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Sample records for technology ussr earth

  1. Space transportation propulsion USSR launcher technology, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Space transportation propulsion U.S.S.R. launcher technology is discussed. The following subject areas are covered: Energia background (launch vehicle summary, Soviet launcher family) and Energia propulsion characteristics (booster propulsion, core propulsion, and growth capability).

  2. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-12

    above peptides. It was demonstrated that tritium planigraphy helped to distinguish the intramembrane aminoacid residues and the polypeptide sequences...other factors on tritium inclusion: nature of aminoacid residues, amphilicity of the spirals, packing density of intramembrane fragments and lipid...Ellanskaya and A. G. Sarafanov, Institute of Nutrition , USSR Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow, Institute of Microbiology and Virology, Ukrainian SSR

  3. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-25

    Escherichia coli with the 5uiiK~in SIH genf wi^h a 9enetic engineering technique developed by the Academy of Sciences of the USSR and the NPO "Ferment...damage to left side of cortex; 5—flexion on right side. An account of the research that followed requires a brief explanation con- cerning a recently

  4. USSR Report, Science and Technology Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-29

    Vladdmirovich Gorenshteyn, Igor Borisovich Kogan , Valentin Vasilyevich Kuzmenko, Ivan Vasilyevich Liptuga, Aleksandr Nikitovich Mikhaylyuchenko, Abdulla...Academician Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Nikonov, president of the Ail-Union Academy of Agricultural Sciences imeni V.l. Lenin. [begin Nikonov recording...Member of the USSR Academy of Sciences Aleksandr Fedorcvich Andreyev, deputy director of the Institute of Physics Problems imeni S.I. Vavilov of the

  5. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-07

    Sf4104 5 USSR: Life Sciences 7 March 1989 Diet of Pregnant Turkmen Women in Ashkhabad [G. Ye. Khodzhayeva, Zh. M. Apresyan, et ai; ZDRA...219 of the cases, 4 of which led to complications. Cholecystectomy , hydatidectomy, selective proximal vagotomy (with drainage), duodenal resection...gastroenterectomy, hemi- colectomy, and resection of the liver were among the other procedures performed. Prevention of post -op com- plications

  6. Earthing Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we reflect on the conditions under which new technologies emerge in the Anthropocene and raise the question of how to conceptualize sustainable technologies therein. To this end, we explore an eco-centric approach to technology development, called biomimicry. We discuss opposing

  7. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-26

    Numerical Reconstruction of Climates in Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic (M. Ya. Verbitskiy; DOKLADY AKADEMII NAUK SSSR, No 1, Mar 87) 10 Study of...Siberian Platform Basement Described on Basis of Seismic Data (V.L. Kuznetsov, G.F. Bgatova, et al.; GEOLOGIYA I GEOFIZIKA, No 2, Feb 87) 38 Use...of a relative angular momentum locally introduced into a fluid rotating as a solid body. The experimental apparatus included a rotating platform

  8. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-06

    tions was determined, evidence of a more recent (Late Lower Cretaceous) age of the deposit. The fact that a more recent age of the gold...bacteria in a liter of water from Odessa Bay has increased by a factor of a million. The number of jellyfish is increasing without restraint. The level...correlations between the parameters of the considered approximation of interest for practical applications. Figures 2; references 13: 12 Russian, 1

  9. JPRS Report Science & Technology USSR: Earth Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-09

    86) 13 Receiver Device (String) Without Load-Supporting Cable for Marine Seismic Research (L.I. Kogan , I.N. Yelnikov, et al.; OKEANOLOGIYA, No 6...of the clouds. The scientists at the Main Geophysical Observatory " Aleksandr Voyeykov" in Leningrad reached this conclusion after conducting...OKEANOLOGIYA in Russian Vol 26, No 6, Nov-Dec 86 (manuscript received 30 Mar 84, after revision 4 Jan 85) p 1039 [Article by L.l. Kogan , I.N

  10. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Science & Technology Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-22

    the sugges- tion to review and change the organization of the man- agement of science. Namely, the USSR Academy of Medical Sciences should...hundreds of works in the bibliography. We have only a few articles and one review . Nonetheless, definite shifts are taking place. At the symposium, we...34Lesnaya fito- patologiya" [Forest Phytopathology ], which was pub- lished in 1986. [Signed] Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party

  11. JPRS Report, Science and Technology USSR: Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-26

    and attenu- Finally, morphologic changes in the epidermis further ation of the sympathetic system during space flight. Tables compromise the barrier...on the left side of the head a reflex mechanism was Cardiovascular Surgery imeni A. N. Bakulev, USSR postulated to be in operation. Figures 1...advanced stages of dystrophy and intralobular and elitis and Viral Encephalitides, USSR Academy of Med- portal infiltration. Accordingly, the data indicate

  12. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Science & Technology Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-23

    lessons from this first epic stage in the development of the productive forces of Krasnoyarsk Kray. That is the first thing. The second is this...34Georgian Folk Poetry " in 12 volumes, which was published by the Metsniyereba Publishing House during 1972-1984. In Technology: 1. Revaz Antonovich

  13. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Science & Technology Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-14

    practical value. A technology was worked out of producing glucoamylase, clucooxydase, catalase , cellulase and other enzymes . The series of works on...ceases to exist as a scientist. He must go to meetings, assign people to pick potatoes , and do virtually anything whatsoever except scientific work...aids; to the Institute of Microbiology imeni Avgust Kirkhenshteyn—for the development of preparations of microbic nucleases and related enzymes

  14. Translations on USSR Science and Technology, Physical Sciences and Technology, Number 51

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-27

    USSR (Kiev) Kovartsev, Aleksandr Nikolayevich, engineer, Kuybyshev Aviation Institute (Kuybyshev) / Kogan , Mark Georgiyevich, candidate of...142-143 [List of authors appearing in UPRAVLYAYUSHCHIYE SISTEMY I MASHINY] [Text] Ayzenberg, Aleksandr Borisovich, senior research associate...IK AN USSR (Kiev) Gumenyuk, Aleksandr Ivanovich, post-graduate student, IK AN USSR (Kiev) Gusev, Vladislav Vladimirovich, candidate of technical

  15. Japan-USSR Trade, Technology Transfer, Implications for U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK JNIT ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO . %, I T;TLE (include Security Clasification ) ~ JAPAN-USSR: TRADE, TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER, AND...Pacific and a wall protecting the Soviet Far East. The Soviet perception of the island chain as a "screen of steel " and a ŕ,000-kilometer cossack sabre...concession which would have limited impact on the Soviet strategic concerns. The key islands in the Northern Territories (for continuity in the "chain of steel

  16. THE EARTH OBSERVATION TECHNOLOGY CLUSTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Aplin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The Earth Observation Technology Cluster is a knowledge exchange initiative, promoting development, understanding and communication about innovative technology used in remote sensing of the terrestrial or land surface. This initiative provides an opportunity for presentation of novel developments from, and cross-fertilisation of ideas between, the many and diverse members of the terrestrial remote sensing community. The Earth Observation Technology Cluster involves a range of knowledge exchange activities, including organisation of technical events, delivery of educational materials, publication of scientific findings and development of a coherent terrestrial EO community. The initiative as a whole covers the full range of remote sensing operation, from new platform and sensor development, through image retrieval and analysis, to data applications and environmental modelling. However, certain topical and strategic themes have been selected for detailed investigation: (1 Unpiloted Aerial Vehicles, (2 Terrestrial Laser Scanning, (3 Field-Based Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy, (4 Hypertemporal Image Analysis, and (5 Circumpolar and Cryospheric Application. This paper presents general activities and achievements of the Earth Observation Technology Cluster, and reviews state-of-the-art developments in the five specific thematic areas.

  17. [Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, James (Technical Monitor); Merkey, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    This grant supported the effort to characterize the problem domain of the Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project, to engage the Beowulf Cluster Computing Community as well as the High Performance Computing Research Community so that we can predict the applicability of said technologies to the scientific community represented by the CT project and formulate long term strategies to provide the computational resources necessary to attain the anticipated scientific objectives of the CT project. Specifically, the goal of the evaluation effort is to use the information gathered over the course of the Round-3 investigations to quantify the trends in scientific expectations, the algorithmic requirements and capabilities of high-performance computers to satisfy this anticipated need.

  18. Improvement in the technology of water cooled reactor plants in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budylin, B.V.; Voznesenskij, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    The report contains the main results in improvement of technology of water-cooled reactors that have been achieved in the USSR since the previous IWG ATPWR meeting in Helsinki, Finland, June 1988. First of all, the safety of operating reactor plants of WWER and RBMK type was greatly increased. New normative-technical documentation was revised and reissued. Introducing new ''General statements of nuclear station safety ensurance'' (OPB-88) since 1.07.1990 is of great importance. The safety analysis showed that the available WWER-1000 design may be the base one for the further development of the advanced technology for WWER that meets the requirements of safety, reliability and economical efficiency. Nowadays, development of two commercial designs of WWER is being conducted: average power, 500-600 MWe and 1000-1300 MWe. The latter one has two stages: WWER-88 (1000 MWe power, in 1990 the stage of detailed project report will be completed) and WWER-92 (1000-1300 MWe power, the concept of the design has been developed). Besides, the design of nuclear district heating plant AST-500 has been developed and its construction is underway now. The design passed an independent examination for safety requirements compliance. (author). 7 refs, 3 figs

  19. Expectations and realities in the nuclear technology exchanges with the USSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewin, J.

    1980-01-01

    A nontechnical, subjective account is given of some of the experiences and personal encounters in the US-USSR technical exchange visit programs. Some notes are given on the growth of nuclear power in the two countries. (DLC)

  20. The nuclear technology development program in the U.S.S.R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukonin, N.F.

    1987-01-01

    The trend of strategy on the nuclear power generation in USSR is not changed in spite of the accident in Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station. In 1986, the electric power generated by nuclear power generation was 162 billion kWh, and the heat supply by nuclear energy was 29 million Gcal. The development of nuclear power generation in USSR for 30 years proved that the atomic energy is technically omnipotent, and the economical substitution of the demand of fossil fuel with nuclear fuel is possible. As of January 1, 1987, 17 nuclear power stations were in operation in USSR, and the total power output was 31,000 MW. The share of nuclear power generation in the total electric power generation was 1/9. 11 nuclear power stations are under construction. The accelerating development of nuclear power generation is the base of meeting the electric power demand in the European region of USSR together with the power transmission from the eastern region. The nuclear power generation in USSR is based on two types of nuclear reactors, that is, water-water type VVER and water-graphite type RBMK. The accident in Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station and the situation thereafter are reported. The development of nuclear power generation in future is discussed. (Kako, I.)

  1. L.D. Trotsky and Activity of Research and Technology Division of USSR Supreme Council of National Economy in mid-1920s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юрий Георгиевич Исаевич

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the activities of L.D. Trotsky as the head of the Research and Technology Division of the Supreme Council of National Economy of the USSR in 1925–1926. The author uses archival documents from the Fund of the Russian State Archive of Economy, documents from the Russian State Archive of Social and Political History and other sources. There is analyzed L.D. Trotsky’s contribution to the development of applied science in the USSR.

  2. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientifics Abstracts cybernetics, Computers, and Automation Technology No. 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    USSR Council of Ministers assigned the institute to begin research on building multimachine complexes. And in just one year the video system was...DMITRIYEV, V. D., engineers IMPROVEMENT IN NOISE STABILITY OF THE "KARAT" INFORMATION COMPUTING SYSTEM AT BELOYARSKAYA ATOMIC ELECTRIC POWER STATION...past motor-generators along the network. As a result of the realization of the above complex of measures the noise stability of the system was

  3. USSR Report, Earth Sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1987-01-01

    Partial Contents: Meteorology, Geography, Oceanography, Temperature Conditions, Ecological and Geographical Problems, Oceanographic Method, Volcanic Depression, Geothermal Field, Electromagnetic Induction, Terrestrial...

  4. USSR Report Earth Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-22

    specialists overlay them with a meridian grid to prepare weather maps. Copies of the maps are sent to weather services in Afghanistan, India , Iraq...regions. The authors of the discovery think that it will become possible in the future to build plants for producing oil and natural gas from lignites

  5. Rare earths: harvesting basic research for technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagatap, B.N.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, rare earths are increasingly becoming a versatile platform for basic research that presents enormous technological potentials. A variety of nano-sized inorganic matrices varying from oxides, phosphates, gallates and aluminates, tungstates, stannates, vanadates to fluorides doped with different lanthanide ions have been synthesized and their optical properties have been investigated in the Chemistry Group, BARC. Another interesting application is laser cooling of solids using rare earth doped glasses with potential applications in remote cooling of electronic devices. Combining the luminescence properties of rare earths with photonic crystals is yet another potent area with wide ranging applications. In this presentation we provide an overview of these developments with examples from the R and D programs of the Chemistry Group, BARC

  6. Translations on USSR Science and Technology, Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences, Number 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-17

    Agricultur Romania. "Receptura de fabricatie nutret urilor combinate ,"" Bucharest, 1972. 6. Sorensen, E. and Havskov, P., "Basic Principles Involved in...antibiotics - - bacitracin, kormogrizein, hygromycin, flavomycin, virginiamycin, tylosin ; growth stimulants - — dimetridazol, karbadox...Czechoslovakia of a scientific research laboratory on the problem of lysine technology for purposes of combining the efforts of interested CEMA

  7. Translations on USSR Science and Technology, Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences, Number 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-07

    with acute poisoning by organophosphorus pesticides (OPP) are important in differential diagnostics of poisoning and for development of methods of...biochemistry, biophysics, environmental and ecological problems, food technology, microbiology, epidemiology and immunology, marine biology, military...Aerospace Medicine Agrotechnology Biology Botany Epidemiology /Immunology Human Engineering Marine Biology 17b. Idem il iers/Open-Ended Terms

  8. Translations on USSR Science and Technology, Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences, Number 46

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-25

    this makes it possible for two operators to care for 3,^+00 gilts . The present technology makes it possible to raise hogs weighing an average of...its permissible deviations. Polarizing current was regulated directly or in inverse propor- tion (positive or negative feedback ) to the deviation...of the informative para- meter from the given range, which was the controlling signal (fig. 1)• ine prescribed feedback coefficient was defined as

  9. Overview of European and other non-US/USSR/Japan launch vehicle and propulsion technology programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Eric E.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: majority of propulsion technology development work is directly related to the ESA's Ariane 5 program and heavily involves SEP (Societe Europeenne de Propulsion) in all areas; Hermes; advanced work on magnetic bearings for turbomachinery; electric propulsion using Cs and Xe propellants done by SEP in France, MBB ERNO in West Germany, and by Culham Lab in UK; successfully tested fired H/O composite nozzle exit cone on 3rd stage of Ariane; turbine blades made of composites to allow increase in gas temperature and improvement in efficiency; combined cycle (turboramjet-rocket) engine analysis work done by Hyperspace; and ESA advanced program studies.

  10. Nuclear fuel industry in USSR, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurasaka, Makoto; Kinoshita, Michio.

    1987-01-01

    The data on the atomic energy industries in East European countries have been published variously so far, but their summaries are very few. In order to know about the atomic energy industries in the world, it is necessary to know about those in East European countries, particularly in USSR. The exploration of uranium ore in USSR was begun in 1940s, and the various types of uranium ore have been found. Simultaneously with the extraction of uranium, molybdenum, iron and rare earth can be extracted, and also phosphatic fertilizer can be produced, therefore, even the uranium deposits of low grade are profitable. The accurate quantity of uranium reserves in USSR is unknown, but the confirmed resources seem to be 100,000 - 160,000 tons. The yearly production of uranium in USSR was about 4,500 tons in mid 1970s, and the cumulative production since 1908 was about 135,000 tons. The main uranium production facilities in USSR are in six districts, but there are many other places of medium and small production. For the exploration, the gamma ray measuring instruments carried by walkers, automobiles and aircrafts are used as a rule. As the mining methods, pit mining, open air mining and leaching in the site are carried out. In the uranium deposits in USSR, several hundreds km of mining is carried out on the yearly average. (Kako, I.)

  11. USSR Report, Chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1986-01-01

    This USSR Report on Chemistry contains articles on Aerosols, Adsorption, Biochemistry, Catalysis, Chemical Industry, Coal Gasification, Electrochemistry, Explosives and Explosions, Fertilizers, Food...

  12. Translations on USSR Trade and Services, Number 1059

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-11-14

    capacity of the enterprises already existing here. Many flow lines are planned to be "tuned" to the production of vitaminized beverages . 11409 CSO...at VDNKh USSR [Exhibition of Achievements of the National Economy of the USSR], and modern technology was shown there. The exhibitors of these

  13. NASA Earth Science Update with Information Science Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halem, Milton

    2000-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of NASA earth science updates with information science technology. Details are given on NASA/Earth Science Enterprise (ESE)/Goddard Space Flight Center strategic plans, ESE missions and flight programs, roles of information science, ESE goals related to the Minority University-Space Interdisciplinary Network, and future plans.

  14. Cloud Computing Technologies Facilitate Earth Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Under a Space Act Agreement, NASA partnered with Seattle-based Amazon Web Services to make the agency's climate and Earth science satellite data publicly available on the company's servers. Users can access the data for free, but they can also pay to use Amazon's computing services to analyze and visualize information using the same software available to NASA researchers.

  15. Bringing robotics technology down to Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Robotics technology is successfully being transitioned from space to terrestrial applications. It is being modified and enhanced to help in the US DOE's Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. Some examples of these applications, ranging from large multijointed manipulators to autonomously navigated remote vehicles, are outlined in this article. They include the following: underground storage tank technology demonstration; light-duty utility arm system; remotely controlled material-handling system; remotely operated excavator; self-guided transfer vehicle. 10 figs

  16. LIDAR technology developments in support of ESA Earth observation missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Yannig; Caron, Jérôme; Hélière, Arnaud; Bézy, Jean-Loup; Meynart, Roland

    2017-11-01

    Critical lidar technology developments have been ongoing at the European Space Agency (ESA) in support of EarthCARE (Earth Clouds, Aerosols, and Radiation Explorer), the 6th Earth Explorer mission, and A-SCOPE (Advanced Space Carbon and Climate Observation of Planet Earth), one of the candidates for the 7th Earth Explorer mission. EarthCARE is embarking an Atmospheric backscatter Lidar (ATLID) while A-SCOPE is based on a Total Column Differential Absorption Lidar. As EarthCARE phase B has just started, the pre-development activities, aiming at validating the technologies used in the flight design and at verifying the overall instrument performance, are almost completed. On the other hand, A-SCOPE pre-phase A has just finished. Therefore technology developments are in progress, addressing critical subsystems or components with the lowest TRL, selected in the proposed instrument concepts. The activities described in this paper span over a broad range, addressing all critical elements of a lidar from the transmitter to the receiver.

  17. Sun-Earth Day - Teaching Heliophysics Through Education Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Cline, T.; Lewis, E.

    2010-01-01

    Sun-Earth Day (SED) is an Education and Outreach program supported by the U.S, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The intent of the program is to teach students and the general public about Heliophysics (the science of the study of the Sun, how it varies, and how solar dynamics affect the rest of the solar system, especially the Earth). The program was begun ten years ago. Each year since that time a particular day has been designated as "Sun-Earth Day ,,. Usually the day of the spring equinox (March 20 or 21) is Sun-Earth Day, but other days have been used as well. Each year a theme is chosen relating to Heliophysics and events reflecting that theme are planned not only for Sun-Earth Day, but for the entire year. From the very beginning educational technology was emphasized in the events in order to effectively reach wide audiences with the SED message. The main approach has been to have a "webcast" related to each year's theme, often from a location that supports the theme as well. For example, a webcast took place from the Mayan pyramids at Chichen Itza, Mexico to highlight the theme of "Ancient Observatories, Timeless Knowledge". Webcasts were not the only technology employed, however. Many of the themes centered on the dynamic nature of the Sun and the effects that solar storms can have on interplanetary space and in our day-to-day life on Earth. Activities for tracking when solar storms happen and how they affect the Earth were developed and brought together in an educational package called Space Weather Action Centers. This project is explained in more detail in another presentation in this session being given by Norma Teresinha Oliveira Reis. Recent Sun-Earth Days have utilized "social networking" technologies to reach widespread groups on the internet. Podcasts, Vodcasts, Facebook, Twitter, and Second Life are the types of network technologies being employed now. The NASA Distance learning Network is another method for bringing Sun-Earth

  18. An Overview of Rare Earth Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschneidner, Karl, Jr.

    2012-02-01

    Currently rare earth science and technology is robust: this includes all the major branches of science -- biochemistry, chemistry, materials and physics. There are, however, currently some anomalies and distortions especially in the technology and applications sector of the rare earth field, which is caused by the dominance of China on the sales of rare earths and rare earth containing products. For the past 5 to 10 years ˜95% of rare earths utilized in commerce came from China. Although Chinese actions have lead to sudden and large price spikes and export embargoes, the rare earths are still available but at a higher cost. The start up of production in 2011 at mines in the USA and Australia will alleviate this situation in about two years. Basic and applied research on the condensed matter physics/materials science has hardly been impacted by these events, but new research opportunities are opening up especially with regard to the USA's military and energy security. Magnets seems to be the hottest topic, but research on battery materials, phosphors and catalysts are also (or should be) strongly considered.

  19. Environmental quality in USSR in 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastino, G.; De Belvis, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    The terrestrial ecosystems of the USSR are spread over an area of about 22 million square kilometers, while its aquatic ecosystems constitute an additional 10 million. The environmental health of this territory, representing one-sixth of the earth's land surface, thus has a significant impact on the overall environmental integrity of the planet. The safeguarding of USSR's environment, however, requires a concerted international effort. The pollutants borne by the Danube, for example, which passes through several European countries before emptying into the Black Sea, are responsible for 75% of that Sea's pollution. With the aim of contributing to international environmental pollution abatement efforts, a thorough survey of the ecological health of the USSR's ecosystems was prepared. The data was divided into the following categories: air, internal surface waters, coastal waters, main sources and volume of pollution, territorial resources, underground natural resources, biological resources, controlled areas, regional ecological problems and state of public health. Assessments were made of specific socio-economic factors affecting USSR's environmental quality, and of this nation's level of knowledge in the field of environmental protection. Responsible administrative bodies and current action being taken in environmental protection, as well as, international agreements and activities were identified

  20. NASA Earth Science Mission Control Center Enterprise Emerging Technology Study Study (MCC Technology Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dan; Horan, Stephen; Royer, Don; Sullivan, Don; Moe, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of the study to identify technologies that could have a significant impact on Earth Science mission operations when looking out at the 5-15 year horizon (through 2025). The potential benefits of the new technologies will be discussed, as well as recommendations for early research and development, prototyping, or analysis for these technologies.

  1. Advanced Information Technology Investments at the NASA Earth Science Technology Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, T.; Seablom, M. S.; Moe, K.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) regularly makes investments for nurturing advanced concepts in information technology to enable rapid, low-cost acquisition, processing and visualization of Earth science data in support of future NASA missions and climate change research. In 2012, the National Research Council published a mid-term assessment of the 2007 decadal survey for future spacemissions supporting Earth science and applications [1]. The report stated, "Earth sciences have advanced significantly because of existing observational capabilities and the fruit of past investments, along with advances in data and information systems, computer science, and enabling technologies." The report found that NASA had responded favorably and aggressively to the decadal survey and noted the role of the recent ESTO solicitation for information systems technologies that partnered with the NASA Applied Sciences Program to support the transition into operations. NASA's future missions are key stakeholders for the ESTO technology investments. Also driving these investments is the need for the Agency to properly address questions regarding the prediction, adaptation, and eventual mitigation of climate change. The Earth Science Division has championed interdisciplinary research, recognizing that the Earth must be studied as a complete system in order toaddress key science questions [2]. Information technology investments in the low-mid technology readiness level (TRL) range play a key role in meeting these challenges. ESTO's Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) program invests in higher risk / higher reward technologies that solve the most challenging problems of the information processing chain. This includes the space segment, where the information pipeline begins, to the end user, where knowledge is ultimatelyadvanced. The objectives of the program are to reduce the risk, cost, size, and development time of Earth Science space-based and ground

  2. Mission to Planet Earth: The role of new technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Paul; Price, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) Enterprise is a long-duration, comprehensive program to advance scientific knowledge of the Earth as a system. It includes both national and international elements. A diverse array of spacecraft-borne instruments will be placed into various orbits to continuously monitor the land, oceans, atmosphere, ice cover, and solar irradiation. In addition to extending certain sets of data critical to assessing global change, new measurements will be made that further expand our understanding of the world and its dynamic environment. Because the program extends well into the 21st century, programmatic and technical changes are inevitable. This paper addresses the role of new flight and ground system technologies in sustaining the vitality of the MTPE program and describes some specific initiatives that will assist the technology infusion process.

  3. Using immersive media and digital technology to communicate Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Ravi

    2016-04-01

    A number of technologies in digital media and interactivity have rapidly advanced and are now converging to enable rich, multi-sensoral experiences which create opportunities for both digital art and science communication. Techniques used in full-dome film-making can now be deployed in virtual reality experiences; gaming technologies can be utilised to explore real data sets; and collaborative interactivity enable new forms of public artwork. This session will explore these converging trends through a number of emerging and forthcoming projects dealing with Earth science, climate change and planetary science.

  4. Utilization of geothermal energy in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kononov, V.I.; Dvorov, I.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that at present geothermal energy is utilized in the USSR mostly for district heating, and for industrial and agricultural purposes. The populations of 7 towns have district heating that is supplied by thermal waters. The population supplied totals about 125,000 people. The total area of greenhouses is 850,000 m 2 . Electric energy generated at geothermal power stations still remains negligible with the installed capacity of the single Pauzhetka station (Kamchatka) being 11 MW. another station at Mutnovka is currently under construction and is expected to be producing 50 MW by 1992 and 200 MW by 1998. The proven geothermal resources in the USSR provide hope for a significant increase in the utilization of the earth's deep heat in the near future

  5. USSR Report, International Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    In 1976 they accounted for 70 per cent of world exports of bananas, rice, rubber and oil, over 80 per cent of exports of cocoa , tea, coffee, wheat... ferment preparations for cheese- making, production of pectin and instant coffee, construction of hot- house complexes, etc. - • The USSR

  6. Space technology for directly imaging and characterizing exo-Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crill, Brendan P.; Siegler, Nicholas

    2017-09-01

    The detection of Earth-like exoplanets in the habitable zone of their stars, and their spectroscopic characterization in a search for biosignatures, requires starlight suppression that exceeds the current best ground-based performance by orders of magnitude. The required planet/star brightness ratio of order 10-10 at visible wavelengths can be obtained by blocking stellar photons with an occulter, either externally (a starshade) or internally (a coronagraph) to the telescope system, and managing diffracted starlight, so as to directly image the exoplanet in reflected starlight. Coronagraph instruments require advancement in telescope aperture (either monolithic or segmented), aperture obscurations (obscured by secondary mirror and its support struts), and wavefront error sensitivity (e.g. line-of-sight jitter, telescope vibration, polarization). The starshade, which has never been used in a science application, benefits a mission by being decoupled from the telescope, allowing a loosening of telescope stability requirements. In doing so, it transfers the difficult technology from the telescope system to a large deployable structure (tens of meters to greater than 100 m in diameter) that must be positioned precisely at a distance of tens of thousands of kilometers from the telescope. We describe in this paper a roadmap to achieving the technological capability to search for biosignatures on an Earth-like exoplanet from a future space telescope. Two of these studies, HabEx and LUVOIR, include the direct imaging of Earth-sized habitable exoplanets as a central science theme.

  7. The Importance of Technology Readiness in NASA Earth Venture Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, James E.; Komar, George J.

    2009-01-01

    The first set of Venture-class investigations share the characteristic that the technology should be mature and all investigations must use mature technology that has been modeled or demonstrated in a relevant environment (Technology Readiness Level (TRL) >5). Technology Readiness Levels are a systematic metric/measurement system that supports assessments of the maturity of a particular technology and the consistent comparison of maturity between different types of technology. The TRL is used in NASA technology planning. A major step in the level of fidelity of the technology demonstration follows the completion of TRL 5. At TRL 6, a system or subsystem model or prototype must be demonstrated in a relevant environment (ground or space) representative model or prototype system or system, which would go well beyond ad hoc, "patch-cord," or discrete component level breadboarding. These TRL levels are chosen as target objectives for the Program. The challenge for offerors is that they must identify key aspects (uncertainty, multi subsystem complexity, etc) of the TRL estimate that should be properly explained in a submitted proposal. Risk minimization is a key component of the Earth Venture missions. Experiences of prior airborne missions will be shared. The discussion will address aspects of uncertainty and issues surrounding three areas of airborne earth science missions: (1) Aircraft or proposed flight platform -- Expressing the capability of the aircraft in terms of the supporting mission requirements. These issues include airplane performance characteristics (duration, range, altitude, among others) and multiship complexities. (2) Instruments -- Establishing that the instruments have been demonstrated in a relevant environment. Instruments with heritage in prior space missions meet this requirement, as do instruments tested on the ground. Evidence that the instruments have demonstrated the ability to collect data as advertised will be described. The complexity of

  8. The rare earths in modern science and technology. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, G.J.; Ryhne, J.J.; Silber, H.B.

    1982-01-01

    There is no other source book covering current activity in rare earth research as current or as comprehensive as The Rare Earths in Modern Science and Technology. Volume 3 of this series further expands and updates the excellent coverage of the field established in the previous two volumes. It brings together the investigative work of a significant cross section of the scientific and industrial community, including contributions from specialists in chemistry, physics, and materials science. The contributors represent an international gathering, including the first contributions to the series by scientists from the People's Republic of China. Topics examined include bioinorganic chemistry, organometallic and coordination chemistry, spectroscopy, phase equilibria and thermodynamics, structural and solid state chemistry, magnetic properties, hydrides, purification and analysis, and new applications

  9. Time to reorganize federal Earth system science and technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisslinger, Carl

    My usual reaction to plans to reorganize activities in the federal government is that these are the last resort of a bureaucrat who is faced with a tough problem and has no idea how to solve it. However, this may be the time to consider seriously a reorganization that would assemble key elements of Earth-oriented science and technology into a single federal agency. This is not a new idea, as proposals to achieve this goal have been formulated in the past and wiring diagrams for a new agency have been developed. These proposals have faded away in the face of resistance to substantial structural change that characterizes the federal bureaucracy.

  10. USSR Report, International Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-09

    in Albania. Born in 1937. Graduate of Moscow Institute of International Relations. Worked for TASS starting in: 1968 , Was editor for the European...deputy chairman of the USSR Committee of Youth Organizations; chief of the international administration, " Olimpiada - 80" Organizing Committee; chief...Syrian border. As a result of conducting a racist policy of exterminating or expelling the Palestinian Arabs, Israel by 1968 (i.e., within two

  11. USA-USSR protocol

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    On 30 November the USA Atomic Energy Commission and the USSR State Committee for the Utilization of Atomic Energy signed, in Washington, a protocol 'on carrying out of joint projects in the field of high energy physics at the accelerators of the National Accelerator Laboratory (Batavia) and the Institute for High Energy Physics (Serpukhov)'. The protocol will be in force for five years and can be extended by mutual agreement.

  12. USSR Report, Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-04

    but remains in postharvest plant residues and in soil. The treatment of winter wheat seeds with fundozol, benomyl and hexathiuram increases the...differentiate the norms and schedules for applying mineral fertilizers with the use of soil and leaf diagnosis and extensively utilize radical top...production-dispatching administra- tion of USSR Goskomsel’khoztekhnika [State Committee of the Agricultural Equipment Association], Moscow: "A Green

  13. Learning More About Our Earth: An Exploration of NASA's Contributions to Earth Science Through Remote Sensing Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Francis

    2017-01-01

    NASA is commonly known for its pioneering work in space exploration and the technological advancements that made access to space possible. NASA is now increasingly known for the agency's research and technologies that support the Earth sciences. This is a presentation focusing on NASA's Earth science efforts told mostly through the technological innovations NASA uses to achieve a greater understanding of the Earth, making it possible to explore the Earth as a system. Enabling this science is NASA's fleet of over two dozen Earth science spacecraft, supported by aircraft, ships and ground observations. NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is a coordinated series of polar-orbiting and low inclination satellites for long-term global observations of the land surface, biosphere, solid Earth, atmosphere, and oceans. With the launching of the three flagship satellite missions, Terra, Aqua and Aura, beginning in 1999, NASA's initial Mission to Planet Earth made it possible to measure aspects of the environment that touch the lives of every person around the world. NASA harnessing the unique space-based platform means, fortunately, no planet is better studied than the one we actually live on.

  14. Advanced Energy Conversion Technologies and Architectures for Earth and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Joe T.; Fikes, John C.; Phillips, Dane J.; Laycock, Rustin L.; ONeill, Mark; Henley, Mark W.; Fork, Richard L.

    2006-01-01

    Research, development and studies of novel space-based solar power systems, technologies and architectures for Earth and beyond are needed to reduce the cost of clean electrical power for terrestrial use and to provide a stepping stone for providing an abundance of power in space, i.e., manufacturing facilities, tourist facilities, delivery of power between objects in space, and between space and surface sites. The architectures, technologies and systems needed for space to Earth applications may also be used for in-space applications. Advances in key technologies, i.e., power generation, power management and distribution, power beaming and conversion of beamed power are needed to achieve the objectives of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial applications. There is a need to produce "proof-ofconcept" validation of critical WPT technologies for both the near-term, as well as far-term applications. Investments may be harvested in near-term beam safe demonstrations of commercial WPT applications. Receiving sites (users) include ground-based stations for terrestrial electrical power, orbital sites to provide power for satellites and other platforms, future space elevator systems, space vehicle propulsion, and space surface sites. Space surface receiving sites of particular interest include the areas of permanent shadow near the moon s North and South poles, where WPT technologies could enable access to ice and other useful resources for human exploration. This paper discusses work addressing a promising approach to solar power generation and beamed power conversion. The approach is based on a unique high-power solar concentrator array called Stretched Lens Array (SLA) applied to both solar power generation and beamed power conversion. Since both versions (solar and laser) of SLA use many identical components (only the photovoltaic cells need to be different), economies of manufacturing and scale may be realized by using SLA on both ends of the laser power beaming

  15. Proceedings of the international conference on science, technology and applications of rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Rare Earth Elements (REEs) are extensively used in clean energy applications like wind turbines, hybrid car batteries/electric motors, solar energy collectors, permanent magnets, phosphors, multifunctional pigments, thin film technologies, defence - related systems, etc. The use of rare earth elements in modern technology has increased several folds over the past few years in both domestic and international sectors due to the growing economy. The current global demand for rare earths is expected to provide a myriad of business opportunities for rare earth industries across the world including India for the utilization of rare earths in green energy, technology and industry. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  16. USSR Report, Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-11

    Kukharskiy and V.E. Kogan , Institute of Cybernetics, Georgian SSR Academy of Sciences] [Abstract] The system PbO’B203-PbHal2, where Hal is F, Cl, Br...Vasilkov, A.S. Kogan and D.N. Kravtsov, Institute of Heteroorganic Compounds imeni A.N. Nesmeyanov, USSR Academy of Sciences, Moscow] [Abstract...34And now we shall see how they analyze them," invited Aleksandr Nikolayevich Moiseyev, Party organizer, who kindly volunteered to show me around all

  17. Ionic liquid technology for recovery and separation of rare earths

    OpenAIRE

    Binnemans, Koen

    2015-01-01

    End-of-life neodymium-iron-boron and samarium-cobalt permanent magnets, fluorescent lamps and metal hydride batteries are valuable secondary resources of rare earths. These resources are characterised by relatively small volumes, but high concentrations of rare earths [1]. On the other hand, industrial process residues such as bauxite residue (red mud) and phosphogypsum contain low concentrations of rare earths, but are available in huge volumes [2]. Recovery of rare earths from end-of-life c...

  18. Petroleum investments in the ex-USSR republics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walde, T.W.

    1992-01-01

    The ex-USSR is still the world's largest oil and gas producer. Oil was developed in the 19th Century in the Baku region, much through nascent international oil companies and finance houses, such as Rothschild's of Paris. Current oil production is hampered by technological backwardness in some areas, inefficient exploitation of existing fields and the general collapse of the organisational, managerial, infrastructural, commercial and financial foundation for the oil industry accompanying the demise of the Soviet Empire. A recent international conference organised jointly by the Centre for Petroleum and Mineral Law and Policy at the University of Dundee and Petroconsultants brought together international oil companies, merchant banks and representatives of the state petroleum agencies in Eastern Europe and in particular the ex-USSR to discuss the current status and the perspectives for international oil and gas investment in the ex-USSR. (author)

  19. Using Cloud-based Storage Technologies for Earth Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, A.; Readey, J.; Votava, P.

    2016-12-01

    Cloud based infrastructure may offer several key benefits of scalability, built in redundancy and reduced total cost of ownership as compared with a traditional data center approach. However, most of the tools and software systems developed for NASA data repositories were not developed with a cloud based infrastructure in mind and do not fully take advantage of commonly available cloud-based technologies. Object storage services are provided through all the leading public (Amazon Web Service, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud, etc.) and private (Open Stack) clouds, and may provide a more cost-effective means of storing large data collections online. We describe a system that utilizes object storage rather than traditional file system based storage to vend earth science data. The system described is not only cost effective, but shows superior performance for running many different analytics tasks in the cloud. To enable compatibility with existing tools and applications, we outline client libraries that are API compatible with existing libraries for HDF5 and NetCDF4. Performance of the system is demonstrated using clouds services running on Amazon Web Services.

  20. USSR Energy Efficiency and Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Sinyak, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The USSR is the largest energy producer and the second largest energy consumer in the world. Its share of global energy reached above 17% in 1988. The Soviet energy system is characterized by low efficiency and high "per capita" energy consumption, although there are some reasons justifying the greater USSR energy use per unit of product output than in other industrialized countries. The present energy savings potential is approximately equal to one-half of the domestic energy consumption. Im...

  1. Inquiry-Based Science and Technology Enrichment Program: Green Earth Enhanced with Inquiry and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hanna

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a guided inquiry integrated with technology, in terms of female middle-school students' attitudes toward science/scientists and content knowledge regarding selective science concepts (e.g., Greenhouse Effect, Air/Water Quality, Alternative Energy, and Human Health). Thirty-five female students who were entering eighth grade attended an intensive, 1-week Inquiry-Based Science and Technology Enrichment Program which used a main theme, "Green Earth Enhanced with Inquiry and Technology." We used pre- and post-attitude surveys, pre- and post-science content knowledge tests, and selective interviews to collect data and measure changes in students' attitudes and content knowledge. The study results indicated that at the post-intervention measures, participants significantly improved their attitudes toward science and science-related careers and increased their content knowledge of selected science concepts ( p < .05).

  2. Contributions to the rare earths to science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spedding, F.H.

    1975-01-01

    This is a brief summary of some areas of science where the rare earths have already played an important role and of other areas where they are almost certain to be helpful. The discovery, abundance, separation, and properties of rare earths are discussed. It is pointed out that the rare earths comprise almost one-fourth of the known metals, and their alloys a third of the possible alloys

  3. Oil and gas USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    Business co-operation with various foreign partners has begun to develop intensively as a result of the restructuring that is now progressing in the Soviet Union. This is particularly the case with the enterprises and organisations dealing with oil and gas production, all of them component parts of the Ministry of Oil and Gas Industry of the USSR. Owing to the enormous territorial expanse of this country, and also to the rather considerable volume of oil produced, the scheme of organisation of this Ministry is complicated and versatile. This Directory lists all the enterprises and organisations that are component parts of the Ministry, their postal addresses, their telephone numbers and the names of their departmental heads. (author)

  4. USSR Report, Earth Sciences, No. 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    sensor used is of the "Limon" type with a sodium iodide crystal, activated by thallium . This principle was applied in creating the GGP "Ays" gamma...the incidence of diseases of children increased significantly, but unfortunately the time of the earthquake coincided with the maximum incidence of

  5. Emerging Geospatial Sharing Technologies in Earth and Space Science Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R.; Bermudez, L. E.

    2013-12-01

    Emerging Geospatial Sharing Technologies in Earth and Space Science Informatics The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) mission is to serve as a global forum for the collaboration of developers and users of spatial data products and services, and to advance the development of international standards for geospatial interoperability. The OGC coordinates with over 400 institutions in the development of geospatial standards. In the last years two main trends are making disruptions in geospatial applications: mobile and context sharing. People now have more and more mobile devices to support their work and personal life. Mobile devices are intermittently connected to the internet and have smaller computing capacity than a desktop computer. Based on this trend a new OGC file format standard called GeoPackage will enable greater geospatial data sharing on mobile devices. GeoPackage is perhaps best understood as the natural evolution of Shapefiles, which have been the predominant lightweight geodata sharing format for two decades. However the format is extremely limited. Four major shortcomings are that only vector points, lines, and polygons are supported; property names are constrained by the dBASE format; multiple files are required to encode a single data set; and multiple Shapefiles are required to encode multiple data sets. A more modern lingua franca for geospatial data is long overdue. GeoPackage fills this need with support for vector data, image tile matrices, and raster data. And it builds upon a database container - SQLite - that's self-contained, single-file, cross-platform, serverless, transactional, and open source. A GeoPackage, in essence, is a set of SQLite database tables whose content and layout is described in the candidate GeoPackage Implementation Specification available at https://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/?artifact_id=54838&version=1. The second trend is sharing client 'contexts'. When a user is looking into an article or a product on the web

  6. Science and technology of the rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzouz, Abdelkrim; Chegrouche, Salah; Telmoune, Sid-Ali; Layachi, Lazhar

    1992-07-01

    The present work studies the chemical physics properties, the different methods of analysis (neutron activation, emission spectrometry, chromatography), and the techniques of separation of rare earth (electrodeposition, thermic decomposition, salts distillation and ions exchange)

  7. Enabling Communication and Navigation Technologies for Future Near Earth Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, David J.; Heckler, Gregory; Menrad, Robert; Hudiburg, John; Boroson, Don; Robinson, Bryan; Cornwell, Donald

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, the Earth Regimes Network Evolution Study (ERNESt) proposed an architectural concept and technologies that evolve to enable space science and exploration missions out to the 2040 timeframe. The architectural concept evolves the current instantiations of the Near Earth Network and Space Network with new technologies to provide a global communication and navigation network that provides communication and navigation services to a wide range of space users in the near Earth domain. The technologies included High Rate Optical Communications, Optical Multiple Access (OMA), Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN), User Initiated Services (UIS), and advanced Position, Navigation, and Timing technology. This paper describes the key technologies and their current technology readiness levels. Examples of science missions that could be enabled by the technologies and the projected operational benefits of the architecture concept to missions are also described.

  8. Technologies and practices for maintaining and publishing earth science vocabularies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Simon; Yu, Jonathan; Williams, Megan; Giabardo, Fabrizio; Lowe, Dominic

    2015-04-01

    Shared vocabularies are a key element in geoscience data interoperability. Many organizations curate vocabularies, with most Geologic Surveys having a long history of development of lexicons and authority tables. However, their mode of publication is heterogeneous, ranging from PDFs and HTML web pages, spreadsheets and CSV, through various user-interfaces, and public and private APIs. Content maintenance ranges from tightly-governed and externally opaque, through various community processes, all the way to crowd-sourcing ('folksonomies'). Meanwhile, there is an increasing expectation of greater harmonization and vocabulary re-use, which create requirements for standardized content formalization and APIs, along with transparent content maintenance and versioning. We have been trialling a combination of processes and software dealing with vocabulary formalization, registration, search and linking. We use the Simplified Knowledge Organization System (SKOS) to provide a generic interface to content. SKOS is an RDF technology for multi-lingual, hierarchical vocabularies, oriented around 'concepts' denoted by URIs, and thus consistent with Linked Open Data. SKOS may be mixed in with classes and properties from specialized ontologies which provide a more specific interface when required. We have developed a suite of practices and techniques for conversion of content from the source technologies and styles into SKOS, largely based on spreadsheet manipulation before RDF conversion, and SPARQL afterwards. The workflow for each vocabulary must be adapted to match the specific inputs. In linked data applications, two requirements are paramount for user confidence: (i) the URI that denotes a vocabulary item is persistent, and should be dereferenceable indefinitely; (ii) the history and status of the resource denoted by a URI must be available. This is implemented by the Linked Data Registry (LDR), originally developed for the World Meteorological Organization and the UK

  9. An Effect of Technology Based Inquiry Approach on the Learning of "Earth, Sun, & Moon" Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmen, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate what affect a technology based inquiry approach (TBIA) had on 5th grade primary students' understanding of earth, sun, and moon concept in a science and technology course and how this changed their academic achievements. This study was carried out in a 5th grade elementary science and technology course…

  10. Biology as a Key Technological Foundation for Settlement Beyond Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, L. J.; Navarrete, J.; Kent, R. E.; McCutcheon, G.; Pless, E.; Paulino-Lima, I. G.

    2017-01-01

    Moving materials beyond Earth, whether spacecraft, living organisms, or both, is limited by mass constraints. Yet human survival requires an extensive infrastructure, from environmental regulation to life support. In practice this means habitats, food, oxygen, waste recycling, medicine and so on. Thus, there is a mismatch between what will be required in transit and at destination to fulfill dreams of human settlements and what can realistically moved there. Further, settlement off planet with current transportation systems requires the ability to operate independently of the Earth for prolonged periods of time, requiring long-term storage of supplies and the flexibilityto satisfy new needs.

  11. 8. Seminar of the IMP-IIE-ININ on technological specialties. Topic 10: Earth Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The document contains two papers within INIS subject scope which were presented at the 8th Seminar of the IMP-IIE-ININ on technological specialties. Topic 10: Earth Sciences. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper

  12. Propulsion Technology Demonstrator. [Demonstrating Novel CubeSat Technologies in Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmie, John; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Pathfinder Technology Demonstrator (PTD) project will test the operation of a variety of novel CubeSat technologies in low- Earth orbit, providing significant enhancements to the performance of these small and effective spacecraft. Each Pathfinder Technology Demonstrator mission consists of a 6-unit (6U) CubeSat weighing approximately 26 pounds (12 kilograms) and measuring 12 inches x 10 inches x 4 inches (30 centimeters x 25 centimeters x 10 centimeters), comparable in size to a common shoebox. CubeSats are a class of nanosatellites that use a standard size and form factor. The standard Cube- Sat size uses a "one unit" or "1U" measuring 4 inches x 4 inches x 4 inches (10x10x10 centimeters) and is extendable to larger sizes by "stacking" a number of the 1U blocks to form a larger spacecraft. Each PTD spacecraft will also be equipped with deployable solar arrays that provide an average of 44 watts of power while in orbit.

  13. Developing Game Changing Technologies and Bringing Them Down to Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, David

    2016-01-01

    Address to entrepreneurs as a thought leader at the next upcoming seminar on 10/25/2016 at the Cardel Theater in Calgary. The technologies developed by NASA over the 60's through to today, has shaped the world as we know it, driving plastics to nano-electronics. To inspire local entrepreneurs developing new technologies.

