo, D.; Langenbucher, G.; Moyer, J.; Butler, P. D.

    2011-08-01

    We describe the design and operation of a modified commercial rheometer to simultaneously perform rheological measurements and structural studies by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The apparatus uses a Couette geometry shear cell allowing two of the three scattering planes to be observed by performing experiments in either the radial or tangential geometries. The device enables small angle neutron scattering patterns to be obtained simultaneously with a wide variety of rheological measurements such as stress/strain flow curves, oscillatory deformations, and creep, recovery and relaxation tests, from -20 °C to 150 °C, for samples with viscosities varying by several orders of magnitude. We give a brief report of recent experiments performed on a dispersion of acicular nanoparticles and biopolymer network under stress demonstrating the utility of such measurements. This device has been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) and made available to the complex fluids community as part of the standard sample environment equipment.

  19. Rheo-small-angle neutron scattering at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcar, L; Pozzo, D; Langenbucher, G; Moyer, J; Butler, P D

    2011-08-01

    We describe the design and operation of a modified commercial rheometer to simultaneously perform rheological measurements and structural studies by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The apparatus uses a Couette geometry shear cell allowing two of the three scattering planes to be observed by performing experiments in either the radial or tangential geometries. The device enables small angle neutron scattering patterns to be obtained simultaneously with a wide variety of rheological measurements such as stress/strain flow curves, oscillatory deformations, and creep, recovery and relaxation tests, from -20 °C to 150 °C, for samples with viscosities varying by several orders of magnitude. We give a brief report of recent experiments performed on a dispersion of acicular nanoparticles and biopolymer network under stress demonstrating the utility of such measurements. This device has been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) and made available to the complex fluids community as part of the standard sample environment equipment.

  20. Animation company "Fast Forwards" production with HP Utility Data Center; film built using Adaptive Enterprise framework enabled by shared, virtual resource

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Hewlett Packard have produced a commercial-quality animated film using an experimental rendering service from HP Labs and running on an HP Utility Data Center (UDC). The project demonstrates how computing resources can be managed virtually and illustrates the value of utility computing, in which an end-user taps into a large pool of virtual resources, but pays only for what is used (1 page).