  14. USSR energy efficiency and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinyak, Y.

    1991-06-01

    The U.S.S.R. is the largest energy producer and the second largest energy consumer in the world. Its share of global energy use reached above 17% in 1988. The soviet energy system is characterized by low efficiency and high per capita energy consumption, although there are some reasons justifying the greater U.S.S.R. energy use per unit of product output than in other industrialized countries. The present energy-savings potential is approximately equal to one-half of the domestic energy consumption. Improvements in energy efficiency at all levels of the national economy are now considered to be the primary goal of national energy policy for the next couple of decades. Being endowed with abundant natural gas resources, the U.S.S.R. will count on this energy source in the future to improve its energy efficiency, reduce expenses and cope with air pollution. After 2005-2010, stabilized primary energy consumption may be reached or there may even be a decline of total energy use. The U.S.S.R. could reduce CO 2 emissions by 20% by 2030 but with substantial negative impacts on GNP growth. Required improvements in the Soviet energy system depend on changes in energy management, including reduction of the role of centralized planning, decentralization and privatization of energy-producing facilities, energy-price reforms, reshaping of investment patterns, reduction in military expenditures, etc. (author)

  15. LIDAR technology for measuring trace gases on Mars and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riris, H.; Abshire, J. B.; Graham, Allan; Hasselbrack, William; Rodriguez, Mike; Sun, Xiaoli; Weaver, Clark; Mao, Jianping; Kawa, Randy; Li, Steve; Numata, Kenji; Wu, Stewart

    2017-11-01

    Trace gases and their isotopic ratios in planetary atmospheres offer important but subtle clues as to the origins of a planet's atmosphere, hydrology, geology, and potential for biology. An orbiting laser remote sensing instrument is capable of measuring trace gases on a global scale with unprecedented accuracy, and higher spatial resolution that can be obtained by passive instruments. For Earth we have developed laser technique for the remote measurement of the tropospheric CO2, O2, and CH4 concentrations from space. Our goal is to develop a space instrument and mission approach for active CO2 measurements. Our technique uses several on and off-line wavelengths tuned to the CO2 and O2 absorption lines. This exploits the atmospheric pressure broadening of the gas lines to weigh the measurement sensitivity to the atmospheric column below 5 km and maximizes sensitivity to CO2 changes in the boundary layer where variations caused by surface sources and sinks are largest. Simultaneous measurements of O2 column use a selected region in the Oxygen A-band. Laser altimetry and atmospheric backscatter can also be measured simultaneously, which permits determining the surface height and measurements made to thick cloud tops and through aerosol layers. We use the same technique but with a different transmitter at 1.65 um to measure methane concentrations. Methane is also a very important trace gas on earth, and a stronger greenhouse gas than CO2 on a per molecule basis. Accurate, global observations are needed in order to better understand climate change and reduce the uncertainty in the carbon budget. Although carbon dioxide is currently the primary greenhouse gas of interest, methane can have a much larger impact on climate change. Methane levels have remained relatively constant over the last decade but recent observations in the Arctic have indicated that levels may be on the rise due to permafrost thawing. NASA's Decadal Survey underscored the importance of Methane as a

  16. Radiation processing in the U.S.S.R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikaev, A. K.

    The present paper is a short review of the modern status of radiation processing in the U.S.S.R. Data on ionizing radiation sources used in radiation processing are reported. The main directions of the development of this field of technology: radiation modification of materials, radiation curing of coatings, radiation-chemical methods of synthesis, radiation sterilization of medical products, radiation treatment of food, application of ionizing radiation for the solution of ecological problems etc. -are considered.

  17. Technology for complex processing of tin-rare earth raw materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumarev, V.M.; Okunev, A.I.; Krasikov, S.A.; Fedorov, V.D.; Safonov, A.V.

    1995-01-01

    The tested technology for processing of tin-rare earth raw materials with complicated composition, including the stage of reducing-sulfidizing melting of raw materials with tin and rare earth elements (gallium, thulium) transition in fumes, with rare refractory metals (tantalum, niobium, tungsten) transition in iron-base or matter-base alloy and transition of radionuclides in dump slag is offered. 4 fig., 5 refs

  18. Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This curriculum-based, easy-to-follow book teaches young readers about Earth as one of the eight planets in our solar system in astronomical terms. With accessible text, it provides the fundamental information any student needs to begin their studies in astronomy, such as how Earth spins and revolves around the Sun, why it's uniquely suitable for life, its physical features, atmosphere, biosphere, moon, its past, future, and more. To enhance the learning experience, many of the images come directly from NASA. This straightforward title offers the fundamental information any student needs to sp

  19. USSR Report, International Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-16

    annual expeditions to study the earth’s last terra incognita, we can speak of a special, Antarctic type of personality, brave, enterprising, efficient...Liechtenstein Turnover Export Import 25,8 1,0 24,8 7,9 0,8 7,1 Luxembourg Turnover Export Import 14,7 7,4 7,3 19,3 8,1 11,2 Malta

  20. Stable ozone layer in Norway and USSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, K.; Svenoe, T.; Terez, E. I.; Terez, G. A.; Roldugin, V.; Larsen, S. H. H.

    1994-01-01

    Long-term column ozone density measurements have been carried out in Norway and USSR. Data from Tromso and two meridional chains in USSR are analyzed, and most of the stations show that no significant decreasing trend in ozone has occurred during the last two decades.

  1. Earth System Monitoring Selected Entries from the Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Modern Earth System Monitoring represents a fundamental change in the way scientists study the Earth System.  In Oceanography, for the past two centuries, ships have provided the platforms for observing.  Expeditions on the continents and Earth’s poles are land-based analogues. Fundamental understanding of current systems, climate, natural hazards, and ecosystems has been greatly advanced. While these approaches have been remarkably successful, the need to establish measurements over time can only be made using Earth observations and observatories with exacting standards and continuous data.  The 19 peer-reviewed contributions in this volume provide early insights into this emerging view of Earth in both space and time in which change is a critical component of our growing understanding. Presents 19 authoritative, peer-reviewed entries from the Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology Covers a wide range of data collection platforms, including satellite remote sensing, aerial surveys, and l...

  2. Bridging the Gap: Use of Spaceflight Technologies for Earth-Based Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinley, Alaina; Vidlak, Carissa; Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Spaceflight is colloquially deemed, the final frontier, or the last area which humans have not yet explored in great depth. While this is true, there are still many regions on Earth that remain isolated from the urban, socially and electronically connected world. Because travelling to space requires a great deal of foresight, engineers are required to think creatively in order to invent technologies that are durable enough to withstand the rigors of the unique and often treacherous environment of outer space. The innovations that are a result of spaceflight designs can often be applied to life on Earth, particularly in the rural, isolated communities found throughout the world. The NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC) is a collaborative, virtual forum that connects businesses, non-profit organizations, academia, and government agencies to allow for better distribution of ideas and technology between these entities (http://www.nasa.gov/offices/NHHPC). There are many technologies that have been developed for spaceflight that can be readily applied to rural communities on Earth. For example, water filtration systems designed for spaceflight must be robust and easily repaired; therefore, a system with these qualifications may be used in rural areas on Earth. This particular initiative seeks to connect established, non-profit organizations working in isolated communities throughout the world with NASA technologies devised for spaceflight. These technologies could include water purification systems, solar power generators, or telemedicine techniques. Applying innovative, spaceflight technologies to isolated communities on Earth provides greater benefits from the same research dollars, thus fulfilling the Space Life Science motto at Johnson Space Center: Exploring Space and Enhancing Life. This paper will discuss this NHHPC global outreach initiative and give examples based on the recent work of the organization.

  3. Sensor Web Technology Challenges and Advancements for the Earth Science Decadal Survey Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Charles D.; Moe, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the Earth science decadal survey era and the role ESTO developed sensor web technologies can contribute to the scientific observations. This includes hardware and software technology advances for in-situ and in-space measurements. Also discussed are emerging areas of importance such as the potential of small satellites for sensor web based observations as well as advances in data fusion critical to the science and societal benefits of future missions, and the challenges ahead.

  4. 6. Seminar of the IIE-ININ-IMP on technological specialties. Topic 13: earth sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The document includes 12 papers presented at the 6. Seminar of the IIE-ININ-IMP (Mexico) on technological specialties in the field of earth sciences. (Topic 13). Four items were in INIS subject scope and a separate abstract was prepared for each of them

  5. Relativistic Gravitational Experiment in the Earth Orbit: Concept, Technology, and Configuration of Satellite Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabanov, A. A.; Milyukov, V. K.; Moskatiniev, I. V.; Nesterin, I. M.; Sysoev, V. K.; Yudin, A. D.

    2017-12-01

    An arrangement of the orbital experiment on the measurement of the light propagation delay in the gravitational field of the Earth (Shapiro effect) using laser interferometry based on a cluster of small spacecraft (SC) is proposed. SC layouts, launch technology, and high-precision measurements of their orbital parameters are considered.

  6. A Demonstration of Big Data Technology for Data Intensive Earth Science (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, K.; Clune, T.; Ramachandran, R.; Rushing, J.; Fekete, G.; Lin, A.; Doan, K.; Oloso, A. O.; Duffy, D.

    2013-12-01

    Big Data technologies exhibit great potential to change the way we conduct scientific investigations, especially analysis of voluminous and diverse data sets. Obviously, not all Big Data technologies are applicable to all aspects of scientific data analysis. Our NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) project, Automated Event Service (AES), pioneers the exploration of Big Data technologies for data intensive Earth science. Since Earth science data are largely stored and manipulated in the form of multidimensional arrays, the project first evaluates array performance of several candidate Big Data technologies, including MapReduce (Hadoop), SciDB, and a custom-built Polaris system, which have one important feature in common: shared nothing architecture. The evaluation finds SicDB to be the most promising. In this presentation, we demonstrate SciDB using a couple of use cases, each operating on a distinct data set in the regular latitude-longitude grid. The first use case is the discovery and identification of blizzards using NASA's Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Application (MERRA) data sets. The other finds diurnal signals in the same 8-year period using SSMI data from three different instruments with different equator crossing times by correlating their retrieved parameters. In addition, the AES project is also developing a collaborative component to enable the sharing of event queries and results. Preliminary capabilities will be presented as well.

  7. Technology Required to Image and Characterize an exo-Earth from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crill, Brendan

    2018-01-01

    NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program (ExEP) guides the development of technology that enables the direct imaging and characterization of exo-Earths in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars with future space observatories. Here we present the 2018 ExEP Technology Gap List, an annual update to ExEP's list of technologies, to be advanced in the next 1-5 years. Key technology gaps are starlight suppression with a coronagraph (internal occulters) or a starshade (external occulters), enabling imaging at extreme contrast (more than 10 billion) by blocking on-axis starlight, while allowing the reflected light of off-axis exoplanets be detected. Building and operating a space coronagraph capable of imaging an exo-Earth will require new technologies beyond those of WFIRST, the first high-contrast coronagraph in space. A starshade has never been used in a space mission and requires new capabilities in precision deployment of large structures, starlight suppression, and in formation sensing and control. We review the current state-of-the-art in coronagraph and starshade technology and the performance level that must be achieved to discover and characterize Earth analogs.

  8. Technology for monitoring global change. [NASA Technology Initiative for space based observations of Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Gordon I.; Hudson, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    Multiinstrumented earth-science platforms currently being planned for both LEO and GEO positions will furnish data for the compilation of systematic and intercorrelated information that is suitable for the treatment of interdisciplinary questions concerning atmospheric, oceanic, hydrological, geological, and biological changes of an either natural or anthropogenic nature. Attention will be given in these observational campaigns to such essential earth variables as atmospheric pressure, rainfall/snowfall, vegetation cover, soil nutrient cycles, sea surface temperatures, ocean circulation, and ocean biological productivity.

  9. A Synergy Framework for the integration of Earth Observation technologies into Disaster Risk Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetani, Francesco; Petiteville, Ivan; Pisano, Francesco; Rudari, Roberto; St Pierre, Luc

    2015-04-01

    Earth observations and space-based applications have seen a considerable advance in the last decade, and such advances should find their way in applications related to DRR, climate change and sustainable development, including in the indicators to monitor advances in these areas. The post-2015 framework for disaster risk reduction, as adopted by the 3rd WCDRR is a action-oriented framework for disaster risk reduction that builds on modalities of cooperation linking local, national, regional and global efforts. Earth observations from ground and space platforms and related applications will play a key role in facilitating the implementation of the HFA2 and represent a unique platform to observe and assess how risks have changed in recent years, as well as to track the reduction in the level of exposure of communities. The proposed white paper focuses mainly on Earth Observation from space but it also addresses the use of other sources of data ( airborne, marine, in-situ, socio-economic and model outputs) in combination to remote sensing data. Earth observations (EO) and Space-based technologies can play a crucial role in contributing to the generation of relevant information to support informed decision-making regarding risk and vulnerability reduction and to address the underlying factors of disaster risk. For example, long series of Earth observation data collected over more than 30 years already contribute to track changes in the environment and in particular, environmental degradation around the world. Earth observation data is key to the work of the scientific community. Whether due to inadequate land-use policies, lack of awareness or understanding regarding such degradation, or inadequate use of natural resources including water and the oceans; Earth observation technologies are now routinely employed by many Ministries of Environment and Natural Resources worldwide to monitor the extent of degradation and a basis to design and enact new environmental

  10. Advance the Earth Science Education in China by Using New Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, R.; Wang, X.; Sun, L.

    2013-12-01

    With the development of Chinese economy, science and technology, as well as the increasing demand of the persons with knowledge and experience in earth science and geological exploration, the higher education of earth science has been boosted in recent years. There are 2,000 to 3,000 students studying earth science every year and many of them will take part in scientific research and engineering technology work around the world after graduation, which increased the demand of educators, both in quantity and quality. However, the fact is that there is a huge gap between the demand and the current number of educators due to the explosion of students, which makes the reform of traditional education methods inevitable. There is great significance in doing research on the teaching methods catering to a large number of students. Some research contents and result based on the reform of education methods has been conducted. We integrate the teaching contents with the cutting-edge research projects and stress significance of earth science, which will greatly enhance the student's enthusiasm of it. Moreover. New technology will be applied to solve the problem that every teacher are responsible for 100~150 students in one courses. For instance, building the Internet platform where teachers and the students can discuss the courses contents, read the latest scientific articles. With the numerical simulation technology, the internal structure of the Earth, geological phenomena, characteristics of ore body, geophysical and hydrological fields, etc. can be simulated and the experiments and teaching practice can be demonstrated via video technology. It can also be used to design algorithm statistics and assessment and monitor teaching effect. Students are separated into small groups to take research training with their personal tutor at the beginning of the first semester, which will increase the opportunities for students to communicate with educators and solve the problem that the

  11. The USSR long-term energy program in action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troitskij, A.A.; Shamrayev, N.G.; Makarov, A.A.; Volfberg, D.B.; Pravednikov, N.K.

    1989-09-01

    Five years have passed since the adoption of the USSR Energy Program developed up to the end of the 20th century. The present report covers main results of this Program. Fuel production and extraction has grown up, substantial increases have been achieved in electricity production, improvements have been made in the energy balance structure and energy efficiency of public production. The arrears in oil and coal production which became apparent in the early 80s were caught up, and losses of associated petroleum gases were lowered. The actual production of natural gas has turned out to be higher as compared with the level stipulated in the Program. The Chernobyl accident has contributed to a certain limitation in the scale of growth of nuclear electricity production. Nevertheless, the nuclear power industry remains to be the most dynamically developing branch in electricity production. Of paramount importance in the USSR Energy Program is the role played by the progress of science and technology - the major means of raising efficiency of the fuel-and-energy complex and achieving the targets in the field of energy conservation. It is also planned to show the role of the USSR Energy Program in solving energy problems in CMEA member countries, in developing mutually beneficial international cooperation in the field of energy. 2 tabs

  12. High End Computing Technologies for Earth Science Applications: Trends, Challenges, and Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, John (Technical Monitor); Biswas, Rupak; Yan, Jerry C.; Brooks, Walter F.; Sterling, Thomas L.

    2003-01-01

    Earth science applications of the future will stress the capabilities of even the highest performance supercomputers in the areas of raw compute power, mass storage management, and software environments. These NASA mission critical problems demand usable multi-petaflops and exabyte-scale systems to fully realize their science goals. With an exciting vision of the technologies needed, NASA has established a comprehensive program of advanced research in computer architecture, software tools, and device technology to ensure that, in partnership with US industry, it can meet these demanding requirements with reliable, cost effective, and usable ultra-scale systems. NASA will exploit, explore, and influence emerging high end computing architectures and technologies to accelerate the next generation of engineering, operations, and discovery processes for NASA Enterprises. This article captures this vision and describes the concepts, accomplishments, and the potential payoff of the key thrusts that will help meet the computational challenges in Earth science applications.

  13. USSR Report, International Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-26

    countries to the intensive type of social reproduction (progressive structural shifts in the economy; the acceleration of scientific-technical...between economic and extra-economic factors ot social reproduction . He reveals not only the workings and results of the technological revolution, but

  14. Exploring Rare Earths supply constraints for the emerging clean energy technologies and the role of recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habib, Komal; Wenzel, Henrik

    with other background end-uses on two key REEs, i.e. neodymium (Nd) and dysprosium (Dy). Our study reveals that a highly accelerated rate of REEs mining is unavoidable in order to keep up with the pace of increasing demand from new technologies required in a renewable energy strategy for meeting the climate......The dependency on critical resources like Rare Earth Elements (REEs) has been pronounced as a potential barrier to a broader implementation of emerging renewable energy technologies. This study explores the dependency of such technologies especially wind turbines and electric vehicles along...

  15. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, L. R. (Editor); Teeter, R. (Editor); Teeter, R. (Editor); Teeter, R. (Editor); Teeter, R. (Editor); Teeter, R. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    This is the eighth issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 48 papers recently published in Russian language periodicals and bound collections and of 10 new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables. Additional features include reviews of two Russian books on radiobiology and a description of the latest meeting of an international working group on remote sensing of the Earth. Information about English translations of Soviet materials available to readers is provided. The topics covered in this issue have been identified as relevant to 33 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology. These areas are: adaptation, biological rhythms, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cosmonaut training, cytology, endocrinology, enzymology, equipment and instrumentation, exobiology, gastrointestinal system, genetics, group dynamics, habitability and environment effects, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, man-machine systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, personnel selection, psychology, reproductive biology, and space biology and medicine.

  16. Earth remote sensing as an effective tool for the development of advanced innovative educational technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorova, Vera; Mayorov, Kirill

    2009-11-01

    Current educational system is facing a contradiction between the fundamentality of engineering education and the necessity of applied learning extension, which requires new methods of training to combine both academic and practical knowledge in balance. As a result there are a number of innovations being developed and implemented into the process of education aimed at optimizing the quality of the entire educational system. Among a wide range of innovative educational technologies there is an especially important subset of educational technologies which involve learning through hands-on scientific and technical projects. The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation of educational technologies based on small satellites development as well as the usage of Earth remote sensing data acquired from these satellites. The increase in public attention to the education through Earth remote sensing is based on the concern that although there is a great progress in the development of new methods of Earth imagery and remote sensing data acquisition there is still a big question remaining open on practical applications of this kind of data. It is important to develop the new way of thinking for the new generation of people so they understand that they are the masters of their own planet and they are responsible for its state. They should desire and should be able to use a powerful set of tools based on modern and perspective Earth remote sensing. For example NASA sponsors "Classroom of the Future" project. The Universities Space Research Association in United States provides a mechanism through which US universities can cooperate effectively with one another, with the government, and with other organizations to further space science and technology, and to promote education in these areas. It also aims at understanding the Earth as a system and promoting the role of humankind in the destiny of their own planet. The Association has founded a Journal of Earth System

  17. USSR Report, International Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-28

    Angola IDEOLOGY AND POLITICS . B. Klyuyev. Islam in India • • • OUR TRIBUNAL ,.,■., Said Amir Zara . Afghanistan. The Social Base of Revolution...states. An example of such cooperation may be the relations with India . They are distinguished by a high degree of trust and mutual understanding. The...an exhibit entitled "Contemporary Industrial Technology of Austria" which will be an important part of the year’s bilateral economic relations

  18. Technology Readiness Level Assessment Process as Applied to NASA Earth Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leete, Stephen J.; Romero, Raul A.; Dempsey, James A.; Carey, John P.; Cline, Helmut P.; Lively, Carey F.

    2015-01-01

    Technology assessments of fourteen science instruments were conducted within NASA using the NASA Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Metric. The instruments were part of three NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey missions in pre-formulation. The Earth Systematic Missions Program (ESMP) Systems Engineering Working Group (SEWG), composed of members of three NASA Centers, provided a newly modified electronic workbook to be completed, with instructions. Each instrument development team performed an internal assessment of its technology status, prepared an overview of its instrument, and completed the workbook with the results of its assessment. A team from the ESMP SEWG met with each instrument team and provided feedback. The instrument teams then reported through the Program Scientist for their respective missions to NASA's Earth Science Division (ESD) on technology readiness, taking the SEWG input into account. The instruments were found to have a range of TRL from 4 to 7. Lessons Learned are presented; however, due to the competition-sensitive nature of the assessments, the results for specific missions are not presented. The assessments were generally successful, and produced useful results for the agency. The SEWG team identified a number of potential improvements to the process. Particular focus was on ensuring traceability to guiding NASA documents, including the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. The TRL Workbook has been substantially modified, and the revised workbook is described.

  19. Integrating emerging earth science technologies into disaster risk management: an enterprise architecture approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. D.; Hao, W.; Chettri, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Disaster risk management has grown to rely on earth observations, multi-source data analysis, numerical modeling, and interagency information sharing. The practice and outcomes of disaster risk management will likely undergo further change as several emerging earth science technologies come of age: mobile devices; location-based services; ubiquitous sensors; drones; small satellites; satellite direct readout; Big Data analytics; cloud computing; Web services for predictive modeling, semantic reconciliation, and collaboration; and many others. Integrating these new technologies well requires developing and adapting them to meet current needs; but also rethinking current practice to draw on new capabilities to reach additional objectives. This requires a holistic view of the disaster risk management enterprise and of the analytical or operational capabilities afforded by these technologies. One helpful tool for this assessment, the GEOSS Architecture for the Use of Remote Sensing Products in Disaster Management and Risk Assessment (Evans & Moe, 2013), considers all phases of the disaster risk management lifecycle for a comprehensive set of natural hazard types, and outlines common clusters of activities and their use of information and computation resources. We are using these architectural views, together with insights from current practice, to highlight effective, interrelated roles for emerging earth science technologies in disaster risk management. These roles may be helpful in creating roadmaps for research and development investment at national and international levels.

  20. Policy for Robust Space-based Earth Science, Technology and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly Elizabeth; Escobar, Vanessa Marie; Aschbacher, Josef; Milagro-Pérez, Maria Pilar; Doorn, Bradley; Macauley, Molly K.; Friedl, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing technology has contributed to the transformation of multiple earth science domains, putting space observations at the forefront of innovation in earth science. With new satellite missions being launched every year, new types of earth science data are being incorporated into science models and decision-making systems in a broad array of organizations. Policy guidance can influence the degree to which user needs influence mission design and when, and ensure that satellite missions serve both the scientific and user communities without becoming unfocused and overly expensive. By considering the needs of the user community early on in the mission-design process, agencies can ensure that satellites meet the needs of multiple constituencies. This paper describes the mission development process in NASA and ESA and compares and contrasts the successes and challenges faced by these agencies as they try to balance science and applications within their missions.

  1. New technology of extracting the amount of rare earth metals from the red mud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martoyan, G A; Karamyan, G G; Vardan, G A

    2016-01-01

    The paper outlined the environmental and economic problems associated with red mud - the waste generated in processing of bauxite ore for aluminum production. The chemical analysis of red mud has identified a number of useful elements including rare earth metals. The electromembrane technology of red mud processing with extraction of valuable elements is described. A possible scheme of separation of these metals through electrolysis is also given. (paper)

  2. New technology of extracting the amount of rare earth metals from the red mud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martoyan, G. A.; Karamyan, G. G.; Vardan, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper outlined the environmental and economic problems associated with red mud - the waste generated in processing of bauxite ore for aluminum production. The chemical analysis of red mud has identified a number of useful elements including rare earth metals. The electromembrane technology of red mud processing with extraction of valuable elements is described. A possible scheme of separation of these metals through electrolysis is also given.

  3. USSR Report, Human Resources, No. 73

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1983-01-01

    .... This document contains articles concerning Human Resources in the USSR. This serial report contains information on trends and policies of the labor force, demographic factors, and the Soviet educational system...

  4. Evaluating rare earth element availability: a case with revolutionary demand from clean technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Elisa; Sherman, Andrew M; Wallington, Timothy J; Everson, Mark P; Field, Frank R; Roth, Richard; Kirchain, Randolph E

    2012-03-20

    The future availability of rare earth elements (REEs) is of concern due to monopolistic supply conditions, environmentally unsustainable mining practices, and rapid demand growth. We present an evaluation of potential future demand scenarios for REEs with a focus on the issue of comining. Many assumptions were made to simplify the analysis, but the scenarios identify some key variables that could affect future rare earth markets and market behavior. Increased use of wind energy and electric vehicles are key elements of a more sustainable future. However, since present technologies for electric vehicles and wind turbines rely heavily on dysprosium (Dy) and neodymium (Nd), in rare-earth magnets, future adoption of these technologies may result in large and disproportionate increases in the demand for these two elements. For this study, upper and lower bound usage projections for REE in these applications were developed to evaluate the state of future REE supply availability. In the absence of efficient reuse and recycling or the development of technologies which use lower amounts of Dy and Nd, following a path consistent with stabilization of atmospheric CO(2) at 450 ppm may lead to an increase of more than 700% and 2600% for Nd and Dy, respectively, over the next 25 years if the present REE needs in automotive and wind applications are representative of future needs.

  5. New Dimensions of GIS Data: Exploring Virtual Reality (VR) Technology for Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolnik, S.; Ramirez-Linan, R.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Earth Science Division (ESD) Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) and Navteca are exploring virtual reality (VR) technology as an approach and technique related to the next generation of Earth science technology information systems. Having demonstrated the value of VR in viewing pre-visualized science data encapsulated in a movie representation of a time series, further investigation has led to the additional capability of permitting the observer to interact with the data, make selections, and view volumetric data in an innovative way. The primary objective of this project has been to investigate the use of commercially available VR hardware, the Oculus Rift and the Samsung Gear VR, for scientific analysis through an interface to ArcGIS to enable the end user to order and view data from the NASA Discover-AQ mission. A virtual console is presented through the VR interface that allows the user to select various layers of data from the server in both 2D, 3D, and full 4pi steradian views. By demonstrating the utility of VR in interacting with Discover-AQ flight mission measurements, and building on previous work done at the Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA Langley supporting analysis of sources of CO2 during the Discover-AQ mission, the investigation team has shown the potential for VR as a science tool beyond simple visualization.

  6. AMS_02 Particle Physics Detector Technologies Orbiting the Earth (2/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    AMS-02 has taken the high performance technologies used in particle physics and implemented them for use in low Earth orbit. Safety aspects for the Space Shuttle flight, that carried AMS_02 to the International Space Station, Space environment and inaccessibility during the life of AMS_02 are some of the aspects which have driven the design of the experiment. The technical challenges to build such a detector have been surmounted through the close collaboration amongst the AMS scientists and industries around the world. Their efforts have resulted in the development of new technologies and higher standards of precision.

  7. AMS_02 Particle Physics Detector Technologies Orbiting the Earth (1/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    AMS-02 has taken the high performance technologies used in particle physics and implemented them for use in low Earth orbit. Safety aspects for the Space Shuttle flight, that carried AMS_02 to the International Space Station, Space environment and inaccessibility during the life of AMS_02 are some of the aspects which have driven the design of the experiment. The technical challenges to build such a detector have been surmounted through the close collaboration amongst the AMS scientists and industries around the world. Their efforts have resulted in the development of new technologies and higher standards of precision.

  8. Beyond Moore's Law: Harnessing spatial-digital disruptive technologies for Digital Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foresman, Timothy W.

    2016-11-01

    Moore's law will reach its plateau by 2020. Big data, however, will continue to increase as the Internet of Things and social media converge into the new era of ‘huge data’. Disruptive technologies, including big data and cloud computing are forces impacting business and government communities. The truth of our collective future is suggested to align with the Digital Earth (DE) vision. Benefits of technological advances will be manifested from business performance improvements based on capitalizing the locational attributes of corporate and government assets - the foundation of big data. Better governance and better business represents a key foundation for sustainability and therefore should be explicit DE guiding principles.

  9. The Teaching of Anthropogenic Climate Change and Earth Science via Technology-Enabled Inquiry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Drew; Sieber, Renee; Seiler, Gale; Chandler, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A gap has existed between the tools and processes of scientists working on anthropogenic global climate change (AGCC) and the technologies and curricula available to educators teaching the subject through student inquiry. Designing realistic scientific inquiry into AGCC poses a challenge because research on it relies on complex computer models, globally distributed data sets, and complex laboratory and data collection procedures. Here we examine efforts by the scientific community and educational researchers to design new curricula and technology that close this gap and impart robust AGCC and Earth Science understanding. We find technology-based teaching shows promise in promoting robust AGCC understandings if associated curricula address mitigating factors such as time constraints in incorporating technology and the need to support teachers implementing AGCC and Earth Science inquiry. We recommend the scientific community continue to collaborate with educational researchers to focus on developing those inquiry technologies and curricula that use realistic scientific processes from AGCC research and/or the methods for determining how human society should respond to global change.

  10. The former USSR: an energy balance in urgent need of improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provost, H.

    1993-01-01

    The energy balance of the former USSR is a decisive factor in the economies of the countries now remaining. This balance is facing a crunch due to excessive consumption of liquid hydrocarbons, combined with a downswing in production since 1988. There is a pressing need to open up the petroleum industries to Western technologies and partnerships. 1 fig., 4 tabs

  11. Research On Technology Of Making Rare Earth Alloy Having Rare Earth Content ≽30% From Ore (≽40% REO) Using Aluminum Thermal Technology In Arc Furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo Xuan Hung; Ngo Trong Hiep; Tran Duy Hai; Nguyen Huu Phuc

    2014-01-01

    Arc furnace was used to smelt materials consisting of rare earth ore having rare earth content of ≽40% REO, aluminum as the reducing agent and additives. Rare earth alloy was obtained with rare earth metal content of more than 30%. (author)

  12. Advanced Concepts, Technologies and Flight Experiments for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Barry D.

    2000-01-01

    Over the last 25 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has established a tradition of excellence in scientific research and leading-edge system developments, which have contributed to improved scientific understanding of our Earth system. Specifically, LaRC advances knowledge of atmospheric processes to enable proactive climate prediction and, in that role, develops first-of-a-kind atmospheric sensing capabilities that permit a variety of new measurements to be made within a constrained enterprise budget. These advances are enabled by the timely development and infusion of new, state-of-the-art (SOA), active and passive instrument and sensor technologies. In addition, LaRC's center-of-excellence in structures and materials is being applied to the technological challenges of reducing measurement system size, mass, and cost through the development and use of space-durable materials; lightweight, multi-functional structures; and large deployable/inflatable structures. NASA Langley is engaged in advancing these technologies across the full range of readiness levels from concept, to components, to prototypes, to flight experiments, and on to actual science mission infusion. The purpose of this paper is to describe current activities and capabilities, recent achievements, and future plans of the integrated science, engineering, and technology team at Langley Research Center who are working to enable the future of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise.

  13. Rare earth elements-critical resources for green energy and digital technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.

    2013-01-01

    High technology and environment applications of the Rare Earth Elements (REE) have grown dramatically in diversity and importance over the past few decades. The REE forms largest economical coherent group in the periodic table. The versatility and specialty of the REE has given them a level of technological, environment and economical importance. As technological applications of REE have multiplied over the past several decades, the demand for them has increased dramatically. The green energy is the segment, which is largely contributed in its performance by the REE. The increasing concern about the impact of green house gases around the globe has made countries to explore clean energy technologies to reduce emissions. India has ambitious plans for generating solar power of 30,000 MW and wind energy of 50,000 MW by 2013. Critical component with respect to wind energy is the high strength rare earth permanent magnet, while in hybrid electrical motors REEs like lanthanum are used in LiMH battery pack

  14. A Possible Technology Development Path to Direct Imaging of Exo-Earths from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    We describe a possible roadmap to achieving the technological capability to search for biosignatures on an Earth-like exoplanet from a future space telescope. The detection of Earth-like exoplanets in the habitable zone of their stars, and their spectroscopic characterization in a search for biosignatures, requires starlight suppression that exceeds the current best ground-based performance by orders of magnitude. The required planet/star brightness ratio of order 1e-10 at visible wavelengths can be obtained by blocking stellar photons with an occulter, either externally (a starshade) or internally (a coronagraph) to the telescope system, and managing diffracted starlight, so as to directly image the exoplanet in reflected starlight. Coronagraph instruments require advancement in telescope aperture (either monolithic or segmented), aperture obscurations (obscured by secondary mirror and its support struts), and wavefront error sensitivity (e.g. line-of-sight jitter, telescope vibration, polarization). The starshade, which has never been used in a science application, benefits a mission by being decoupled from the telescope, allowing a loosening of telescope stability requirements. In doing so, it transfers the difficult technology from the telescope system to a large deployable structure (tens of meters to greater than ~ 100 m in diameter) that must be positioned precisely at a distance of tens of thousands of kilometers from the telescope. Two ongoing mission concept studies, HabEx and LUVOIR, include the direct imaging of Earth-sized habitable exoplanets as a central science theme.

  15. EarthServer: a Summary of Achievements in Technology, Services, and Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Peter

    2015-04-01

    based on OGC and W3C standards, in particular the Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS) which defines a high-level coverage query language. Reviewers have attested EarthServer that "With no doubt the project has been shaping the Big Earth Data landscape through the standardization activities within OGC, ISO and beyond". We present the project approach, its outcomes and impact on standardization and Big Data technology, and vistas for the future.

  16. Information Technology Infusion Case Study: Integrating Google Earth(Trademark) into the A-Train Data Depot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter; Kempler, Steven; Leptoukh, Gregory; Chen, Aijun

    2010-01-01

    This poster paper represents the NASA funded project that was to employ the latest three dimensional visualization technology to explore and provide direct data access to heterogeneous A-Train datasets. Google Earth (tm) provides foundation for organizing, visualizing, publishing and synergizing Earth science data .

  17. JPRS Report, Science & Technology USSR: Physics & Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-09

    real constants a,k,l. Another special case besides the Kerr metric with 1 = 1 and the Gutsunayev-Manko solution with 1 = -1 is the Schwarzschild ...temperature behind the shock wave- front remain constant. Development of an electron ava- lanche is accounted for by adding the two reactions N2 + e...superheat reached at that instant. Tests were performed with aqueous solutions of ethanol, with rhodamine G dye added as thermal sensitizer in

  18. USSR Report, Science and Technology Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-10

    organizations and enterprises. The existing procedure of the free, in practice popular receipt of scientific and technical information suffers, in...Information on the Social Sciences (INION) »Ekonomika. Novaya inostrannaya literatura po obshchestvennym naukam» [Economics. New Foreign Literature on the...vividly as possible the questions of scientific and technical progress and in popularizing and "translating" new scientific and technical ideas into the

  19. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-15

    Tar Obtained by High-Speed Pyrolysis of Kansk-Achinsk Coal (I.V. Tsykovskaya, T.Yu. Stolyarova, et al.; ZHURNAL PRIKLADNOY KHIMII, No 2, Feb 87...Chemical analysis of the plants (cucumbers, tomatoes , beets, cabbage, potatotes) demonstrated a significant rise in the levels of Fe, Mn, Zn, Ni and Cr...ways of processing heavy oil residues, pyrolysis of gaseous and liquid crude, production of aromatic hydrocarbons, production of monomers

  20. JPRS Report Science & Technology USSR: Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-18

    Fractionated Irradiation [V. N. Malakhovskiy, M. I. Bokk; RADIOBIOLOGIYA, Vol 29 No 3, May-Jun 89] 41 Melanin Acts as Radioprotector [A. Patyko...Alternaria alternata, Aureobasidium pullulans, Tricho- derma viride; but Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium her- barum, Stemphylium ilicis, and Ulocladium atrum...of the above. Melanin -producing micromycetes predominated on materials subjected to storage both in open fields and sheds. Determinations of

  1. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-09

    Dehydrogenase Activity (A.N. Gaydamakin, M.M. Abramov ; RADIOBIOLOGIYA, No 4, Jul-Aug 87) 37 Radioprotective Efficacy and Mechanism of Action of... Abramov ] [Abstract] Comparative studies were conducted on outbred rats and dogs in order to assess the indicator value of lymphocytic succinate

  2. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-08

    nothing more alien to man than a robot./ ■— Karel Capek , "R.U.R" 16 "And yet, life offers us numerous examples of an entirely different organi...Domln: They will never think up anything new. They could be perfect university professors./ — Karel Capek , "R.U.R." As a matter of fact, Sapatyy is not

  3. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-11

    and for use in modules for water desalination and obtaining extra- pure water required by the power, machine building, and electronics industries. New...the possibility of desalination of pre-softened KDV, using an imitation solution of average degree of mineralization and treating it with a unit...charge-selective membrane, MK-100, modified with ethylenediamine. After dialysis, using the modified membrane, 50 the resulting brine concentrate

  4. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-28

    to significantly decrease the cost of discharge air purification. References 9: Russian. UDC 66.096.5:66.099.2 Granulation Process in Fluidized Bed ...A. S. Parfenov, and Yu. I. Chernyayev] [Abstract] It has been demonstrated experimentally that during fluidized bed granulation new centers of...INDUSTRY JPRS-UCH-90-014 28 December 1990 only slightly. The results indicate that the granule -metric composition in fluidized bed granulation can

  5. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Materials Science

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1988-01-01

    Partial Contents: Analysis, Testing, Fracture Surface, Corrosion, Metal COrrosion, Nitrogen, Sugar Cane, Wax, Corrosion Resistance, Alloy, Titanium, Electrochemical Behavior, Crystalline States, Electrolytic Titanium...

  6. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-28

    KHIMII in Russian Vo] 32, No 1, Jan-Fcb 86 pp 138-139 [ Review by Professor B. A. Kasavina, Moscow, of book by A. A. Prokbonchukov, N. A. Zhizhina... reviewed outlines contemporary concepts concerning the composition, structure and nature of formation of the organic and mineral phases of bones and...UkSSR in 1983-1984. Phytopathological and bacteriological analysis of affected samples revealed bacteriosis agents of the seeds. The seeds studied

  7. JPRS Report Science & Technology USSR: Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-09

    more often (p < 0.01) among the causes of hospital death than are myocardial rupture, arrhythmia , thromboembolisms, etc. Thus, the data obtained in... newborn infants. This research is financed by the UkSSR Academy of Sciences within the framework of the scientific-technical program "Ecology of the

  8. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-08

    fibrous complex-forming sorbent with amidoxime groups to preconcentrate the metals. The metals were sorption concentrated on a filter made of nonwoven ...Chromatographie Determination of Cholesterol in Blood Plasma [G. M. Kheyfets; ZHURNAL ANALITICHESKOY KHIMII, Vol 45 No 4, Apr 90] 2 Atomic Absorption...of moist gaseous samples. The accuracy of results from determining components without filter -drying the sample increased more than fourfold in this

  9. USSR Report: Cybernetics, Computers and Automation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-03

    to use sound judgment in choosing hardware corresponding to the con- ditions of the most economic approach to tasks of the automated control system...goods for groups 8191 "Goods of the Textile Industry (Except for Fabrics, Nonwoven Materials and Knitted Items)," 8218 "Heavy Cotton Industrial Fabrics...generation of software for ASUTP, that are being implemented at similar UKPG, has been developed. The distinguishing feature of ASUTP UKPG with absorption

  10. JPRS Report Science & Technology USSR: Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-18

    Characteristics of Derivatives of RP4 Plasmid With Broad Host Spectrum With Variable Properties of Maintenance and Heredity (P. Dobrovolski, V.A. Sakanyan...Clinical Immunology Work-Up and Hypersensitivity Aspects of Urticaria Induced by Pyrazoline Derivatives CYu, A, Poroshina, L. V. Luss, et al

  11. JPRS Report, Science & Technology USSR: Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-12

    COAL PROCESSING Physical-Chemical and Heat-Engineering Properties of Khandinsk Lignite Deposit Coal [G. I. Khromykh, M. A. Matveyeva, et al...Article by Suresh C. Ameta, R. S. Ameta, Rakesh Bhandia, MISS Sapna Sahasi and R. K. Jain, Sukhadin University, India ] UDC 541.128 [Abstract] Results...UCH-91-008 12 August 1991 Physical-Chemical and Heat-Engineering Properties of Khandinsk Lignite Deposit Coal 917M0101A Moscow KH1MIYA TVERDOGO

  12. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Life Sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1987-01-01

    Partial Contents: Aerospace Medicine, Agricultural Science, Biochemistry, Biophysics, Biotechnology, Epidemiology, Genetics, Immunology, Industrial Medicine, Laser Bioeffects, Marine Mammals, Medicine, Microbiology...

  13. JPRS Report Science & Technology USSR: Life Sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1990-01-01

    Partial Contents: Agricultural Science, Biochemistry, Biophysics, Epidemiology, Genetics, Laser Bioeffects, Medicine, Microbiology, Molecular Biology, Nonionizing Radiation Effects, Physiology, Public Health...

  14. JPRS Report Science & Technology USSR: Life Sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1988-01-01

    ...: Life sciences, aerospace medicine, agriculture science, biochemistry, biophysics, genetics, immunology, industrial medicine, laser bioeffects, medicine, molecular biology, nonionizing radiation...

  15. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Life Sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1988-01-01

    Partial Contents: Biochemistry, Biophysics, Biotechnology, Genetics, Immunology, Industrial Medicine, Laser Bioeffects, Marine Mammals, Medicine, Microbiology, Molecular Biology, Nonionizing Radiation Effects...

  16. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Engineering & Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-05

    apparatus included an objective and an ocular, also a master collimator with a Foucault grating as viewed object in its focal plane. Several gratings...in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor, such a rod being filled with material which absorbs neutrons and embedded in a granular pile which resists ...22 passes. The resistance to plowing increases by 27 16-25 percent due to the tracks of caterpillar tractors, the resistance due to heavy wheeled

  17. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    the order Agaricales , which possess hallucinogenic proper- ties. Of particular interest are the species which contain the pharmacologically active...indol compound psilocy- bin. At the present time approximately 120 species of Agaricales fungi are known, approximately half of which produce...uents of the Agaricales . BEITR. BIOCHEM. PHYSIOL. NATUR, 1965, pp 501-507. COPYRIGHT: Izdatelstvo "Nauka", "Mikologiya i fito- patololgiya", 1988

  18. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-23

    attributed to chelation of nonheme iron . Figures 4; references 12: 5 Russian, 7 Western. 12172/9835 CSO: 1840/504 27 BIOPHYSICS UDC 577.344...substrates. The covalent binding and inhibition of RI did not involve inhibition of NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase and conversion of P-450 to P-420...electrons through C-559. It appears plasible that C-559 heme is the iron - porphyrln group located closest to bacteriochlorophyl dimer in the

  19. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-04

    smooth muscle and depressing non-adrenergic inhibiting potentials of smooth muscle cells of mammal stomach . Two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser...dynamics of a number of clinical signs: decrease In abdominal pain, restoration of peristalsis , normalization of body temperature, decrease in...splinter wounds of the chest, stomach , face and amputation of the left forearm resulted. Surgical correction with shock treatment were the first steps

  20. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Engineering & Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-10

    since the stresses in the metal are significantly reduced thanks to the spherical shape of the housing components and high uniformity of the... childish question, "Do you need money?" I looked up. No, he wasn’t joking. He looked serious. It turned out the documentation for one of the machine...acceptance is instituted. And this has seriously alarmed the branch headquarters. What main lines of effort should be stressed so that the situation

  1. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-14

    in women, abortions or premature births. In uncomplicated campylobacteriosis the symptomatology is generally similar to that of brucellosis. Diabetes ...described and discussed. Topics discussed briefly include: types of lasers used in this area of medicine, laser angioplasty , myocardial fene- stration...kg enhanced the aggressive-defensive response to unavoidable painful stimuli (electric foot shock) on an equiva- lent basis with that obtained with

  2. USSR Report, Science and Technology Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-28

    biotechnology—for nutritive and other consumer properties; food technology—for gustatory qualities. During the 12th Five-Year Plan a twofold increase in the...of not only undemanding forest species, but also, under the protection of a forest, various grain and fodder crops, fruit trees, and vineyards and

  3. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-23

    2 Resolution of Raman Spectra into Constituent Components [R. Ya. Yuga , Yu. L. Khaldna; ZHURNAL...Shushakov, and Yu. D. Tsvetkov, Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combus- [Article by R. Ya. Yuga and Yu. L. Khaldna, Institute of tion, Siberian Department

  4. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-09

    Kogan , A. I. Lyakhov, et al.; AVTOMATIKA I TELEMEKHANIKA, No 1, Nov 86) 18 Analysis of Dynamic Errors of Digital Control Systems Resulting From...TELEMEKHANIKA in Russian No 1, Nov 86 (manuscript received 25 Apr 85) pp 142-151 [Article by Ya. A. Kogan , A. I. Lyakhov and S. G. Nersesyan, Moscow...Candidate of Technical Sciences A. D. Kozlov gives an account. Aleksandr Dmitriyevich, how much has the database grown during the past year? —The

  5. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-17

    Reconstruction of Inner Coma of Halley’s Comet Determined Using TV Information From ’Vega’ Spacecraft [A. Yu. Kogan , V. N. Kheyfets; KOSMICHESKIYE...Romanenko and Aleksandr Laveykin had unfolded during two strenuous egresses in June, had to be replaced. From the standpoint of rate of deteriora- tion...as compared with your own egress?," I asked Aleksandr Laveykin, who was watching his friends with interest as they repeated well-known operations

  6. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-10

    in the structure of infantile mortality. Chronic patients suffering from hereditary diseases occupy 20 percent of the beds in children’s infirmaries...asocial elements (prisoners and prostitutes); individuals with venereal, oncologic, or somatic diseases or tuberculosis ; and patients at psychiatric... Tuberculosis patients 386 0 Patients with viral hepatitis 362 (327/35) 0 Patients from psychiatric clinics 464 0 Patients who had received blood

  7. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-29

    several days to work in one or another industry. Experiments are planned for this year to apply it at research centers. The created device will...lexical and syntactic analysis. The system has been introduced at the Institute of Applied Geo- physics, State Commission on Hydrology and...problems in production of plastic parts; sampling stastistical data from the AIPS fund in order to plot factor dependences and develop standards. On

  8. USSR Report, Science and Technology Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-12

    method of compulsion comes into force. For example, the Ministry of the Electrical Equipment Industry for various reasons was not able for a long time... buyer . And perhaps also simply by the unfounded increase of prices. Such a thing also frequently occurs in our practice. And given all this the

  9. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-12

    concentration of endogenous 5-OT: on average by 25 and 13-40%, respectively.ə> A dose of 25-50 pg/kg raised the concentration of 5-OT in dog brain [l7-20...by erythrocytes is an energy-dependent process that can be arrested by agents having an inhibitory effect on glycolysis . Figures 1; references 69

  10. Implications of Technology Transfers for the USSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Press, 1968). 1 0 2 See Franklyn Holzman , "Foreign Trade," in A. Bergson and S. Kuznets, eds., Economic Trends in the Soviet Union, pp. 287-320...around this problem, but none of the reforms or reorganizations have accomplished this. Professor David Granick, in a recent SRI study, 1 4" maintains

  11. USSR Report, Cybernetics Computers and Automation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-05

    Materials from foreign-language sources are translated; those from English -language sources are transcribed or reprinted, with the original phrasing and...Informational Robot-Manipulator Systems." Moscow, Mashinostroyeniye, 1977, 272 pages. 2 Pratt U. "Digital Processing of Images." Translated from English ...adjectives. It provides for automatic formation of lexical- gramatical information necessary for natural language processing. The semant^ syntactic

  12. JPRS Report Science & Technology USSR: Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-29

    environmentally beneficial. However, using sawdust or wood shavings precludes production of high quality products for machine building or...12 Universal Industrial Liquid Reactor of Continuous Action [Yu. S. Ivchenko; KHIMICHESKAYA PROMYSHLENNOST No 3, Mar 91] 12 COMBUSTION ... Combustible Fluids [Ye. R. Nazin, I. V. Karpukhina; KHIMICHESKAYA PROMYSHLENNOST No 3, Mar 91] 13 ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY Apparatus for Wet

  13. USSR Report, Science and Technology Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-22

    of this conception it is necessary first of all to differentiate science from other forms of spiritual production ( art , management activity...enthomologists, agronomists, and mathematicians will be members); on the other, " transdisciplinary " research, when a new base (for example, a methods base) is

  14. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-30

    Oxidation fSh. S. Sarymsakov, R. P. Koroleva, et al; KHIMIYA TVERDOGO TOPLIVA, No 6, Nov-Dec 89] 17 Coal Pyrolysis in Inert Atmosphere. Part 2...Products on Shaping Properties of Coke From Mildly Caking and Noncaking Coals [I. M. Glushchenko, O. F. Dolgikh; KOKS I KHIMIYA, No 1, Jan 90] 18...Method for Increasing Level of Hydrogen Sulfide Purging From Coke Oven Gas [N. K. Smolyakov; KOKS I KHIMIYA, No 1, Jan 90] 18 Increasing

  15. JPRS Report Science & Technology USSR: Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-10

    Moscow ZASHCHITA RASTENIY in Russian No 9, Sep 87 p 32 [Article by N. N. Guseva, department head, Ail-Union Institute of Plant Protection, N. A...once daily for 10 days improved muscle reconstruction, particularly at the edges of the trans- plant . After two months the tissue had a mixed...pharmacotherapeutic efficacy is related to the study of the interaction between an entire complex of variable factors and broadly based biopharmaceutical

  16. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-11

    No 1, Jan 87) - a - Acoustical Characteristics of Invar Powder Alloys (V. A. Vershinin, V. I. Kostikov, et al.; POROSHKOVAYA METALLURGIYA, No 1...CHARACTERISTICS OF INVAR POWDER ALLOYS Kiev POROSHKOVAYA METALLURGIYA in Russian No 1, Jan 87 (manuscript received 21 Jan 86) pp 95-98 [Article by V. A... Invar powder alloys , 36Ni and 32NiCoCu, was made for a determination of the temperature dependence of their Young’s modulus, shear modulus

  17. USSR Report, Science and Technology Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-02

    interest in science is now less that it was, assume, 10-15 years ago. Today they more willingly read about ESP, the Bermuda Triangle , the "snowman...CENTER OF VILNIUS STATE UNIVERSITY Vilnius SOVETSKAYA LITVA in Russian 29 May 85 p 4 [Article by R. Chesna: "The Mysterious World of the Laser"] [Text

  18. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-10

    Cardiovascular Diseases in Uzbek SSR [R. T. Sultanov, L. V. Mironova, et al.; MEDITSINSKIY ZHURNAL UZBEKISTANA, No 7, Jul 90] ... 77 Tuberculosis...the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, as well as the musculoskeletal system, Lyme disease presents a great danger to human health and can...Morfologiya, sistema - tika, ekologiya, meditsinskoye znacheniye" [The Tayga Ixodes Persulcatus Schulze (Acarina, Ixodidae) Tick: Morphology, Systematics

  19. JPRS Report, Science & Technology USSR: Lift Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-17

    Pseudomonas, Achromobacter, Aspergillus, Penicillium , Alternaria, Fusarium and some others. Trials with the antimicrobial prepara- tions Karbotsid-213...Effects of Synthetic Peptides , Immunoglobulin Fragments and Selected Proteins (L.V. Kozlov, M.N. Sizoy, et al.; BIOKHIMIYA, No 5, May 86) \\ [ u...86) 34 Protective Effect in Influenza Infections of Fully Synthetic Peptide -Polyion Complexes (R.V. Petrov, R.M. Khaitov, et al.; IMMUNOLOGIYA

  20. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Engineering & Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-05

    conservatism and that the branch’s personnel have a poor command of the new management techniques ? Minister S. A. Afanasyev began his speech to the ministry... techniques at 30 Mintyazhmash enterprises. Some 135 forms were found to be in violation of established standards (they contained 140,000 indicators...a piece written for the piano cannot be performed on the violin , even if the artist owns both instruments. "Do you think I don’t want to get away

  1. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-10

    after repairs. All four cars had undergone a prophylaxis; both the rolling parts and the interiors had been made new again. The showroom for the...eliminate spherical aberration by selection of the proper interlacing of the lens microstructure and to virtually eliminate spherical- chromatic

  2. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-05

    Psychology Signal Detection Against Background of Noise by an Individual Working in a Group [M. A. Tsiskaridze, E. N Buchukuri, et ai; SOOBSHCHENIYA...with the treatment of infertility , will get expensive, more modern equipment. Before, we never even dreamed of such a thing. We have laparo- scopy... money . Certainly a raise in salary won’t hurt anyone. But in the cooperative many medical people receive the independence and the opportunities they

  3. Technology and human purpose: the problem of solids transport on the Earth's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haff, P. K.

    2012-11-01

    Displacement of mass of limited deformability ("solids") on the Earth's surface is opposed by friction and (the analog of) form resistance - impediments relaxed by rotational motion, self-powering of mass units, and transport infrastructure. These features of solids transport first evolved in the biosphere prior to the emergence of technology, allowing slope-independent, diffusion-like motion of discrete objects as massive as several tons, as illustrated by animal foraging and movement along game trails. However, high-energy-consumption technology powered by fossil fuels required a mechanism that could support fast advective transport of solids, i.e., long-distance, high-volume, high-speed, unidirectional, slope-independent transport across the land surface of materials like coal, containerized fluids, minerals, and economic goods. Pre-technology nature was able to sustain regional- and global-scale advection only in the limited form of piggybacking on geophysical flows of water (river sediment) and air (dust). The appearance of a mechanism for sustained advection of solids independent of fluid flows and gravity appeared only upon the emergence of human purpose. Purpose enables solids advection by, in effect, simulating a continuous potential gradient, otherwise lacking, between discrete and widely separated fossil-fuel energy sources and sinks. Invoking purpose as a mechanism in solids advection is an example of the need to import anthropic principles and concepts into the language and methodology of modern Earth system dynamics. As part of the emergence of a generalized solids advection mechanism, several additional transport requirements necessary to the function of modern large-scale technological systems were also satisfied. These include spatially accurate delivery of advected payload, targetability to essentially arbitrarily located destinations (such as cities), and independence of structure of advected payload from transport mechanism. The latter property

  4. Technology and human purpose: the problem of solids transport on the Earth's surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Haff

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Displacement of mass of limited deformability ("solids" on the Earth's surface is opposed by friction and (the analog of form resistance – impediments relaxed by rotational motion, self-powering of mass units, and transport infrastructure. These features of solids transport first evolved in the biosphere prior to the emergence of technology, allowing slope-independent, diffusion-like motion of discrete objects as massive as several tons, as illustrated by animal foraging and movement along game trails. However, high-energy-consumption technology powered by fossil fuels required a mechanism that could support fast advective transport of solids, i.e., long-distance, high-volume, high-speed, unidirectional, slope-independent transport across the land surface of materials like coal, containerized fluids, minerals, and economic goods. Pre-technology nature was able to sustain regional- and global-scale advection only in the limited form of piggybacking on geophysical flows of water (river sediment and air (dust. The appearance of a mechanism for sustained advection of solids independent of fluid flows and gravity appeared only upon the emergence of human purpose. Purpose enables solids advection by, in effect, simulating a continuous potential gradient, otherwise lacking, between discrete and widely separated fossil-fuel energy sources and sinks. Invoking purpose as a mechanism in solids advection is an example of the need to import anthropic principles and concepts into the language and methodology of modern Earth system dynamics. As part of the emergence of a generalized solids advection mechanism, several additional transport requirements necessary to the function of modern large-scale technological systems were also satisfied. These include spatially accurate delivery of advected payload, targetability to essentially arbitrarily located destinations (such as cities, and independence of structure of advected payload from transport mechanism. The

  5. Globalization and Mobilization of Earth Science Education with GeoBrain Geospatial Web Service Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, M.; di, L.

    2005-12-01

    The needs for Earth science education to prepare students as globally-trained geoscience workforce increase tremendously with globalization of the economy. However, current academic programs often have difficulties in providing students world-view training or experiences with global context due to lack of resources and suitable teaching technology. This paper presents a NASA funded project with insights and solutions to this problem. The project aims to establish a geospatial data-rich learning and research environment that enable the students, faculty and researchers from institutes all over the world easily accessing, analyzing and modeling with the huge amount of NASA EOS data just like they possess those vast resources locally at their desktops. With the environment, classroom demonstration and training for students to deal with global climate and environment issues for any part of the world are possible in any classroom with Internet connection. Globalization and mobilization of Earth science education can be truly realized through the environment. This project, named as NASA EOS Higher Education Alliance: Mobilization of NASA EOS Data and Information through Web Services and Knowledge Management Technologies for Higher Education Teaching and Research, is built on profound technology and infrastructure foundations including web service technology, NASA EOS data resources, and open interoperability standards. An open, distributed, standard compliant, interoperable web-based system, called GeoBrain, is being developed by this project to provide a data-rich on-line learning and research environment. The system allows users to dynamically and collaboratively develop interoperable, web-executable geospatial process and analysis modules and models, and run them on-line against any part of the peta-byte archives for getting back the customized information products rather than raw data. The system makes a data-rich globally-capable Earth science learning and research

  6. Adsorption technology of the earth as 'Steamship'; 'jokisen' chikyugo no kyuchaku gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, Tsutomu [Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    1999-04-05

    It becomes 2200W of the value equal to the elephant of 4.3 body weight tons, when one of the division into two of energy consumption is made to be the standard metabolism quantity Japanese per capita. They are human and 25 times of the standard metabolism of the almost equal sheep of the body weight. New organism group in which Japanese evolve from the general homeotherm in this point still more is made. What kind of mechanisms is necessary so that 6 billion elephants may gently inhabit the earth? Since the human haughtiness is conspicuous, and the activity of the earth appears a passive too, I do not like the language of being gentle in the earth. However, the ultimate technology which here, it was gentle in the earth was considered. It is the technology that it moves there water circulation atmosphere irrational and is the gentlest in the earth. (NEDO)

  7. The earth-coupled heat pump: Utilizing innovative technology in single family rehabilitation strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-01

    The study examines the feasibility of incorporating the use of earth-coupled heat pump technology in single-family housing rehabilitation projects, based on energy conservation attributes and financial considerations. Following evaluation of a theoretical model which indicated that installations of the heat pumps were feasible, the heat pumps were tested under actual conditions in five single family housing units which were part of the Urban Homesteading Program, and were matched with comparable units which did not receive special treatment. Energy consumption information was collected for all units for twelve months. Variables were identified, and the data was analyzed for individual housing units and compared with the results predicted by the theoretical model to determine the practicality of incorporating such technology in large scale rehabilitation projects. 14 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Creating a FIESTA (Framework for Integrated Earth Science and Technology Applications) with MagIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Jarboe, N.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.

    2017-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (https://earthref.org/MagIC) has recently developed a containerized web application to considerably reduce the friction in contributing, exploring and combining valuable and complex datasets for the paleo-, geo- and rock magnetic scientific community. The data produced in this scientific domain are inherently hierarchical and the communities evolving approaches to this scientific workflow, from sampling to taking measurements to multiple levels of interpretations, require a large and flexible data model to adequately annotate the results and ensure reproducibility. Historically, contributing such detail in a consistent format has been prohibitively time consuming and often resulted in only publishing the highly derived interpretations. The new open-source (https://github.com/earthref/MagIC) application provides a flexible upload tool integrated with the data model to easily create a validated contribution and a powerful search interface for discovering datasets and combining them to enable transformative science. MagIC is hosted at EarthRef.org along with several interdisciplinary geoscience databases. A FIESTA (Framework for Integrated Earth Science and Technology Applications) is being created by generalizing MagIC's web application for reuse in other domains. The application relies on a single configuration document that describes the routing, data model, component settings and external services integrations. The container hosts an isomorphic Meteor JavaScript application, MongoDB database and ElasticSearch search engine. Multiple containers can be configured as microservices to serve portions of the application or rely on externally hosted MongoDB, ElasticSearch, or third-party services to efficiently scale computational demands. FIESTA is particularly well suited for many Earth Science disciplines with its flexible data model, mapping, account management, upload tool to private workspaces, reference metadata, image

  9. Technology Development to Support Human Health and Performance in Exploration Beyond Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundrot, C.E.; Steinberg, S. L.; Charles, J. B.

    2011-01-01

    In the course of defining the level of risks and mitigating the risks for exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit, NASA s Human Research Program (HRP) has identified the need for technology development in several areas. Long duration missions increase the risk of serious medical conditions due to limited options for return to Earth; no resupply; highly limited mass, power, volume; and communication delays. New space flight compatible medical capabilities required include: diagnostic imaging, oxygen concentrator, ventilator, laboratory analysis (saliva, blood, urine), kidney stone diagnosis & treatment, IV solution preparation and delivery. Maintenance of behavioral health in such an isolated, confined and extreme environment requires new sensory stimulation (e.g., virtual reality) technology. Unobtrusive monitoring of behavioral health and treatment methods are also required. Prolonged exposure to weightlessness deconditions bone, muscle, and the cardiovascular system. Novel exercise equipment or artificial gravity are necessary to prevent deconditioning. Monitoring of the degree of deconditioning is required to ensure that countermeasures are effective. New technologies are required in all the habitable volumes (e.g., suit, capsule, habitat, exploration vehicle, lander) to provide an adequate food system, and to meet human environmental standards for air, water, and surface contamination. Communication delays require the crew to be more autonomous. Onboard decision support tools that assist crew with real-time detection and diagnosis of vehicle and habitat operational anomalies will enable greater autonomy. Multi-use shield systems are required to provide shielding from solar particle events. The HRP is pursuing the development of these technologies in laboratories, flight analog environments and the ISS so that the human health and performance risks will be acceptable with the available resources.

  10. Modeling and Analysis Compute Environments, Utilizing Virtualization Technology in the Climate and Earth Systems Science domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, A.; Nemani, R. R.; Wang, W.; Votava, P.; Hashimoto, H.

    2010-12-01

    Given the increasing complexity of climate modeling and analysis tools, it is often difficult and expensive to build or recreate an exact replica of the software compute environment used in past experiments. With the recent development of new technologies for hardware virtualization, an opportunity exists to create full modeling, analysis and compute environments that are “archiveable”, transferable and may be easily shared amongst a scientific community or presented to a bureaucratic body if the need arises. By encapsulating and entire modeling and analysis environment in a virtual machine image, others may quickly gain access to the fully built system used in past experiments, potentially easing the task and reducing the costs of reproducing and verify past results produced by other researchers. Moreover, these virtual machine images may be used as a pedagogical tool for others that are interested in performing an academic exercise but don't yet possess the broad expertise required. We built two virtual machine images, one with the Community Earth System Model (CESM) and one with Weather Research Forecast Model (WRF), then ran several small experiments to assess the feasibility, performance overheads costs, reusability, and transferability. We present a list of the pros and cons as well as lessoned learned from utilizing virtualization technology in the climate and earth systems modeling domain.

  11. Novel Space-based Solar Power Technologies and Architectures for Earth and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Joe T.; Fikes, John C.; O'Neill, Mark J.

    2005-01-01

    Research, development and studies of novel space-based solar power systems, technologies and architectures for Earth and beyond are needed to reduce the cost of clean electrical power for terrestrial use and to provide a stepping stone for providing an abundance of power in space, i.e., manufacturing facilities, tourist facilities, delivery of power between objects in space, and between space and surface sites. The architectures, technologies and systems needed for space to Earth applications may also be used for in-space applications. Advances in key technologies, i.e., power generation, power management and distribution, power beaming and conversion of beamed power are needed to achieve the objectives of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial applications. Power beaming or wireless power transmission (WPT) can involve lasers or microwaves along with the associated power interfaces. Microwave and laser transmission techniques have been studied with several promising approaches to safe and efficient WPT identified. These investigations have included microwave phased array transmitters, as well as laser transmission and associated optics. There is a need to produce "proof-of-concept" validation of critical WPT technologies for both the near-term, as well as far-term applications. Investments may be harvested in near-term beam safe demonstrations of commercial WPT applications. Receiving sites (users) include ground-based stations for terrestrial electrical power, orbital sites to provide power for satellites and other platforms, future space elevator systems, space vehicle propulsion, and space to surface sites. This paper briefly discusses achieving a promising approach to the solar power generation and beamed power conversion. The approach is based on a unique high-power solar concentrator array called Stretched Lens Array (SLA) for both solar power generation and beamed power conversion. Since both versions (solar and laser) of SLA use many identical components

  12. The rare-earth elements: Vital to modern technologies and lifestyles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Long, Keith R.; Gambogi, Joseph; Seal, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, the rare-earth elements (REEs) were familiar to a relatively small number of people, such as chemists, geologists, specialized materials scientists, and engineers. In the 21st century, the REEs have gained visibility through many media outlets because of (1) the public has recognized the critical, specialized properties that REEs contribute to modern technology, as well as (2) China's dominance in production and supply of the REEs and (3) international dependence on China for the majority of the world's REE supply.Since the late 1990s, China has provided 85–95 percent of the world’s REEs. In 2010, China announced their intention to reduce REE exports. During this timeframe, REE use increased substantially. REEs are used as components in high technology devices, including smart phones, digital cameras, computer hard disks, fluorescent and light-emitting-diode (LED) lights, flat screen televisions, computer monitors, and electronic displays. Large quantities of some REEs are used in clean energy and defense technologies. Because of the many important uses of REEs, nations dependent on new technologies, such as Japan, the United States, and members of the European Union, reacted with great concern to China’s intent to reduce its REE exports. Consequently, exploration activities intent on discovering economic deposits of REEs and bringing them into production have increased.

  13. ldentifying Episodes of Earth Science Phenomena Using a Big-Data Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Oloso, Amidu; Rushing, John; Lin, Amy; Fekete, Gyorgy; Ramachandran, Rahul; Clune, Thomas; Dunny, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    's intricate dynamics, we are continuously discovering novel ES phenomena. We generally gain understanding of a given phenomenon by observing and studying individual events. This process usually begins by identifying the occurrences of these events. Once representative events are identified or found, we must locate associated observed or simulated data prior to commencing analysis and concerted studies of the phenomenon. Knowledge concerning the phenomenon can accumulate only after analysis has started. However, as mentioned previously, comprehensive records only exist for a very limited set of high-impact phenomena; aside from these, finding events and locating associated data currently may take a prohibitive amount of time and effort on the part of an individual investigator. The reason for the lack of comprehensive records for most of the ES phenomena is mainly due to the perception that they do not pose immediate and/or severe threat to life and property. Thus they are not consistently tracked, monitored, and catalogued. Many phenomena even lack precise and/or commonly accepted criteria for definitions. Moreover, various Earth Science observations and data have accumulated to a previously unfathomable volume; NASA Earth Observing System Data Information System (EOSDIS) alone archives several petabytes (PB) of satellite remote sensing data, which are steadily increasing. All of these factors contribute to the difficulty of methodically identifying events corresponding to a given phenomenon and significantly impede systematic investigations. We have not only envisioned AES as an environment for identifying customdefined events but also aspired for it to be an interactive environment with quick turnaround time for revisions of query criteria and results, as well as a collaborative environment where geographically distributed experts may work together on the same phenomena. A Big Data technology is thus required for the realization of such a system. In the following, we first

  14. Technological requirements of nuclear electric propulsion systems for fast Earth-Mars transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérend, N.; Epenoy, R.; Cliquet, E.; Laurent-Varin, J.; Avril, S.

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in electric propulsion technologies such as magnetoplasma rockets gave a new momentum to the study of nuclear electric propulsion concepts for Mars missions. Some recent works have been focused on very short Earth-to-Mars transfers of about 40 days with high-power, variable specific impulse propulsion systems [1]. While the interest of nuclear electric propulsion appears clearly with regard to the payload mass ratio (due to a high level of specific impulse), its interest with regard to the transfer time is more complex to define, as it depends on many design parameters. In this paper, a general analysis of the capability of nuclear electric propulsion systems considering both criteria (the payload mass ratio and the transfer time) is performed, and the technological requirements for fast Earth-Mars transfers are studied. This analysis has been performed in two steps. First, complete trajectory optimizations have been performed by CNES-DCT in order to obtain the propulsion requirements of the mission for different technological hypotheses regarding the engine technology (specific impulse levels and the throttling capability) and different mission requirements. The methodology used for designing fuel-optimal heliocentric trajectories, based on the Pontryagin's Maximum Principle will be presented. Trajectories have been computed for various power levels combined with either variable or fixed Isp. The second step consisted in evaluating a simpler method that could easily link the main mission requirements (the transfer time and the payload fraction) to the main technological requirements (the specific mass of the power generation system and the structure mass ratio of the whole vehicle, excluding the power generation system). Indeed, for power-limited systems, propulsion requirements can be characterized through the "trajectory characteristic" parameter, defined as the integral over time of the squared thrust acceleration. Technological requirements for

  15. High-performance technology for indexing of high volumes of Earth remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strotov, Valery V.; Taganov, Alexander I.; Kolesenkov, Aleksandr N.; Kostrov, Boris V.

    2017-10-01

    The present paper has suggested a technology for search, indexing, cataloging and distribution of aerospace images on the basis of geo-information approach, cluster and spectral analysis. It has considered information and algorithmic support of the system. Functional circuit of the system and structure of the geographical data base have been developed on the basis of the geographical online portal technology. Taking into account heterogeneity of information obtained from various sources it is reasonable to apply a geoinformation platform that allows analyzing space location of objects and territories and executing complex processing of information. Geoinformation platform is based on cartographic fundamentals with the uniform coordinate system, the geographical data base, a set of algorithms and program modules for execution of various tasks. The technology for adding by particular users and companies of images taken by means of professional and amateur devices and also processed by various software tools to the array system has been suggested. Complex usage of visual and instrumental approaches allows significantly expanding an application area of Earth remote sensing data. Development and implementation of new algorithms based on the complex usage of new methods for processing of structured and unstructured data of high volumes will increase periodicity and rate of data updating. The paper has shown that application of original algorithms for search, indexing and cataloging of aerospace images will provide an easy access to information spread by hundreds of suppliers and allow increasing an access rate to aerospace images up to 5 times in comparison with current analogues.

  16. Do It Yourself (DIY) Earth Science Collaboratories Using Best Practices and Breakthrough Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, E.

    2017-12-01

    The objective of published earth science study data results and literature on the Web should be to provide a means to integrate discoverable science resources through an open collaborative-Web. At the core of any open science collaborative infrastructure is the ability to discover, manage and ultimately use relevant data accessible to the collaboration. Equally important are the relationships between people, applications, services, and publications, which capture critical contextual knowledge that enable their effective use. While contributions of either irreproducible or costly data can be a great asset the inability of users being able to use the data intelligently or make sense of it, makes these investments not usable. An ability to describe ad-hoc discoverable usage methodologies, provide feedback to data producers, and identify and cite data in a systematic way by leveraging existing Web-enabled off the shelf technology is needed. Fortunately many break-through advancements in data publication best practices and government, open source, and commercial investments support consumers who can provide feedback, share experiences, and contribute back to the earth science ecosystem.

  17. BROND. USSR Evaluated Neutron Data Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manokhin, V.N.

    1990-09-01

    BROND, the USSR computerized data library for evaluated neutron reaction data was released in 1987/1990. Upon request it is available on magnetic tape, costfree, from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. This document describes the contents of this library in the versions BROND-NDS1 and BROND-NDS2, BROND-NDS3, BROND-NDS4. (author). 16 refs

  18. BROND-2. USSR Evaluated Neutron Data Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manokhin, V.N.

    1992-01-01

    BROND-2, the USSR computerized data library for evaluated neutron reaction data was released in 1992. Upon request it is available on magnetic tape, costfree, from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. The Library BROND-2 reported in this document supersedes the earlier versions ''BROND-NDS1'' plus three supplements ''BROND-NDS2'', ''BROND-NDS3'', ''BROND-NDS4''. 16 refs

  19. USSR Report, International Economic Relations, No. 61

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-15

    into the heated atmosphere of the first days of work after the CPSU Central Committee June Plenum and the USSR Supreme Soviet session. In studying...million kilowatts generating capacity. Documents on cooperation in the construction of the Ilha Grande 2.4 million kilowatts TES, an ethanol production

  20. Ex-USSR: petroleum activities in 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This paper gives statistical data on economy and petroleum industry in ex-USSR: Primary energy production and consumption (coal, petroleum, natural gas, primary power), petroleum and natural gas reserves, drilling activity, exports and imports of petroleum products, refining capacity. 2 figs., 14 tabs

  1. World Stress Map of the Earth: a key to tectonic processes and technological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Karl; Müller, Birgit

    2001-08-01

    Modern civilisation explores and penetrates the interior of the Earth's crust, recovers from it and stores into it solids, fluids and gases to a hitherto unprecedented degree. Management of underground structures such as boreholes or reservoirs take into account the existing stress either to take advantage of it or at least to minimise the effects of man-made stress. This paper presents the World Map of Tectonic Stresses (in short: World Stress Map or WSM) as a fundamental geophysical data-base. The impact of the WSM is pointed out: in the context of global tectonics, in seismic hazard quantification and in a wide range of technological problems in industrial applications such as oil reservoir management and stability of underground openings (tunnels, boreholes and waste disposal sites).

  2. Risk reduction methodologies and technologies for the Earth Observing System (EOS) Operations Center (EOC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Richard K.; Pingitore, Nelson V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will discuss proposed Flight Operations methodologies and technologies for the Earth Observing System (EOS) Operations Center (EOC), to reduce risks associated with the operation of complex multi-instrument spacecraft in a multi-spacecraft environment. The EOC goals are to obtain 100 percent science data capture and maintain 100 percent spacecraft health, for each EOS spacecraft. Operations risks to the spacecraft and data loss due to operator command error, mission degradation due to mis-identification of an anomalous trend in component performance or mis-management of resources, and total mission loss due to improper subsystem configuration or mis-identification of an anomalous condition. This paper discusses automation of routine Flight Operations Team (FOT) responsibilities, Expert systems for real-time non-nominal condition decision support, and Telemetry analysis systems for in-depth playback data analysis and trending.

  3. Ten years research activities in Earth observation at the Cyprus University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Agapiou, Athos; Mamouri, Rodanthi; Nisantzi, Argyro; Papoutsa, Christiana; Tzouvaras, Marios; Neoclous, Kyriacos; Mettas, Christodoulos; Michaelides, Silas

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents the achievements for the last 10 years of the Remote Sensing and Geo-Environment Laboratory of the Cyprus University of Technology in the Earth observation through the ERATOSTHENES Research Centre. Over the past 10 years, the Centre has secured competitive research funding from various sources, such as the European Commission, the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation, as well as industrial partners, having participated either as a coordinator or as a partner in more than 60 research projects. The research activities of the Centre encompass remote sensing and GIS applications in the fields of Cultural Heritage, Agriculture, Water Resource Management, Environment, Infrastructure, Marine Spatial Planning, Atmospheric, Air Pollution and Coastal Applications, Natural Resource Management and Hazard Assessment. The aim of this paper is to map the existing activities and identify the future trends and goals of the Eratosthenes Research Centre for the next 15 years.

  4. 2000 Survey of Distributed Spacecraft Technologies and Architectures for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise in the 2010-2025 Timeframe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticker, Ronald L.; Azzolini, John D.

    2000-01-01

    The study investigates NASA's Earth Science Enterprise needs for Distributed Spacecraft Technologies in the 2010-2025 timeframe. In particular, the study focused on the Earth Science Vision Initiative and extrapolation of the measurement architecture from the 2002-2010 time period. Earth Science Enterprise documents were reviewed. Interviews were conducted with a number of Earth scientists and technologists. fundamental principles of formation flying were also explored. The results led to the development of four notional distribution spacecraft architectures. These four notional architectures (global constellations, virtual platforms, precision formation flying, and sensorwebs) are presented. They broadly and generically cover the distributed spacecraft architectures needed by Earth Science in the post-2010 era. These notional architectures are used to identify technology needs and drivers. Technology needs are subsequently grouped into five categories: Systems and architecture development tools; Miniaturization, production, manufacture, test and calibration; Data networks and information management; Orbit control, planning and operations; and Launch and deployment. The current state of the art and expected developments are explored. High-value technology areas are identified for possible future funding emphasis.

  5. Present situation and trends in application of isotopes and ionizing radiations in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shtan, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    New trends of nuclear science and engineering - radiation engineering and radiation technology - have emerged because of the large scale industrial production of artificial radioactive isotopes as well as of the manufacture of electrophysical sources of ionizing radiation. Over 3,500 isotope articles consumed by more than 15,000 enterprises are now manufactured in the USSR. The new trends have subsequently converted into individual branches of the nuclear science and engineering, without which the future technical progress in various fields of industry, medicine, agriculture and scientific research is impossible. Reviewing the situation and trends in the USSR, the following matters are described: tracer method, radiation instrumentation, radiation flaw detection, radiation technology, radiation sterilization, radiation polymerization, radiation modification, radiation and chemical synthesis, food preservation, radiation therapy, radioisotope power engineering. (J.P.N.)

  6. Technology and Engineering Advances Supporting EarthScope's Alaska Transportable Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, J.; Enders, M.; Busby, R.

    2015-12-01

    EarthScope's Transportable Array (TA) in Alaska and Canada is an ongoing deployment of 261 high quality broadband seismographs. The Alaska TA is the continuation of the rolling TA/USArray deployment of 400 broadband seismographs in the lower 48 contiguous states and builds on the success of the TA project there. The TA in Alaska and Canada is operated by the IRIS Consortium on behalf of the National Science Foundation as part of the EarthScope program. By Sept 2015, it is anticipated that the TA network in Alaska and Canada will be operating 105 stations. During the summer of 2015, TA field crews comprised of IRIS and HTSI station specialists, as well as representatives from our partner agencies the Alaska Earthquake Center and the Alaska Volcano Observatory and engineers from the UNAVCO Plate Boundary Observatory will have completed a total of 36 new station installations. Additionally, we will have completed upgrades at 9 existing Alaska Earthquake Center stations with borehole seismometers and the adoption of an additional 35 existing stations. Continued development of battery systems using LiFePO4 chemistries, integration of BGAN, Iridium, Cellular and VSAT technologies for real time data transfer, and modifications to electronic systems are a driving force for year two of the Alaska Transportable Array. Station deployment utilizes custom heliportable drills for sensor emplacement in remote regions. The autonomous station design evolution include hardening the sites for Arctic, sub-Arctic and Alpine conditions as well as the integration of rechargeable Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries with traditional AGM batteries We will present new design aspects, outcomes, and lessons learned from past and ongoing deployments, as well as efforts to integrate TA stations with other existing networks in Alaska including the Plate Boundary Observatory and the Alaska Volcano Observatory.

  7. Leveraging Open Standards and Technologies to Enhance Community Access to Earth Science Lidar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, C. J.; Nandigam, V.; Krishnan, S.; Cowart, C.; Baru, C.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2011-12-01

    Lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) data, collected from space, airborne and terrestrial platforms, have emerged as an invaluable tool for a variety of Earth science applications ranging from ice sheet monitoring to modeling of earth surface processes. However, lidar present a unique suite of challenges from the perspective of building cyberinfrastructure systems that enable the scientific community to access these valuable research datasets. Lidar data are typically characterized by millions to billions of individual measurements of x,y,z position plus attributes; these "raw" data are also often accompanied by derived raster products and are frequently terabytes in size. As a relatively new and rapidly evolving data collection technology, relevant open data standards and software projects are immature compared to those for other remote sensing platforms. The NSF-funded OpenTopography Facility project has developed an online lidar data access and processing system that co-locates data with on-demand processing tools to enable users to access both raw point cloud data as well as custom derived products and visualizations. OpenTopography is built on a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) in which applications and data resources are deployed as standards compliant (XML and SOAP) Web services with the open source Opal Toolkit. To develop the underlying applications for data access, filtering and conversion, and various processing tasks, OpenTopography has heavily leveraged existing open source software efforts for both lidar and raster data. Operating on the de facto LAS binary point cloud format (maintained by ASPRS), open source libLAS and LASlib libraries provide OpenTopography data ingestion, query and translation capabilities. Similarly, raster data manipulation is performed through a suite of services built on the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL). OpenTopography has also developed our own algorithm for high-performance gridding of lidar point cloud data

  8. Engaging Middle School Students with Google Earth Technology to Analyze Ocean Cores as Evidence for Sea Floor Spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouhet, T.; Cook, J.

    2006-12-01

    Google Earth's ability to captivate students' attention, its ease of use, and its high quality images give it the potential to be an extremely effective tool for earth science educators. The unique properties of Google Earth satisfy a growing demand to incorporate technology in science instruction. Google Earth is free and relatively easy to use unlike some other visualization software. Students often have difficulty conceptualizing and visualizing earth systems, such as deep-ocean basins, because of the complexity and dynamic nature of the processes associated with them (e.g. plate tectonics). Google Earth's combination of aerial photography, satellite images and remote sensing data brings a sense of realism to science concepts. The unobstructed view of the ocean floor provided by this technology illustrates three-dimensional subsurface features such as rift valleys, subduction zones, and sea-mounts enabling students to better understand the seafloor's dynamic nature. Students will use Google Earth to navigate the sea floor, and examine Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) core locations the from the Glomar Challenger Leg 3 expedition. The lesson to be implemented was expanded upon and derived from the Joint Oceanographic Insitute (JOI) Learning exercise, Nannofossils Reveal Seafloor Spreading. In addition, students take on the role of scientists as they graph and analyze paleontological data against the distance from the Mid Ocean Ridge. The integration of ocean core data in this three-dimensional view aids students' ability to draw and communicate valid conclusions about their scientific observations. A pre and post survey will be given to examine attitudes, self-efficacy, achievement and content mastery to a sample of approximately 300 eighth grade science students. The hypothesis is that the integration of Google Earth will significantly improve all areas of focus as mentioned above.

  9. Translations on USSR Resources, Number 766

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-17

    Parathurammina Suleimanavi Lip. Fragments of algae and limbs of crinoida, the shells of barchyopoda and sponge spicules are encountered in the detritus. The...mineral fields; fishing industry and marine resources; and water resources. 17. Key Words and Document Analysis. 17a. Descriptors USSR...middle and upper. The lower part (the 4,434 to 4,399 meter interval) is made up of dark grey organogenic-clastic, thin plate limestones with spicule

  10. First energy conference Israel-former USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamkov, S.

    1993-01-01

    The most significant deliberations of the conference dealt with the energy issues confronting the participating countries and the world as a whole: solution to current energy problems and the replacement of finite energy sources with renewable and clean resources. It is relevant to mention here the impressive presentation on the prospect of nuclear power in the former USSR following the Chernobyl accident, summarizing the perceptions on this critical issue

  11. Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies: Building a Global Infrastructure for Climate Change Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ahrens, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ananthakrishnan, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bell, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bharathi, S. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Brown, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Chen, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chervenak, A. L. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Cinquini, L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Pasadena, CA (United States); Drach, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, I. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fox, P. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Hankin, S. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (PMEL), Seattle, WA (United States); Harper, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Hook, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Jones, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Middleton, D. E. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Miller, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nienhouse, E. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Schweitzer, R. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (PMEL), Seattle, WA (United States); Schuler, R. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Shipman, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shoshani, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Siebenlist, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sim, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Strand, W. G. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Wang, F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilcox, H. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Wilhelmi, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2010-08-16

    Established within DOE’s Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-) 2 program, with support from ASCR and BER, the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) is a consortium of seven laboratories (Argonne National Laboratory [ANL], Los Alamos National Laboratory [LANL], Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory [LBNL], Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory [LLNL], National Center for Atmospheric Research [NCAR], Oak Ridge National Laboratory [ORNL], and Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory [PMEL]), and two institutes (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute [RPI] and the University of Southern California, Information Sciences Institute [USC/ISI]). The consortium’s mission is to provide climate researchers worldwide with a science gateway to access data, information, models, analysis tools, and computational capabilities required to evaluate extreme-scale data sets. Its stated goals are to (1) make data more useful to climate researchers by developing collaborative technology that enhances data usability; (2) meet the specific needs that national and international climate projects have for distributed databases, data access, and data movement; (3) provide a universal and secure web-based data access portal for broad-based multi-model data collections; and (4) provide a wide range of climate data-analysis tools and diagnostic methods to international climate centers and U.S. government agencies. To this end, the ESG-CET is working to integrate all highly publicized climate data sets—from climate simulations to observations—using distributed storage management, remote high-performance units, high-bandwidth wide-area networks, and user desktop platforms in a collaborative problem-solving environment.

  12. Earth observation technologies in service to the cultural landscape of Cyprus: risk identification and assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuca, Branka; Tzouvaras, Marios; Agapiou, Athos; Lysandrou, Vasiliki; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Nisantzi, Argyro; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.

    2016-08-01

    The Cultural landscapes are witnesses of "the creative genius, social development and the imaginative and spiritual vitality of humanity. They are part of our collective identity", as it is internationally defined and accepted (ICOMOSUNESCO). The need for their protection, management and inclusion in the territorial policies has already been widely accepted and pursued. There is a great number of risks to which the cultural landscapes are exposed, arising mainly from natural (both due to slow geo-physical phenomena as well as hazards) and anthropogenic causes (e.g. urbanisation pressure, agriculture, landscape fragmentation etc.). This paper explores to what extent Earth Observation (EO) technologies can contribute to identify and evaluate the risks to which Cultural Landscapes of Cyprus are exposed, taking into consideration specific phenomena, such as land movements and soil erosion. The research of the paper is illustrated as part of the activities carried out in the CLIMA project - "Cultural Landscape risk Identification, Management and Assessment". It aims to combine the fields of remote sensing technologies, including Sentinel data, and monitoring of cultural landscape for its improved protection and management. Part of this approach will be based on the use of InSAR techniques in order to monitor the temporal evolution of deformations through the detection and measurement of the effects of surface movements caused by various factors. The case study selected for Cyprus is the Nea Paphos archeological site and historical center of Paphos, which are listed as UNESCO World Heritage sites. The interdisciplinary approach adopted in this research was useful to identify major risks affecting the landscape of Cyprus and to classify the most suitable EO methods to assess and map such risks.

  13. The Contribution of Earth Observation Technologies to Monitoring Strategies of Cultural Landscapes and Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuca, B.

    2017-08-01

    Coupling of Climate change effects with management and protection of cultural and natural heritage has been brought to the attention of policy makers since several years. On the worldwide level, UNESCO has identified several phenomena as the major geo-hazards possibly induced by climate change and their possible hazardous impact to natural and cultural heritage: Hurricane, storms; Sea-level rise; Erosion; Flooding; Rainfall increase; Drought; Desertification and Rise in temperature. The same document further referrers to satellite Remote Sensing (EO) as one of the valuable tools, useful for development of "professional monitoring strategies". More recently, other studies have highlighted on the impact of climate change effects on tourism, an economic sector related to build environment and traditionally linked to heritage. The results suggest that, in case of emergency the concrete threat could be given by the hazardous event itself; in case of ordinary administration, however, the threat seems to be a "hazardous attitude" towards cultural assets that could lead to inadequate maintenance and thus to a risk of an improper management of cultural heritage sites. This paper aims to illustrate potential benefits that advancements of Earth Observation technologies can bring to the domain of monitoring landscape heritage and to the management strategies, including practices of preventive maintenance. The attempt here is to raise awareness on the importance of integrating satellite remote sensing imagery and the deriving products with other geospatial information (even geo-referenced historic maps) for a more complete insight on the environmental dynamics of landscapes.

  14. A Highly Scalable Data Service (HSDS) using Cloud-based Storage Technologies for Earth Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, A.; Readey, J.; Votava, P.; Henderson, J.; Willmore, F.

    2017-12-01

    Cloud based infrastructure may offer several key benefits of scalability, built in redundancy, security mechanisms and reduced total cost of ownership as compared with a traditional data center approach. However, most of the tools and legacy software systems developed for online data repositories within the federal government were not developed with a cloud based infrastructure in mind and do not fully take advantage of commonly available cloud-based technologies. Moreover, services bases on object storage are well established and provided through all the leading cloud service providers (Amazon Web Service, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud, etc…) of which can often provide unmatched "scale-out" capabilities and data availability to a large and growing consumer base at a price point unachievable from in-house solutions. We describe a system that utilizes object storage rather than traditional file system based storage to vend earth science data. The system described is not only cost effective, but shows a performance advantage for running many different analytics tasks in the cloud. To enable compatibility with existing tools and applications, we outline client libraries that are API compatible with existing libraries for HDF5 and NetCDF4. Performance of the system is demonstrated using clouds services running on Amazon Web Services.

  15. Nuclear fuel industry in USSR, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurasaka, Makoto; Kinoshita, Michio.

    1987-01-01

    The development of uranium ore in USSR changes from the deposits of high grade or easy to excavate to those of low grade or hard to excavate. In the deposits like this, the various elements which are useful for industrial fields are contained in addition to uranium, but these components become the harmful foreign matters to the uranium and its compounds used for atomic energy industry. All the other elements must be removed to obtain the purity as nuclear fuel, but it is necessary to effectively use these elements though their quantity is very small. As the separation of these elements is expensive, the production of such related products as fertilizer, alum and saltpeter is carried out accompanying the extraction of uranium, in this way, the improvement of efficiency is planned. In USSR, ion exchange process was developed in a very short period, and at present, this is used to extract high purity uranium compounds and others. For the adsorption of uranium, anion exchange resin is used in addition to cation exchange resin. By pulp adsorption process, the consumption of water, energy and chemicals was largely saved. Because of the closed process without releasing wastes, pollution was prevented. The method of extracting uranium and accompanying elements and the rough refineries for uranium in USSR are described. (Kako, I.)

  16. Analyzing the Pension System of the USSR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei V. Pudovkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article under the title "ANALYSIS OF THE PENSION SYSTEM OF THE USSR" deals with numerous aspects of development of the pension system of the former USSR. Since the improvement of the Russian pension system is presently high on the agenda, the author believes that analyzing the own historical experience in the first line is essential in order to create a sound and efficient pension system in Russia. The study presented in the article aims to execute an in-depth analysis of legislature on the soviet pension system with the view to recreate the architecture of the pension system of the USSR. In addition, the study also reflects on the official statistics for the said period to make a qualified and fundamental conclusion on the efficiency of the soviet pension system. The evolution of the pension system, based on statistical data evidently proves the efficiently of the soviet pension system. It is highly recommended that the positive aspects of the soviet pension system are taken into consideration when reforming the actual pension system of Russian Federation.

  17. Measures to restore metallurgical mine wasteland using ecological restoration technologies: A case study at Longnan Rare Earth Mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yunzhang; Gu, Ruizhi; Guo, Ruikai; Zhang, Xueyan

    2017-01-01

    Whereas mining activities produce the raw materials that are crucial to economic growth, such activities leave extensive scarring on the land, contributing to the waste of valuable land resources and upsetting the ecological environment. The aim of this study is therefore to investigate various ecological technologies to restore metallurgical mine wastelands. These technologies include measures such as soil amelioration, vegetation restoration, different vegetation planting patterns, and engineering technologies. The Longnan Rare Earth Mine in the Jiangxi Province of China is used as the case study. The ecological restoration process provides a favourable reference for the restoration of a metallurgical mine wasteland.

  18. The Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET): Scaling the Earth System Grid to Petascale Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-09-27

    This report, which summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period April 1, 2007 through September 30, 2007, includes discussion of overall progress, period goals, highlights, collaborations and presentations. To learn more about our project, please visit the Earth System Grid website. In addition, this report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC project management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) project management, national and international stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), etc.), and collaborators. The ESG-CET executive committee consists of David Bernholdt, ORNL; Ian Foster, ANL; Don Middleton, NCAR; and Dean Williams, LLNL. The ESG-CET team is a collective of researchers and scientists with diverse domain knowledge, whose home institutions include seven laboratories (ANL, LANL, LBNL, LLNL, NCAR, ORNL, PMEL) and one university (ISI/USC); all work in close collaboration with the project's stakeholders and domain researchers and scientists. During this semi-annual reporting period, the ESG-CET increased its efforts on completing requirement documents, framework design, and component prototyping. As we strove to complete and expand the overall ESG-CET architectural plans and use-case scenarios to fit our constituency's scope of use, we continued to provide production-level services to the community. These services continued for IPCC AR4, CCES, and CCSM, and were extended to include Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP) data.

  19. Promoting Lifelong Ocean Education: Shaping Tomorrow's Earth Stewards and the Science and Technology Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeson, Blanche

    2006-01-01

    The coming ocean observing systems provide an unprecedented opportunity to change both the public perception of our oceans, and to inspire, captivate and motivate our children, our young adults and even our fellow adults to pursue careers allied with the oceans and to become stewards of our Planet's last unexplored environment. Education plans for the operational component, the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), and for the research component, Ocean Research Interactive Observatory Networks (ORION), are designed to take advantage of this opportunity. In both cases, community recommendations were developed within the context of the following assumptions: 1. Utilize research on how people learn, especially the four-pronged model of simultaneous learner-centered, knowledge-center, assessment-centered and community-centered learning 2. Strive for maximum impact on national needs in science and technology learning 3. Build on the best of what is already in place 4. Pay special attention to quality, sustainability, and scalability of efforts 5. Use partnerships across federal, state and local government, academia, and industry. Community recommendations for 100s and ORION education have much in common and offer the opportunity to create a coherent education effort allied with ocean observing systems. Both efforts focus on developing the science and technology workforce of the future, and the science and technology literacy of the public within the context of the Earth system and the role of the oceans and Great Lakes in that system. Both also recognize that an organized education infrastructure that supports sustainability and scalability of education efforts is required if ocean observing education efforts are to achieve a small but measurable improvement in either of these areas. Efforts have begun to develop the education infrastructure by beginning to form a community of educators from existing ocean and aquatic education networks and by exploring needs and

  20. A Report on the Development of Rare Earth-Cobalt Permanent Magnet Technology - Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    materials can have their magnetic properties significantly degraded or en- hanced by the presence of hydrogen. 30 May PM - Visit to the National Institute of...They are engaged in rare earth oxide reduction, rare earth separation and the produc- tion of rare earth-cobalt magnets. They also produce polypropylene ...plant on-line which produces several hundred extruded cylinders per month. A hot extrusion process at 7000 C is used to achieve an 85% reduction in

  1. Report by USSR survey mission of Nuclear Safety Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The USSR survey mission of Nuclear Safety Commission drew up and presents the report as follows. In relation to the accident in Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station in USSR, in order to investigate into the present status of the countermeasures for nuclear power safety in USSR and to exchange opinion, the USSR survey mission inspected nuclear power station facilities and visited the government organs, research institutes and others in USSR. The survey mission comprised 13 members, and went to Moscow, Kiev and two nuclear power station sites, from October 22 to November 1, 1989, for 11 days. At present in USSR, 49 nuclear power plants of about 35 GWe are in operation, and by 2000, the operation of more nuclear power plants of about 30 GWe is needed, but due to the change of social situation in USSR, its attainment seems to be difficult. The plan of nuclear power generation in USSR, the ensuring of safety in general, the recent countermeasures for improving safety, the effect of the accident in Chenobyl Nuclear Power Station on health and so on are reported. The detailed record of the visit to Zaporozhe and Chernobyl Nuclear Power Stations and 7 other research institutes and government organs is given. (K.I.)

  2. The V. I. Lenin State Library of the USSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igumnova, N. P.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses objectives set forth in "Status of Librarianship in the USSR" adopted by Decree of Presidium of Supreme Soviet of USSR of March 13, 1984, to consolidate Leninist principles of library work as unified system. Organization of country's libraries, effective formation of library collections, library services, and bibliographic…

  3. THE CONTRIBUTION OF EARTH OBSERVATION TECHNOLOGIES TO MONITORING STRATEGIES OF CULTURAL LANDSCAPES AND SITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Cuca

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Coupling of Climate change effects with management and protection of cultural and natural heritage has been brought to the attention of policy makers since several years. On the worldwide level, UNESCO has identified several phenomena as the major geo-hazards possibly induced by climate change and their possible hazardous impact to natural and cultural heritage: Hurricane, storms; Sea-level rise; Erosion; Flooding; Rainfall increase; Drought; Desertification and Rise in temperature. The same document further referrers to satellite Remote Sensing (EO as one of the valuable tools, useful for development of “professional monitoring strategies”. More recently, other studies have highlighted on the impact of climate change effects on tourism, an economic sector related to build environment and traditionally linked to heritage. The results suggest that, in case of emergency the concrete threat could be given by the hazardous event itself; in case of ordinary administration, however, the threat seems to be a “hazardous attitude” towards cultural assets that could lead to inadequate maintenance and thus to a risk of an improper management of cultural heritage sites. This paper aims to illustrate potential benefits that advancements of Earth Observation technologies can bring to the domain of monitoring landscape heritage and to the management strategies, including practices of preventive maintenance. The attempt here is to raise awareness on the importance of integrating satellite remote sensing imagery and the deriving products with other geospatial information (even geo-referenced historic maps for a more complete insight on the environmental dynamics of landscapes.

  4. Stratospheric platforms: a novel technological support for Earth observation and remote sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovis, Fabio; Lo Presti, Letizia; Magli, Enrico; Mulassano, Paolo; Olmo, Gabriella

    2001-12-01

    The international community agrees that the new technology based on the use of Unmanned Air Vehicles High Altitude Very long Endurance (UAV-HAVE) could play an important role for the development of remote sensing and telecommunication applications. A UAV-HAVE vehicle can be described as a low- cost flying infrastructure (compared with satellites) optimized for long endurance operations at an altitude of about 20 km. Due to such features, its role is similar to satellites, with the major advantages of being less expensive, more flexible, movable on demand, and suitable for a larger class of applications. According to this background, Politecnico di Torino is involved as coordinator in an important project named HeliNet, that represent one of the main activities in Europe in the field of stratospheric platforms, and is concerned with the development of a network of UAV-HAVE aircraft. A key point of this project is the feasibility study for the provision of several services, namely traffic monitoring, environmental surveillance, broadband communications and navigation. This paper reports preliminary results on the HeliNet imaging system and its remote sensing applications. In fact, many environmental surveillance services (e.g. regional public services for agriculture, hydrology, fire protection, and more) require very high-resolution imaging, and can be offered at a lower cost if operated by a shared platform. The philosophy behind the HeliNet project seems to be particularly suitable to manage such missions. In particular, we present a system- level study of possible imaging payloads to be mounted on- board of a stratospheric platform to collect Earth observation data. Firstly, we address optical payloads such as multispectral and/or hyperspectral ones, which are a very short-term objective of the project. Secondly, as an example of mid-term on-board payload, we examine the possibility to carry on the platform a light-SAR system. For both types of payload, we show

  5. DOE SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-09-27

    The mission of the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is to provide the worldwide climate-research community with access to the data, information, model codes, analysis tools, and intercomparison capabilities required to make sense of enormous climate data sets. Its specific goals are to (1) provide an easy-to-use and secure web-based data access environment for data sets; (2) add value to individual data sets by presenting them in the context of other data sets and tools for comparative analysis; (3) address the specific requirements of participating organizations with respect to bandwidth, access restrictions, and replication; (4) ensure that the data are readily accessible through the analysis and visualization tools used by the climate research community; and (5) transfer infrastructure advances to other domain areas. For the ESGF, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultra-scale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (such as the Community Earth System Model and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate, Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, etc.), and analysis and visualization tools, all serving a diverse user community. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as ANL, LANL, LBNL/NERSC, LLNL/PCMDI, NCAR, and ORNL) and at unfunded partner sites, such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate

  6. JPRS Report, Science & Technology USSR: Science & Technology Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-06

    necessary demandingness and readiness of those, for whom this information is intended, and the inadequacy of their information culture do not...technical achievements to a wide range of users, the increase of their skills ( information culture ), the deter- mination and the inclusion in the realm

  7. JPRS Report Science & Technology, USSR: Science & Technology Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-17

    vating sugar - beets in Latvia and proposed supplying Riga with water from Lake Baltezers—there was a time when Riga was second among European capitals...Levitin; PRAVDA, 12 Nov 88] 12 Military Applications Improving Effectiveness of Military Inventors, Innovators [V. M. Shabanov Interview; KRASNAYA...undermined the genetic stock of our people, are right. The system of secondary and higher education with its orientation toward the utmost averaging out

  8. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Science & Technology Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-28

    Marina Nikolayevna Stroganova, docent, staff members of the same university; Candidate of Biological Sciences Alek- sandr Vladimirovich Khabarov...Mikhail Gukasovich Abramov , professor, Doctor JPRS-UST-88-005 28 April 1988 26 Awards, Prizes of Medical Sciences Natalya Yevgenyevna Andreyeva...docent, Doctor of Medical Sciences Lev Iosifovich Idel- son, senior scientific associate, Candidate of Medical Sciences Marina Davydovna Brilliant

  9. JPRS Report, Science and Technology, USSR: Science & Technology Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-18

    field of mastery of the process of converting without combustion through oxidation chemical into electrical energy, which promises extraordinarily...experimental research connected with the synthesis of catalytic systems, capa- ble of decomposing water (photoreaction) into hydrogen and oxygen...example. In the parks and on the streets of the capital it would be possible to grow a hybrid of poplar and aspen , which was developed by scientists

  10. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Science & Technology Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-15

    prologue to the establishment of a Soviet-Czechoslovak scientific production association. The chronicles of interaction also include moments that can...an exceptionally alarming symptom of the disease of sectorial science, and this was discussed with concern at the last party congress. The...sciences without a dissertation defense. In 1936 he defended his dissertation on the theme "Respiratory Reflexes During Vascular Intoxication in

  11. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Science & Technology Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-18

    giving blood, fearing AIDS and viral hepatitis . Many fields in medicine, in which it is impossible to manage without artificial circulation: These...the Serpukhov KGB, and then the Ser- pukhov Interrayon Procuracy, who accused Beloyartsev of a shortage of alcohol , were drawn into the case. They...researcher and as a creator. Here is a brief chronicle of the discoveries of Bayev in the contexts of the devel- opment of molecular biology and

  12. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Science & Technology Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-10

    and tech- nical complex is higher in those countries which have a more developed, sensibly balanced technical base. Of course, it is possible to...money relations sensibly . In some places they are needed, in some they are not. In practically all countries general theoretical research and a large...1987. Submitted by the Scientific Research Institute of Health Resort Studies and Physiotherapy imeni I.G. Koniash- vili. 2. E.S. Dvalishvili. The

  13. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Science & Technology Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-05

    Yevstigneyev, Ruben Nikolayevich—doctor of eco- nomic sciences, professor. Yegiazaryan, Gevork Ashotovich—doctor of economic sciences...that leguminous plants, being in symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria which form nodules on their root system, substantially enrich the soil...significantly the development of the con- ditions of the effective symbiosis of agricultural plants and microorganisms that improve the nutrition of

  14. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Science & Technology Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-07

    overcoming serious living inconveniences and consequently do not yield a full return. One’s look at the problem cannot be simply sympathetic , it must be...access to the knowledge and facts stored in electronic banks. Without this, infor- mation dystrophy sets in. Information is replaced with...Kukushkin, Ye.Ye. Meyzerov and A.V. Chistyakov—A cycle of research on the comprehensive study of pain mechanisms and reflex methods of

  15. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Science & Technology Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-07

    Yuridicheskaya literatura , 1983, p 145). Previously the authors themselves indicated the information on the specific creative contribution, just as the...acceleration of scientific and technical progress are of great economic and political importance. COPYRIGHT: Izdatelstvo "Yuridicheskaya literatura

  16. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Science & Technology Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-15

    Literature and Language Department Literary studies 1 2 Linguistics 2 2 Theory of culture and art criticism 1 - Far Eastern Department...theoretical physics and astronomy; of the Lithuanian language; of culture and art criticism; of geography; of immunology— have appeared. The Kaunas...Miller, the texts of Siberian literature of the 17th-18th centuries, the memoirs of Siberians of the 19th century, the works of Maksim Grek , and

  17. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Science & Technology Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-31

    with the NASA leadership and the US national foundation. As soon as you make a specific suggestion, the administrative bureaucracy virtually bans...TRIBUNA in Russian No 3-4, 23 Feb 90 p 12 [Advertisements] [Text] The Moscow Instruments and Computer Equip- ment Store and Showroom Offers...90-006 31 MAY 1990 Address of the showroom : 117218 Moscow, Nakhi- movskiy Prospekt, 30/43. Telephone inquiries: 129- 09-36. The Minsk Scientific

  18. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, C. S. (Editor); Donnelly, K. L. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Research in exobiology, life sciences technology, space biology, and space medicine and physiology, primarily using data gathered on the Salyut 6 orbital space station, is reported. Methods for predicting, diagnosing, and preventing the effects of weightlessness are discussed. Psychological factors are discussed. The effects of space flight on plants and animals are reported. Bioinstrumentation advances are noted.

  19. USSR Report, Agriculture, No. 1392

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-26

    have begun to sow soy - beans. The major part of this crop will be cultivated according to industrial technology without a need for manual labor...bleached and sprouting grains. The reduction in the protein and gluten content in wheat grain is associated mainly with growth in productivity over the

  20. PMEL contributions to the collaboration: SCALING THE EARTH SYSTEM GRID TO PETASCALE DATA for the DOE SciDACs Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankin, Steve

    2012-06-01

    Drawing to a close after five years of funding from DOE's ASCR and BER program offices, the SciDAC-2 project called the Earth System Grid (ESG) Center for Enabling Technologies has successfully established a new capability for serving data from distributed centers. The system enables users to access, analyze, and visualize data using a globally federated collection of networks, computers and software. The ESG software now known as the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) has attracted a broad developer base and has been widely adopted so that it is now being utilized in serving the most comprehensive multi-model climate data sets in the world. The system is used to support international climate model intercomparison activities as well as high profile U.S. DOE, NOAA, NASA, and NSF projects. It currently provides more than 25,000 users access to more than half a petabyte of climate data (from models and from observations) and has enabled over a 1,000 scientific publications.

  1. Snow density climatology across the former USSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, X.; Zhang, T.; Wang, K.

    2014-04-01

    Snow density is one of the basic properties used to describe snow cover characteristics, and it is a key factor for linking snow depth and snow water equivalent, which are critical for water resources assessment and modeling inputs. In this study, we used long-term data from ground-based measurements to investigate snow density (bulk density) climatology and its spatiotemporal variations across the former Soviet Union (USSR) from 1966 to 2008. The results showed that the long-term monthly mean snow density was approximately 0.22 ± 0.05 g cm-3 over the study area. The maximum and minimum monthly mean snow density was about 0.33 g cm-3 in June, and 0.14 g cm-3 in October, respectively. Maritime and ephemeral snow had the highest monthly mean snow density, while taiga snow had the lowest. The higher values of monthly snow density were mainly located in the European regions of the former USSR, on the coast of Arctic Russia, and the Kamchatka Peninsula, while the lower snow density occurred in central Siberia. Significant increasing trends of snow density from September through June of the next year were observed, however, the rate of the increase varied with different snow classes. The long-term (1966-2008) monthly and annual mean snow densities had significant decreasing trends, especially during the autumn months. Spatially, significant positive trends in monthly mean snow density lay in the southwestern areas of the former USSR in November and December and gradually expanded in Russia from February through April. Significant negative trends mainly lay in the European Russia and the southern Russia. There was a high correlation of snow density with elevation for tundra snow and snow density was highly correlated with latitude for prairie snow.

  2. Electric power development in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudenko, Y.N.

    1993-01-01

    The generation of electric power in the USSR is based on the Unified Electric Power System (UEPS) whose network cover most of the habitable territory of the country. Therefore, the development of the UEPS governs the overall evolution of the electric power generation in the country. At present, eleven out of thirteen joint electric power systems, which supply electricity to most of the USSR, are operating within the UEPS. The total electric power generation in the country reached 1728 billion kWh in 1990, of which the UEPS supplied approximately 90%. About 70% of installed capacity of the UEPS is fossil-fuelled power plants, about 12 % is nuclear power plants, and about 18% is hydroelectric power plants. The system-forming grid of the UEPS is made up of transmission lines of 220, 330, 500 and 750 kV. The on-line supervisory control of the UEPS is achieved by four-level automated system of dispatch control (UEPS, joint electric power systems, regional electric power systems, electric power plants, substations,electric grid regions). The development and extension of the UEPS in the USSR ensure higher reliability and quality of electric power supply to end-users, combined with higher efficiency. The principal problem facing the UEPS are as follows: the need to ensure environmental protection and efficiency of the steam power plants; to improve the safety and efficiency of nuclear power plants. The solution to these problems will define the conditions of the UEPS development, as well as electric power systems of other countries, at least for the coming two decades. This paper characterizes the peculiarities of the UEPS development over the last 20 years, including the installed capacity structure and the system-forming electric power grid. Special attention is paid to the environmental problems related to functioning and development of the UEPS and to the means of their solution. (author)

  3. Development of technology and equipment for manufacturing fluorides rare-earths via non-aqueous method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatalov, V.V.; Kozlov, O.I.; Machirev, V.P.; Zvonarev, E.N.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The works on technology and equipment for rare earths (RE) fluorides are very scarce. Presently RE-fluorides are manufactured by various methods. Conventionally they can be divided into two main groups. The first group comprises methods based on precipitation of fluorides from soluble salts of corresponding metals by fluohydric acid (aqueous methods) with following thermal decomposition of aquatic fluorides obtained until anhydric state is reached. The second group (called dry, gaseous or non-aqueous) comprises methods based on direct fluorizating (by fluorine hydride, fluor or other fluorating agents) have several important advantages compared to the aqueous methods: the fluorides obtained are anhydrous; the operations of fluoride precipitation, washing, decantation, filtration are excluded as well as their drying and calcination. The process of calcination is, as a rule, accompanied by pyrohydrolysis. The products manufactured by precipitation are inferior to those obtained by the non-aqueous technique. The world production practice uses both groups of methods. Nevertheless, the method of gaseous hydrofluorination is preferable. In all non-aqueous processes the initial materials are oxides RE which interact with gaseous fluorine hydride. The initial materials - oxides are obtained by thermal decomposition of carbonates, hydroxides, oxalates and so on. One of the best type of apparatus for thermal decomposition processes is a horizontal ring shaped vibrating apparatus with direct heating. The RE - fluorides is synthesized by way of RE-oxide interacting with hydrogen fluoride at 200-550 deg C in single continuous operation: (RE) 2 O 3 + 6 HF → 2 (RE)F 3 + 3 H 2 0 The apparatus consists of a nickel horizontal two tube screw. Reaction time is varied from 2 to 6 hours; the productivity of reactor is defined by feed screw rotation and initial material bulk density. Hydrogen fluoride was passing the reactor opposite to the solid phase. The degree

  4. NASA's Global Imagery Browse Services - Technologies for Visualizing Earth Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cechini, M. F.; Boller, R. A.; Baynes, K.; Schmaltz, J. E.; Thompson, C. K.; Roberts, J. T.; Rodriguez, J.; Wong, M. M.; King, B. A.; King, J.; De Luca, A. P.; Pressley, N. N.

    2017-12-01

    For more than 20 years, the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) has collected earth science data for thousands of scientific parameters now totaling nearly 15 Petabytes of data. In 2013, NASA's Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) formed its vision to "transform how end users interact and discover [EOS] data through visualizations." This vision included leveraging scientific and community best practices and standards to provide a scalable, compliant, and authoritative source for EOS earth science data visualizations. Since that time, GIBS has grown quickly and now services millions of daily requests for over 500 imagery layers representing hundreds of earth science parameters to a broad community of users. For many of these parameters, visualizations are available within hours of acquisition from the satellite. For others, visualizations are available for the entire mission of the satellite. The GIBS system is built upon the OnEarth and MRF open source software projects, which are provided by the GIBS team. This software facilitates standards-based access for compliance with existing GIS tools. The GIBS imagery layers are predominantly rasterized images represented in two-dimensional coordinate systems, though multiple projections are supported. The OnEarth software also supports the GIBS ingest pipeline to facilitate low latency updates to new or updated visualizations. This presentation will focus on the following topics: Overview of GIBS visualizations and user community Current benefits and limitations of the OnEarth and MRF software projects and related standards GIBS access methods and their in/compatibilities with existing GIS libraries and applications Considerations for visualization accuracy and understandability Future plans for more advanced visualization concepts including Vertical Profiles and Vector-Based Representations Future plans for Amazon Web Service support and deployments

  5. USSR reins-in nuclear plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, Judith.

    1989-01-01

    The USSR had hoped to double its nuclear capacity by the year 2000 to provide 20 per cent of its electricity. But this may no longer be possible in the face of the growing anti-nuclear movement allowed by Glasnost and given a focus by Chernobyl. Local protest has forced Moscow to drop its plans to build one of the world's biggest nuclear power plants at Ignalina in Lithuania. Although two 1,500 MW units are operating, there is national opposition to two more being built there. A year ago the Government had to scrap plans to build a 1,000MW VVER (pressurised water reactor) at Krasnador near the Black Sea, because of high seismic activity in the area. In the Ukraine, building has also stopped at the Chigirin plant. Plans to build nuclear heat and power plants at Odessa and Kharkov were cancelled last July. Construction of a nuclear power and heat plant at Minsk has been suspended and the Byelorussian government has proposed to Moscow that it should be redesigned to run on gas. A planned nuclear power and heat plant in Gorky and a plant being built in the Crimea are in doubt. Armenia's two reactors in the Ararat valley are to be closed and converted to a thermal plant, following increased concern after the 1988 earthquake. The USSR are looking at other energy sources, geothermal, solar, wind and wave. (author)

  6. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the University of Hawaii at Manoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The University of Hawaii at Manoa, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) is a partner in the Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples...

  7. A SmallSat Approach for Global Imaging Spectroscopy of the Earth SYSTEM Enabled by Advanced Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R. O.; Asner, G. P.; Thompson, D. R.; Mouroulis, P.; Eastwood, M. L.; Chien, S.

    2017-12-01

    Global coverage imaging spectroscopy in the solar reflected energy portion of the spectrum has been identified by the Earth Decadal Survey as an important measurement that enables a diverse set of new and time critical science objectives/targets for the Earth system. These science objectives include biodiversity; ecosystem function; ecosystem biogeochemistry; initialization and constraint of global ecosystem models; fire fuel, combustion, burn severity, and recovery; surface mineralogy, geochemistry, geologic processes, soils, and hazards; global mineral dust source composition; cryospheric albedo, energy balance, and melting; coastal and inland water habitats; coral reefs; point source gas emission; cloud thermodynamic phase; urban system properties; and more. Traceability of these science objectives to spectroscopic measurement in the visible to short wavelength infrared portion of the spectrum is summarized. New approaches, including satellite constellations, to acquire these global imaging spectroscopy measurements is presented drawing from recent advances in optical design, detector technology, instrument architecture, thermal control, on-board processing, data storage, and downlink.

  8. Holistic Approach to Secondary Earth Science Teacher Professional Development: the Triad of Project-based Instruction, Earth Science Content, and GIS Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino-Hare, L.; Sample, J. C.; Fredrickson, K.; Claesgens, J.; Bloom, N.; Henderson-Dahms, C.; Manone, M.

    2011-12-01

    We have provided two years of professional development for secondary and middle school teachers with a focus on project-based instruction (PBI) using GIS. The EYE-POD project (funded by NSF-ITEST) involved pairs of teachers from Arizona and the surrounding region in two-week institutes during Summer, 2010, and an advanced institute in Summer, 2011. The NAz-POD project (funded by Arizona Department of Education and administered by Science Foundation Arizona) provided similar PD experiences, but the institutes occurred during weekends in the academic year. The institutes were led by a team with expertise in Earth science content, professional development and pedagogy, and GIS. The teachers developed learning modules using the project based learning instructional model. Pedagogy, content, and GIS skills were combined throughout the professional development activities. Academic year follow up by NAU personnel included classroom observations and technical support. For assessing student work we provided a rubric, but learned that teachers were not prepared to assess GIS products in order to determine the level of student understanding. In year two of the project we incorporated strategies for assessment of student products into the professional development. Teacher-participants and their students completed several pre- and post- assessments. Teacher assessments included a geospatial performance assessment, classroom observations, and content tests. Student data collection included attitude and efficacy questionnaires, content tests, and authentic assessments including products using GIS. Content tests were the same for teachers and students and included spatial reasoning, data analysis, and Earth science content. Data was also collected on teacher perception of professional development delivery and self-reported confidence in teaching with PBI and geospatial technology. Student assessments show that improvement occurred in all areas on the content test. Possible factors

  9. Carbon footprint assessment of recycling technologies for rare earth elements: A case study of recycling yttrium and europium from phosphor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Allen H; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Huang, Lance H; Su, Chao-Chin

    2017-02-01

    Rare earth elements are key raw materials in high-technology industries. Mining activities and manufacturing processes of such industries have caused considerable environmental impacts, such as soil erosion, vegetation destruction, and various forms of pollution. Sustaining the long-term supply of rare earth elements is difficult because of the global shortage of rare earth resources. The diminishing supply of rare earth elements has attracted considerable concern because many industrialized countries regarded such elements as important strategic resources for economic growth. This study aims to explore the carbon footprints of yttrium and europium recovery techniques from phosphor. Two extraction recovery methods, namely, acid extraction and solvent extraction, were selected for the analysis and comparison of carbon footprints. The two following functional units were used: (1) the same phosphor amounts for specific Y and Eu recovery concentrations, and (2) the same phosphor amounts for extraction. For acid extraction method, two acidic solutions (H 2 SO 4 and HCl) were used at two different temperatures (60 and 90°C). For solvent extraction method, acid leaching was performed followed by ionic liquid extraction. Carbon footprints from acid and solvent extraction methods were estimated to be 10.1 and 10.6kgCO 2 eq, respectively. Comparison of the carbon emissions of the two extraction methods shows that the solvent extraction method has significantly higher extraction efficiency, even though acid extraction method has a lower carbon footprint. These results may be used to develop strategies for life cycle management of rare earth resources to realize sustainable usage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Study of Oceans and Atmospheric Interactions Associated with Tropical Cyclone Activity using Earth Observing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Warith; Reddy, Remata

    From October 22nd to 30th, 2012 Hurricane Sandy was a huge storm of many abnormalities causing an estimated 50 billion dollars in damage. Tropical storm development states systems’ energy as product of warm sea surface temperatures (SST’s) and tropical cyclone heat potential (TCHP). Advances in Earth Observing (EO) technology, remote sensing and proxy remote sensing have allowed for accurate measurements of SST and TCHP information. In this study, we investigated rapid intensification of Sandy through EO applications for precipitable water vapor (PWAT), SST’s and TCHP during the period of October 27th. These data were obtained from NASA and NOAA satellites and NOAA National Buoy data center (NDBC). The Sensible Heat (Qs) fluxes were computed to determine available energy resulting from ocean-atmosphere interface. Buoy 41010, 120 NM east of Cape Canaveral at 0850 UTC measured 22.3 °C atmospheric temperatures and 27 °C SST, an interface of 4.7 °C. Sensible heat equation computed fluxes of 43.7 W/m2 at 982.0 mb central pressure. Sandy formed as late-season storm and near-surface air temperatures averaged > 21 °C according to NOAA/ESRL NCEP/NCAR reanalysis at 1000 mb and GOES 13 (EAST) geostationary water vapor imagery shows approaching cold front during October 27th. Sandy encountered massive dry air intrusion to S, SE and E quadrants of storm while travelling up U.S east coast but experienced no weakening. Cool, dry air intrusion was considered for PWAT investigation from closest sounding station during Oct. 27th 0900 - 2100 UTC at Charleston, SC station 72208. Measured PWAT totaled 42.97 mm, indicating large energy potential supply to the storm. The Gulf Stream was observed using NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT) MODIS SST analysis. The results show 5 °C warmer above average than surrounding cooler water, with > 25 °C water extent approximately 400 NM east of Chesapeake Bay and eddies > 26 °C. Results from sensible heat

  11. Daily and Sub-daily Precipitation for the Former USSR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a compilation of in situ daily and hourly meteorological observations for the former USSR initially obtained within the framework of several joint...

  12. Nuclear power in USSR. Present status and future outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemskoff, Pierre.

    1980-05-01

    This study on nuclear electricity in the USSR deals with the main aspects of the development motivations of this form of energy in the country. The various systems developed are recalled, with their complex of power stations in operations or under construction, as well as the various other Soviet achievements: processs heat reactors, prefabricated reactors, etc. The nuclear industry in the USSR, profitability of the base facilities and cooperation with foreign countries are briefly reviewed [fr

  13. A summary of USSR thermionic energy conversion activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasor, N. S.

    1978-01-01

    The paper surveys the research and development associated with thermionic energy conversion in the USSR. Consideration is given to the basic physics of the thermionic converter, the development of thermionic nuclear reactors including the three TOPAZ models, radioisotope-heated generators, and the thermionic topping of fossil-fueled electric-power plants. Comparisons are made between U.S. and USSR capabilities in thermionic energy conversion and potential cooperative programs are noted.

  14. USSR Report, Construction and Related Industries, No. 99

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-10

    little shyness . The problem is very acute. We need construction firms which in cooperation with partners would guarantee the national economy the...USSR minister of Industrial Construction: " Learn to Economize"] [Text] August 14 is the Day of the Builder. All Soviet people observe this...lines in cooperation with client ministries and the USSR Ministry of Installation and Special Construction Work. Prior to the establishment of

  15. Solar energy utilization in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpil'rajn, Eh.Eh.

    1993-01-01

    The conditions for solar energy utilization in the USSR are not too favorable. Only in the country's southern regions is there sufficient insolation to make solar energy utilization economical. In higher latitudes only seasonable use of solar energy is reasonable. Up to now, the main application of solar energy was to produce low temperature heat for hot water production, drying of agricultural goods, space heating and thermal treating of concrete. A substantial part of the solar heating installations is flat plate solar collectors. The total installed area of solar collectors slightly exceeds 100,000 m 2 . The collectors are produced by industry, as well as by small enterprises. In some cases selective coatings are used over the absorber plates; black nickel or chromium is the main coating material. Recently, new projects were launched to develop and produce advanced collectors with enhanced efficiency and reliability. Substantial progress has been made in the USSR in developing and producing photovoltaic cells, mainly for space applications. Terrestrial applications of photovoltaic is only in the very early stage. About 100 Kw of photovoltaic cells are produced annually in the USSR, based on mono or polycrystalline silicon. Some experimental photovoltaic-arrays in the range of several tenth of Kw are installed in different places. Research and development work is carried out to produce thin film cells. Effort are in progress to construct automated production lines for 1 MW per year of crystalline and amorphous silicon. In the Crimea, a solar power plant SES-5 (5 MW peak power) was commissioned some years ago. The plant is of a tower type, with a circular helioscope field. The plants working fluid is steam. The experienced gained demonstrates that this design concept has several disadvantages. The cost of electricity produced by such type plants extremely high. Recently, alternative types of solar power plants have been under development, in particular, a project

  16. Hydrothermal Microflow Technology as a Research Tool for Origin-of-Life Studies in Extreme Earth Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Kunio

    2017-10-02

    Although studies about the origin of life are a frontier in science and a number of effective approaches have been developed, drawbacks still exist. Examples include: (1) simulation of chemical evolution experiments (which were demonstrated for the first time by Stanley Miller); (2) approaches tracing back the most primitive life-like systems (on the basis of investigations of present organisms); and (3) constructive approaches for making life-like systems (on the basis of molecular biology), such as in vitro construction of the RNA world. Naturally, simulation experiments of chemical evolution under plausible ancient Earth environments have been recognized as a potentially fruitful approach. Nevertheless, simulation experiments seem not to be sufficient for identifying the scenario from molecules to life. This is because primitive Earth environments are still not clearly defined and a number of possibilities should be taken into account. In addition, such environments frequently comprise extreme conditions when compared to the environments of present organisms. Therefore, we need to realize the importance of accurate and convenient experimental approaches that use practical research tools, which are resistant to high temperature and pressure, to facilitate chemical evolution studies. This review summarizes improvements made in such experimental approaches over the last two decades, focusing primarily on our hydrothermal microflow reactor technology. Microflow reactor systems are a powerful tool for performing simulation experiments in diverse simulated hydrothermal Earth conditions in order to measure the kinetics of formation and degradation and the interactions of biopolymers.

  17. Half a century of SETI in the USSR and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gindilis, Lev; Gurvits, Leonid

    SETI studies in the USSR ascend back to the beginning of the 1960s. The stage for these studies have been set by the publication of the first edition of the book “The Universe, Life and Intelligence” by I.S. Shklovsky in 1962. Important milestones of early decades of the studies were the First All-Union Conference on extraterrestrial civilisations (Byurakan, 1964), the First International Symposium on CETI (Byurakan, 1971), the Zelenchukskaya Workshop (1975), Tallinn (1981) and Vilnius (1987) symposia, the Decennial US-USSR Conference on SETI (Santa Cruz, CA, 1991). The studies discussed at these forums ranged from developing criteria of “artificiality” of signals, analysing possible strategies of communication and broadcasting of messages on cosmic distances, methodology of search for artificial signals in various domains of the electro-magnetic spectrum, optimisation of frequency bands for search of and communication with ETI. A number of exploratory search projects have been conducted in radio and optical domains in the 1960s-80s. Theoretical studies were focused at developing optimal techniques for coding and decoding of interstellar messages, evaluation of astro-engineering dimension of the extraterrestrial intelligent activities, advancing philosophical aspects of the SETI problem. Later, in the 1990s and first decade of the third millennium, despite of general difficulties confronting scientific activities in Russia, SETI-oriented studies continued in the area of surveys of sun-like stars in Milky Way, search for Dyson spheres and optical signals with indications on artificiality. Several programmes of cosmic broadcasting were conducted too, including radio transmission toward selected stars. Serious re-thinking was given to incentives for passive and active involvement in SETI and CETI by cosmic civilisations. In our presentation, we will give a brief review of the past activities mentioned above and offer an outlook for further steps in advancing

  18. Integrating iPad Technology in Earth Science K-12 Outreach Courses: Field and Classroom Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Davin J.; Witus, Alexandra E.

    2013-01-01

    Incorporating technology into courses is becoming a common practice in universities. However, in the geosciences, it is difficult to find technology that can easily be transferred between classroom- and field-based settings. The iPad is ideally suited to bridge this gap. Here, we fully integrate the iPad as an educational tool into two…

  19. Sharing meanings: developing interoperable semantic technologies to enhance reproducibility in earth and environmental science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildhauer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Earth and environmental scientists are familiar with the entities, processes, and theories germane to their field of study, and comfortable collecting and analyzing data in their area of interest. Yet, while there appears to be consistency and agreement as to the scientific "terms" used to describe features in their data and analyses, aside from a few fundamental physical characteristics—such as mass or velocity-- there can be broad tolerances, if not considerable ambiguity, in how many earth science "terms" map to the underlying "concepts" that they actually represent. This ambiguity in meanings, or "semantics", creates major problems for scientific reproducibility. It greatly impedes the ability to replicate results—by making it difficult to determine the specifics of the intended meanings of terms such as deforestation or carbon flux -- as to scope, composition, magnitude, etc. In addition, semantic ambiguity complicates assemblage of comparable data for reproducing results, due to ambiguous or idiosyncratic labels for measurements, such as percent cover of forest, where the term "forest" is undefined; or where a reported output of "total carbon-emissions" might just include CO2 emissions, but not methane emissions. In this talk, we describe how the NSF-funded DataONE repository for earth and environmental science data (http://dataone.org), is using W3C-standard languages (RDF/OWL) to build an ontology for clarifying concepts embodied in heterogeneous data and model outputs. With an initial focus on carbon cycling concepts using terrestrial biospheric model outputs and LTER productivity data, we describe how we are achieving interoperability with "semantic vocabularies" (or ontologies) from aligned earth and life science domains, including OBO-foundry ontologies such as ENVO and BCO; the ISO/OGC O&M; and the NSF Earthcube GeoLink project. Our talk will also discuss best practices that may be helpful for other groups interested in constructing their own

  20. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran (Editor); Donaldson, P. Lynn (Editor); Teeter, Ronald (Editor); Garshnek, Victoria (Editor); Rowe, Joseph (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This is the 19th issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 47 papers published in Russian language periodicals or presented at conferences and of 5 new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. Reports on two conferences, one on adaptation to high altitudes, and one on space and ecology are presented. A book review of a recent work on high altitude physiology is also included. The abstracts in this issue have been identified as relevant to 33 areas of space biology and medicine. These areas are: adaptation, biological rhythms, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cytology, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, biology, group dynamics, habitability and environmental effects, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, man-machine systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, and space biology and medicine.

  1. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran (Editor); Teeter, Ronald (Editor); Teeter, Ronald (Editor); Teeter, Ronald (Editor); Teeter, Ronald (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    This is the thirteenth issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 39 papers recently published in Russian-language periodicals and bound collections, two papers delivered at an international life sciences symposium, and three new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. Also included is a review of a recent Soviet-French symposium on Space Cytology. Current Soviet Life Sciences titles available in English are cited. The materials included in this issue have been identified as relevant to 31 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology. These areas are: adaptation, biological rhythms, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cosmonaut training, cytology, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, equipment and instrumentation, gastrointestinal systems, genetics, habitability and environment effects, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, space biology, and space medicine.

  2. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran (Editor); Teeter, Ronald (Editor); Siegel, Bette (Editor); Donaldson, P. Lynn (Editor); Leveton, Lauren B. (Editor); Rowe, Joseph (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This is the sixteenth issue of NASA's USSR Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 57 papers published in Russian language periodicals or presented at conferences and of 2 new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. An additional feature is the review of a book concerned with metabolic response to the stress of space flight. The abstracts included in this issue are relevant to 33 areas of space biology and medicine. These areas are: adaptation, biological rhythms, bionics, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, exobiology, gastrointestinal system, genetics, gravitational biology, habitability and environmental effects, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, man-machine systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, reproductive biology, and space biology.

  3. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, Issue 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran (Editor); Donaldson, P. Lynn (Editor); Teeter, Ronald (Editor); Garshnek, Victoria (Editor); Rowe, Joseph (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This is the 18th issue of NASA's USSR Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 50 papers published in Russian language periodicals or presented at conferences and of 8 new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. A review of a recent Aviation Medicine Handbook is also included. The abstracts in this issue have been identified as relevant to 37 areas of space biology and medicine. These areas are: adaptation, aviation medicine, biological rhythms, biospherics, body fluids, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cytology, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, equipment and instrumentation, exobiology, gastrointestinal system, genetics, gravitational biology, group dynamics, habitability and environmental effects, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, man-machine systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, reproductive biology, space biology and medicine, and space industrialization.

  4. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, L. R. (Editor); Teeter, R. (Editor); Teeter, R. (Editor); Teeter, R. (Editor); Teeter, R. (Editor); Teeter, R. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    This is the seventh issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 29 papers recently published in Russian language periodicals and bound collections and of 8 new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. Additional features include two interviews with the Soviet Union's cosmonaut physicians and others knowledgable of the Soviet space program. The topics discussed at a Soviet conference on problems in space psychology are summarized. Information about English translations of Soviet materials available to readers is provided. The topics covered in this issue have been identified as relevant to 29 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology. These areas are adaptation, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, exobiology, genetics, habitability and environment effects, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, morphology and cytology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, and space medicine.

  5. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, Issue 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran; Radtke, Mike; Teeter, Ronald; Garshnek, Victoria; Rowe, Joseph E.

    1987-01-01

    The USSR Space Life Sciences Digest contains abstracts of 37 papers recently published in Russian language periodicals and bound collections and of five new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. Additional features include the translation of a book chapter concerning use of biological rhythms as a basis for cosmonaut selection, excerpts from the diary of a participant in a long-term isolation experiment, and a picture and description of the Mir space station. The abstracts included in this issue were identified as relevant to 25 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology. These areas are adaptation, biological rhythms, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, group dynamics, habitability and environmental effects, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, morphology and cytology, musculosketal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, personnel selection, psychology, and radiobiology.

  6. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, L. R. (Editor); Radtke, M. (Editor); Teeter, R. (Editor); Rowe, J. E. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    This is the sixth issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 54 papers recently published in Russian language periodicals and bound collections and of 10 new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. Additional features include a table of Soviet EVAs and information about English translations of Soviet materials available to readers. The topics covered in this issue have been identified as relevant to 26 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology. These areas are adaptation, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, exobiology, genetics, habitability and environment effects, health and medical treatment, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism., microbiology, morphology and cytology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, reproductive biology, and space medicine.

  7. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran; Teeter, Ronald; Radtke, Mike; Rowe, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    This is the fourteenth issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 32 papers recently published in Russian language periodicals and bound collections and of three new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. Also included is a review of a recent Soviet conference on Space Biology and Aerospace Medicine. Current Soviet life sciences titles available in English are cited. The materials included in this issue have been identified as relevant to the following areas of aerospace medicine and space biology: adaptation, biological rhythms, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, equipment and instrumentation, gastrointestinal systems, habitability and environment effects, human performance, immunology, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, and space biology and medicine.

  8. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran; Donaldson, P. Lynn; Garshnek, Victoria; Rowe, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    This is the twenty-first issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 37 papers published in Russian language periodicals or books or presented at conferences and of a Soviet monograph on animal ontogeny in weightlessness. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. A book review of a work on adaptation to stress is also included. The abstracts in this issue have been identified as relevant to 25 areas of space biology and medicine. These areas are: adaptation, biological rhythms, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cytology, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, equipment and instrumentation, exobiology, gravitational biology, habitability and environmental effects, hematology, human performance, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, operational medicine, perception, psychology, and reproductive system.

  9. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran (Editor); Radtke, Mike (Editor); Radtke, Mike (Editor); Radtke, Mike (Editor); Radtke, Mike (Editor); Radtke, Mike (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    This is the eleventh issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 54 papers recently published in Russian language periodicals and bound collections and of four new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated. Additional features include the translation of a paper presented in Russian to the United Nations, a review of a book on space ecology, and report of a conference on evaluating human functional capacities and predicting health. Current Soviet Life Sciences titles available in English are cited. The materials included in this issue have been identified as relevant to 30 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology. These areas are: adaptation, aviation physiology, biological rhythms, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cosmonaut training, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, equipment and instrumentation, gastrointestinal systems, group dynamics, genetics, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, perception, personnel selection, psychology, and radiobiology.

  10. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, L. R. (Editor); Radtke, M. (Editor); Garshnek, V. (Editor); Rowe, J. E. (Editor); Teeter, R. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    This is the third issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. Abstracts are included for 46 Soviet periodical articles in 20 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology and published in Russian during the second third of 1985. Selected articles are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. In addition, translated introductions and tables of contents for seven Russian books on six topics related to NASA's life science concerns are presented. Areas covered are adaptation, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, endocrinology, exobiology, gravitational biology, habitability and environmental effects, health and medical treatment, immunology, life support systems, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system; neurophysiology, nutrition, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, and space physiology. Two book reviews translated from the Russian are included and lists of additional relevant titles available in English with pertinent ordering information are given.

  11. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, L. R. (Editor); Radtke, M. (Editor); Garshnek, V. (Editor); Rowe, J. E. (Editor); Teeter, R. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The second issue of the bimonthly digest of USSR Space Life Sciences is presented. Abstracts are included for 39 Soviet periodical articles in 16 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology and published in Russian during the first half of 1985. Selected articles are illustrated with figures from the original. Translated introductions and tables of contents for 14 Russian books on 11 topics related to NASA's life science concerns are presented. Areas covered are: adaptation, biospheric, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cybernetics and biomedical data processing, gastrointestinal system, group dynamics, habitability and environmental effects, health and medical treatment, hematology, immunology, life support systems, metabolism, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, psychology, radiobiology, and space biology. Two book reviews translated from Russian are included and lists of additional relevant titles available either in English or in Russian only are appended.

  12. Active optics as enabling technology for future large missions: current developments for astronomy and Earth observation at ESA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallibert, Pascal

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, a trend for higher resolution has increased the entrance apertures of future optical payloads for both Astronomy and Earth Observation most demanding applications, resulting in new opto-mechanical challenges for future systems based on either monolithic or segmented large primary mirrors. Whether easing feasibility and schedule impact of tight manufacturing and integration constraints or correcting mission-critical in-orbit and commissioning effects, Active Optics constitutes an enabling technology for future large optical space instruments at ESA and needs to reach the necessary maturity in time for future mission selection and implementation. We present here a complete updated overview of our current R and D activities in this field, ranging from deformable space-compatible components to full correction chains including wavefront sensing as well as control and correction algorithms. We share as well our perspectives on the way-forward to technological maturity and implementation within future missions.

  13. JPRS Report, Soviet Union: Political Affairs: USSR Government Passes Resolution on State Arbitration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1989-01-01

    This document contains the Decree of the USSR Council of Ministers on Ratification of the Statute on the USSR State Arbitration Commission and the Rules for Hearing Economic Disputes by State Arbitration Commissions...

  14. Rare-earth-doped materials with application to optical signal processing, quantum information science, and medical imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, R. L.; Thiel, C. W.; Sun, Y.; Böttger, Thomas; Macfarlane, R. M.

    2012-02-01

    Unique spectroscopic properties of isolated rare earth ions in solids offer optical linewidths rivaling those of trapped single atoms and enable a variety of recent applications. We design rare-earth-doped crystals, ceramics, and fibers with persistent or transient "spectral hole" recording properties for applications including high-bandwidth optical signal processing where light and our solids replace the high-bandwidth portion of the electronics; quantum cryptography and information science including the goal of storage and recall of single photons; and medical imaging technology for the 700-900 nm therapeutic window. Ease of optically manipulating rare-earth ions in solids enables capturing complex spectral information in 105 to 108 frequency bins. Combining spatial holography and spectral hole burning provides a capability for processing high-bandwidth RF and optical signals with sub-MHz spectral resolution and bandwidths of tens to hundreds of GHz for applications including range-Doppler radar and high bandwidth RF spectral analysis. Simply stated, one can think of these crystals as holographic recording media capable of distinguishing up to 108 different colors. Ultra-narrow spectral holes also serve as a vibration-insensitive sub-kHz frequency reference for laser frequency stabilization to a part in 1013 over tens of milliseconds. The unusual properties and applications of spectral hole burning of rare earth ions in optical materials are reviewed. Experimental results on the promising Tm3+:LiNbO3 material system are presented and discussed for medical imaging applications. Finally, a new application of these materials as dynamic optical filters for laser noise suppression is discussed along with experimental demonstrations and theoretical modeling of the process.

  15. Interdisciplinary Navigation Unit for Mathematics and Earth Science Using Geospatial Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaglik, S. M.; Harris, V.

    2006-12-01

    Central Wyoming College (CWC) is located northeast of the Wind River Mountains. Although many people find recreation in the wilderness and remote areas surrounding the area, people still lose their lives because they become lost or disoriented. Creating an interdisciplinary field-based curriculum unit within mathematics (MATH 1000) and earth science (GEOL 1070) courses for non-science and education majors, provides students an opportunity to develop critical thinking skills and quantitative literacy. It also provides some necessary skills for survival and an understanding of landscape formation and wilderness navigation using geoscience. A brief history of navigation, including the importance of finding latitude and longitude, and the fairly recent implementation of the Global Positioning System, precedes activities in which students learn to use a basic compass. In addition to learning how to adjust for magnetic declination they read topographic maps, specifically USGS quadrangles, and learn how to use the scale in the legend to verify calculations using the Pythagorean Theorem. Students learn how to estimate distance and time required for traveling a pre- determined distance while using dimensional analysis to convert from the English system to metric. They learn how to read and measure latitude and longitude, as well as universal transverse Mercator projection measurements (UTM's), to find their position. The basic mathematical skills are assessed through hands-on activities such as finding their location on a map using a compass, a GPS unit, and Google Earth, and using a combination of maps, compasses, and GPS units to navigate through a course. Our goal is to provide life-saving information to students while incorporating necessary core curriculum from both mathematics and earth science classes. We work to create field-based activities, as well as assessments, to insure that students who complete the course are prepared to safely enjoy the outdoors and are

  16. Emerging Earth Science Technologies in Disaster Risk Management: Prototype and Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Examine emerging technologies and assess their potential to dramatically change the utility and impact of satellite data for GEOSS societal benefits • Investigate...

  17. Synthetic biology meets bioprinting: enabling technologies for humans on Mars (and Earth).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J

    2016-08-15

    Human exploration off planet is severely limited by the cost of launching materials into space and by re-supply. Thus materials brought from Earth must be light, stable and reliable at destination. Using traditional approaches, a lunar or Mars base would require either transporting a hefty store of metals or heavy manufacturing equipment and construction materials for in situ extraction; both would severely limit any other mission objectives. Long-term human space presence requires periodic replenishment, adding a massive cost overhead. Even robotic missions often sacrifice science goals for heavy radiation and thermal protection. Biology has the potential to solve these problems because life can replicate and repair itself, and perform a wide variety of chemical reactions including making food, fuel and materials. Synthetic biology enhances and expands life's evolved repertoire. Using organisms as feedstock, additive manufacturing through bioprinting will make possible the dream of producing bespoke tools, food, smart fabrics and even replacement organs on demand. This new approach and the resulting novel products will enable human exploration and settlement on Mars, while providing new manufacturing approaches for life on Earth. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. Technological characteristics of compressed earth blocks for its use as a building material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Villalba, Luz Stella; Camacho-Perez, Nancy; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Becerra-Becerra, Javier; Esmeralda Corredor-Pulido, Dery; Fort, Rafael

    2013-04-01

    We present here an innovative building technique, which uses ecological, inexpensive and environmentally friendly materials. These compressed earth blocks seem to be very good for building purposes and that is why we have characterized three types of compressed earth blocks (CEB, named by their color as yellow, grey and red) mineralogically by means of X ray diffraction XRD and scanning electron microscopy SEM (both blocks and raw materials), petrographically by polarizing optical light microscopy POLM, and SEM, and, mainly, petrophysically: their hydric, physical and physico-mechanical properties by means of determining their capillary water absorption, porosity (open or accessible to water, pore size distribution and micro/macroporosity), and densities, color and ultrasound velocity (together with anisotropy). The particularities of these analyzed materials show that some varieties are more durable than others, and that all of them can be used as building materials with some restrictions related to their appropriate placing in the structures and the exposure to water. Acknowledgements: This work is supported by the GEOMATERIALES (S2009/MAT-1629) and CONSOLIDER-TCP (CSD2007-0058) programmes. Thanks also to the UCM (Complutense University of Madrid) Research Group "Alteración y conservación de los materiales pétreos del patrimonio" / Alteration and conservation of heritage stone materials (ref. 921349).

  19. The Teaching of Anthropogenic Climate Change and Earth Science via Technology-Enabled Inquiry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Drew; Sieber, Renee; Seiler, Gale; Chandler, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A gap has existed between the tools and processes of scientists working on anthropogenic global climate change (AGCC) and the technologies and curricula available to educators teaching the subject through student inquiry. Designing realistic scientific inquiry into AGCC poses a challenge because research on it relies on complex computer models,…

  20. Sister Earth, Our Common Home: Toward a Sustainable, Planet Friendly Approach to Dialysis, a Paradigm of High Technology Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara; Mery, David

    2017-11-01

    In our high-technology, highly polluted world, medicine plays an important role balancing saving lives with the expenses of growing amounts of waste products, not only biologically dangerous (the potentially "contaminated" or "hazardous" waste) but also potentially harmful for the planet (nonrecyclable, plastic waste). Dialysis, the prototype of high-technology medicine, is central to these problems, as the present treatment of about 2 million patients produces an enormous quantity of waste (considering hazardous waste only about 2 kg per session, with 160 sessions per year, that is 320 kg per patient, or about 640,000 tons of hazardous waste per year for 2 million patients, roughly corresponding to 6 nuclear aircraft carriers). Furthermore, obsolete dialysis machines, and water treatments are discharged, adding to the "technological waste." Water produced by the reverse osmosis is also discharged; this is the only nonhazardous, nonpolluting waste, but in particular in dry areas, wasting water is a great ecologic concern. The present review is aimed at discussing strategies already in place and to be further implemented for reducing this particular "uremic toxin" for the earth: dialysis waste, including dialysis disposables, water, and dialysis machines. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Demographic upheavals in the former USSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haub, C

    1995-01-01

    Fertility and life expectancy have changed since the breakup of the Soviet republics in 1991 and continue to change very rapidly. Before 1991, the USSR was the fastest growing developed country in the world. Annual growth rates in the mid-1980s were 0.9% compared to only 0.1% in Europe or 1.1% in the US. Immigration did not greatly affect the USSR's growth rate. By 1993, the population had declined in 8 of the 15 former republics. Deaths exceeded births in Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, Estonia, and Latvia, followed by Lithuania in 1994. The last census was conducted in 1989. Fertility declined in Russia from 1.9 in 1990 to 1.4 in 1993. Fertility has been low in Lithuania at 1.7, in the Ukraine at 1.6, in Latvia at 1.5, and in Estonia at 1.4. Kazakhstan, Georgia, and Kyrgyzstan have experienced fertility decline, which was affected by emigration to Russia and other countries after 1990. 25 million Russians have resided in the former republics in 1990. In Kazakhstan, the 160,000 more births than deaths were offset by 200,000 emigrants. Central republics with higher fertility experienced declines after 1990; for example, Kyrgyzstan declined from 3.7 in 1990 to 3.3 in 1993. Life expectancy for males in Russia in 1993 was 58.9 years, which was a decline from 63.8 years in 1990. About 50% of the decline in life expectancy was due to circulatory diseases, and about 25% was due to external causes such as accidents, suicide, and alcoholism. Infant mortality has been increasing since 1990; for example, it increased in the Ukraine from 12.9 in 1990 to 14.1 in 1992. Russia's population in 1993 experienced 700,000 more deaths than births. The demographic impact will be declining school enrollments and smaller employment among the working population to support the aged. The change to a market economy has been uneven in Russia, where it has advanced more rapidly than in the republics. It is unclear whether the declining birth rate and increasing mortality rates will continue, but

  2. Space Technology for Reduction of Desert Areas on Earth and Weather Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin SANDU

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In precedent papers the authors presented the idea of a space system composed of two opposite parabolic mirrors (large and small having the same focal point. This system is able to concentrate solar power in a strong light beam having irradiance of hundreds or thousands of times stronger than the solar irradiance on Earth's orbit. The system can be placed on a Sun synchronous orbit around the Earth or on the Earth’s orbit around the Sun at a distance of several hundred km from ground. When the concentrated light beam is directed toward the Earth surface it can locally melt, vaporize or decomposes tones of ground in its elements. This is happening because when the ground is hit by the light beam, ground temperature can reach thousands of degrees Celsius. At such temperatures the matter is decomposed into constitutive elements. For example, the silicate oxides which are frequently found in the composition of desert ground are decomposed into oxygen and silicon. Similarly, other oxides release oxygen and other type of oxides or constitutive elements. A network of deep and large channels can be dug in this way in hot deserts as Sahara. When these channels are connected with the seas & oceans, a network of water channels is created in those deserts. In this way, the local climate of deserts will change because channel water is vaporized during daytime when air temperature reaches 50ºC and condenses during nighttime when air temperature is around 0ºC. Presence of clouds over the hot deserts can lead to a reduction of ground temperature and rain follows. The channel water can be desalinized for producing drinking water and for irrigation using simple equipment. In addition to these advantages, channel deserts can be a solution for melting of polar ice calottes and flooding of seaside areas that are inhabited areas. On the other hand, the system composed of two opposite mirrors can be used for strength decreasing or deviation of hurricanes and

  3. Enhancing Earth Science And IT Literacy Through Environmental Science Information Technology Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, K. E.; Molinaro, M.

    2004-12-01

    The Environmental Science Information Technology Activities (ESITA) program provides grades 9 and 10 students with under-represented minority backgrounds in the East San Francisco Bay Area with real-world opportunities to learn about and apply information technologies through a series of project-based activities related to environmental science. Supported by the NSF Information Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program, ESITA activities engage students in the use of newly acquired information technology (IT) skills and understandings while performing air and water quality research investigations. One project that ESITA students have become involved in relates to the currently relevant issue of elevated levels of lead found in drinking waters in Washington, D.C. Students based in the Bay Area have initiated and maintained E-mail correspondence with children who attend elementary schools in the D.C. area. After receiving a thorough explanation of required sampling procedures devised by the Bay Area students, the elementary school children have sent 500 ml water samples from their homes and schools to Berkeley along with information about the locations from which the water samples were collected. These samples were then prepared for lead analysis at Lawrence Hall of Science by ESITA students, who used resulting data to perform a preliminary assessment of the geospatial distribution of lead trouble spots throughout Washington, DC. Later, ESITA student scientists will work with students from the UC Berkeley School of Public Health to develop surveys and questionnaires that generate high quality information useful with regard to assessing the impact of the current lead crisis on younger children in the Washington, D.C. area. Through the application of new understandings to current, real-world environmental problems and issues such as that related to lead, positive changes in students' attitudes towards IT and science have occurred, which accompany

  4. The Canadian Space Agency, Space Station, Strategic Technologies for Automation and Robotics Program technology development activity in protection of materials from the low Earth orbit space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francoeur, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Strategic Technologies in Automation and Robotics (STEAR) program is managing a number of development contracts to improve the protection of spacecraft materials from the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) space environment. The project is structured in two phases over a 3 to 4 year period with a budget of 3 to 4 million dollars. Phase 1 is designed to demonstrate the technical feasibility and commercial potential of a coating/substrate system and its associated application process. The objective is to demonstrate a prototype fabrication capability using a full scale component of a commercially viable process for the protection of materials and surface finishes from the LEO space environment, and to demonstrate compliance with a set of performance requirements. Only phase 1 will be discussed in this paper.

  5. SECT STUDIES IN USSR: TERMINOLOGY AND APPROACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Safronov

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The main theme of the article is sect studies in USSR. Soviet tradition in the fi eld did not appear from the thin air but was a «dialectic» — in the sense that simultaneously and legitimately can be estimated as continuation and rejection — sequel of pre-Soviet sect-study approach. Soviet tradition per se is based on ambiguous — according to Lenin’s position — understanding of sectarianism as an example of class combat (positive dimension but religiously specific (negative dimension. This negative attitude was expressed in specific ideological and political position towards sectarianism. Stating this position was a priority and that is why the establishing of proper Soviet scientifi c approach was problematic. It began to form only in the 1960-s. The term «sect» for both pre-Soviet and Soviet researches had negative connotation in dogmatic way for the former and in ideological way for the latter. Such a long history of negative understanding of the term makes it very hard to understand it as a neutral in contemporary Russia

  6. Underground nuclear explosions at Astrakhan, USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, I.Y.

    1982-01-01

    The three underground nuclear explosions recorded in 1980 and 1981 by Hagfors Observatory in Sweden are in the vicinity of Astrakhan on the Caspian Sea. They are believed to be associated with the development of a gas condensate field discovered in 1973. The gas producing horizons are in limestones at 4000 m depth. They are overlain by bedded, Kungarian salts. Salt domes are recognized in the area. Plans to develop the field are contained in the 11th Five Year Plan (1981-82). The USSR has solicited bids from western contractors to build gas separation and gas processing plant with an annual capacity of 6 billion m 3 . Ultimate expansion plans call for three plants with the total capacity of 18 billion m 3 . By analogy with similar peaceful nuclear explosions described in 1975 by the Soviets at another gas condensate field, the underground cavities are probably designed for storage of unstable, sour condensate after initial separation from the gaseous phases in the field. Assuming that the medium surrounding the explosions is salt, the volume of each cavity is on the order of 50,000 m 3

  7. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran; Radtke, Mike; Teeter, Ronald; Rowe, Joseph E.

    1987-01-01

    This is the ninth issue of NASA's USSR Space Lifes Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 46 papers recently published in Russian language periodicals and bound collections and of a new Soviet monograph. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. Additional features include reviews of a Russian book on biological rhythms and a description of the papers presented at a conference on space biology and medicine. A special feature describes two paradigms frequently cited in Soviet space life sciences literature. Information about English translations of Soviet materials available to readers is provided. The abstracts included in this issue have been identified as relevant to 28 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology. These areas are: adaptation, biological rhythms, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, equipment and instrumentation, gastrointestinal system, genetics, habitability and environment effects, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, morphology and cytology, musculoskeletal system, nutrition, neurophysiology, operational medicine, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, and space biology and medicine.

  8. Biological Technologies for Life Beyond Low Earth Orbit (BT4LBLEO): Study Introductions and Synopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, John W.

    2011-01-01

    The study will address the following mission concerns: -Extended human presence in the environments of deep space as well as the Moon and Mars will require a solid biological understanding of the integrated effects of diminished gravity, enhanced radiation, and transit- and destination-specific variables from the sub-cellular to the whole organism level. -Biological and associated technologies for biological and robotic precursor missions to realize future objectives for space colonization. -Surfaces, gravity levels, radiation environments, and atmospheres of these nearest neighbors are radically different in chemical and geological make-up from those on our home planet, and all of these contributory effects must be considered.

  9. Exploring Rare Earths supply constraints for the emerging clean energy technologies and the role of recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habib, Komal; Wenzel, Henrik

    with other background end-uses on two key REEs, i.e. neodymium (Nd) and dysprosium (Dy). Our study reveals that a highly accelerated rate of REEs mining is unavoidable in order to keep up with the pace of increasing demand from new technologies required in a renewable energy strategy for meeting the climate...... change challenge. Recycling does not seem to be in a position to close the wide gap between future demand and supply by 2050 mainly due to the long lifetime of key end-use products....

  10. A consortium approach for disaster relief and technology research and development: Fire station earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Douglas C.

    1992-06-01

    A new paradigm is proposed for alleviating the chronic problem of inadequate response to natural and man-made disasters. Fundamental flaws and weaknesses in the current disaster mitigation system point to the need for an international consortium involving governments, academia, industry, and businesses. Recent changes in social and political framework offer a unique opportunity of rethink and reform the existing disaster response mechanism. Benefits of a collaborative consortium approach may include commercial incentives, improved cost effectiveness, coherence in research and development efforts, conduciveness for long-term planning, and improved deployment of technology for disaster mitigation.

  11. Measuring Glasnost in and out of the U.S.S.R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, B

    1988-02-01

    Initiatives in the USSR, characterized by General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev as "glasnost" (openness) and "perestroika" (restructuring), come after almost a decade of change in the People's Republic of China, yet the Soviet experiment, which emphasizes market activities, is hardly a monolithic effort. In 1982, the 286 million Soviet citizens who live on 2 continents will be affected by "perestroika" in markedly different ways. The complex demographics of the USSR will figure significantly in determining those unequal effects. It is likely, if Gorbachev's campaign continues as intended, that patient exporters who explore the new Soviet arena to test their marketing skills will experience success. In fact, the USSR has been conducting business with the US for years. To date, nearly a dozen corporations have signed joint ventures with the Soviet Union, and at least 50 more have expressed an interest. Those companies with long-standing Soviet relationships are most interested; they are familiar with the bureaucratic obstacles and have a network of Soviet contacts. Gorbachev has made it clear that the Soviet economy needs basic foreign technology to move into the 21st century on an equal footing with other industrialized nations. Along with attracting foreign capital, the USSR must get its domestic house in order. The growth in the gross national product, which hovered at an annual 2.5% in the early 1980s, must double, according to the Twelfth Five Year Plan (1986-90). The 1988 population of 286 million has relatively few men, particularly in older age groups, and a growing ethnic mix. Of late, planners have made a concerted effort to narrow the gap among ethnic groups by expanding maternity benefits and health care. The most immediate consequences of the changing ethnic structure emerge in the labor force. Entry-level workers are scarce in European Russia, where about 60% of all Soviet industrial activity takes place and will become more scarce in coming years

  12. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts, Chemistry, Number 60

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-07-12

    compounds. The new process consists of acidifying the waste water to a pH of1-2, then adding the coagulant ferrous sulphate (FeS04«7H 0) and calcium... regenerated . References: 4 Russian. 78 USSR UDC 613.34:628.165 DESALINATION AS A PUBLIC HEALTH PROBLEM IN THE USSR Moscow GIGIYENA I SANITARIYA in Russian...628.162[546.17]:628.315.2(439) METHODS FOR REMOVING THE NITROGEN CONTENT OF WASTEWATERS IN HUNGARY PART 2: BIOLOGICAL METHODS Budapest MAGYAR

  13. A Repression of Czechoslovak Citizens in the USSR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hornik Jan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Around 30,000 citizens of pre-war Czechoslovakia were persecuted in the Soviet Union, at least 5.000 originated from Czech lands. One of the groups consist of the people who in the period of 1939-1942 sought refuge in the USSR from German or Hungarian Nazism, or who wanted to actively fight against it. They ended up in the Gulag, from which they were freed during an amnesty linked to the creation of a Czechoslovak unit in the USSR. Many were Czechoslovak Jews, including those who escaped from the Nazi concentration camp in Poland. Nisko, while thousands were inhabitants of Carpathian Ruthenia.

  14. Study On Beneficiation Technology Of Dong Pao Rare-Earth-Barite-Fluorite With Two Product Plans About Content And Recovery Of Rare-Earth Fine Ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duong Van Su; Truong Thi Ai; Bui Ba Duy; Bui Thi Bay; Nguyen Hong Ha; Le Thi Hong Ha; Doan Thi Mo; Doan Dac Ban; Nguyen Hoang Son

    2014-01-01

    The ore sample used in the research was taken from the F3 ore bodies and the sample of the F7, F9 and F16 ore bodies which contain the average of 5.98% TR 2 O 3 ; they are multi-metals ore which is difficult to enrich, highly weather with very complex ingredients. The process of the experiment is the ore is crushed, ground, screened and classified reasonably to -0.1 mm and divided into 3 particle size with the following technique: (1) -0.020 mm is primary sludge and the rare-earth fine ore; (2) 0.075-1 mm is gotten through the sludge concentrating table with the output is the 2 parts: the heavy part which is dried magnetic separator with high magnetism to get the rare-earth fine ore and the light one; (3) Light minerals, non-magnetic and ferromagnetic minerals group are ground together to 85% of them get size within -0.075 mm then mix it with 0.020-0.075 mm group. Using flotation separator, get barite-rare earth mixture and fluorite. After that, we separate this mixture by secondary flotation and get refined rare earth, barite and fluorite mineral. The result of the theme: (1) product plan A-rare-earth fine ore has TR 2 O 3 content archive 42.07% with recovery is 69.70%; (2) product plan B-rare-earth fine ore has TR 2 O 3 content archive 29.64% with recovery is 80.01%. (author)

  15. Study of borehole plugging in bedded salt domes by earth melting technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, D.L.

    1975-06-01

    The intent of this program is to define the most viable Melted In situ Rock salt Plug (MIRP) System options, these options being addressed primarily from the downhole subsystem perspective, with a conventional drill rig as the basis for the surface part of the MIRP System. Preliminary experiments had indicated that it is possible to backfill the open penetrations in the domed salt deposits with a melted in situ rocksalt plug such that in time the melted rock salt plug effectively duplicates the parent virgin salt. The programmatic assumption for the requirement of duplicating the virgin salt with a MIRP provides the basis for this study. A system functional analysis was performed to establish the requirements for the performance of the overall MIRP System. A similar functional analysis was conducted for the salt plug that would be formed by the MIRP System. Based on the analyses of the material, thermal, and structural behavior of the salt plug, the requirements for the formation of an acceptable salt plug were determined. From the functional analysis a determination was made of the operation of the hardware for the downhole portion of the MIRP System. From that perspective several design concepts were formulated. For these design concepts a technology roadmap was developed. The pertinent aspects, results, conclusions and recommendations of the above are summarized in the sections that follow

  16. Environmental consequences of Pollution and its Impact on earth's surface climate Using Geospatial Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit

    2016-07-01

    Modern transportation is an indispensable ingredient for development, allowing the pressure group of labor, supplies and goods, and enabling general public to access key resources and services. Climate change is a most important threat to sustainable development in any developing or developed country. Urban air pollution is on the rise, due to rapid economic and inhabitants growth and an increase in motorization. Modern transport is fundamental for improvement, allowing the movement of goods and enabling general public to access key resources and services. Travel today is relatively faster and people across the world are travelling more than ever before. Its stipulate regarding forecast is an indispensable part of transportation development in order to evaluate future needs of an urban area. Over increasing traffic concentration posed continued threat to ambient air quality and responsible for producing agents of physical condition hazards. Geospatial technology provides the smartest approach to resolve these inconvenience as it can cover a large area in a fraction of time. The research work focuses on the recognition of traffic intensities with increasing of SO2, NO2 and noise level considered at particular traffic sites in the Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India. SO2, NO2 and Noise levels recorded in the city, are much higher than the permissible level and are likely to causes associated health and psychological illnesses to nearby inhabitant.

  17. There's an app for that! Incorporating smartphone technology in earth science education and outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Vanessa NL; Gallant, Ailie JE; Tay, Adeline

    2015-04-01

    A trial field-based, e-learning activity based in a coastal suburb in inner Melbourne was established in 2013 for a first year undergraduate environmental science class at Monash University. A self-guided walking tour was developed using existing app and podcast technologies, allowing students to undertake independent fieldwork. The intended outcomes of the activity were for students to be able to contextualise climate change in a real world situation and to identify associated issues for natural and human environments. The students were provided with information on the natural landscape features, including the soils, geomorphology and vegetation, and on the projected future changes in sea level based on inundation modelling from climate projections. Students were given a field guide handbook with instructions and questions to assist them in data collection. From the data collected in the field, students undertook additional research and highlighted a series of issues surrounding sea-level rise in the area, which was then presented and assessed. Students mostly reported positively on the activity. Peer-based learning and diversity from a classroom environment were highlighted as positives. Students also responded favourably to developing their own ideas through independent data collection and learning, and to being able to visualise the impacts of climate change in the real world. This was reflected in a higher mean mark in the question on this issue in the final exam compared to the mean mark in the previous year.

  18. Crosscutting Airborne Remote Sensing Technologies for Oil and Gas and Earth Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrey, A. D.; Frankenberg, C.; Green, R. O.; Eastwood, M. L.; Thompson, D. R.; Thorpe, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Airborne imaging spectroscopy has evolved dramatically since the 1980s as a robust remote sensing technique used to generate 2-dimensional maps of surface properties over large spatial areas. Traditional applications for passive airborne imaging spectroscopy include interrogation of surface composition, such as mapping of vegetation diversity and surface geological composition. Two recent applications are particularly relevant to the needs of both the oil and gas as well as government sectors: quantification of surficial hydrocarbon thickness in aquatic environments and mapping atmospheric greenhouse gas components. These techniques provide valuable capabilities for petroleum seepage in addition to detection and quantification of fugitive emissions. New empirical data that provides insight into the source strength of anthropogenic methane will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on the evolving constraints enabled by new methane remote sensing techniques. Contemporary studies attribute high-strength point sources as significantly contributing to the national methane inventory and underscore the need for high performance remote sensing technologies that provide quantitative leak detection. Imaging sensors that map spatial distributions of methane anomalies provide effective techniques to detect, localize, and quantify fugitive leaks. Airborne remote sensing instruments provide the unique combination of high spatial resolution (<1 m) and large coverage required to directly attribute methane emissions to individual emission sources. This capability cannot currently be achieved using spaceborne sensors. In this study, results from recent NASA remote sensing field experiments focused on point-source leak detection, will be highlighted. This includes existing quantitative capabilities for oil and methane using state-of-the-art airborne remote sensing instruments. While these capabilities are of interest to NASA for assessment of environmental impact and global climate

  19. Instrument technology for magnetosphere plasma imaging from high Earth orbit. Design of a radio plasma sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, D. Mark; Reinisch, Bodo W.

    1995-01-01

    The use of radio sounding techniques for the study of the ionospheric plasma dates back to G. Briet and M. A. Tuve in 1926. Ground based swept frequency sounders can monitor the electron number density (N(sub e)) as a function of height (the N(sub e) profile). These early instruments evolved into a global network that produced high-resolution displays of echo time delay vs frequency on 35-mm film. These instruments provided the foundation for the success of the International Geophysical Year (1958). The Alouette and International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) programs pioneered the used of spaceborne, swept frequency sounders to obtain N(sub e) profiles of the topside of the ionosphere, from a position above the electron density maximum. Repeated measurements during the orbit produced an orbital plane contour which routinely provided density measurements to within 10%. The Alouette/ISIS experience also showed that even with a high powered transmitter (compared to the low power sounder possible today) a radio sounder can be compatible with other imaging instruments on the same satellite. Digital technology was used on later spacecraft developed by the Japanese (the EXOS C and D) and the Soviets (Intercosmos 19 and Cosmos 1809). However, a full coherent pulse compression and spectral integrating capability, such as exist today for ground-based sounders (Reinisch et al., 1992), has never been put into space. NASA's 1990 Space Physics Strategy Implementation Study "The NASA Space Physics Program from 1995 to 2010" suggested using radio sounders to study the plasmasphere and the magnetopause and its boundary layers (Green and Fung, 1993). Both the magnetopause and plasmasphere, as well as the cusp and boundary layers, can be observed by a radio sounder in a high-inclination polar orbit with an apogee greater than 6 R(sub e) (Reiff et al., 1994; Calvert et al., 1995). Magnetospheric radio sounding from space will provide remote density measurements of

  20. Georgians in Tsarist Russia and in the USSR,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    the aggressive Communist Bloc from the hands of yesterday’s bete noire , the national spirit. ŗ That internationalism today is little more than veneer...possess armed forces anu even the right of succession from the USSR. All of this is, in actual practice, a fiction and, like the Soviet Constitution itself

  1. The USSR during the interwar period: political-diplomatic aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Sandache

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The foreign policy of the USSR in the interwar period was characterized by a realism that used the forces of the international Communism in accordance with the primordial interests of Stalinism. During this period, the USSR was the third industrial power in the world after USA and Germany. The installation of the National-Socialism in Germany caused a profound political change on the part of Stalin and also the Western democracies. These sought to defend themselves against a new German expansion and were suddenly much more forthcoming towards Moscow. The USSR was admitted to the League of Nations and signed mutual assistance pacts with France and Czechoslovakia. U.S. finally decided to recognize the Soviet government. On August 23rd, 1939, to the amazement of the whole world, the German-Soviet non-aggression pact was signed in the (Moscow Kremlin, pact which had a secret protocol attached, that provided for the division of Poland between Germany and the USSR.

  2. Education for Trade Union Officials and Militants in the USSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglay, M. V.

    1987-01-01

    The author describes labor education in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). The course system consists of three levels of courses, including (1) local short-term trade union courses, (2) regional permanent courses that last up to a month, and (3) seminars at the Trade Unionist Upgrading Institute. (CH)

  3. Environmental management in the USSR. Issue 9. Collection of papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratsiansky, A.N.

    1991-01-01

    The 9th English-language issue in the series 'Environmental management in the USSR' deals with expert assessment of programmes and relevant governmental decisions on the elimination of consequences of the Chernobyl accident. The collection features the Decision of the USSR Supreme Soviet 'On the Unified Programme for the Elimination of Consequences of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Accident and the Resultant Situation' adopted on 25 April 1990 and the Report of the Subcommission for State Programmes of the RSFSR, the Ukrainian SSR and the Byelorussian SSR for the Elimination of Consequences of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Accident in 1990-1995 under the Commission of Experts of the USSR State Planning Committee. To complement the corresponding sections of the Report the collection presents materials on the sociological, socio-psychological and medico-psychological dimensions of the expert appraisal of the general situation existing in the area suffering the consequences of the Chernobyl accident. The present publication has been suggested by the USSR Supreme Soviet Committee for Ecology and Natural Resources Management

  4. Atmospheric deposition of rare earth elements in Albania studied by the moss biomonitoring technique, neutron activation analysis and GIS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allajbeu, Sh; Yushin, N S; Qarri, F; Duliu, O G; Lazo, P; Frontasyeva, M V

    2016-07-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are typically conservative elements that are scarcely derived from anthropogenic sources. The mobilization of REEs in the environment requires the monitoring of these elements in environmental matrices, in which they are present at trace level. The determination of 11 REEs in carpet-forming moss species (Hypnum cupressiforme) collected from 44 sampling sites over the whole territory of the country were done by using epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) at IBR-2 fast pulsed reactor in Dubna. This paper is focused on REEs (lanthanides) and Sc. Fe as typical consistent element and Th that appeared good correlations between the elements of lanthanides are included in this paper. Th, Sc, and REEs were never previously determined in the air deposition of Albania. Descriptive statistics were used for data treatment using MINITAB 17 software package. The median values of the elements under investigation were compared with those of the neighboring countries such as Bulgaria, Macedonia, Romania, and Serbia, as well as Norway which is selected as a clean area. Geographical distribution maps of the elements over the sampled territory were constructed using geographic information system (GIS) technology. Geochemical behavior of REEs in moss samples has been studied by using the ternary diagram of Sc-La-Th, Spider diagrams and multivariate analysis. It was revealed that the accumulation of REEs in current mosses is associated with the wind-blowing metal-enriched soils that is pointed out as the main emitting factor of the elements under investigation.

  5. Study on Yen Phu rare earth ore concentrate treatment technology and separation of major heavy rare earth elements by solvent extraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ba Thuan; Pham Quang Trung; Vu Lap Lai

    2003-01-01

    1. Yenphu rare earth ore concentrate treatment by alkali under pressure: On the base of studying mineral and chemical compositions of Yenphu rare earth ore concentrate containing 28% TREO and conditions for digestion of ore concentrate by alkali under pressure such as ore concentrate/ NaOH ratio, alkali concentration, pressure and temperature at bench scale (100 gram and 5 kg per batch), the optimal conditions for decomposition of REE ore concentrate have been determined. The yield of the decomposition stage is about 90%. The studies on alkali washing, REE leaching by HCl, pH for leaching process, and iron and radioactive impurities removing by Na 2 S + Na 2 PO 4 have been carried out. The obtained results show that mixture of Na 2 S 5% + Na2PO 4 1% is effective in iron and radioactive impurities removing. The obtained REE oxides get purity of > 99% and meet the need of solvent extraction (SX) individual separation of rare earth elements. The schema for recovery of REEs from Yenphu REE ore concentrate by alkali decomposition under high pressure has been proposed. 2. Fractionation of Yenphu rare earth mixture into subgroups by solvent extraction with PC88A: On the base of simulation program, the parameters for fractional process of rare earths mixture into subgroups by solvent extraction with PC88A have been proposed and determined by experimental verification on mixer-settler set. According to this process, rare earths mixture fractionated into yttrium and light subgroups. In their turn, the light subgroup was separated into light (La, Ce, Pr, Nd) and middle (Sm, Eu, Gd) subgroups. The average yield of the process reached value > 95%. The composition of light subgroup meets the needs for individual separation of Gd, Eu, and Sm. 3. Separation and purification of yttrium: The process for recovery of yttrium consists of two stages: upgrade to get high quality Y concentrate by PC88A and purification by Aliquat 336 in NH 4 SCN-NH 4 Cl medium. The process parameter for

  6. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Electronics & Electrical Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-23

    11, Nov 86) 20 ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY Melt-Through Characteristics of Walls of Metal Objects Struck by Lightning (N. R. Abramov , I. P...Jun 86) pp 22-27 [Article "by N. R. Abramov , I. P. Kuzhekin and V. P. Larionov, Moscow Power Engineering Institute] [Abstract] Existing methods of

  7. USSR Report, Science and Technology Policy, No. 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-09

    thermal energy and electric power, utilization of lignites , potassium salts, other raw materials produced in this country and secondary resources...Sweden, Austria and India . In 1982 scientific contacts were further developed with Latin America and Middle East countries," the scientist added

  8. JPRS Report, Science and Technology USSR: Life Sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1990-01-01

    ... in Various Experimental Models of Hypokinesia, Effects of Hydroxydimethylaminopropylidine Bisphosphonate on Bony Tissue in Hypokinetic Rats Morphological Examination of Rat Adrenal Glands Following Flight...

  9. JPRS Report, Science and Technology USSR: Life Sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1990-01-01

    ... Aboard Biosputnik Kosmos- 1667, Central and Regional Hemodynamics in Prolonged Space Flights Protective Functions of Skin Characteristics of Individual Elements of Spring Wheat Production Process...

  10. JPRS Report, Science and Technology USSR: Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-16

    neuro- hensive serological reactions - CSR) with HIV infections. syphilis (two cases of cerebral vascular syphilis, I case of Two of the patients (a...shown to exhibit diurnal cycles reflecting vari- and be used in ultrasonic acupuncture . The instrument was ations in the functional cycles of the various... vascular Surgery imeni A. N. Bakulev, on self-financing at demonstrated that suppuration involved markedly the institute. Discussion of the pros and cons

  11. JPRS Report, Science and Technology USSR: Life Sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1990-01-01

    ... from Isolated Brassica Protoplasts Modifiers of Mutation Induction Incidence in Barley Nematophagic Characteristics of Biopreparation of Predacious Fungi Obtained by Experimental Industrial Method, Mutant 428 Rice Variety.

  12. Translations on USSR Science and Technology Biomedical Sciences No. 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-18

    there was increased excretion of phosphorus in urine. Changes were observed in nitrogen metabolism: negative nitrogen balance, 50-100% increase in... nitrogen content of urine, while creatine level rose by over 4 times. Hypokinesia was associated with increased breakdown of glycogen in the liver...imperative to make more rational use of the land, on which there must be sufficient cultivation of leguminous crops (peas, etc.), as well as barley

  13. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Electronics & Electrical Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-14

    S. V. Bobrovnikov; ELEKTROSVYAZ, No 2, Feb 88] 3 Tolerance Monitoring of Digital Television Channel [S. S. Kogan , V. N. Sokolov; TEKHNIKA KINO I...Motion [ Aleksandr Radiyevich Bedyukh, Vladimir Vasilyevich Zagorodniy, et al; TEKHNICHESKAYA ELEKTRODINAMIKA, No 3, May-Jun 88] 29 Electrical...TEKHNIKA KINO I TELEVIDENIYA in Russian No 3, Mar 88 pp 13-17 [Article by S. S. Kogan and V. N. Sokolov] [Abstract] Automatic tolerance monitoring of

  14. JPRS Report, Science and Technology USSR: Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-02

    comitantly, metabolic changes demonstrated that EMF [Article by N.N. Vasilevskiy, N.B. Suvorov and M.V. enhanced glycogenolysis and inhibition of...5,7- the rats (tremor of the front extremities, excess grooming dihydroxytryptamine, a toxin which destroys serotonin- and "wet dog " type of shaking

  15. JPRS Report, Science and Technology USSR: Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-26

    5, May 89] ...................................... 34 Interrelationship Between Amplitude of Kinesthetic Evoked Potentials and Rate and Acceleration of...Between Respiratory System Response, Mental and Physical Efficiency, and Metabolic Features in An Individual After a Yearlong Stay in Alpine Conditions [T... technically reproduced on the phonates belong to those substances that are can accu- ground in any range and at all levels. mulate in metabolically active

  16. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Computers, Control Systems and Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-14

    in turn provides known model properties. The most popular formal verification criteria are activity and safety of models developed. A circuit...dannykh (Planning of Database Structures). Moscow, Mir Press, 1985. The approach developed by the author is implemented in his plan for ALTERNATIVA

  17. Building a global federation system for climate change research: the earth system grid center for enabling technologies (ESG-CET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, R.; Bernholdt, D. E.; Bharathi, S.; Brown, D.; Chen, M.; Chervenak, A. L.; Cinquini, L.; Drach, R.; Foster, I. T.; Fox, P.; Fraser, D.; Halliday, K.; Hankin, S.; Jones, P.; Kesselman, C.; Middleton, D. E.; Schwidder, J.; Schweitzer, R.; Schuler, R.; Shoshani, A.; Siebenlist, F.; Sim, A.; Strand, W. G.; Wilhelmi, N.; Su, M.; Williams, D. N.

    2007-07-01

    The recent release of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 4th Assessment Report (AR4) has generated significant media attention. Much has been said about the US role in this report, which included significant support from the Department of Energy through the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) and other Department of Energy (DOE) programs for climate model development and the production execution of simulations. The SciDAC-supported Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) also played a major role in the IPCC AR4: all of the simulation data that went into the report was made available to climate scientists worldwide exclusively via the ESG-CET At the same time as the IPCC AR4 database was being developed, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), a leading US climate science laboratory and a ESG participant, began publishing model runs from the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), and its predecessor the Parallel Coupled Model (PCM) through ESG In aggregate, ESG-CET provides seamless access to over 180 terabytes of distributed climate simulation data to over 6,000 registered users worldwide, who have taken delivery of more than 250 terabytes from the archive. Not only does this represent a substantial advance in scientific knowledge, it is also a major step forward in how we conduct the research process on a global scale. Moving forward, the next IPCC assessment report, AR5, will demand multi-site metadata federation for data discovery and cross-domain identity management for single sign-on of users in a more diverse federation enterprise environment. Towards this aim, ESG is leading the effort in the climate community towards standardization of material for the global federation of metadata, security, and data services required to standardize, analyze, and access data worldwide.

  18. US-USSR telemedicine consultation spacebridge to Armenia and Ufa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The Final Report on the U.S.-U.S.S.R. Telemedicine Consultation Spacebride to Armenia and Ufa is presented. The goal of this activity was to provide expert medical consultation to the Armenian medical personnel in the areas of plastic and reconstructive surgery, physical and psychological rehabilitation, public health, and epidemiology following the devastating earthquake in Dec. 1988. The U.S. and U.S.S.R. implementation teams developed new standards for medical information transmittal as well as protocols and schedules on how to conduct medical consultations. The consultations were provided to the Republic Diagnostic Center in Yerevan, U.S.S.R. by four U.S. medical centers: University of Utah/LDS Hospital, University of Texas, Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Service Systems, and Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

  19. Temporal change in radiocesium intake for USSR residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Masafumi; Nakamura, Yuji; Kobayashi, Sadayoshi

    1993-01-01

    The body burden of 137 Cs in individuals from the USSR who visited Japan and Japanese who returned from the USSR after various periods of stay there, was measured with a whole-body counter at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. A compartment model was used to describe the temporal change in radiocesium body burden following the continuous ingestion of radiocesium. The daily amount of radiocesium intake in mBq per kg of body weight was estimated to have decreased with a half-time ranging from 391 to 920 days for adults in Kiev Ukraine after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. Countermeasures against the consequences of the accident appear to have exempted the inhabitants from aggregation of radiocesium in their bodies. Differences in foodstuffs consumed should be taken into account when radiation health risks are compared with different age groups. (author)

  20. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts Chemistry No. 53

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-23

    antagonism manifested by DDVP. USSR UDC 632.95.021:634.1/.7 REQUIREMENTS FOR INSECTICIDES AND ACARICIDES USED FOR INTEGRATED PROTECTION OF...PROPERTIES AND AMINOACID SEQUENCE OF TWO CYTOTOXINS FROM THE VENOM OF MIDDLE ASIAN COBRA NAJA NAJA OXIANA Moscow BIOORGANICHESKAYA KHIMIYA in Russian...used to test for homogeneity of these cytotoxins. Aminoacid com- position and total aminoacid sequence of cytotoxins were determined, showing to

  1. Internal migration in the USSR: 1897-1926.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leasure, J W; Lewis, R A

    1967-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe and to analyze internal migration in the USSR primarily by the use of data from the 1926 census of the USSR. The article is divided into two parts. The first is devoted to a description of the aggregate and regional migration patterns based on place-of-birth data. The second is an analysis of these migration patterns, primarily in terms of economic differentials by guberniya. Because only limited income data are available for the period around1926 and because other economic data are scarce or unusable owing to boundary changes, census data on labor force distribution, literacy, and urbanization are used as substitute variables to approximate income differences.Migrationis a complex phenomenon related to a host of factors. The present study does not presume fully to explain migration in the USSR, but it does attempt to isolate differences in income and to relate these to the internal migration that occurred during this period. As a result of processing and analyzing an extensive array of data, we have shown that differences in income, derived indirectly from a variety of data, are closely related to internal migration in the USSR in the period prior to the 1926 census. There were striking similarities in respect to internal migration between the period prior to the 1897 census and the period prior to the1926 census. The chief areas of out-migration and in-migration were roughly the same,and migrants in both periods moved primarily to areas of higher income.

  2. [Health in the USSR in the era of Perestroika].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbe, S; Garbe, E

    1990-01-01

    For years, the Health Service of the USSR was considered a model and a guide. Countries in the Third World were invited to follow its various elements in organizing their own national health systems. But, since August 1987, everybody has known that the Health Service of the USSR is in a very bad situation. Official reports, journals of the Party and declarations of the health authorities all emphasized the catastrophic state of the health care organization in USSR: rising mortality rates, alcohol and drug abuse, extensive pollution, hospitals without hygiene or equipment, lack of professionalism and extended corruption among medical doctors and other health workers, patients' dissatisfaction etc... Of special concern are the cardiovascular and maternal mortality rates which are now much higher than in other countries. In the wake of perestroïka, a plan of reform was initiated by the Party and the Government, and was announced in 1988 by Health Minister E.N. Tchazov. The basic principle of the Health Service in the USSR remains prevention. Nevertheless, a great number of new measures will be implemented. Health information and care will be brought to the people by health workers. Mass screening for the most frequent diseases will be performed. Computers will be used on a large scale for managing high risk groups. Health centers will be strengthened. But the most revolutionary element of the reform will be the extension of the "paying sector", with increased number of facilities having financial autonomy. These facilities provide care and require some payment from the patients. They existed previously, but in the future they will be increased and strengthened. This means that the patients will have to pay more money but the services will be likely improved. The future will show whether the plan will succeed or fail.

  3. Digital Earth - A sustainable Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahavir

    2014-02-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth.

  4. The oil industry in the USSR: status, problems and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchourilov, L.D.

    1992-01-01

    The oil industry is a key sector of the USSR national economy which has been growing rapidly since the Second World Ware. In the mid-1940s, the country's annual oil production was as low as 18 million tons. In 1980, oil production exceeded 600 million tons. It should be noted that the USSR oil industry has up to now developed within geographical, political and economic state borders. Therefore, the situation in the industry reflects the general situation in the country's economy. At the present time however, when the efforts of the worldwide community are being integrated towards efficient and environmentally compatible production, and when the need to save depletable resources is obvious clearly the USSR oil industry must not retain its isolation. In this connection we would like to attract the attention of world oilmen to the problems in the development of oil resources in our country with its huge reserves, an established system of exploration, production, processing, oil and gas transport, a developed infrastructure and scientific potential. The purpose of the present paper is to point out the main features which define, as we believe, possible lines for mutually beneficial international cooperation. (author)

  5. Shuttle Imaging Radar-C mission operations - Technology test bed for Earth Observing System synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, J. P.; Collins, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    The mission operations for the Space Radar Lab (SRL), particularly in the areas of real-time replanning and science activity coordination, are presented. The two main components of SRL are the Shuttle Imaging Radar-C and the X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar. The Earth Observing System SAR will be a multispectral, multipolarization radar satellite that will provide information over an entire decade, permitting scientists to monitor large-scale changes in the earth's environment over a long period of time.

  6. Proceedings of the second US-USSR symposium: air pollution effects on vegetation including forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginald D. Noble; Juri L Martin; Keith F., eds. Jensen; Keith F. Jensen

    1989-01-01

    To commemorate the 10th year of cooperation between the US-USSR in the field of environmental protection, a symposium was organized, the major objectives of which were to acquaint US-USSR scientists with project accomplishments; to promote understanding of the nature of environmental problems that relate to air pollution effect on vegetation on a more global scale; to...

  7. Investigation of an epidemic of hair loss in children in Chernovtsy, USSR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sangster B; Groot G de

    1989-01-01

    Op verzoek van het Ministerie van Volksgezondheid van de USSR aan de WHO is aan de lokale Gezondheidsautoriteiten assistentie verleend bij het ophelderen van de oorzaak van een epidemie van haaruitval bij kinderen in Chernovtsy, USSR. Onderzocht werden gegevens over het verloop van de epidemie

  8. Natural gas industry in USSR and in Central Europe: Domestic market and exports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kousnetzoff, N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper strikes the balance of natural gas industry in USSR and Central Europe and the state of domestic market and exports: natural gas accounting in Eastern Europe before the crisis, production capacity of the former USSR, impacts of crisis on natural gas consumption and long term forecasts are the main subjects described. 2 tab

  9. Plenum of the All-Union Committee on the Study of Rheumatism and Diseases of the Joints at the Presidium of the Academy of Medical Sciences USSR - USSR

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shcherbatenko, S

    1960-01-01

    .... The report on the prophylaxis of rheumatism was submitted by Active Member of the Acad. Med. Sci. USSR, Prof. A. I. Nesterov (Moscow). Experience shows that the streptococcus plays the principal role in the development of rheumatism...

  10. USSR Report Political and Sociological Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-03

    to the production of adulterated juices in departmental organizations and enterprises, CPSU member T. K. Dzhabadari, former minister of the Georgian...did not fulfill its milk purchase plan in the first half of the year. Our 2.5 percent shortfall in the plan graphically attests to a lack of...flowline-shop technology of milk production, while in Navoi Oblast this technology is not being introduced at all. Is there no one in our republic who

  11. Regional seminar on approaches and practices in strengthening radiation protection and waste management infrastructure in countries of Eastern Europe and the former USSR. Programme, book of extended synopses, list of participants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This publication contains 30 extended synopses of presentations given by the participants of the seminar. The scope of the presentations included development of radiation protection laws, radioactive waste management technologies, radiation protection infrastructure and constitution of national regulatory bodies. Recent developments in these areas in a number of Eastern Europe and former USSR countries were presented. The role of international co-operation in development of safe radioactive waste management technologies and in establishing legislative and regulatory frameworks was shown

  12. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, I. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Middleton, D. E. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Ananthakrishnan, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Siebenlist, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shoshani, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sim, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bell, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Drach, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ahrens, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jones, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Chastang, J. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Cinquini, L. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Fox, P. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Harper, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Hook, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Nienhouse, E. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Strand, G. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); West, P. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Wilcox, H. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Wilhelmi, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Zednik, S. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Hankin, S. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Washington, DC (United States); Schweitzer, R. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Washington, DC (United States); Bernholdt, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shipman, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bharathi, S. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina Del Rey, CA (United States). Information Sciences Institute; Chervenak, A. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina Del Rey, CA (United States). Information Sciences Institute; Schuler, R. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina Del Rey, CA (United States). Information Sciences Institute; Su, M. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina Del Rey, CA (United States). Information Sciences Institute

    2010-04-21

    This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities).

  13. Leveraging Current Initiatives to Bring Earth and Space Science into Elementary and Early Childhood Classrooms: NGSS in the Context of the Classroom Technology Push

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Guffrey, H. A.

    2016-12-01

    Classroom teachers face many challenges today such as new standards, the moving targets of high stakes tests and teacher evaluations, inconsistent/insufficient access to resources and evolving education policies. Science education in the K-5 context is even more complex. NGSS can be intimidating, especially to K-5 educators with little science background. High stakes science tests are slow to catch up with newly drafted state level science standards, leaving teachers unsure about what to change and when to implement updated standards. Amid all this change, many schools are also piloting new technology programs. Though exciting, tech initiatives can also be overwhelming to teachers who are already overburdened. A practical way to support teachers in science while remaining mindful of these stressors is to design and share resources that leverage other K-5 school initiatives. This is often done by integrating writing or math into science learning to meet Common Core requirements. This presentation will suggest a method for bringing Earth and space science learning into elementary / early childhood classrooms by utilizing the current push for tablet technology. The goal is to make science integration reasonable by linking it to technology programs that are in their early stages. The roles and uses of K-5 Earth and space science apps will be examined in this presentation. These apps will be linked to NGSS standards as well as to the science and engineering practices. To complement the app resources, two support frameworks will also be shared. They are designed to help educators consider new technologies in the context of their own classrooms and lessons. The SAMR Model (Puentadura, 2012) is a conceptual framework that helps teachers think critically about the means and purposes of integrating technology into existing lessons. A practical framework created by the author will also be shared. It is designed to help teachers identify and address the important logistical

  14. Development of low-cost technology for the next generation of high efficiency solar cells composed of earth abundant elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Rakesh [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2014-09-28

    The development of renewable, affordable, and environmentally conscious means of generating energy on a global scale represents a grand challenge of our time. Due to the “permanence” of radiation from the sun, solar energy promises to remain a viable and sustainable power source far into the future. Established single-junction photovoltaic technologies achieve high power conversion efficiencies (pce) near 20% but require complicated manufacturing processes that prohibit the marriage of large-scale throughput (e.g. on the GW scale), profitability, and quality control. Our approach to this problem begins with the synthesis of nanocrystals of semiconductor materials comprising earth abundant elements and characterized by material and optoelectronic properties ideal for photovoltaic applications, namely Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe). Once synthesized, such nanocrystals are formulated into an ink, coated onto substrates, and processed into completed solar cells in such a way that enables scale-up to high throughput, roll-to-roll manufacturing processes. This project aimed to address the major limitation to CZTSSe solar cell pce’s – the low open-circuit voltage (Voc) reported throughout literature for devices comprised of this material. Throughout the project significant advancements have been made in fundamental understanding of the CZTSSe material and device limitations associated with this material system. Additionally, notable improvements have been made to our nanocrystal based processing technique to alleviate performance limitations due to the identified device limitations. Notably, (1) significant improvements have been made in reducing intra- and inter-nanoparticle heterogeneity, (2) improvements in device performance have been realized with novel cation substitution in Ge-alloyed CZTGeSSe absorbers, (3) systematic analysis of absorber sintering has been conducted to optimize the selenization process for large grain CZTSSe absorbers, (4) novel electrical

  15. "Winter of our anxiety" by J. Steinbeck in USSR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhdanova Liya Iskanderovna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the features of the Soviet reception of the novel by John Steinbeck. «The winter of our anxiety» published in the USSR within the sunset of «thaw» in 1962. Despite the restrained assessment of the novel at its homeland and the general low opinion about the post-war work of Steinbeck, in the USSR «Winter of our anxiety» was accepted very warmly, after the Nobel committee of Soviet critics began to talk about the return of «old times of Steinbeck>s «Grapes of wrath». However, no doubt that the reason for the success of this book in the USSR was not much Steinbeck>s «critics of bourgeois reality», the «American Dream», which commonly was written by the domestic press as guessable Soviet readers parallels between the way the main character of the novel Ethan Allen Hawley, committed them to choose between good and evil, «money and humanity» - and his own life, ambiguous and unstable situation of the creative intelligentsia in the Soviet Union at the beginning of 1960. However, the inability to say publicly about his own doubts and problems that inevitably led to a repetition of the rhetoric of the 1930s reduced the value of the novel «Winter of our anxiety» in denouncing the American way of life. Documentary base article made reviews of the novel members of the editorial board of the magazine «Foreign Literature «, research works by R.D. Orlova «Money against humanity» («Foreign Literature», 1962, № 3 and I.M. Levidova «Postwar books of John Steinbeck» («Questions of Literature», 1962, № 8.

  16. Design and industrial production of frequency standards in the USSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, Nikolai A.; Uljanov, Adolph A.

    1990-01-01

    Some aspects of research development and production of quantum frequency standards, carried out in QUARTZ Research and Production Association (RPA), Gorky, U.S.S.R., were investigated for the last 25 to 30 years. During this period a number of rubidium and hydrogen frequency standards, based on the active maser, were developed and put into production. The first industrial model of a passive hydrogen maser was designed in the last years. Besides frequency standards for a wide application range, RPA QUARTZ investigates metrological frequency standards--cesium standards with cavity length 1.9 m and hydrogen masers with a flexible storage bulb.

  17. Italian Troops on USSR occupied Territories in 1941−1945

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Игорь Игоревич Баринов

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the activities of Italian allied troops of Nazi Germany in the occupied during the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945 of the USSR Soviet territories. The material contained in the article allows to compare the Italian occupation administration policy and its features as well as its involvement in war crimes on Soviet territory. This article also gives a possibility to trace the organizing role of Germany in terms of organization of the occupation regime on the Soviet territory and its relations with its allies and satellites on the Eastern Front. The work is based primarily on unexplored archival documents.

  18. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts, Chemistry, Number 52

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-02-23

    V.l., RAKOV, A.P., ANDREYEV, G.F., Chuvash State University [Abstract] 2-methyl-3- oxo -3-ethoxy-6,3-oxaphosphabicyclo [3,1,0] hexane is synthesized...METHOD FOR PREPARATION OF 10- Oxo -4a-HYDROXY-10-PHOSPHAPERHYDROANTHRACENE USSR AUTHOR’S CERTIFICATE No 445760, FILED 12/03/73, PUBLISHED 19/12/75 in...12.4 g of dimethylchlorophosphine in CgHg monomer formaldehyde is passed in, obtained by depolimerization of paraform, until the reaction

  19. The USSR And FRG’s “New Ostpolitik”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Filitov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the changes in the mutual perceptions between the FRG and the USSR from mid-60s through early 70s of the 20th century, which became a precondition for the détente in their relationship. It is based largely on the analysis of the documents stored in the Archive of the Foreign Policy of the Russian Federation and recently released for the researchers. The author highlights the initiatives by Willy Brandt as a Foreign Minister in 1966–1969 and subsequently as a Federal Chancellor in breaking the deadlock in Bonn’s foreign policy created by his predecessors. It is emphasized that those initiatives found the positive response from the Soviet side. A reversal movement towards a regime of confrontation took place under conditions of the Czechoslovak crisis of 1968 (“Prague spring”, but its impact was rather short-lived. With the government of Social-Liberal coalition coming to power in October 1969, the Federal Republic’s course to the détente took the firmer contours (joining the Non-Proliferation Treaty, positive attitude to the All-European Conference, beginning the negotiations with the USSR, and the process of the normalization between West and East in the Central Europe accelerated. The complicating factor was the dogmatic positions taken by some leaders of “socialist community” countries (in Poland and GDR in particular as well as by some representatives of the Soviet diplomatic corps. Critically scrutinized in this context are the attempts to promote the course towards the “fencing-off” in the German-German relations as dictated by the theory of “two German nations”. The examples of confronting those mindsets are cited – in particular, from the exponents of the nascent civil society in the USSR (the case of the “Spiegel” interview by the Soviet expert on Germany D.E. Melnikov in the first month of 1970. The positions of the détente supporters both in the USSR and in the FRG turned out to be

  20. Clean coal technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanyan, G.S.

    1993-01-01

    According to the World Energy Council (WEC), at the beginning of the next century three main energy sources - coal, nuclear power and oil will have equal share in the world's total energy supply. This forecast is also valid for the USSR which possesses more than 40% of the world's coal resources and continuously increases its coal production (more than 700 million tons of coal are processed annually in the USSR). The stringent environmental regulations, coupled with the tendency to increase the use of coal are the reasons for developing different concepts for clean coal utilization. In this paper, the potential efficiency and environmental performance of different clean coal production cycles are considered, including technologies for coal clean-up at the pre-combustion stage, advanced clean combustion methods and flue gas cleaning systems. Integrated systems, such as combined gas-steam cycle and the pressurized fluidized bed boiler combined cycle, are also discussed. The Soviet National R and D program is studying new methods for coal utilization with high environmental performance. In this context, some basic research activities in the field of clean coal technology in the USSR are considered. Development of an efficient vortex combustor, a pressurized fluidized bed gasifier, advanced gas cleaning methods based on E-beam irradiation and plasma discharge, as well as new catalytic system, are are presented. In addition, implementation of technological innovations for retrofitting and re powering of existing power plants is discussed. (author)

  1. History of radiation and nuclear disasters in the former USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malko, M.V.

    2013-01-01

    The report describes the history of radiation and nuclear accidents in the former USSR. These accidents accompanied development of military and civilian use of nuclear energy. Some of them as testing of the first Soviet nuclear, Kyshtym radiation accident, radiation contamination of the Karachai lake and the Techa river, nuclear accidents at the Soviet submarine on August 10, 1985 in the Chazhma Bay (near Vladivostok) as well as nuclear accidents on April 26, 1986 at the Chernobyl NPP were of large scale causing significant radiological problems for many hundreds thousands of people. There were a number of important reasons of these and other accidents. The most important among them were time pressure by development of nuclear weapon, an absence of required financial and material means for adequate management of problems of nuclear and radiation safety, and inadequate understanding of harmful interaction of ionizing radiation on organism as well as a hypersecrecy by realization of projects of military and civilian use of nuclear energy in the former USSR. (author)

  2. SEARCHING THE RIGHT TRACKS OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES IN THE EARTH RACE FOR A BALANCE BETWEEN PROGRESS AND SURVIVAL

    OpenAIRE

    GREU, Victor

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the actual World major challenges, which could require priority technological solutions from the information and communications technologies (ICT) field, but not exclusively from this area. The main point of the paper is to emphasize the importance, for the actual information society (IS) and for the following Knowledge Based Society (KBS), of perceiving the gravity of these challenges, which appear as a companion of the general race for progress, as they put...

  3. USSR Report, International Affairs. Peoples of Asia and Africa, Number 4, July-August 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-22

    East and Southeast Asia . This struggle brought political independence to many countries. URBAN LOWER STRATA: SOCIAL AND CLASS STRUGGLE A.I...i \\ 07 1016 JPRS-UI A-86-003 22 January 1986 USSR Report INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS PEOPLES OF ASIA AND AFRICA No. 4...reproduction must be obtained from copyright owner. JPRS-UIA-86-003 22 January 1986 USSR REPORT INTERNATIONALAF FAIRS PEOPLES OF ASIA AND AFRICA

  4. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts, Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences, Number 83.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-14

    applied for root crops and vegetables. Tables 3; References 8 (Russian). Biochemistry CSSR/USSR UDC 613.2+613.6:616.45-001.1/.3 NUTRITION AND LABOR...0. tshawytschae. Figures 1; References 11: 1 Russian, 10 Western. USSR UDC 619:576.809.33 NUTRITIVE MEDIA FOR THE CULTIVATION OF BACTERIA Moscow... aminoacids to 0.02%, the zones of casein hydrolysis do not form since the synthesis by the extra-cellular proteases is repressed. Hence the criterion

  5. Investigation of an epidemic of hair loss in children in Chernovtsy, USSR

    OpenAIRE

    Sangster B; Groot G de

    1989-01-01

    Op verzoek van het Ministerie van Volksgezondheid van de USSR aan de WHO is aan de lokale Gezondheidsautoriteiten assistentie verleend bij het ophelderen van de oorzaak van een epidemie van haaruitval bij kinderen in Chernovtsy, USSR. Onderzocht werden gegevens over het verloop van de epidemie en analyse-gegevens van de kinderen en van het milieu. Tevens werd en representatieve groep van 24 van de 165 kinderen die ziek waren geweest onderzocht. De totale groep bestond uit kinderen met verschi...

  6. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts, Engineering and Equipment, Number 32

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-25

    operation with water injection per year. Figures 2. 114 USSR UDC 621.438:621.43:536.2 BALANCE OF ENERGY, HEAT AND EXERGY IN A DIESEL- TURBINE ...71 Turbine & Engine Design 86 EQUIPMENT Acoustical & Ultrasonic 91 Aeronautical & Space 93 Atomic & Nuclear 94 Gyros copic 95 Hydraulic...96 Industrial 98 Marine & Shipbuilding 101 Measuring, Testing, Calibrating 103 Power, Engine, Turbine , Pump 114 - a - [III - USSR - 21 F

  7. Evolution of Interethnic Relations and National Policy in USSR in 1920s − 1991

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Владимир Матвеевич Козьменко

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the main stages of the international relations evolution from the first days of the USSR existence to its collapse in 1991. The authors pay attention to the serious mistakes in the national policy of the Communist Party and the Soviet Government that led to the aggravation of the national situation in the USSR and finally to the national and state crisis in the Soviet Union.

  8. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts Physics and Mathematics No. 35

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-06-15

    3. USSR UDC 537.621 MAGNETIC, ELASTIC, AND THERMAL PROPERTIES OF INVAR ALLOYS Fe-Ni +8.3 atom% Mn Sverdlovsk MAGNITNYYE, MAGNITOMEKHANICHESKIYE...authors] [Text] A study was made concerning the effect of manganese in Invar alloys on their Curie point, on the components of anomaly of the...a nonuniform distri- büton of manganese in austenite blurs the ferromagnetic transformation of Invar alloys . 55 USSR UDC 537.621 MEAN MAGNETIC

  9. The tectonic chart of the oil and gas bearing territories of the USSR and the mandatory notes for it

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakirova, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    The article is a review of the tectonic chart of the oil and gas bearing territories of the USSR (1 to 2,500,000 scale) and the mandatory notes for it compiled by a collective of geologists from the USSR Ministry of Geology, the Ministry of the Petroleum Industry, the Ministry of the Gas Industry and the USSR Academy of Sciences and published in 1984.

  10. Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET): A Data Infrastructure for Data-Intensive Climate Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-06-03

    For the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF), the ESG-CET team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultrascale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (e.g., Couple Model Intercomparison Project, Community Earth System Model), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, and so forth), and analysis and visualization tools, all of which serve a diverse community of users. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as LANL, LBNL, LLNL, NCAR, and ORNL) as well as at unfunded partners sites such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate Computing Centre, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory. More recently, ESG-CET has been extending services beyond data-file access and delivery to develop more detailed information products (scientific graphics, animations, etc.), secure binary data-access services (based upon the OPeNDAP protocol), and server-side analysis capabilities. These will allow users to request data subsets transformed through commonly used analysis and intercomparison procedures. As we transition from development activities to production and operations, the ESG-CET team is tasked with making data available to all users seeking to understand, process, extract value from, visualize, and/or communicate it to others. This ongoing effort, though daunting in scope and complexity, will greatly magnify the value of numerical climate model outputs and climate observations for future national and international climate-assessment reports

  11. Energy development of the USSR from 1917 to 1950

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Amouroux, Jean-Marie

    2015-10-01

    The author proposes an historical overview of energy policy and energy development in the USSR, from its creation to 1950. He outlines that these policy and development were based on a huge stock of coal. Thus, the main efforts have been focused on the development of coal extraction to support an industrial development. The author comments how the political structure and organisation resulted in a public, monolithic and planned industry. He also comments energy needs to be satisfied during the three first five-year plans, the level of energy and electricity productions (comparison with other countries). He outlines that coal has been preferred for a long time to hydrocarbon for energy production, comments the emergence of new mineral fields beside Donbass, and shows that coal has also been the main basis for electrification

  12. Station Climatic Summaries: China, the Former USSR, and Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-01

    TD •PERATURE (OF) EXTRIEMAE 1 32 38 414 62 80 92 92 88 76 60 416 34 92 MEAN DAILY MAX 1 0 6 22 37 52 68 71 61 53 33 19 6 36 MEAN 1 -5 0 15 30 41 60...BASED ONLY ON AVAILABLE DATA, I.E. LT 241 HRS/DAY, O LT 12 Ii0 TH/ IYR SOURCE(S): 1. USAFETAC DATSAV SURFACE JAN 73 - DEC 86, THREE HOURLY 2...STATION: ROVNO-IN"ROVNO USSR STATION 9t 333010 ICAO tD : U/A LOCATION: 50*35N, 26W0OW ELEVATION (iElT)i 766 L.fT - GMT ’ 3 PREPARED 8Y: USAJETAC/ECR, JAN

  13. Political Repressions in USSR (Against Speculations, Perversion and Mystifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor N. Zemskov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the great numbers of political repressions, which were exaggerated by authors: R.A. Medvedev, A.I. Solzhenitsyn, O.G. Shatunovskoy, A.V. Antonov-Ovseenko in 80-90s are criticized. The author characterizes figures given in tens and even in hundreds of millions of victims as a statistical charlatanism.After checking up the KGB archives, and documents of division responsible for NKVD-MVD special settlements, the author spills the light on real numbers of political repressions in USSR. In his view, the total number of political victims does not exceed 2, 6 million people. This number implies over 800 thousand of death sentenced for political reasons, around 600 thousand political prisoners who died in labor camps, and about 1, 2 million people died in exile (including ‘Kulak Exile’ and during transportation (deported ethnic groups and others.

  14. Petroleum and gas in Ex-USSR countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kousnetzoff, N.

    1994-01-01

    Forecasting related to russian federation have to take in part three factors of different nature: evolution of price in the world, maturity of reserves and the time it will take to go to a market economy; All of the predictions are not easy to make; two kinds of previsions are made: these ones of economists and these ones of energy specialists. A good example of the first kind is the recent World Energy Outlook of International Agency for Energy: the basic hypothesis is that Ex-USSR needs foreign currency, the minimum being the actual level; so it is supposed that petroleum exports are not going to decrease under 2 millions of barrels by day, that is to say the level of 1991 exports, and natural gas exports are going to increase

  15. Daily temperature and precipitation data for 223 USSR Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razuvaev, V.N.; Apasova, E.G.; Martuganov, R.A. [Research Institute of Hydrometeorological Information, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Vose, R.S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Steurer, P.M. [National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, NC (United States)

    1993-11-01

    On- May 23, 1972, the United States and the USSR established a bilateral initiative known as the Agreement on Protection of the Environment. Given recent interest in possible greenhouse gas-induced climate change, Working Group VIII (Influence of Environmental Changes on Climate) has become particularly useful to the scientific communities of both nations. Among its many achievements, Working Group VIII has been instrumental in the exchange of climatological information between the principal climate data centers of each country [i.e., the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina, and the Research Institute of Hydrometeorological Information in Obninsk, Russia]. Considering the relative lack of climate records previously available for the USSR, data obtained via this bilateral exchange are particularly valuable to researchers outside the former Soviet Union. To expedite the dissemination of these data, NOAA`s Climate and Global Change Program funded the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and NCDC to distribute one of the more useful archives acquired through this exchange: a 223-station daily data set covering the period 1881-1989. This data set contains: (1) daily mean, minimum, and maximum temperature data; (2) daily precipitation data; (3) station inventory information (WMO No., name, coordinates, and elevation); (4) station history information (station relocation and rain gauge replacement dates); and (5) quality assurance information (i.e., flag codes that were assigned as a result of various data checks). The data set is available, free of charge, as a Numeric Data Package (NDP) from CDIAC. The NDP consists of 18 data files and a printed document which describes both the data files and the 223-station network in detail.

  16. Utilizing Iron Residues from Zinc Production in the U.S.S.R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunov, V. M.; Matveev, A. F.; Yaroslavtsev, A. S.

    1988-08-01

    When zinc calcine leach residues are subjected to conventional hydro-metallurgical treatment, iron is removed from the production circuit in the form of jarosite or goethite. A combined hydrometallurgical treatment of zinc calcine and zinc oxide fume leach residues applied at a zinc plant in the U.S.S.R. produces potassium jarosite containing undesirable impurities of 1.5-2.0 wt.% Zn, 0.2-0.3 wt.% Cu, 0.2-0.6 wt.% Pb, 0.005-0.01 wt. % Cd and 27-29 wt. % Fe. After some study, it was found that low-contaminant jarosite can be used in iron-oxide pigments and in cement clinker production. Methods for manufacturing such products have been developed and tested on a pilot-plant scale, and commercial tests are in progress. The investigations carried out for low-contaminantjarosite utilization resulted not only in the development of a wasteless and environmentally acceptable technology for zinc calcine treatment, but made it possible to recover one more valuable component—iron—from zinc raw materials.

  17. Atmospheric depositions of rare earth elements in Albania studied by the moss biomonitoring technique, neutron activation analysis and GIS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allajbeu, Sh.; Lazo, P.; Yushin, N.S.; Frontasyeva, M.V.; Qarri, F.; Duliu, O.G.

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) are conservative elements, scarcely derived from anthropogenic sources. The mobilization of REE in the environment requires their monitoring in environmental matrices, where they are mainly present at trace levels. The results on determination of the content of 11 elements by epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) at the IBR-2 reactor in Dubna in carpet-forming moss species Hypnum cupressiforme collected from 44 sampling sites over the whole Albanian territory are presented and discussed. The paper is focused on Sc and lanthanides, as well as Fe and Th, the last ones showing correlations with the investigated REE. With the exception of Fe, all other elements were never determined in the air deposition of Albania. The STATISTICA TM 10 software was used for data analysis. The median values for the content of elements under investigation were compared to those in Bulgaria, Macedonia, Romania and Serbia, as well as Norway selected as a pristine area. Therefore, it was shown that the accumulation of REE in mosses is associated with the wind blown metal-enriched soils that are pointed out as the main emitting factor. [ru

  18. NASA Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for Minority University and Research Education Program Promotes Climate Literacy by Engaging Students at Minority Serving Institutions in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B.; Alston, E. J.; Chambers, L. H.; Bynum, A.; Montgomery, C.; Blue, S.; Kowalczak, C.; Leighton, A.; Bosman, L.

    2017-12-01

    NASA Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for Minority University Research & Education Program - MUREP (ESTEEM) activities enhance institutional capacity of minority serving institutions (MSIs) related to Earth System Science, Technology and energy education; in turn, increasing access of underrepresented groups to science careers and opportunities. ESTEEM is a competitive portfolio that has been providing funding to institutions across the United States for 10 years. Over that time 76 separate activities have been funded. Beginning in 2011 ESTEEM awards focused on MSIs and public-school districts with high under-represented enrollment. Today ESTEEM awards focus on American Indian/Alaska Native serving institutions (Tribal Colleges and Universities), the very communities most severely in need of ability to deal with climate adaptation and resiliency. ESTEEM engages a multi-faceted approach to address economic and cultural challenges facing MSI communities. PIs (Principal Investigators) receive support from a management team at NASA, and are supported by a larger network, the ESTEEM Cohort, which connects regularly through video calls, virtual video series and in-person meetings. The cohort acts as a collective unit to foster interconnectivity and knowledge sharing in both physical and virtual settings. ESTEEM partners with NASA's Digital Learning Network (DLNTM) in a unique non-traditional model to leverage technical expertise. DLN services over 10,000 participants each year through interactive web-based synchronous and asynchronous events. These events allow for cost effective (no travel) engagement of multiple, geographically dispersed audiences to share local experiences with one another. Events allow PIs to grow their networks, technical base, professional connections, and develop a sense of community, encouraging expansion into larger and broader interactions. Over 256 connections, beyond the 76 individual members, exist within the cohort. PIs report

  19. Lunar Science from and for Planet Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, M. C.; Hiesinger, H.; Head, J. W., III

    2008-09-01

    anniversary in 2007 over the launch of Sputnik (from the former Soviet Union). The ensuing Apollo (US) and Luna (USSR) programs initiated serious exploration of the Moon. The samples returned from those (now historic!) early missions changed our understanding of our place in the universe forever. They were the first well documented samples from an extraterrestrial body and attracted some of the top scientists in the world to extract the first remarkable pieces of information about Earth's nearest neighbour. And so they did - filling bookcases with profound new discoveries about this airless, waterless, and beautifully mysterious ancient world. The Moon was found to represent pure geology for a silicate planetary body - without all the complicating factors of plate tectonics, climate, and weather that recycle or transform Earth materials repeatedly. And then nothing happened. After the flush of reconnaissance, there was no further exploration of the Moon. For several decades scientists had nothing except the returned samples and a few telescopes with which to further study Earth's neighbour. Lack of new information breeds ignorance and can be stifling. Even though the space age was expanding its horizons to the furthest reaches of the solar system and the universe, lunar science moved slowly if at all and was kept in the doldrums. The drought ended with two small missions to the Moon in the 1990's, Clementine and Lunar Prospector. As summarized in the SSB/NRC report (and more completely in Jolliff et al. Eds. 2006, New Views of the Moon, Rev. Min. & Geochem.), the limited data returned from these small spacecraft set in motion several fundamental paradigm shifts in our understanding of the Moon and re-invigorated an aging science community. We learned that the largest basin in the solar system and oldest on the Moon dominates the southern half of the lunar farside (only seen by spacecraft). The age of this huge basin, if known, would constrain the period of heavy bombardment

  20. Clustering biomass-based technologies towards zero emissions - a tool how the Earth's resources can be shifted back to sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravitis, J.; Pauli, G.

    2001-01-01

    The Zero Emissions Research Initiative (ZERI) was founded on the fundamental concept that, in order to achieve environmentally sustainable development, industries must maximize the use of available raw materials and utilize their own wastes and by-products to the fullest extent possible so as to eliminate all emissions into the air, water and soil. Research focuses on what are considered to be four central components of zero emissions biobased industries: (I) integrated biosystems, (II) materials separation technologies, (III) biorefinery, and (IV) zero emissions systems design. In this way, industries may be organized into clusters within one single system, or in interdependent sets of industries. (authors)

  1. The Development of an Interoperable Open Source Geographic Information Technology Stack for Ingest, Management, and Delivery of Earth Observation and Geospatial Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, K. K.; Sanchez-Silva, R.; Cavner, J. A.; Hudspeth, W. B.

    2009-12-01

    The rapid growth of geospatial data volume and number of sources has highlighted the need for, and spurred the growth and adoption of interoperable geospatial data services. For nearly a decade the Earth Data Analysis Center at The University of New Mexico has been developing standards-based geospatial data management systems based upon a core collection of Open Source technologies, with the collection of employed technologies contributing to a unified information architecture that is enabled by interoperability standards. These technologies include geodatabases (PostGIS), geospatial data access libraries and associated utility programs (GDAL and OGR), scripting languages that enable automated data processing and management (Python), online mapping servers (MapServer), online mapping (OpenLayers, MapFish, GeoEXT), and desktop GIS applications (uDig, QGIS, and GRASS). The interoperability standards upon which EDAC's geospatial information architectures are built include those coming out of the Open Geospatial Consortium (WMS, WFS, WCS, KML, GML), the World Wide Web Consortium (HTML, CSS, SOAP, XML), and ECMA (ECMAscript AKA Javascript). This paper outlines the complementary roles that these various Open Source applications play in the multi-tiered Services Oriented Architectures developed by EDAC in support of a variety of projects, and provides an illustration of how the capabilities enabled by these technologies are interconnected using well-defined open standards. These capabilities include data ingest and query services that support searching for data content based upon keywords and defined spatial extent. They also include data administration services that support data product ingest and registration, data product modification, and deletion from the data registry. Finally, the system supports dynamic generation of Open Geospatial Consortium services for each geospatial data product in the system, enabling integration of data from the system into a wide variety

  2. Research and Technology Development to Advance Environmental Monitoring, Food Systems, and Habitat Design for Exploration Beyond Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Thomas A.; Perchonek, M. H.; Ott, C. M.; Kaiser, M. K.

    2011-01-01

    Exploration missions will carry crews far beyond the relatively safe environs of cis-lunar space. Such trips will have little or no opportunity for resupply or rapid aborts and will be of a duration that far exceeds our experience to date. The challenges this imposes on the requirements of systems that monitor the life support and provide food and shelter for the crew are the focus of much research within the Human Research Program. Making all of these technologies robust and reliable enough for multi-year missions with little or no ability to run for home calls for a thorough understanding of the risks and impacts of failure. The way we currently monitor for microbial contamination of water, air, and surfaces, by sampling and growing cultures on nutrient media, must be reconsidered for exploration missions which have limited capacity for consumables. Likewise, the shelf life of food must be increased so that the nutrients required to keep the crewmembers healthy do not degrade over the life of the mission. Improved formulations, preservation, packaging, and storage technologies are all being investigated for ways slow this process or replace stowed food with key food items grown fresh in situ. Ensuring that the mass and volume of a spacecraft are used to maximum efficiency calls for infusing human factors into the design from its inception to increase efficiency, improve performance, and retain robustness toward operational realities. Integrating the human system with the spacecraft systems is the focus of many lines of investigation.

  3. A technique for measurement of earth station antenna G/T by radio stars and Applications Technology Satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochevar, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    A new technique has been developed to accurately measure the G/T of a small aperture antenna using geostationary satellites and the well established radio star method. A large aperture antenna having the capability of accurately measuring its G/T by using a radio star of known power density is used to obtain an accurate G/T to use as a reference. The CNR of both the large and small aperture antennas are then measured using an Applications Technology Satellite (ATS). After normalizing the two C/N ratios to the large antenna system noise temperature the G/T or the gain G of the small aperture antenna can then be determined.

  4. REU Site: CUNY/GISS CGCR - Increasing Diversity in Earth and Space Science and Space Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L. P.; Marchese, P.; Carlson, B. E.; Howard, A. M.; Damas, M. C.; Boxe, C.; Sohl, L. E.; Cheung, T. D.; Zavala-Gutierrez, R.; Jiang, M.

    2016-12-01

    This presentation describes student projects and accomplishments of the NSF REU Site: The City University of New York / NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Center for Global Climate Research. These student experiences contribute to the preparation of a diverse workforce in the areas of ocean modeling, planetary atmospheres, atmospheric science, climate change, heliophysics and space technology. It is important to motivate students to continue their studies towards advanced degrees and pursue careers related to these fields of study. This is best accomplished by involving undergraduates in research. For the past three years, this REU Site has supported research for more than 35 students, approximately 60 percent from underrepresented minorities and 35 percent female. All the students have progressed towards their degrees and some have advanced to graduate study. This program is supported by NSF award AGS-1359293 REU Site: CUNY/GISS Center for Global Climate Research and the NASA New York State Space Grant Consortium and in collaboration with the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS).

  5. Chernobyl and status of nuclear power development in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagarinskii, A.Yu.

    1989-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident has seriously affected development of the USSR nuclear power program. But it has not eliminated the basic prerequisites for nuclear power development in the USSR which are: - resources and consumption territorial disproportions; - large share of oil and gas in electricity generation; - negative ecological aspects of coal plants; - high power industry development rate. At the same time it has aggravated the old problems and has given rise to some new-ones of which the most important are: - increased safety requirements; rise in costs; longer construction schedules; public opinion. On the whole for further safe development of nuclear power a detailed analysis of the Chernobyl accident is required, including studies of long-term accident consequences and measures of their mitigation and elimination. A necessary condition for NPP operation to be continued would also be development and rapid implementation of technical approaches which would permit to eliminate the design shortcomings in the RBMK NPPs both operating and those under construction. At the same time we have to ensure their competitiveness with other energy sources and possibility of expansion of their applications. The problem of public opinion should be emphasised. After the Chernobyl accident we have faced a social phenomenon which is quite new in this country. There is almost no site where the population was not opposed to NPP construction. For us these problems are especially difficult as we have had no experience of this kind of interactions with the public. We are planning and begin to realize a program basing on the current world experience. This program includes primarily a wide series of publications on the problems of nuclear energy its ecologic and economic advantages as compared with conventional and alternative energy sources,, using all cur-rent media. Centers of public information discussion clubs, exhibitions etc are being organized. In particular, our Institute has

  6. The New York City Research Initiative: A Model for Undergraduate and High School Student Research in Earth and Space Sciences and Space Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzo, F.; Frost, J.; Carlson, B. E.; Marchese, P.; Rosenzweig, C.; Austin, S. A.; Peteet, D. M.; Druyan, L.; Fulakeza, M.; Gaffin, S.; Baruh, H.; Decker, S.; Thangam, S.; Miles, J.; Moshary, F.; Rossow, W.; Greenbaum, S.; Cheung, T. K.; Johnson, L. P.

    2010-12-01

    1 Frank Scalzo, 1 Barbara Carlson, 2 Leon Johnson, 3 Paul Marchese, 1 Cynthia Rosenzweig, 2 Shermane Austin, 1 Dorothy Peteet, 1 Len Druyan, 1 Matthew Fulakeza, 1 Stuart Gaffin, 4 Haim Baruh, 4 Steven Decker, 5 Siva Thangam, 5 Joe Miles, 6 James Frost, 7 Fred Moshary, 7 William Rossow, 7 Samir Ahmed, 8 Steven Greenbaum and 3 Tak Cheung 1 NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, USA 2 Physical, Environmental and Computer Sciences, Medgar Evers College, CUNY, Brooklyn, NY, USA 3 Physics, Queensborough Community College, CUNY, Queens, NY, USA 4 Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, USA 5 Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ, USA 6 Physics, LaGuardia Community College, CUNY, Queens, NY, USA 7 Electrical Engineering, City College of New York, CUNY, USA 8 Physics, Hunter College, CUNY, USA The New York City Research Initiative (NYCRI) is a research and academic program that involves high school, undergraduate and graduate students, and high school teachers in research teams under the mentorship of college/university principal investigator of NASA funded projects and/or NASA scientists. The principal investigators are at 7 colleges/universities within a 20-mile radius of New York City (NYC and Northern New Jersey), as well as the NASA Goddard Institute of Space Studies. The program supports research in Earth Science, Space Science, and Space Technology. Research investigations include: Sea Surface Temperature and Precipitation in the West African Monsoon, Urban Heat Island: Sun and Rain Effects, Decadal Changes in Aerosol and Asthma, Variations in Salinity and River Discharge in the Hudson River Estuary, Environmental Change in the Hudson Estuary Wetlands, Verification of Winter Storm Scale Developed for Nor’easters, Solar Weather and Tropical Cyclone Activity, Tropospheric and Stratospheric Ozone Investigation in Metropolitan NYC, Aerosol Optical Depth through use of a MFRSR, Detection of Concentration in the Atmosphere Using a Quantum Cascade Laser System

  7. A Brief History of Radio Astronomy in the USSR A Collection of Scientific Essays

    CERN Document Server

    Salomonovich, A; Samanian, V; Shklovskii, I; Sorochenko, R; Troitskii, V; Kellermann, K; Dubinskii, B; Kaidanovskii, N; Kardashev, N; Kobrin, M; Kuzmin, A; Molchanov, A; Pariiskii, Yu; Rzhiga, O

    2012-01-01

    This translation from Russian makes the history of radio astronomy in the USSR available in the English language for the first time. The book includes descriptions of the antennas and instrumentation used in the USSR, the astronomical discoveries, as well as interesting personal backgrounds of many of the early key players in Soviet radio astronomy. A Brief History of Radio Astronomy in the USSR is a collection of memoirs recounting an interesting but largely still dark era of Soviet astronomy. The arrangement of the essays is determined primarily by the time when radio astronomy studies began at the institutions involved. These include the Lebedev Physical Institute (FIAN), Gorkii State University and the affiliated Physical-Technical Institute (GIFTI), Moscow State University Sternberg Astronomical institute (GAISH) and Space Research Institute (IKI), the Department of Radio Astronomy of the Main Astronomical Observatory in Pulkovo (GAO), Special Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), Byurakan Astrophysical Obse...

  8. Increasing shaft depth with rock hoisting to the surface. [USSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durov, E.M.

    1982-06-01

    Schemes of shaft construction with increasing shaft depth depend on: shaft depth, shaft diameter, types of hoisting systems, schemes of shaft reinforcement. Investigations carried out in underground coal mines in the USSR show that waste rock haulage to the surface by an independent hoisting system is most economical. Installation of this system depends on the existing hoisting scheme. When one of the operating cages or skips can be removed without a negative influence on mine operation the system of rock waste hoisting is used. The hoisting bucket used for rock removal from the shaft bottom moves in the shaft section from which one of the cages or skips has been removed. Examples of using this scheme in Donbass, Kuzbass and other coal basins are given. Economic aspects of waste material hoisting to the surface are analyzed. The system is economical when the remaining hoisting system can accept additional loads after removal of a cage or skip from the shaft. Investigations show that use of a bucket with a capacity from 2.5 to 3.0 m/sup 3/ for waste rock removal from the shaft being modernized and deepened is most economical.

  9. Translations on USSR Science and Technology, Physical Sciences and Technology, Number 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-11-30

    Institute of Helminthology imeni K. I. Skryabin, project leader, Bessonov, Andrey Stefanovich, doctor of veterinary sciences , deputy director, Demidov...Nikolay Vasil’yevich, Kuznetsov, Mikhail Ivanovich, Shumakovich, Yevgeniy Yevgen’yevich, doctors of veterinary sciences , Kotel’nikov, Gennadiy... sciences , senior scientific associate, Panasyuk, Dmitriy Iosifovich, doctor of veterinary sciences , section head, associates of the same institute

  10. Translations on USSR Science and Technology, Physical Sciences and Technology, Number 26

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-29

    I I cuma /ia of a signal b) Figure l. Structural schematic of a radio direction finder, a,. Simultaneous, and, b. separate detection and...based on various epoxy and phenol resins [14] as substrates and pastes is of interest. For conductors and resistors, the functional phases are silver...limits of the visible and near- IR ranges, and also the conditions and methods for processing the col- lected materials. In particular, aboard the

  11. Translations on USSR Science and Technology, Physical Sciences and Technology, No. 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-07

    control processors, communications processors in multimachine systems, specialized processors for Fourier trans- formation and other...of the user). One can configure local and territorially dispersed multimachine complexes on the basis of the SM-1 and SM-2 UVK. Data can be...but the main effect provided conversion from sources with linear and pulsed stabilizers to new source converters having more than three times

  12. DOE SciDAC’s Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Final Report for University of Southern California Information Sciences Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chervenak, Ann Louise [Univ. of Southern California Information Sciences Inst., Marina del Rey, CA (United States)

    2013-12-19

    The mission of the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is to provide the worldwide climate-research community with access to the data, information, model codes, analysis tools, and intercomparison capabilities required to make sense of enormous climate data sets. Its specific goals are to (1) provide an easy-to-use and secure web-based data access environment for data sets; (2) add value to individual data sets by presenting them in the context of other data sets and tools for comparative analysis; (3) address the specific requirements of participating organizations with respect to bandwidth, access restrictions, and replication; (4) ensure that the data are readily accessible through the analysis and visualization tools used by the climate research community; and (5) transfer infrastructure advances to other domain areas. For the ESGF, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultra-scale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (such as the Community Earth System Model and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate, Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, etc.), and analysis and visualization tools, all serving a diverse user community. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as ANL, LANL, LBNL/NERSC, LLNL/PCMDI, NCAR, and ORNL) and at unfunded partner sites, such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate Computing

  13. Tolerance of the High Energy X-ray Imaging Technology ASIC to potentially destructive radiation processes in Earth-orbit-equivalent environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, D. F.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Wilson, M.; Benmoussa, A.; Campola, M.; Christe, S. D.; Gissot, S.; Jones, L.; Newport, J.; Prydderch, M.; Richards, S.; Seller, P.; Shih, A. Y.; Thomas, S.

    2018-02-01

    The High Energy X-ray Imaging Technology (HEXITEC) ASIC is designed on a 0.35 μm CMOS process to read out CdTe or CZT detectors and hence provide fine-pixellated spectroscopic imaging in the range 2-200 keV. In this paper, we examine the tolerance of HEXITEC to both potentially destructive cumulative and single event radiation effects. Bare ASICs are irradiated with X-rays up to a total ionising dose (TID) of 1 Mrad (SiO2) and bombarded with heavy ions with linear energy transfer (LET) up to 88.3 MeV mg-1 cm-2. HEXITEC is shown to operate reliably below a TID of 150 krad, have immunity to fatal single event latchup (SEL) and have high tolerance to non-fatal SEL up to LETs of at least 88.3 MeV mg-1 cm-2. The results are compared to predictions of TID and SELs for various Earth-orbits and aluminium shielding thicknesses. It is found that HEXITEC's radiation tolerance to both potentially destructive cumulative and single event effects is sufficient to reliably operate in these environments with moderate shielding.

  14. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, I. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Middleton, D. E. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2009-10-15

    This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities). During this semi-annual reporting period, the ESG-CET team continued its efforts to complete software components needed for the ESG Gateway and Data Node. These components include: Data Versioning, Data Replication, DataMover-Lite (DML) and Bulk Data Mover (BDM), Metrics, Product Services, and Security, all joining together to form ESG-CET's first beta release. The launch of the beta release is scheduled for late October with the installation of ESG Gateways at NCAR and LLNL/PCMDI. Using the developed ESG Data Publisher, the ESG II CMIP3 (IPCC AR4) data holdings - approximately 35 TB - will be among the first datasets to be published into the new ESG enterprise system. In addition, the NCAR's ESG II data holdings will also be published into the new system - approximately 200 TB. This period also saw the testing of the ESG Data Node at various collaboration sites, including: the British Atmospheric Data Center (BADC), the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology, the University of Tokyo

  15. Digital Earth – A sustainable Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahavir

    2014-01-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth

  16. Food Systems: Modern Technology, Transnationalization, Regional and National Situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Social Science Journal, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Topics discussed include: the emergence of biotechnology; modern food technology; strategies of transnational food companies; transnational agribusiness firms and Mexican agriculture; food production in Western Europe; the agro-industrial system of the USSR; food systems in India; food production systems of the Senegal River; and production modes…

  17. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semiannual Progress Report October 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-04-02

    This report summarizes work carried out by the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) from October 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011. It discusses ESG-CET highlights for the reporting period, overall progress, period goals, and collaborations, and lists papers and presentations. To learn more about our project and to find previous reports, please visit the ESG-CET Web sites: http://esg-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ and/or https://wiki.ucar.edu/display/esgcet/Home. This report will be forwarded to managers in the Department of Energy (DOE) Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), as well as national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., those involved in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP5) for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5); the Community Earth System Model (CESM); the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES); SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science; the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP); the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)), and also to researchers working on a variety of other climate model and observation evaluation activities. The ESG-CET executive committee consists of Dean N. Williams, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ian Foster, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); and Don Middleton, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The ESG-CET team is a group of researchers and scientists with diverse domain knowledge, whose home institutions include eight laboratories and two universities: ANL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), LLNL, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NCAR, Oak Ridge National

  18. The Earth's Changing Climate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GENERAL I ARTICLE. The Earth's Changing Climate. Man-Made Changes and Their Consequences. PKDas is a former Director. General of the Meteoro- logical Department of. India. After retiring in. 1983, he taught Meteorolo- gy at the University of. Nairobi in Kenya (1983·85) and later at the Indian. Institute of Technology.

  19. The Technology Security Program. A Report to the 99th Congress, Second Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    for benevolent and modest purposes; SThe USSR does not depend on Western technology because it: is a Sreat s cientific and technological power; "The...Committee 01 Apr Swiss Minister of Defense 01 Apr FRG Minister of Defense 02 Apr National Security Industrial Assdciation 15 Apr South Korean

  20. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes over 180 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies.The talk will present an overview of current efforts in ESI, the role members of IEEE GRSS play, and discuss

  1. Progress of magnetic-suspension systems and magnetic bearings in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    This paper traces the development and progress of magnetic suspension systems and magnetic bearings in the USSR. The paper describes magnetic bearings for turbomachines, magnetic suspension systems for vibration isolation, some special measuring devices, wind tunnels, and other applications. The design, principles of operation, and dynamic characteristics of the system are presented

  2. THE HOT “COLD WAR”: THE USSR IN SOUTHERN AFRICA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hennie

    Shubin emphasises the wide spectrum of Soviet support of liberation movements in Southern Africa, ranging from financial assistance, medical aid, food and other civilian supplies, to academic education, military and political training in the USSR and in African countries, the supply of weapons and other war materials,.

  3. Studies of shortwave solar radiation in the U.S.S.R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelstam, S L

    1967-11-01

    A history is presented of measurements of solar vacuum uv and soft x radiation made by rocket and satellite-borne instruments in the U.S.S.R. The origin and mechanism of the production of solar x rays are discussed.

  4. Development of passive condensers for accident localization systems at nuclear power plants in the former USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznecov, M.V.

    1992-01-01

    The development is summarized of passive condensers for accident localization systems at nuclear power plants (with RBMK and WWER reactors) in the former USSR. Basic properties and criteria defining their availability are described, as are experimental tests and technical solution optimization results. (author) 2 fig

  5. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts. Beomedical and Behavioral Sciences, Number 58

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-11-23

    highly effective nitrogen - containing product is produced, rich in valuable micro- and macro-elements, essential amino acids, easily digestible in...silage of leguminous crops, grass and potatoes. 1/1 68 USSR GAYDENKO, V. P., MIKHAYLENKO. A. A., SHARAPOVA, I. N., CHUMAKOVA, P. K. and MAMONOVA

  6. Tank farm restoration and safe operation, Project W-314, upgrade scope summary report (USSR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The revision to the Project W-314 Upgrade Scope Summary Report (USSR), incorporates changes to the project scope from customer guidance. Included are incorporation of the recommendations from HNF-2500, agreements regarding interfaces with Project W-211, and assumption of scope previously assigned to Project W-454

  7. Analysis of nuclear stimulation of Reservoir A, U.S.S.R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, J.H.

    1972-01-01

    Following stimulation by three nuclear explosives, the field rate of production of ''Reservoir A'', U.S.S.R., increased very significantly. The potential profitability of projects such as Reservoir A and some of the possible causes for the increased rate of production are reviewed

  8. Space orbits of collaboration. [international cooperation and the U.S.S.R. space program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, B.

    1978-01-01

    The U.S.S.R. cooperative space efforts with other Socialist countries dating back to 1957 are reviewed. The Interkosmos program, which is divided into three series of satellites (solar, ionospheric and magnetospheric), is discussed as well as the Prognoz, Kosmos, Soyuz, and Molniya spacecraft. Collaboration with France, India, Sweden, and the United States is mentioned.

  9. Reducing the environmental impact of the fuel and energy complex in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minaev, E.V.

    1991-01-01

    In this article there is a brief overview of some of the Soviet Union's environmental problems. Democratization, decentralization and privatization have stimulated the use of environmental impact assessments and of measures to prevent industrial accidents. A long-term nature conservation and natural resources management programme for the USSR has been developed for the period 1991-2005. (author). 1 tab

  10. Research results reported by OEO summer (1981) student employees of LLNL working with Earth Sciences (K) Division personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, M. C.; Griffith, P. J.; Kreevoy, E. P.; Turner, III, H. J.; Tatman, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Significant experimental results were achieved in a number of research programs that were carried out during the summer of 1981 by students sponsored by the Office of Equal Opportunity at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These students were working with Earth Sciences (K) Division personnel. Accomplishments include the following: (1) preparation of post-burn stratigraphic sections for the Hoe Creek III experiment, Underground Coal Gasification project; (2) preparation of miscellaneous stratigraphic sections in the Climax granite near the Spent Fuel Test, Nevada Test Site, for the Waste Isolation Project; (3) confirmation of the applicability of a new theory relating to subsidence (solid matrix movement); (4) experimental confirmation that organic groundwater contaminants produced during an underground coal gasification experiment can be removed by appropriate bacterial treatment; (5) development of data supporting the extension of the Greenville Fault Zone into the Northern Diablo Range (Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, California); (6) completion of a literature review on hazardous waste (current disposal technology, regulations, research needs); (7) preparation of a map showing levels of background seismic noise in the USSR; (8) demonstration of a correlation of explosion size with the P-wave magnitude of the seismic signal produced by the explosion; and (9) reduction of data showing the extent of ground motion resulting from subsidence in the vicinity of the Hoe Creek III experiment, Underground Coal Gasification Project.

  11. Research results reported by OEO summer (1981) student employees of LLNL working with Earth Sciences (K) Division personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, M.C.; Griffith, P.J.; Kreevoy, E.P.; Turner, H.J. III; Tatman, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    Significant experimental results were achieved in a number of research programs that were carried out during the summer of 1981 by students sponsored by the Office of Equal Opportunity at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These students were working with Earth Sciences (K) Division personnel. Accomplishments include the following: (1) preparation of post-burn stratigraphic sections for the Hoe Creek III experiment, Underground Coal Gasification project; (2) preparation of miscellaneous stratigraphic sections in the Climax granite near the Spent Fuel Test, Nevada Test Site, for the Waste Isolation Project; (3) confirmation of the applicability of a new theory relating to subsidence (solid matrix movement); (4) experimental confirmation that organic groundwater contaminants produced during an underground coal gasification experiment can be removed by appropriate bacterial treatment; (5) development of data supporting the extension of the Greenville Fault Zone into the Northern Diablo Range (Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, California); (6) completion of a literature review on hazardous waste (current disposal technology, regulations, research needs); (7) preparation of a map showing levels of background seismic noise in the USSR; (8) demonstration of a correlation of explosion size with the P-wave magnitude of the seismic signal produced by the explosion; and (9) reduction of data showing the extent of ground motion resulting from subsidence in the vicinity of the Hoe Creek III experiment, Underground Coal Gasification Project

  12. Rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranstone, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    There has been no Canadian production of the rare earth oxides since 1977. World production in 1978, the last year for which figures are available, is estimated to have been about 41000 tonnes, mostly from Australia and the United States. The United States Bureau of Mines estimates that world reserves contain about 7 million tonnes of rare earth oxides and 35 million tonnes of yttrium. The largest yttrium reserves are in India, while China is believed to have the world's largest reserves of rare earth oxides. World consumption of rare aarths increased slightly in 1980, but is still only a small fraction of known reserves. Rare earths are used mainly in high-strength magnets, automobile exhaust systems, fluorescent tube and television screen phosphors, metallurgical applications, petroleum cracking catalysts, and glass polishing

  13. Rare (Earth Elements [score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Méndez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rare (Earth Elements is a cycle of works for solo piano. The cycle was inspired by James Dillon’s Book of Elements (Vol. I-V. The complete cycle will consist of 14 pieces; one for each selected rare (earth element. The chosen elements are Neodymium, Erbium, Tellurium, Hafnium, Tantalum, Technetium, Indium, Dysprosium, Lanthanium, Cerium, Europium, Terbium, Yttrium and Darmstadtium. These elements were selected due to their special atomic properties that in many cases make them extremely valuable for the development of new technologies, and also because of their scarcity. To date, only 4 works have been completed Yttrium, Technetium, Indium and Tellurium.

  14. Earth Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The following papers were presented at the earth science session: earth science developments in support of water isolation; development of models and parameters for ground-water flow in fractured rock masses; isotope geochemistry as a tool for determining regional ground-water flow; natural analogs of radionuclide migration; nuclide retardation data: its use in the NWTS program; and ground-water geochemistry and interaction with basalt at Hanford

  15. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T. [and others

    2000-11-01

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  16. Capturing near-Earth asteroids around Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Zaki; Lamb, Christopher A.; Ross, Shane D.

    2012-12-01

    The list of detected near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) is constantly growing. NEAs are likely targets for resources to support space industrialization, as they may be the least expensive source of certain needed raw materials. The limited supply of precious metals and semiconducting elements on Earth may be supplemented or even replaced by the reserves floating in the form of asteroids around the solar system. Precious metals make up a significant fraction NEAs by mass, and even one metallic asteroid of ˜1km size and fair enrichment in platinum-group metals would contain twice the tonnage of such metals already harvested on Earth. There are ˜1000 NEAs with a diameter of greater than 1 km. Capturing these asteroids around the Earth would expand the mining industry into an entirely new dimension. Having such resources within easy reach in Earth's orbit could provide an off-world environmentally friendly remedy for impending terrestrial shortages, especially given the need for raw materials in developing nations. In this paper, we develop and implement a conceptually simple algorithm to determine trajectory characteristics necessary to move NEAs into capture orbits around the Earth. Altered trajectories of asteroids are calculated using an ephemeris model. Only asteroids of eccentricity less than 0.1 have been studied and the model is restricted to the ecliptic plane for simplicity. We constrain the time of retrieval to be 10 years or less, based on considerations of the time to return on investment. For the heliocentric phase, constant acceleration is assumed. The acceleration required for transporting these asteroids from their undisturbed orbits to the sphere of influence of the Earth is the primary output, along with the impulse or acceleration necessary to effect capture to a bound orbit once the Earth's sphere of influence is reached. The initial guess for the constant acceleration is provided by a new estimation method, similar in spirit to Edelbaum's. Based on the

  17. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  18. USSR Report, Life Sciences, Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1984-01-01

    Partial Contents: Aerospace Medicine, Agrotechnology, Biotechnology, Environment, Food Technology, Genetics, Laser Effects, Marine Mammals, Medicine, Microbiology, Molecular Biology, Nonionizing Electromagnetic...

  19. Rare earth elements in nuclear medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodina G.E.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The review focuses on the key applications of stable and radioactive isotopes of rare earth elements in the technology of nuclear medicine, radionuclide diagnostics and therapy, as well as magnetic resonance imaging and binary radiotherapy technologies.

  20. Monitoring the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita-Finzi, Claudio

    2003-02-01

    Monitoring the Earth is the first book to review the recent advances in satellite technology, computing and mass spectrometry that are opening up completely new avenues of enquiry to Earth scientists. Among the geological changes that were previously considered too slow or too extensive for direct measurements and that can now be monitored directly are continental displacements, mountain uplift, the growth and decay of icesheets and glaciers, the faulting and folding of rocks, the progress of weathering and sedimentation, and the growth of coral reefs. In addition to these developments, the book assesses progress in fields not normally considered part of physical geology, such as the shape and orbit of the gravity and the terrestrial magnetic field. The results from the new findings are already helping Earth scientists analyze and explain the underlying mechanisms, notably with regard to the storage and release of strain during earthquakes and the interaction of glacial history with the Earth's rate of rotation. The outcoe is a foretaste of the physical geology of the space age.^Fully illustrated with line drawings and photographs, and with a bibliography that encompasses the scattered and disparate litarature, Monitoring the Earth is intended for undergraduates in geology, geomorphology, geomatic engineering and planetary science, but it should also be of interest to astronomers and historians of science.

  1. USSR Report, USA: Economics, Politics, Ideology, No. 11, November 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-31

    psychological (or, more precisely, psychotic ) atmosphere favoring Reagan and his congressional supporters in next year’s elections. But this was not the full...danger of the outbreak of nuclear war, which would annihilate virtually all life on earth, is having an oppressive effect on the mental state of mil

  2. USSR Report, International Affairs Peoples of Asia and Africa No 2, March-April 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-26

    Murakami Sigeyoshi (pp 166-176) (G.Ye. Svetlov) (not translated) Reviews L.A. Fridman Review of I.A. Zevelev’s ’Southeast Asia : Urbanization and...282085 JPRS-UIA-86-038 26 AUGUST 1986 USSR Report INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS PEOPLES OF ASIA AND AFRICA No 2, MARCH-APRIL 1986 DISTRIBUTION...B* i;mited ^„> »Bpä|lf|SpI £a%Q&S; ■;.’; M*%’>’’V.i -••’::"■;• •:■■ "■• ÄÄUST 1986 USSR Report INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS PEOPLES OF ASIA

  3. INFORMATION PROPAGANDA IN USSR AS INSTRUMENT OF “SOFT POWER”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Светлана Александровна Бокерия

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of «soft power» are becoming an integral part of foreign policy and national security. The use of «soft power» allows resisting political pressure and cultural expansion of foreign countries, ensures the preservation of national identity, creates a positive image of a state and strengthens international position of the country. Considerable experience in the effective use of instruments of «soft power» in foreign and domestic policy was accumulated during the existence of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The article analyzes the methods and principles of information propaganda in the USSR as an instrument of «soft power», information infrastructure of the mechanism of propaganda in the USSR as a system. There are discussed the main methodological principles of Marxist-Leninist ideology, as well as the effectiveness of the communist ideology at the state level.

  4. Prospects of nuclear power in the USSR after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.; Asmolov, V.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear power is an integral part of the USSR power industry. At present, about 12% of the country's electricity is produced by nuclear power plants, saving about 70 million tons per year of equivalent fossil fuel. The FEC analysis reveals that any acceptable solution of the energy supply problem and limitation hazardous ecological effects cannot be achieved without appropriate development of nuclear energy capacities, with the necessary safety levels ensured. The thorough comparative analysis of nuclear power development in the USSR, taking into account the economic factors and ecological consequences of power development shows that nuclear power capacity has to be systematically increased - up to 56 million kW by the year 2000, and 95-150 million kW by 2010. The main condition for this expansion is the enhanced nuclear power safety. This development has to be competitive with the ecologically acceptable coal power plants operating in the european part of the country. (authors)

  5. Summary of USSR reports on mechanical and radioactivity effects of underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, Paul

    1970-01-01

    Two reports have been issued by the USSR which examine the mechanical effects and radioactive contamination of the environment from underground nuclear explosions. In reviewing the mechanical effects, the institute of Terrestrial Physics of the USSR Academy of Sciences emphasizes the advantages of nuclear explosives, namely the tremendous power and small dimensions, in the industrial and construction fields. The authors note that the mechanical effects are based not only upon the explosive yield but also upon the thermodynamic properties of the cavity gases during expansion. These properties may vary widely depending upon the rock material. A list of the basic parameters affecting the mechanical effects of contained nuclear explosions includes: cavity volume, dimensions of the chimney, degree of rock fracturing, intensity of the compression wave as a function of distance from shot point, and seismic effects. The second paper describes the phenomenology of radioactive contamination of the environment for both contained and excavation explosions

  6. The radiological consequences in the USSR from the Chernobyl accident: Description of the scheme of implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, Mona

    2004-01-01

    After October 1989 the Government of the USSR requested the IAEA to organize an international assessment of the 'concept which the USSR has evolved to enable the population to live safely in areas affected by radioactive contamination following the Chernobyl accident, and an evaluation of the effectiveness of the steps taken in these areas to safeguard the health of the population'. The IAEA responded positively to this request for special assistance. The IAEA is carried out an extensive international project involving over 100 experts who assessed the human health and environmental consequences in the affected areas of Byelorussia, the Ukraine, and the Russian Federation, and evaluate measures taken by Soviet authorities to protect the population and the environment

  7. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  8. Afganistan and rare earths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilian M. Dobrescu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available On our planet, over a quarter of new technologies for the economic production of industrial goods, are using rare earths, which are also called critical minerals and industries that rely on these precious items being worth of an estimated nearly five trillion dollars, or 5 percent of world gross domestic product. In the near future, competition will increase for the control of rare earth minerals embedded in high-tech products. Rare minerals are in the twenty-first century what oil accounted for in the twentieth century and coal in the nineteenth century: the engine of a new industrial revolution. Future energy will be produced increasingly by more sophisticated technological equipment based not just on steel and concrete, but incorporating significant quantities of metals and rare earths. Widespread application of these technologies will result in an exponential increase in demand for such minerals, and what is worrying is that minerals of this type are almost nowhere to be found in Europe and in other industrialized countries in the world, such as U.S. and Japan, but only in some Asian countries, like China and Afghanistan.

  9. Politics, Work and Daily Life in the USSR: A Survey of Former Soviet Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    fundamentally different from the industrial and post-industrial societies of the West? Does it represent a different genus of social, political and economic...in cultural and socioeconomic competition and in the perceptions of equity of politics (Glazer and Moynihan 1975; Azrael 1978; Rothschild 1981...other. they also refer to competing principles and values when evaluating the equity of their standing. Survey research with former citizens of the USSR

  10. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts, Materials Science and Metallurgy, Number 42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-27

    6 Russian, 7 Western. USSR UDC [546(682+22)]:539.238;541.18.048 THE STRUCTURE OF THIN In2S3 FILMS Moscow IZVESTIYA AKADEMII NAUK SSSR...BELYAYEVA, M. N., and SKORNYAKOV, L. G., Ural Polytechnical Institute [Abstract] Thin In2S3 films (1500-4000 Ä), obtained by the method of chemical...of crystalline In2S3 - Recrystallization and the appearance, connected therewith, of optical properties characterizing In2S3 in the films, is

  11. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences No. 64

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-02-17

    No references. USSR UDC 616.981.42+616.981.71+616.986.7)-036.21(211) SEARCH FOR COMBINED FOCI OF BRUCELLOSIS , ENDEMIC RICKETTSIOSES, AND LEPTO...National Dkrug which reports widespread brucellosis , and infection of people, reindeer, and rodents with leptospirosis and endemic rickettsioses. In...OF A VIRUS FROM SHEEP CLOSELY RELATED TO BOVINE ADENOVIRUS TYPE 2 Budapest MAGYAR ALLATORVOSOK LAPIA in Hungarian No 10, Oct 76 signed to press 24

  12. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts, Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences, Number 67.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-30

    and news items on aerospace medicine, agrotechnology bionics and bioacoustics, biochemistry, biophysics, environmental and ecological problems, food...informa- tion by various sections of the brain is examined and clinical aspects and bionic approaches to study of sensory systems are discussed...of the Ground Locomotion of Mammals (Shik). Biomechanics of the Locomotion of Man (Bogdanov and Gurfinkel’). References 1773. USSR UDC 612.76

  13. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts. Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences. Number 56.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-11-08

    conduct research on the effects of nutrition , soil moisture and solar illumination; to continue studies of mechanization aimed at realizing a labor...connective tissue proteins; the proteins contain all aminoacids including the essential aminoacids ; lysine and histidine content is 1.5 that of beef...VYSOTSKIY, V. G., S0K0L0V, V. N., and YATSYSHINA, T. A., Institute of Nutrition , Academy of Medical Sciences USSR, Moscow THE CONCEPT OF LABILE PROTEIN AND

  14. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences No. 65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-01

    resulting from poor nutrition of the newcomers. The replacement of the "carbohydrate" type of energy metabolism with the "fat" type is conducive...PITANIYA in Russian No 6, Nov/Dec 76 signed to press 9 Feb 76 pp 73-74 MEYEROVICH, R. I., Institute of Nutrition , Academy of Medical Sciences USSR...L438K. Annotation] [Text] This is a collection of articles on biosynthesis of aminoacids , organic acids, enzymes, and other biologically active

  15. Current status and future prospects of gas-turbine development in the USSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liulka, A. M.

    1981-06-01

    It is noted that gas turbine engines are widely used in the USSR in the gas industry as main drives for superchargers in main stations. In addition, gas turbine engines are widely used in the chemical industry as well as in the iron and steel industries; a series of standard units with output up to 100 MW operate in electric power engineering under base and peak load. Gas turbine engines are also used in shipbuilding and civil aviation.

  16. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences No. 61

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-05

    631.524.86 PIKA , N. A., and GLADYSHKO, S. A., Ukrainian Scientific Research Institute of the Potato, Nemeshayevo, Kiev Oblast USE OF WILD PHYTOPHTORA...medium, the use of a pollen mixture and the creation of suitable external conditions (temperature, moisture, 1/2 USSR PIKA , N. A., and GLADYSHKO, S. A...analysis, has been received from two strongly divergent points of view: many notably American and Western European writers have regarded it as the

  17. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts, Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences, Number 92

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-07-26

    chemistry imeni A. N. Bakh, Academy of Sciences USSR Moscow; Belorussian Scientific Research Institute of Potato, Fruit and Vegetable Growing, Minsk...576.8.097.29 ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF MYC0T0XIN T-2 PRODUCED BY FUSARIUM SPOROTRI- CHIELLA Moscow DOKLADY VASKhNIL in Russian No 3, Mar 78 pp 36-38...identification of Fusarium sporotrichiella mycotoxin T-2: trichotecene 8- alpha-(3-methylbutyryloxy)-4-beta, 15-diacetoxycirp-9-ene-3-alpha-ol, for

  18. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. Index to issues 15-20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This bibliography provides an index to issues 15 through 20 of the USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. There are two sections. The first section lists bibliographic citations of abstracts in these issues, grouped by topic area categories. The second section provides a key word index for the same abstracts. The topic categories include exobiology, space medicine and psychology, human performance and man-machine systems, various life/body systems, human behavior and adaptation, biospherics, and others.

  19. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. Index to issues 26-29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Lydia Razran (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This bibliography provides an index to issues 26 through 29 of the USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. There are two sections. The first section lists bibliographic citations of abstracts in these issues, grouped by topic area categories. The second section provides a key word index for the same abstracts. The topic categories include exobiology, space medicine and psychology, human performance and man-machine systems, various life/body systems, human behavior and adaptation, biospherics, and others.

  20. The contribution of Earth observation technologies to the reporting obligations of the Habitats Directive and Natura 2000 network in a protected wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Regos

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Wetlands are highly productive systems that supply a host of ecosystem services and benefits. Nonetheless, wetlands have been drained and filled to provide sites for building houses and roads and for establishing farmland, with an estimated worldwide loss of 64–71% of wetland systems since 1900. In Europe, the Natura 2000 network is the cornerstone of current conservation strategies. Every six years, Member States must report on implementation of the European Habitats Directive. The present study aims to illustrate how Earth observation (EO technologies can contribute to the reporting obligations of the Habitats Directive and Natura 2000 network in relation to wetland ecosystems. Methods We analysed the habitat changes that occurred in a protected wetland (in NW Spain, 13 years after its designation as Natura 2000 site (i.e., between 2003 and 2016. For this purpose, we analysed optical multispectral bands and water-related and vegetation indices derived from data acquired by Landsat 7 TM, ETM+ and Landsat 8 OLI sensors. To quantify the uncertainty arising from the algorithm used in the classification procedure and its impact on the change analysis, we compared the habitat change estimates obtained using 10 different classification algorithms and two ensemble classification approaches (majority and weighted vote. Results The habitat maps derived from the ensemble approaches showed an overall accuracy of 94% for the 2003 data (Kappa index of 0.93 and of 95% for the 2016 data (Kappa index of 0.94. The change analysis revealed important temporal dynamics between 2003 and 2016 for the habitat classes identified in the study area. However, these changes depended on the classification algorithm used. The habitat maps obtained from the two ensemble classification approaches showed a reduction in habitat classes dominated by salt marshes and meadows (24.6–26.5%, natural and semi-natural grasslands (25.9–26.5% or sand dunes (20.7–20

  1. China's rare-earth industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Pui-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction China's dominant position as the producer of over 95 percent of the world output of rare-earth minerals and rapid increases in the consumption of rare earths owing to the emergence of new clean-energy and defense-related technologies, combined with China's decisions to restrict exports of rare earths, have resulted in heightened concerns about the future availability of rare earths. As a result, industrial countries such as Japan, the United States, and countries of the European Union face tighter supplies and higher prices for rare earths. This paper briefly reviews China's rare-earth production, consumption, and reserves and the important policies and regulations regarding the production and trade of rare earths, including recently announced export quotas. The 15 lanthanide elements-lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium, and lutetium (atomic numbers 57-71)-were originally known as the rare earths from their occurrence in oxides mixtures. Recently, some researchers have included two other elements-scandium and yttrium-in their discussion of rare earths. Yttrium (atomic number 39), which lies above lanthanum in transition group III of the periodic table and has a similar 3+ ion with a noble gas core, has both atomic and ionic radii similar in size to those of terbium and dysprosium and is generally found in nature with lanthanides. Scandium (atomic number 21) has a smaller ionic radius than yttrium and the lanthanides, and its chemical behavior is intermediate between that of aluminum and the lanthanides. It is found in nature with the lanthanides and yttrium. Rare earths are used widely in high-technology and clean-energy products because they impart special properties of magnetism, luminescence, and strength. Rare earths are also used in weapon systems to obtain the same properties.

  2. Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE). An overview of the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment and the outlook for a satellite crop inventory. [Great Plains Corridor (North America), Canada, U.S.S.R., Brazil, China, India, and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, R. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The most important LACIE finding was that the technology worked very well in estimating wheat production in important geographic locations. Based on working through the many successes and shortcomings of LACIE, it can be stated with confidence that: (1) the current technology can successfully monitor what production in regions having similar characteristics to those of the U.S.S.R. wheat areas and the U.S. hard red winter wheat areas; (2) with additional applied research, significant improvements in capabilities to monitor wheat in these and other important production regions can be expected in the near future; (3) the remote sensing and weather effects modeling technology approached used by LACIE is generally applicable to other major crops and crop-producing regions of the world; and (4) with suitable effort, this technology can now advance rapidly and could be widespread use in the late 1980's.

  3. The USSR Victory in World War II and the Emergence of the Independent Republic of Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa M. Efimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Victorious ending of the World War 2 on May, 9, 1945, stroke a crushing blow on the military axis Berlin - Rome - Tokyo. The USSR played a decisive role both on European and Asian fronts. Fulfilling its allied duty the Soviet Union entered the war in the Far East on 9 August, 1945 and defeated the Japanese army in Manchuria. This act became a great contribution to liberation of Asian peoples from the Japanese occupation. On the 17 August 1945 the Republic of Indonesia declared its independence. The recognition on the side of international community as well as diplomatic support became\\e vital for the survival of the newly emerged Republic.The Soviet victory together with the allied nations in the Second World War, the new status of the USSR as a superpower, its constant anticolonial stance stimulated former colonies to appeal to the Soviet Union for backing and support. One of the first was the Republic of Indonesia, to which the USSR rendered all kind of help and encourages. The present article which is a result of the study of newly available documents from several recently opened Soviet archives shows the Soviet backing of Indonesia in the UN, its diplomatic recognition, in strengthening of Indonesian status as a sovereign state on the international arena as a whole.

  4. First Islamic Conferences of Asia and Africa Countries and the Role of the USSR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayrat Fayazovich Ibatullin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the position of the USSR on the Islamic Conferences of Asia and Africa. Recognizes the role and importance of Soviet policy aimed at the elimination of colonialism and neo-colonialism; protect the independence and sovereign rights of states and peoples, the strengthening of world peace. Based on the directives of the Soviet delegation, the author gives a clear position of the USSR at the conference. It is a question of one of the most important goals that faced the Soviet delegation at the 2nd Islamic Conference of Asian and African countries was the fact that in their decisions and documents of the Conference emphasized the importance of the "Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples", adopted by the UN the initiative of the Soviet Union, condemned Portugal and other colonial powers, sabotaging its implementation, and demanded the immediate and strict implementation of the Declaration. It is mentioned the major questions which have discussed the countries-participants of conferences. The author examine the actual position of the USSR aimed at eliminating the economic, political and spiritual consequences of colonialism in the developing countries based on documents and actual materials.

  5. USSR Report, Life Sciences, Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-05

    and adapts rapidly to natural conditions--it feeds on nectar and the hemolymph of victims, couples and actively seeks out the caterpillars of the...other animals (Institute of Zoology), as well as technology for production of canned melon juice and technology for planting and cultivating rice

  6. In-Situ Resource Utilization for Space Exploration: Resource Processing, Mission-Enabling Technologies, and Lessons for Sustainability on Earth and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, A. F.; Palaszewski, B. A.; Landis, G. A.; Jaworske, D. A.; Colozza, A. J.; Kulis, M. J.; Heller, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    As humanity begins to reach out into the solar system, it has become apparent that supporting a human or robotic presence in transit andor on station requires significant expendable resources including consumables (to support people), fuel, and convenient reliable power. Transporting all necessary expendables is inefficient, inconvenient, costly, and, in the final analysis, a complicating factor for mission planners and a significant source of potential failure modes. Over the past twenty-five years, beginning with the Space Exploration Initiative, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), academic collaborators, and industrial partners have analyzed, researched, and developed successful solutions for the challenges posed by surviving and even thriving in the resource limited environment(s) presented by near-Earth space and non-terrestrial surface operations. In this retrospective paper, we highlight the efforts of the co-authors in resource simulation and utilization, materials processing and consumable(s) production, power systems and analysis, fuel storage and handling, propulsion systems, and mission operations. As we move forward in our quest to explore space using a resource-optimized approach, it is worthwhile to consider lessons learned relative to efficient utilization of the (comparatively) abundant natural resources and improving the sustainability (and environment) for life on Earth. We reconsider Lunar (and briefly Martian) resource utilization for potential colonization, and discuss next steps moving away from Earth.

  7. Saving Earth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, J.; Blok, V.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that the Anthropocene is relevant for philosophy of technology because it makes us sensitive to the ontological dimension of contemporary technology. In §1, we show how the Anthropocene has ontological status insofar as the Anthropocenic world appears as managerial resource

  8. Probes to the Inferior Planets - A New Dawn for NEO and IEO Detection Technology Demonstration from Heliocentric Orbits Interior to the Earth's?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundmann, J. T.; Mottola, S.; Drentschew, M.; Drobczyk, M.; Kahle, R.; Maiwald, V.; Quantius, D.; Zabel, P.; Van Zoest, T.

    2011-11-01

    With the launch of MESSENGER and VENUS EXPRESS, a new wave of exploration of the inner solar system has begun. Noting the growing number of probes to the inner solar system, it is proposed to connect the expertise of the respective spacecraft teams and the NEO and IEO survey community to best utilize the extended cruise phases and to provide additional data return in support of pure science as well as planetary defence. Several missions to Venus and Mercury are planned to follow in this decade. Increased interest in the inferior planets is accompanied by several missions designed to study the Sun and the interplanetary medium (IPM) from a position near or in Earth orbit, such as the STEREO probes and SDO. These augment established solar observation capabilities at the Sun-Earth L1 Lagrangian point such as the SOHO spacecraft. Thus, three distinct classes of spacecraft operate or observe interior to Earth's orbit. All these spacecraft carry powerful multispectral cameras optimized for their respective primary targets. MESSENGER is scheduled to end its six-year interplanetary cruise in March 2011 to enter Mercury orbit, but a similarly extended cruise with several gravity-assists awaits the European Mercury mission BEPICOLOMBO. Unfortunately, the automatic abort of the orbit insertion manoeuvre has also left AKATSUKI (a.k.a. Venus Climate Orbiter (VCO), Planet-C) stranded in heliocentric orbit. After an unintended fly-by, the probe will catch up with Venus in approximately six years. Meanwhile, it stays mostly interior to Venus in a planet-leading orbit. In addition to the study of comets and their interaction with the IPM, observations of small bodies akin to those carried out by outer solar system probes are occasionally attempted with the equipment available. The study of structures in the interplanetary dust (IPD) cloud has been a science objective during the cruise phase of the Japanese Venus probe AKATSUKI from Earth to Venus. IPD observations in the

  9. Mining and processing of uranium ores in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskorin, B.N.; Mamilov, V.A.; Korejsho, Yu.A.

    1983-01-01

    Experience gained in uranium ore mining by modern methods in combination with underground and heap leaching is summarized. More intensive processing of low-grade ores has been achieved through the use of autoclave leaching, sorptive treatment of thick pulps, extractive separation of pure uranium compounds, automated continuous sorption devices of high efficiency for processing the underground- and heap-leaching liquors, natural and mine water, and recovery of molybdenum, vanadium, scandium, rare earths and phosphate fertilizers from low-grade ores. Production of ion-exchangers and extractants has been developed and processes for concomitant recovery of copper, gold, ionium, tungsten, caesium, zirconium, tantalum, nickel and cobalt have been designed. (author)

  10. Rare earths: occurrence, production and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, T.K.S.; Mukherjee, T.K.

    2002-01-01

    The mining and processing of rare earth minerals, particularly of monazite, began in a modest way in 1880s for commercialized production of mantle for gas lighting. For all major applications up to mid-twentieth century- production of lighter flints, misch metal as a metallurgical alloying agent, colouring, decolourizing and polishing agents for glass, petroleum cracking catalysts and arc-carbons, unseparated or partially separated rare earths were adequate. These applications continue till today. With the development and industrial application of powerful techniques like ion exchange and solvent extraction for the separation of rare earths, the decades after 1960 saw increasing utilization of the specific properties of the individual rare earths. Some of these advanced technological applications include: special glass for optical systems including camera lenses, phosphors for colour television, cathode ray tubes and fluorescent lighting, X-ray intensification screens, high intensity permanent magnets, electro optical devices, lasers, hydrogen storage materials, hydride rechargeable batteries, photomagnetic data storage systems, autoexhaust catalysts, special ceramics of unusual toughness, artificial diamonds and nonpoisonous plastic colorants. The topics covered in the book include rare earths: their story identity, rare earth resources, processing of ores and recovery of mixed rare earths products, separation and purification of rare earths, nonmetallic applications of rare earths, rare earth metals: production and applications, rare earth alloys and their applications, analysis of rare earth, processing of rare earth resources in India by Indian Rare Earth Ltd. and availability and market conditions

  11. Flooding Effect on Earth Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Banimahd

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Earth building is a sustainable, environmentally friendly and economical method of construction that has been used worldwide for many centuries. For the past three decades, earth has seen a revival as a building material for a modern construction method due to its benefits in terms of low carbon content, low cost and energy involved during construction, as well as the fact that it is a sustainable technology of building. Climate change is influencing precipitation levels and patterns around the world, and as a consequence, flood risk is increasing rapidly. When flooding occurs, earth buildings are exposed to water by submersion, causing an increase in the degree of saturation of the earth structures and therefore a decrease of the suction between particles. This study investigated the effect of cycles of flooding (consecutive events of flooding followed by dry periods on earth walls. A series of characterization tests were carried out to obtain the physical and mechanical properties of the studied earth material. In a second stage, Flooding Simulation Tests (FST were performed to explore the earth walls’ response to repeated flooding events. The results obtained for the tested earth wall/samples with reinforced material (straw reveal hydraulic hysteresis when wall/samples are subject to cycles of wetting and drying.

  12. One Day on Earth

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    In collaboration with the CineGlobe Film Festival, the One Day on Earth global film project invites you to share your story of scientific inspiration, scientific endeavors and technological advancement on 11 November 2011 (11.11.11).   Technology in the 21st century continuously inspires us to re-imagine the world. From outer-space to cyberspace, new ideas that we hope will improve the lives of future generations keep us in a state of change. However, these new technologies may alter the nature of our shared existence in ways not yet known. On 11.11.11, we invite you to record the exciting ways that science is a part of your life, together with people around the world who will be documenting their lives on this day of global creation. See www.onedayonearth.org for details on how to participate.

  13. The pattern of mass disease in the U.S.S.R.: a product of socialist or capitalist development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R; Schatzkin, A

    1982-01-01

    The mortality structure of a society is determined primarily by the nature of the social organization. Although this general principle, which forms the basis of the Marxist approach to public health, has been well demonstrated in the classical model of capitalist society, there has been little attempt to apply this theory to countries that have experienced socialist revolutions. This paper examines the mortality structure of the U.S.S.R. Given the high degree of similarity between mass disease in the U.S.S.R. and Western capitalist countries, fundamental questions must be raised about the political and economic system currently operating in the U.S.S.R. It is suggested that the health experience in the Soviet Union over the last two decades has been determined primarily by the nature of the antagonistic class relations that have resulted from the restoration on capitalism.

  14. Earth Resources Technology Satellite-1 (ERTS-1) data and anthropology: Use of these data in carrying capacity estimates for sites in Upper Volta and Niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reining, P. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Repetitively derived multispectral band imagery from ERTS-1 is now available for many parts of the earth's land surface and represents major new data sources for anthropological work in habitat, land use, and settlement patterns. A completed first step test of ERTS-1 data is available in carrying capacity estimates for Mossi, Hausa, and Sonrai sites derived from: (1) field work; (2) aerial photography; and (3) ERTS-1. Data can test more than one carrying capacity formula.

  15. The large area crop inventory experiment: An experiment to demonstrate how space-age technology can contribute to solving critical problems here on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The large area crop inventory experiment is being developed to predict crop production through satellite photographs. This experiment demonstrates how space age technology can contribute to solving practical problems of agriculture management.

  16. At-Risk and Bilingual Fifth-Grade Students' On-Task Behavior and Conceptual Understanding in Earth Science-Related Topics during Inquiry-, Technology-, and Game-Based Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, K.; Vasquez, Y.; Avandano, C.; Moreno, K.; Besinaiz, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Graduate K-12 (GK12) program has been developed by NSF to support the national effort to advance scientific knowledge through educational partnerships. This paper highlights research conducted during the 2006-2007 school year with the Texas A&M University GK12 project. Two elementary schools with very high numbers of at risk students - those who are poor, speak English as their second language, and have a history of failing state-mandated tests were identified to be the field site for the GK12 project. In these two, high-minority (97% and 40% African American and Hispanic) schools, 80% and 56% of the children have been identified by the state as at risk; 94% and 52% are classified as economically disadvantaged; and 46% and 2% are limited English proficient, respectively. In the past year, 30% and 73% of fifth grade students in these schools passed the science portion of the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) test. Data collected during a three- week period where GK12 fellows taught the fifth graders Earth science-related topics is presented. During the implementation, students were engaged in technology-, inquiry-, and game-based activities. Students were divided into low-, medium-, and high-abilities in one school, and regular and bilingual groups in the other. Pre- post open-ended multiple choice tests indicated that all but the low performing students' conceptual understanding (CU) significantly (p significantly improved during the inquiry activity, and the high and bilingual students' CU significantly improved for the game activities. Classroom observation assessments showed that there was a significant (p Significant differences between student groups' CU and on-task behavior indicated that technology-based activities showed greatest differences between the low- ability learners and the other students, whereas, inquiry-based activities tended not to show such extremes. In the case of the bilingual and regular students however, technology

  17. Sulfur Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  18. Technology and society: ideological implications of information and computer technologies in the Soviet Union

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigle, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the impact of technology on the USSR's social system from the perspective of Soviet ideological development. The analysis of information and computer technologies within this framework de-emphasizes both modernization theories and those that assume unchallenged Communist Party control over technological development. Previous studies have examined the level of Soviet technological achievements and the gap between this level and those in the West, many referring to ideological boundaries of Soviet technological development without, however, systematically analyzing the resulting implications for the Soviet ideology of Marxism-Leninism. This study develops a framework for analyzing the impact of new technologies in the USSR in the fields of technology, ideology, and the scientific and technological revolution. On the basis of this framework, examination turns to the relevant Soviet theoretical and technical literature and debates among Soviety elites, concluding that the introduction of information and computer technologies and the organization of computer networks has exacerbated tensions in Soviety Marxism-Leninism.

  19. Recognition and Awards The former USSR awarded me the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    This is a great reward for me as it was my most cherished dream come true! Dr Parmjit Singh Sehra. Former Prof. of Agrometeorology, Department of Agricultural Meteorology,. Punjab Agricultural University (PAU), Ludhiana 141 004, Punjab, India. Presently Principal, DAV Institute of Engineering Technology, Betla Road,.

  20. Next-generation Digital Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodchild, Michael F; Guo, Huadong; Annoni, Alessandro; Bian, Ling; de Bie, Kees; Campbell, Frederick; Craglia, Max; Ehlers, Manfred; van Genderen, John; Jackson, Davina; Lewis, Anthony J; Pesaresi, Martino; Remetey-Fülöpp, Gábor; Simpson, Richard; Skidmore, Andrew; Wang, Changlin; Woodgate, Peter

    2012-07-10

    A speech of then-Vice President Al Gore in 1998 created a vision for a Digital Earth, and played a role in stimulating the development of a first generation of virtual globes, typified by Google Earth, that achieved many but not all the elements of this vision. The technical achievements of Google Earth, and the functionality of this first generation of virtual globes, are reviewed against the Gore vision. Meanwhile, developments in technology continue, the era of "big data" has arrived, the general public is more and more engaged with technology through citizen science and crowd-sourcing, and advances have been made in our scientific understanding of the Earth system. However, although Google Earth stimulated progress in communicating the results of science, there continue to be substantial barriers in the public's access to science. All these factors prompt a reexamination of the initial vision of Digital Earth, and a discussion of the major elements that should be part of a next generation.

  1. Translations on USSR Science and Technology, Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences, Number 35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-07-14

    structurally resemble sensory cells of the ear and its vestibular system, have special hairs at the apex. Electroreceptors of the nodular type have neither...shops there were statistically reliable differences in the moribidity levels for neuralgia, neuritis , and radiculitis (difference of indices 3«21 ± O

  2. Translations on USSR Science and Technology, Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences, Number 42

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-08

    an.tisera to A/FM/1/47 (HlNl) to the homologous titer, with antiserum to the strain A/ whale /Pacific Ocean/19/76 to one-eighth titer, with antiserum to A...with a virus isolated from whales 1.5 years prior to this event, indicates the possi- bility for importation of a virus into the human population...from rorquals caught " ^f^97^*£tion of South Pacific. This article presents the.results of ^ ^f epidemic strains and the influenza virus isolated

  3. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts, Cybernetics, Computers, and Automation Technology, Number 30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-23

    Systems, College of Transportation, Zilina [Abstract] The article discusses programming of the INTEL 8080 microprocessor developed at the College of...Transportation at Zilina . A typical application program of a microcomputer contains 50 to 4,000 instructions. The means of programming depends on the

  4. Translations on USSR Science and Technology, Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences, Number 33

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-07-05

    fectiveness of preventive work among healthy children—this is the central task of public health bodies of all levels in the cause of protection of moth ...the volume of circulating plasma. The urine was col- lected by a catheter 2 hours before the beginning of blood loss and k hours after blood loss

  5. Translations on USSR Science and Technology, Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences, Number 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-07-28

    the operon in the genome of the toxigenicity-converting phage and blocks expression of the phage structural gene of toxin production. According to...enterobacteria, which determine fermentation of lactose and saccharose. The existence of plasmids of this type could lead to forma- tion of atypical strains and...catabolite-sensitive operons (Gershanovitch et al., 1977). Discovery of the role of PTS in the transport of glucose and analogues thereof in E. coli

  6. Translations on USSR Science and Technology, Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences, Number 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-07

    use of a "beam scalpel" in clinical oncology in the removal of malignant tumors will result in a significant decrease in recurring postoperative... Physiotherapy and Health Resort Treatment], Perm’, 1974, pp 147-148. 5. Kholodov, Yu. A. "Vliyaniye elektromagnitnykh i magnitnykh poley na

  7. Translations on USSR Science and Technology, Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences, Number 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-12

    leguminous crops; cruciferous clubroot, peronosporosis of onions, viral and bacterial diseases, for vegetable crops. The conference discussed and approved...aspiration from it had a beneficial effect on the air environment. The concentration of nitrogen oxides does not exceed the maximum permissible levels

  8. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts, Cybernetics, Computers and Automation Technology, Number 34

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-07-26

    pp Ul-ljlt manuscript received 9 Mar 77 D0LG0P0L0V, ALEKSANDR SERGYEVICH, senior engineer, Pskov Radio Components Plant (Pskov) and...Jul 76 B0R0DKIN, A. M., B0R0DKIN, L. I., GURIN, N. N., KOGAN , YA. A., LYAPICHEVA, N. G. and MUCHNIK, I. B., Moscow [Abstract] The optimal speed...Kiev); GULYAYEV, ALEKSANDR IVANOVICH, candidate in technical sciences, RIUTs, Ministry of Public Health UkrSSR (Kiev); and DEMENTKOVA, ANNA

  9. Translations on USSR Science and Technology, Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences, Number 37

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-07-19

    and the body of the cell became narrow and pyknomorphous. Dystrophie changes in the astrocytes could be observed in several preparations. The...circulation is associated with an increase in the tone of the internal carotid arteries resulting from dominance of sympathetic over parasympathetic...defensive reflex was determined in the course of prolonged administration of cephedrine. The numerical research results were treated statistically

  10. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts, Cybernetics, Computers, and Automation Technology, Number 26

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-26

    MATEMATICHESKOYE OBESPECHENIYE GIBRIDNOY VYCHISLITEL’NOY SISTEMY GVS-100. VYPUSK 2. SISTEMA KOMAND ANALOGOVOY CHASTI I USTROYSTVA PREOBRAZO- VANIYA I... cardiovascular diseases was developed in cooperation with the Institute of Cardiology imeni Myanikov, the Moscow Oblast Clinical Institute imeni Vladimirskiy...heart specialists in determining the causes of cardiovascular diseases. A complex for taking mass cardiovascular examinations of the population is

  11. The Palestinian Problem In The Middle East Policy Of The USSR / Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Nosenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the stages in the formation of the USSR policy in the field of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict resolution, the features of the developed policy and practical conclusions that could be useful in advancing the current Middle East policy of the Russian Federation. Initially, the Soviet Union perceived the Palestinian theme primarily from the point of view of the problem of refugees. However, Moscow increasingly felt the need for reliable allies in the region. The movement for cooperation between the Palestine Liberation Organization and the USSR was bilateral: the PLO departed from revolutionary romanticism and began to follow a pragmatic line to expand contacts with opponents of Israel. Moscow began to consider the activities of the PLO as part of the national liberation movement, took a sharply anti-Israeli stance. Such a distortion led to a loss of freedom of maneuver in the region and to the announcement of deliberately non-constructive proposals for a Palestinian-Israeli settlement. Only since 1985 the USSR returned to a more flexible position, which sought to combine the interests of the Palestinian people and Israel. At the present stage, Russian diplomacy uses Soviet experience and connections, especially in the sphere of personal contacts. But Russia’s role in the Middle East conflict resolution has decreased due to subjective and objective reasons. Against the backdrop of the Arab Spring and the Civil War in Syria, Palestinian issues have become secondary in the agenda of Moscow, which, however, can lead to a new surge of violence and tension. Special relations with the Palestinian national liberation movement have always been an advantage of Soviet and then Russian diplomacy. The authors believe that this advantage should be used more actively to strengthen Russia’s positions in the region.

  12. The main ways of increasing safety of fast reactors under development in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagdasarov, Yu.E.; Kochetkov, L.A.; Poplavsky, V.M.

    1991-01-01

    In the paper a brief review of the main fast reactor concepts under development in the USSR is presented. The current status in development and licensing of the BN-800 project is described. Primary emphasis is being given to the problems of safety ensuring in the light of changes in requirements of codes and specifications. The consequences of further growth in requirement to nuclear power industry and the ways of increasing the fast reactor safety, the advantages and disadvantages of using alternative designs and coolants are being analyzed. (author)

  13. Levels of radioactivity in Wales from the accident at Chernobyl, USSR on 26 April 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    This document contains a compilation of the results of environmental monitoring for radioactivity and radiation in Wales following the accident at Chernobyl, USSR, on 26 April 1986. The compilation has been prepared by the National Radiological Protection Board at the request of the Welsh Office and includes all information available to the NRPB up to 23 May 1986. Data are presented under the following headings: Background information, concentrations in air, water (rain, surface, tapwater, non-potable), grass, outdoor dose rates, concentrations in cows, goats and ewes' milk, concentrations in leafy vegetables and other foods. (U.K.)

  14. The Moscow economic conference of April 1952: a tactical manoeuvre or a new strategy of USSR?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Михаил Аркадьевич Липкин

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article analyzes the prehistory, history and the meaning of a large soviet international action - the Moscow economic conference in April 1952. With a use of new evidences from the Russian state archive of social and political history the author argues that the Conference was not just a reaction to the Marshall Plan and Shuman Plan in Western Europe. It was the first attempt to open the iron curtain and change the logic of international relations towards peaceful coexistence. The Conference turned into quite unusual for the period of late Stalin's rule nursery for fresh ideas used in full by USSR later in 1950-1970s.

  15. The Effects of Nuclear Weapons on Post WWII US/USSR Confrontations intensity Peak Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-06

    The Strategic BaW», 1070 New York: Washington Papers, Morgenstern , Oskar . The Qmstion of National Defan... *„ York: Random House, 206 I £> üsf!ood...34 Wohlstetter’s theory was followed by Oak&r Morgenstern , who argued that it was in the interest of the US for both the US and USSR to have invul- nerable...1958. ’ prxnuja an 23 Osfcar Morgenstern , The Question of National Defense. New York: Random House, 1958, p. 75. * 2h ’ Rrodie» Strategy in

  16. Review of works an atmospheric radioactivity study published in the USSR during 1979-1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styro, B.I.

    1984-01-01

    A review of works published in U.S.S.R. during 1979-1982 investigating the different aspects of the contamination of the atmosphere by the radionuclides of both natural and artificial origin was carried out. A peculiarity of this time range was an increase of interest to the contaminations caused by the work of nuclear power plants or, more exactly, of the nuclear fuel cycle plants. Particularly, a number of investigations devoted to the studies of contamination of the atmosphere by radioactive noble gases and of their influence on a number of geophysical processes in atmosphere was published

  17. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts, Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences, Number 84

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-28

    of stabilized grain meal. USSR UDC 6lT-001.17-092.2-0T:6l6.61-008.931:517.152.11 CHANGES IK HEPATIC GLYCOLYSIS OF THE RAT INDUCED BY EXPERIMENTAL... glycolysis in burns and that this may "be the mechanism responsible for the ineffective- ness of glucose as an energy source in such situations...MISHCHENKO, V. I., Poltava Medical Stomatological Institute [Abstract] Experiments were done on ten dogs of both sexes weighing from 12 to 21 kg to

  18. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts, Engineering and Equipment. Number 25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-10-29

    is based on plant data on 139 sections of butt-welded seams made by manual arc welding. In ultrasonic flaw detection the sizes of defects were...Russian. 1/1 USSR UDC 621.822.71 VOLOKUSHIN, V. F., Engineer, Eighteenth State Bearing Plant , Vin- nitsa CAUSES OF THE FORMATION OF TROOSTITE SPOTS...regarding the so-called tropism of the system and the property that prevents it from approaching an obstacle at a distance less than a certain safe value

  19. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. A A Shah1 2 T H Bell1. School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia. Earth Observatory of Singapore, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

  20. Designing Visual Earth: Multimedia Geographic Visualization for the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Harold

    1998-01-01

    Provides information on computer software using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and visualization technologies and Visual Earth, a series of integrated classroom solutions for a variety of science topics. Describes some uses of GIS and Visual Earth in science classrooms. (ASK)

  1. Are Earth Sciences lagging behind in data integration methodologies?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Paasche, H

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects discussions German and South African Earth scientists, statisticians and risk analysts had on occasion of two bilateral workshops on Data Integration Technologies for Earth System Modelling and Resource Management...

  2. USSR Report, Translations from Kommunist, No. 5, March 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-14

    tangible under- standing of this thesis : during the difficult period of the Patriotic War, when the existence of the very foundations of our system...ensure always and everywhere a justifiable and objective assessment of individual labor contributions." The profound content of this thesis contains...well as freight, freight-passenger and passenger hovercraft . Technologically, this solution is entirely realistic. However, economic and

  3. Scarcity of rare earth elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, M.A.; Lammertsma, K.

    2013-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are important for green and a large variety of high-tech technologies and are, therefore, in high demand. As a result, supply with REEs is likely to be disrupted (the degree of depends on the REE) in the near future. The 17 REEs are divided into heavy and light REEs. Other

  4. Working Group 7.1 on environmental transport, US-USSR Joint Coordinating Committee on Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains brief summaries of the status of projects of the Environmental Transport Group of the US-USSR Joint Coordinating Committee of Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety. Projects reported on include: Management and Administration; Atmospheric Transport; Resuspension; External Dose; Terrestrial Food Chains; Aquatic Food Chains; Hydrological Transport; and Intercalibration

  5. Short history of steam generators in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The first power stations appeared in Russia in the late 1880s. Early pioneers in generator design are mentioned. Lenin considered power production essential for rapid industrialization. In the early 1920s power stations were designed to make use of local fuels: peat, brown coal, and anthracite culm. The high-pressure, once-through boiler technology was introduced in the 1930s. At the same time cogeneration was a widely used technology, and efforts were being made to increase boiler capacity. In 1939, in line with prewar policies of dispersing Soviet industry to protect it from enemy attack, boiler capacity was limited to 25 tons/hr. Almost all of the multi-drum boilers were destroyed as a result of WWII. A novel method of salvaging the boilers by welding 2 or 3 units together to make a single unit was implemented after the war. Research organizations are mentioned along with their specific contributions. Modern steam generators use boiler turbines and supercritical once-through boilers. It was only in the late 1950s that economic planners discovered that oil and gas in power stations was cost effective. In 1954 a 5-MW graphite-water reactor became the world's first nuclear power plant. For the next 20 years, two types of nuclear reactors began production: pressurized water-cooled, water-moderated reactors in the 200-400 MW range; and channel-type graphite-moderated, water-cooled reactors in the 100-200 MW range

  6. Gas core nuclear thermal rocket engine research and development in the former USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehlinger, M.W.; Bennett, R.G.; Motloch, C.G.; Gurfink, M.M.

    1992-09-01

    Beginning in 1957 and continuing into the mid 1970s, the USSR conducted an extensive investigation into the use of both solid and gas core nuclear thermal rocket engines for space missions. During this time the scientific and engineering. problems associated with the development of a solid core engine were resolved. At the same time research was undertaken on a gas core engine, and some of the basic engineering problems associated with the concept were investigated. At the conclusion of the program, the basic principles of the solid core concept were established. However, a prototype solid core engine was not built because no established mission required such an engine. For the gas core concept, some of the basic physical processes involved were studied both theoretically and experimentally. However, no simple method of conducting proof-of-principle tests in a neutron flux was devised. This report focuses primarily on the development of the. gas core concept in the former USSR. A variety of gas core engine system parameters and designs are presented, along with a summary discussion of the basic physical principles and limitations involved in their design. The parallel development of the solid core concept is briefly described to provide an overall perspective of the magnitude of the nuclear thermal propulsion program and a technical comparison with the gas core concept

  7. Creation and implementation of the international information system for radiation legacy of the USSR 'RADLEG'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskra, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The stating of radiological problem of the radiation legacy of the Soviet and Russian military and civil programs of the nuclear fuel cycle have became possible after 'cold war' termination. The objective of the 'RADLEG' project is 'Development of a sophisticated computer based data system for evaluation of the radiation legacy of the former USSR and setting priorities on remediation and prevention policy'. The goal of the 'RADLEG' Project Phase 1 was creation of a simple operational database to be linked to GIS, describing currently available information on radiation legacy of the former USSR. During the Project Phase 2 the public accessible database linked to GIS has been developed. This GIS data system containing comprehensive information on the radiation legacy of the former Soviet Union has been developed in order to aid policy makers in two principle areas: to identify and set priorities on radiation safety problems, and to provide guidance for the development of technically, economically and socially sound policies to reduce health and environmental impact of radioactively contaminated sites. (author)

  8. A few nuclear technologies in earth science and industry; Quelques techniques nucleaires dans l`industrie et les sciences de la terre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillot, A.

    1994-12-31

    The radioactivity pacific and favourable applications are very numerous. The sensitivity, the efficiency of these processes make them peculiarly attractive. Nevertheless, their implementation is a demanding job on account of numerous subjects that must acquire the specialists: nuclear, electronic and computing, fluid mechanics and sometimes... athletics when it concerns studies on the maritime sites. In spite of these numerous advantages, we must not deduce that those methods are the panacea destined to replace the other technologies. It`s the association of these two approaches which is an economy and progress supply.

  9. Earth observing data and methods for advancing water harvesting technologies in the semi-arid rain-fed environments of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, C.; Thenkabail, P.; Sharma, R. R.

    2011-01-01

    The paper develops approaches and methods of modeling and mapping land and water productivity of rain-fed crops in semi-arid environments of India using hyperspectral, hyperspatial, and advanced multispectral remote sensing data and linking the same to field-plot data and climate station data. The overarching goal is to provide information to advance water harvesting technologies in the agricultural croplands of the semi-arid environments of India by conducting research in a representative pilot site in Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  10. Soviet steam generator technology: fossil fuel and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosengaus, J.

    1987-01-01

    In the Soviet Union, particular operational requirements, coupled with a centralized planning system adopted in the 1920s, have led to a current technology which differs in significant ways from its counterparts elsewhere in the would and particularly in the United States. However, the monograph has a broader value in that it traces the development of steam generators in response to the industrial requirements of a major nation dealing with the global energy situation. Specifically, it shows how Soviet steam generator technology evolved as a result of changing industrial requirements, fuel availability, and national fuel utilization policy. The monograph begins with a brief technical introduction focusing on steam-turbine power plants, and includes a discussion of the Soviet Union's regional power supply (GRES) networks and heat and power plant (TETs) systems. TETs may be described as large central co-generating stations which, in addition to electricity, provide heat in the form of steam and hot water. Plants of this type are a common feature of the USSR today. The adoption of these cogeneration units as a matter of national policy has had a central influence on Soviet steam generator technology which can be traced throughout the monograph. The six chapters contain: a short history of steam generators in the USSR; steam generator design and manufacture in the USSR; boiler and furnace assemblies for fossil fuel-fired power stations; auxiliary components; steam generators in nuclear power plants; and the current status of the Soviet steam generator industry. Chapters have been abstracted separately. A glossary is included containing abbreviations and acronyms of USSR organizations. 26 references

  11. Subject matter of the All-Union Coordination Conference. [USSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudkevich, M.I.; Tselik, M.P.; Belkina, T.V.

    1984-06-01

    Conference on reviewing plans for new research and experimental design projects in the coking industry for 1984-85 took place on 13-17 June 1983. Participants represented the Ministry of Ferrous Metallurgy, Institute for the Chemistry of Coal and other research institutes, technical schools and coking plants. The titles of the more important papers delivered at the conference are given. Main directions in research and development, test results of new processes and technology, automation and mechanization in the industry, preparation of coal batches for coking, studies on coals from the eastern deposits, methods for evaluating blast furnace cokes, and other subject areas related to the coking and chemical industry were covered in the papers delivered at the conference. Altogether 179 on-going and new projects were discussed at the conference.

  12. Consumer goods and food industry, local industry of the western region of ussr in the times of «developed socialist society»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleh M. Malyarchuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The economy of the Ukrainian SSR and the western region, according to most indicators, continued to develop on its own basis, solving ordinary socio-political and socio-economic challenges. In 1960-1980s of the twentieth century the two types of reproduction were combined: extensive sources of growth (exploitation of new natural and labour resources, and intensive ones which improved production structure and management system. Western region of the republic developed rapidly, engineering and instrumentation grew, as well as oil and gas and chemical industries, together with consumer goods and food industry, local industry. However, low quality, inadequate technologies reduced the positive impact of these industries on economic efficiency. In addition, other problems arose. As a result tasks of economic development planned by the third Programme of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union turned out to be unfulfilled. Despite a slight increase in industrial growth its rate declined. A large-scale restructuring of the economy on resource conservation, introduction of new technologies began in industrialized countries. Scientific progress in the USSR stalled. It should be noted that attempts to improve the situation were done over and over, but they were not in the economic and scientific spheres but in the political one. The crisis in industry and agriculture of the USSR in the second half of 1980s went far beyond purely production problems, took on socio-economic character and became threatening as for the provision of the country with necessary goods and food, creating social tension. In the late 1980s food consumption per capita decreased, and deficit in manufactured goods increased. Investing activities of villages almost stopped. Employees from the village began to massively lose stable jobs and reliable source of income. The decline in agricultural production led to idle capacity of the food and consumer goods industry, decline in employment

  13. Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, W.H.; Caesar, S.

    1992-09-01

    The Franklin Institute Science Museum provided an exhibit entitled the Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition. This 3500 square-foot exhibit on global climate change was developed in collaboration with the Association of Science-Technology Centers. The exhibit opened at The Franklin Institute on February 14, 1992, welcoming 291,000 visitors over its three-month stay. During its three-year tour, Greenhouse Earth will travel to ten US cities, reaching two million visitors. Greenhouse Earth aims to deepen public understanding of the scientific issues of global warming and the conservation measures that can be taken to slow its effects. The exhibit features hands-on exhibitry, interactive computer programs and videos, a theater production, a ''demonstration cart,'' guided tours, and lectures. supplemental educational programs at the Institute included a teachers preview, a symposium on climate change, and a ''satellite field trip.'' The development of Greenhouse Earth included front-end and formative evaluation procedures. Evaluation includes interviews with visitors, prototypes, and summative surveys for participating museums. During its stay in Philadelphia, Greenhouse Earth was covered by the local and national press, with reviews in print and broadcast media. Greenhouse Earth is the first large-scale museum exhibit to address global climate change

  14. Environmental science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manahan, S.E. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1998-12-31

    This complete survey of modern environmental science covers the four traditional spheres of the environment: water, air, earth, and life, and introduces a fifth sphere -- the anthrosphere -- which the author defines as the sphere of human activities, especially technology, that affect the earth. The book discusses how technology can be used in a manner that minimizes environmental disruption.

  15. Rare earth industries: Downstream business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The value chain of the rare earths business involves mining, extraction, processing, refining and the manufacture of an extensive range of downstream products which find wide applications in such industries including aerospace, consumer electronics, medical, military, automotive, renewable wind and solar energy and telecommunications. In fact the entire gamut of the high-tech industries depends on a sustainable supply of rare earths elements. The explosive demand in mobile phones is an excellent illustration of the massive potential that the rare earths business offers. In a matter of less than 20 years, the number of cell phones worldwide has reached a staggering 5 billion. Soon, going by the report of their growth in sales, the world demand for cell phones may even exceed the global population. Admittedly, the rare earths business does pose certain risks. Top among the risks are the health and safety risks. The mining, extraction and refining of rare earths produce residues and wastes which carry health and safety risks. The residues from the extraction and refining are radioactive, while their effluent waste streams do pose pollution risks to the receiving rivers and waterways. But, as clearly elaborated in a recent report by IAEA experts, there are technologies and systems available to efficiently mitigate such risks. The risks are Rare Earth manageable. However, it is crucial that the risk and waste management procedures are strictly followed and adhered to. This is where effective monitoring and surveillance throughout the life of all such rare earths facilities is crucial. Fortunately, Malaysia's regulatory standards on rare earths follow international standards. In some areas, Malaysia's regulatory regime is even more stringent than the international guidelines. (author)

  16. A brief introduction to high altitude nuclear explosion and a review on high altitude nuclear tests of usa and former USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jingwen

    1999-11-01

    The author briefly introduces some knowledge about high altitude nuclear explosion (HANE) and presents a general review on high altitude nuclear tests of USA and former USSR. Physical phenomenon generated by HANE is given. The effects of HANE on space flyer, artificial satellite and communication are discussed. Some aspects of a mechanism of antimissile for HANE are described and the effect and role of HANE for USA and USSR are reviewed

  17. International Collaboration on bio-hydrogen R and D. Report for the Research Institute of Innovative Technology for the Earth (RITE), Tokyo, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huesing, B.

    1998-01-01

    In order to solve the problem of the foreseeable depletion of fossil energy resources and of expected global climatic changes due to the emission of greenhouse gases future energy systems are required which meet the growing world energy demand but do not depend on fossil fuels. One possible option which is discussed as a clean and environmentally friendly energy source for the 21{sup st} century is the conversion of solar energy into hydrogen. Hydrogen as an environmentally friendly energy source can also be an integral part of a zero-emission economy because it can contribute to the minimization of toxic dispersion (especially the greenhouse gas CO{sub 2}) and to the maximization of sustainable use of renewable resources. It has been known for more than 50 years that certain living organisms are able to produce hydrogen. Biological hydrogen production has several comparative advantages over competing hydrogen production technologies such as photovoltaic or solarthermic electricity generation plus water hydrolysis. These advantages are - simpler systems: hydrogen production from direct water splitting without involvement of electricity/electrolysis, - self-regenerating systems, - biologically degradable systems: disposal can be coupled to the production of additional value-added substances, - flexible systems: production organisms can adapt to changing environmental conditions, - versatile systems: production organisms which are tailor-made to special environmental conditions can be selected. (orig.)

  18. Research on the information network for R and D on the innovative technology for the earth; Chikyu kankyo taisaku gijutsu no kenkyu joho network chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    With an objective to structure an information network system to promote research information exchange on global environment preserving technologies, the currently used RITE information system was reviewed, and the WWW home page was discussed. Three years have passed since the structuring of the RITE information system, during which remarkably popularized use of the Internet can be seen. With respect to provision of research information through the Internet, IP connection is possible in almost all the countries; a variety of research information utilizing WWW are provided; multi-media functions are advancing in image information, audio information and animated image information; and retrieval servers are improved according to applicable fields. Regarding the RITE information system, discussions are given on improvement in the Internet access environment, and expansion in information providing scope and information exchange environment. A WWW home page was prepared on a trial basis, which indicated that a considerable amount of information can be provided even under the presently retained information and the current network environment. 2 refs., 28 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Earth mortars and earth-lime renders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernandes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth surface coatings play a decorative architectural role, apart from their function as wall protection. In Portuguese vernacular architecture, earth mortars were usually applied on stone masonry, while earth renders and plasters were used on indoors surface coatings. Limestone exists only in certain areas of the country and consequently lime was not easily available everywhere, especially on granite and schist regions where stone masonry was a current building technique. In the central west coast of Portugal, the lime slaking procedure entailed slaking the quicklime mixed with earth (sandy soil, in a pit; the resulting mixture would then be combined in a mortar or plaster. This was also the procedure for manufactured adobes stabilized with lime. Adobe buildings with earth-lime renderings and plasters were also traditional in the same region, using lime putty and lime wash for final coat and decoration. Classic decoration on earth architecture from the 18th-19th century was in many countries a consequence of the François Cointeraux (1740-1830 manuals - Les Cahiers d'Architecture Rurale" (1793 - a French guide for earth architecture and building construction. This manual arrived to Portugal in the beginning of XIX century, but was never translated to Portuguese. References about decoration for earth houses were explained on this manual, as well as procedures about earth-lime renders and ornamentation of earth walls; in fact, these procedures are exactly the same as the ones used in adobe buildings in this Portuguese region. The specific purpose of the present paper is to show some cases of earth mortars, renders and plasters on stone buildings in Portugal and to explain the methods of producing earth-lime renders, and also to show some examples of rendering and coating with earth-lime in Portuguese adobe vernacular architecture.

  20. 8 April 2013 - Indian Hon'ble Minister for Ministry of Science & Technology and Ministry of Earth Sciences Shri Sudini Jaipal Reddy in the LHC tunnel with K. Foraz, visiting the CMS cavern with Technical Coordinator A. Ball and Former Spokesperson T. Virdee, signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Samuel Morier-Genoud

    2013-01-01

    8 April 2013 - Indian Hon'ble Minister for Ministry of Science & Technology and Ministry of Earth Sciences Shri Sudini Jaipal Reddy in the LHC tunnel with K. Foraz, visiting the CMS cavern with Technical Coordinator A. Ball and Former Spokesperson T. Virdee, signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer.

  1. Near Earth Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    , Near Earth Objects: Asteroids and comets following paths that bring them near the Earth. NEOs have collided with the Earth since its formation, some causing local devastation, some causing global climate changes, yet the threat from a collision with a near Earth object has only recently been recognised...

  2. Rare earth ferrosilicon alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caiquan, L.; Zeguang, T.; Zaizhang, L.

    1985-01-01

    In order to obtain RE ferrosilicon alloy with good quality and competitive price, it is essential that proper choice of raw materials, processing technology and equipments should be made based on the characteristics of Bai-Yun-Ebo mineral deposits. Experimental work and actual production practice indicate that pyrometallurgical method is suitable for the extraction and isolation of the rare earths and comprehensive utilization of the metal values contained in the feed material is capable of reducing cost of production of RE ferrosilicon alloy. In the Bai-Yun-Ebo deposit, the fluorite type medium lean ore (with respect to iron content) makes a reserve of considerable size. The average content of the chief constituents are given

  3. Telephony Earth Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Adrian J.; Kay, Stan

    The Telephony Earth Station (TES), a digital full-mesh SCPC (single channel per carrier) system designed for satellite voice and data transmission is described. As compared to companded FM, the advanced speech compression and forward error correction techniques used by TES better achieve the quality, power, and bandwidth ideal for each application. In addition, the TES offers a fully demand-assigned voice call setup, handles point-to-point data channels, supports a variety of signaling schemes, and does not require any separate pilot receivers at the station, while keeping costs low through innovative technology and packaging. The TES can be used for both C-band and Ku-band (domestic or international) applications, and is configurable either as an VSAT (very small aperture terminal) using an SSPA, or as a larger station depending on the capacity requirements. A centralized DAMA processor and network manager is implemented using a workstation.

  4. Geospatial Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Philip A.; Ritz, John

    2004-01-01

    Geospatial technology refers to a system that is used to acquire, store, analyze, and output data in two or three dimensions. This data is referenced to the earth by some type of coordinate system, such as a map projection. Geospatial systems include thematic mapping, the Global Positioning System (GPS), remote sensing (RS), telemetry, and…

  5. Summary of medical investigations in the U.S.S.R. manned space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazenko, O. G.; Genin, A. M.; Egorov, A. D.

    The results of biomedical investigations carried out in the U.S.S.R. manned space missions are discussed. Their basic result is well-documented evidence that man can perform space flights of long duration. The investigations have demonstrated no direct correlation between inflight or postflight physiological reactions of crewmembers and flight duration. In all likelihood, this can be attributed to the fact that special exercises done inflight efficiently prevented adverse effects of weightlessness. However, human reactions to weightlessness need further study. They include negative calcium balance and anemia as well as vestibulo-autonomic disorders shown by crewmembers at early stages of weightlessness. Attention should be given to psychological, social-psychological and ethical problems that may also limit further increase in flight duration.

  6. The use of live vaccine for vaccination of human beings against brucellosis in the USSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VERSHILOVA, P A

    1961-01-01

    The great majority of human brucellosis cases in the USSR are caused by contact with infected sheep and goats. Extensive action has been taken to prevent human infection and to reduce the incidence among farm animals, the main prophylactic measure in recent years being vaccination with live brucellosis vaccine. The author summarizes the steps leading to the development of a satisfactory vaccine and gives a brief description of the method of preparation. Discussing the results obtained, she states that there has been a nearly 60% reduction in the number of human cases over the period 1952-58.The subcutaneous route of administration is usually resorted to, but preliminary figures suggest that cutaneous vaccination is equally effective immunogenically, although in persons who have suffered from active brucellosis it causes strong reactions and may lead to exacerbation of the disease. Research is going forward into the development of a cutaneous vaccine capable of general use.

  7. Results from the US/USSR exchange for heat load material studies of simulated disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahl, J.M.; Crawford, J.F.; McDonald, J.M.; McGrath, R.; Zakharov, A.; Tserevitinov, S.; Barabash, V.; Guseva, M.

    1992-01-01

    The motivation behind exchange 1.2 of the USSR/US exchange program of cooperation for magnetic confinement fusion is to more closely simulate tokamak disruptions with a variety of plasma devices within the Soviet Union and the United States and to characterize the effect these simulated disruptions have on candidate PFC materials. Earlier work conducted in the Soviet Union by a team of Soviet and American researchers showed ablation of graphites exposed to a disruption like heat flux from a plasma flow was significantly less than that previously expected. Work has continued and results from recent work at the University of New Mexico are in general agreement with earlier results from the Soviet Union. New results from work in the United States and the Soviet Union will be presented. (orig.)

  8. Utilizing methane from degassing as a fuel for furnaces of drying systems. [USSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matveev, V.I.; Telegin, A.K.

    1984-10-01

    The use is evaluated of methane from coal seam degassing in the Severnaya mine as a fuel for dryers in the Severnaya coal preparation plant in the USSR. Dryers used in the plant are equipped with PMZ-4TsR furnaces. Middlings (type Zh18 coal) with 30% ash content and 0.25 MJ/kg calorific value were used as a fuel. When dryers were fired with middlings moisture content in coal concentrate declined from 10.1% to 5.1%, system output amounted to 133 t/h. After plant modernization middlings were replaced with methane from coal seam degassing (methane content in the mixture with air ranged from 40 to 60%). Replacing middlings with methane increased dryer output from 133 to 203 t/h. Moisture content in dried coal was reduced from 11.8 to 4.8%. Repair cost decreased, environmental pollution caused by combustion also declined. Payback period amounted to 6 months.

  9. Epidemiology and determinants of induced abortion in the U.S.S.R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remennick, L I

    1991-01-01

    Since the mid-50s, induced abortion (IA) has been the principal method of birth control for as much as 80% of the U.S.S.R. population, with more than 9 million of terminations performed annually. After brief discussion of the general and specific reasons for a long-term IA dominance in family planning practices, data of the national statistics and local surveys on IA prevalence, contraceptive use and their determinants are critically reviewed. Although most couples are willing to use contraception, they have to rely on traditional methods with high failure rates (withdrawal, condom, rhythm/calendar). Due to many years of misleading information, population views on pros and cons of various birth control methods are severely biased. Public health implications of multiple IA are summarised.

  10. Radioactive waste management in the USSR: A review of unclassified sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.J.

    1991-03-01

    The Soviet Union does not currently have an overall radioactive waste management program or national laws that define objectives, procedures, and standards, although such a law is being developed, according to the Soviets. Occupational health and safety does not appear to receive major attention as it does in Western nations. In addition, construction practices that would be considered marginal in Western facilities show up in Soviet nuclear power and waste management operations. The issues involved with radioactive waste management and environmental restoration are being investigated at several large Soviet institutes; however, there is little apparent interdisciplinary integration between them, or interaction with the USSR Academy of Sciences. It is expected that a consensus on technical solutions will be achieved, but it may be slow in coming, especially for final disposal of high-level radioactive wastes and environmental restoration of contaminated areas. Meanwhile, many treatment, solidification, and disposal options for radioactive waste management are being investigated by the Soviets

  11. Sources to environmental radioactive contamination from nuclear activities in the former USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polikarpov, G.G.; Aarkrog, A.

    1993-01-01

    There is three major sites of radioactive environmental contamination in the former USSR: the Cheliabinsk region in the Urals, Chernobyl NPP in Ukraine and Novaya Zemlya in the Arctic Ocean. The first mentioned is the most important with regard to local (potential) contamination, the last one dominates the global contamination. A number of sites and sources are less well known with regard to environmental contamination. This is thus the case for the plutonium production factories at Tomsk and Dodonovo. More information on nuclear reactors in lost or dumped submarines is also needed. From a global point of view reliable assessment of the radioactive run-off from land and deposits of nuclear waste in the Arctic Ocean are in particular pertinent

  12. Review of investigations of atmospheric contamination carried out in the USSR from 1975 to 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styro, B.I.

    1980-01-01

    A brief characteristic of main directions of atmospherical contamination is given. A bibliographic list of articles and books, published in the USSR during 1975-1978 is presented. Atmospherical contamination study was carried out within the wide range of problems during this period. They are: both artificial and natural radioactive substances, the behaviour of these substances in the atmosphere and their application as tracers for a number of processes of atmospheric physics. Attention was paid to the study of radon fission products ( 222 Rn, 210 Pb, 210 Bi, 210 Po) behaviour in the atmosphere, of the ratio between 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 144 Ce concentrations in surface air during the first months after nuclear explosion, to the study of radioactive fallout and washout of radionuclides from the atmosphere, of cosmic ray produced radionuclides, 85 Kr concentration as a product of the nuclear power production development. Serious attention was also paid to methodics problems referring measurements and sampling [ru

  13. Radioactive waste management in the USSR: A review of unclassified sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.J.

    1991-03-01

    The Soviet Union does not currently have an overall radioactive waste management program or national laws that define objectives, procedures, and standards, although such a law is being developed, according to the Soviets. Occupational health and safety does not appear to receive major attention as it does in Western nations. In addition, construction practices that would be considered marginal in Western facilities show up in Soviet nuclear power and waste management operations. The issues involved with radioactive waste management and environmental restoration are being investigated at several large Soviet institutes; however, there is little apparent interdisciplinary integration between them, or interaction with the USSR Academy of Sciences. It is expected that a consensus on technical solutions will be achieved, but it may be slow in coming, especially for final disposal of high-level radioactive wastes and environmental restoration of contaminated areas. Meanwhile, many treatment, solidification, and disposal options for radioactive waste management are being investigated by the Soviets.

  14. Radioactive waste management in the USSR: A review of unclassified sources. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.J.

    1991-03-01

    The Soviet Union does not currently have an overall radioactive waste management program or national laws that define objectives, procedures, and standards, although such a law is being developed, according to the Soviets. Occupational health and safety does not appear to receive major attention as it does in Western nations. In addition, construction practices that would be considered marginal in Western facilities show up in Soviet nuclear power and waste management operations. The issues involved with radioactive waste management and environmental restoration are being investigated at several large Soviet institutes; however, there is little apparent interdisciplinary integration between them, or interaction with the USSR Academy of Sciences. It is expected that a consensus on technical solutions will be achieved, but it may be slow in coming, especially for final disposal of high-level radioactive wastes and environmental restoration of contaminated areas. Meanwhile, many treatment, solidification, and disposal options for radioactive waste management are being investigated by the Soviets.

  15. Gide in the U.S.S.R.: some observations on Comradeship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, P

    1995-01-01

    After 1914-18, Gide emphasized the value of the Comradeship of Mankind rather than the essentially individualistic ethos to which he had been previously committed. However, while believing in the social benefits of tolerating pederasty, he still saw a person's difference from the norm as the guarantee of authenticity. Political idealism and curiosity took him to the U.S.S.R. in 1936, and on his return he criticized the inertia, ignorance, and conformism which he considered were encouraged by the Soviet state's promotion of the family unit. This essay examines how his attitude towards sexuality led him to question alleged political freedoms and to see in the Soviet oppression of minorities, including homosexuals, the denial of the revolutionary spirit.

  16. Positive Image of the USSR and Soviet Characters in American Films in 1943–1945

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fedorov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the article the author performs a hermeneutic analysis of cultural context, i.e. investigation of media texts interpretation, cultural and historical factors influencing the views of the agency / author of a media text and the audience, on specific examples of positive image of the USSR and soviet characters in American films in 1943-1945. The author bears in mind that the hermeneutic analysis of a media text comprehension involves a comparison with a historical, cultural tradition and reality; insight into its logic; comparison of media images in historical and cultural contexts combined with the historical, hermeneutical analyses of the structural, plot, ethical, ideological and iconographic / visual analyses of media stereotypes and media text characters. The analysis of these media texts, in the author's opinion, is especially important for media education of future historians, culture experts, art critics, social scientists, philologists, psychologists and teachers.

  17. Il commercio estero dei paesi est europei e dell'URSS negli anni ottanta.(The foreign trade of Eastern European and USSR countries in the 1980s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. MASTROPASQUA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Il commercio dei paesi europei e URSS orientale è caratterizzato da una fondamentale asimmetria . Da una parte , vi è commercio intra-area ( intra - COMECON che costituisce la parte prevalente ma è tuttavia meno importante per la crescita . D' altra parte, vi è il commercio con i paesi industrializzati ( est-ovest , che , anche se rappresenta una porzione più piccola , attraverso l'importazione di manufatti ad alto contenuto tecnologico , è fondamentale per il processo di accumulazione interna . Il presente lavoro analizza il commercio le due aree negli ultimi dieci anni . L'autore esamina le principali caratteristiche del commercio intra - Comecon , il commercio est-ovest , le riforme del commercio estero e il problema della convertibilità delle valute in Unione Sovietica .The trade of Eastern European and USSR countries is characterised by a fundamental asymmetry. On the one hand, there is intra-area trade (intra-COMECON which constitutes the prevalent part but is, however, less important for growth. On the other hand, there is trade with industrialised countries (east-west which, although it represents a smaller portion, through the importation of highly technological manufactured goods, is crucial to the process of internal accumulation. The present work analyses the trade to the two areas over the past decade. The author looks at the principal characteristics of intra-COMECON trade, east-west trade, foreign trade reforms and the problem of currency convertibility in the Soviet Union. JEL: F14, P23

  18. Ramifications of the Soviet energy situation: political, security and economic implications of the USSR's energy posture through the year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, T.W.

    1982-01-01

    This study analyzes the Soviet energy situation at present and projects supply and demand probabilities through the end of the century. It conludes that the Soviet Union will itself remain a net exporter of fuels in this period, but the East European requirement will severely strain Soviet export capabilities. In particular, it appears that the USSR's petroleum production will be inadequate to satiate the growing domestic and Soviet Bloc requirements for oil and, by the end of the decade, the communist countries of Europe will become net importers of petroleum. Natural gas will grow in importance, and exports will grow impressively. Coal production will be inadequate to meet planners' expectations and hydroelectric and nuclear power will make only marginal incremental contributions. The dilemma facing Soviet energy authorities is how to allocate the growing scarcity of oil production and to obtain the supplies that will be needed from abroad. The depletion of Soviet petroleum exports to West Europe will impinge greatly on the Kremlin's ability to purchase high-technology goods and grain from the West. Energy policy issues will arise as major points of division not only between the Soviet Union and the United States, but as items of contention between Washington and its Allies. Policy-makers in this country will increasingly deal with East-West energy issues in a national security context.

  19. Propriedades físicas e tecnológicas de farinha de trigo tratada com terra diatomácea Technological and physical properties of wheat flour treated with diatomaceous earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janete Deliberali Freo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Embora exista grande número de trabalhos sobre a aplicação de terra diatomácea no controle de insetos em grãos de trigo, as informações sobre o resíduo que permanece na farinha após a moagem, mesmo com retirada parcial na etapa de limpeza, e se este altera a qualidade tecnológica, são restritas. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar as propriedades físicas e tecnológicas de farinha de trigo tratada com diferentes terras diatomáceas. As terras diatomáceas de marcas comerciais, codificadas como TD1 e TD2 e a farinha de trigo tipo I foram adquiridas no mercado local. A TD1 e TD2 foram adicionadas nas doses zero, 0,5, 1,0 e 2,0g kg-1 de farinha de trigo, homogeneizadas em misturador e realizadas as análises número de queda, alveografia, farinografia, cor e teste de panificação experimental. O experimento foi conduzido em delineamento inteiramente casualizado em arranjo fatorial 2x4, os resultados submetidos à análise de variância (ANOVA e nos modelos significativos, as médias comparadas entre si pelo teste de Tukey a 5% de significância. A terra diatomácea adicionada na quantidade de até 2g kg-1 afeta as propriedades físicas e funcionais da farinha de trigo. O alveógrafo é efetivo para predizer alterações nas propriedades físicas de farinha de trigo tratada com terra diatomácea. As alterações mais acentuadas nas propriedades físicas da farinha de trigo são do componente L* (luminosidade de cor e força geral de glúten (W, enquanto que nas tecnológicas o escore de pontos e componente L* de cor do miolo.Although there are many studies on the application of diatomaceous earth for insect control in wheat grains, the information about the residue that remains in the flour after grinding, even with partial removal in the cleaning step, and if this changes the technological quality are restricted. The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical and functional properties of wheat flour treated with diatomaceous

  20. Digest of NASA earth observation sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    A digest of technical characteristics of remote sensors and supporting technological experiments uniquely developed under NASA Applications Programs for Earth Observation Flight Missions is presented. Included are camera systems, sounders, interferometers, communications and experiments. In the text, these are grouped by types, such as television and photographic cameras, lasers and radars, radiometers, spectrometers, technology experiments, and transponder technology experiments. Coverage of the brief history of development extends from the first successful earth observation sensor aboard Explorer 7 in October, 1959, through the latest funded and flight-approved sensors under development as of October 1, 1972. A standard resume format is employed to normalize and mechanize the information presented.

  1. Connecting Earth observation to high-throughput biodiversity data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bush, Alex; Sollmann, Rahel; Wilting, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Understandably, given the fast pace of biodiversity loss, there is much interest in using Earth observation technology to track biodiversity, ecosystem functions and ecosystem services. However, because most biodiversity is invisible to Earth observation, indicators based on Earth observation could...... be misleading and reduce the effectiveness of nature conservation and even unintentionally decrease conservation effort. We describe an approach that combines automated recording devices, high-throughput DNA sequencing and modern ecological modelling to extract much more of the information available in Earth...

  2. Prospects for armed conflict between the USSR and the United States until 1950 in the CIA estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamedov Zaur Imalverdi oglu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the archival documents of the Central Intelligence Agency. The sources of the post-war period provide an opportunity to see what forecasts the US intelligence personnel put forward. CIA analysts considered various scenarios of events, detailing military aspects and signs of potential aggression on the part of the USSR. CIA employees did a great job, predicting the possible occupation of Western Europe and the Middle East by the Soviet Union.

  3. Text of the joint USSR-USA statement following the summit meeting in Moscow, 29 May - 2 June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The document reproduces the text of the joint USSR-USA statement following the summit meeting between the President of the United States, Ronald W. Reagan and the General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, held in Moscow between May 29 - June 2, 1988. It refers to the arms control (including nuclear weapons), human rights and humanitarian concerns, regional issues, bilateral affairs and further meetings

  4. The Lifeworld Earth and a Modelled Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juuti, Kalle

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to study the question of whether a phenomenological view of the Earth could be empirically endorsed. The phenomenological way of thinking considers the Earth as a material entity, but not as an object as viewed in science. In the learning science tradition, tracking the process of the conceptual change of the shape of the…

  5. THE IMPORTANCE OF HOUSING CONSTRUCTION EXPERIENCE IN THE USSR AS MEANS OF FORMING HUMANITARIAN SPACE FOR PRESENT-DAY RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golomazova Tamara Nikolaevna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Today the current task of the social policy of Russia is solution of the housing problem. In Russia today there is a lack of housing, especially modern housing of good quality. In the article the experience of mass housing construction in the USSR is considered. The reasons of housing crisis in the USSR and the ways of its overcome, which were offered in the 60—80th of the 20th century are analyzed. The author pays special attention to the positive component of the experience of overcoming the housing crisis, but also its disadvantages are underlined. The author believes, that in future specialists we should form not only a knowledge of housing construction experience in the USSR, but the understanding of the importance of this experience and opportunity to use it in the contemporary Russian conditions. The author points out, what exactly can be used to solve the housing problem of present-day Russia basing on this experience.

  6. Rare earth sulfates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komissarova, L.N.; Shatskij, V.M.; Pokrovskij, A.N.; Chizhov, S.M.; Bal'kina, T.I.; Suponitskij, Yu.L.

    1986-01-01

    Results of experimental works on the study of synthesis conditions, structure and physico-chemical properties of rare earth, scandium and yttrium sulfates, have been generalized. Phase diagrams of solubility and fusibility, thermodynamic and crystallochemical characteristics, thermal stability of hydrates and anhydrous sulfates of rare earths, including normal, double (with cations of alkali and alkaline-earth metals), ternary and anion-mixed sulfates of rare earths, as well as their adducts, are considered. The state of ions of rare earths, scandium and yttrium in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions is discussed. Data on the use of rare earth sulfates are given

  7. NASA Earth Exchange (NEX)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) represents a new platform for the Earth science community that provides a mechanism for scientific collaboration and knowledge sharing....

  8. EarthKAM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sponsored by NASA, EarthKAM (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students) is an educational outreach program allowing middle school students to take pictures...

  9. Micro earth stations - Technology and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deman, Craig

    The use of microearth stations (MESs) for distributed demand applications is examined. MESs are based on premise-to-premise communications and provide a high degree of control over the network. Various business applications of MESs, which include star configuration systems consisting of MESs communicating through a network center processing facility in the Ku and C bands, and transmit/receive configurations for MESs, are described. The market potential for vendors of MES equipment is evaluated; it is determined that in order for the equipment to remain marketable the addition of voice communication and video to MESs will be necessary. The costs of the ground segment hardware and software, space segment, and installation of a MES system are analyzed. The capabilities of C- and Ku-band networks are discussed and compared.

  10. Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of the ADEOS mission are as follows: to acquire data on worldwide environmental changes such as the green house effect, ozone layer depletion, tropical rain forest deforestation, and abnormal climatic conditions; to contribute to international global environmental monitoring; and to further the development of platform bus technology, interorbital data relay technology, etc., which are necessary for the future earth observation systems. To make continuous, thorough observations of the entire earth's surface and its atmosphere, the spacecraft carries two core sensors: the Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer (AVNIR) and the Ocean Color and Temperature Sensor (OCTS). The two sensors were developed by NASDA. Additionally, the spacecraft carries six (6) Announcement of Opportunity (AO) sensors: the NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT) and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS); the Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Surface (POLDER) system; the Interferometric Monitor for Greenhouse Gases (IMG); the Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer (ILAS); and the Retroreflector in Space (RIS). In early 1996, ADEOS will be launched into a sun synchronous sub-recurrent orbit at an altitude of approximately 797 km by an H-2 launcher.

  11. Mission to Planet Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilford, Shelby G.; Asrar, Ghassem; Backlund, Peter W.

    1994-01-01

    Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) is NASA's concept for an international science program to produce the understanding needed to predict changes in the Earth's environment. NASA and its interagency and international partners will place satellites carrying advanced sensors in strategic Earth orbits to gather multidisciplinary data. A sophisticated data system will process and archive an unprecedented amount of information about the Earth and how it works as a system. Increased understanding of the Earth system is a basic human responsibility, a prerequisite to informed management of the planet's resources and to the preservation of the global environment.

  12. Mission to Planet Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.S.; Backlund, P.W.

    1992-01-01

    Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) is NASA's concept for an international science program to produce the understanding needed to predict changes in the earth's environment. NASA and its interagency and international partners will place satellites carrying advanced sensors in strategic earth orbits to gather multidisciplinary data. A sophisticated data system will process and archive an unprecedented amount of information about the earth and how it works as a system. Increased understanding of the earth system is a basic human responsibility, a prerequisite to informed management of the planet's resources and to the preservation of the global environment. 8 refs

  13. Academic Earth science in transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrotsky, Alexandra

    During the past 5 years, I have served on visiting committees for Earth science departments at Stanford, Harvard, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Columbia, Cal-Tech, and the Geophysical Lab of the Carnegie Institution in Washington, D.C. As chair of Princeton's department, I have also experienced external review from the other side of the process. These committees attempt to diagnose major problems, supply appropriate remedies, and target opportunities for improvement in matters ranging from faculty hiring to curriculum. One very useful service provided by a visiting committee is to help distinguish dilemmas that are truly local and unique to the institution from those common to science and society as a whole. A snapshot of the tensions and opportunities common to academic Earth science has emerged from these experiences.

  14. Preparation of rare earth fluorides from apatite concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulyarchuk, I.F.; Voloshchenko, M.V.; Zen'kovich, E.G.; Sumenkova, V.V.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Problem Lit'ya)

    1980-01-01

    The processes of preparation of the rare earths element sum from apatite concentrate of the Khibins, connected with preliminary extraction of rare earth phosphates from nitric acid extract using solvent extraction or direct precipitation from the extract by solution of potassium and ammonium fluorides. The sequence of the processes of the first variant is the following: solvent extraction of rare earths by tributylphosphate from clarified nitric acid extract of apatite with subsequent reextraction of rare earths with water and precipitation of rare earth phosphates from aqueous solution during neutralization by ammonia. In case of fluoride preparation from rare earth phosphate the main attention is paid to precipitation and filtration of fluorides. Technological scheme and cost price of industry for the production of 1800 t of rare earth trifluorides a year are calculated. When taking account of TBP losses according to its solubility the industry cost price is 1O times lower the modern cost of rare earth fluorides

  15. Mitigating Climate Change with Earth Orbital Sunshades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coverstone, Victoria; Johnson, Les

    2015-01-01

    An array of rotating sunshades based on emerging solar sail technology will be deployed in a novel Earth orbit to provide near-continuous partial shading of the Earth, reducing the heat input to the atmosphere by blocking a small percentage of the incoming sunlight, and mitigating local weather effects of anticipated climate change over the next century. The technology will provide local cooling relief during extreme heat events (and heating relief during extreme cold events) thereby saving human lives, agriculture, livestock, water and energy needs. A synthesis of the solar sail design, the sails' operational modes, and the selected orbit combine to provide local weather modification.

  16. Radiation exposure of population due to medical diagnostic procedures in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, E.I.; Stavitskij, R.V.; Knizhnikov, V.A.; Barkhudarov, R.M.; Korsunskij, V.N.; Popov, V.I.; Tarasenko, Yu.I.; Postnikov, V.A.; Frolov, N.V.; Sidorin, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    The evaluation of radiation doses to population in the ussr on the basis of the data on frequency of 12 main forms of X-ray examinations and the results of measuring absorbed doses on tissue-kquivalent main's phantom are given. The evaluation of radiation exposure due to radiopharmaceutical preparations is based on consumption of 26 types of compounds in 320 national laboratories and i is performed by the methods developed in the framework of the mird committee (usa). In thhe active bone marrow, lungs mammary, glands thyroid and other organs (stomach, liver, spleen, etc.) the equivalent doses are determined and on their base the effective equivalent doses (eed). The average eed from x ray diagnostic examinations is 1.4 mSv per year (140 mrem per year) of which 55.4% falls on X-ray examination, 26.9% on radiography, 17.7% on mass miniature radiography (fluorography). Radionuclide diagnostics contribution is 3.2x10 -2 mSv per year (3.8 mrem per year). Medicinal radiation exposure approximately doubles the natural background, it is comparable with exposure in premises and essentially exceeds the radiation doses to population from other sources

  17. Automated control system structure of the USSR Academy of Science Kaon facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Yu.S.; Konovalov, V.A.; Murin, B.P.; Filipchicov, L.L.; Esin, S.K.; Senichev, Yu.V.

    1992-01-01

    Up to date at Nuclear Research Institute of the USSR AS (Moscow-Troitsk) it is finished building of Moscow Meson Facility high intensity current proton Linear Accelerator (LA) (beam parameters: energy - 600 MeV, average current - 0.5 mA, pulse current - 50 mA). The LA proposed to serve as Kaon facility (KF) injector which is under working out [1]. Kaon complex, in addition to LA, includes: buster proton synchrotron (BR) with output energy 7.5 GeV, main synchrotron (SR) with proton energy up to 45 GeV and storer-stretcher (SS). The KF is proposed to work at 3 regimes. At first regime SS follows SR and is used as beam stretcher. KF time work diagram is cleaned by Fig.la. A half of beam pulses from LA and BR is used at ones for physical experiments. At second regime SS is inserted between BR and SR and works as collector. At third regime it is supposed to store in SS 4-6 beam pulses with next fast exit to experiment. The such kind using allows to receive terra watt power level pulses (8 · 10 14 particles with 45 GeV energy) with frequency of 1 Hz. There are presented below brief description of KF systems, which are concerned of radiotechnical systems (RTS) control (ACS) and adjusting (AAS). (author)

  18. Tests and studies of USSR materials at the US coal burning MHD facility UTSI-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telegin, G P; Romanov, A I; Rekov, A I; Spiridonov, E G; Barodina, T I; Vysotsky, D A

    1978-10-01

    In accordance with the overall program of the US--USSR cooperation in the field of MHD power generation tests of Soviet electrode materials were conducted at the coal burning MHD facility UTSI-2 of the University of Tennessee Space Institute. The main purposes of the tests are evaluation of electrode materials behavior in the channel of the MHD generator operating with combustion products of coal containing ionizing alkali seed, study of thermal and physical stability of materials in the presence of corrosive slag, study of electrophysical characteristics of electrode materials when they are subjected to the passage of current through the plasma-slag-electrode system. Tests were conducted on electrodes made of silicon carbide doped with titanium and LaCrO/sub 3/--Cr cermet. Results are reported on the phase and chemical composition and structure of these two materials, their thermophysical and electrophysical properties, and the electrode fabrication methods. The MHD facility UTSI-2, where the tests were conducted is one of few utilizing actual coal as the fuel. A description of this facility is given, and its main operating parameters and the methods used to conduct electrode tests with and without an applied current are described.

  19. Stratigraphy and paleoceanography of Pliocene deposits of Karaginsky Island, eastern Kamchatka, U.S.S.R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladenkov, Yu. B.; Barinov, K.B.; Basilian, A.E.; Cronin, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    The lithology and paleontology of Pliocene deposits from Karaginsky Island, off eastern Kamchatka Peninsula, U.S.S.R., are described in order to provide a paleoceanographic reconstruction of this region of the eastern North Pacific Ocean. The stratigraphic sequence is divided into three suites - the Limimtevayamian, the Ust-Limimtevayamian, and the Tusatuvayamian, which correspond to three standard Pacific diatom zones - the Thalassiosira oestrupii, Neodenticula koizumi-N. kamtschatica, and N. koizumi. The entire sequence is further subdivided into six members and 18 distinct beds on the basis of molluscan assemblages and three members and seven beds on the basis of benthic foraminiferal assemblages. Marine ostracodes are described from the Limimtevayamian suite. The marine invertebrate assemblages from Karaginsky Island provide evidence that: (1) ocean water temperatures were warmer than today about 4 Ma and again about 3.5-3.0 Ma; (2) several Arctic-Atlantic species of molluscs and ostracodes migrated to the eastern North Pacific between 4.2-3.0 Ma, presumably through the proto-Bering Strait; (3) many species found in the Karaginsky Island Pliocene represent Pacific taxa which migrated through the Arctic into the North Atlantic during the late Pliocene. ?? 1991.

  20. The Spitak (Armenia, USSR) Earthquake: Residential Building Typology and Seismic Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomonis, A

    1990-06-01

    The 1988 earthquake in Armenia was the most serious seismic disaster since the 1976 earthquake in Tangshan, China. At least 25,000 people lost their lives in a tremor of moderate magnitude and the USSR suffered a loss of more than 2.5 per cent of 1988's GDP. Research at the Martin Centre on the effects of earthquakes on human lives has shown an increase in global earthquake mortality rate, despite the well known improvements in some countries. The Armenian disaster was a warning to all of us concerned with natural or man-made disasters. Areas of potential high hazard are pointed out for the sub-Caucasian region. Construction practices similar to those in Armenia are certainly found in many other parts of the world, with some regional variations, and the fast assimilation of the lessons is an important target. The structural characteristics of all the residential building types existing in the affected area are presented in terms of their seismic vulnerability. Vulnerable points are discussed with a view to low cost interventions that will drastically improve the seismic safety of new buildings.